WorldWideScience

Sample records for two-bladed teetering-hub downwind

  1. A Two-Bladed Teetering Hub configuration for the DTU 10 MW RWT: loads considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Rasmussen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    study on an alternative downwind two-bladed rotor configuration. The study is based on a model representative of next generation multi-MW wind turbines: the DTU 10-MW Reference Wind Turbine (RWT). As a first design iteration, the aerodynamic characteristics of the original rotor are maintained......As the size of wind turbine rotors continuously grows, the need for innovative solutions that would yield to lighter rotor configurations becomes more urgent. Traditional wind turbine designs have favored the classic three-bladed upwind rotor configuration. This work presents instead a concept...... in load variations, and hence in fatigue damage, affects the turbine blades, shaft and tower, and originates from the aerodynamic unbalance on the rotor, as well as from aeroelastic interaction with the tower frequency. To mitigate the load amplification caused by the interaction between the tower...

  2. A Two-Bladed Concept Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong

    2012-01-01

    This article shows the potential for reducing extreme loads with an innovative design of wind turbine, a partial pitch two-bladed concept turbine. The most extreme conditions to test a turbine are considered to be stand-still combined with a grid failure in which the wind comes from all directions...

  3. Noise from Two-Blade Propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, E Z; Deming, A F

    1936-01-01

    The two-blade propeller, one of the most powerful sources of sound known, has been studied with the view of obtaining fundamental information concerning the noise emission. In order to eliminate engine noise, the propeller was mounted on an electric motor. A microphone was used to pick up the sound whose characteristics were studied electrically. The distribution of noise throughout the frequency range, as well as the spatial distribution about the propeller, was studied. The results are given in the form of polar diagrams. An appendix of common acoustical terms is included.

  4. Mechanical Design, Analysis, and Testing of a Two-Bladed Wind Turbine Hub

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrell, J.

    2002-06-01

    Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Golden, Colorado, began performing the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment in 1993 to better understand the unsteady aerodynamics and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines. The experiment consists of an extensively instrumented, downwind, three-bladed, 20-kilowatt wind turbine. In May 1995, I received a request from the NWTC to design a two-bladed hub for the experiment. For my thesis, I present the results of the mechanical design, analysis, and testing of the hub. The hub I designed is unique because it runs in rigid, teetering, or independent blade-flapping modes. In addition, the design is unusual because it uses two servomotors to pitch the blades independently. These features are used to investigate new load reduction, noise reduction, blade pitch optimization, and yaw control techniques for two-bladed turbines. I used a methodology by G. Phal and W. Bietz to design the hub. The hub meets all the performance specifications except that it achieves only 90% of the specified teeter range. In my thesis, I focus on the analysis and testing of the hub body. I performed solid-mechanics calculations, ran a finite-element analysis simulation, and experimentally investigated the structural integrity of the hub body.

  5. Analysis and test results for a two-bladed, passive cycle pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbine in free and controlled yaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holenemser, K.H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report surveys the analysis and tests performed at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on a horizontal-axis, two-laded wind turbine with teeter hub. The introduction is a brief account of results obtained during the 5-year period ending December 1985. The wind tunnel model and the test turbine (7.6 m [25 ft.] in diameter) at Washington University`s Tyson Research Center had a 67{degree} delta-three angle of the teeter axis. The introduction explains why this configuration was selected and named the passive cycle pitch (PCP) wind turbine. Through the analysis was not limited to the PCP rotor, all tests, including those done from 1986 to 1994, wee conducted with the same teetered wind rotor. The blades are rather stiff and have only a small elastic coning angle and no precone.

  6. Morphing Downwind-Aligned Rotor Concept Based on a 13-MW Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichter, Brian; Steele, Adam; Loth, Eric; Moriarty, Patrick; Selig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To alleviate the mass-scaling issues associated with conventional upwind rotors of extreme-scale wind turbines (>/=10 MW), a morphing downwind-aligned rotor (MoDaR) concept is proposed herein. The concept employs a downwind rotor with blades whose elements are stiff (no intentional flexibility) but with hub-joints that can be unlocked to allow for moment-free downwind alignment. Aligning the combination of gravitational, centrifugal and thrust forces along the blade path reduces downwind cantilever loads, resulting in primarily tensile loading. For control simplicity, the blade curvature can be fixed with a single morphing degree of freedom using a near-hub joint for coning angle: 22 degrees at rated conditions. The conventional baseline was set as the 13.2-MW Sandia 100-m all glass blade in a three-bladed upwind configuration. To quantify potential mass savings, a downwind load-aligning, two-bladed rotor was designed. Because of the reduced number of blades, the MoDaR concept had a favorable 33% mass reduction. The blade reduction and coning led to a reduction in rated power, but morphing increased energy capture at lower speeds such that both the MoDaR and conventional rotors have the same average power: 5.4 MW. A finite element analysis showed that quasi-steady structural stresses could be reduced, over a range of operating wind speeds and azimuthal angles, despite the increases in loading per blade. However, the concept feasibility requires additional investigation of the mass, cost and complexity of the morphing hinge, the impact of unsteady aeroelastic influence because of turbulence and off-design conditions, along with system-level Levelized Cost of Energy analysis.

  7. Simulation of low frequency noise from a downwind wind turbine rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2007-01-01

    in the period from around 1980 to 1990. One of the common characteristics of this low frequency noise, emerging from analysis of the phenomenon, was that the sound pressure level is strongly varying in time. We have investigated this phenomenon using a model package by which the low frequency noise...... to the aero acoustic model. The results for a 5 MW two-bladed turbine with a downwind rotor showed an increase in the sound pressure level of 5-20 dB due to the unsteadiness in the wake caused mainly by vortex shedding. However, in some periods the sound pressure level can increase additionally 0-10 dB when...... the blades directly pass through the discrete shed vortices behind the tower. The present numerical results strongly confirm the experiences with full scale turbines showing big variations of sound pressure level in time due to the wake unsteadiness, as well as a considerable increase in sound pressure level...

  8. Relevance of aerodynamic modelling for load reduction control strategies of two-bladed wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, B.; Cheng, P. W.

    2014-06-01

    A new load reduction concept is being developed for the two-bladed prototype of the Skywind 3.5MW wind turbine. Due to transport and installation advantages both offshore and in complex terrain two-bladed turbine designs are potentially more cost-effective than comparable three-bladed configurations. A disadvantage of two-bladed wind turbines is the increased fatigue loading, which is a result of asymmetrically distributed rotor forces. The innovative load reduction concept of the Skywind prototype consists of a combination of cyclic pitch control and tumbling rotor kinematics to mitigate periodic structural loading. Aerodynamic design tools must be able to model correctly the advanced dynamics of the rotor. In this paper the impact of the aerodynamic modelling approach is investigated for critical operational modes of a two-bladed wind turbine. Using a lifting line free wake vortex code (FVM) the physical limitations of the classical blade element momentum theory (BEM) can be evaluated. During regular operation vertical shear and yawed inflow are the main contributors to periodic blade load asymmetry. It is shown that the near wake interaction of the blades under such conditions is not fully captured by the correction models of BEM approach. The differing prediction of local induction causes a high fatigue load uncertainty especially for two-bladed turbines. The implementation of both cyclic pitch control and a tumbling rotor can mitigate the fatigue loading by increasing the aerodynamic and structural damping. The influence of the time and space variant vorticity distribution in the near wake is evaluated in detail for different cyclic pitch control functions and tumble dynamics respectively. It is demonstrated that dynamic inflow as well as wake blade interaction have a significant impact on the calculated blade forces and need to be accounted for by the aerodynamic modelling approach. Aeroelastic simulations are carried out using the high fidelity multi body

  9. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows past two-bladed rotors in forward-flight conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, H.; Mamou, M.; Khalid, M.

    2004-01-01

    The current paper presents time-accurate numerical simulations of compressible flows past two-bladed rotor configurations using a Chimera moving grid approach. The simulations are performed for a variety of flow conditions and various blade aspect ratios. The rotor blades are rectangular, untapered and untwisted planforms. Their cross-sections are built using the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. The aerodynamic performance of the rotor is investigated using the Euler equations. The CFD-FASTRAN code was used for the computations. The pressure distributions are benchmarked against the experimental data from Caradonna and Tung and a number of previous Euler calculations by Agarwal and Deese and Chen et al. The comparisons indicate that the current simulations for the forward flight conditions can reproduce the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces and the prediction of shockwave locations with reasonably good accuracy. (author)

  10. Numerical simulations of unsteady flows past two-bladed rotors in forward-flight conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.; Mamou, M.; Khalid, M. [National Research Council, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Hongyi.Xu@nrc.ca

    2004-07-01

    The current paper presents time-accurate numerical simulations of compressible flows past two-bladed rotor configurations using a Chimera moving grid approach. The simulations are performed for a variety of flow conditions and various blade aspect ratios. The rotor blades are rectangular, untapered and untwisted planforms. Their cross-sections are built using the NACA 0012 airfoil profile. The aerodynamic performance of the rotor is investigated using the Euler equations. The CFD-FASTRAN code was used for the computations. The pressure distributions are benchmarked against the experimental data from Caradonna and Tung and a number of previous Euler calculations by Agarwal and Deese and Chen et al. The comparisons indicate that the current simulations for the forward flight conditions can reproduce the pressure distributions on the blade surfaces and the prediction of shockwave locations with reasonably good accuracy. (author)

  11. Evaluation of MOSTAS computer code for predicting dynamic loads in two bladed wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Janetzke, D. C.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1979-01-01

    Calculated dynamic blade loads were compared with measured loads over a range of yaw stiffnesses of the DOE/NASA Mod-O wind turbine to evaluate the performance of two versions of the MOSTAS computer code. The first version uses a time-averaged coefficient approximation in conjunction with a multi-blade coordinate transformation for two bladed rotors to solve the equations of motion by standard eigenanalysis. The second version accounts for periodic coefficients while solving the equations by a time history integration. A hypothetical three-degree of freedom dynamic model was investigated. The exact equations of motion of this model were solved using the Floquet-Lipunov method. The equations with time-averaged coefficients were solved by standard eigenanalysis.

  12. Investigation of potential extreme load reduction for a two-bladed upwind turbine with partial pitch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong; Larsen, Torben J.; Yde, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a wind turbine concept with an innovative design combining partial pitch with a two-bladed (PP-2B) turbine configuration. Special emphasis is on extreme load reduction during storm situations at standstill, but operational loads are also investigated. In order to compare...... loads are reduced by approximately 20% for the PP-2B and 18% for the PP-3B compared with the 3B turbine for the parked condition in a storm situation. Moreover, a huge potential of 60% is observed for the reduction of the extreme tower bottom bending moment for the PP-2B turbine, when the wind direction...... is from ±90° to the turbine, but this also requires that the turbine is parked in a T-configuration. © 2014 The Authors. Wind Energy published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  13. Justice downwind: America's atomic testing program in the 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, H.

    1986-01-01

    Drawing on personal interviews, case histories, and the archives of the Atomic Energy Commission, Professor Ball discusses the American nuclear-testing program from 1951 to 1963, the impact of the testing on people living downwind from the Nevada Test Site, long-term effects of radiation exposure, and the clash between the ''downwinders'' and the government

  14. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  15. Design of an Advanced Wood Composite Rotor and Development of Wood Composite Blade Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebel, Thomas; Dechow, Curtis; Zuteck, Michael

    1984-01-01

    In support of a program to advance wood composite wind turbine blade technology, a design was completed for a prototype, 90-foot diameter, two-bladed, one-piece rotor, with all wood/epoxy composite structure. The rotor was sized for compatibility with a generator having a maximum power rating of 4000 kilowatts. Innovative features of the rotor include: a teetering hub to minimize the effects of gust loads, untwisted blades to promote rotor power control through stall, joining of blades to the hub structure via an adhesive bonded structural joint, and a blade structural design which was simplified relative to earlier efforts. The prototype rotor was designed to allow flexibility for configuring the rotor upwind or downwind of the tower, for evaluating various types of teeter dampers and/or elastomeric stops, and with variable delta-three angle settings of the teeter shaft axis. The prototype rotor was also designed with provisions for installing pressure tap and angle of attack instrumentation in one blade. A production version rotor cost analysis was conducted. Included in the program were efforts directed at developing advanced load take-off stud designs for subsequent evaluation testing by NASA, development of aerodynamic tip brake concepts, exploratory testing of a wood/epoxy/graphite concept, and compression testing of wood/epoxy laminate, with scarf-jointed plies.

  16. Simulating the moderating effect of a lake on downwind temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, R. G., Jr.; Chen, E.; Sutherland, R. A.; Bartholic, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    A steady-state, two-dimensional numerical model is used to simulate air temperatures and humidity downwind of a lake at night. Thermal effects of the lake were modelled for the case of moderate and low surface winds under the cold-air advective conditions that occur following the passage of a cold front. Surface temperatures were found to be in good agreement with observations. A comparison of model results with thermal imagery indicated the model successfully predicts the downwind distance for which thermal effects due to the lake are significant.

  17. Comparative studies on control systems for a two-blade variable-speed wind turbine with a speed exclusion zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Jian; Song, Dongran; Dong, Mi; Chen, Sifan; Zou, Libing; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    To avoid the coincidence between the tower nature frequency and rotational excitation frequency, a SEZ (speed exclusion zone) must be built for a two-blade wind turbine with a full rated converter. According to the literature, two methods of SEZ-crossing could be adopted. However, none of them have been studied in industrial applications, and their performance remains unclear. Moreover, strategies on power regulation operation are not covered. To fully investigate them, this paper develops two control systems for a two-blade WT (wind turbines) with a SEZ. Because control systems play vital roles in determining the performance of the WT, this paper focuses on comparative studies on their operation strategies and performance. In these strategies, optimal designs are introduced to improve existing SEZ algorithms. Moreover, to perform power regulation outside the SEZ, two operation modes are divided in the proposed down power regulation solutions. The developed control systems’ performance is confirmed by simulations and field tests. Two control systems present similar capabilities of power production and SEZ-bridging. Nevertheless, at the cost of significantly increased tower loads, one captures 1% more energy than the other. Overall consideration must be made for the control system selection for a WT with a SEZ. - Highlights: • Two control systems are developed for a two-blade WT with a SEZ. • Three strategies, that is, power optimization, power limitation and power regulation, are discussed. • Optimal designs are adopted to enhance the WT's SEZ-bridging capability. • Simple but effective power regulation solutions are presented. • Simulation and field test results show that Control System 2 produces 1% more energy at the cost of increased tower loads.

  18. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    . The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy......This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off...... the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is given as well as a brief summary of the design process...

  19. Effect of a rough surface on the aerodynamic characteristics of a two-bladed wind-powered engine with cylindrical blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasheva, N. K.; Kunakbaev, T. O.; Dyusembaeva, A. N.; Shuyushbayeva, N. N.; Damekova, S. K.

    2017-11-01

    We have reported the results of experiments on determining the drag coefficient and the thrust coefficient of a two-bladed wind-powered engine based on the Magnus effect with rotating rough cylinders in the range of air flow velocity of 4-10 m/s (Re = 26800-90000) for a constant rotation number of a cylindrical blade about its own axis. The results show that an increase in the Reynolds number reduces the drag coefficient and the thrust coefficient. The extent of the influence of the relative roughness on the aerodynamic characteristics of the two-bladed wind-powered engine has been experimentally established.

  20. Large-eddy simulation analysis of turbulent flow over a two-blade horizontal wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh (United States); You, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Unsteady turbulent flow characteristics over a two-blade horizontal wind turbine rotor is analyzed using a large-eddy simulation technique. The wind turbine rotor corresponds to the configuration of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI campaign. The filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a non-inertial reference frame fixed at the centroid of the rotor, are solved with centrifugal and Coriolis forces using an unstructured-grid finite-volume method. A systematic analysis of effects of grid resolution, computational domain size, and time-step size on simulation results, is carried out. Simulation results such as the surface pressure coefficient, thrust coefficient, torque coefficient, and normal and tangential force coefficients are found to agree favorably with experimental data. The simulation showed that pressure fluctuations, which produce broadband flow-induced noise and vibration of the blades, are especially significant in the mid-chord area of the suction side at around 70 to 95 percent spanwise locations. Large-scale vortices are found to be generated at the blade tip and the location connecting the blade with an airfoil cross section and the circular hub rod. These vortices propagate downstream with helical motions and are found to persist far downstream from the rotor.

  1. Experimental study of the wake characteristics of a two-blade horizontal axis wind turbine by time-resolved PIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LiRu; CEN KeFa; XING JiangKuan; WANG JianWen; YUAN RenYu; DONG XueQing; MA JianLong; LUO Kun; QIU KunZan; NI MingJiang

    2017-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments of the wake characteristics of a two-blade wind turbine,in the downstream region of 0<x/R< 10,have been carried out.With the help of the time resolved particle image velocimetry (TRPIV),flow properties such as the vortex structure,average velocity,fluctuations velocities and Reynolds stresses are obtained at different tip speed ratios (TSR).It is found that the wind turbine wake flow can be divided into velocity deficit region,velocity remained region and velocity increased region,with generally higher velocity deficit compared with a three-blade wind turbine wake.Once a blade rotates to the reference 0° plane,the tip vortices generate,shed and move downstream with the intensity gradually decreased.The leapfrogging phenomenon of tip vortices caused by the force interaction of adjacent vortices is found and more apparent in the far wake region.The axial fluctuation velocity is larger than radial fluctuation velocity at the blade root region,and the turbulent kinetic energy shares the similar trend as the axial fluctuation velocity.The axial normalized Reynolds normal stress is much larger than the radial normalized Reynolds normal stress and Reynolds shear stress at the blade root region.As the TSR increases,the radial location where the peak axial normalized Reynolds normal stress u u / U2 and axial fluctuation velocity appear descends in the radial direction.

  2. A new geometrical model for mixing of highly viscous fluids by combining two-blade and helical screw agitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadjeb Abdessalam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mixing processes are becoming today a huge concern for industrialists in various domains like the pharmaceutical production, oil refining, food industry and manufacture of cosmetic products especially when the processes are related to the mixing of highly viscous products. So the choice of a stirring system for this category of products or fluids must be rigorously examined before use because of the flows which are laminar in the most cases, something that is not good to obtain homogeneous particles or suspensions after the mixing operation. This CFD study allows developing a new geometrical model of mechanical agitator with high performance for mixing of highly viscous fluids. It consists of a combination of two bladed and helical screw agitators. The investigations of the flow structure generated in the vessel are made by using the computer code ANSYS CFX (version 13.0, which allows us to realize and test the effectiveness of the new stirrer on the resulting mixture and power consumption.

  3. Numerical Simulation of Tower Rotor Interaction for Downwind Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Janajreh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Downwind wind turbines have lower upwind rotor misalignment, and thus lower turning moment and self-steered advantage over the upwind configuration. In this paper, numerical simulation to the downwind turbine is conducted to investigate the interaction between the tower and the blade during the intrinsic passage of the rotor in the wake of the tower. The moving rotor has been accounted for via ALE formulation of the incompressible, unsteady, turbulent Navier-Stokes equations. The localized CP, CL, and CD are computed and compared to undisturbed flow evaluated by Panel method. The time history of the CP, aerodynamic forces (CL and CD, as well as moments were evaluated for three cross-sectional tower; asymmetrical airfoil (NACA0012 having four times the rotor's chord length, and two circular cross-sections having four and two chords lengths of the rotor's chord. 5%, 17%, and 57% reductions of the aerodynamic lift forces during the blade passage in the wake of the symmetrical airfoil tower, small circular cross-section tower and large circular cross-section tower were observed, respectively. The pronounced reduction, however, is confined to a short time/distance of three rotor chords. A net forward impulsive force is also observed on the tower due to the high speed rotor motion.

  4. Three-dimensional Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation of a two-bladed vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Hang; Zhou, Dai; Bao, Yan; Li, Ye; Han, Zhaolong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation and polyhedral mesh are utilized. • Power coefficient and wake velocity are compared between experiments and simulations. • Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation shows more vortices under dynamic stall. • Different scales of flow separations are distinguished by these two models. - Abstract: The aerodynamic performance of a two-bladed vertical axis wind turbine is investigated using the turbulence model of the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation and the polyhedral mesh. The sliding mesh technique is used to simulate the rotation of the rotor. Meanwhile, the results obtained by the shear stress transport k-ω model are presented as contrast. Then, the simulated power coefficients at different tip speed ratios and the wake velocity are validated by comparison with the experimental data from available literature. It is shown that the power coefficients and wake velocity predicted by the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation are closer to the experimental data than those by the shear stress transport k-ω model. The pressure distributions predicted by the two turbulence models show different degrees of discrepancies in different scales of flow separation. By comparing the vorticity magnitude graphs, the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation is found to be able to capture more exquisite vortices after the flow separations. Limited by its inherent ability, the shear stress transport k-ω model predicts vortices that are less realistic than those of Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation. Hence, it may cause some errors in predicting the pressure distributions, especially when the blades suffer dynamic stall. It is demonstrated that the Improved Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation is regarded as a reliable model to analyze the aerodynamic performance of vertical axis wine turbines.

  5. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    During February and April 2012 a series of wind tunnel tests were performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility (OJF) with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible ...... in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy's aeroelastic simulation program HAWC2....... blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the tower base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is provided as well as a brief summary of the design process. The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating...

  6. Proceedings of the upwind downwind cities air and health conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The upwind downwind conference examined the health impacts of poor air quality and how land use decisions impact air quality as well as the roles of industry, community groups, academia and government in improving air quality. Conference attendees included planners, public health officials, policy makers, environmental managers, non-government organizations, academics, industry, community groups and politicians. The conference covered several topics including partnerships between public health and planning with respect to improving air quality in urban environments; the use of science in decision-making and development of new projects, policies and regulations; airshed agreements in North America, in addition to Ontario's new air quality regulations; and examples of citizen groups, non-government organizations, industry, academia and local, provincial and federal governments partnering to improve air quality. A total of 16 presentations were presented at the conference, of which 2 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. The conference also featured several keynote speakers and panel discussions. tabs., figs

  7. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  8. Epidemic juvenile hypothyroidism among a population of Hanford 'downwinders'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, C.M.; Nussbaum, R.H.; Nussbaum, F.D.; Kordysh, E.; Goldsmith, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    Self-defined 'downwinders' responded to questionnaires as to their health and their potential exposures to emissions from the Hanford Nuclear Facility in the U.S. The area considered was between the Cascades and the Rocky Mountains, primarily to the East and Northeast of the facility. Of 801 questionnaires, returned, 518 were from women. Of these, 210 reported that they had been diagnosed by their physicians as having hypothyroidism. 31 of the 283 men had reported being diagnosed as hypothyroid. The condition is generally found to be frequent among adult women, but is uncommon in children. 54 of the 210 cases among females were diagnosed among those less than 20 years of age, and 5 out of 31 males were found in this age range. Peak years for diagnosis among females were from 1945 to 1965, with only three juvenile cases occurring after 1970 among 80 female hypothyroid cases overall. Among males there were five juvenile cases in 1955-1960 out of 7 overall, but no juvenile cases among 24 cases at other times. The timing of the onset of this epidemic follows closely after the massive release of I 131 from the facility in 1945, so that a causal relationship is strongly suggested. The counties of residence of cases corresponds to the counties with high cumulative dose estimates in children's thyroid glands. Validation of the diagnostic criteria was checked in a sample of cases. Other types of thyroid abnormalities were also increased. One case of juvenile thyroid cancer was reported. While thyroid cancer in adults was unusually frequent, the first cases occurred in 1955 and the highest number (8) in 1985. Our findings are consistent with the clinical finding that hypothyroidism in children frequently follows radiation of the head and neck. Similarities with the Marshall Islanders exposed to the nuclear test, 'Bravo' and to those exposed near Chernobyl are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Time Dependence of Aerosol Light Scattering Downwind of Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, L. I.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Wang, J.; Lewis, E. R.; Springston, S. R.; Chand, D.; Shilling, J.; Arnott, W. P.; Freedman, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Zhang, Q.; Yokelson, R. J.; Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    In the first phase of BBOP (Biomass Burn Observation Project), a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored study, wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest were sampled from the G-1 aircraft via sequences of transects that encountered emission whose age (time since emission) ranged from approximately 15 minutes to four hours. Comparisons between transects allowed us to determine the near-field time evolution of trace gases, aerosol particles, and optical properties. The fractional increase in aerosol concentration with plume age was typically less than a third of the fractional increase in light scattering. In some fires the increase in light scattering exceeded a factor of two. Two possible causes for the discrepancy between scattering and aerosol mass are i) the downwind formation of refractory tar balls that are not detected by the AMS and therefore contribute to scattering but not to aerosol mass and ii) changes to the aerosol size distribution. Both possibilities are considered. Our information on tar balls comes from an analysis of TEM grids. A direct determination of size changes is complicated by extremely high aerosol number concentrations that caused coincidence problems for the PCASP and UHSAS probes. We instead construct a set of plausible log normal size distributions and for each member of the set do Mie calculations to determine mass scattering efficiency (MSE), angstrom exponents, and backscatter ratios. Best fit size distributions are selected by comparison with observed data derived from multi-wavelength scattering measurements, an extrapolated FIMS size distribution, and mass measurements from an SP-AMS. MSE at 550 nm varies from a typical near source value of 2-3 to about 4 in aged air.

  10. Step Sizes for Strong Stability Preservation with Downwind-Biased Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2011-01-01

    order accuracy. It is possible to achieve more relaxed step size restrictions in the discretization of hyperbolic PDEs through the use of both upwind- and downwind-biased semidiscretizations. We investigate bounds on the maximum SSP step size for methods

  11. Numerical Investigations on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine:Downwind Versus Upwind Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2015-01-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  12. Step Sizes for Strong Stability Preservation with Downwind-Biased Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2011-08-04

    Strong stability preserving (SSP) integrators for initial value ODEs preserve temporal monotonicity solution properties in arbitrary norms. All existing SSP methods, including implicit methods, either require small step sizes or achieve only first order accuracy. It is possible to achieve more relaxed step size restrictions in the discretization of hyperbolic PDEs through the use of both upwind- and downwind-biased semidiscretizations. We investigate bounds on the maximum SSP step size for methods that include negative coefficients and downwind-biased semi-discretizations. We prove that the downwind SSP coefficient for linear multistep methods of order greater than one is at most equal to two, while the downwind SSP coefficient for explicit Runge–Kutta methods is at most equal to the number of stages of the method. In contrast, the maximal downwind SSP coefficient for second order Runge–Kutta methods is shown to be unbounded. We present a class of such methods with arbitrarily large SSP coefficient and demonstrate that they achieve second order accuracy for large CFL number.

  13. Optimization of Darrieus turbines with an upwind and downwind momentum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, J. L.; McCoy, H.

    1983-08-01

    This paper presents a theoretical aerodynamic performance optimization for two dimensional vertical axis wind turbines. A momentum type wake model is introduced with separate cosine type interference coefficients for the up and downwind half of the rotor. The cosine type loading permits the rotor blades to become unloaded near the junction of the upwind and downwind rotor halves. Both the optimum and the off design magnitude of the interference coefficients are obtained by equating the drag on each of the rotor halves to that on each of two cosine loaded actuator discs in series. The values for the optimum rotor efficiency, solidity and corresponding interference coefficients have been obtained in a closed form analytic solution by maximizing the power extracted from the downwind rotor half as well as from the entire rotor. A numerical solution was required when viscous effects were incorporated in the rotor optimization.

  14. Numerical and Experimental Results of a Passive Free Yawing Downwind Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    The background of this PhD study concerns a medium sized 3 bladed wind turbine in a free yawing and downwind configuration. Largely funded by an EU Marie-Curie IAPP grant, the project was jointly setup by the renewable energy consultant 3E, DTU Wind Energy and the TU Delft. The 3 bladed free yawing...... downwind concept is pursued in an attempt to increase the robustness of a wind turbine by eliminating the traditionally actively controlled, and sometimes failure prone yawing mechanism. Under certain conditions, such as for remote (off shore) and off grid applications, a decreased failure rate can...... increase the economical competitiveness significantly compared to more traditional power supplies. This work presents aeroelastic analysis and results of a wind tunnel test campaign for the 3 bladed free yawing downwind concept. The investigated topics concern free yawing stability and how it is affected...

  15. Environmental Factors Affecting Asthma and Allergies: Predicting and Simulating Downwind Exposure to Airborne Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey; Estes, Sue; Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Huete, Alfredo; Solano, Ramon; Ratana, Piyachat; Jiang, Zhangyan; Flowers, Len; Zelicoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the environmental factors that affect asthma and allergies and work to predict and simulate the downwind exposure to airborne pollen. Using a modification of Dust REgional Atmosphere Model (DREAM) that incorporates phenology (i.e. PREAM) the aim was to predict concentrations of pollen in time and space. The strategy for using the model to simulate downwind pollen dispersal, and evaluate the results. Using MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), to get seasonal sampling of Juniper, the pollen chosen for the study, land cover on a near daily basis. The results of the model are reviewed.

  16. Modeling of ammonia dry deposition downwind of a large poultry facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes a study investigating dry deposition of ammonia downwind of a poultry facility located on the southern perimeter of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. This work is a component of a larger project conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: "Imp...

  17. Modeling of Ammonia Dry Deposition to a Pocosin Landscape Downwind of a Large Poultry Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    A semi-empirical bi-directional flux modeling approach is used to estimate NH3 air concentrations and dry deposition fluxes to a portion of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge (PLNWR) downwind of a large poultry facility. Meteorological patterns at PLNWR are such that som...

  18. Open access wind tunnel measurements of a downwind free yawing wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    A series of free yawing wind tunnel experiments was held in the Open Jet Facility (OJF) of the TU Delft. The ≈ 300 W turbine has three blades in a downwind configuration and is optionally free to yaw. Different 1.6m diameter rotor configurations are tested such as blade flexibility and sweep...

  19. Tar balls are processed, weakly absorbing, primary aerosol particles formed downwind of boreal forest fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacek, A. J., III; Buseck, P. R.; Adachi, K.; Kleinman, L. I.; Onasch, T. B.; Springston, S. R.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning is a major source of light-absorbing black and brown carbonaceous aerosols Brown carbon is a poorly characterized mixture that includes tar balls (TBs), a type of carbonaceous particle unique to biomass burning. Here we describe the first atmospheric observations of the formation and evolution of TBs Aerosol particles were collected on TEM grids during individual aircraft transects at varying downwind distances from the Colockum Tarp wildland fire. The TEM images show primary particles transforming from viscous, impact-deformed particles to spherical TBs. The number fraction of TBs in the wildfire smoke plume increased from less than 5% in samples collected close to the emission source to greater than 40% after 3 hours of aging, with little change in downwind TB diameters. The TB mass fraction increased from 2% near the fire to 23±9% downwind. Single-scatter albedo determined from scattering and absorption measurements increased slightly with downwind distance. Mie calculations show this observation is consistent with weak light absorbance by TBs (m=1.56 - 0.02i) but not consistent with order-of-magnitude stronger absorption observed in different settings. The field-derived TB mass fractions reported here indicate that this particle type should be accounted for in biomass-burn emission inventories.

  20. Reduction of Air Pollution Levels Downwind of a Road with an Upwind Noise Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    We propose a dispersion model to characterize the impact of an upwind solid noise barrier next to a highway on air pollution concentrations downwind of the road. The model is based on data from wind tunnel experiments conducted by Heist et al. (2009). The model assumes that the...

  1. The Downwind Hemisphere of the Heliosphere as Observed with IBEX-Lo from 2009 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurz, P.; Galli, A.; Schwadron, N.; Kucharek, H.; Moebius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Sokol, J. M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2017-12-01

    The topic of this study is the vast region towards the tail of the heliosphere. To this end, we comprehensively analyzed energetic neutral hydrogen atoms (ENAs) of energies 10 eV to 2.5 keV from the downwind hemisphere of the heliosheath measured during the first 7 years of the IBEX (Interstellar Boundary Explorer) mission. Neutralized ions from the heliosheath (the region of slow solar wind plasma between termination shock and heliopause) can be remotely observed as ENAs down to 10 eV with the IBEX-Lo sensor onboard IBEX. This sensor covers those energies of the ion spectrum that dominate the total plasma pressure in the downwind region. So far, this region of the heliosphere has never been explored in-situ. Converting observations obtained near Earth orbit at these low energies to the original ion distributions in the heliocentric rest frame at 100 AU is very challenging, making the assessment of uncertainties and implicit assumptions crucial. From the maps of observed ENAs from the heliosheath and their uncertainties we derive observational constraints on heliospheric models for the downwind hemisphere. These constraints limit the possible range of 1) the distance of the termination shock, 2) the total plasma pressure across the termination shock, 3) the radial flow velocity of the heliosheath plasma, 4) the extinction length of said plasma, and finally 5) the dimension of the heliosheath in downwind directions. Because these parameters are coupled and because of observational limitations, we also need to characterize the degeneracy, i.e., the fact that different sets of parameters may reproduce the observations.

  2. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a twisted airfoil shaped two-bladed H-Darrieus rotor made from fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Rajat; Roy, Sukanta; Biswas, Agnimitra [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Silchar, Assam, 788010 (India)

    2010-07-01

    H-Darrieus rotor is a lift type device having two to three blades designed as airfoils. The blades are attached vertically to the central shaft through support arms. The support to vertical axis helps the rotor maintain its shape. In this paper, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of an airfoil shaped two-bladed H-Darrieus rotor using Fluent 6.2 software was performed. Based on the CFD results, a comparative study between experimental and computational works was carried out. The H-Darrieus rotor was 20cm in height, 5cm in chord and twisted with an angle of 30{sup o} at the trailing end. The blade material of rotor was Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP). The experiments were earlier conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel for various height-to-diameter (H/D) ratios. A two dimensional computational modeling was done with the help of Gambit tool using unstructured grid. Realistic boundary conditions were provided for the model to have synchronization with the experimental conditions. Two dimensional steady-state segregated solver with absolute velocity formulation and cell based grid was considered, and a standard k-epsilon viscous model with standard wall functions was chosen. A first order upwind discretization scheme was adopted for pressure velocity coupling of the flow. The inlet velocities and rotor rotational speeds were taken from the experimental results. From the computational analysis, power coefficient (Cp) and torque coefficient (Ct) values at ten different H/D ratios namely 0.85, 1.0, 1.10, 1.33, 1.54, 1.72, 1.80, 1.92, 2.10 and 2.20 were calculated in order to predict the performances of the twisted H-rotor. The variations of Cp and Ct with tip speed ratios were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. The standard deviations of computational Cp and Ct from experimental Cp and Ct were obtained. From the computational analysis, the highest values of Cp and Ct were obtained at H/D ratios of 1.0 and 1.54 respectively. The deviation of

  3. Numerical and experimental results of a passive free yawing downwind wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verelst, D.R.S.

    2013-09-15

    The background of this PhD study concerns a medium sized 3 bladed wind turbine in a free yawing and downwind configuration. Largely funded by an EU Marie-Curie IAPP grant, the project was jointly setup by the renewable energy consultant 3E, DTU Wind Energy and the TU Delft. The 3 bladed free yawing downwind concept is pursued in an attempt to increase the robustness of a wind turbine by eliminating the traditionally actively controlled, and sometimes failure prone yawing mechanism. Under certain conditions, such as for remote (off shore) and off grid applications, a decreased failure rate can increase the economical competitiveness significantly compared to more traditional power supplies. This work presents aeroelastic analysis and results of a wind tunnel test campaign for the 3 bladed free yawing downwind concept. The investigated topics concern free yawing stability and how it is affected by coning angle, blade sweep, and blade flexibility using both numerical and experimental methods. The wind tunnel tests were organized in the Open Jet Facility of the TU Delft, and the thesis discusses the experiment's design, construction, operation, and gives an analysis of the results. It provides a dataset to compare aeroelastic simulations with experimental results for varying yawed inflow conditions and free yawing stability. The experimental data scope is limited to rotor speed, tower base bending moment, yaw angle, and blade root flapwise bending moments measurements. Other work covered during the PhD study is a parametric blade sweep investigation for the NREL 5MW turbine, and a detailed study on load extrapolation methods based on aeroelastic simulations. It is concluded that the 3 bladed, free yawing, and downwind wind turbine can operate in a stable manner. However, numerical studies indicate a less stable operating region when the rotor flow is about to stall. The experiments confirmed the free yawing stability, but the unstable region indicated in the

  4. Using Atmosphere-Forest Measurements To Examine The Potential For Reduced Downwind Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viner, B.

    2015-01-01

    A 2-D dispersion model was developed to address how airborne plumes interact with the forest at Savannah River Site. Parameters describing turbulence and mixing of the atmosphere within and just above the forest were estimated using measurements of water vapor or carbon dioxide concentration made at the Aiken AmeriFlux tower for a range of stability and seasonal conditions. Stability periods when the greatest amount of mixing of an airborne plume into the forest were found for 1) very unstable environments, when atmospheric turbulence is usually at a maximum, and 2) very stable environments, when the plume concentration at the forest top is at a maximum and small amounts of turbulent mixing can move a substantial portion of the plume into the forest. Plume interactions with the forest during stable periods are of particular importance because these conditions are usually considered the worst-case scenario for downwind effects from a plume. The pattern of plume mixing into the forest was similar during the year except during summer when the amount of plume mixed into the forest was nearly negligible for all but stable periods. If the model results indicating increased deposition into the forest during stable conditions can be confirmed, it would allow for a reduction in the limitations that restrict facility operations while maintaining conservative estimates for downwind effects. Continuing work is planned to confirm these results as well as estimate specific deposition velocity values for use in toolbox models used in regulatory roles.

  5. Modeling blowing snow accumulation downwind of an obstruction: The Ohara Eulerian particle distribution equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinar, N. J.

    2017-05-01

    An equation was proposed to model the height of blowing snow accumulation downwind of an obstacle such as vegetation, a snow fence, a building, or a topographic feature. The equation does not require aerodynamic flow condition parameters such as wind speed, allowing for the spatial distribution of snow to be determined at locations where meteorological data is not available. However, snow particle diffusion, drift, and erosion coefficients must be estimated for application of the equation. These coefficients can be used to provide insight into the relative magnitude of blowing snow processes at a field location. Further research is required to determine efficient methods for coefficient estimation. The equation could be used with other models of wind-transported snow to predict snow accumulation downwind of an obstacle without the need for wind speed adjustments or correction equations. Applications for this equation include the design of snow fences, and the use of this equation with other hydrological models to predict snow distribution, climate change, drought, flooding, and avalanches.

  6. Near-wake flow structure downwind of a wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D. [University of Minnesota, Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory, Department of Civil Engineering, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Porte-Agel, Fernando [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), ENAC-IIE-WIRE, Wind Engineering and Renewable Energy Laboratory (WIRE), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Wind turbines operate in the surface layer of the atmospheric boundary layer, where they are subjected to strong wind shear and relatively high turbulence levels. These incoming boundary layer flow characteristics are expected to affect the structure of wind turbine wakes. The near-wake region is characterized by a complex coupled vortex system (including helicoidal tip vortices), unsteadiness and strong turbulence heterogeneity. Limited information about the spatial distribution of turbulence in the near wake, the vortex behavior and their influence on the downwind development of the far wake hinders our capability to predict wind turbine power production and fatigue loads in wind farms. This calls for a better understanding of the spatial distribution of the 3D flow and coherent turbulence structures in the near wake. Systematic wind-tunnel experiments were designed and carried out to characterize the structure of the near-wake flow downwind of a model wind turbine placed in a neutral boundary layer flow. A horizontal-axis, three-blade wind turbine model, with a rotor diameter of 13 cm and the hub height at 10.5 cm, occupied the lowest one-third of the boundary layer. High-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure velocities in multiple vertical stream-wise planes (x-z) and vertical span-wise planes (y-z). In particular, we identified localized regions of strong vorticity and swirling strength, which are the signature of helicoidal tip vortices. These vortices are most pronounced at the top-tip level and persist up to a distance of two to three rotor diameters downwind. The measurements also reveal strong flow rotation and a highly non-axisymmetric distribution of the mean flow and turbulence structure in the near wake. The results provide new insight into the physical mechanisms that govern the development of the near wake of a wind turbine immersed in a neutral boundary layer. They also serve as important data for the development and

  7. Contribution of ship traffic to aerosol particle concentrations downwind of a major shipping lane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivekäs, N.; Massling, Andreas; Grythe, H.

    2014-01-01

    at a remote location. We studied the particle number concentration (12 to 490 nm in diameter), the mass concentration (12 to 150 nm in diameter) and number and volume size distribution of aerosol particles in ship plumes for a period of 4.5 months at Hovsore, a coastal site on the western coast of Jutland...... in Denmark. During episodes of western winds, the site is about 50 km downwind of a major shipping lane and the plumes are approximately 1 hour old when they arrive at the site. We have used a sliding percentile-based method for separating the plumes from the measured background values and to calculate...... the ship plume contribution to the total particle number and PM0.15 mass concentration (mass of particles below 150 nm in diameter, converted from volume assuming sphericity) at the site. The method is not limited to particle number or volume concentration, but can also be used for different chemical...

  8. Composition analyses of size-resolved aerosol samples taken from aircraft downwind of Kuwait, Spring 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, T.A.; Wilkinson, K. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Schnell, R. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1992-09-20

    Analyses are reported for eight aerosol samples taken from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Electra typically 200 to 250 km downwind of Kuwait between May 19 and June 1, 1991. Aerosols were separated into fine (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m) and coarse (2.5 < D{sub p} 10 {mu}m) particles for optical, gravimetric, X ray and nuclear analyses, yielding information on the morphology, mass, and composition of aerosols downwind of Kuwait. The mass of coarse aerosols ranged between 60 and 1971 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and, while dominated by soil derived aerosols, contained considerable content of sulfates and salt (NaCl) and soot in the form of fluffy agglomerates. The mass of fine aerosols varied between 70 and 785 {mu}g/m{sup 3}, of which about 70% was accounted for via compositional analyses performed in vacuum. While most components varied greatly from flight to flight, organic matter and fine soils each accounted for about 1/4 of the fine mass, while salt and sulfates contributed about 10% and 7%, respectively. The Cl/S ratios were remarkably constant, 2.4 {+-} 1.2 for coarse particles and 2.0 {+-} 0.2 for fine particles, with one flight deleted in each case. Vanadium, when observed, ranged from 9 to 27 ng/m{sup 3}, while nickel ranged from 5 to 25 ng/m{sup 3}. In fact, fine sulfates, vanadium, and nickel occurred in levels typical of Los Angeles, California, during summer 1986. The V/Ni ratio, 1.7 {+-} 0.4, was very similar to the ratios measured in fine particles from combusted Kuwaiti oil, 1.4 {+-} 0.9. Bromine, copper, zinc, and arsenic/lead were also observed at levels between 2 and 190 ng/m{sup 3}. The presence of massive amounts of fine, typically alkaline soils in the Kuwaiti smoke plumes significantly modified their behavior and probably mitigated their impacts, locally and globally. 16 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  9. Health Effects of Subchronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mauderly

    2009-01-07

    The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive laboratory-based evaluation of selected respiratory and cardiac health hazards of subchronic (up to 6 months) inhalation of simulated key components of 'downwind plume' emissions of coal combustion. This project was performed as an integral part of a joint government-industry program termed the 'National Environmental Respiratory Center' (NERC), which is aimed at disentangling the roles of different physical-chemical air pollutants and their sources in the health effects associated statistically with air pollution. The characterization of the exposure atmosphere and the health assays were identical to those employed in the NERC protocols used to evaluate other pollution source emissions, such as diesel, gasoline, and wood combustion. The project had two phases, each encompassing multiple tasks. Guidelines for the composition of the exposure atmosphere were set by consensus of an expert workshop. Development of the capability to generate the exposure atmosphere and pilot studies of the comparative exposure composition using two coal types were accomplished in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the toxicological study was conducted using Powder River Basin Sub-bituminous coal. NETL provided 50% support for the work in Phase 1 and had intended to provide 20% support for the work in Phase 2. Phase 1 is completed and Phase 2 is in the final stages. All animal exposures were completed without incident, and the composition of the exposure atmospheres met the targets. All of the health sample collections are completed, but some samples remain to be analyzed. Data summaries and final statistical analysis of results remain to be completed. The goal is to submit all publications before the end of FY-08. Repeated exposure to simulated downwind coal emissions caused some significant health effects, but the number of effects tended to be fewer than those caused by the other NERC exposures (diesel and gasoline

  10. Aerial and surface rivers: downwind impacts on water availability from land use changes in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wei; Luedeke, Matthias K. B.; Zemp, Delphine C.; Lakes, Tobia; Kropp, Juergen P.

    2018-02-01

    The abundant evapotranspiration provided by the Amazon forests is an important component of the hydrological cycle, both regionally and globally. Since the last century, deforestation and expanding agricultural activities have been changing the ecosystem and its provision of moisture to the atmosphere. However, it remains uncertain how the ongoing land use change will influence rainfall, runoff, and water availability as findings from previous studies differ. Using moisture tracking experiments based on observational data, we provide a spatially detailed analysis recognizing potential teleconnection between source and sink regions of atmospheric moisture. We apply land use scenarios in upwind moisture sources and quantify the corresponding rainfall and runoff changes in downwind moisture sinks. We find spatially varying responses of water regimes to land use changes, which may explain the diverse results from previous studies. Parts of the Peruvian Amazon and western Bolivia are identified as the sink areas most sensitive to land use change in the Amazon and we highlight the current water stress by Amazonian land use change on these areas in terms of the water availability. Furthermore, we also identify the influential source areas where land use change may considerably reduce a given target sink's water reception (from our example of the Ucayali River basin outlet, rainfall by 5-12 % and runoff by 19-50 % according to scenarios). Sensitive sinks and influential sources are therefore suggested as hotspots for achieving sustainable land-water management.

  11. The Importance of Particle Size in Estimating Downwind Contamination from an RDD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, T.

    2007-01-01

    There is general agreement that realistic quantities of radiological material released from a radiological dispersal device (RDD) will not travel more than hundred meters at toxic levels. Of greater concern in the case of such an incident is the size of the area contaminated with radiological particles. Remediation of contaminated areas will require either removal of the deposited articles or disposal of the contaminated materials. Contours of expected contaminated areas have been presented which extend more than 10 miles downwind of the release location. It would be impossible to remediate such a large area, so the likely response will be to permanently seal most of it off from further use. Not only are these radiation contours below levels of concern, the particle size assumed is unreasonably low, especially when the density of radioactive materials is considered. Using of appropriate RDD characterization and range of particle size, this presentation will show that expected contamination areas should be small enough to make remediation feasible.(author)

  12. Downwind evolution of transpiration by two irrigated crops under conditions of local advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAneney, K. J.; Brunet, Y.; Itier, B.

    1994-09-01

    Previous measurements of water loss from small-dish evaporimeters mounted at the height of irrigated crops grown under conditions of extreme local advection in the Sudan are reexamined. From these evaporimeter measurements, it is possible to calculate fractional changes in the saturation deficit. Relationships between canopy conductance and saturation deficit are briefly reviewed and introduced into the Penman-Monteith equation to calculate transpiration rates as a function of distance downwind of the boundary between the upwind desert and the irrigated crop. In contradiction to most theoretical predictions, these new calculations show rates of transpiration to undergo only modest changes with increasing fetch. This occurs because of the feedback interaction between saturation deficit and stomatal conductance. This result is in good accord with a recent study suggesting that a dry-moist boundary transition may be best modelled as a simple step change in surface fluxes and further that the advective enhancement of evaporation may have been overestimated by many advection models. Larger effects are expected on dry matter yields because of the direct influence of saturation deficit on the yield-transpiration ratio.

  13. Downwind evolution of the volatility and mixing state of near-road aerosols near a US interstate highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Provat K.; Khlystov, Andrey; Grieshop, Andrew P.

    2018-02-01

    We present spatial measurements of particle volatility and mixing state at a site near a North Carolina interstate highway (I-40) applying several heating (thermodenuder; TD) experimental approaches. Measurements were conducted in summer 2015 and winter 2016 in a roadside trailer (10 m from road edge) and during downwind transects at different distances from the highway under favorable wind conditions using a mobile platform. Results show that the relative abundance of semi-volatile species (SVOCs) in ultrafine particles decreases with downwind distance, which is consistent with the dilution and mixing of traffic-sourced particles with background air and evaporation of semi-volatile species during downwind transport. An evaporation kinetics model was used to derive particle volatility distributions by fitting TD data. While the TD-derived distribution apportions about 20-30 % of particle mass as semi-volatile (SVOCs; effective saturation concentration, C∗ ≥ 1µm-3) at 10 m from the road edge, approximately 10 % of particle mass is attributed to SVOCs at 220 m, showing that the particle-phase semi-volatile fraction decreases with downwind distance. The relative abundance of semi-volatile material in the particle phase increased during winter. Downwind spatial gradients of the less volatile particle fraction (that remaining after heating at 180 °C) were strongly correlated with black carbon (BC). BC size distribution and mixing state measured using a single-particle soot photometer (SP2) at the roadside trailer showed that a large fraction (70-80 %) of BC particles were externally mixed. Heating experiments with a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (V-TDMA) also showed that the nonvolatile fraction in roadside aerosols is mostly externally mixed. V-TDMA measurements at different distances downwind from the highway indicate that the mixing state of roadside aerosols does not change significantly (e.g., BC mostly remains externally mixed) within a

  14. Cross-hemispheric transport of central African biomass burning pollutants: implications for downwind ozone production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollutant plumes with enhanced concentrations of trace gases and aerosols were observed over the southern coast of West Africa during August 2006 as part of the AMMA wet season field campaign. Plumes were observed both in the mid and upper troposphere. In this study we examined the origin of these pollutant plumes, and their potential to photochemically produce ozone (O3 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Their possible contribution to the Atlantic O3 maximum is also discussed. Runs using the BOLAM mesoscale model including biomass burning carbon monoxide (CO tracers were used to confirm an origin from central African biomass burning fires. The plumes measured in the mid troposphere (MT had significantly higher pollutant concentrations over West Africa compared to the upper tropospheric (UT plume. The mesoscale model reproduces these differences and the two different pathways for the plumes at different altitudes: transport to the north-east of the fire region, moist convective uplift and transport to West Africa for the upper tropospheric plume versus north-west transport over the Gulf of Guinea for the mid-tropospheric plume. Lower concentrations in the upper troposphere are mainly due to enhanced mixing during upward transport. Model simulations suggest that MT and UT plumes are 16 and 14 days old respectively when measured over West Africa. The ratio of tracer concentrations at 600 hPa and 250 hPa was estimated for 14–15 August in the region of the observed plumes and compares well with the same ratio derived from observed carbon dioxide (CO2 enhancements in both plumes. It is estimated that, for the period 1–15 August, the ratio of Biomass Burning (BB tracer concentration transported in the UT to the ones transported in the MT is 0.6 over West Africa and the equatorial South Atlantic.

    Runs using a photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, initialized with the observations, were used to estimate

  15. Epidemic juvenile hypothyroidism among a population of Hanford 'downwinders'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, C.M.; Nussbaum, R.H.; Nussbaum, F.D. [Northwest Radiation Health Alliance, Portland, OR (United States); Kordysh, E.; Goldsmith, J.R. [Dept. of Epidemiology, Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2001-07-01

    Self-defined 'downwinders' responded to questionnaires as to their health and their potential exposures to emissions from the Hanford Nuclear Facility in the U.S. The area considered was between the Cascades and the Rocky Mountains, primarily to the East and Northeast of the facility. Of 801 questionnaires, returned, 518 were from women. Of these, 210 reported that they had been diagnosed by their physicians as having hypothyroidism. 31 of the 283 men had reported being diagnosed as hypothyroid. The condition is generally found to be frequent among adult women, but is uncommon in children. 54 of the 210 cases among females were diagnosed among those less than 20 years of age, and 5 out of 31 males were found in this age range. Peak years for diagnosis among females were from 1945 to 1965, with only three juvenile cases occurring after 1970 among 80 female hypothyroid cases overall. Among males there were five juvenile cases in 1955-1960 out of 7 overall, but no juvenile cases among 24 cases at other times. The timing of the onset of this epidemic follows closely after the massive release of I{sup 131} from the facility in 1945, so that a causal relationship is strongly suggested. The counties of residence of cases corresponds to the counties with high cumulative dose estimates in children's thyroid glands. Validation of the diagnostic criteria was checked in a sample of cases. Other types of thyroid abnormalities were also increased. One case of juvenile thyroid cancer was reported. While thyroid cancer in adults was unusually frequent, the first cases occurred in 1955 and the highest number (8) in 1985. Our findings are consistent with the clinical finding that hypothyroidism in children frequently follows radiation of the head and neck. Similarities with the Marshall Islanders exposed to the nuclear test, 'Bravo' and to those exposed near Chernobyl are discussed. (orig.)

  16. Meteorological modeling of arrival and deposition of fallout at intermediate distances downwind of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederwall, R.T.; Peterson, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    A three-dimensional atmospheric transport and diffusion model is used to calculate the arrival and deposition of fallout from 13 selected nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in the 1950s. Results are used to extend NTS fallout patterns to intermediate downwind distances (300 to 1200 km). The radioactive cloud is represented in the model by a population of Lagrangian marker particles, with concentrations calculated on an Eulerian grid. Use of marker particles, with fall velocities dependent on particle size, provides a realistic simulation of fallout as the debris cloud travels downwind. The three-dimensional wind field is derived from observed data, adjusted for mass consistency. Terrain is represented in the grid, which extends up to 1200 km downwind of NTS and has 32-km horizontal resolution and 1-km vertical resolution. Ground deposition is calculated by a deposition-velocity approach. Source terms and relationships between deposition and exposure rate are based on work by Hicks. Uncertainty in particle size and vertical distributions within the debris cloud (and stem) allow for some model tuning to better match measured ground-deposition values. Particle trajectories representing different sizes and starting heights above ground zero are used to guide source specification. An hourly time history of the modeled fallout pattern as the debris cloud moves downwind provides estimates of fallout arrival times. Results for event HARRY illustrate the methodology. The composite deposition pattern for all 13 tests is characterized by two lobes extending out to the north-northeast and east-northeast, respectively, at intermediate distances from NTS. Arrival estimates, along with modeled deposition values, augment measured deposition data in the development of data bases at the county level

  17. Ozone concentrations at a selected high-elevation forest site downwind Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-JArdon, R.

    2013-05-01

    Torres-Jardón, R.*, Rosas-Pérez, I., Granada-Macías, L. M., Ruiz-Suárez, L. G. Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, UNAM, México D. F. México * rtorres@unam.mx For many years, the vegetation of forest species such as Abies religiosa in natural parks located in the southwest mountains of Mexico City has attracted much attention since these parks have been experiencing a severe decline of unclear etiology. The high ozone levels in the area and the observed naked eye macroscopic, histological and cytological injuries on these species, strongly suggest an important contribution of tropospheric ozone to this deterioration process. Apart of historical short monitoring campaigns for measuring ozone levels in these mountains, it is known just a little is known about the present exposure levels at which the local vegetation is exposed. A continuous ozone analyzer has been in operation since 2011 at a high-elevation forest site (Parque Nacional Miguel Hidalgo, PNMH; 3110 m above mean sea level) located downwind of Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA), in order to characterize the local ozone diel amplitude and its seasonal trend, as well as the influence of MCMA on the local O3 concentrations. Hourly average ozone data in PNMH shows that in general, the diel of ozone concentrations in the forest site has a statistical significant correlation with the pattern of ozone levels observed in several monitoring sites (smog receptor sites) within the MCMA, although the high elevation O3 levels are relatively lower than those in the urban area (around 2200 m above mean sea level). It is possible that a part of the oxidants in the air masses are removed by sink deposition processes during the air mass transport across the hills. The diel amplitude of ozone concentrations is small in the cold season, increasing as the seasons advance to June. As in the city, the highest ozone concentrations occur in April or May and the lowest levels during the rainy season, which extends from

  18. Mathematical Model of Two Blades System

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2014), s. 361-369 ISSN 2321-3558 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1166 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : turbine blades * dry friction * vibration damping * torsion Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  19. Screening method to assess the greenhouse gas mitigation potential of old landfills, based on downwind methane concentration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    A nationwide effort is taking place in Denmark to mitigate methane emissions from landfills, by using biocovers. A large number of older landfills were found to be potential candidates for biocover implementation, but very little information was available for these sites to help evaluate if signi......A nationwide effort is taking place in Denmark to mitigate methane emissions from landfills, by using biocovers. A large number of older landfills were found to be potential candidates for biocover implementation, but very little information was available for these sites to help evaluate...... if significant methane emissions occur. To assess these sites, we developed a low-cost and quick remote sensing methodology, whereby downwind methane concentrations from 91 landfills were measured using a mobile analytical platform, and emission rates were calculated using an inverse dispersion model. The method...

  20. Field investigation of a wake structure downwind of a VANT (Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine) in a wind farm array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H. T.; Buck, J. W.; Germain, A. C.; Hinchee, M. E.; Solt, T. S.; Leroy, G. M.; Srnsky, R. A.

    1988-09-01

    The effects of upwind turbine wakes on the performance of a FloWind 17-m vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) were investigated through a series of field experiments conducted at the FloWind wind farm on Cameron Ridge, Tehachapi, California. From the field measurements, we derived the velocity and power/energy deficits under various turbine on/off configurations. Much information was provided to characterize the structure of VAWT wakes and to assess their effects on the performance of downwind turbines. A method to estimate the energy deficit was developed based on the measured power deficit and the wind speed distributions. This method may be adopted for other turbine types and sites. Recommendations are made for optimizing wind farm design and operations, as well as for wind energy management.

  1. Combining discrete equations method and upwind downwind-controlled splitting for non-reacting and reacting two-fluid computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, K.

    2012-01-01

    When numerically investigating multiphase phenomena during severe accidents in a reactor system, characteristic lengths of the multi-fluid zone (non-reactive and reactive) are found to be much smaller than the volume of the reactor containment, which makes the direct modeling of the configuration hardly achievable. Alternatively, we propose to consider the physical multiphase mixture zone as an infinitely thin interface. Then, the reactive Riemann solver is inserted into the Reactive Discrete Equations Method (RDEM) to compute high speed combustion waves represented by discontinuous interfaces. An anti-diffusive approach is also coupled with RDEM to accurately simulate reactive interfaces. Increased robustness and efficiency when computing both multiphase interfaces and reacting flows are achieved thanks to an original upwind downwind-controlled splitting method (UDCS). UDCS is capable of accurately solving interfaces on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes, including reacting fronts for both deflagration and detonation configurations. (author)

  2. Airborne detection and quantification of swine influenza a virus in air samples collected inside, outside and downwind from swine barns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar A Corzo

    Full Text Available Airborne transmission of influenza A virus (IAV in swine is speculated to be an important route of virus dissemination, but data are scarce. This study attempted to detect and quantify airborne IAV by virus isolation and RRT-PCR in air samples collected under field conditions. This was accomplished by collecting air samples from four acutely infected pig farms and locating air samplers inside the barns, at the external exhaust fans and downwind from the farms at distances up to 2.1 km. IAV was detected in air samples collected in 3 out of 4 farms included in the study. Isolation of IAV was possible from air samples collected inside the barn at two of the farms and in one farm from the exhausted air. Between 13% and 100% of samples collected inside the barns tested RRT-PCR positive with an average viral load of 3.20E+05 IAV RNA copies/m³ of air. Percentage of exhaust positive air samples also ranged between 13% and 100% with an average viral load of 1.79E+04 RNA copies/m³ of air. Influenza virus RNA was detected in air samples collected between 1.5 and 2.1 Km away from the farms with viral levels significantly lower at 4.65E+03 RNA copies/m³. H1N1, H1N2 and H3N2 subtypes were detected in the air samples and the hemagglutinin gene sequences identified in the swine samples matched those in aerosols providing evidence that the viruses detected in the aerosols originated from the pigs in the farms under study. Overall our results indicate that pigs can be a source of IAV infectious aerosols and that these aerosols can be exhausted from pig barns and be transported downwind. The results from this study provide evidence of the risk of aerosol transmission in pigs under field conditions.

  3. The impact of photovoltaic (PV) installations on downwind particulate matter concentrations: Results from field observations at a 550-MWAC utility-scale PV plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, Dwarakanath; Sinha, Parikhit

    2017-10-01

    With utility-scale photovoltaic (PV) projects increasingly developed in dry and dust-prone geographies with high solar insolation, there is a critical need to analyze the impacts of PV installations on the resulting particulate matter (PM) concentrations, which have environmental and health impacts. This study is the first to quantify the impact of a utility-scale PV plant on PM concentrations downwind of the project site. Background, construction, and post-construction PM 2.5 and PM 10 (PM with aerodynamic diameters construction through a wind-shielding effect. The results show that the (1) confidence intervals of the mean PM concentrations during construction overlap with or are lower than background concentrations for three of the four BAM stations; and (2) post-construction PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations downwind of the PV installation are significantly lower than the background concentrations at three of the four BAM stations. At the fourth BAM station, downwind post-construction PM 2.5 and PM 10 concentrations increased marginally by 5.7% and 2.6% of the 24-hr ambient air quality standards defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, respectively, when compared with background concentrations, with the PM 2.5 increase being statistically insignificant. This increase may be due to vehicular emissions from an access road near the southwest corner of the site or a drainage berm near the south station. The findings demonstrate the overall environmental benefit of downwind PM emission abatement from a utility-scale PV installation in desert conditions due to wind shielding. With PM emission reductions observed within 10 months of completion of construction, post-construction monitoring of downwind PM levels may be reduced to a 1-yr period for other projects with similar soil and weather conditions. This study is the first to analyze impact of a utility photovoltaic (PV) project on downwind particulate matter (PM) concentration in desert conditions. The PM

  4. Modeling ozone plumes observed downwind of New York City over the North Atlantic Ocean during the ICARTT field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-H. Lee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport and chemical transformation of well-defined New York City (NYC urban plumes over the North Atlantic Ocean were studied using aircraft measurements collected on 20–21 July 2004 during the ICARTT (International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation field campaign and WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry model simulations. The strong NYC urban plumes were characterized by carbon monoxide (CO mixing ratios of 350–400 parts per billion by volume (ppbv and ozone (O3 levels of about 100 ppbv near New York City on 20 July in the WP-3D in-situ and DC-3 lidar aircraft measurements. On 21 July, the two aircraft captured strong urban plumes with about 350 ppbv CO and over 150 ppbv O3 (~160 ppbv maximum about 600 km downwind of NYC over the North Atlantic Ocean. The measured urban plumes extended vertically up to about 2 km near New York City, but shrank to 1–1.5 km over the stable marine boundary layer (MBL over the North Atlantic Ocean. The WRF-Chem model reproduced ozone formation processes, chemical characteristics, and meteorology of the measured urban plumes near New York City (20 July and in the far downwind region over the North Atlantic Ocean (21 July. The quasi-Lagrangian analysis of transport and chemical transformation of the simulated NYC urban plumes using WRF-Chem results showed that the pollutants can be efficiently transported in (isentropic layers in the lower atmosphere (<2–3 km over the North Atlantic Ocean while maintaining a dynamic vertical decoupling by cessation of turbulence in the stable MBL. The O3 mixing ratio in the NYC urban plumes remained at 80–90 ppbv during nocturnal transport over the stable MBL, then grew to over 100 ppbv by daytime oxidation of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 with mixing ratios on the order of 1 ppbv. Efficient transport of reactive nitrogen species (NOy, specifically nitric

  5. Dimensional and chemical characterization of particles at a downwind receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, G; Stabile, L; Avino, P; Vanoli, R

    2010-07-01

    In the last years numerous epidemiological studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of particulate matter on human health. In industrialized areas, anthropogenic activities highly contribute to the fine and ultrafine particle concentrations. Then, it is important to characterize the evolution of particle size distribution and chemical composition near these emission points. Waste incineration represents a favorable technique for reducing the waste volume. However, in the past, municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) had a bad reputation due to the emission of toxic combustion byproducts. Consequently, the risk perception of the people living near MWIs is very high even if in Western countries waste incineration has nowadays to be considered a relatively clean process from a technical point of view. The study here presented has an exemplary meaning for developing appropriate management and control strategies for air quality in the surrounding of MWIs and to perform exposure assessment for populations involved. Environment particles were continuously measured through a SMPS/APS system over 12 months. The monitoring site represents a downwind receptor of a typical MWI. Furthermore, elements and organic fractions were measured by means of the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and using dichotomous and high volume samplers. Annual mean values of 8.6 x 10(3)+/-3.7 x 10(2)part.cm(-3) and 31.1+/-9.0 microg m(-3) were found for number and mass concentration, typical of a rural site. Most of the elements can be attributed to long-range transport from other natural and/or anthropogenic sources. Finally, the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons present low concentrations with a mean value of 24.6 ng m(-3). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impacts of traffic emissions on atmospheric particulate nitrate and organics at a downwind site on the periphery of Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yi Ming; Tan, Hao Bo; Jie Li, Yong; Schurman, Misha I.; Li, Fei; Canonaco, Francesco; Prévôt, André S. H.; Chan, Chak K.

    2017-09-01

    Particulate matter (PM) pollution on the peripheries of Chinese megacities can be as serious as in cities themselves. Given the substantial vehicular emissions in inner-city areas, the direct transport of primary PM (e.g., black carbon and primary organics) and effective formation of secondary PM from precursors (e.g., NOx and volatile organic compounds) can contribute to PM pollution in buffer zones between cities. To investigate how traffic emissions in inner-city areas impact these adjacent buffer zones, a suite of real-time instruments were deployed in Panyu, downwind from central Guangzhou, from November to December 2014. Nitrate mass fraction was higher on high-PM days, with the average nitrate-to-sulfate ratio increasing from around 0.35 to 1.5 as the PM mass concentration increased from 10 to 160 µg m-3. Particulate nitrate was strongly correlated with excess ammonium (([NH4+] / [SO42-] - 1.5) × [SO42-]), with higher concentrations in December than in November due to lower temperatures. The organic mass fraction was the highest across all PM1 levels throughout the campaign. While organic aerosols (OA) were dominated by secondary organic aerosols (SOA = semi-volatile oxygenated organic aerosols + low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosols) as a campaign average, freshly emitted hydrocarbon-like organic aerosols (HOA) contributed up to 40 % of OA during high-OA periods, which typically occurred at nighttime and contributed 23.8 to 28.4 % on average. This was due to daytime traffic restrictions on heavy-duty vehicles in Guangzhou, and HOA almost increased linearly with total OA concentration. SOA increased as odd oxygen (Ox = O3 + NO2) increased during the day due to photochemistry. A combination of nighttime traffic emissions and daytime photochemistry contributed to the buildup of PM in Panyu. The mitigation of PM pollution in inner-city areas by reducing vehicular traffic can potentially improve air quality in peripheral areas.

  7. Characterization of wet and dry deposition in the downwind of industrial sources in a dry tropical area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R K; Agrawal, M

    2001-12-19

    An atmospheric deposition study was conducted in the downwind of Shaktinagar Thermal Power Plant (STPP), Renusagar Thermal Power Plant (RTPP), and Anpara Thermal Power Plant (ATPP), at Singrauli region, Uttar Pradesh (UP), India to characterize dry and wet deposition in relation to different pollution loading. During the study period, dry and wet depositions and levels of gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NO2) were estimated across the sites. Dry deposition was collected on a monthly basis and wet deposition on an event basis. Depositions were analyzed for pH, nitrate (NO3-), ammonium (NH4+), and sulphate (SO4(2-)) contents. Dry deposition rate both collected as clearfall and throughfall varied between 0.15 to 2.28 and 0.33 to 3.48 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively, at control and maximally polluted sites. The pH of dry deposition varied from 5.81 to 6.89 during winter and 6.09 to 7.02 during summer across the sites. During the rainy season, the mean pH of clear wet deposition varied from 6.56 to 7.04 and throughfall varied from 6.81 to 7.22. The concentrations of NO2 and SO2 pollutants were highest during the winter season. Mean SO2 concentrations varied from 18 to 75 g m(-3) at control and differently polluted sites during the winter season. The variation in NO2 concentrations did not show a pattern similar to that of SO2. The highest NO2 concentration during the winter season was 50 g m(-3), observed near RTPP. NO2 concentration did not show much variation among different sites, suggesting that the sources of NO2 emission are evenly distributed along the sites. The concentrations of NH4+, NO3-, and SO4(2-) ions in dry deposition were found to be higher in summer as compared to the winter season. In dry deposition (clearfall) the concentrations of NH4+, NO3-, and SO4(2-) varied from 0.13 to 1.0, 0.81 to 1.95, and 0.82 to 3.27 mg l(-1), respectively, during winter. In wet deposition (clearfall), the above varied from 0.14 to 0.74, 0.81 to 1.82, and 0.67 to 2.70 mg l(-1

  8. Characterization of Wet and Dry Deposition in the Downwind of Industrial Sources in a Dry Tropical Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Singh

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An atmospheric deposition study was conducted in the downwind of Shaktinagar Thermal Power Plant (STPP, Renusagar Thermal Power Plant (RTPP, and Anpara Thermal Power Plant (ATPP, at Singrauli region, Uttar Pradesh (UP, India to characterize dry and wet deposition in relation to different pollution loading. During the study period, dry and wet depositions and levels of gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NO2 were estimated across the sites. Dry deposition was collected on a monthly basis and wet deposition on an event basis. Depositions were analyzed for pH, nitrate (NO3�, ammonium (NH4+, and sulphate (SO42� contents. Dry deposition rate both collected as clearfall and throughfall varied between 0.15 to 2.28 and 0.33 to 3.48 g m�2 day�1, respectively, at control and maximally polluted sites. The pH of dry deposition varied from 5.81 to 6.89 during winter and 6.09 to 7.02 during summer across the sites. During the rainy season, the mean pH of clear wet deposition varied from 6.56 to 7.04 and throughfall varied from 6.81 to 7.22. The concentrations of NO2 and SO2 pollutants were highest during the winter season. Mean SO2 concentrations varied from 18 to 75 �g m�3 at control and differently polluted sites during the winter season. The variation in NO2 concentrations did not show a pattern similar to that of SO2. The highest NO2 concentration during the winter season was 50 �g m�3, observed near RTPP. NO2 concentration did not show much variation among different sites, suggesting that the sources of NO2 emission are evenly distributed along the sites. The concentrations of NH4+, NO3�, and SO42� ions in dry deposition were found to be higher in summer as compared to the winter season. In dry deposition (clearfall the concentrations of NH4+, NO3�, and SO42� varied from 0.13 to 1.0, 0.81 to 1.95, and 0.82 to 3.27 mg l�1, respectively, during winter. In wet deposition (clearfall, the above varied from 0.14 to 0.74, 0.81 to 1.82, and 0

  9. Paleolimnological assessment of nutrient enrichment on diatom assemblages in a priori defined nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited lakes downwind of the Athabasca Oil Sands, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen R. Laird

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As the industrial footprint of the Athabasca Oil Sands Region (AOSR continues to expand, concern about the potential impacts of pollutants on the surrounding terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems need to be assessed. An emerging issue is whether recent increases in lake production downwind of the development can be linked to AOSR activities, and/or whether changing climatic conditions are influencing lake nutrient status. To decipher the importance of pollutants, particularly atmospheric deposition of reactive nitrogen (Nr, and the effects of climate change as potential sources of increasing lake production, lakes from both within and outside of the nitrogen deposition zone were analyzed for historical changes in diatom assemblages. Lake sediment cores were collected from a priori defined nitrogen (N - and phosphorus (P - limited lakes within and outside the N plume associated with the AOSR. Diatom assemblages were quantified at sub-decadal resolution since ca. 1890 to compare conditions prior to oil sands expansion and regional climate warming, to the more recent conditions in each group of lakes (Reference and Impacted, N- and P-limited lakes. Analyses of changes in assemblage similarity and species turnover indicates that changes in diatom assemblages were minimal both within and across all lake groups.  Small changes in percent composition of planktonic taxa, particularly small centric taxa (Discostella and Cyclotella species and pennate taxa, such as Asterionella formosa and Fragilaria crotonensis, occurred in some of the lakes. While these changes were consistent with potential climate effects on algal growth, water column stability and other factors; the timing and direction of biotic changes were variable among sites suggesting that any apparent response to climate was lake dependent. The absence of a consistent pattern of diatom changes associated with receipt of reactive nitrogen or intrinsic nutrient-limitation status of the lake

  10. Reduction mechanism of dynamic loads on down wind rotor; Furyoku hatsuden system down wind rotor no doteki kaju no keigen kiko ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, K; Shimizu, Y; Yasui, T [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Dynamic force on blades in a large wind mill changes with rotational speed for various reasons, such as wind shear that causes vertical distribution of wind velocity or titling angle. Therefore, a 2-blade system on a teetered hub is a practical selection for the coned, down-wind type. Use of teetered axis greatly reduces bending moment in the flap direction and that at the axis of rotation. An attempt was made to understand dynamic loads by inertial force resulting from oscillation of the blade rotating on the teetered axis, and thereby to avoid them. The in-plane load can be diminished to zero when the teetered axis is coincided with the center of gravity, but generally cannot be avoided when the blade is strained significantly, except it is operated at the rated condition. The in-plane load and bending moment can be avoided, when rotational freedom is given around the y axis. Dynamic load on a down-wind rotor can be avoided by use of universal joint. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Control design for two-bladed wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Solingen, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades wind energy has evolved into a mature source of sustainable energy such that onshore wind turbines have become cost competitive with other fossil-based energy sources. Onshore wind energy, however, faces social resistance and a lack of available locations. Offshore wind energy,

  12. Modern Control Design for Flexible Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A. D.

    2004-07-01

    Control can improve energy capture and reduce dynamic loads in wind turbines. In the 1970s and 1980s, wind turbines used classical control designs to regulate power and speed. The methods used, however, were not always successful. Modern turbines are larger, mounted on taller towers, and more dynamically active than their predecessors. Control systems to regulate turbine power and maintain stable, closed-loop behavior in the presence of turbulent wind inflow will be critical for these designs. This report applies modern state-space control design methods to a two-bladed teetering hub upwind machine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), which is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. The design objective is to regulate turbine speed and enhance damping in several low-damped flexible modes of the turbine. Starting with simple control algorithms based on linear models, complexity is added incrementally until the desired performance is firmly established.

  13. Radioactive cesium isotope ratios as a tool for determining dispersal and re-dispersal mechanisms downwind from the Nevada Nuclear Security Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Darin C; Delmore, James E; Tranter, Troy; Mann, Nick R; Abbott, Michael L; Olson, John E

    2012-08-01

    Fractionation of the two longer-lived radioactive cesium isotopes ((135)Cs and (137)Cs) produced by above ground nuclear tests have been measured and used to clarify the dispersal mechanisms of cesium deposited in the area between the Nevada Nuclear Security Site and Lake Mead in the southwestern United States. Fractionation of these isotopes is due to the 135-decay chain requiring several days to completely decay to (135)Cs, and the 137-decay chain less than one hour decay to (137)Cs. Since the Cs precursors are gases, iodine and xenon, the (135)Cs plume was deposited farther downwind than the (137)Cs plume. Sediment core samples were obtained from the Las Vegas arm of Lake Mead, sub-sampled and analyzed for (135)Cs/(137)Cs ratios by thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The layers proved to have nearly identical highly fractionated isotope ratios. This information is consistent with a model where the cesium was initially deposited onto the land area draining into Lake Mead and the composite from all of the above ground shots subsequently washed onto Lake Mead by high intensity rain and wind storms producing a layering of Cs activity, where each layer is a portion of the composite. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Remote sensing of volcanic CO2, HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, André; Solvejg Dinger, Anna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Kostinek, Julian; Fieber, Lukas; Fischerkeller, Constanze; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Hase, Frank; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kuhn, Jonas; Lübcke, Peter; Tirpitz, Lukas; Tu, Qiansi

    2017-01-01

    Remote sensing of the gaseous composition of non-eruptive, passively degassing volcanic plumes can be a tool to gain insight into volcano interior processes. Here, we report on a field study in September 2015 that demonstrates the feasibility of remotely measuring the volcanic enhancements of carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and bromine monoxide (BrO) in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna using portable and rugged spectroscopic instrumentation. To this end, we operated the Fourier transform spectrometer EM27/SUN for the shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectral range together with a co-mounted UV spectrometer on a mobile platform in direct-sun view at 5 to 10 km distance from the summit craters. The 3 days reported here cover several plume traverses and a sunrise measurement. For all days, intra-plume HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO vertical column densities (VCDs) were reliably measured exceeding 5 × 1016, 2 × 1017, 5 × 1017, and 1 × 1014 molec cm-2, with an estimated precision of 2.2 × 1015, 1.3 × 1016, 3.6 × 1016, and 1.3 × 1013 molec cm-2, respectively. Given that CO2, unlike the other measured gases, has a large and well-mixed atmospheric background, derivation of volcanic CO2 VCD enhancements (ΔCO2) required compensating for changes in altitude of the observing platform and for background concentration variability. The first challenge was met by simultaneously measuring the overhead oxygen (O2) columns and assuming covariation of O2 and CO2 with altitude. The atmospheric CO2 background was found by identifying background soundings via the co-emitted volcanic gases. The inferred ΔCO2 occasionally exceeded 2 × 1019 molec cm-2 with an estimated precision of 3.7 × 1018 molec cm-2 given typical atmospheric background VCDs of 7 to 8 × 1021 molec cm-2. While the correlations of ΔCO2 with the other measured volcanic gases confirm the detection of volcanic CO2 enhancements, correlations were found of variable

  15. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, D. L.; Hu, M.; Wu, Z. J.; Guo, S.; Wen, M. T.; Nowak, A.; Wehner, B.; Wiedensohler, A.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Wang, X. S.; Li, Y. P.; Zeng, L. M.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2010-10-01

    In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ) and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG) in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8)×104 cm-3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1)×104 cm-3. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm-3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm-3. More 20-100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100-660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were similar at GZ (69±43 μg m-3) and BG (69±58 μg m-3) with R2 of 0.71 for the daily average PM2.5 at these two sites, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformation are the main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO42-, NO3- accounted for about 60% in 100-660 nm particle mass and PM2.5 increase. When south or southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants took place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase rates of secondary ions in PM1.0 than other species and shifting the peaks of sulfate and ammonium mass size distributions to larger sizes. SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+ accounted for about 70% and 40% of PM1.0 and PM2.5, respectively.

  16. CCN activity and organic hygroscopicity of aerosols downwind of an urban region in central Amazonia: seasonal and diel variations and impact of anthropogenic emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalman, Ryan; de Sá, Suzane S.; Palm, Brett B.; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Castillo, Paulo; Day, Douglas A.; Kuang, Chongai; Manzi, Antonio; Ng, Nga Lee; Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Souza, Rodrigo; Springston, Stephen; Watson, Thomas; Pöhlker, Christopher; Pöschl, Ulrich; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Artaxo, Paulo; Jimenez, Jose L.; Martin, Scot T.; Wang, Jian

    2017-10-01

    During the Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) campaign, size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra were characterized at a research site (T3) 60 km downwind of the city of Manaus, Brazil, in central Amazonia for 1 year (12 March 2014 to 3 March 2015). Particle hygroscopicity (κCCN) and mixing state were derived from the size-resolved CCN spectra, and the hygroscopicity of the organic component of the aerosol (κorg) was then calculated from κCCN and concurrent chemical composition measurements. The annual average κCCN increased from 0.13 at 75 nm to 0.17 at 171 nm, and the increase was largely due to an increase in sulfate volume fraction. During both wet and dry seasons, κCCN, κorg, and particle composition under background conditions exhibited essentially no diel variations. The constant κorg of ˜ 0. 15 is consistent with the largely uniform and high O : C value (˜ 0. 8), indicating that the aerosols under background conditions are dominated by the aged regional aerosol particles consisting of highly oxygenated organic compounds. For air masses strongly influenced by urban pollution and/or local biomass burning, lower values of κorg and organic O : C atomic ratio were observed during night, due to accumulation of freshly emitted particles, dominated by primary organic aerosol (POA) with low hygroscopicity, within a shallow nocturnal boundary layer. The O : C, κorg, and κCCN increased from the early morning hours and peaked around noon, driven by the formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and dilution of POA emissions into a deeper boundary layer, while the development of the boundary layer, which leads to mixing with aged particles from the residual layer aloft, likely also contributed to the increases. The hygroscopicities associated with individual organic factors, derived from PMF (positive matrix factorization) analysis of AMS (aerosol mass spectrometry) spectra, were estimated through

  17. CCN activity and organic hygroscopicity of aerosols downwind of an urban region in central Amazonia: seasonal and diel variations and impact of anthropogenic emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thalman

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During the Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5 campaign, size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN spectra were characterized at a research site (T3 60 km downwind of the city of Manaus, Brazil, in central Amazonia for 1 year (12 March 2014 to 3 March 2015. Particle hygroscopicity (κCCN and mixing state were derived from the size-resolved CCN spectra, and the hygroscopicity of the organic component of the aerosol (κorg was then calculated from κCCN and concurrent chemical composition measurements. The annual average κCCN increased from 0.13 at 75 nm to 0.17 at 171 nm, and the increase was largely due to an increase in sulfate volume fraction. During both wet and dry seasons, κCCN, κorg, and particle composition under background conditions exhibited essentially no diel variations. The constant κorg of ∼ 0. 15 is consistent with the largely uniform and high O : C value (∼ 0. 8, indicating that the aerosols under background conditions are dominated by the aged regional aerosol particles consisting of highly oxygenated organic compounds. For air masses strongly influenced by urban pollution and/or local biomass burning, lower values of κorg and organic O : C atomic ratio were observed during night, due to accumulation of freshly emitted particles, dominated by primary organic aerosol (POA with low hygroscopicity, within a shallow nocturnal boundary layer. The O : C, κorg, and κCCN increased from the early morning hours and peaked around noon, driven by the formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol (SOA and dilution of POA emissions into a deeper boundary layer, while the development of the boundary layer, which leads to mixing with aged particles from the residual layer aloft, likely also contributed to the increases. The hygroscopicities associated with individual organic factors, derived from PMF (positive matrix factorization analysis of AMS (aerosol mass

  18. Effect of rotor configuration on guyed tower and foundation designs and estimated costs for intermediate site horizontal axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, G. R.; Winemiller, J. R.; Savino, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Three designs of a guyed cylindrical tower and its foundation for an intermediate size horizontal axis wind turbine generator are discussed. The primary difference in the three designs is the configuration of the rotor. Two configurations are two-blade rotors with teetering hubs - one with full span pitchable blades, the other with fixed pitch blades. The third configuration is a three-bladed rotor with a rigid hub and fixed pitch blades. In all configurations the diameter of the rotor is 38 meters and the axis of rotation is 30.4 meters above grade, and the power output is 200 kW and 400 kW. For each configuration the design is based upon for the most severe loading condition either operating wind or hurricane conditions. The diameter of the tower is selected to be 1.5 meters (since it was determined that this would provide sufficient space for access ladders within the tower) with guy rods attached at 10.7 meters above grade. Completing a design requires selecting the required thicknesses of the various cylindrical segments, the number and diameter of the guy rods, the number and size of soil anchors, and the size of the central foundation. The lower natural frequencies of vibration are determined for each design to ensure that operation near resonance does not occur. Finally, a cost estimate is prepared for each design. A preliminary design and cost estimate of a cantilever tower (cylindrical and not guyed) and its foundation is also presented for each of the three configurations.

  19. Sources of fatigue damage to passive yaw wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laino, D.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Using an integrated computer analysis approach developed at the University of Utah, fatigue damage sources to passive yaw wind turbine blades have been investigated. Models of a rigid hub and teetering hub machine reveal the parameters important to the fatigue design of each type. The teetering hub proved much less susceptible to fatigue damage from normal operation loads. As a result, extreme events were critical to the teetering hub fatigue life. The rigid hub blades experienced extremely large gyroscopic load cycles induced by rapid yaw rates during normal operation. These yaw rates stem from turbulence activity which is shown to be dependent upon atmospheric stability. Investigation revealed that increasing yaw damping is an effective way of significantly reducing these gyroscopic fatigue loads.

  20. Weight and cost analysis of large wind turbine rotors constructed from conventional materials and from advanced composite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Holten, Th

    1982-07-01

    Cost calculations and cost analyses of the blades and the (teetering) hubs of large wind turbines. The blades are of different shapes, construction and materials (aluminium, steel and glass reinforced plastics). Teetering hubs are heavy and complicated steel constructions, necessary to minimize material fatigue. In large wind turbines with a diameter of 60 to 100 m or even more the rotor mass (hubs and blades together) may vary from 46,000 to 216,000 kg. Costs are estimated to be DFL. 16/kg, both for teetering hubs and/or blades made of glass reinforced plastics. Due to lack of experience and of exact knowledge of the loads appearing during operation under field conditions the uncertainty factor may be 10% to 15%.

  1. The National Environmental Respiratory Center (NERC) experiment in multi-pollutant air quality health research: III. Components of diesel and gasoline engine exhausts, hardwood smoke and simulated downwind coal emissions driving non-cancer biological responses in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauderly, Joe L; Seilkop, Steven K

    2014-09-01

    An approach to identify causal components of complex air pollution mixtures was explored. Rats and mice were exposed by inhalation 6 h daily for 1 week or 6 months to dilutions of simulated downwind coal emissions, diesel and gasoline exhausts and wood smoke. Organ weights, hematology, serum chemistry, bronchoalveolar lavage, central vascular and respiratory allergic responses were measured. Multiple additive regression tree (MART) analysis of the combined database ranked 45 exposure (predictor) variables for importance to models best fitting 47 significant responses. Single-predictor concentration-response data were examined for evidence of single response functions across all exposure groups. Replication of the responses by the combined influences of the two most important predictors was tested. Statistical power was limited by inclusion of only four mixtures, albeit in multiple concentrations each and with particles removed for some groups. Results gave suggestive or strong evidence of causation of 19 of the 47 responses. The top two predictors of the 19 responses included only 12 organic and 6 inorganic species or classes. An increase in red blood cell count of rats by ammonia and pro-atherosclerotic vascular responses of mice by inorganic gases yielded the strongest evidence for causation and the best opportunity for confirmation. The former was a novel finding; the latter was consistent with other results. The results demonstrated the plausibility of identifying putative causal components of highly complex mixtures, given a database in which the ratios of the components are varied sufficiently and exposures and response measurements are conducted using a consistent protocol.

  2. The National Environmental Respiratory Center (NERC) experiment in multi-pollutant air quality health research: II. Comparison of responses to diesel and gasoline engine exhausts, hardwood smoke and simulated downwind coal emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauderly, J L; Barrett, E G; Day, K C; Gigliotti, A P; McDonald, J D; Harrod, K S; Lund, A K; Reed, M D; Seagrave, J C; Campen, M J; Seilkop, S K

    2014-09-01

    The NERC Program conducted identically designed exposure-response studies of the respiratory and cardiovascular responses of rodents exposed by inhalation for up to 6 months to diesel and gasoline exhausts (DE, GE), wood smoke (WS) and simulated downwind coal emissions (CE). Concentrations of the four combustion-derived mixtures ranged from near upper bound plausible to common occupational and environmental hotspot levels. An "exposure effect" statistic was created to compare the strengths of exposure-response relationships and adjustments were made to minimize false positives among the large number of comparisons. All four exposures caused statistically significant effects. No exposure caused overt illness, neutrophilic lung inflammation, increased circulating micronuclei or histopathology of major organs visible by light microscopy. DE and GE caused the greatest lung cytotoxicity. WS elicited the most responses in lung lavage fluid. All exposures reduced oxidant production by unstimulated alveolar macrophages, but only GE suppressed stimulated macrophages. Only DE retarded clearance of bacteria from the lung. DE before antigen challenge suppressed responses of allergic mice. CE tended to amplify allergic responses regardless of exposure order. GE and DE induced oxidant stress and pro-atherosclerotic responses in aorta; WS and CE had no such effects. No overall ranking of toxicity was plausible. The ranking of exposures by number of significant responses varied among the response models, with each of the four causing the most responses for at least one model. Each exposure could also be deemed most or least toxic depending on the exposure metric used for comparison. The database is available for additional analyses.

  3. Iterative tuning of feedforward IPC for two-bladed wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, S.P.; van Solingen, E.; van Wingerden, J.W.; Beerens, J; Bossanyi, E.; Chaviaropoulos, T.; Cheng, P.W.

    2016-01-01

    At present, the cost of offshore wind energy does not meet the level of onshore wind and fossil-based energy sources. One way to extend the turbine lifetime, and thus reduce cost, is by reduction of the fatigue loads of blades and other turbine parts using Individual Pitch Control (IPC). This type

  4. Transient power coefficients for a two-blade Savonius wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, K.; Naterer, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada). Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

    2010-07-01

    The wind power industry had a 29 percent growth rate in installed capacity in 2008, and technological advances are helping to speed up growth by significantly increasing wind turbine power yields. While the majority of the industry's growth has come from large horizontal axis wind turbine installations, small wind turbines can also be used in a wide variety of applications. This study predicted the transient power coefficient for a Savonius vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) wind turbine with 2 blades. The turbine's flow field was used to analyze pressure distribution along the rotor blades in relation to the momentum, lift, and drag forces on the rotor surfaces. The integral force balance was used to predict the transient torque and power output of the turbine. The study examined the implications of the addition of a second blade on the model's ability to predict transient power outputs. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) programs were used to verify that the formulation can be used to accurately predict the transient power coefficients of VAWTs with Savonius blades. 11 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  5. A comparison study of the two-bladed partial pitch turbine during normal operation and an extreme gust conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T; Petersen, M M; Larsen, T J

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the load comparisons between the numerical simulation and the full-scale load measurement data. First part of this paper includes the comparisons of statistic load in terms of maximum, mean, and minimum values for the selected normal operation cases. The blade root bending moments and tower top bending moments are compared. Second part of this paper introduces the dynamic response comparisons during an extreme wind gust condition where the wind speed changed approximately 10 m/s during three seconds. The rotor speed and blade root flapwise and edgewise bending moment are compared. The nonlinear aeroelastic simulation code HAWC2 is used for the simulations. A very fine agreement between the simulated and the full-scale measured loads is seen for the both comparisons

  6. Performance Comparisons and Down Selection of Small Motors for Two-Blade Heliogyro Solar Sail 6U CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwattananon, Peerawan; Bryant, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    This report compiles a review of 130 commercial small scale motors (piezoelectric and electric motors) and almost 20 researched-type small scale piezoelectricmotors for potential use in a 2 blades Heliogyro Solar Sail 6U CubeSat. In this application, a motor and gearhead (drive system) will deploy a roll of solar sailthin film (2 um thick)accommodated in a 2U CubeSat (100 x 200 x 100 mm) housing. The application requirements are: space rated, output torque at fulldeployment of 0.8 Nm, reel speed of 3 rpm, drive system weight limited to 150 grams, diameter limited to 50 mm, and the length not to exceed 40 mm. The 50mm diameter limit was imposed as motors with larger diameters would likely weigh too much and use more space on the satellite wall. This would limit theamount of the payload. The motors performance are compared between small scale, volume within 3x102 cm3 (3x105 mm3), commercial electric DC motors,commercial piezoelectric motors, and researched-type (non-commercial) piezoelectric motors extracted from scientific and product literature. The comparisonssuggest that piezoelectric motors without a gearhead exhibit larger output torque with respect to their volume and weight and require less input power toproduce high torque. A commercially available electric motor plus a gearhead was chosen through a proposed selection process to meet the applications designrequirements.

  7. A new geometrical model for mixing of highly viscous fluids by combining two-blade and helical screw agitators

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjeb Abdessalam; Bouzit Mohamed; Kamla Youcef; Ameur Houari

    2017-01-01

    Mixing processes are becoming today a huge concern for industrialists in various domains like the pharmaceutical production, oil refining, food industry and manufacture of cosmetic products especially when the processes are related to the mixing of highly viscous products. So the choice of a stirring system for this category of products or fluids must be rigorously examined before use because of the flows which are laminar in the most cases, something that is not good to obtain homogeneous pa...

  8. Aerosol Properties Downwind of Biomass Burns Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buseck, Peter R [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We determined the morphological, chemical, and thermal properties of aerosol particles generated by biomass burning during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) campaign during the wildland fire season in the Pacific Northwest from July to mid-September, 2013, and in October, 2013 from prescribed agricultural burns in the lower Mississippi River Valley. BBOP was a field campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The morphological information was both two-dimensional, as is typical of most microscopy images and that have many of the characteristic of shadows in that they lack depth data, and three-dimensional (3D). The electron tomographic measurements will provided 3D data, including the presence and nature of pores and interstices, and whether the individual particles are coated by or embedded within other materials. These microphysical properties were determined for particles as a function of time and distance from the respective sources in order to obtain detailed information regarding the time evolution of changes during aging.

  9. Footprint of recycled water subsidies downwind of Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Continental evaporation is a significant and dynamic flux within the atmospheric water budget, but few methods provide robust observational constraints on the large-scale hydroclimatological and hydroecological impacts of this ‘recycled-water’ flux. We demonstrate a geospatial analysis that provides...

  10. Effect of shelter porosity on downwind flow characteristics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nosek, Štěpán; Kellnerová, Radka; Jurčáková, Klára; Jaňour, Zbyněk; Chaloupecká, Hana; Jakubcová, Michala

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, March (2016), 02084-02084 ISSN 2100-014X. [Experimental Fluid Mechanics 2015 /10./. Praha, 17.11.2015-20.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18964S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : atmospehric boundary layer * porosity * coherent structures * wind tunnel Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  11. Evolution of aerosol downwind of a major highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Gordon, M.; Makar, P.; Mihele, C.; Evans, G. J.; Jeong, C.; Wentzell, J. J.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Primary aerosol from traffic emissions can have a considerable impact local and regional scale air quality. In order to assess the effect of these emissions and of future emissions scenarios, air quality models are required which utilize emissions representative of real world conditions. Often, the emissions processing systems which provide emissions input for the air quality models rely on laboratory testing of individual vehicles under non-ambient conditions. However, on the sub-grid scale particle evolution may lead to changes in the primary emitted size distribution and gas-particle partitioning that are not properly considered when the emissions are ‘instantly mixed’ within the grid volume. The affect of this modeling convention on model results is not well understood. In particular, changes in organic gas/particle partitioning may result in particle evaporation or condensation onto pre-existing aerosol. The result is a change in the particle distribution and/or an increase in the organic mass available for subsequent gas-phase oxidation. These effects may be missing from air-quality models, and a careful analysis of field data is necessary to quantify their impact. A study of the sub-grid evolution of aerosols (FEVER; Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways) was conducted in the Toronto area in the summer of 2010. The study included mobile measurements of particle size distributions with a Fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS), aerosol composition with an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), black carbon (SP2, PA, LII), VOCs (PTR-MS) and other trace gases. The mobile laboratory was used to measure the concentration gradient of the emissions at perpendicular distances from the highway as well as the physical and chemical evolution of the aerosol. Stationary sites at perpendicular distances and upwind from the highway also monitored the particle size distribution. In addition, sonic anemometers mounted on the mobile lab provided measurements of turbulent dispersion as a function of distance from the highway, and a traffic camera was used to determine traffic density, composition and speed. These measurements differ from previous studies in that turbulence is measured under realistic conditions and hence the relationship of the aerosol evolution to atmospheric stability and mixing will also be quantified. Preliminary results suggest that aerosol size and composition does change on the sub-grid scale, and sub-grid scale parameterizations of turbulence and particle chemistry should be included in models to accurately represent these effects.

  12. Aerodynamic flow simulation of wind turbine: Downwind versus upwind configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janajreh, Isam; Qudaih, Rana; Talab, Ilham; Ghenai, Chaouki

    2010-01-01

    Large scale wind turbines and wind farms continue to grow mounting 94.1 GW of the electrical grid capacity in 2007 and expected to reach 160.0 GW in 2010. Wind energy plays a vital role in the quest for renewable and sustainable energy as well as in reducing carbon emission. Early generation wind turbines (windmills) were used mainly for water pumping and seed grinding, whereas today they generate 1/5 of the current Denmark's electricity and will double its grid capacity reaching 12.5% in 2010. Wind energy is plentiful (72 TW estimated to be commercially viable) and clean while its intensive capital cost still impede widespread deployment. However, there are technological challenges, i.e. high fatigue load, noise emission, and meeting stringent reliability and safety standards. Newer inventions, e.g., downstream wind turbines and flapping rotor blades, are sought to enhance their performance, i.e. lower turning moments and cut-in speed and to absorb portion of the cost due to the absent of yaw mechanisms. In this work, numerical analysis of the downstream wind turbine blade is conducted. In particular, the interaction between the tower and the rotor passage is investigated. Circular cross sectional tower and aerofoil shapes are considered in a staggered configuration and under cross-stream motion. The resulting blade static pressure and aerodynamic forces are computed at different incident wind angles and wind speeds. The computed forces are compared to the conventional upstream wind turbine. Steady state and transient, incompressible, viscous Navier-Stokes and turbulent flow analysis are employed. The k-epsilon model is utilized as the turbulence closure. The passage of the rotor blade is governed by ALE and is represented numerically as a sliding mesh against the upstream fixed tower domain.

  13. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  14. Downwind changes in grain size of aeolian dust; examples from marine and terrestrial archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Prins, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust in the atmosphere may have a cooling effect when small particles in the high atmosphere block incoming solar energy (e.g., Claquin et al., 2003) but it may also act as a 'greenhouse gas' when larger particles in the lower atmosphere trap energy that was reflected from the Earth's surface (e.g., Otto et al., 2007). Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a good understanding of the particle-size distribution of aeolian dust in space and time. As wind is a very size-selective transport mechanism, the sediments it carries typically have a very-well sorted grain-size distribution, which gradually fines from proximal to distal deposition sites. This fact has been used in numerous paleo-environmental studies to both determine source-to-sink changes in the particle size of aeolian dust (e.g., Weltje and Prins, 2003; Holz et al., 2004; Prins and Vriend, 2007) and to quantify mass-accumulation rates of aeolian dust (e.g., Prins and Weltje 1999; Stuut et al., 2002; Prins et al., 2007; Prins and Vriend, 2007; Stuut et al., 2007; Tjallingii et al., 2008; Prins et al., 2009). Studies on modern wind-blown particles have demonstrated that particle size of dust not only is a function of lateral but also vertical transport distance (e.g., Torres-Padron et al., 2002; Stuut et al., 2005). Nonetheless, there are still many unresolved questions related to the physical properties of wind-blown particles like e.g., the case of "giant" quartz particles found on Hawaii (Betzer et al., 1988) that can only originate from Asia but have a too large size for the distance they travelled through the atmosphere. Here, we present examples of dust particle-size distributions from terrestrial (loess) as well as marine (deep-sea sediments) sedimentary archives and their spatial and temporal changes. With this contribution we hope to provide quantitative data for the modelling community in order to get a better grip on the role of wind-blown particles in the climate system. Cited references Betzer, P.R., Carder, K.L., Duce, R.A., Merrill, J.T., Tindale, N.W., Uematsu, M., Costello, D.K., Young, R.W., Feely, R.A., Breland, J.A., Bernstein, R.E., Greco, A.M., 1988. Long-range transport of giant mineral aerosol particles. Nature 336, 568. Claquin, T., Roelandt, C., Kohfeld, K.E., Harrison, S.P., Tegen, I., C., P.I., Balkanski, Y., Bergametti, G., Hansson, M., Mahowald, N.M., Rodhe, H., Schulz, M., 2003. Radiative forcing of climate by ice-age atmospheric dust. Climate Dynamics 20, 193-202. Holz, C., Stuut, J.-B.W., Henrich, R., 2004. Terrigenous sedimentation processes along the continental margin off NW-Africa: implications from grain-size analyses of surface sediments. Sedimentology 51, 1145-1154. Otto, S., de Reus, M., Trautmann, T., Thomas, A., Wendisch, M., Borrmann, S., 2007. Atmospheric radiative effects of an in situ measured Saharan dust plume and the role of large particles. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 4887-4903. Prins, M.A., Weltje, G.J., 1999. End-member modeling of siliciclastic grain-size distributions: the Late Quaternary record of eolian and fluvial sediment supply to the Arabian Sea and its paleoclimatic significance., in: Harbaugh, J., Watney, L., Rankey, G., Slingerland, R., Goldstein, R., Franseen, E. (Eds.), Numerical experiments in stratigraphy: Recent advances in stratigraphic and sedimentologic computer simulations. SEPM Special Publication 62. Society for Sedimentary Geology, pp. 91-111. Prins, M.A., Vriend, M., 2007, Glacial and interglacial eolian dust dispersal patterns across the Chinese Loess Plateau inferred from decomposed loess grain-size records. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (G-cubed), 8, Q07Q05, doi:10.1029/2006GC001563. Prins, M.A., Vriend, M., Nugteren, G., Vandenberghe, J., Lu, H., Zheng, H., Jan Weltje, G., 2007. Late Quaternary aeolian dust input variability on the Chinese Loess Plateau: inferences from unmixing of loess grain-size records. Quaternary Science Reviews 26, 230-242. Prins, M.A., Zheng, H., Beets, K., Troelstra, S., Bacon, P., Kamerling, I., Wester, W., Konert, M., Huang, X., Ke, W., Vandenberghe, J., 2009. Dust supply from river floodplains: The case of the lower Huang He (Yellow River) recorded in a loess-palaeosol sequence from the Mangshan Plateau. Journal of Quaternary Science 24, 75-84. Stuut, J.-B.W., Prins, M.A., Schneider, R.R., Weltje, G.J., Jansen, J.H.F., Postma, G., 2002. A 300-kyr record of aridity and wind strength in southwestern Africa: inferences from grain-size distributions of sediments on Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic. Marine Geology 180, 221-233. Stuut, J.-B.W., Zabel, M., Ratmeyer, V., Helmke, P., Schefuß, E., Lavik, G., Schneider, R.R., 2005. Provenance of present-day eolian dust collected off NW Africa. Journal of Geophysical Research 110. Stuut, J.-B.W., Kasten, S., Lamy, F., Hebbeln, D., 2007. Sources and modes of terrigenous sediment input to the Chilean continental slope. Quaternary International 161, 67-76. Tjallingii, R., Claussen, M., Stuut, J.-B.W., Fohlmeister, J., Jahn, A., Bickert, T., Lamy, F., Rohl, U., 2008. Coherent high- and low-latitude control of the northwest African hydrological balance. Nature Geoscience 1, 670-675. Torres-Padrón, M.E., Gelado-Caballero, M.D., Collado-Sánchez, C., Siruela-Matos, V.F., Cardona-Castellano, P.J., Hernández-Brito, J.J., 2002. Variability of dust inputs to the CANIGO zone. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography 49, 3455-3464. Weltje, G.J., Prins, M.A., 2003. Muddled or mixed? Inferring palaeoclimate from size distributions of deep-sea clastics. Sedimentary Geology 162, 39-62.

  15. Numerical modeling of a downwind-developing mesoscale convective system over the Masurian Lake District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wójcik Damian K.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Meteorological data concerning the severe convective system from the 21 August 2007 are analyzed in this study. Compiled information allows to understand the reason for the storm development and to identify its fundamental convective mode. Next, the EULAG model is utilized to perform an idealized test that shows a downwind–developing storm growth in an environment comparable to the one that was observed on the 21 August 2007 in the Masurian Lake District. Finally, the COSMO numerical weather prediction model is applied to reconstruct the storm development. The experiment is carried out for various computational grids having the horizontal grid length between 7.0 and 0.55 km. It turns out that the COSMO model is capable in simulating storms of that type. Since the model is used for operational weather forecasting in Poland the evaluation of this skill contributes to the increase of public safety.

  16. Estimation of Downwind Concentration of Airborne Effluents Discharged in the Neighbourhood of Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, P. J.

    Air flow in the neighborhood of buildings is briefly described and compared with that assumed for the usual atmospheric diffusion equations. The literature is reviewed and empirical formulae which have been proposed are listed and compared. (RH)

  17. Measurements of atmospheric turbidity in an arc downwind of St. Louis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesely, M.L.

    1975-01-01

    A preliminary analysis of the data obtained with use of the dichopyranometer indicates that large decreases in the direct-beam irradiance occurred during August 9 - 11 at several of the monitoring sites, four of which were located on an arc about 110 km from the Gateway Arch, Jefferson Expansion National Memorial, a well-known landmark in St. Louis. The four sites have azimuthal bearings east of north from the Arch of --16 deg (EPA, Glasgow), 9 deg (Waverly), 24 deg (Sangamon Co.), and 31 deg (Sloman farm). There are figures that show the variation of four-hour averages of tau at these sites. Also shown are the turbidity measurements at the St. Louis site, which was actually in Illinois at RAMS site 103, located about 7 km northeast of the Gateway Arch in a suburban area. The urban plume from St. Louis was expected to be about 20 deg wide and perhaps 10 to 20 deg greater in azimuth than the surface wind direction would indicate. Thus, on August 8, the effects of the plume should have been detected at the site on the azimuthal bearing of 24 deg, but this was not evident from the data. On August 9, the plume should have been east of, or at a greater azimuthal bearing than, the easternmost site (at 31 deg), and this may be supported by the existence of the slightly greater values of turbidity at that easternmost site. However, on August 10 and 11, similar southwesterly wind directions were not always associated with a maximum in turbidity at the easternmost site. Hence, it appears that the St. Louis plume did not consistently have a dominant role in causing atmospheric turbidity

  18. Cancer incidence in an area of radioactive fallout downwind from the Nevada Test Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C J

    1984-01-13

    Exposures in southwestern Utah to radioactive fallout (1951 through 1962) from atmospheric nuclear detonations at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were followed by smaller exposures (1962 through 1979) from venting of underground nuclear detonations. The cancer incidence in a 1951 cohort (4, 125) of Mormon families in southwestern Utah near the NTS was compared with that of all Utah Mormons (1967 through 1975). There were 109 more cases of cancer than expected (288[observed]/179[expected]). Leukemia was most prominent early (1958 through 1966), with 19 cases, five times more than expected (3.6). The excess of leukemia persisted into the later period (1972 through 1980), with 12 cases observed, 3.4 expected. There was an increase in lymphoma. Excess cases of thyroid cancer appeared early and a notable excess appeared later (14/1.7). An excess of breast cancer was noted later (27/14). There were more cancers of the gastrointestinal tract than expected. There was an excess of melanoma (12/4.5), bone cancer (8/0.7), and brain tumors (9/3.9). A subgroup with history of acute fallout effects had a higher cancer incidence. That these cases can be associated with radiation exposures is supported by a comparison between groups of the ratio of cancers of more radiosensitive organs with all other types of cancer.

  19. Observations of Downwind Development of Wind Speed and Variance Profiles at Bognaes and Comparison with Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Højstrup, Jørgen; Peterson, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric flow over a change in surface roughness are reported. Both wind speed and turbulence characteristics were measured. Although the observation site departed from the ideal assumed in roughness change models, it was found that the predictions of `second-order closure' mod...

  20. Medium-Range Dispersion Experiments Downwind from a Shoreline in Near Neutral Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Lyck, E.

    1980-01-01

    Five atmospheric dispersion experiments, all assigned Pasquill stability class D, were performed at Risø National Laboratory. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released at a height of 60 m from the Risø meteorological tower, situated on a peninsula in the Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, and was sampled...

  1. Proceedings of the upwind downwind 2008 conference : climate change and healthy cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This conference provided a forum to examine the effects of poor air quality on public health. It was attended by urban planners, public health officials, policy makers, environmental managers, non-government organizations, academics, industry, community groups and politicians. The first session of the conference focused on research in cardiovascular and respiratory health impacts, linkages and actions to improve air quality and address climate change. The session on urban and transportation planning focused on how the implementation of transportation systems and land use patterns through urban design can impact health and air quality. It examined green buildings, standards and their linkages to improving local air quality. The session on climate change and local partnerships focused on local actions that cities, organizations and individuals can take to improve air quality and address climate change. One of the 16 presentations featured at this conference has been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  2. First Responder Immersive Training Simulation Environment (FRITSE): Downwind Hazard Modeling of Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    MODULE datatype !>>TYPE TYPE OUTPUT_TYPE INTEGER :: MX INTEGER :: IL, JL, KL INTEGER :: IG, JG, KG END TYPE...PARAMETER :: C_cutoff = 1.E-20 END MODULE datatype 21 in which (IL,JL,KL) and (IG,JG,KG) represent (I,J,K) indices in the local and

  3. Mercury accumulation in transplanted Hypogymnia physodes lichens downwind of Wisconsin chlor-alkali plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makholm, M.M.; Bennett, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Emissions of mercury from a chlor-alkali plant in central Wisconsin have raised concern about possible effects on biota in the area. Samples of the lichen Hypogymnia physodes, which no longer grows in the area, were transplanted from a site in northeastern Wisconsin and positioned on plastic stands at varying distances up to 1250 m from the plant and sampled for Hg quarterly for one year to test the hypothesis that Hg would be taken up by the lichens and would decline with distance. Average tissue concentrations were elevated when first sampled at three months and continued to increase at the nearest sites until the study ended after one year. Average concentrations after a year of exposure ranged from 4418 ppb at 250 m from the plant to 403 ppb at 1250 m from the plant. The decrease over distance followed a negative exponential pattern. Background concentrations at a control site in northern Wisconsin averaged 155 ppb.

  4. Development of Data Acquisition System for Wind Energy Applications

    OpenAIRE

    西本,澄

    1992-01-01

    A Data acquisiton system developed for wind energy applications will be described in this paper. This system is composed of an anemometer with two blades downwind and a computer which processes wind data. Wind energy calculated from an average wind speed is inaccurate, since wind power increases with the cube of wind velocity. To decide the design and the site for a wind turbine system, it is very important to consider wind data on a long term basis, that is the total wind energy and distribu...

  5. Two Blades-Up Runs Using the JetStream Navitus Atherectomy Device Achieve Optimal Tissue Debulking of Nonocclusive In-Stent Restenosis: Observations From a Porcine Stent/Balloon Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammas, Nicolas W; Aasen, Nicole; Bailey, Lynn; Budrewicz, Jay; Farago, Trent; Jarvis, Gary

    2015-08-01

    To determine the number of runs with blades up (BU) using the JetStream Navitus to achieving optimal debulking in a porcine model of femoropopliteal artery in-stent restenosis (ISR). In this porcine model, 8 limbs were implanted with overlapping nitinol self-expanding stents. ISR was treated initially with 2 blades-down (BD) runs followed by 4 BU runs (BU1 to BU4). Quantitative vascular angiography (QVA) was performed at baseline, after 2 BD runs, and after each BU run. Plaque surface area and percent stenosis within the treated stented segment were measured. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was used to measure minimum lumen area (MLA) and determine IVUS-derived plaque surface area. QVA showed that plaque surface area was significantly reduced between baseline (83.9%±14.8%) and 2 BD (67.7%±17.0%, p=0.005) and BU1 (55.4%±9.0%, p=0.005) runs, and between BU1 and BU2 runs (50.7%±9.7%, patherectomy. JetStream Navitus achieved optimal tissue debulking after 2 BD and 2 BU runs with no further statistical gain in debulking after the BU2 run. Operators treating ISR with JetStream Navitus may be advised to limit their debulking to 2 BD and 2 BU runs to achieve optimal debulking. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Investigation of the NACA 4-(3)(8)-045 Two-blade Propellers at Forward Mach Numbers to 0.725 to Determine the Effects of Compressibility and Solidity on Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, John; Draley, Eugene C; Delano, James B; Feldman, Lewis

    1950-01-01

    As part of a general investigation of propellers at high forward speeds, tests of two 2-blade propellers having the NACA 4-(3)(8)-03 and NACA 4-(3)(8)-45 blade designs have been made in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel through a range of blade angle from 20 degrees to 60 degrees for forward Mach numbers from 0.165 to 0.725 to establish in detail the changes in propeller characteristics due to compressibility effects. These propellers differed primarily only in blade solidity, one propeller having 50 percent and more solidity than the other. Serious losses in propeller efficiency were found as the propeller tip Mach number exceeded 0.91, irrespective of forward speed or blade angle. The magnitude of the efficiency losses varied from 9 percent to 22 percent per 0.1 increase in tip Mach number above the critical value. The range of advance ratio for peak efficiency decreased markedly with increase of forward speed. The general form of the changes in thrust and power coefficients was found to be similar to the changes in airfoil lift coefficient with changes in Mach number. Efficiency losses due to compressibility effects decreased with increase of blade width. The results indicated that the high level of propeller efficiency obtained at low speeds could be maintained to forward sea-level speeds exceeding 500 miles per hour.

  7. New particle formation in the presence of a strong biomass burning episode at a downwind rural site in PRD, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. B. Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterise the features of particle pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region, a 1-month intensive campaign was conducted at the rural supersite (Kaiping in the autumn of 2008. In total, 12 new particle formation (NPF events are identified out of 30 campaign days. The results show that in the case of higher source and sink values, the result of the competition between source and sink is more likely the key limiting factor to determine the observation of NPF events at Kaiping. One episode with consecutive NPF events in the presence of strong biomass burning plume was observed between 10 and 15 November. The elevation of particle volume concentration (6.1 µm3/cm3/day is due to the coaction by the local biomass burning and secondary transformation. Organics and sulphates are the major components in PM1, accounting for 42 and 35% of the mass concentration, respectively. In this study, a rough estimation is applied to quantify the contributions of diverse sources to the particle number concentration. On average, the primary emission and secondary formation provide 28 and 72% of particle number concentration and 21 and 79% of mass concentration, respectively.

  8. A simulated approach to estimating PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations downwind from cotton gins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton gins are required to obtain operating permits from state air pollution regulatory agencies (SAPRA), which regulate the amount of particulate matter that can be emitted. Industrial Source Complex Short Term version 3 (ISCST3) is the Gaussian dispersion model currently used by some SAPRAs to pr...

  9. New particle formation in the presence of a strong biomass burning episode at a downwind rural site in PRD, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hu, M.; Yue, D. L.; Yang, Q.; Zhang, Y. H. [State Key Joint Lab. of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Coll. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking Univ., Beijing (China)], e-mail: minhu@pku.edu.cn; He, L. Y.; Huang, X. F. [Key Lab. for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking Univ. Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen (China); Zheng, J. [Dept. of Atmospheric Science, Texas AandM Univ., College Station, Texas (United States); Zhang, R. Y. [State Key Joint Lab. of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Coll. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Department of Atmospheric Science, Texas AandM Univ., College Station, Texas (United States))

    2013-09-15

    In order to characterise the features of particle pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, a 1-month intensive campaign was conducted at the rural supersite (Kaiping) in the autumn of 2008. In total, 12 new particle formation (NPF) events are identified out of 30 campaign days. The results show that in the case of higher source and sink values, the result of the competition between source and sink is more likely the key limiting factor to determine the observation of NPF events at Kaiping. One episode with consecutive NPF events in the presence of strong biomass burning plume was observed between 10 and 15 November. The elevation of particle volume concentration (6.1 mm{sup 3}/cm{sup 3}/day) is due to the coaction by the local biomass burning and secondary transformation. Organics and sulphates are the major components in PM{sub 1}, accounting for 42% and 35% of the mass concentration, respectively. In this study, a rough estimation is applied to quantify the contributions of diverse sources to the particle number concentration. On average, the primary emission and secondary formation provide 28 and 72% of particle number concentration and 21% and 79% of mass concentration, respectively.

  10. Relation between Ocean SST Dipoles and Downwind Continental Croplands Assessed for Early Management Using Satellite-based Photosynthesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Daijiro

    2015-04-01

    Crop-monitoring systems with the unit of carbon-dioxide sequestration for environmental issues related to climate adaptation to global warming have been improved using satellite-based photosynthesis and meteorological conditions. Early management of crop status is desirable for grain production, stockbreeding, and bio-energy providing that the seasonal climate forecasting is sufficiently accurate. Incorrect seasonal forecasting of crop production can damage global social activities if the recognized conditions are unsatisfied. One cause of poor forecasting related to the atmospheric dynamics at the Earth surface, which reflect the energy budget through land surface, especially the oceans and atmosphere. Recognition of the relation between SST anomalies (e.g. ENSO, Atlantic Niño, Indian dipoles, and Ningaloo Niño) and crop production, as expressed precisely by photosynthesis or the sequestrated-carbon rate, is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms related to poor production. Solar radiation, surface air temperature, and water stress all directly affect grain vegetation photosynthesis. All affect stomata opening, which is related to the water balance or definition by the ratio of the Penman potential evaporation and actual transpiration. Regarding stomata, present data and reanalysis data give overestimated values of stomata opening because they are extended from wet models in forests rather than semi-arid regions commonly associated with wheat, maize, and soybean. This study applies a complementary model based on energy conservation for semi-arid zones instead of the conventional Penman-Monteith method. Partitioning of the integrated Net PSN enables precise estimation of crop yields by modifying the semi-closed stomata opening. Partitioning predicts production more accurately using the cropland distribution already classified using satellite data. Seasonal crop forecasting should include near-real-time monitoring using satellite-based process crop models to avoid social difficulties that can derive from uncertain seasonal predictions produced from long-term forecasting. Acknowledgement The author appreciates scientific discussions held with the application team of seasonal prediction at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. Key words: crop production, monitoring, forecasting, SST anomaly, remote sensing

  11. Determination of gas recovery efficiency at two Danish landfills by performing downwind methane measurements and stable carbon isotopic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fathi Aghdam, Ehsan; Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Chanton, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    In this study, the total methane (CH4) generation rate and gas recovery efficiency at two Danish landfills were determined by field measurements. The landfills are located close to each other and are connected to the same gas collection system. The tracer gas dispersion method was used...... for quantification of CH4 emissions from the landfills, while the CH4 oxidation efficiency in the landfill cover layers was determined by stable carbon isotopic technique. The total CH4 generation rate was estimated by a first-order decay model (Afvalzorg) and was compared with the total CH4 generation rate...... determined by field measurements. CH4 emissions from the two landfills combined ranged from 29.1 to 49.6 kg CH4/h. The CH4 oxidation efficiency was 6–37%, with an average of 18% corresponding to an average CH4 oxidation rate of 8.1 kg CH4/h. The calculated gas recovery efficiency was 59–76%, indicating...

  12. Concentration and movement of neonicotinoids as particulate matter downwind during agricultural practices using air samplers in southwestern Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero, Luis Gabriel; Limay-Rios, Victor; Xue, Yingen; Schaafsma, Arthur

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions of neonicotinoid seed treatment insecticides as particulate matter in field crops occur mainly for two reasons: 1) due to abraded dust of treated seed generated during planting using vacuum planters, and 2) as a result of disturbances (tillage or wind events) in the surface of parental soils which release wind erodible soil-bound residues. In the present study, concentration and movement of neonicotinoids as particulate matter were quantified under real conditions using passive and active air samplers. Average neonicotinoid concentrations in Total Suspended Particulate (TSP) using passive samplers were 0.48 ng/cm 2 , trace, trace (LOD 0.80 and 0.04 ng/cm 2 for clothianidin and thiamethoxam, respectively), and using active samplers 16.22, 1.91 and 0.61 ng/m 3 during planting, tillage and wind events, respectively. There was a difference between events on total neonicotinoid concentration collected in particulate matter using either passive or active sampling. Distance of sampling from the source field during planting of treated seed had an effect on total neonicotinoid air concentration. However, during tillage distance did not present an effect on measured concentrations. Using hypothetical scenarios, values of contact exposure for a honey bee were estimated to be in the range from 1.1% to 36.4% of the reference contact LD 50 value of clothianidin of 44 ng/bee. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative assessment of metal elements using moss species as biomonitors in downwind area of lead-zinc mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balabanova, Biljana; Stafilov, Trajče; Šajn, Robert; Andonovska, Katerina Bačeva

    2017-02-23

    Distributions of a total of 21 elements were monitored in significantly lead-zinc polluted area using moss species (Hypnum cupressiforme and Camptothecium lutescens) used interchangeably, covering a denser sampling network. Interspecies comparison was conducted using Box-Cox transformed values, due to their skewed distribution. The median concentrations of trace elements in the both mosses examined decreased in the following order: Fe>Mn>Zn>Pb>Cu>Ni∼Cr∼As>Co>Cd>Hg. For almost all analyzed elements, H. cupressiforme revealed higher bio-accumulative abilities. For arsenic contents was obtained ER-value in favor of C. lutescens. The ER for the element contents according to the distance from the pollution source in selected areas was significantly enriched for the anthropogenic introduced elements As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. After Box-Cox transformation of the content values, T B was significantly different for As (4.82), Cd (3.84), Cu (2.95), Pb (4.38), and Zn (4.23). Multivariate factor analysis singled out four elemental associations: F1 (Al-Co-Cr-Fe-Li-Ni-V), F2 (Cd-Pb-Zn), F3 (Ca-Mg-Na-P) and F4 (Cu) with a total variance of 89%. Spatial distribution visualized the hazardously higher contents of "hot spots" of Cd > 1.30 mg/kg, Cu > 22 mg/kg, Pb > 130 mg/kg and Zn > 160 mg/kg. Therefore, main approach in moss biomonitoring should be based on data management of the element distribution by reducing the effect of extreme values (considering Box-Cox data transformation); the interspecies variation in sampling media does not deviate in relation to H. cupressiforme vs. C. lutescens.

  14. Relationships of outdoor and indoor ultrafine particles at residences downwind of a major international border crossing in Buffalo, NY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, T R; Fisher, R; Zhou, X; Jaques, P A; Ferro, A R

    2010-08-01

    During winter 2006, indoor and outdoor ultrafine particle (UFP) size distribution measurements for particles with diameters from 5.6 to 165 nm were taken at five homes in a neighborhood directly adjacent to the Peace Bridge Complex (PBC), a major international border crossing connecting Buffalo, New York to Fort Erie, Ontario. Monitoring with 1-s time resolution was conducted for several hours at each home. Participants were instructed to keep all external windows and doors closed and to refrain from cooking, smoking, or other activity that may result in elevating the indoor UFP number concentration. Although the construction and age for the homes were similar, indoor-to-outdoor comparisons indicate that particle infiltration rates varied substantially. Overall, particle concentrations indoors were lower and less variable than particle concentrations outdoors, with average indoor-outdoor ratios ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 (mean 0.34) for particles between 5.6 and 165 nm in diameter. With no indoor sources, the average indoor-outdoor ratios were lowest (0.2) for 20-nm particles, higher (0.3) for particles <10 nm, and highest (0.5) for particles 70-165 nm. This study provides insight into the penetration of UFP into homes and the resulting change in particle size distributions as particles move indoors near a major diesel traffic source. Although people spend most of their time in their homes, exposure estimates for epidemiological studies are generally determined using ambient concentrations. The findings of this study will contribute to improved size-resolved UFP exposure estimates for near roadway exposure assessments and epidemiological studies.

  15. Maximizing Energy Capture of Fixed-Pitch Variable-Speed Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, K.; Migliore, P.

    2000-08-01

    Field tests of a variable-speed, stall-regulated wind turbine were conducted at a US Department of Energy Laboratory. A variable-speed generating system, comprising a doubly-fed generator and series-resonant power converter, was installed on a 275-kW, downwind, two-blade wind turbine. Gearbox, generator, and converter efficiency were measured in the laboratory so that rotor aerodynamic efficiency could be determined from field measurement of generator power. The turbine was operated at several discrete rotational speeds to develop power curves for use in formulating variable-speed control strategies. Test results for fixed-speed and variable-speed operation are presented along with discussion and comparison of the variable-speed control methodologies. Where possible, comparisons between fixed-speed and variable-speed operation are shown.

  16. Detection of low-frequency organized structures in night-time air flow within a spruce canopy on the upwind and downwind sides of a mountain ridge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potužníková, Kateřina; Sedlák, Pavel; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 4 (2015), s. 432-437 ISSN 1530-261X R&D Projects : GA ČR(CZ) GP205/05/P564; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-24688S; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300420803 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : nocturnal boundary layer * turbulence * organized structures * complex terrain * forest canopy * wavelet transform Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Science s, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.570, year: 2015 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/asl.578/epdf

  17. Quantifying methane emission from fugitive sources by combining tracer release and downwind measurements – A sensitivity analysis based on multiple field surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Using a dual species methane/acetylene instrument based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), the dynamic plume tracer dispersion method for quantifying the emission rate of methane was successfully tested in four measurement campaigns: (1) controlled methane and trace gas release with differe...

  18. The EtnaPlumeLab (EPL research cluster: advance the understanding of Mt. Etna plume, from source characterisation to downwind impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Sellitto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a multidisciplinary research cluster named EtnaPlumeLab (EPL was established, gathering experts from volcanology and atmospheric science communities. Target of EPL is to advance the understanding of Mt. Etna's gas and aerosol emissions and the related processes, from source to its regional climatic impact in the Mediterranean area. Here, we present the cluster and its three interacting modules: EPL-RADIO (Radioactive Aerosols and other source parameters for better atmospheric Dispersion and Impact estimatiOns, SMED (Sulfur MEditerranean Dispersion and Med-SuV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes Work Package 5. Preliminary results have for the first time highlighted the relevance of Mt. Etna's plume impact at the Mediterranean regional scale. These results underline that further efforts need to be made to get insight into a synoptic volcanogenic-atmospheric chemistry/climatic understanding of volcanic plumes impact.

  19. Quantifying methane emission from fugitive sources by combining tracer release and downwind measurements - a sensitivity analysis based on multiple field surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, Jacob G; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter; Rella, Chris W; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2014-08-01

    Using a dual species methane/acetylene instrument based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), the dynamic plume tracer dispersion method for quantifying the emission rate of methane was successfully tested in four measurement campaigns: (1) controlled methane and trace gas release with different trace gas configurations, (2) landfill with unknown emission source locations, (3) landfill with closely located emission sources, and (4) comparing with an Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) instrument using multiple trace gasses for source separation. The new real-time, high precision instrument can measure methane plumes more than 1.2 km away from small sources (about 5 kg h(-1)) in urban areas with a measurement frequency allowing plume crossing at normal driving speed. The method can be used for quantification of total methane emissions from diffuse area sources down to 1 kg per hour and can be used to quantify individual sources with the right choice of wind direction and road distance. The placement of the trace gas is important for obtaining correct quantification and uncertainty of up to 36% can be incurred when the trace gas is not co-located with the methane source. Measurements made at greater distances are less sensitive to errors in trace gas placement and model calculations showed an uncertainty of less than 5% in both urban and open-country for placing the trace gas 100 m from the source, when measurements were done more than 3 km away. Using the ratio of the integrated plume concentrations of tracer gas and methane gives the most reliable results for measurements at various distances to the source, compared to the ratio of the highest concentration in the plume, the direct concentration ratio and using a Gaussian plume model. Under suitable weather and road conditions, the CRDS system can quantify the emission from different sources located close to each other using only one kind of trace gas due to the high time resolution, while the FTIR system can measure multiple trace gasses but with a lower time resolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Inflow characteristics associated with high-blade-loading events in a wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, N. D.

    1993-07-01

    The stochastic characteristics of the turbulent inflow have been shown to be of major significance in the accumulation of fatigue in wind turbines. Because most of the wind turbine installations in the U.S. have taken place in multi-turbine or windfarm configurations, the fatigue damage associated with the higher turbulence levels within such arrangements must be taken into account when making estimates of component service lifetimes. The simultaneous monitoring of two adjacent wind turbines over a wide range of turbulent inflow conditions has given the authors more confidence in describing the structural load distributions that can be expected in such an environment. The adjacent testing of the two turbines allowed the authors to postulate that observed similarities in the response dynamics and load distributions could be considered quasi-universal, while the dissimilarities could be considered to result from the differing design of the rotors. The format has also allowed them to begin to define appropriate statistical load distribution models for many of the critical components in which fatigue is a major driver of the design. In addition to the adjacent turbine measurements, they also briefly discuss load distributions measured on a teetered-hub turbine.

  1. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, Peter [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States); Afjeh, Abdollah [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Jamali, Mohsin [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Bingman, Verner [Bowling Green State Univ., OH (United States)

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  2. Public health impacts of the severe haze in Equatorial Asia in September-October 2015: demonstration of a new framework for informing fire management strategies to reduce downwind smoke exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplitz, Shannon N.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Marlier, Miriam E.; Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Kim, Patrick S.; Liu, Tianjia; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Schwartz, Joel; Pongsiri, Montira; Myers, Samuel S.

    2016-09-01

    In September-October 2015, El Niño and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions set the stage for massive fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), leading to persistently hazardous levels of smoke pollution across much of Equatorial Asia. Here we quantify the emission sources and health impacts of this haze episode and compare the sources and impacts to an event of similar magnitude occurring under similar meteorological conditions in September-October 2006. Using the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, we first calculate the influence of potential fire emissions across the domain on smoke concentrations in three receptor areas downwind—Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore—during the 2006 event. This step maps the sensitivity of each receptor to fire emissions in each grid cell upwind. We then combine these sensitivities with 2006 and 2015 fire emission inventories from the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) to estimate the resulting population-weighted smoke exposure. This method, which assumes similar smoke transport pathways in 2006 and 2015, allows near real-time assessment of smoke pollution exposure, and therefore the consequent morbidity and premature mortality, due to severe haze. Our approach also provides rapid assessment of the relative contribution of fire emissions generated in a specific province to smoke-related health impacts in the receptor areas. We estimate that haze in 2015 resulted in 100 300 excess deaths across Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, more than double those of the 2006 event, with much of the increase due to fires in Indonesia’s South Sumatra Province. The model framework we introduce in this study can rapidly identify those areas where land use management to reduce and/or avoid fires would yield the greatest benefit to human health, both nationally and regionally.

  3. Multidisciplinary design optimization of large wind turbines—Technical, economic, and design challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashuri, Turaj; Zaaijer, Michiel B.; Martins, Joaquim R.R.A.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • 5, 10 and 20 MW wind turbines are developed using multidisciplinary design optimization. • Technical feasibility and economy of large wind turbines are investigated. • Critical upscaling trends of existing wind turbines are presented up to 20 MW. • Design challenges of large wind turbines are identified, and design solutions proposed. • With no design innovation, upscaling of existing turbines will increase the costs. - Abstract: Wind energy has experienced a continuous cost reduction in the last decades. A popular cost reduction technique is to increase the rated power of the wind turbine by making it larger. However, it is not clear whether further upscaling of the existing wind turbines beyond the 5–7 MW range is technically feasible and economically attractive. To address this question, this study uses 5, 10, and 20 MW wind turbines that are developed using multidisciplinary design optimization as upscaling data points. These wind turbines are upwind, 3-bladed, pitch-regulated, variable-speed machines with a tubular tower. Based on the design data and properties of these wind turbines, scaling trends such as loading, mass, and cost are developed. These trends are used to study the technical and economical aspects of upscaling and its impact on the design and cost. The results of this research show the technical feasibility of the existing wind turbines up to 20 MW, but the design of such an upscaled machine is cost prohibitive. Mass increase of the rotor is identified as a main design challenge to overcome. The results of this research support the development of alternative lightweight materials and design concepts such as a two-bladed downwind design for upscaling to remain a cost effective solution for future wind turbines.

  4. Study of the stall delay phenomenon and of wind turbine blade dynamics using numerical approaches and NREL's wind tunnel tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, Simon-Philippe

    2008-06-15

    The production of electricity from wind has experienced an enormous growth worldwide in the last 20 years. It is now widely seen as a serious alternative to more conventional energy production methods. Improvements are however still possible to make it more cost-effective. This can be done through a better understanding of the fundamental phenomena involved in the interaction of the wind with the wind turbine rotor. This growth in the production of energy from wind is expected to continue at a similar rate in the years to come, helped by the installation of wind turbines at sea, that is becoming a hot topic in the wind energy field today. The phenomenon of stall delay affecting rotating wind turbine blades is an example of an aerodynamic phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Several models exist to correct for this effect. Five such models were first tested within a vortex wake simulation code based on the modelling of a prescribed wake behind the rotor of the turbine. Comparison was made with wind tunnel test data acquired in head-on flow on a two-bladed 10.1 diameter wind turbine at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) in 2000. It revealed a general overprediction of the stall delay effects, at the same time as great disparity was obtained between the different models. Conclusions from this work served as a starting point for a much more thorough investigation on this subject, where several models were tested in terms of different quantities using the same simulation code, and where the application of some of the models was improved. Overprediction of the loads was once again obtained when comparison was made to the NREL results in head-on flow, and none of the models was found to correctly represent the flow physics involved. The premises on which each of the models relies were discussed as a means of better understanding and modelling this phenomenon. The important issue of tip loss was also covered, and guidelines were suggested to improve

  5. Calculation of large ion densities under HVdc transmission lines by the finite difference method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, Tomotaka; Sunaga, Yoshitaka

    1995-01-01

    A calculation method for large ion densities (charged aerosols) under HVdc transmission lines was developed considering both the charging mechanism of aerosols by small ions and the drifting process by wind. Large ion densities calculated by this method agreed well with the ones measured under the Shiobara HVdc test line on the lateral profiles at ground level up to about 70m downwind from the line. Measured values decreased more quickly than calculated ones farther downwind from the line. Considering the effect of point discharge from ground cover (earth corona) improved the agreement in the farther downwind region

  6. Effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on small wind turbine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on the noise level of two different size wind turbines was investigated at the Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) near Bushland, TX. Noise and performance data were collected on two blade designs tested on a wind turbine rated a...

  7. Vortex capturing vertical axis wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zannetti, L; Gallizio, F; Ottino, G

    2007-01-01

    An analytical-numerical study is presented for an innovative lift vertical axis turbine whose blades are designed with vortex trapping cavities that act as passive flow control devices. The unsteady flow field past one-bladed and two-bladed turbines is described by a combined analytical and numerical method based on conformal mapping and on a blob vortex method

  8. Project Boomerang

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allen L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experimental project on boomerangs designed for an undergraduate course in classical mechanics. The students designed and made their own boomerangs, devised their own procedures, and carried out suitable measurements. Presents some of their data and a simple analysis for the two-bladed boomerang. (Author/MLH)

  9. Open Burn/Open Detonation Dispersion Model (OBODM) User's Guide. Volume I. User's Instructions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bjorklund, Jay

    1998-01-01

    ...) of obsolete munitions and solid propellants. OBODM uses loud/plume rise, dispersion, and deposition algorithms taken from existing models for instantaneous and quasi-continuous sources to predict the downwind transport and dispersion...

  10. Comparison of toxicological and radiological aspects of K basins sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-01-01

    The composition of various K Basins sludge is evaluated for its toxicological and radiological impacts downwind from accidents. It is shown that the radiological risk evaluation guidelines are always more limiting than the toxicological risk evaluation guidelines

  11. Lagrangian-similarity diffusion-deposition model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, T.W.

    1979-01-01

    A Lagrangian-similarity diffusion model has been incorporated into the surface-depletion deposition model. This model predicts vertical concentration profiles far downwind of the source that agree with those of a one-dimensional gradient-transfer model

  12. Aerodynamic performance of a small vertical axis wind turbine using an overset grid method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangga, Galih; Solichin, Mochammad; Daman, Aida; Sa'adiyah, Devy; Dessoky, Amgad; Lutz, Thorsten

    2017-08-01

    The present paper aims to asses the aerodynamic performance of a small vertical axis wind turbine operating at a small wind speed of 5 m/s for 6 different tip speed ratios (λ=2-7). The turbine consists of two blades constructed using the NACA 0015 airfoil. The study is carried out using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods employing an overset grid approach. The (URANS) SST k - ω is used as the turbulence model. For the preliminary study, simulations of the NACA 0015 under static conditions for a broad range of angle of attack and a rotating two-bladed VAWT are carried out. The results are compared with available measurement data and a good agreement is obtained. The simulations demonstrate that the maximum power coefficient attained is 0.45 for λ=4. The aerodynamic loads hysteresis are presented showing that the dynamic stall effect decreases with λ.

  13. Noise from propellers with symmetrical sections at zero blade angle, II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, A F

    1938-01-01

    In a previous paper (Technical Note No. 605), a theory was developed that required an empirical relation to calculate sound pressures for the higher harmonics. Further investigation indicated that the modified theory agrees with experiment and that the empirical relation was due to an interference phenomenon peculiar to the test arrangement used. Comparison is made between the test results for a two-blade arrangement and the theory. The comparison is made for sound pressures in the plane of the revolving blades for varying values of tip velocity. Comparison is also made at constant tip velocity for all values of azimuth angle B. A further check is made between the theory and the experimental results for the fundamental of a four-blade arrangement with blades of the same dimensions as those used in the two-blade arrangement.

  14. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  15. Yaw control for active damping of structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Control Engineering Lab.

    1996-12-01

    Yaw torque control for reduction of structural dynamic loads in a two-bladed wind turbine is investigated. The models are obtained using rigid-body mechanics. Linear quadratic control theory is utilized for design and analysis. The analysis of two simple examples, where the teeter angle and the tower lateral bending motion are regarded, shows that a time-varying controller has some advantages compared with a time-invariant controller. 6 refs, 9 figs

  16. Propeller rotation noise due to torque and thrust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Arthur F

    1940-01-01

    Sound pressure of the first four harmonics of rotation from a full-scale two-blade propeller were measured and are compared with values calculated from theory. The comparison is made (1) for the space distribution with constant tip speed and (2) for fixed space angles with variable tip speed. A relation for rotation noise from an element of radius developed by Gutin is given showing the effect of number of blades on the rotation noise.

  17. New blades shape up for dozers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chironis, N.P.

    1985-05-01

    This article discusses the design of blades used on dozers for the reclamation work following surface mining. Two blades are described which have led to a 50% reduction in reclamation costs and a 20% reduction in fuel requirements over conventional equipment. These results are from work carried out at the Kayenta mine in Arizona, USA. Design considerations in the development of the blades are described. Descriptions of both the centre flow blades and the universal blades are given.

  18. Garos AIMS. Finite element modelling of the wind power plant WTS-3 at Maglarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haagen, T.; Henoch, A.; Olsson, J.; Noren, L.; Ulfvarsson, A.

    1985-07-01

    The project deals with the dynamic response of a rotating horizontal axis windturbine with two blades. The work is directed towards lifetime estimation, stability, analysis and yaw stability. This report presents the accomplishment of finite modelling of the Maglarp plant by means of the matrice NASTRAN. Selection of suitable measurements for later dynamic analysis by the GAROS package is reported. Computer files suitable for further analysis are being stored, and are listed in the report.

  19. Design, fabrication, and initial test of a fixture for reducing the natural frequency of the Mod-O wind turbine tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winemiller, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.; Sizemore, R. L.; Yee, S. T.

    1979-01-01

    It was desired to observe the behavior of a two bladed wind turbine where the tower first bending natural frequency is less than twice the rotor speed. The system then passes through resonance when accelerating to operating speed. The frequency of the original Mod-O tower was reduced by placing it on a spring fixture. The fixture is adjustable to provide a range of tower bending frequencies. Fixture design details are given and behavior during initial operation is described.

  20. Design, fabrication, and test of a steel spar wind turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Viterna, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    The design and fabrication of wind turbine blades based on 60 foot steel spars are discussed. Performance and blade load information is given and compared to analytical prediction. In addition, performance is compared to that of the original MOD-O aluminum blades. Costs for building the two blades are given, and a projection is made for the cost in mass production. Design improvements to reduce weight and improve fatigue life are suggested.

  1. Air pollutant concentrations near three Texas roadways, part II: Chemical characterization and transformation of pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Andrea L.; Jia, Yuling; Denbleyker, Allison; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Fraser, Matthew P.; Allen, David T.; Collins, Donald R.; Michel, Edward; Pudota, Jayanth; Sullivan, David; Zhu, Yifang

    Spatial gradients of vehicular emitted air pollutants were measured in the vicinity of three roadways in the Austin, Texas area: (1) State Highway 71 (SH-71), a heavily traveled arterial highway dominated by passenger vehicles; (2) Interstate 35 (I-35), a limited access highway north of Austin in Georgetown; and (3) Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), a heavily traveled surface roadway with significant truck traffic. A mobile monitoring platform was used to characterize the gradients of CO and NO x concentrations with increased distance from each roadway, while concentrations of carbonyls in the gas-phase and fine particulate matter mass and composition were measured at stationary sites upwind and at one (I-35 and FM-973) or two (SH-71) downwind sites. Regardless of roadway type or wind direction, concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), and oxides of nitrogen (NO x) returned to background levels within a few hundred meters of the roadway. Under perpendicular wind conditions, CO, NO and NO x concentrations decreased exponentially with increasing distance perpendicular to the roadways. The decay rate for NO was more than a factor of two greater than for CO, and it comprised a larger fraction of NO x closer to the roadways than further downwind suggesting the potential significance of near roadway chemical processing as well as atmospheric dilution. Concentrations of most carbonyl species decreased with distance downwind of SH-71. However, concentrations of acetaldehyde and acrolein increased farther downwind of SH-71, suggesting chemical generation from the oxidation of primary vehicular emissions. The behavior of particle-bound organic species was complex and further investigation of the size-segregated chemical composition of particulate matter (PM) at increasing downwind distances from roadways is warranted. Fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) mass concentrations, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), hopanes, and elemental carbon (EC

  2. The effect of chemical weapons incineration on the survival rates of Red-tailed Tropicbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, E.A.; Schenk, G.A.; Doherty, P.F.

    2001-01-01

    In 1992, the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System (JACADS) began incinerating U.S. chemical weapons stockpiles on Johnston Atoll (Pacific Ocean) where about 500,000 seabirds breed, including Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda). We hypothesized that survival rates of birds were lower in those nesting downwind of the incinerator smokestack compared to those upwind, and that birds might move away from the area. From 1992 - 2000 we monitored survival and movements between areas upwind and downwind from the JACADS facility. We used a multi-strata mark recapture approach to model survival, probability of recapture and movement. Probability of recapture was significantly higher for birds in downwind areas (owing to greater recapture effort) and thus was an important 'nuisance' parameter to take into account in modeling. We found no differences in survival between birds nesting upwind ( 0.8588) and downwind (0.8550). There was no consistent difference in movement rates between upwind or downwind areas from year to year: differences found may be attributed to differing vegetation growth and human activities between the areas. Our results suggest that JACADS has had no documentable influence on the survival and year to year movement of Red-tailed Tropicbirds.

  3. Enhanced Dispersion and Removal of Ammonia Emitted from a Poultry House with a Vegetative Environmental Buffer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung S. Ro

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Vegetative environmental buffers (VEBs, which are composed of tolerant trees, shrubs, and tall grasses, can be used to control and reduce the transport of ammonia (NH3 emissions from animal feeding operations (AFOs. However, the effectiveness of VEBs has not been quantitated. In this study, we measure the dispersion and removal of NH3 in simulated emissions from a small broiler house that was equipped with a VEB. The dispersion enhancement due to the VEB was estimated by comparing the measured downwind concentration of the co-released tracer gas, methane (CH4, to the theoretical CH4 concentrations at the same distance downwind without the VEB. The accuracy of the theoretical downwind concentrations calculated using the forward Lagrangian stochastic (fLS technique was 95%, which was validated by comparing the measured and calculated CH4 concentrations in a separate experiment without the VEB. The VEB enhanced the dispersion of CH4 and reduced the downwind concentration to 63% of the theoretical concentration. In addition to dispersion, the VEB removed another 22% of the NH3, resulting in a net 51% decrease of the theoretical downwind concentration. These results clearly demonstrated that the VEB was effective both in dispersing and removing NH3 emitted from the broiler house.

  4. Determination of the Maximum Aerodynamic Efficiency of Wind Turbine Rotors with Winglets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaunaa, Mac; Johansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    The present work contains theoretical considerations and computational results on the nature of using winglets on wind turbines. The theoretical results presented show that the power augmentation obtainable with winglets is due to a reduction of tip-effects, and is not, as believed up to now, caused by the downwind vorticity shift due to downwind winglets. The numerical work includes optimization of the power coefficient for a given tip speed ratio and geometry of the span using a newly developed free wake lifting line code, which takes into account also viscous effects and self induced forces. Validation of the new code with CFD results for a rotor without winglets showed very good agreement. Results from the new code with winglets indicate that downwind winglets are superior to upwind ones with respect to optimization of Cp, and that the increase in power production is less than what may be obtained by a simple extension of the wing in the radial direction. The computations also show that shorter downwind winglets (>2%) come close to the increase in Cp obtained by a radial extension of the wing. Lastly, the results from the code are used to design a rotor with a 2% downwind winglet, which is computed using the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys3D. These computations show that further work is needed to validate the FWLL code for cases where the rotor is equipped with winglets

  5. Determination of the Maximum Aerodynamic Efficiency of Wind Turbine Rotors with Winglets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunaa, Mac; Johansen, Jeppe [Senior Scientists, Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde, DK-4000 (Denmark)

    2007-07-15

    The present work contains theoretical considerations and computational results on the nature of using winglets on wind turbines. The theoretical results presented show that the power augmentation obtainable with winglets is due to a reduction of tip-effects, and is not, as believed up to now, caused by the downwind vorticity shift due to downwind winglets. The numerical work includes optimization of the power coefficient for a given tip speed ratio and geometry of the span using a newly developed free wake lifting line code, which takes into account also viscous effects and self induced forces. Validation of the new code with CFD results for a rotor without winglets showed very good agreement. Results from the new code with winglets indicate that downwind winglets are superior to upwind ones with respect to optimization of Cp, and that the increase in power production is less than what may be obtained by a simple extension of the wing in the radial direction. The computations also show that shorter downwind winglets (>2%) come close to the increase in Cp obtained by a radial extension of the wing. Lastly, the results from the code are used to design a rotor with a 2% downwind winglet, which is computed using the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys3D. These computations show that further work is needed to validate the FWLL code for cases where the rotor is equipped with winglets.

  6. Assessing Model Characterization of Single Source ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aircraft measurements made downwind from specific coal fired power plants during the 2013 Southeast Nexus field campaign provide a unique opportunity to evaluate single source photochemical model predictions of both O3 and secondary PM2.5 species. The model did well at predicting downwind plume placement. The model shows similar patterns of an increasing fraction of PM2.5 sulfate ion to the sum of SO2 and PM2.5 sulfate ion by distance from the source compared with ambient based estimates. The model was less consistent in capturing downwind ambient based trends in conversion of NOX to NOY from these sources. Source sensitivity approaches capture near-source O3 titration by fresh NO emissions, in particular subgrid plume treatment. However, capturing this near-source chemical feature did not translate into better downwind peak estimates of single source O3 impacts. The model estimated O3 production from these sources but often was lower than ambient based source production. The downwind transect ambient measurements, in particular secondary PM2.5 and O3, have some level of contribution from other sources which makes direct comparison with model source contribution challenging. Model source attribution results suggest contribution to secondary pollutants from multiple sources even where primary pollutants indicate the presence of a single source. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, deci

  7. Effect of the number of blades and solidity on the performance of a vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafin, PL; Nishino, T.; Wang, L.; Kolios, A.

    2016-09-01

    Two, three and four bladed ϕ-shape Vertical Axis Wind Turbines are simulated using a free-wake vortex model. Two versions of the three and four bladed turbines are considered, one having the same chord length as the two-bladed turbine and the other having the same solidity as the two-bladed turbine. Results of the two-bladed turbine are validated against published experimental data of power coefficient and instantaneous torque. The effect of solidity on the power coefficient is presented and the instantaneous torque, thrust and lateral force of the two-, three- and four-bladed turbines are compared for the same solidity. It is found that increasing the number of blades from two to three significantly reduces the torque, thrust and lateral force ripples. Adding a fourth blade further reduces the ripples except for the torque at low tip speed ratio. This work aims to help choosing the number of blades during the design phase of a vertical axis wind turbine.

  8. Data Driven Modelling of the Dynamic Wake Between Two Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben; Bak, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    turbine. This paper establishes flow models relating the wind speeds at turbines in a farm. So far, research in this area has been mainly based on first principles static models and the data driven modelling done has not included the loading of the upwind turbine and its impact on the wind speed downwind......Wind turbines in a wind farm, influence each other through the wind flow. Downwind turbines are in the wake of upwind turbines and the wind speed experienced at downwind turbines is hence a function of the wind speeds at upwind turbines but also the momentum extracted from the wind by the upwind....... This paper is the first where modern commercial mega watt turbines are used for data driven modelling including the upwind turbine loading by changing power reference. Obtaining the necessary data is difficult and data is therefore limited. A simple dynamic extension to the Jensen wake model is tested...

  9. Near-road air pollution impacts of goods movement in communities adjacent to the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Kathleen H.; Fruin, Scott A.; Winer, Arthur M.

    A mobile platform was outfitted with real-time instruments to spatially characterize pollution concentrations in communities adjacent to the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, communities heavily impacted by emissions related to dieselized goods movement, with the highest localized air pollution impacts due to heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDT). Measurements were conducted in the winter and summer of 2007 on fixed routes driven both morning and afternoon. Diesel-related pollutant concentrations such as black carbon, nitric oxide, ultrafine particles, and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were frequently elevated two to five times within 150 m downwind of freeways (compared to more than 150 m) and up to two times within 150 m downwind of arterial roads with significant amounts of diesel traffic. While wind direction was the dominant factor associated with downwind impacts, steady and consistent wind direction was not required to produce; high impacts were observed when a given area was downwind of a major roadway for any significant fraction of time. This suggests elevated pollution impacts downwind of freeways and of busy arterials are continuously occurring on one side of the road or the other, depending on wind direction. The diesel truck traffic in the area studied was high, with more than 2000 trucks per peak hour on the freeway and two- to six-hundred trucks per hour on the arterial roads studied. These results suggest that similarly-frequent impacts occur throughout urban areas in rough proportion to diesel truck traffic fractions. Thus, persons living or working near and downwind of busy roadways can have several-fold higher exposures to diesel vehicle-related pollution than would be predicted by ambient measurements in non-impacted locations.

  10. Epiphytic macrolichens in relation to air pollutants from industrial centres in Brevil, Porsgrunn and Skien, Norway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurholt, G

    1968-01-01

    The distribution of lichens on tree stems on top of exposed hills showed distinct relation to industrial air pollution. The main components of pollution are acidic, but the basic ones are more persistent and raise the pH of the bark. Under conditions of moderate pollution lichens usually characterizing rich bark (Populus) are instead found on ordinarily poor bark (Pinus). Detailed pattern of distribution are consistent with the idea of toxic or favorable down-wind effect, depending on the species of lichen and the species of tree. Some lichen species are restricted to downwind stations, others are absent from the same stations.

  11. Solution to the inversely stated transient source-receptor problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo, E.; Sheff, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    Transient source-receptor problems are traditionally handled via the Boltzmann equation or through one of its variants. In the atmospheric transport of pollutants, meteorological uncertainties in the planetary boundary layer render only a few approximations to the Boltzmann equation useful. Often, due to the high number of unknowns, the atmospheric source-receptor problem is ill-posed. Moreover, models to estimate downwind concentration invariably assume that the source term is known. In this paper, an inverse methodology is developed, based on downwind measurement of concentration and that of meterological parameters to estimate the source term

  12. 30 CFR 75.1103-4 - Automatic fire sensor and warning device systems; installation; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... systems that use carbon monoxide sensors shall provide identification of fire along all belt conveyors. (1... downwind of each belt drive unit, each tailpiece transfer point, and each belt take-up. If the belt drive, tailpiece, and/or take-up for a single transfer point are installed together in the same air course, and the...

  13. Aligning smoke management with ecological and public health goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan W. Long; Leland W. Tarnay; Malcolm P. North

    2017-01-01

    Past and current forest management affects wildland fire smoke impacts on downwind human populations. However, mismatches between the scale of benefits and risks make it difficult to proactively manage wildland fires to promote both ecological and public health. Building on recent literature and advances in modeling smoke and health effects, we outline a framework to...

  14. Robust lidar-based closed-loop wake redirection for wind farm control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raach, Steffen; Boersma, S.; van Wingerden, J.W.; Schlipf, David; Cheng, Po Wen; Dochain, Denis; Henrion, Didier; Peaucelle, Dimitri

    2017-01-01

    Wind turbine wake redirection is a promising concept for wind farm control to increase the total power of a wind farm. Further, the concept aims to avoid partial wake overlap on a downwind wind turbine and hence aims to decrease structural loads. Controller for wake redirection need to account

  15. The effect of nitrogen additions on bracken fern and its insect herbivores at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Jones; M.E. Fenn; T.D. Paine

    2011-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric pollution, including nitrogen deposition, on bracken fern herbivores has never been studied. Bracken fern is globally distributed and has a high potential to accumulate nitrogen in plant tissue. We examined the response of bracken fern and its herbivores to N fertilization at a high and low pollution site in forests downwind of Los Angeles,...

  16. Preventing desert locust plagues: optimizing management interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, van A.; Cressman, K.; Magor, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    Solitarious desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria (Forskål) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), inhabit the central, arid, and semi-arid parts of the species¿ invasion area in Africa, the Middle East, and South-West Asia. Their annual migration circuit takes them downwind to breed sequentially where winter,

  17. Verification of the Gaspar dose assessment module used in Maxigasp and Popgasp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    The GASPAR module utilized in MAXIGASP and POPGASP has been verified by hand calculations. The program operates as documented by the NRC [Eckerman et. al. 1980]. Equations used in the code to calculate downwind deposition rates, concentrations in air, on ground surfaces, and in vegetables, meat, and milk are provided in this report.

  18. Source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban background and a street location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Voogt, M.; Blom, M.; Weijers, E. P.; Rockmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    The contribution of regional, urban and traffic sources to PM2.5 and PM10 in an urban area was investigated in this study. The chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 was measured over a year at a street location and up- and down-wind of the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The C-14 content in EC

  19. Source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban background and a street location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuken, M.P.; Moerman, M.M.; Voogt, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of regional, urban and traffic sources to PM2.5 and PM10 in an urban area was investigated in this study. The chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 was measured over a year at a street location and up- and down-wind of the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The 14C content in EC

  20. Impact of the Manaus urban plume on trace gas mixing ratios near the surface in the Amazon Basin: Implications for the NO-NO2-O-3 photostationary state and peroxy radical levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trebs, I.; Mayol-Bracero, O.L.; Pauliquevis, T.; Kuhn, U.; Sander, R.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Meixner, F.X.; Kesselmeier, J.; Artaxo, P.; Andreae, M.O.

    2012-01-01

    We measured the mixing ratios of NO, NO2, O-3, and volatile organic carbon as well as the aerosol light-scattering coefficient on a boat platform cruising on rivers downwind of the city of Manaus (Amazonas State, Brazil) in July 2001 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in

  1. The effect of motion on presence during virtual sailing for advanced training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, F.A.; Verlinden, J.C.; Dukalski, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the amount of motion simulation required to influence presence and immersion on a dinghy sailing simulator. We specifically focused on the effects of roll, pitch and heave, when sailing an course with up-, side-and down-wind sections in a virtual environment. A real dingy was

  2. Some basic mathematical methods of diffusion theory. [emphasis on atmospheric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giere, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An introductory treatment of the fundamentals of diffusion theory is presented, starting with molecular diffusion and leading up to the statistical methods of turbulent diffusion. A multilayer diffusion model, designed to permit concentration and dosage calculations downwind of toxic clouds from rocket vehicles, is described. The concepts and equations of diffusion are developed on an elementary level, with emphasis on atmospheric applications.

  3. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30...

  4. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  5. Exposure of Lima bean leaves to volatiles from herbivore-induced conspecific plants results in emission of carnivore attractants: active or passive process?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choh, Y.; Shimoda, T.; Ozawa, R.; Dicke, M.; Takabayashi, J.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatiles emitted by herbivore-damaged plants can cause responses in downwind undamaged neighboring plants, such as the attraction of carnivorous enemies of herbivores. One of the open questions is whether this involves an active (production of volatiles) or passive

  6. Hydrogen ion input to the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, during the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene E. Likens; F. Herbert Bormann; John S. Eaton; Robert S. Pierce; Noye M. Johnson

    1976-01-01

    Being downwind of eastern and midwestern industrial centers, the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest offers a prime location to monitor long-term trends in atmospheric chemistry. Continuous measurements of precipitation chemistry during the last 10 years provide a measure of recent changes in precipitation inputs of hydrogen ion. The weighted average pH of precipitation...

  7. Impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on vegetation and soils in Joshua Tree National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.B. Allen; L. Rao; R.J. Steers; A. Bytnerowicz; M.E. Fenn

    2009-01-01

    The western Mojave Desert is downwind of nitrogen emissions from coastal and inland urban sources, especially automobiles. The objectives of this research were to measure reactive nitrogen (N) in the atmosphere and soils along a N-deposition gradient at Joshua Tree National Park and to examine its effects on invasive and native plant species. Atmospheric nitric acid (...

  8. Steady-state solution of the semi-empirical diffusion equation for area sources. [air pollution studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeff, S. A.; Hameed, S.

    1975-01-01

    The problem investigated can be solved exactly in a simple manner if the equations are written in terms of a similarity variable. The exact solution is used to explore two questions of interest in the modelling of urban air pollution, taking into account the distribution of surface concentration downwind of an area source and the distribution of concentration with height.

  9. Modeling the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere of the south coast air basin of California. 1. Ozone formation metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Robert J; Revelle, Meghan K; Dabdub, Donald

    2004-02-01

    Metrics associated with ozone (O3) formation are investigated using the California Institute of Technology (CIT) three-dimensional air-quality model. Variables investigated include the O3 production rate (P(O3)), O3 production efficiency (OPE), and total reactivity (the sum of the reactivity of carbon monoxide (CO) and all organic gases that react with the hydroxyl radical). Calculations are spatially and temporally resolved; surface-level and vertically averaged results are shown for September 9, 1993 for three Southern California locations: Central Los Angeles, Azusa, and Riverside. Predictions indicate increasing surface-level O3 concentrations with distance downwind, in line with observations. Surface-level and vertically averaged P(O3) values peak during midday and are highest downwind; surface P(O3) values are greater than vertically averaged values. Surface OPEs generally are highest downwind and peak during midday in downwind locations. In contrast, peaks occur in early morning and late afternoon in the vertically averaged case. Vertically averaged OPEs tend to be greater than those for the surface. Total reactivities are highest in upwind surface locations and peak during rush hours; vertically averaged reactivities are smaller and tend to be more uniform temporally and spatially. Total reactivity has large contributions from CO, alkanes, alkenes, aldehydes, unsubstituted monoaromatics, and secondary organics. Calculations using estimated emissions for 2010 result in decreases in P(O3) values and reactivities but increases in OPEs.

  10. Dispersion climatology in a coastal zone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1986-01-01

    A crosswind integrated K-model with wind- and K-profiles described by Monin-Obukhov similarity expressions is solved for a continuous surface release to yield the vertical spread of the plume as a function of the surface roughness z0 and the Monin-Obukhov length L for a given downwind distance. T...

  11. Impacts of upwind wildfire emissions on CO, CO2, and PM2.5 concentrations in Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. V. Mallia; J. C. Lin; S. Urbanski; J. Ehleringer; T. Nehrkorn

    2015-01-01

    Biomass burning is known to contribute large quantities of CO2, CO, and PM2.5 to the atmosphere. Biomass burning not only affects the area in the vicinity of fire but may also impact the air quality far downwind from the fire. The 2007 and 2012 western U.S. wildfire seasons were characterized by significant wildfire...

  12. Ecological effects of nitrogen deposition in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Fenn; Jill S. Baron; Edith B. Allen; Heather M. Rueth; Koren R. Nydick; Linda Geiser; William D. Bowman; James O. Sickman; Thomas Meixner; Dale W. Johnson; Peter Neitlich

    2003-01-01

    In the western United States vast acreages of land are exposed to low levels of atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition, with interspersed hotspots of elevated N deposition downwind of large, expanding metropolitan centers or large agricultural operations. Biological response studies in western North America demonstrate that some aquatic and terrestrial plant and microbial...

  13. Modelling and measurements of wakes in large wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmie, R J; Rathmann, O; Frandsen, S T; Hansen, K S; Politis, E; Prospathopoulos, J; Rados, K; Cabezon, D; Schlez, W; Phillips, J; Neubert, A; Schepers, J G; Pijl, S P van der

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models of flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve power output predictions

  14. Verification of the Gaspar dose assessment module used in Maxigasp and Popgasp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    The GASPAR module utilized in MAXIGASP and POPGASP has been verified by hand calculations. The program operates as documented by the NRC [Eckerman et. al. 1980]. Equations used in the code to calculate downwind deposition rates, concentrations in air, on ground surfaces, and in vegetables, meat, and milk are provided in this report

  15. Modelling and measurements of wakes in large wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Rathmann, Ole; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models of flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve...

  16. Quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from a biological waste treatment facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Bang; Møller, Jacob; Mønster, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    measurements downwind of the facility. Emission measurements were conducted over a period of three days, and in total, 80 plume traverses were obtained. On-site screening showed that important processes resulting in methane emissions were aerobic composting reactors, anaerobic digester reactors, composting...

  17. Particle dry-deposition experiment using ambient airborne soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne solid concentrations were measured simultaneously at sampling towers upwind and 305-m downwind of a site. When the wind speed and wind direction were identical at each site, isokinetic air samplers on the sampling towers were automatically activated. The fraction of the airborne solid plume remaining after the 305-m fetch ranged from 0.53 to 1.07

  18. Predicted buffer zones to protect temporary pond invertebrates from ground-based insecticide applications against desert locusts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahr, J.; Gadji, B.; Dia, D.

    2000-01-01

    To estimate safe downwind distances (i.e. buffer zone widths) for temporary ponds from ULV-treatments with current locust insecticides, experimental trials with two ground-based sprayers, the hand-held Micro-Ulva® and the vehicle-mounted Ulva-Mast® X15 Mark I, were conducted with fenitrothion

  19. Symposium on intermediate-range atmospheric-transport processes and technology assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 papers in this proceedings. The purpose of this meeting was to assess the state of the art of modeling atmospheric transport processes 10 to 100 km downwind of point and area sources of pollution

  20. Wind reduction patterns around isolated biomass for wind erosion control in a desertified area of Central Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasr Al-amin, N.K.; Stigter, C.J.; El-Tayeb Mohammed, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sparse vegetation, feature common in arid zone, to reduce wind force (velocity) and hence protect the surface and regions downwind from drifting sand and their consequences. Respectively 4 (with heights h of 4, 3.2, 2 and 1.66 m), 2 (with h of

  1. 75 FR 45209 - Federal Implementation Plans To Reduce Interstate Transport of Fine Particulate Matter and Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Quality Modeling Approach and Results 1. What air quality modeling platform did EPA use? 2. How did EPA... that downwind states receive the relief from upwind emissions guaranteed under CAA section 110(a)(2)(D) For the 24-hour PM 2.5 standard, EPA's air quality modeling shows that in the areas with continuing...

  2. Increased heat fluxes near a forest edge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W; van Breugel, PB; Moors, EJ; Nieveen, JP

    2002-01-01

    Observations of sensible and latent heat flux above forest downwind of a forest edge show these fluxes to be larger than the available energy over the forest. The enhancement averages to 56 W m(-2), or 16% of the net radiation, at fetches less than 400 m, equivalent to fetch to height ratios less

  3. Increased heat fluxes near a forest edge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.; Breugel, van P.B.; Moors, E.J.; Nieveen, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Observations of sensible and latent heat flux above forest downwind of a forest edge show these fluxes to be larger than the available energy over the forest. The enhancement averages to 56 W mm2, or 16 f the net radiation, at fetches less than 400 m, equivalent to fetch to height ratios less than

  4. A wind-tunnel investigation of wind-turbine wakes in different yawed and loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    Wind-turbine wakes have negative effects on wind-farm performance. They are associated with: (a) the velocity deficit, which reduces the generated power of downwind turbines; and (b) the turbulence level, which increases the fatigue loads on downwind turbines. Controlling the yaw angle of turbines can potentially improve the performance of wind farms by deflecting the wake away from downwind turbines. However, except for few studies, wakes of yawed turbines still suffer from the lack of systematic research. To fill this research gap, we performed wind-tunnel experiments in the recirculating boundary-layer wind tunnel at the WIRE Laboratory of EPFL to better understand the wakes of yawed turbines. High-resolution stereoscopic particle image-velocimetry (S-PIV) was used to measure three velocity components in a horizontal plane located downwind of a horizontal-axis, three-blade model turbine. A servo-controller was connected to the DC generator of the turbine, which allowed us to apply different loadings. The power and thrust coefficients of the turbine were also measured for each case. These power and thrust measurements together with the highly-resolved flow measurements enabled us to study different wake characteristics such as the energy entrainment from the outer flow into the wake, the wake deflection and the helicoidal tip vortices for yawed turbines.

  5. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 11: Smoke Impact Spreadsheet (SIS) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent Wickman; Ann Acheson

    2005-01-01

    The Smoke Impact Spreadsheet (SIS) is a simple-to-use planning model for calculating particulate matter (PM) emissions and concentrations downwind of wildland fires. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does and does not do, and tells the user how to obtain the model.

  6. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Mohammed, Azad; Massey Simonich, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9–126 ng/m3 (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05–0.71 ng/m3 (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1–3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  7. Flow field studies on a micro-air-vehicle-scale cycloidal rotor in forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Andrew H.; Jarugumilli, Tejaswi; Benedict, Moble; Lakshminarayan, Vinod K.; Jones, Anya R.; Chopra, Inderjit

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the flow physics and principles of force production on a cycloidal rotor (cyclorotor) in forward flight. The cyclorotor considered here consists of two blades rotating about a horizontal axis, with cyclic pitch angle variation about the blade quarter-chord. The flow field at the rotor mid-span is analyzed using smoke flow visualization and particle image velocimeV are compared with flow fields predicted using 2D CFD and time-averaged force measurements acquired in an open-jet wind tunnel at three advance ratios. It is shown that the experimental flow field is nearly two dimensional at μ = 0.73 allowing for qualitative comparisons to be made with CFD. The incoming flow velocity decreases in magnitude as the flow passes through the retreating (upper) half of the rotor and is attributed to power extraction by the blades. A significant increase in flow velocity is observed across the advancing (lower) half of the rotor. The aerodynamic analysis demonstrates that the blades accelerate the flow through the lower aft region of the rotor, where they operate in a high dynamic pressure environment. This is consistent with CFD-predicted values of instantaneous aerodynamic forces which reveal that the aft section of the rotor is the primary region of force production. Phase-averaged flow field measurements showed two blade wakes in the flow, formed by each of the two blades. Analysis of the blades at several azimuthal positions revealed two significant blade-wake interactions. The locations of these blade-wake interactions are correlated with force peaks in the CFD-predicted instantaneous blade forces and highlight their importance to the generation of lift and propulsive force of the cyclorotor.

  8. A Parameter Identification Method for Helicopter Noise Source Identification and Physics-Based Semi-Empirical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric, II; Schmitz, Fredric H.

    2010-01-01

    A new physics-based parameter identification method for rotor harmonic noise sources is developed using an acoustic inverse simulation technique. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. This new method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise, allowing accurate estimates of BVI noise to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions.

  9. Noise from Propellers with Symmetrical Sections at Zero Blade Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, A F

    1937-01-01

    A theory has been deduced for the "rotation noise" from a propeller with blades of symmetrical section about the chord line and set at zero blade angle. Owing to the limitation of the theory, the equations give without appreciable error only the sound pressure for cases where the wave lengths are large compared with the blade lengths. With the aid of experimental data obtained from a two-blade arrangement, an empirical relation was introduced that permitted calculation of higher harmonics. The generality of the final relation given is indicated by the fundamental and second harmonic of a four-blade arrangement.

  10. Numerical simulation of a hovering rotor using embedded grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Earl-Peter N.; Srinivasan, Ganapathi R.

    1992-01-01

    The flow field for a rotor blade in hover was computed by numerically solving the compressible thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations on embedded grids. In this work, three embedded grids were used to discretize the flow field - one for the rotor blade and two to convect the rotor wake. The computations were performed at two hovering test conditions, for a two-bladed rectangular rotor of aspect ratio six. The results compare fairly with experiment and illustrates the use of embedded grids in solving helicopter type flow fields.

  11. Call for tender - Areva-Alstom: watershed in wind energy - Technological duel on the open sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupin, L.

    2012-01-01

    The author comments the answers to a call for tender made by the French government and concerning five offshore wind farm sites (Le Treport, Fecamp, Courseulles sur Mer, Saint-Brieuc and Saint-Nazaire). As they are present within the three consortiums, Areva and Alstom should provide the wind turbines. This would result in the construction by Alstom of two blade and mast factories and two turbine and pad factories. For both companies, this market of 500 to 600 turbines is an opportunity. Many jobs are at stake. They push themselves forward for their experience or their innovation capacity. But their wind turbines will be based on foreign (Spanish or German) technology

  12. Call for tender - Areva-Alstom: watershed in wind energy - Technological duel on the open sea; Appel d'offres - Areva-Alstom: partage des eaux dans l'eolien - Duel technologique au grand large

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupin, L.

    2012-02-16

    The author comments the answers to a call for tender made by the French government and concerning five offshore wind farm sites (Le Treport, Fecamp, Courseulles sur Mer, Saint-Brieuc and Saint-Nazaire). As they are present within the three consortiums, Areva and Alstom should provide the wind turbines. This would result in the construction by Alstom of two blade and mast factories and two turbine and pad factories. For both companies, this market of 500 to 600 turbines is an opportunity. Many jobs are at stake. They push themselves forward for their experience or their innovation capacity. But their wind turbines will be based on foreign (Spanish or German) technology

  13. Effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a small horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, A F; Freris, L L; Graham, J M.R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    An experiment into the effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a 5 kW, two bladed, teetered HAWT has been performed. It has been shown that control activity influences the distribution of strain in the blade but that in a high rotor speed, high cycle fatigue regime this has little influence on damage rate. The experiment was conducted on a small test turbine by implementing variable speed stall, pitch and yaw control strategies and measuring blade flapwise strain response at root and midspan locations. A full description of the investigation is provided. (au)

  14. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH

  15. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH

  16. Canopy wake measurements using multiple scanning wind LiDARs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, C. D.; Carbajo Fuertes, F.; Iungo, V.; Stefan, H. G.; Porte-Agel, F.

    2014-12-01

    Canopy wakes have been shown, in controlled wind tunnel experiments, to significantly affect the fluxes of momentum, heat and other scalars at the land and water surface over distances of ˜O(1 km), see Markfort et al. (EFM, 2013). However, there are currently no measurements of the velocity field downwind of a full-scale forest canopy. Point-based anemometer measurements of wake turbulence provide limited insight into the extent and details of the wake structure, whereas scanning Doppler wind LiDARs can provide information on how the wake evolves in space and varies over time. For the first time, we present measurements of the velocity field in the wake of a tall patch of forest canopy. The patch consists of two uniform rows of 40-meter tall deciduous, plane trees, which border either side of the Allée de Dorigny, near the EPFL campus. The canopy is approximately 250 m long, and it is approximately 40 m wide, along the direction of the wind. A challenge faced while making field measurements is that the wind rarely intersects a canopy normal to the edge. The resulting wake flow may be deflected relative to the mean inflow. Using multiple LiDARs, we measure the evolution of the wake due to an oblique wind blowing over the canopy. One LiDAR is positioned directly downwind of the canopy to measure the flow along the mean wind direction and the other is positioned near the canopy to evaluate the transversal component of the wind and how it varies with downwind distance from the canopy. Preliminary results show that the open trunk space near the base of the canopy results in a surface jet that can be detected just downwind of the canopy and farther downwind dissipates as it mixes with the wake flow above. A time-varying recirculation zone can be detected by the periodic reversal of the velocity near the surface, downwind of the canopy. The implications of canopy wakes for measurement and modeling of surface fluxes will be discussed.

  17. Demonstration of partial pitch 2-bladed wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong; Zahle, Frederik; Troldborg, Niels

    -sections on the blade as well as fully resolved rotor simulations, and finally simulations coupling HAWC2 with EllipSys3D, investigating the behaviors of the rotor at standstill, has been performed. For the WP3, the state-of-the art aeroelastic analysis tool, HAWC2, has been updated in order to consider the partial......This is the final report for the EUDP project performed from January 2012 to December 2015. The main objective for the project was to demonstrate the potential of the partial pitch two-bladed (PP-2B) technology. DTU Wind Energy took a responsibility for three workpackages (WPs) among 6 WPs which...... were aerodynamic evaluation of partial pitch technology (WP2), aeroelastic analysis of two-bladed turbine (WP3) and On-site testing (WP4). For the WP2, a comprehensive set of 3D CFD simulations including the gap between inner and outer part of the blade and vortex generators (VGs) of both cross...

  18. A soft rotor concept - design, verification and potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, F; Thirstrup Petersen, J [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper contains results from development and testing of a two-bladed soft rotor for an existing 15 kW flexible wind turbine. The new concept is characterised as a free yawing down wind turbine with nacelle tilting flexibility and a two-bladed teetering rotor with three-point supported flexible blades with built-in structural couplings. The power and the loads are controlled by active stall and active coning. The concept has been developed by extensive application of aero-elastic predictions, numerical optimisation and stability analysis in order to obtain optimal aero-elastic response and minimal loads. The flexible blades and the principle of active coning allow the blades to deflect with the wind to such an extent that the loads are reduced to between 25 and 50% of the loads for a similar rigid rotor. All conceptual design principles have been focused on application to large MW turbines, and aero-elastic predictions for an upscale 1 MW version show that this would have approximately identical characteristisc, without being particularly optimised for the actual size. (au)

  19. Soot in the atmosphere and snow surface of Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, S.G.; Clarke, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    Samples of snow collected near the south pole during January and February 1986 were analyzed for the presence of light-absorbing particles by passing the melted snow through a nuclepore filter. Transmission of light through the filter showed that snow far from the station contains the equivalent of 0.1-0.3 ng of carbon per gram of snow (ng/g). Samples of ambient air were filtered and found to contain about 1-2 ng of carbon per kilogram of air, giving a scavenging ratio of about 150. The snow downwind of the station exhibited a well-defined plume of soot due to the burning of diesel fuel, but even in the center of the plume 1 km downwind, the soot concentration was only 3 ng/g, too small to affect snow albedo significantly. Measurements of snow albedo near large inland stations are therefore probably representative of their surrounding regions

  20. Three year review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Since 1977 research and development activities include various biotechnology systems: algal systems, microbial systems, water hyacinth utilization systems, pisciculture biogas systems; food, fodder and forestry systems (including algal systems), cattle feeding with water hyacinth, biodynamic-intensive vegetable gardening, hydroponic raft culture in stagnant water, small-lot energy-food forestry, and energy plantations; wind and solar energy systems including a bidirectional horizontal-axis down-wind sail-wing windmill, a horizontal-axis down-wind sail-wing windmill, solar crop and fish dryers, solar cookers and water sterilizers; appropriate-construction systems including pond-construction systems, passive solar-building techniques and pond roofing; and communication systems.

  1. Characterization and Impact of Low Frequency Wind Turbine Noise Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, James

    Wind turbine noise is a complex issue that requires due diligence to minimize any potential impact on quality of life. This study enhances existing knowledge of wind turbine noise through focused analyses of downwind sound propagation, directionality, and the low frequency component of the noise. Measurements were conducted at four wind speeds according to a design of experiments at incremental distances and angles. Wind turbine noise is shown to be highly directional, while downwind sound propagation is spherical with limited ground absorption. The noise is found to have a significant low frequency component that is largely independent of wind speed over the 20-250 Hz range. The generated low frequency noise is shown to be audible above 40 Hz at the MOE setback distance of 550 m. Infrasound levels exhibit higher dependency on wind speed, but remain below audible levels up to 15 m/s.

  2. Mathematical modelling and numerical resolution of multi-phase compressible fluid flows problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagoutiere, Frederic

    2000-01-01

    This work deals with Eulerian compressible multi-species fluid dynamics, the species being either mixed or separated (with interfaces). The document is composed of three parts. The first parts devoted to the numerical resolution of model problems: advection equation, Burgers equation, and Euler equations, in dimensions one and two. The goal is to find a precise method, especially for discontinuous initial conditions, and we develop non dissipative algorithms. They are based on a downwind finite-volume discretization under some stability constraints. The second part treats of the mathematical modelling of fluids mixtures. We construct and analyse a set of multi-temperature and multi-pressure models that are entropy, symmetrizable, hyperbolic, not ever conservative. In the third part, we apply the ideas developed in the first part (downwind discretization) to the numerical resolution of the partial differential problems we have constructed for fluids mixtures in the second part. We present some numerical results in dimensions one and two. (author) [fr

  3. Far Field Modeling Methods For Characterizing Surface Detonations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed particle samples collected during experiments that were designed to replicate tests of nuclear weapons components that involve detonation of high explosives (HE). SRNL collected the particle samples in the HE debris cloud using innovative rocket propelled samplers. SRNL used scanning electronic microscopy to determine the elemental constituents of the particles and their size distributions. Depleted uranium composed about 7% of the particle contents. SRNL used the particle size distributions and elemental composition to perform transport calculations that indicate in many terrains and atmospheric conditions the uranium bearing particles will be transported long distances downwind. This research established that HE tests specific to nuclear proliferation should be detectable at long downwind distances by sampling airborne particles created by the test detonations.

  4. The global impact of biomass burning on tropospheric reactive nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, H. II; Moxim, W.J.; Kasibhatla, P.S.; Logan, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    In this chapter the authors first review their current understanding of both the anthropogenic and natural sources of reactive nitrogen compounds in the troposphere. Then the available observations of both surface concentration and wet deposition are summarized for regions with significant sources, for locations downwind of strong sources, and for remote sites. The obvious sparsity of the data leads to the next step: an attempt to develop a more complete global picture of surface concentrations and deposition of NO y with the help of global chemistry transport model (GCTM). The available source data are inserted into the GCTM and the resulting simulations compared with surface observations. The impact of anthropogenic sources, both downwind and at remote locations, is discussed and the particular role of biomass burning is identified

  5. A mathematical model of bird collisions with wind turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    When a bird flies through the disk swept out by the blades of a wind turbine rotor, the probability of collision depends on the motions and dimensions of the bird and the blades. The collision model in this paper predicts the probability for birds that glide upwind, downwind, an across the wind past simple one-dimensional blades represented by straight lines, and upwind and downwind past more realistic three-dimensional blades with chord and twist. Probabilities vary over the surface of the disk, and in most cases, the tip of the blade is less likely to collide with a bird than parts of the blade nearer the hub. The mean probability may be found by integration over the disk area. The collision model identifies the rotor characteristics that could be altered to make turbines safer for birds

  6. A flow visualization study of spore release using a wind tunnel-mounted laser light sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Eisner, A.D.; Wiener, R.W.; Main, C.E.

    1997-01-01

    A phase Doppler anemometry system in combination with a laser light sheet was used in a low-speed recirculating wind tunnel to examine the flow field around an individual leaf. Turbulence similar to that encountered near the surface of the earth in a neutral stability boundary layer was generated using a grid at the upwind end of the wind tunnel test section. Individual healthy and diseased plant leaves were introduced into the tunnel with the leaf tip pointing downwind. The Mie-scattered radiation from the spores departing the diseased leaf was captured on videotape. Image processing software was used to enhance the visual quality of the individual frames from the videotape and to make spore velocity calculations. Three main vortex regions around the leaf were identified. The importance of these regions to the separation of the spores from the leaf surface and their subsequent downwind movement was analyzed

  7. Near-source mobile methane emission estimates using EPA Method33a and a novel probabilistic approach as a basis for leak quantification in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertson, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions from underground pipeline leaks remain an ongoing issue in the development of accurate methane emission inventories for the natural gas supply chain. Application of mobile methods during routine street surveys would help address this issue, but there are large uncertainties in current approaches. In this paper, we describe results from a series of near-source (< 30 m) controlled methane releases where an instrumented van was used to measure methane concentrations during both fixed location sampling and during mobile traverses immediately downwind of the source. The measurements were used to evaluate the application of EPA Method 33A for estimating methane emissions downwind of a source and also to test the application of a new probabilistic approach for estimating emission rates from mobile traverse data.

  8. ALOFT-PC a smoke plume trajectory model for personal computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, W.D.; McGrattan, K.B.; Mullin, J.V.

    1996-01-01

    A computer model, named ALOFT-PC, was developed for use during in-situ burning of oil spills to predict smoke plume trajectory. The downwind distribution of smoke particulate is a complex function of fire parameters, meteorological conditions, and topographic features. Experimental burns have shown that the downwind distribution of smoke is not Gaussian and simple smoke plume models do not capture the observed plume features. ALOFT-PC consists of the Navier-Stokes equations using an eddy viscosity over a uniform grid that spans the smoke plume and its surroundings. The model inputs are wind speed and variability, atmospheric temperature profile, and fire parameters and the output is the average of the plume. 7 refs., 3 tabs

  9. Atmospheric Dispersion of Various Types of Iodine in UAE in February and August

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sungyeop; Beeley, Philip A. [Khalifa Univ. of Science, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kim, Sungyeop; Chang, Soonheung; Lee, Kunjai [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The distribution ratio of these three types of iodine being released to the atmosphere under accident scenario is still not clearly reported because of its complex kinetics of chemical and physical process in the accidental condition. In this research, the dispersion behaviors of three kinds of iodine in the atmosphere have been considered in the UAE environment in winter and summer situations. Higher ground level concentration on the same downwind distance from the source appears in summer because of lower wind speed than that of winter. More lateral spreading of vertical downwind direction in summer has been confirmed because of less stable air than that of winter. Higher ground level concentrations have been appeared in order of particle type, organic gas type and elemental gas type of I-131 with given assumptions.

  10. Wind Turbine Down-regulation Strategy for Minimum Wake Deficit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Kuichao; Zhu, Jiangsheng; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Down-regulation mode of wind turbine is commonly used no matter for the reserve power for supporting ancillary service to the grid, power optimization in wind farm or reducing power loss in the fault condition. It is also a method to protect faulty turbine. A down-regulation strategy based...... on minimum wake deficit is proposed in this paper, for the power improvement of the downwind turbine in low and medium wind speed region. The main idea is to operate turbine work at an appropriate operating point through rotor speed and torque control. The effectiveness of the strategy is verified...... by comparing with maximum rotor speed strategy. The result shows that the proposed strategy can improve the power of downwind turbine effectively....

  11. Atmospheric ammonia mixing ratios at an open-air cattle feeding facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Brooks, Sarah D; Thornton, Daniel C O; Auvermann, Brent W

    2010-02-01

    Mixing ratios of total and gaseous ammonia were measured at an open-air cattle feeding facility in the Texas Panhandle in the summers of 2007 and 2008. Samples were collected at the nominally upwind and downwind edges of the facility. In 2008, a series of far-field samples was also collected 3.5 km north of the facility. Ammonium concentrations were determined by two complementary laboratory methods, a novel application of visible spectrophotometry and standard ion chromatography (IC). Results of the two techniques agreed very well, and spectrophotometry is faster, easier, and cheaper than chromatography. Ammonia mixing ratios measured at the immediate downwind site were drastically higher (approximately 2900 parts per billion by volume [ppbv]) than thos measured at the upwind site (open-air animal feeding operations, especially under the hot and dry conditions present during these measurements.

  12. Ozone Transport Aloft Drives Surface Ozone Maxima Across the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanCuren, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A persistent layer of polluted air in the lower free troposphere over the Mojave Desert (California and Nevada) drives spring and summer surface ozone maxima as deep afternoon mixing delivers ozone and ozone precursors to surface measurement sites 200 km or more downwind of the mountains that separate the deserts from the heavily populated coastal areas of California. Pollutants in this elevated layer derive from California source regions (the Los Angeles megacity region and the intensive agricultural region of the San Joaquin Valley), and from long-range transport from Asia. Recognition of this poorly studied persistent layer explains and expands the significance of previously published reports of ozone and other pollutants observed in and over the Mojave Desert, resolves an apparent paradox in the timing of ozone peaks due to transport from the upwind basins, and provides a new perspective on the long-range downwind impacts of megacity pollution plumes.

  13. A 20-KW Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) at the Marine Corps Air Station, Kaneohe, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    of propellers and that vertical-axis wind turbines would be more efficient. Several turbines such as the Darrieus and gyro-mill, of this type are... wind turbines , wind systems siting, alternate energy systems, remote site power generation. 20 ABSTRACT (Con!,,u,. - r r... .. do I(3 lI - d #,d e...Corps Air Station (MCAS) Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii. The wind turbine generator chosen for the evaluation was a horizontal-axis-propeller- downwind rotor

  14. FIREPLUME model for plume dispersion from fires: Application to uranium hexafluoride cylinder fires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.F.; Dunn, W.E.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides basic documentation of the FIREPLUME model and discusses its application to the prediction of health impacts resulting from releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) in fires. The model application outlined in this report was conducted for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted UF 6 . The FIREPLUME model is an advanced stochastic model for atmospheric plume dispersion that predicts the downwind consequences of a release of toxic materials from an explosion or a fire. The model is based on the nonbuoyant atmospheric dispersion model MCLDM (Monte Carlo Lagrangian Dispersion Model), which has been shown to be consistent with available laboratory and field data. The inclusion of buoyancy and the addition of a postprocessor to evaluate time-varying concentrations lead to the current model. The FIREPLUME model, as applied to fire-related UF 6 cylinder releases, accounts for three phases of release and dispersion. The first phase of release involves the hydraulic rupture of the cylinder due to heating of the UF 6 in the fire. The second phase involves the emission of material into the burning fire, and the third phase involves the emission of material after the fire has died during the cool-down period. The model predicts the downwind concentration of the material as a function of time at any point downwind at or above the ground. All together, five fire-related release scenarios are examined in this report. For each scenario, downwind concentrations of the UF 6 reaction products, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride, are provided for two meteorological conditions: (1) D stability with a 4-m/s wind speed, and (2) F stability with a 1-m/s wind speed

  15. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C

  16. A modified Gaussian model for the thermal plume from a ground-based heat source in a cross-wind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selander, W.N.; Barry, P.J.; Robertson, E.

    1990-06-01

    An array of propane burners operating at ground level in a cross-wind was used as a heat source to establish a blown-over thermal plume. A three-dimensional array of thermocouples was used to continuously measure the plume temperature downwind from the source. The resulting data were used to correlate the parameters of a modified Gaussian model for plume rise and dispersion with source strength, wind speed, and atmospheric dispersion parameters

  17. Combustion of sodium in the open atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morewith, H A; Johnson, R P; Nelson, C T; Otter, J M [Energy System Group, Rockwell International, Rockwell (United States)

    1979-03-01

    A series of sodium fire tests has been conducted in ambient air at a meteorological test site. This test series was designed to simulate hypothetical accidents which might occur in the heat transport system of an LMFBR. Measurements of concentration, agglomeration, fallout, and chemical species of the sodium combustion products were made as a function of downwind distance. In each of the first two tests, {approx}23 kg of 540 deg. C sodium was sprayed as a fan of 250-{mu}m sodium drops across the wind, from heights of 5 or 6 m. Each release took a few minutes. A dense sodium combustion product aerosol was formed, and quickly agglomerated to large (100 to 660 {mu}m) diameter particles. More than 50% of the aerosol mass fell out within several hundred meters of the release point. Two additional tests were performed by releasing sodium through 9.5-mm diameter jets at a height of 30 m. In each test, the sodium jet was aimed horizontally across the wind, and followed a downward parabolic trajectory, releasing burning sodium drops along its track. Again, close-in fallout due to large agglomerates was observed. A substantial amount of unburned sodium fell 30 m to the ground, where it burned. In a third type of test, sodium was burned for 60 min as pool in a 1.5m{sup 2} burn pan at 9 m/s wind velocity. Approximately 30% of the combustion products became airborne. Large agglomerates fell out as they moved downwind, depositing 1 kg/m{sup 2} at 1 m downwind from the edge of the pan. Chemical analysis of the samples indicated that the sodium fires produced mainly Na{sub 2}O, and that the conversion of NaOH was slow. Comparison were made with COMRADEX-IV code models, which are appropriate for calculating deposition and concentrations for downwind distances between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 4} m. (author)

  18. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  19. Restoration of sand dunes along human-altered coasts: a scheme for Miramar beach, Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    to perform their functions. 29 There are various ways of restoring dunes that are destroyed. Artificial nourishment of beaches is one such method that has been classified as a modem scientific strategy to counter sand depletion along coasts... can be easily achieved by erecting 1 m high wire mesh, wooden or geotextile fences perpendicular to the direction of prevailing winds. In general, sand gets deposited 6 to 8 m downwind behind these barriers as observed behind artificial objects lying...

  20. Sand fences: An environment-friendly technique to restore degraded coastal dunes

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mascarenhas, A.

    of prevailing winds (Matias et al. 2005). Our observations show that sand gets deposited 2 to 6 m downwind behind artificial barriers lying on the beach. A series of fences can therefore intercept wind-blown sand over a considerable area along the frontal beach..., but fashioned artificially; (e) Restoration of coastal dunes can be adopted wherever these features are damaged due to natural processes or human interference. Acknowledgements: The author is grateful to the Director, NIO, Goa, for permission to publish...

  1. Resolving vorticity-driven lateral fire spread using the WRF-Fire coupled atmosphere–fire numerical model

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, C. C.; Sharples, J. J.; Evans, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Fire channelling is a form of dynamic fire behaviour, during which a wildland fire spreads rapidly across a steep lee-facing slope in a direction transverse to the background winds, and is often accompanied by a downwind extension of the active flaming region and extreme pyro-convection. Recent work using the WRF-Fire coupled atmosphere-fire model has demonstrated that fire channelling can be characterised as vorticity-driven lateral fire spread (VDLS). In t...

  2. Studies on Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine with Passive Teetered Brake & Damper Mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    SHIMIZU, Yukimaru; KAMADA, Yasunari; MAEDA, Takao

    1998-01-01

    In order to improve the reliability of megawatt wind turbines, the passive teetered brake & damper mechanism is applied. Its two unique effects, as its name implies, are braking and damping. The passive brake & damper mechanism is useful for variable speed control of the large wind turbine. It is comprised of teetering and feathering mechanisms. When the wind speed exceeds the rated wind speed, the blade is passively teetered in a downwind direction and, at the same time, a feathering mechani...

  3. Comparing satellite SAR and wind farm wake models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Vincent, P.; Husson, R.

    2015-01-01

    . These extend several tens of kilometres downwind e.g. 70 km. Other SAR wind maps show near-field fine scale details of wake behind rows of turbines. The satellite SAR wind farm wake cases are modelled by different wind farm wake models including the PARK microscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting...... (WRF) model in high resolution and WRF with coupled microscale parametrization....

  4. Accident-generated radioactive particle source term development for consequence assessment of nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutter, S.L.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

    1983-04-01

    Consequences of nuclear fuel cycle facility accidents can be evaluated using aerosol release factors developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. These experimentally determined factors are compiled and consequence assessment methods are discussed. Release factors can be used to estimate the fraction of material initially made airborne by postulated accident scenarios. These release fractions in turn can be used in models to estimate downwind contamination levels as required for safety assessments of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 20 references, 4 tables

  5. Verification of AXAIRQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, A. A.

    1995-10-01

    AXAIR89Q, designed to determine downwind doses following acute atmospheric releases at SRS, has been improved; the new version is AXAIRQ. Improvements include deposition option, new diffusion coefficients, ability to calculate 95% dose at user selected distances, and user-input mixing height. Other improvements also have been made to the format of the output. The user has the option to select the new features or operate the code as AXAIR89Q.

  6. Transport of biologically important nutrients by wind in an eroding cold desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Germino, Matthew J.; Benner, Shawn G.; Glenn, Nancy F.; Hoover, Amber N.

    2012-01-01

    Wind erosion following fire is an important landscape process that can result in the redistribution of ecologically important soil resources. In this study we evaluated the potential for a fire patch in a desert shrubland to serve as a source of biologically important nutrients to the adjacent, downwind, unburned ecosystem. We analyzed nutrient concentrations (P, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn, Al) in wind-transported sediments, and soils from burned and adjacent unburned surfaces, collected during the first to second growing seasons after a wildfire that burned in 2007 in Idaho, USA in sagebrush steppe; a type of cold desert shrubland. We also evaluated the timing of potential wind erosion events and weather conditions that might have contributed to nutrient availability in downwind shrubland. Findings indicated that post-fire wind erosion resulted in an important, but transient, addition of nutrients on the downwind shrubland. Aeolian sediments from the burned area were enriched relative to both the up- and down-wind soil and indicated the potential for a fertilization effect through the deposition of the nutrient-enriched sediment during the first, but not second, summer after wildfire. Weather conditions that could have produced nutrient transport events might have provided increased soil moisture necessary to make nutrients accessible for plants in the desert environment. Wind transport of nutrients following fire is likely important in the sagebrush steppe as it could contribute to pulses of resource availability that might, for example, affect plant species differently depending on their phenology, and nutrient- and water-use requirements.

  7. Combustion of sodium in the open atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morewith, H.A.; Johnson, R.P.; Nelson, C.T.; Otter, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    A series of sodium fire tests has been conducted in ambient air at a meteorological test site. This test series was designed to simulate hypothetical accidents which might occur in the heat transport system of an LMFBR. Measurements of concentration, agglomeration, fallout, and chemical species of the sodium combustion products were made as a function of downwind distance. In each of the first two tests, ∼23 kg of 540 deg. C sodium was sprayed as a fan of 250-μm sodium drops across the wind, from heights of 5 or 6 m. Each release took a few minutes. A dense sodium combustion product aerosol was formed, and quickly agglomerated to large (100 to 660 μm) diameter particles. More than 50% of the aerosol mass fell out within several hundred meters of the release point. Two additional tests were performed by releasing sodium through 9.5-mm diameter jets at a height of 30 m. In each test, the sodium jet was aimed horizontally across the wind, and followed a downward parabolic trajectory, releasing burning sodium drops along its track. Again, close-in fallout due to large agglomerates was observed. A substantial amount of unburned sodium fell 30 m to the ground, where it burned. In a third type of test, sodium was burned for 60 min as pool in a 1.5m 2 burn pan at 9 m/s wind velocity. Approximately 30% of the combustion products became airborne. Large agglomerates fell out as they moved downwind, depositing 1 kg/m 2 at 1 m downwind from the edge of the pan. Chemical analysis of the samples indicated that the sodium fires produced mainly Na 2 O, and that the conversion of NaOH was slow. Comparison were made with COMRADEX-IV code models, which are appropriate for calculating deposition and concentrations for downwind distances between 10 2 and 10 4 m. (author)

  8. Overview of current programs and trends in assessment of health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiessen, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation research programs of the US DOE are discussed in the presentation. Data bases have been established from epidemiological studies on radiation exposures and effects in atom bomb survivors, nuclear facility personnel, radium dial painters and populations living downwind from above- and below-ground nuclear tests. In addition, a Risk Analysis Program has been established to evaluate energy technologies and related problems with respect to their health and environmental uncertainties. 8 figures

  9. Characterization of air pollutant concentrations, fleet emission factors, and dispersion near a North Carolina interstate freeway across two seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Provat K.; Khlystov, Andrey; Snyder, Michelle G.; Grieshop, Andrew P.

    2018-03-01

    We present field measurement data and modeling of multiple traffic-related air pollutants during two seasons at a site adjoining Interstate 40, near Durham, North Carolina. We analyze spatial-temporal and seasonal trends and fleet-average pollutant emission factors and use our data to evaluate a line source dispersion model. Month-long measurement campaigns were performed in summer 2015 and winter 2016. Data were collected at a fixed near-road site located within 10 m from the highway edge, an upwind background site and, under favorable meteorological conditions, along downwind perpendicular transects. Measurements included the size distribution, chemical composition, and volatility of submicron particles, black carbon (BC), nitrogen oxides (NOx), meteorological conditions and traffic activity data. Results show strong seasonal and diurnal differences in spatial distribution of traffic sourced pollutants. A strong signature of vehicle emissions was observed within 100-150 m from the highway edge with significantly higher concentrations during morning. Substantially higher concentrations and less-sharp near-road gradients were observed in winter for many species. Season-specific fleet-average fuel-based emission factors for NO, NOx, BC, and particle number (PN) were derived based on up- and down-wind roadside measurements. The campaign-average NOx and PN emission factors were 20% and 300% higher in winter than summer, respectively. These results suggest that the combined effect of higher emissions and their slower downwind dispersion in winter dictate the observed higher downwind concentrations and wider highway influence zone in winter for several species. Finally, measurements of traffic data, emission factors, and pollutant concentrations were integrated to evaluate a line source dispersion model (R-LINE). The dispersion model captured the general trends in the spatial and temporal patterns in near-road concentrations. However, there was a tendency for the model

  10. An Elevated Reservoir of Air Pollutants over the Mid-Atlantic States During the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Campaign: Airborne Measurements and Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Loughner, Christopher P.; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Arkinson, Heather L.; Brent, Lacey C.; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Tzortziou, Maria A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Martins, Douglas K.; hide

    2013-01-01

    During a classic heat wave with record high temperatures and poor air quality from July 18 to 23, 2011, an elevated reservoir of air pollutants was observed over and downwind of Baltimore, MD, with relatively clean conditions near the surface. Aircraft and ozonesonde measurements detected approximately 120 parts per billion by volume ozone at 800 meters altitude, but approximately 80 parts per billion by volume ozone near the surface. High concentrations of other pollutants were also observed around the ozone peak: approximately 300 parts per billion by volume CO at 1200 meters, approximately 2 parts per billion by volume NO2 at 800 meters, approximately 5 parts per billion by volume SO2 at 600 meters, and strong aerosol optical scattering (2 x 10 (sup 4) per meter) at 600 meters. These results suggest that the elevated reservoir is a mixture of automobile exhaust (high concentrations of O3, CO, and NO2) and power plant emissions (high SO2 and aerosols). Back trajectory calculations show a local stagnation event before the formation of this elevated reservoir. Forward trajectories suggest an influence on downwind air quality, supported by surface ozone observations on the next day over the downwind PA, NJ and NY area. Meteorological observations from aircraft and ozonesondes show a dramatic veering of wind direction from south to north within the lowest 5000 meters, implying that the development of the elevated reservoir was caused in part by the Chesapeake Bay breeze. Based on in situ observations, Community Air Quality Multi-scale Model (CMAQ) forecast simulations with 12 kilometers resolution overestimated surface ozone concentrations and failed to predict this elevated reservoir; however, CMAQ research simulations with 4 kilometers and 1.33 kilometers resolution more successfully reproduced this event. These results show that high resolution is essential for resolving coastal effects and predicting air quality for cities near major bodies of water such as

  11. Investigating the structure of power plant plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paffrath, D

    1978-01-01

    In the down-wind area of the RWE power plant Neurath near Grevenbroich the particle number and SO/sub 2/-concentration distribution were measured from an airplane. The results of the distributions are discussed and they are used to estimate dispersion parameters. Furthermore emission rates are evaluated, and the results are in rather good agreement with the data which have been made avialable by the power plant administration.

  12. Relocation Impacts of an H-Separations Coil and Tube Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-01-01

    The relocation impacts of an accidental release, scenario 1-RD-2.35, are evaluated for H-Separations. The extent of the area potentially contaminated to a level that would result in doses exceeding the relocation protective action guide (PAG) is calculated. The maximum calculated distance downwind from the accident at which the relocation PAG is exceeded is also determined. The consequences of the release are evaluated using the HOTSPOT model and an EXCEL spreadsheet

  13. Relocation impacts of an H-Separations coil and tube failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-01-01

    The relocation impacts of an accidental release, scenario 1-RD-2.35, are evaluated for H-Separations. The extent of the area potentially contaminated to a level that would result in doses exceeding the relocation protective action guide (PAG) is calculated. The maximum calculated distance downwind from the accident at which the relocation PAG is exceeded is also determined. The consequences of the release are evaluated using the HOTSPOT model and an EXCEL spreadsheet

  14. The abundance and diversity of antibiotic resistance genes in the atmospheric environment of composting plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Min; Qiu, Tianlei; Sun, Yanmei; Wang, Xuming

    2018-07-01

    Composting is considered to reduce the introduction of antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) into the environment through land application of manure; however, the possible pollution of ARGs in the atmospheric environment of composting plants is unknown. In this study, 29 air samples including up- and downwind, composting, packaging, and office areas from 4 composting plants were collected. Dynamic concentrations of 22 subtypes of ARGs, class 1 integron (intl1), and 2 potential human pathogenic bacteria (HPB), and bacterial communities were investigated using droplet digital PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing, respectively. In this study, intl1 and 22 subtypes of ARGs (except tetQ) were detected in air of composting, packaging, office, and downwind areas. The highest concentration of 15 out of 22 subtypes of ARGs was detected in the packaging areas, and intl1 also had the maximum average concentration of 10 4  copies/m 3 , with up to (1.78 ± 0.49) × 10 -2 copies/16S rRNA copy. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling of ARGs, potential HPBs, and bacterial components all indicated that the bioaerosol pollutant pattern in packaging areas was most similar to that in composting areas, followed by office, downwind, and upwind areas. The co-occurrence between ARGs and bacterial taxa assessed by Procrustes test, mantel test, and network analysis implied that aerosolized ARG fragments from composting and packaging areas contributed to the compositions of ARG aerosols in office and downwind areas. The results presented here show that atmoshperic environments of composting plants harbor abundant and diverse ARGs, which highlight the urgent need for comprehensive evaluation of potential human health and ecological risks of composts during both production as well as land application. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Radioecological aspects of nuclear warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvardson, Kay

    1977-01-01

    Radioactive fallout, one of the major effects of nuclear warfare, will cause acute radiation sickness within the close-in or intermediate areas downwind from surface bursts. Global fallout from high yield explosions will be fairly evenly distributed in the hemisphere where the explosions occur, and will cause irradiation from ground deposit, inhaled material and contaminated food. Estimates of collective doses and the approximate number of late casualties from the global contamination are presented for a given total explosion yield. (author)

  16. Ground deposition pattern of an explosive radiological dispersal device (RDD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharon, A.; Halevy, I.; Sattinger, D.; Berenstein, Z.; Neuman, R.; Banaim, P.; Pinhas, M.; Yaar, I.

    2014-01-01

    Activity deposition pattern of outdoor explosive RDD experiments were discussed and analyzed. In cases of fine, respirable size, aerosols dispersion, most of the activity deposited inside a circle of up to 4 fireball radii around the detonation point. About an order of magnitude less was deposited in the rest of the wide open area, in the downwind direction. The effects of different RA particles size distribution on the ground deposition pattern is still being studying under the framework of GF project

  17. Numerical simulation of self-induced rainout using a dynamic convective cloud model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molenkamp, C.R.

    1980-03-01

    The hypothesis that self-induced rainout can occur is supported by observations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, where deposition of weapons debris with precipitation occurred several km downwind of the burst point. This precipitation was initiated either directly by the nuclear weapons or by the ensuing fires. Simulation of the Nagasaki event with a convection cloud precipitation scavenging model, although fraught with many questionable assumptions, agrees surprisingly well with the observations and supports the hypothesis that self-induced rainout can occur

  18. A Two Step Method to Treat Variable Winds in Fallout Smearing Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    measurement netowrk was modest. However, the southward curvature was verified by data from inhabited atolls (Rongerik and Rongelap) downwind of the...Pi and the American Nuclear Society. Permanent Address: 12 Whipple Street Lewiston, Maine 04240 124 UNCLASSIFIED- SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE...Controlling Office) 15. SECURITY CLASS. (of this report) UNCLASSIFIED IS. DECLASStFICATIO’OOWNGRAODHG SCHEDULE 16. DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT (of this

  19. A description of the katabatic ''plume'' from Coal Creek Canyon and its fate in the Rocky Flats Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulter, R.L.; Shannon, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Katabatic flow from Coal Creek Canyon often affects the region that includes the Rocky Flats Plant near Denver, Colorado. The flow from the canyon enters a wide, gently sloping plain approximately 5 km upwind of the plant. Measurements of this flow are combined with a theoretical analysis that describes the dimensions and strength of the flow across the plains as a function of downwind distance from Coal Creek

  20. AXAIRQ User's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1995-10-01

    AXAIRQ is the primary dose assessment code used at the Savannah River Site to predict downwind doses following a hypothetical atmospheric release of relatively short duration. Purpose is to perform calculations for safety-related documentation, and AXAIRQ strictly adheres to the guidance in US NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145 (USNRC 1982) entitled Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants. Doses are determined for the plume shine, ground shine, and inhalation pathways. Ingestion is not considered

  1. Design and operating experience on the US Department of Energy experimental Mod-0 100-kW wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental wind turbine was designed and fabricated to assess technology requirements and engineering problems of large wind turbines. The machine has demonstrated successful operation in all of its design modes and served as a prototype developmental test bed for the Mod-0A operational wind turbines which are currently used on utility networks. The mechanical and control system are described as they evolved in operational tests and some of the experience with various systems in the downwind rotor configurations are elaborated.

  2. Chemical element concentrations in four lichens on a transect entering Voyageurs National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J.; Wetmore, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    A three factor transect study was conducted to test the hypothesis that chemical elements from air emissions in the vicinity of International Falls, Minnesota could not be detected in lichens along a 24 km transect reaching into Voyageurs National Park. It was hypothesized that element concentrations in lichens would decline exponentially downwind and would reach background values at a distance before the park boundary. Four species (Cladina rangiferina, Evernia mesomorpha, Hypogymnia physodes, and Parmelia sulcata) were sampled at ten sites for 3 years and 17 chemical elements were measured. The most notable result was a curvilinear geographic trend for many elements, which decreased from International Falls and then increased towards the park. This trend was significant for many anthropogenic elements, including S, Hg, Cd, and Cr, and for all four species. This type of distribution pattern has been observed in Hypogymnia physodes in other studies downwind of a steel mill and an oil refinery. Cladina, a ground-dwelling lichen, generally had lower tissue concentrations of the elements than the three epiphytic species. Tissue concentrations over the 3 years of sampling declined an average of 12%. Sufficient evidence exists to conclude that lichen tissue element concentrations in the vicinity of International Falls may be related to local air emissions, and that an exponential decline of element concentrations downwind of the sources does not apply to this situation.

  3. Characterisation of airborne particulate pollution in the Cu smelter and former mining town of Karabash, South Ural Mountains of Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, B J; Udachin, V; Purvis, O W; Spiro, B; Cressey, G; Jones, G C

    2004-11-01

    Airborne total suspended particulates (TSP), dusts from smelter blast furnace and converter stacks, and filtrates of snow melt waters have been characterised in the Cu smelter and former mining town of Karabash, Russia. TSP was collected at sites up- and downwind of the smelter and large waste and tailings dumps (Oct. 2000 and July 2001). Methods for particle size, mineralogical and elemental determinations have been tested and described, and a new PSD-MicroSOURCE XRD technique developed for the mineralogical analysis of microsamples on filter substrates. TSP in downwind samples has a mean equivalent spherical diameter of 0.5 microm (s.d. = 0.2) and was found to be 100% respirable. The main element of human health/environmental concern, above Russian maximum permitted levels (1 microg m(-3), average over any time period), was Pb which was measured at 16-30 microg m(-3) in downwind samples. Individual particulates mainly consisted of complex mixtures of anglesite (PbSO4), Zn2SnO4 and poorly ordered Zn sulphates. From experimental and theoretical considerations, a high proportion of contained Pb, Zn, Cd and As in this material is considered to be in a readily bioavailable form. Chemical and mineralogical differences between the TSP, stack dusts and snow samples are discussed, as well as the implications for human and regional environmental health.

  4. Emissions from mesoscale in-situ oil (diesel) fires: the Mobile 1994 experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.; Ackerman, F.; Lambert, P.; Zhendi, W.; Nelson, R.; Goldthorp, M.; Wang, D.; Steenkammer, A.; Turpin, R.; Campagna, P.; Graham, L.; Hiltabrand, R.

    1996-01-01

    The various aspects of in-situ burning of diesel oil were studied in a series of three mesoscale burns. The burn was conducted in a 15 X 15 m steel pan with an outer berm filled with salt water pumped from Mobile Bay. The diesel fuel which was released and floated on 0.6 metre of water, was ignited and left to burn for about 25 minutes, after-which the water under the burns was analyzed. Four downwind ground stations were set up to conduct extensive sampling and monitoring of the smoke plumes in order to determine their emissions. Particulate samples from the air were analysed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); these were found to be lower in the soot than in the starting oil. Particulates in the air were found to be greater than recommended exposure levels only up to 100 metres downwind at ground level. The study showed that diesel burns produced about 4 times more particulate matter than a similar-sized crude oil burn. The particulate matter was distributed exponentially downwind from the fire. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using multiple gas chromatographic techniques. The results of 148 substance analyses were presented. 6 refs., 32 tabs., 12 figs

  5. Contribution of regional-scale fire events to ozone and PM2.5 ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model, Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model, and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical grid model. The modeling system was applied to track the contribution from a wildfire (Wallow) and prescribed fire (Flint Hills) using both source sensitivity and source apportionment approaches. The model estimated fire contribution to primary and secondary pollutants are comparable using source sensitivity (brute-force zero out) and source apportionment (Integrated Source Apportionment Method) approaches. Model estimated O3 enhancement relative to CO is similar to values reported in literature indicating the modeling system captures the range of O3 inhibition possible near fires and O3 production both near the fire and downwind. O3 and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are formed in the fire plume and transported downwind along with highly reactive VOC species such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde that are both emitted by the fire and rapidly produced in the fire plume by VOC oxidation reactions. PAN and aldehydes contribute to continued downwind O3 production. The transport and thermal decomposition of PAN to nitrogen oxides (NOX) enables O3 production in areas

  6. Winds and the distribution of nearshore phytoplankton in a stratified lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Hélène

    2017-10-01

    The distribution of phytoplankton in lakes is notoriously patchy and dynamic, but wind-driven currents and algal buoyancy/motility are thought to determine where algae accumulate. In this study, nearshore phytoplankton were sampled from different parts of a lake basin twice a day for 4-5 consecutive days, in the spring and in late summer, to test whether short-term changes in phytoplankton biomass and community composition can be predicted from wind-driven currents. On windy days, phytoplankton biomass was higher at downwind than at upwind nearshore sites, and the magnitude of this difference increased linearly with increasing wind speed. However, contrary to the generally assumed downwind phytoplankton aggregations, these differences were mostly due to upwelling activity and the dilution of phytoplankton at upwind nearshore sites. The distribution of individual taxa was also related to wind speed, but only during late stratification (except for cryptophytes), and these relationships were consistent with the buoyancy and motility of each group. On windy days, large diatoms and cyanobacteria concentrated upwind, neutrally buoyant taxa (green algae, small diatoms) were homogeneously distributed, and motile taxa (cryptophytes, chrysophytes, dinoflagellates) concentrated downwind. Predictable differences in the biomass and composition of phytoplankton communities could affect the efficiency of trophic transfers in nearshore areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of Remote Sensing and Dust Modelling to Evaluate Ecosystem Phenology and Pollen Dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Sprigg, William A.; Watts, Carol; Shaw, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The impact of pollen release and downwind concentrations can be evaluated utilizing remote sensing. Previous NASA studies have addressed airborne dust prediction systems PHAiRS (Public Health Applications in Remote Sensing) which have determined that pollen forecasts and simulations are possible. By adapting the deterministic dust model (as an in-line system with the National Weather Service operational forecast model) used in PHAiRS to simulate downwind dispersal of pollen, initializing the model with pollen source regions from MODIS, assessing the results a rapid prototype concept can be produced. We will present the results of our effort to develop a deterministic model for predicting and simulating pollen emission and downwind concentration to study details or phenology and meteorology and their dependencies, and the promise of a credible real time forecast system to support public health and agricultural science and service. Previous studies have been done with PHAiRS research, the use of NASA data, the dust model and the PHAiRS potential to improve public health and environmental services long into the future.

  8. Rainfall Modification by Urban Areas: New Perspectives from TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Pierce, Harold F.; Negri, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Data from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar (PR) were employed to identify warm season rainfall (1998-2000) patterns around Atlanta, Montgomery, Nashville, San Antonio, Waco, and Dallas. Results reveal an average increase of -28% in monthly rainfall rates within 30-60 kilometers downwind of the metropolis with a modest increase of 5.6% over the metropolis. Portions of the downwind area exhibit increases as high as 51%. The percentage changes are relative to an upwind control area. It was also found that maximum rainfall rates in the downwind impact area exceeded the mean value in the upwind control area by 48% - 116%. The maximum value was generally found at an average distance of 39 km from the edge of the urban center or 64 km from the center of the city. Results are consistent with METROMEX studies of St. Louis almost two decades ago and with more recent studies near Atlanta. Future work is extending the investigation to Phoenix, Arizona, an arid U.S. city, and several international cities like Mexico City, Johannesburg, and Brasilia. The study establishes the possibility of utilizing satellite-based rainfall estimates for examining rainfall modification by urban areas on global scales and over longer time periods. Such research has implications for weather forecasting, urban planning, water resource management, and understanding human impact on the environment and climate.

  9. Trace-metal concentrations in African dust: effects of long-distance transport and implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia; Lamothe, Paul; Morman, Suzette; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Gilkes, Robert; Prakongkep, Nattaporn

    2010-01-01

    The Sahara and Sahel lose billions of tons of eroded mineral soils annually to the Americas and Caribbean, Europe and Asia via atmospheric transport. African dust was collected from a dust source region (Mali, West Africa) and from downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad-Tobago (TT) and U.S. Virgin Islands (VI)] and analysed for 32 trace-elements. Elemental composition of African dust samples was similar to that of average upper continental crust (UCC), with some enrichment or depletion of specific trace-elements. Pb enrichment was observed only in dust and dry deposition samples from the source region and was most likely from local use of leaded gasoline. Dust particles transported long-distances (VI and TT) exhibited increased enrichment of Mo and minor depletion of other elements relative to source region samples. This suggests that processes occurring during long-distance transport of dust produce enrichment/depletion of specific elements. Bioaccessibility of trace-metals in samples was tested in simulated human fluids (gastric and lung) and was found to be greater in downwind than source region samples, for some metals (e.g., As). The large surface to volume ratio of the dust particles (<2.5 µm) at downwind sites may be a factor.

  10. Darrieus wind-turbine and pump performance for low-lift irrigation pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, L. J.; Sharif, M.

    1981-10-01

    In the Great Plains about 15 percent of the irrigation water pumped on farms comes from surface water sources; for the United States as a whole, the figure is about 22 percent. Because of forecast fuel shortages, there is a need to develop alternative energy sources such as wind power for surface water pumping. Specific objectives of this investigation were to: design and assemble a prototype wind powered pumping system for low lift irrigation pumping; determine performance of the prototype system; design and test an irrigation system using the wind powered prototype in a design and test an farm application; and determine the size combinations of wind turbines, tailwater pits, and temporary storage reservoirs needed for successful farm application of wind powered tailwater pumping systems in western Kansas. The power source selected was a two bladed, 6 m diameter, 9 m tall Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine with 0.10 solidity and 36.1 M(2) swept area.

  11. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  12. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, S F; Wang, Y; Liu, Z C; Zhu, Z T; Ning, C; Zhao, L F

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG κ-ε model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head

  13. Model predictive control of trailing edge flaps on a wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaignet, Damien Bruno

    of the wind turbine fatigue and extreme loads. This potential was confirmed with wind tunnel tests made on blade sections with trailing edge flaps and on a scaled two-bladed wind turbine in a wind tunnel. The work presented in this thesis includes a full-scale test run on a Vestas V27 wind turbine equipped...... fatigue loads by 23%, but also the main shaft and the tower fatigue loads by up to 32%. Extreme loads during normal production also benefit from the trailing edge flaps. At last, the same controller was run on the Vestas V27 wind turbine located at the Risø Campus of the Technical University of Denmark......Trailing edge flaps on wind turbine blades have been investigated for several years. Aero-servoelastic simulations carried out with different simulation tools, trailing edge flaps configurations and controller designs proved that trailing edge flaps are a suitable solution for reducing some...

  14. The design of high-speed windmills suitable for driving electric generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, G J

    1975-01-01

    A simple windmill theory is presented for designing a small, horizontal axis windmill for powering an automobile-type generator used along with a storage battery. Windmills designed by the method presented in this paper have maximum efficiencies in the order of 0.40 to 0.45, which approaches 75% of the theoretical maximum. Wind tunnel tests were performed on a two-bladed unit designed for a tip speed/wind speed ratio of 7. Maximum efficiency was close to 0.45 at a tip speed/wind speed ratio of slightly over 6. This windmill, if fitted directly to a specially wound three-brush automobile type generator, wil begin to charge a 6-volt battery at a wind speed of 7.5-8 mph. 2 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a Savonius wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Mao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Savonius wind turbine is a common vertical axis wind turbine which simply comprises two or three arc-type blades and can generate power under poor wind conditions. With the aim of increasing the turbine’s power efficiency, the effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a typical two-bladed Savonius wind turbine is investigated with a transient computational fluid dynamics method. Simulations were based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes equations, and the renormalization group k − ε turbulent model was utilized. The numerical method was validated with existing experimental data. The results indicate that the turbine with a blade arc angle of 160 ∘ generates the maximum power coefficient, 0.2836, which is 8.37% higher than that from a conventional Savonius turbine.

  16. The Actuator Surface Model: A New Navier-Stokes Based Model for Rotor Computations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Zhang, J.H.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new numerical technique for simulating two-dimensional wind turbine flow. The method, denoted as the 2D actuator surface technique, consists of a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver in which the pressure distribution is represented by body forces that are distributed along ....... In the last part, the actuator surface technique is applied to compute the flow past a two-bladed vertical axis wind turbine equipped with NACA 0012 airfoils. Comparisons with experimental data show an encouraging performance of the method.......This paper presents a new numerical technique for simulating two-dimensional wind turbine flow. The method, denoted as the 2D actuator surface technique, consists of a two-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver in which the pressure distribution is represented by body forces that are distributed along...

  17. An experimental study on improvement of Savonius rotor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H. Mahmoud

    2012-03-01

    In this work different geometries of Savonius wind turbine are experimentally studied in order to determine the most effective operation parameters. It was found that, the two blades rotor is more efficient than three and four ones. The rotor with end plates gives higher efficiency than those of without end plates. Double stage rotors have higher performance compared to single stage rotors. The rotors without overlap ratio (β are better in operation than those with overlap. The results show also that the power coefficient increases with rising the aspect ratio (α. The conclusions from the measurements of the static torque for each rotor at different wind speeds verify the above summarized results of this work.

  18. Pressure coefficient evolutions on the blades of a Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, A.; Guignard, S. [UMRR 7343, Marseilles (France). Lab. IUSTI; Kamoun, B. [Faculte des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia). Lab. de Physique

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of the pressure field distribution on the blades of a vertical axis Savonius wind machine are presented. The rotor used in the wind tunnel is a two blades cylindrical shape with a central gap. Pressure gauges are placed on each side of a blade, so the pressure jumps between intrados and extrados of a blade during a whole rotation are drawn. In the static configuration, the machine is disposed at various incidences. The determination of pressure jumps allows to calculate the static torque of the machine versus the incidence angle. In the dynamic situation the machine is rotating at various frequencies and gauges signals are varying dynamically of course with the incidence. The dynamic torque coefficient is calculated. Evolutions of the starting torque and starting conditions are then described and dynamic effects on torque evolution are presented. (orig.)

  19. Blade number impact on pressure and performance of archimedes screw turbine using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Syuhada, Ahmad; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2018-02-01

    Many rivers in Indonesia can be used as source of mini/micro hydro power plant using low head turbine. The most suitable type of turbine used in fluid flow with low head is the Archimedes screw turbine. The Archimedes screw hydro turbine is a relative newcomer to the small-scale hydropower that can work efficiently on heads as low as 10 meter. In this study, the performance of Archimedes water turbines that has different blade numbers that are thoroughly evaluated to obtain proper blade configuration. For this purpose, numerical simulations are used to predict the pressure changes that occur along the turbine. The simulation results show that turbines with an amount of two blades have more sloping pressure distribution so that it has better stability.

  20. The fast code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, L.N.; Wilson, R.E. [Oregon State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The FAST Code which is capable of determining structural loads on a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data are given at two wind speeds for the ESI-80. The FAST Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees of freedom for blade bending, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffnesses, and weights to differ and models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting, occurrence histograms, and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST Code and test results is good. (au)

  1. Effect of Selection of Design Parameters on the Optimization of a Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine via Genetic Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alpman, Emre

    2014-01-01

    The effect of selecting the twist angle and chord length distributions on the wind turbine blade design was investigated by performing aerodynamic optimization of a two-bladed stall regulated horizontal axis wind turbine. Twist angle and chord length distributions were defined using Bezier curve using 3, 5, 7 and 9 control points uniformly distributed along the span. Optimizations performed using a micro-genetic algorithm with populations composed of 5, 10, 15, 20 individuals showed that, the number of control points clearly affected the outcome of the process; however the effects were different for different population sizes. The results also showed the superiority of micro-genetic algorithm over a standard genetic algorithm, for the selected population sizes. Optimizations were also performed using a macroevolutionary algorithm and the resulting best blade design was compared with that yielded by micro-genetic algorithm

  2. CFD simulation of a 2 bladed multi megawatt wind turbine with flexible rotor connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, L.; Luhmann, B.; Rösch, K.-N.; Lutz, T.; Cheng, P.-W.; Krämer, E.

    2016-09-01

    An innovative passive load reduction concept for a two bladed 3.4 MW wind turbine is investigated by a conjoint CFD and MBS - BEM methodology. The concept consists of a flexible hub mount which allows a tumbling motion of the rotor. First, the system is simulated with a MBS tool coupled to a BEM code. Then, the resulting motion of the rotor is extracted from the simulation and applied on the CFD simulation as prescribed motion. The aerodynamic results show a significant load reduction on the support structure. Hub pitching and yawing moment amplitudes are reduced by more than 50% in a vertically sheared inflow. Furthermore, the suitability of the MBS - BEM approach for the simulation of the load reduction system is shown.

  3. Rotorblades for large wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerle, P. M.; Hahn, M.

    1981-09-01

    Details of the design work and manufacturing process for a running prototype production of 25 m long composite rotor blades for wind energy generators are presented. The blades are of the 'integrated spar design' type and consist of a glass fiber skin and a PVC core. A computer program (and its action tree) is used for the analysis of the multi-connected hybrid cross-section, in order to achieve optimal design specifications. Four tools are needed for the production of two blade types, including two molds, and milling, cutting and drilling jigs. The manufacturing processes for the molds, jigs and blades are discussed in detail. The final acceptance of the blade is based on a static test where the flexibility of the blade is checked by magnitude of load and deflection, and a dynamic test evaluating the natural frequencies in bending and torsion.

  4. Navier-Stokes and Comprehensive Analysis Performance Predictions of the NREL Phase VI Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, Earl P. N.; Burklund, Michael D.; Johnson, Wayne

    2003-01-01

    A vortex lattice code, CAMRAD II, and a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stoke code, OVERFLOW-D2, were used to predict the aerodynamic performance of a two-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine. All computations were compared with experimental data that was collected at the NASA Ames Research Center 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Computations were performed for both axial as well as yawed operating conditions. Various stall delay models and dynamics stall models were used by the CAMRAD II code. Comparisons between the experimental data and computed aerodynamic loads show that the OVERFLOW-D2 code can accurately predict the power and spanwise loading of a wind turbine rotor.

  5. Quadcopter thrust optimization with ducted-propeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuantama Endrowednes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In relation to quadcopter body frame model, propeller can be categorized into propeller with ducted and without ducted. This study present differences between those two using CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics method. Both categories utilize two blade-propeller with diameter of 406 (mm. Propeller rotation generates acceleration per time unit on the volume of air. Based on the behavior of generated air velocity, ducted propeller can be modeled into three versions. The generated thrust and performance on each model were calculated to determine the best model. The use of ducted propeller increases the total weight of quadcopter and also total thrust. The influence of this modeling were analyzed in detail with variation of angular velocity propeller from 1000 (rpm to 9000 (rpm. Besides the distance between propeller tip and ducted barrier, the size of ducted is also an important part in thrust optimization and total weight minimization of quadcopter.

  6. Reduction of wind powered generator cost by use of a one bladed rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruyn, R R; Wiesner, W; Ljungstroem, O [ed.

    1976-01-01

    Cost analysis supported by preliminary design studies of one and two bladed wind powered generator units shows that a 30% reduction in acquisition cost can be achieved with a one bladed design. Designs studied were sized for an output power of 1000 kilowatts. The one bladed design has the potential for reducing acquisition cost to $680 per available kilowatt if the unit is located in a region with mean surface winds of 15 mph. Vibratory loads of the one bladed design are significant and will require considerable design attention. The one per rev Coriolis torque caused by blade flapping is the most significant problem. The major source of blade flapping will be the velocity gradient of the ground boundary layer. A torsional vibration isolating coupling may be required in the generator drive to reduce the loads due to this vibratory torque. An inclined flapping hinge also is desirable to cause pitch-flap coupling that will suppress blade flap motions.

  7. Modeling the effects of control systems of wind turbine fatigue life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, K.G.; Laino, D.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In this study we look at the effect on fatigue life of two types of control systems. First, we investigate the Micon 65, an upwind, three bladed turbine with a simple yaw control system. Results indicate that increased fatigue damage to the blade root can be attributed to continuous operation at significant yaw error allowed by the control system. Next, we model a two-bladed teetered rotor turbine using three different control systems to adjust flap deflections. The first two limit peak power output, the third limits peak power and cyclic power output over the entire range of operation. Results for simulations conducted both with and without active control are compared to determine how active control affects fatigue life. Improvement in fatigue lifetimes were seen for all control schemes, with increasing fatigue lifetime corresponding to increased flap deflection activity. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Synchronisation phenomenon in three blades rotor driven by regular or chaotic oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szmit Zofia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the paper is to analysed the influence of the different types of excitation on the synchronisation phenomenon in case of the rotating system composed of a rigid hub and three flexible composite beams. In the model is assumed that two blades, due to structural differences, are de-tuned. Numerical calculation are divided on two parts, firstly the rotating system is exited by a torque given by regular harmonic function, than in the second part the torque is produced by chaotic Duffing oscillator. The synchronisation phenomenon between the beams is analysed both either for regular or chaotic motions. Partial differential equations of motion are solved numerically and resonance curves, time series and Poincaré maps are presented for selected excitation torques.

  9. Rotorblades for large wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wackerle, P M; Hahn, M

    1981-01-01

    Details of the design work and manufacturing process for a running prototype production of 25 m long composite rotor blades for wind energy generators are presented. The blades are of the 'integrated spar design' type and consist of a glass fiber skin and a PVC core. A computer program (and its action tree) is used for the analysis of the multi-connected hybrid cross-section, in order to achieve optimal design specifications. Four tools are needed for the production of two blade types, including two molds, and milling, cutting and drilling jigs. The manufacturing processes for the molds, jigs and blades are discussed in detail. The final acceptance of the blade is based on a static test where the flexibility of the blade is checked by magnitude of load and deflection, and a dynamic test evaluating the natural frequencies in bending and torsion.

  10. Effect of Number of Blades on Performance of Ceiling Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeeb Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of number of blades on ceiling fan performance is discussed. This approach helps to satisfy tradeoff between high air flow (performance and power consumption (energy efficiency. Specifically, variation from two to six blades is considered with nonlinear forward sweep profile. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS technique is used to model the flow field induced by the ceiling fan inside a generic room. The performance is gauged through response parameters namely volumetric flow rate, mass flow rate, torque and energy efficiency. The results indicate that mass and volumetric flow rates are maximized for six blade configuration and energy efficiency is maximized for two blade configuration. The study indicates the importance of tradeoff between high air flow through ceiling fan and associated energy efficiency.

  11. The modeling of the dynamic behavior of an unsymmetrical rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pǎrǎuşanu, Ioan; Gheorghiu, Horia; Petre, Cristian; Jiga, Gabriel; Crişan, Nicoleta

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the modeling of the dynamic behaviour of unsymmetrical rotors in relatively simple quantitative terms. Numerical simulations show that the shaft orthotropy produces a peak of resonant vibration about half the regular critical speed and, for small damping, a range of possible unstable behavior between the two critical speeds. Rotors having the shaft and/or the disks with unequal diametral moments of inertia (e.g., two-bladed small airplane propellers, wind turbines and fans) are dynamically unstable above a certain speed and some of these may return to a stable condition at a sufficiently high speed, depending on the particular magnitudes of the gyroscopic coupling and the inertia inequality.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Wind Turbine Rotors Autorotation by Using the Modified LS-STAG Immersed Boundary Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia K. Marchevsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A software package is developed for numerical simulation of wind turbine rotors autorotation by using the modified LS-STAG level-set/cut-cell immersed boundary method. The level-set function is used for immersed boundaries description. Algorithm of level-set function construction for complex-shaped airfoils, based on Bézier curves usage, is proposed. Also, algorithm for the level-set function recalculation at any time without reconstructing the Bézier curve for each new rotor position is described. The designed second-order Butterworth low-pass filter for aerodynamic torque filtration for simulations using coarse grids is presented. To verify the modified LS-STAG method, the flow past autorotating Savonius rotor with two blades was simulated at Re=1.96·105.

  13. Reduced design load basis for ultimate blade loads estimation in multidisciplinary design optimization frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavese, Christian; Tibaldi, Carlo; Larsen, Torben J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to provide a fast and reliable approach to estimate ultimate blade loads for a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework. For blade design purposes, the standards require a large amount of computationally expensive simulations, which cannot be efficiently run each cost...... function evaluation of an MDO process. This work describes a method that allows integrating the calculation of the blade load envelopes inside an MDO loop. Ultimate blade load envelopes are calculated for a baseline design and a design obtained after an iteration of an MDO. These envelopes are computed...... for a full standard design load basis (DLB) and a deterministic reduced DLB. Ultimate loads extracted from the two DLBs with the two blade designs each are compared and analyzed. Although the reduced DLB supplies ultimate loads of different magnitude, the shape of the estimated envelopes are similar...

  14. Particle image and acoustic Doppler velocimetry analysis of a cross-flow turbine wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Cross-flow turbines have advantageous properties for converting kinetic energy in wind and water currents to rotational mechanical energy and subsequently electrical power. A thorough understanding of cross-flow turbine wakes aids understanding of rotor flow physics, assists geometric array design, and informs control strategies for individual turbines in arrays. In this work, the wake physics of a scale model cross-flow turbine are investigated experimentally. Three-component velocity measurements are taken downstream of a two-bladed turbine in a recirculating water channel. Time-resolved stereoscopic particle image and acoustic Doppler velocimetry are compared for planes normal to and distributed along the turbine rotational axis. Wake features are described using proper orthogonal decomposition, dynamic mode decomposition, and the finite-time Lyapunov exponent. Consequences for downstream turbine placement are discussed in conjunction with two-turbine array experiments.

  15. Design and fabrication of a composite wind turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. A.; Haley, R. G.

    1980-01-01

    The design considerations are described which led to the combination of materials used for the MOD-I wind turbine generator rotor and to the fabrication processes which were required to accomplish it. It is noted that the design problem was to create a rotor for a 2500 kW wind turbine generator. The rotor was to consist of two blades, each with a length of 97.5 feet and a weight of less than 21,000 pounds. The spanwise frequency is 1.17-1.45 Hz, and the chordwise frequency 2.80-2.98 Hz. The design life of the blade is 30 years, or 4.35 x 10 to the 8th cycles. The structures of the spars and trailing edges are described, and the adhesive bonding system is discussed.

  16. Multi-model evaluation of short-lived pollutant distributions over east Asia during summer 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quennehen, B.; Raut, J.-C.; Law, K. S.; Daskalakis, N.; Ancellet, G.; Clerbaux, C.; Kim, S.-W.; Lund, M. T.; Myhre, G.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Safieddine, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Thomas, J. L.; Tsyro, S.; Bazureau, A.; Bellouin, N.; Hu, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Klimont, Z.; Kupiainen, K.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Quaas, J.; Rumbold, S. T.; Schulz, M.; Cherian, R.; Shimizu, A.; Wang, J.; Yoon, S.-C.; Zhu, T.

    2016-08-01

    The ability of seven state-of-the-art chemistry-aerosol models to reproduce distributions of tropospheric ozone and its precursors, as well as aerosols over eastern Asia in summer 2008, is evaluated. The study focuses on the performance of models used to assess impacts of pollutants on climate and air quality as part of the EU ECLIPSE project. Models, run using the same ECLIPSE emissions, are compared over different spatial scales to in situ surface, vertical profiles and satellite data. Several rather clear biases are found between model results and observations, including overestimation of ozone at rural locations downwind of the main emission regions in China, as well as downwind over the Pacific. Several models produce too much ozone over polluted regions, which is then transported downwind. Analysis points to different factors related to the ability of models to simulate VOC-limited regimes over polluted regions and NOx limited regimes downwind. This may also be linked to biases compared to satellite NO2, indicating overestimation of NO2 over and to the north of the northern China Plain emission region. On the other hand, model NO2 is too low to the south and west of this region and over South Korea/Japan. Overestimation of ozone is linked to systematic underestimation of CO particularly at rural sites and downwind of the main Chinese emission regions. This is likely to be due to enhanced destruction of CO by OH. Overestimation of Asian ozone and its transport downwind implies that radiative forcing from this source may be overestimated. Model-observation discrepancies over Beijing do not appear to be due to emission controls linked to the Olympic Games in summer 2008.With regard to aerosols, most models reproduce the satellite-derived AOD patterns over eastern China. Our study nevertheless reveals an overestimation of ECLIPSE model mean surface BC and sulphate aerosols in urban China in summer 2008. The effect of the short-term emission mitigation in Beijing

  17. Effects of emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant on precipitation, snowpack, and surface-water chemistry in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area, Colorado, 1995-2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, M. Alisa; Campbell, Donald H.; Ingersoll, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation, snowpack, and surface-water samples collected during 1995-2003 were analyzed to evaluate the effects of emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant on water chemistry in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area. The Hayden powerplant, one of two large coal-fired powerplants in the Yampa Valley, was retrofitted with control systems during late 1998 and 1999 to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide--the primary precursors of haze and acidic precipitation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, evaluated three water-chemistry data sets: wet-only precipitation chemistry from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, snowpack chemistry from the Rocky Mountain snowpack network, and surface-water chemistry from a U.S. Geological Survey long-term lakes monitoring program. Concentrations and deposition rates of selected constituents were compared for the periods before and after emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant. Data collected during 1995-98 were used to represent the pre-control period, and data collected during 2000-2003 were used to represent the post-control period. Ten stations in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program were evaluated including two that were directly downwind from the Hayden powerplant (Dry Lake and Buffalo Pass) and eight that were upwind or more distant (more than 100 kilometers) from the powerplant. Precipitation amount at all 10 precipitation stations was lower in the post-control period than the pre-control period as a result of a regional drought that persisted during the post-control period. In contrast to precipitation amount, there was no consistent pattern of change in sulfate concentrations between periods, indicating that the drought did not have a concentrating effect on sulfate or that trends in regional sulfur dioxide emissions masked its influence. Sulfate concentrations increased at three stations between periods, remained the

  18. Multi-model evaluation of short-lived pollutant distributions over east Asia during summer 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Quennehen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of seven state-of-the-art chemistry–aerosol models to reproduce distributions of tropospheric ozone and its precursors, as well as aerosols over eastern Asia in summer 2008, is evaluated. The study focuses on the performance of models used to assess impacts of pollutants on climate and air quality as part of the EU ECLIPSE project. Models, run using the same ECLIPSE emissions, are compared over different spatial scales to in situ surface, vertical profiles and satellite data. Several rather clear biases are found between model results and observations, including overestimation of ozone at rural locations downwind of the main emission regions in China, as well as downwind over the Pacific. Several models produce too much ozone over polluted regions, which is then transported downwind. Analysis points to different factors related to the ability of models to simulate VOC-limited regimes over polluted regions and NOx limited regimes downwind. This may also be linked to biases compared to satellite NO2, indicating overestimation of NO2 over and to the north of the northern China Plain emission region. On the other hand, model NO2 is too low to the south and west of this region and over South Korea/Japan. Overestimation of ozone is linked to systematic underestimation of CO particularly at rural sites and downwind of the main Chinese emission regions. This is likely to be due to enhanced destruction of CO by OH. Overestimation of Asian ozone and its transport downwind implies that radiative forcing from this source may be overestimated. Model-observation discrepancies over Beijing do not appear to be due to emission controls linked to the Olympic Games in summer 2008.With regard to aerosols, most models reproduce the satellite-derived AOD patterns over eastern China. Our study nevertheless reveals an overestimation of ECLIPSE model mean surface BC and sulphate aerosols in urban China in summer 2008. The effect of the short-term emission

  19. Using models to interpret the impact of roadside barriers on near-road air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Seyedmorteza; Ahangar, Faraz Enayati; Schulte, Nico; Venkatram, Akula

    2016-08-01

    The question this paper addresses is whether semi-empirical dispersion models based on data from controlled wind tunnel and tracer experiments can describe data collected downwind of a sound barrier next to a real-world urban highway. Both models are based on the mixed wake model described in Schulte et al. (2014). The first neglects the effects of stability on dispersion, and the second accounts for reduced entrainment into the wake of the barrier under unstable conditions. The models were evaluated with data collected downwind of a kilometer-long barrier next to the I-215 freeway running next to the University of California campus in Riverside. The data included measurements of 1) ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations at several distances from the barrier, 2) micrometeorological variables upwind and downwind of the barrier, and 3) traffic flow separated by automobiles and trucks. Because the emission factor for UFP is highly uncertain, we treated it as a model parameter whose value is obtained by fitting model estimates to observations of UFP concentrations measured at distances where the barrier impact is not dominant. Both models provide adequate descriptions of both the magnitude and the spatial variation of observed concentrations. The good performance of the models reinforces the conclusion from Schulte et al. (2014) that the presence of the barrier is equivalent to shifting the line sources on the road upwind by a distance of about HU/u∗ where H is the barrier height, U is the wind velocity at half of the barrier height, and u∗ is the friction velocity. The models predict that a 4 m barrier results in a 35% reduction in average concentration within 40 m (10 times the barrier height) of the barrier, relative to the no-barrier site. This concentration reduction is 55% if the barrier height is doubled.

  20. Spatial variations in soil and plant nitrogen levels caused by ammonia deposition near a cattle feedlot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jianlin; Chen, Deli; Bai, Mei; Sun, Jianlei; Lam, Shu Kee; Mosier, Arvin; Liu, Xinliang; Li, Yong

    2018-03-01

    Cattle feedlots are significant ammonia (NH3) emission sources, and cause high NH3 deposition. This study was conducted to investigate the responses of soil mineral nitrogen (N), percent cover of plant species, leaf N content, and leaf δ15N to NH3 deposition around a 17,500-head cattle feedlot in Victoria, Australia. Soil samples were collected in May 2015 at 100-m intervals along eight downwind transects, and plant samples were collected in June 2015 from five sites at 50- to 300-m intervals along a grassland transect within 1 km downwind of the feedlot. NH3 deposition was also monitored at five sites within 1 km downwind of the feedlot. The estimated NH3-N deposition rates ranged from 2.9 kg N ha-1 yr-1 at 1 km from the feedlot to 203 kg N ha-1 yr-1 at 100 m from the feedlot. The soil mineral N content was high (22-98 mg kg-1, mainly nitrate), significantly decreased with increasing distance from the feedlot, and significantly increased with increasing NH3-N deposition. With increasing NH3-N deposition, the percent cover of the herb species Cymbonotus lawsonianus increased significantly, but that of the grass species Microlaena stipoides decreased significantly. The leaf total N contents of the grass and herb species were high (>4%), and were linearly, positively correlated with the NH3-N deposition rate. Leaf δ15N values were linearly, negatively correlated with the N deposition rate. These results indicate that the leaf N contents and δ15N values of C. lawsonianus and M. stipoides may be bioindicators of N deposition.

  1. Self-similarity and flow characteristics of vertical-axis wind turbine wakes: an LES study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Dabiri, John O.

    2017-04-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is coupled with a turbine model to study the structure of the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). In the simulations, a tuning-free anisotropic minimum dissipation model is used to parameterise the subfilter stress tensor, while the turbine-induced forces are modelled with an actuator line technique. The LES framework is first validated in the simulation of the wake behind a model straight-bladed VAWT placed in the water channel and then used to study the wake structure downwind of a full-scale VAWT sited in the atmospheric boundary layer. In particular, the self-similarity of the wake is examined, and it is found that the wake velocity deficit can be well characterised by a two-dimensional multivariate Gaussian distribution. By assuming a self-similar Gaussian distribution of the velocity deficit, and applying mass and momentum conservation, an analytical model is developed and tested to predict the maximum velocity deficit downwind of the turbine. Also, a simple parameterisation of VAWTs for LES with very coarse grid resolutions is proposed, in which the turbine is modelled as a rectangular porous plate with the same thrust coefficient. The simulation results show that, after some downwind distance (x/D ≈ 6), both actuator line and rectangular porous plate models have similar predictions for the mean velocity deficit. These results are of particular importance in simulations of large wind farms where, due to the coarse spatial resolution, the flow around individual VAWTs is not resolved.

  2. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  3. Characteristics of cloud-to-ground lightning activity over Seoul, South Korea in relation to an urban effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-to-ground (CG lightning flash data collected by the lightning detection network installed at the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA have been used to study the urban effect on lightning activity over and around Seoul, the largest metropolitan city of South Korea, for the period of 1989–1999. Negative and positive flash density and the percentage of positive flashes have been calculated. Calculation reveals that an enhancement of approximately 60% and 42% are observed, respectively, for negative and positive flash density over and downwind of the city. The percentage decrease of positive flashes occurs over and downwind of Seoul and the amount of decrease is nearly 20% compared to upwind values. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by Steiger et al. (2002 and Westcott (1995. CG lightning activities have also been considered in relation to annual averages of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm and sulphur dioxide (SO2 concentrations. Interesting results are found, indicating that the higher concentration of SO2 contributes to the enhancement of CG lightning flashes. On the other hand, the contribution from PM10 concentration has not appeared in this study to be as significant as SO2 in the enhancement of CG lightning flashes. Correlation coefficients of 0.33 and 0.64 are found between the change in CG lightning flashes and the PM10 and SO2, respectively, for upwind to downwind areas, suggesting a significant influence of the increased concentration of SO2 on the enhancement of CG flashes.

  4. Ammonia and Methane Dairy Emission Plumes in the San Joaquin Valley of California from Individual Feedlot to Regional Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David J.; Sun, Kang; Pan, Da; Zondlo, Mark A.; Nowak, John B.; Liu, Zhen; Diskin, Glenn; Sachse, Glen; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Ferrare, Richard; hide

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural ammonia (NH3) emissions are highly uncertain, with high spatiotemporal variability and a lack of widespread in situ measurements. Regional NH3 emission estimates using mass balance or emission ratio approaches are uncertain due to variable NH3 sources and sinks as well as unknown plume correlations with other dairy source tracers. We characterize the spatial distributions of NH3 and methane (CH4) dairy plumes using in situ surface and airborne measurements in the Tulare dairy feedlot region of the San Joaquin Valley, California, during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality 2013 field campaign. Surface NH3 and CH4 mixing ratios exhibit large variability with maxima localized downwind of individual dairy feedlots. The geometric mean NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio derived from surface measurements is 0.15 +/- 0.03 ppmv ppmv-1. Individual dairy feedlots with spatially distinct NH3 and CH4 source pathways led to statistically significant correlations between NH3 and CH4 in 68% of the 69 downwind plumes sampled. At longer sampling distances, the NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio decreases 20-30%, suggesting the potential for NH3 deposition as a loss term for plumes within a few kilometers downwind of feedlots. Aircraft boundary layer transect measurements directly above surface mobile measurements in the dairy region show comparable gradients and geometric mean enhancement ratios within measurement uncertainties, even when including NH3 partitioning to submicron particles. Individual NH3 and CH4 plumes sampled at close proximity where losses are minimal are not necessarily correlated due to lack of mixing and distinct source pathways. Our analyses have important implications for constraining NH3 sink and plume variability influences on regional NH3 emission estimates and for improving NH3 emission inventory spatial allocations.

  5. Longitudinal study of the contamination of air and of soil surfaces in the vicinity of pig barns by livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Jochen; Friese, Anika; Klees, Sylvia; Tenhagen, Bernd A; Fetsch, Alexandra; Rösler, Uwe; Hartung, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    During 1 year, samples were taken on 4 days, one sample in each season, from pigs, the floor, and the air inside pig barns and from the ambient air and soil at different distances outside six commercial livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA)-positive pig barns in the north and east of Germany. LA-MRSA was isolated from animals, floor, and air samples in the barn, showing a range of airborne LA-MRSA between 6 and 3,619 CFU/m(3) (median, 151 CFU/m(3)). Downwind of the barns, LA-MRSA was detected in low concentrations (11 to 14 CFU/m(3)) at distances of 50 and 150 m; all upwind air samples were negative. In contrast, LA-MRSA was found on soil surfaces at distances of 50, 150, and 300 m downwind from all barns, but no statistical differences could be observed between the proportions of positive soil surface samples at the three different distances. Upwind of the barns, positive soil surface samples were found only sporadically. Significantly more positive LA-MRSA samples were found in summer than in the other seasons both in air and soil samples upwind and downwind of the pig barns. spa typing was used to confirm the identity of LA-MRSA types found inside and outside the barns. The results show that there is regular airborne LA-MRSA transmission and deposition, which are strongly influenced by wind direction and season, of up to at least 300 m around positive pig barns. The described boot sampling method seems suitable to characterize the contamination of the vicinity of LA-MRSA-positive pig barns by the airborne route.

  6. Relationship of infant and fetal mortality to operations at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, Washington State, 1946-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cate, S.; Hansom, J.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of infant and fetal mortality to numbers of nuclear reactors at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation was investigated. Mortality rates were obtained using 36 years of United States vital statistics data. Three different exposure groups were selected based on meteorologic studies of the Hanford area: group 1, counties downwind of Hanford all year; group 2, counties seasonally downwind; and group 3, counties not downwind. Washington state was used as an additional comparison group. Four periods of operation based on fluctuations in numbers of reactors were characterized. Log-linear analysis revealed that the three groups and Washington state had similar trends in infant mortality rates over the four time periods. On the other hand, the trend in fetal mortality rates for group 1 did differ significantly from trends for the two other groups and Washington state. The trends of fetal mortality rates for group 2, group 3, and Washington state were not statistically different. Fetal mortality rates in group 1, however, failed to decline from period 1 (1946-1954) to period 2 (1955-1964) as expected by the trends for the two groups and Washington state. During period 2, the greatest number of reactors were operating. County-specific analysis showed that, of the counties in group 1, the trend in fetal mortality for Benton County, where Hanford is located, was significantly different from that for Washington state. A possible link between Hanford and an excess in fetal deaths is suggested by the deviation in trend of group 1, which appears localized to Benton County and the period of peak activity at Hanford

  7. Environmental Sampling FY03 Annual Report - Understanding the Movement of Mercury on the INEEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael L. Abbott

    2003-01-01

    Environmental mercury measurements were started in Fy-01 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) to monitor downwind impacts from on-going waste treatment operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and to improve our scientific understanding of mercury fate and transport in this region. This document provides a summary of the sampling done in FY04. Continuous total gaseous mercury (TGM) measurements were made using a Tekran Model 2537A mercury vapor analyzer during October 2002 and from February through July 2003. The equipment was deployed in a self-contained field trailer at the Experimental Field Station (EFS) four kilometers downwind (northeast) of INTEC. Mercury surface-to-air flux measurements were made in October 2002 and from February through May 2003 to better understand the fate of the estimated 1500 kg of mercury emitted from 36 years of calciner operations at INTEC and to improve our scientific understanding of mercury environmental cycling in this region. Flux was measured using an INEEL-designed dynamic flux chamber system with a Tekran automated dual sampling (TADS) unit. Diel flux was positively correlated with solar radiation (r = 0.65), air temperature (r = 0.64), and wind speed (r = 0.38), and a general linear model for flux prediction at the INEEL was developed. Reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) was measured at EFS in July using a Tekran Model 1130 mercury speciation unit. Based on comparisons with other published data around the U.S., mercury air concentrations and surface flux rates directly downwind from INTEC were not distinguishable from remote area (non-industrial) background levels during the monitoring period

  8. Flow and sediment transport dynamics in a slot and cauldron blowout and over a foredune, Mason Bay, Stewart Island (Rakiura), NZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesp, Patrick A.; Hilton, Michael; Konlecher, Teresa

    2017-10-01

    This study is the first to simultaneously compare flow and sediment transport through a blowout and over an adjacent foredune, and the first study of flow within a highly sinuous, slot and cauldron blowout. Flow across the foredune transect is similar to that observed in other studies and is primarily modulated by across-dune vegetation density differences. Flow within the blowout is highly complex and exhibits pronounced accelerations and jet flow. It is characterised by marked helicoidal coherent vortices in the mid-regions, and topographically vertically forced flow out of the cauldron portion of the blowout. Instantaneous sediment transport within the blowout is significant compared to transport onto and/or over the adjacent foredune stoss slope and ridge, with the blowout providing a conduit for suspended sediment to reach the downwind foredune upper stoss slope and crest. Medium term (4 months) aeolian sedimentation data indicates sand is accumulating in the blowout entrance while erosion is taking place throughout the majority of the slot, and deposition is occurring downwind of the cauldron on the foredune ridge. The adjacent lower stoss slope of the foredune is accreting while the upper stoss slope is slightly erosional. Longer term (16 months) pot trap data shows that the majority of foredune upper stoss slope and crest accretion occurs via suspended sediment delivery from the blowout, whereas the majority of the suspended sediment arriving to the well-vegetated foredune stoss slope is deposited on the mid-stoss slope. The results of this study indicate one mechanism of how marked alongshore foredune morphological variability evolves due to the role of blowouts in topographically accelerating flow, and delivering significant aeolian sediment downwind to relatively discrete sections of the foredune.

  9. The Canadian experimental HT release of June 10, 1987, US measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.; Murphy, C.E.

    1988-09-01

    In June 1987, an experiment was performed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario, Canada, to study the oxidation of elemental tritium (HT) released to the environment. The experiment involved a 30-minute release of 3.54 TBq (95.7 Ci)of HT to the atmosphere at an elevation of one meter. Scientists from six countries participated in the experiment. The air measurements showed HT concentrations downwind of the release in general agreement with classical atmospheric diffusion (Gaussian) up to the maximum distance measured (400 m). The HTO/HT ratios were shown to slowly increase downwind (∼ 4 x 10/sup /minus/5/ at 50 m to almost 10/sup /minus/3/ at 400 m) as conversion of HT took place. After the release, HTO concentrations in the atmosphere remained elevated. Vegetation samples were also taken since the vegetation and associated soil system have been implicated in the oxidation of HT. Freeze-dried water from vegetation samples was found to be low in HTO immediately after the release suggesting a low direct uptake of HTO in air by vegetation. The tritiated water concentration increased during the first day, peaking during the second day (about 15--30 kBq/L of water at 50 m from the source), and decreasing by the end of the second day. This pattern suggests oxidation in the soil followed by plant uptake through sorption of soil water. This was confirmed by measurements taken by other groups at the experiment site. The HTO in vegetation decreased with distance downwind with the same pattern as the HT measured during the release indicating that the oxidation of HT was linearly related to the HT concentration in the atmosphere during the exposure period. An adequate description of the process can be made through the observed phenomenon of HT deposition into the soil with subsequent rapid oxidation by soil bacteria. 30 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  10. How do Humans interact with the Biotic Pump of South America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajar; Pande, Saket; Renata Cordeiro Ortigara, Angela; Uhlenbrook, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The negative effects of the deforestation have been both advertised and down played. However, the effects are far more tangible than what they seem to be. It has been shown that the change in forest cover causes the rainfall patterns to change as the forests work as so-called Biotic Pumps. This changes the water availability in the area by modifying the water balance. Local water balances affect the changes that may take longer to be visible on the larger scales. The Amazon rain forest, one of the most bio-diverse areas worldwide, is an essential part of the biosphere of South America. However, there are clear links between deforestation carried out for agricultural purposes, specifically, Soybean and Sugarcane and the variability in global food prices. Here we analyse the anthropogenic actions that may influence the biotic pump. Variables such as volatility in commodity prices, risk taking capacities, land availability, government subsidies are used to drive the decision making of farmers. These variables are embedded in a lumped biotic pump model made for Brazil, utilizing data from different sources including MODIS, Centro de Previsão do Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC), European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The biotic pump model essentially transports atmospheric moisture downwind, part of which falls as rain. The atmospheric moisture 'upwind' accounts for evaporation, incorporating land cover changes in response to land use decisions made by farmers and rainfall. The model is run for scenarios to demonstrate how rain downwind is affected by upwind land cover and provides first insights in to how much rain and productivity (agriculture) downwind is caused by the Amazonian rain forest upwind We then discuss the value of environmental conservation based on marginal productivity analysis, i.e., finding harmony between the conservation of rainforest and the economic growth of the country.

  11. The potential near-source ozone impacts of upstream oil and gas industry emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaguer, Eduardo P

    2012-08-01

    Increased drilling in urban areas overlying shale formations and its potential impact on human health through decreased air quality make it important to estimate the contribution of oil and gas activities to photochemical smog. Flares and compressor engines used in natural gas operations, for example, are large sources not only of NOx but also offormaldehyde, a hazardous air pollutant and powerful ozone precursor We used a neighborhood scale (200 m horizontal resolution) three-dimensional (3D) air dispersion model with an appropriate chemical mechanism to simulate ozone formation in the vicinity ofa hypothetical natural gas processing facility, based on accepted estimates of both regular and nonroutine emissions. The model predicts that, under average midday conditions in June, regular emissions mostly associated with compressor engines may increase ambient ozone in the Barnett Shale by more than 3 ppb beginning at about 2 km downwind of the facility, assuming there are no other major sources of ozone precursors. Flare volumes of 100,000 cubic meters per hour ofnatural gas over a period of 2 hr can also add over 3 ppb to peak 1-hr ozone somewhatfurther (>8 km) downwind, once dilution overcomes ozone titration and inhibition by large flare emissions of NOx. The additional peak ozone from the hypothetical flare can briefly exceed 10 ppb about 16 km downwind. The enhancements of ambient ozone predicted by the model are significant, given that ozone control strategy widths are of the order of a few parts per billion. Degrading the horizontal resolution of the model to 1 km spuriously enhances the simulated ozone increases by reducing the effectiveness of ozone inhibition and titration due to artificial plume dilution.

  12. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose

  13. Streamtube expansion effects on the Darrieus wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.

    1985-04-01

    The purpose of the work described in this paper was to determine the aerodynamic loads and performance of a Darrieus wind turbine by including the expansion effects of the streamtubes through the rotor. The double-multiple streamtube model with variable interference factors was used to estimate the induced velocities with a modified CARDAAV computer code. Comparison with measured data and predictions shows that the stream-tube expansion effects are relatively significant at high tip-speed ratios, allowing a more realistic modeling of the upwind/downwind flowfield asymmetries inherent in the Darrieus rotor.

  14. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2. We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80%–20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate, EA sources account for approximately 30%–50% (over the Western US and 10%–20% (over the Eastern US. The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3, and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3. Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m−3 of sulfate originates from EA over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase. We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be

  15. On the road to recovery: Gasoline content regulations and child health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Michelle

    2017-07-01

    Gasoline content regulations are designed to curb pollution and improve health, but their impact on health has not been quantified. By exploiting both the timing of regulation and spatial variation in children's exposure to highways, I estimate the effect of gasoline content regulation on pollution and child health. The introduction of cleaner-burning gasoline in California in 1996 reduced asthma admissions by 8% in high exposure areas. Reductions are greatest for areas downwind from highways and heavy traffic areas. Stringent gasoline content regulations can improve child health, and may diminish existing health disparities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. An in situ survey of Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range, Central Nevada. Date of survey: September--November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    A ground-based in situ radiological survey was conducted downwind of the Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3 nuclear safety test sites at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada from September through November 1993. The purpose of the study was to corroborate the americium-241 ( 241 Am) soil concentrations that were derived from the aerial radiological survey of the Clean Slate areas, which was conducted from August through October 1993. The presence of 241 Am was detected at 140 of the 190 locations, with unrecoverable or lost data accounting for fifteen (15) of the sampling points. Good agreement was obtained between the aerial and in situ results

  17. Statistical prediction of far-field wind-turbine noise, with probabilistic characterization of atmospheric stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Barlas, Emre; Sogachev, Andrey

    2018-01-01

    Here we provide statistical low-order characterization of noise propagation from a single wind turbine, as affected by mutually interacting turbine wake and environmental conditions. This is accomplished via a probabilistic model, applied to an ensemble of atmospheric conditions based upon......; the latter solves Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations of momentum and temperature, including the effects of stability and the ABL depth, along with the drag due to the wind turbine. Sound levels are found to be highest downwind for modestly stable conditions not atypical of mid-latitude climates...

  18. Statistical fault diagnosis of wind turbine drivetrain applied to a 5MW floating wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghane, Mahdi; Nejad, Amir R.; Blanke, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    to prevent them to develop into failure, statistical change detection is used in this paper. The Cumulative Sum Method (CUSUM) is employed to detect possible defects in the downwind main bearing. A high fidelity gearbox model on a 5-MW spar-type wind turbine is used to generate data for fault-free and faulty...... conditions of the bearing at the rated wind speed and the associated wave condition. Acceleration measurements are utilized to find residuals used to indirectly detect damages in the bearing. Residuals are found to be nonGaussian, following a t-distribution with multivariable characteristic parameters...

  19. Environmental effects of solar thermal power systems: ecological observations during construction of the Barstow 10 MWe pilot STPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, F.B. (ed.)

    1981-10-01

    The environmental monitoring plan used consists of comparisons of a few meteorological variables and changes in the states of a limited array of indicator species or assemblages of species of plants and animals. Observations inlude aerial photography of the site, saltation meter measurements downwind from the site to measure fluxes of windblown sand, measurements of airborne particulates and atmospheric pollutants, and baseline temperature profiles made at two sites near the heliostat field to measure micro-meteorological patterns. Observations were made of annual plants both in off-field plots and in heliostat field, of shrubs, birds, rodents, reptiles, and sensitive species listed as rare or endangered. (LEW)

  20. Source areas and chemical composition of fine particulate matter in the Pearl River Delta region of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagler, G. S. W.; Bergin, M. H.; Salmon, L. G.; Yu, J. Z.; Wan, E. C. H.; Zheng, M.; Zeng, L. M.; Kiang, C. S.; Zhang, Y. H.; Lau, A. K. H.; Schauer, J. J.

    Fine particulate matter (PM 2.5) was measured for 4 months during 2002-2003 at seven sites located in the rapidly developing Pearl River Delta region of China, an area encompassing the major cities of Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Guangzhou. The 4-month average fine particulate matter concentration ranged from 37 to 71 μg m -3 in Guangdong province and from 29 to 34 μg m -3 in Hong Kong. Main constituents of fine particulate mass were organic compounds (24-35% by mass) and sulfate (21-32%). With sampling sites strategically located to monitor the regional air shed patterns and urban areas, specific source-related fine particulate species (sulfate, organic mass, elemental carbon, potassium and lead) and daily surface winds were analyzed to estimate influential source locations. The impact of transport was investigated by categorizing 13 (of 20 total) sampling days by prevailing wind direction (southerly, northerly or low wind-speed mixed flow). The vicinity of Guangzhou is determined to be a major source area influencing regional concentrations of PM 2.5, with levels observed to increase by 18-34 μg m -3 (accounting for 46-56% of resulting particulate levels) at sites immediately downwind of Guangzhou. The area near Guangzhou is also observed to heavily impact downwind concentrations of lead. Potassium levels, related to biomass burning, appear to be controlled by sources in the northern part of the Pearl River Delta, near rural Conghua and urban Guangzhou. Guangzhou appears to contribute 5-6 μg m -3 of sulfate to downwind locations. Guangzhou also stands out as a significant regional source of organic mass (OM), adding 8.5-14.5 μg m -3 to downwind concentrations. Elemental carbon is observed to be strongly influenced by local sources, with highest levels found in urban regions. In addition, it appears that sources outside of the Pearl River Delta contribute a significant fraction of overall fine particulate matter in Hong Kong and Guangdong province. This is evident

  1. CO2 fluxes near a forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Leclerc, Monique Y.; Zhang, Gensheng

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with recent advances on the dynamics of the flow at a forest edge, few studies have considered its role on scalar transport and, in particular, on CO2 transfer. The present study addresses the influence of the abrupt roughness change on forest atmosphere CO2 exchange and contrasts...... as a function of both sources/sinks distribution and the vertical structure of the canopy. Results suggest that the ground source plays a major role in the formation of wave-like vertical CO2 flux behavior downwind of a forest edge, despite the fact that the contribution of foliage sources/sinks changes...

  2. E-O Propagation, Signature and System Performance Under Adverse Meteorological Conditions Considering Out-of-Area Operations (La Propagation, la Signature et les performances des Systemes optroniques dans des Conditions Meteorologiques Defavorables, compte Tenu des Operations hors Zone)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    distribution CSAS-100-HV 7 m (Surf-2) 0.16-32 .gm PMS2 CSASP-200 Base of Pier 15 m (Surf-1,3) Aerosol size distribution 11.2 m (Surf-2) 0.2-20 pm PMS3 CSASP-100...270 4 180 V ~C2 go 1P-2 PMS3.(6m..) PM.Sl.(12.) PMS2 in.)... ...... Reference -2- ....... .... ..... ............... kn - .2 25 26 27 28 Day number...1 (12 in) are presently available do not allow for a more sophisticated 3 ..... PMS2 (15 m) approach. 2 The horizontal aerosol flux downwind from the

  3. Optimization of the Darrieus wind turbines with double-multiple-streamtube model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschivoiu, I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses a new improvement of the double-multiple-stream tube model by considering the stream tube expansion effects on the Darrieus wind turbine. These effects, allowing a more realistic modeling of the upwind/downwind flow field asymmetries inherent in the Darrieus rotor, were calculated by using CARDAAX computer code. When the dynamic stall is introduced in the double-multiple-stream tube model, the aerodynamic loads and performance show significant changes in the range of low tip-speed ratio

  4. Sources of errors in the determination of fluorine in feeding stuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oelschlaeger, W; Kirchgessner, M

    1960-01-01

    The difference between deficiency and toxicity levels of F in fodder is small; for this reason the many sources of error in the estimation of F contents are discussed. A list, and preventive measures suggested are included. Finally, detailed working instructions are given for accurate F analysis, and representative F contents of certain feeding stuffs are tabulated. A maximal permissible limit for dairy cattle of 2 - 3 mg F per day per kg body weight is suggested. F contents of plants growing near HF-producing plants especially downwind, are often dangerously high.

  5. Boundary layer pollution profiles from a rural site in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, John; McGee, Thomas; Thompson, Anne; Twigg, Laurence; Sumnicht, Grant; Stauffer, Ryan

    2018-04-01

    During the NASA 2016 KORUS-AQ campaign, the ground based NASA GSFC ozone lidar and balloon borne instrumentation were deployed to the remote Taehwa Forest site (37.3 N, 127.3 E, 151 m AGL) to characterize the transport of pollution downwind of the Seoul metropolitan region. On most days from 02 May to 10 June 2016, continuous hours of lidar profiles of ozone were measured. Select days are shown to represent key ozone events that occurred at the rural site.

  6. Changes in the physico-chemical properties of Amazonian aerosols from background conditions due to urban impacts in Central Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Barbosa, H. M.; Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Fiorese, C.; Andre, B.; Rizzo, L. V.; Ditas, F.; Pöhlker, C.; Pöhlker, M. L.; Saturno, J.; Holanda, B. A.; Wang, J.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Machado, L.; Andreae, M. O.; Martin, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The GoAmazon 2014/15 experiment (Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon) was a great opportunity to study how urbanization can change aerosol properties under pristine conditions in a tropical rain forest. The experiment took place from January 2014 to December 2015 in the vicinity of Manaus, Brazil, where several sampling stations were operated. Natural biogenic aerosol properties were studied in 3 sampling stations upwind of Manaus (ATTO (T0a), ZF2 (T0z) and EMBRAPA (T0e)). Urban impacted aerosols were analysed in two downwind sampling stations at Tiwa (T2) and Manacapuru (T3). Properties analysed were size distribution, scattering and absorption, composition, vertical profiles and others. Remote sensing measurements were done using AERONET and MODIS, while extensive ground based measurements were done in all sampling stations. Remote sensing measurements shows important changes in aerosol optical depth (AOD), especially in the aerosol absorption component. It was also observed a reduction in cloud droplet size downwind of Manaus for liquid phase clouds. Changes in particle number and size were also very significant, that reflected in changes in the aerosol radiative forcing (RF) before and after Manaus plume. In the dry season, an average RF of -24 w/m² was observed upwind, while -17 w/m² was observed downwind, due to large scale biomass burning aerosols. Single scattering albedo (SSA) at 550 nm changed from a high value of 0.96 upwind to 0.84 downwind due to the increase in absorbing aerosols in the wet season. In the dry season, SSA at 550nm changed from 0.95 to 0.87. Aerosol composition showed a large dominance of organic aerosols for all sites, accounting for 65-75% of PM1 non refractory aerosol. Most of these were secondary organic aerosol (SOA), with very low sulfate and nitrate concentrations. The influence of the Manaus plume on aerosol properties was more intense during the wet season, because in the dry season a significant amount of

  7. Analysis of MAIAC Dust Aerosol Retrievals from MODIS Over North Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Hsu, C.; Torres, O.; Leptoukh, G.; Kalashnikova, O.; Korkin, S.

    2011-01-01

    An initial comparison of aerosol optical thickness over North Africa for year 2007 was performed between the Deep Blue and Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithms complimented with MISR and OMI data. The new MAIAC algorithm has a better sensitivity to the small dust storms than the DB algorithm, but it also has biases in the brightest desert regions indicating the need for improvement. The quarterly averaged AOT values in the Bodele depression and western downwind transport region show a good agreement among MAIAC, MISR and OMI data, while the DB algorithm shows a somewhat different seasonality.

  8. Images from Galileo of the Venus cloud deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belton, M.J.S.; Gierasch, P.J.; Smith, M.D.; Helfenstein, P.; Schinder, P.J.; Pollack, James B.; Rages, K.A.; Ingersoll, A.P.; Klaasen, K.P.; Veverka, J.; Anger, C.D.; Carr, M.H.; Chapman, C.R.; Davies, M.E.; Fanale, F.P.; Greeley, R.; Greenberg, R.; Head, J. W.; Morrison, D.; Neukum, G.; Pilcher, C.B.

    1991-01-01

    Images of Venus taken at 418 (violet) and 986 [near-infrared (NIR)] nanometers show that the morphology and motions of large-scale features change with depth in the cloud deck. Poleward meridional velocities, seen in both spectral regions, are much reduced in the NIR. In the south polar region the markings in the two wavelength bands are strongly anticorrelated. The images follow the changing state of the upper cloud layer downwind of the subsolar point, and the zonal flow field shows a longitudinal periodicity that may be coupled to the formation of large-scale planetary waves. No optical lightning was detected.

  9. American ground zero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, C.

    1993-01-01

    This book is a collection of startling photographs of the people in the western United States who were affected by the radioactive fallout from atomic blasts at the Nevada test site from 1951 to 1963. Six states--Utah, Arizona, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, and New Mexico--were most directly downwind from the nuclear tests. Also included in the book are experiences related by the people who Gallagher photographed that testify to the Atomic Energy Commission's disregard for the lives of US citizens and for the ultimate consequences of its actions

  10. Rise of a cold plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakuta, Michio

    1977-06-01

    The rise of smoke from the stacks of two research reactors in normal operation was measured by photogrametric method. The temperature of effluent gas is less than 20 0 C higher than that of the ambient air (heat emission of the order 10 4 cal s -1 ), and the efflux velocity divided by the wind speed is between 0.5 and 2.8 in all 16 smoke runs. The field data obtained within downwind distance of 150m are compared with those by plume rise formulas presently available. Considering the shape of bending-over plume, the Briggs' formula for 'jet' gives a reasonable explanation of the observed plume rise. (auth.)

  11. Some public health lessons from Three Mile Island: a case study in chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, G.K.

    1981-01-01

    The problems arising from Three Mile Island were not limited to deficiencies in reactor design, safety controls or manpower training. The author, Pennsylvania's newly appointed Secretary of Health, states that the public health sector was totally unprepared to cope with this accident. H e contends that decisions were made by engineers and physicists when medical doctors were called for; that the incidence of hypothyroidism has increased tenfold downwind from two Pennsylvania reactor sites and he appeals for cooperation between physicians specialized in radiation medicine, nuclear physicists and engineers to establish public health safeguards in the event of future accidents. (Auth.)

  12. Concentration Fluctuations in Smoke Plumes Released Near the Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, Torben; Pécseli, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    results are tested against these hypotheses. We find strong evidence for a simple scaling of the standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis with the average concentrations at the downwind distances observed in our experiments. Near-ground concentration fluctuations in fixed as well as moving frames...... of references are investigated. The scaling is supported by data from several experimental sites and different atmospheric stability conditions. One conclusion of the study is that relatively accurate estimates for the standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis can be obtained for the concentration fluctuations...

  13. AXAOTHER XL -- A spreadsheet for determining doses for incidents caused by tornadoes or high-velocity straight winds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, A.A.

    1996-09-01

    AXAOTHER XL is an Excel Spreadsheet used to determine dose to the maximally exposed offsite individual during high-velocity straight winds or tornado conditions. Both individual and population doses may be considered. Potential exposure pathways are inhalation and plume shine. For high-velocity straight winds the spreadsheet has the capability to determine the downwind relative air concentration, however for the tornado conditions, the user must enter the relative air concentration. Theoretical models are discussed and hand calculations are performed to ensure proper application of methodologies. A section has also been included that contains user instructions for the spreadsheet

  14. Computation of radionuclide particulate finite area fugitive source strengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, D E

    1983-06-01

    Atmospheric source strengths quantifying particulate re-suspension from wind and non-wind disturbance-driven processes are computed for sites of small area. These values are useful in computing downwind air concentration values to evaluate risk to exposed populations. The net source strength for the site is the sum of the wind- and disturbance-driven components. A unified source strength approach includes both classes of re-suspension processes. More research is needed to satisfactorily express the time-dependence of re-suspension parameters, especially in non-arid climates where population densities are greater. (JMT)

  15. Concentration fluctuations and averaging time in vapor clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, David J

    2010-01-01

    This book contributes to more reliable and realistic predictions by focusing on sampling times from a few seconds to a few hours. Its objectives include developing clear definitions of statistical terms, such as plume sampling time, concentration averaging time, receptor exposure time, and other terms often confused with each other or incorrectly specified in hazard assessments; identifying and quantifying situations for which there is no adequate knowledge to predict concentration fluctuations in the near-field, close to sources, and far downwind where dispersion is dominated by atmospheric t

  16. Assessment of the long-term impacts of PM10 and PM2.5 particles from construction works on surrounding areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant; Marsh, Daniel; Fuller, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Construction activities are common across cities; however, the studies assessing their contribution to airborne PM10 (≤10 μm) and PM2.5 (≤2.5 μm) particles on the surrounding air quality are limited. Herein, we assessed the impact of PM10 and PM2.5 arising from construction works in and around London. Measurements were carried out at 17 different monitoring stations around three construction sites between January 2002 and December 2013. Tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM 1400) and OSIRIS (2315) particle monitors were used to measure the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions in the 0.1-10 μm size range along with the ambient meteorological data. The data was analysed using bivariate concentration polar plots and k-means clustering techniques. Daily mean concentrations of PM10 were found to exceed the European Union target limit value of 50 μg m(-3) at 11 monitoring stations but remained within the allowable 35 exceedences per year, except at two monitoring stations. In general, construction works were found to influence the downwind concentrations of PM10 relatively more than PM2.5. Splitting of the data between working (0800-1800 h; local time) and non-working (1800-0800 h) periods showed about 2.2-fold higher concentrations of PM10 during working hours when compared with non-working hours. However, these observations did not allow to conclude that this increase was from the construction site emissions. Together, the polar concentration plots and the k-means cluster analysis applied to a pair of monitoring stations across the construction sites (i.e. one in upwind and the other in downwind) confirmed the contribution of construction sources on the measured concentrations. Furthermore, pairing the monitoring stations downwind of the construction sites showed a logarithmic decrease (with R(2) about 0.9) in the PM10 and PM2.5 concentration with distance. Our findings clearly indicate an impact of construction activities on the nearby downwind areas and a need

  17. Character, mass, distribution, and origin of tephra-fall deposits from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: highlighting the significance of particle aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kristi; Coombs, Michelle L; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano included 20 tephra-producing explosions between March 15, 2009 and April 4, 2009 (UTC). Next-Generation radar (NEXRAD) data show that plumes reached heights between 4.6 km and 19 km asl and were distributed downwind along nearly all azimuths of the volcano. Explosions lasted between 0.8 mm thick), including communities along the Kenai Peninsula (80–100 km) and the city of Anchorage (170 km). Trace ash (mass of tephra-fall deposits at 54.6 × 109 kg with a total DRE volume of 20.6 × 106 m3.

  18. EERA-DTOC Project: Design Tools for Offshore Wind Farm Clusters; Proyecto EERA-DTOC: herramientas para el diseno de clusters de Parques Eolicos Marinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    In the EERA-DTOC Project an integrated and validated software design tool for the optimization of offshore wind farms and wind farm clusters has been developed. The CIEMAT contribution to this project has change the view on mesoscale wind forecasting models, which were not so far considered capable of modeling wind farm scale phenomena. It has been shown the ability of the WRF model to simulate the wakes caused by the wind turbines on the downwind ones (inter-turbine wakes within a wind farm) as well as the wakes between wind farms within a cluster. (Author)

  19. The maximum ground level concentration of air pollutant and the effect of plume rise on concentration estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayhoub, A.B.; Azzam, A.

    1991-01-01

    The emission of an air pollutant from an elevated point source according to Gaussian plume model has been presented. An elementary theoretical treatment for both the highest possible ground-level concentration and the downwind distance at which this maximum occurs for different stability classes has been constructed. The effective height release modification was taken into consideration. An illustrative case study, namely, the emission from the research reactor in Inchas, has been studied. The results of these analytical treatments and of the derived semi-empirical formulae are discussed and presented in few illustrative diagrams

  20. Photochemical model estimated fire impacts on ozone and aerosol evaluated with field studies and routine data sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. R.

    2017-12-01

    Highly instrumented field studies provide a unique opportunity to evaluate multiple aspects of photochemical grid model representation of fire emissions, dispersion, and chemical evolution. Fuel information and burn area for a specific fire coupled with near-fire and downwind chemical measurements provides information needed to constrain model predicted fire plume transport and chemical evolution of important pollutants such as ozone and particulate matter (PM2.5) that have deleterious health effects. Most local to regional scale field campaigns to date have made relatively few transects through plumes from fires with well characterized fuel type and consumption. While more comprehensive field studies are being planned for 2018 and beyond (WE-CAN, FIREX, FIRE-CHEM, and FASMEE), existing measurement data from multiple field campaigns including 2013 SEAC4RS, satellite data, and routine surface networks are used to assess how a regulatory modeling system captures fire impacts on local to regional scale ozone and PM2.5. Key aspects of the regulatory modeling system include fire location and burn area from SMARTFIRE2, emissions from BlueSky framework, and predictions of ambient O3 and PM2.5 from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical transport model. A comparison of model estimated O3 from specific fires with routine surface measurements at rural locations in proximity to the 2013 Rim fire, 2011 Wallow fire, and 2011 Flint Hills fires suggest the modeling system over-estimates smoke impacts on hourly ozone. Sensitivity simulations where solar radiation and photolysis rates are more aggressively attenuated by smoke reduced O3 predictions but did not ameliorate the over prediction bias. PM2.5 organic carbon tends to be overpredicted at rural surface sites downwind from the 2011 Flint Hills prescribed fires while results were mixed at rural sites downwind of the 2013 Rim fire and 2011 Wallow fire suggesting differences in fuel characterization (e

  1. Field measurements of the washout coefficient for gaseous iodine likely to be released on accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caput, C.; Camus, H.; Gauthier, D.; Belot, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Field experiments were performed in Brittany to assess the washout coefficient Λ for molecular iodine. During each run, a few grams of nonradioactive iodine were released from a 12 meters telescopic mast, and the rain was sampled at a short distance downwind along complete transversal sections of the plume. The amount of iodine in each sample was determined by ionic chromatography to calculate the washout coefficient. In most cases, the results obtained (a few 10 -5 s -1 ) are not so different as expected from the theoretical values assuming a complete solubility of iodine in rain water. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  2. EFFAIR: a computer program for estimating the dispersion of atmospheric emissions from a nuclear site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dormuth, K.W.; Lyon, R.B.

    1978-11-01

    Analysis of the transport of material through the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer is an important part of environmental impact assessments for nuclear plants. Although this is a complex phenomenon, practical estimates of ground level concentrations downwind of release are usually obtained using a simple Gaussian formula whose coefficients are obtained from empirical correlations. Based on this formula, the computer program EFFAIR has been written to provide a flexible tool for atmospheric dispersion calculations. It is considered appropriate for calculating dilution factors at distances of 10 2 to 10 4 metres from an effluent source if reflection from the inversion lid is negligible in that range. (author)

  3. Policy on stable iodine prophylaxis following nuclear reactor accidents (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This policy considers the alleviation of possible hazards that may arise from any radioiodines inhaled from a plume of fission products emanating from a nuclear reactor accident. Such a nuclear reactor may be land or ship-based. In any accident that releases radioiodines to the environment, one countermeasure that may need to be considered to reduce the effect of inhalation of radioiodines by persons downwind of the point of release is to provide those persons with tablets containing stable iodine. Both potassium iodide (KI) and potassium iodate (KIO 3 ) are recommended as effective prophylactics tablets for this purpose in Australia. Action levels, doses and contraindicatories are briefly outlined

  4. Exploring Evidence of Land Surface Dynamics of River Basin Development in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eluwa, C.; Brown, C.

    2017-12-01

    Improving the productivity of agricultural lands in Africa in the face of climate variability and change is vital to achieving food security. A variety of possible approaches exist, many of which focus on the development and expansion of irrigation - at times associated with dam construction to provide co-benefits of hydropower and water supply. Optimal development of river basin infrastructure such as this has long been a topic of interest in water resources systems analysis. Recent advances have focused on addressing the uncertainty associated with climate change in the development of river basin plans. However, such studies rarely consider either the uncertainty from changing local surface-atmosphere interactions via basin development or the attendant effects on local ecosystems, precipitation, evapotranspiration and consequently the availability of water for the proposed projects. Some numerical experiments have described and reproduced the mechanisms via which river basin infrastructure influences local climatology in Sahelian Africa. However, no studies have explored available data for evidence of land-atmosphere interactions associated with actual development projects. This study explores the correlation of seasonal soil moisture and latent heat flux over currently dammed/irrigated areas on downwind precipitation in the East Africa region (bounded by 0N, -15N, 25E, 40E) at the mesoscale (30km - 100km) to unearth evidence of local climatological effects of river basin development (irrigation schemes). The adopted process is (1) use reanalysis data to derive mean wind directions at 800hPa for selected regions (2) use mean wind directions (and orthogonal directions) to locate high (and low) impact areas 30 -100km downwind (3) extract precipitation time series for downwind locations from three different gridded products (CRU, GCPC, PRINCETON) (4) compare precipitation time series across datasets in high/low impact areas and correlate with upwind latent heat flux

  5. Methods for estimating on-site ambient air concentrations at disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.T.

    1987-01-01

    Currently, Gaussian type dispersion modeling and point source approximation are combined to estimate the ambient air concentrations of pollutants dispersed downwind of an areawide emission source, using the approach of virtual point source approximation. This Gaussian dispersion modeling becomes less accurate as the receptor comes closer to the source, and becomes inapplicable for the estimation of on-site ambient air concentrations at disposal sites. Partial differential equations are solved with appropriate boundary conditions for use in estimating the on-site concentrations in the ambient air impacted by emissions from an area source such as land disposal sites. Two variations of solution techniques are presented, and their predictions are compared

  6. Feasibility study of wind-generated electricity for rural applications in southwestern Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohring, G. W.

    The parameters associated with domestic production of wind generated electricity for direct use by small farms and rural homes in the southwestern Ohio region are discussed. The project involves direct utility interfaced electricity generation from a horizontal axis, down-wind, fixed pitch, wind powered induction generator system. Goals of the project are to determine: the ability to produce useful amounts of domestic wind generated electricity in the southwestern Ohio region; economic justification for domestic wind generated electrical production; and the potential of domestic wind generated electricity for reducing dependence on non-renewable energy resources in the southwestern Ohio region.

  7. Orthogonal Bases used for Feed Forward Control of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    In optimizing wind turbines it can be of a large help to use information of wind speeds at upwind turbine for the control of downwind turbines, it is, however, problematic to use these measurements directly since they are highly influenced by turbulence behind the wind turbine rotor plane. In this....... In this paper an orthogonal basis is use to extract the general trends in the wind signal, which are forward to the down wind turbines. This concept controller is designed and simulated on a generic 4.8 MW wind turbine model, which shows the potential of this proposed scheme....

  8. CRUNCH, Dispersion Model for Continuous Dense Vapour Release in Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagger, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The situation modelled is as follows. A dense gas emerges from a source such that it can be considered to emerge through a rectangular area, placed in the vertical plane and perpendicular to the plume direction, which assumes that of the ambient wind. The gas flux at the source, and in every plane perpendicular to the plume direction, is constant in time and a stationary flow field has been attained. For this to apply, the characteristic time of release must be much larger than that for dispersal of the contaminant. The plume can be thought to consist of a number of rectangular elements or 'puffs' emerging from the source at regular time intervals. The model follows the development of these puffs at a series of downwind points. These puffs are immediately assumed to advect with the ambient wind at their half-height. The plume also slumps due to the action of gravity and is allowed to entrain air through its sides and top surface. Spreading of a fluid element is caused by pressure differences across this element and since the pressure gradient in the wind direction is small, the resulting pressure differences and slumping velocities are small also, thus permitting this convenient approximation. Initially, as the plume slumps, its vertical dimension decreases and with it the slumping velocity and advection velocity. Thus the plume advection velocity varies as a function of downwind distance. With the present steady state modelling, and to satisfy continuity constraints, there must be consequent adjustment of plume height. Calculation of this parameter from the volume flux ensures this occurs. As the cloud height begins to grow, the advection velocity increases and the plume height decreases accordingly. With advection downwind, the cloud gains buoyancy by entraining air and, if the cloud is cold, by absorbing heat from the ground. Eventually the plume begins to disperse as would a passive pollutant, through the action of

  9. Evaluation and Uncertainty of a New Method to Detect Suspected Nuclear and WMD Activity: Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzeja, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Werth, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Buckley, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-29

    The Atmospheric Technology Group at SRNL developed a new method to detect signals from Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) activities in a time series of chemical measurements at a downwind location. This method was tested with radioxenon measured in Russia and Japan after the 2013 underground test in North Korea. This LDRD calculated the uncertainty in the method with the measured data and also for a case with the signal reduced to 1/10 its measured value. The research showed that the uncertainty in the calculated probability of origin from the NK test site was small enough to confirm the test. The method was also wellbehaved for small signal strengths.

  10. Contamination assessment of heavy metals in the soils around Khouzestan Steel Company (Ni, Mn, Pb, Fe, Zn, Cr)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormozi Nejad, F.; Rastmanesh, F.; Zarasvandi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The highest concentrations were found at soil samples 4 and 12. Comparison of heavy metals concentration with unpolluted soil standard indicated that, concentrations of Cr, Zn, Fe, Ni and Pb is higher than that of unpolluted soil standard. In general, Manganese, Chromium, Zinc and Lead are the most important elements that are found in emissions of steel plants. The soil samples near the steel plant and downwind direction have much higher pollution level. The results showed that Mn, Pb and Zn is related to human activity and Cr have geogenic source and Fe and Ni have both geogenic and anthropogenic source in the study area in the city of Ahwaz.

  11. Relocation impacts of a major release from SRTC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Thompson, E.A.; Thompson, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    The relocation impacts of an accidental release, scenario 1-RD-3 , are evaluated for the Savannah River Technology Center. The extent of the area potentially contaminated to a level that would result in doses exceeding the relocation protective action guide(PAG)is calculated. The maximum calculated distance downwind from the accident at which the relocation PAG is exceeded is also determined. The consequences of the particulate portion of the release are evaluated using the HOTSPOT model and an EXCEL spreadsheet. The consequences of the tritium release are evaluated using UFOTRI

  12. Some public health lessons from Three Mile Island: a case study in chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLeod, G K [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Graduate School of Public Health

    1981-01-01

    The problems arising from Three Mile Island were not limited to deficiencies in reactor design, safety controls or manpower training. The author, Pennsylvania's newly appointed Secretary of Health, states that the public health sector was totally unprepared to cope with this accident. H e contends that decisions were made by engineers and physicists when medical doctors were called for; that the incidence of hypothyroidism has increased tenfold downwind from two Pennsylvania reactor sites and he appeals for cooperation between physicians specialized in radiation medicine, nuclear physicists and engineers to establish public health safeguards in the event of future accidents.

  13. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Apel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs, predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers were able to approximate the observed MCMA daytime patterns and absolute values of the VOC OH reactivity. The MOZART model is also in agreement with observations showing that NMHCs dominate the reactivity distribution except in the afternoon hours. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height.

    A northeast transport event was studied in which air originating in the MCMA was intercepted aloft with the Department of Energy (DOE G1 on 18 March and downwind with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind; ozone was shown to be photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial extent and temporal evolution of the plume

  14. Simplified scheme or radioactive plume calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, T.A.; Montan, D.N.

    1976-01-01

    A simplified mathematical scheme to estimate external whole-body γ radiation exposure rates from gaseous radioactive plumes was developed for the Rio Blanco Gas Field Nuclear Stimulation Experiment. The method enables one to calculate swiftly, in the field, downwind exposure rates knowing the meteorological conditions and γ radiation exposure rates measured by detectors positioned near the plume source. The method is straightforward and easy to use under field conditions without the help of mini-computers. It is applicable to a wide range of radioactive plume situations. It should be noted that the Rio Blanco experiment was detonated on May 17, 1973, and no seep or release of radioactive material occurred

  15. Mobile laboratory for near real-time measurements of very low-level radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The Tracking Radioactive Atmospheric Contaminants (TRAC) System is a mobile laboratory, developed by Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to improve emergency response and environmental research capabilities at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). In the event of an atmospheric release, the TRAC laboratory can confirm the location and radionuclide composition of the downwind cloud by analyzing samples in near real-time in the field. Specialized monitoring systems were developed to analyze most radionuclides produced in SRP's diverse operations. Sensitivities are radionuclide dependent and can be below maximum permissible concentration (MPC) values by factors as large as one hundred thousand. 6 references, 6 figures

  16. Change of Surface Roughness and Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto

    1978-01-01

    The ratio between upstream and far downstream surface friction velocities relative to a change in surface roughness is given on the basis of results from surface Rossby number similarity theory. By simple theories for the internal boundary layer, which are found to compare quite well with recent...... numerical results from higher-order closure models, it is found that, even at a downwind distance such that the internal boundary layer has grown to the full height of the planetary boundary layers, the surface stress still considerably exceeds the equilibrium value...

  17. Chemical composition of fogwater collected along the California coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, D.J.; Waldman, J.M.; Munger, J.W.; Hoffman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Fogwater collected at both urban and nonurban coastal sites in California ws found to be consistently acidic. Millimolar concentrations of NO/sub 3//sup -/, and fogwater pH values below 3, were observed at sites downwind of the Los Angeles basin. Fogwater composition at remote sites showed evidence of substantial continental and anthropogenic contributions. Acid-neutralizing capacities in coastal air were found to be very low and insufficient to neutralize even small acid inputs. Chloride loss relative to its sea salt contribution was observed at sites furthest from anthropogenic sources.

  18. Automated emergency meteorological response system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    A sophisticated emergency response system was developed to aid in the evaluation of accidental releases of hazardous materials from the Savannah River Plant to the environment. A minicomputer system collects and archives data from both onsite meteorological towers and the National Weather Service. In the event of an accidental release, the computer rapidly calculates the trajectory and dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere. Computer codes have been developed which provide a graphic display of predicted concentration profiles downwind from the source, as functions of time and distance

  19. Cooling tower drift: experiment design for comprehensive case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laulainen, N.S.

    1978-01-01

    A drift experiment program to develop a data base which can be used for validation of drift deposition models has been formulated. The first field effort is designed for a suitable mechanical-draft cooling tower to be selected after site visits have been conducted. The discussion here demonstrates the importance of characterizing the droplet size spectrum emitted from the tower and to accurately account for droplet evaporation, because the downwind droplet deposition patterns and near-surface airborne concentrations are extremely sensitive to these parameters

  20. Radioecological aspects of nuclear warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvarson, K.

    1975-01-01

    The radioactive fallout from nuclear explosions is one of the major effects of nuclear warfare. Those levels causing acute radiation sickness are to be expected only within the close-in or intermediate areas downwind from surface bursts. Global fallout from high yield explosions will be fairly evenly distributed in the hemisphere where the explosions occurred and cause irradiation from ground deposit, inhaled material and contaminated food. The collective doses and the order of magnitude of late casualties from this global contamination are estimated for a given total explosion yield. (auth)

  1. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Windpower, Nautica [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States); Marrone, Joseph [OCC COWI, Vancouver (Canada); Wagner, Thomas [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States)

    2013-08-29

    was developed and implemented in FAST to extend its capability for ice load modeling.Both upwind and downwind 2-bladed rotor wind turbine designs were developed and studied. The new rotor blade uses a new twist angle distribution design and a new pitch control algorithm compared with the baseline model. The coning and tilt angles were selected for both the upwind and downwind configurations to maximize the annual energy production. The risk of blade-tower impact is greater for the downwind design, particularly under a power grid fault; however, this risk was effectively reduced by adjusting the tilt angle for the downwind configuration.

  2. Fallout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin, P.L.

    1989-01-01

    When the United States government conducted atmospheric nuclear tests in southern Nevada during the 1950s and early 1960s, radioactive fallout drifted downwind onto citizens. The case of Irene Allen v. The United States of America, filed on August 30, 1979, brought to public awareness the plight of residents of Nevada, Utah, and Arizona. Within the context of the trial, this book provides an overview of the development and atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons by the United States, focusing on Shot Harry, the most radioactive of the 105 atmospheric tests conducted from 1951 to 1962

  3. Report of the International Ice Patrol in the North Atlantic. 1984 Season Bulletin Number 70

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    directed 300 to the right of area has a high degree of the middle of the thermocline. downwind. Measured winds from variability (Soule, 1964; Scobie ...geostrophic flow as long as the in the area north of 430 N ( Scobie conducted in both 1983 and Figure B-10. Actual iceberg and TOD drift from 17-22 July...before next season. lIP 8030. plans to evaluate the drift model using the drift data obtained from Scobie , R.W. and R.H., Schultz HORNBEAM, data from

  4. Comparison of loads for wind turbine down-regulation strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiangsheng; Ma, Kuichao; N. Soltani, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    For wind farm active power setpoint tracking, both farm level and turbine level down regulation strategies should to be optimized. Several down regulation strategies are chosen to analyse the wind turbine load performance according to different wind speed and power reference. In this paper we...... suggest appropriate down regulation strategy to control wind turbine for active power reference tracking. we compare four different control strategies, namely Const-Ω, Const-λ, Max-Ω and Min-Ct and discuss the loads on main components and downwind speed by presenting analysis of several wind scenarios...

  5. Double tracer experiments to investigate models for the calculation of gamma doses from a radioactive cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.P.; Gryning, S.E.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.; Karlberg, O.; Lyck, E.

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents work from a series of atmospheric dispersion experiments in May 1981 at the Ringhals nuclear power plant in Sweden. The aim of the project was to obtain short-term observations of concentrations and gamma-ray exposures from stack effluents and to compare these results with corresponding values calculated from computer models. Two tracers, sulphurhexafluoride (SF 6 ) and radioactive noble gases, were released from a 110-m stack and detected at ground level downwind at distances of 3-4 km. Calculations were made with two Gaussian plume models: PLUCON developed at Riso National Laboratory and UNIDOSE developed at Studsvik Energiteknik AB. (orig.)

  6. Transport of Aerosols: Regional and Global Implications for Climate, Weather, and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine; Kahn, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant impact on global climate, regional weather, and local air quality. In this study, we use a global model GOCART together with satellite data and ground-based measurements to assess the emission and transport of pollution, dust, biomass burning, and volcanic aerosols and their implications. In particular, we will show the impact of emissions and long-range transport of aerosols from major pollution and dust source regions to (1) the surface air quality, (2) the atmospheric heating rates, and (3) surface radiation change near the source and downwind regions.

  7. Study on the air quality near vegetation along the highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijers, E.P.; Kos, G.P.A.; Van den Bulk, W.C.M.; Vermeulen, A.T.

    2007-08-01

    The results of downwind measurements of air quality around vegetation near a motorway are presented and discussed. The study (first ever in the Netherlands) was performed by order of the Innovation Programme Air Quality. At a carefully selected location measurements of PM and NOx were carried out downwind from a motorway in front of and (at various distances) behind a parallel orientated vegetation strip. Results are compared with synchronized data collected at a nearby location without vegetation (the 'reference' situation) and at the same distances from the motorway. Major findings are: Comparing measurements in front of and behind the vegetation strip show that the presence of vegetation tends to lower PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations immediately behind the vegetation. However, no such change is apparent in the concentrations of NO and NO2. The comparison with measurements executed without vegetation ('reference') indicate that concentration levels close to the vegetation strip are similar or somewhat higher. At a larger distance from motorway and vegetation (>30 m) NO and NO2 concentrations tend to be lower than what is observed in the reference situation. This could not be determined for PM [nl

  8. TIGER Burned Brightly in JAMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Kashiwagi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    The Transition From Ignition to Flame Growth Under External Radiation in 3D (TIGER- 3D) experiment, which is slated to fly aboard the International Space Station, conducted a series of highly successful tests in collaboration with the University of Hokkaido using Japan's 10-sec JAMIC drop tower. The tests were conducted to test engineering versions of advanced flight diagnostics such as an infrared camera for detailed surface temperature measurements and an infrared spectroscopic array for gas-phase species concentrations and temperatures based on detailed spectral emissions in the near infrared. Shown in the top figure is a visible light image and in the bottom figure is an infrared image at 3.8 mm obtained during the microgravity tests. The images show flames burning across cellulose samples against a slow wind of a few centimeters per second (wind is from right to left). These flow velocities are typical of spacecraft ventilation systems that provide fresh air for the astronauts. The samples are ignited across the center with a hot wire, and the flame is allowed to spread upwind and/or downwind. As these images show, the flames prefer to spread upwind, into the fresh air, which is the exact opposite of flames on Earth, which spread much faster downwind, or with the airflow, as in forest fires.

  9. The impact of the Almalyk Industrial Complex on soil chemical and biological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukurov, Nosir; Pen-Mouratov, Stanislav; Steinberger, Yosef

    2005-01-01

    The effect of heavy metals on soil free-living nematodes, microbial biomass (C mic ) and basal respiration (BR) was studied along a 15 km downwind deposition gradient, originating at the Almalyk Industrial Complex. Soil samples from 0-10 and 10-20 cm layers were collected at 5 km intervals. A significant decrease in heavy metal deposition was found going from the source in the downwind direction and with depth. The soil microbial biomass, basal respiration and derived microbial indices for soil samples from the Almalyk industrial area were analysed. The lowest soil microbial biomass and total number of free-living nematodes were found in soil samples near the industrial complex, with a high heavy metal and weak total organic carbon (C org ) content. The highest C mic was found in the soil samples collected 15 km from the pollution source. BR displayed similar results. The derived indices, metabolic quotient (qCO 2 ) and microbial ratio (C mic /C org ), revealed significant differences with distance, confirming environmental stress in the first and second locations. The present study elucidates the importance of soil nematode and microbial populations as suitable tools for bio-monitoring the effect of heavy metals on soil systems. - Soil nematodes and microbes are suitable biomonitors for metals in soils

  10. Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques

  11. Applications of dendrochronology and sediment geochronology to establish reference episodes for evaluations of environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Carroll, J.; Abraham, J.D.; Landeen, D.S. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Dendrochronology and sediment geochronology have been used to demonstrate retrospective monitoring of environmental radioactivity at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. {sup 14}C in annual growth rings of sagebrush preserved the temporal and spatial patterns of {sup 14}C resulting from dispersion downwind of a nuclear fuel processing facility at the Hanford Site in Washington State. As far as 10 km downwind of the facility, {sup 14}C concentrations were significantly higher in growth rings formed during a fuel processing episode than in rings produced during preoperational or postoperational episodes. An episode of uranium mill tailings deposition in pond sediments at the Grand Junction Office in Colorado was reconstructed using {sup 210}Pb geochronology constrained by a marker of peak {sup 137}Cs fallout. Uranium concentrations in ponds sediments deposited after the processing episode provide a reasonable cleanup standard. These reference episodes of environmental radioactivity reconstructed from measurements taken within contaminated environments can improve or replace reference area data as baseline information for dose reconstructions, risk assessments, and the establishment of cleanup standards. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Applications of dendrochronology and sediment geochronology to establish reference episodes for evaluations of environmental radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, W.J.; Carroll, J.; Abraham, J.D.; Landeen, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Dendrochronology and sediment geochronology have been used to demonstrate retrospective monitoring of environmental radioactivity at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 14 C in annual growth rings of sagebrush preserved the temporal and spatial patterns of 14 C resulting from dispersion downwind of a nuclear fuel processing facility at the Hanford Site in Washington State. As far as 10 km downwind of the facility, 14 C concentrations were significantly higher in growth rings formed during a fuel processing episode than in rings produced during preoperational or postoperational episodes. An episode of uranium mill tailings deposition in pond sediments at the Grand Junction Office in Colorado was reconstructed using 210 Pb geochronology constrained by a marker of peak 137 Cs fallout. Uranium concentrations in ponds sediments deposited after the processing episode provide a reasonable cleanup standard. These reference episodes of environmental radioactivity reconstructed from measurements taken within contaminated environments can improve or replace reference area data as baseline information for dose reconstructions, risk assessments, and the establishment of cleanup standards. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Plant/soil concentration ratios of 226Ra for contrasting sites around an active U mine-mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Concentrations of 226Ra were determined in native vegetation and underlying substrate (soil and tailings) at various sites around a conventional open-pit, acid leach U production operation in Wyoming. Plant/soil concentration ratios (CRs) for 226Ra were estimated for various sites, including weathered tailings; a tailings impoundment shoreline; downwind from exposed tailings; a mine overburden reclamation area; and several background locations. Radium-226 concentrations for vegetation and substrate and CR values from the perturbed sites were elevated above background. The highest vegetation concentration (1.3 Bq g-1) was found in a grass which had invaded exposed, weathered tailings. Levels of 226Ra in soil and vegetation and CR values decreased with distance from the tailings impoundment edge. CR values varied significantly among sites, but few differences were found between plant species groups. The observed CR values ranged from 0.07 at the background and reclamation areas to 0.4 downwind from the tailings area. Average CR values for plants growing on exposed tailings and within one meter from the impoundment edge were 0.15 and 0.3, respectively. CR values of 226Ra for plants on tailings substrates were comparatively low in contrast to other radionuclides in the U chain. We speculate that in the case of sulfuric acid leached tailings-derived material, 226Ra is sequestered as sulfate, which is highly insoluble relative to the sulfates of the other elements (e.g., U and Th) resulting in reduced availability for plant uptake

  14. Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson Handford, C.

    1990-08-01

    Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level sauna on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to differences in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to ˜60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

  15. Aircraft and ground-based measurements of hydroperoxides during the 2006 MILAGRO field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Nunnermacker

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixing ratios of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide were determined aboard the US Department of Energy G-1 Research Aircraft during the March, 2006 MILAGRO field campaign in Mexico. Ground measurements of total hydroperoxide were made at Tecámac University, about 35 km NW of Mexico City. In the air and on the ground, peroxide mixing ratios near the source region were generally near 1 ppbv. Strong southerly flow resulted in transport of pollutants from Mexico City to two downwind surface sites on several flight days. On these days, it was observed that peroxide concentrations slightly decreased as the G-1 flew progressively downwind. This observation is consistent with low or negative net peroxide production rates calculated for the source region and is due to the very high NOx concentrations in the Mexico City plateau. However, relatively high values of peroxide were observed at takeoff and landing near Veracruz, a site with much higher humidity and lower NOx concentrations.

  16. New horizontal and vertical mass transfer coefficient equation formulations applied to a refinery data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellums, L.J.; Fine, D.G.; DeCoursey, S.S.; Cronic, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The American Petroleum Institute (API) has collected a large tracer data base representing the best field data on atmospheric dispersion performed up to 1982. Twelve of these tracer programs (Hanford 67, Green Glow, Prairie Grass, NRTS, TMI, Ocean Breeze, Dry Gulch, St. Louis, Rancho Seco, Paramount, Karlsruhe, Goodyear) were brought into Phillips Petroleum Company for Gaussian plume formulation using an optimal least squares procedure. The horizontal diffusion and the vertical diffusion were manipulated in an optimal fashion in the Gaussian plume formulation to give a best fit of calculated to experimental (field observations) data important conclusions from the many observations in this work are: 1. Field measured Turner stability when used with Pasquill-Gifford curves does not choose horizontal and vertical dispersion rates representative of true atmospheric turbulence in most cases, 2. Individual stabilities are required rather than assuming one stability for both dispersion rates, and 3. Horizontal diffusion is a function of downwind distance, crosswind distance, and stability for dispersion downwind of building complexes with considerable ground roughness

  17. User's manual for DWNWND: an interactive Gaussian plume atmospheric transport model with eight dispersion parameter options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.E.; Miller, C.W.

    1980-05-01

    The most commonly used approach for estimating the atmospheric concentration and deposition of material downwind from its point of release is the Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model. Two of the critical parameters in this model are sigma/sub y/ and sigma/sub z/, the horizontal and vertical dispersion parameters, respectively. A number of different sets of values for sigma/sub y/ and sigma/sub z/ have been determined empirically for different release heights and meteorological and terrain conditions. The computer code DWNWND, described in this report, is an interactive implementation of the Gaussian plume model. This code allows the user to specify any one of eight different sets of the empirically determined dispersion paramters. Using the selected dispersion paramters, ground-level normalized exposure estimates are made at any specified downwind distance. Computed values may be corrected for plume depletion due to deposition and for plume settling due to gravitational fall. With this interactive code, the user chooses values for ten parameters which define the source, the dispersion and deposition process, and the sampling point. DWNWND is written in FORTRAN for execution on a PDP-10 computer, requiring less than one second of central processor unit time for each simulation

  18. An LES study of vertical-axis wind turbine wakes aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Dabiri, John O.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) combined with a turbine model is used to investigate the structure of the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). In the simulations, a recently developed minimum dissipation model is used to parameterize the subgrid-scale stress tensor, while the turbine-induced forces are modeled with an actuator-line technique. The LES framework is first tested in the simulation of the wake behind a model straight-bladed VAWT placed in the water channel, and then used to study the wake structure downwind of a full-scale VAWT sited in the atmospheric boundary layer. In particular, the self-similarity of the wake is examined, and it is found that the wake velocity deficit is well characterized by a two-dimensional elliptical Gaussian distribution. By assuming a self-similar Gaussian distribution of the velocity deficit, and applying mass and momentum conservation, an analytical model is developed and tested to predict the maximum velocity deficit downwind of the turbine.

  19. The climate penalty for clean fossil fuel combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkermann, W.; Vogel, B.; Sutton, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    To cope with the world's growing demand for energy, a large number of coal-fired power plants are currently in operation or under construction. To prevent environmental damage from acidic sulphur and particulate emissions, many such installations are equipped with flue gas cleaning technology that reduces the emitted amounts of sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). However, the consequences of this technology for aerosol emissions, and in particular the regional scale impact on cloud microphysics, have not been studied until now. We performed airborne investigations to measure aerosol size distributions in the air masses downwind of coal-fired power installations. We show how the current generation of clean technology reduces the emission of sulphur and fine particulate matter, but leads to an unanticipated increase in the direct emission of ultrafine particles (1-10 nm median diameter) which are highly effective precursors of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Our analysis shows how these additional ultrafine particles probably modify cloud microphysics, as well as precipitation intensity and distribution on a regional scale downwind of emission sources. Effectively, the number of small water droplets might be increased, thus reducing the water available for large droplets and rain formation. The possible corresponding changes in the precipitation budget with a shift from more frequent steady rain to occasionally more vigorous rain events, or even a significant regional reduction of annual precipitation, introduce an unanticipated risk for regional climate and agricultural production, especially in semi-arid climate zones.

  20. The effects of sorting by aeolian processes on the geochemical characteristics of surface materials: a wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Lang, Lili; Hua, Ting; Zhang, Caixia; Li, Hui

    2018-03-01

    The geochemical characteristics of aeolian and surface materials in potential source areas of dust are frequently employed in environmental reconstructions as proxies of past climate and as source tracers of aeolian sediments deposited in downwind areas. However, variations in the geochemical characteristics of these aeolian deposits that result from near-surface winds are currently poorly understood. In this study, we collected surface samples from the Ala Shan Plateau (a major potential dust source area in Central Asia) to determine the influence of aeolian processes on the geochemical characteristics of aeolian transported materials. Correlation analyses show that compared with surface materials, the elements in transported materials (e.g., Cu, As, Pb, Mn, Zn, Al, Ca, Fe, Ga, K, Mg, P, Rb, Co, Cr, Na, Nb, Si, and Zr) were subjected to significant sorting by aeolian processes, and the sorting also varied among different particle size fractions and elements. Variations in wind velocity were significantly correlated with the contents of Cr, Ga, Sr, Ca, Y, Nd, Zr, Nb, Ba, and Al, and with the Zr/Al, Zr/Rb, K/Ca, Sr/Ca, Rb/Sr, and Ca/Al ratios. Given the great variation in the geochemical characteristics of materials transported under different aeolian processes relative to those of the source materials, these results indicate that considerable uncertainty may be introduced to analyses by using surface materials to trace the potential source areas of aeolian deposits that accumulate in downwind areas.

  1. A new approach for evaluating measured wake data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Mikael [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1996-12-01

    Wind turbine wakes have been studied by analysing a large set of atmospheric data, from a wind farm with four turbines sited on a flat coastal area. The results obtained have ben generalized to allow tests against data from other full scale wind turbines as well as wind tunnel simulations. These comparisons are found to give very satisfactory results. The thrust coefficient is found to be a better parameter for description than wind speed, of wake characteristics because it implicitly includes the effect of regulation. It is also found that down-wind travel time is more convenient to use than down-wind distance in this context. The travel time to the end of the near wake region, i.e. to the point where a single velocity deficit peak first appears, is found to be inversely proportional to the rotational frequency of the turbine and to the turbulence intensity of the ambient air flow and proportional to the ratio of the wake radius and the hub height. For larger travel times, i.e. for the far wake region, it is found that the centre line relative velocity deficit decreases with the logarithm of the time traveled and is parametrically dependent on the time constant and the thrust coefficient. 3 refs, 5 figs

  2. Dispersal and survival rates of adult and juvenile Red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda exposed to potential contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber, E. A.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Annual survival and dispersal rates of adult and juvenile red-tailed tropicbirds were examined in connection with exposure to heavy metals. From 1990-2000 the incineration of a U.S. stockpile of chemical weapons stored at Johnston Atoll exposed nesting tropicbirds to increased levels of human disturbance, smoke stack emissions and potential leaks. Using a multi-state mark-recapture modeling approach, birds nesting in this site (downwind of the plant were compared to those nesting in a reference site (upwind of the plant with less human disturbance, no exposure to smoke stack emissions or other potential incineration emissions. We did not find any difference in survival of adults or juveniles when comparing the two sites. Adult breeding dispersal rates did not differ between the sites but we did find differences in the age-specific natal dispersal rates. Birds fledged from downwind areas were less likely to return to their natal area to nest and more likely to immigrate to the upwind area than vice-versa. This asymmetry in emigration rates is believed to be due to differing vegetation densities and has implications for vegetation management in relation to tropicbird nest success and population size.

  3. PM2.5 and Carbon Emissions from Prescribed Fire in a Longleaf Pine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strenfel, S. J.; Clements, C. B.; Hiers, J. K.; Kiefer, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Prescribed fires are a frequently utilized land-management tool in the Southeastern US. In order to better characterize emissions and impacts from prescribed fire in longleaf pine ecosystems, in situ data were obtained within the burn perimeter using a 10-m instrumented flux tower. Turbulence and temperature data at 10-m were sampled at 10 Hz using a sonic anemometer and fine-wire thermocouples respectively. Measurements of PM2.5, CO and CO2 emissions were sampled at 10-m within the burn perimeter and PM2.5 and Black Carbon PM2.5 were sampled 0.5 km downwind of the fire front using a 2-m instrumented tripod. Preliminary results indicate PM2.5 and carbon emissions significantly increased during the fire-front passage, and downwind PM concentrations were amplified beyond pre-fire ambient concentrations. In addition, the considerable amount a heat release and flux data gathered from these prescribed fires suggests that near surface atmospheric conditions were directly impacted by increased turbulence generation.

  4. Effects of Building‒roof Cooling on Flow and Distribution of Reactive Pollutants in street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. J.; Choi, W.; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The effects of building‒roof cooling on flow and dispersion of reactive pollutants were investigated in the framework of flow dynamics and chemistry using a coupled CFD‒chemistry model. For this, flow characteristics were analyzed first in street canyons in the presence of building‒roof cooling. A portal vortex was generated in street canyon, producing dominant reverse and outward flows near the ground in all the cases. The building‒roof cooling increased horizontal wind speeds at the building roof and strengthened the downward motion near the downwind building in the street canyon, resultantly intensifying street canyon vortex strength. The flow affected the distribution of primary and secondary pollutants. Concentrations of primary pollutants such as NOx, VOC and CO was high near the upwind building because the reverse flows were dominant at street level, making this area the downwind region of emission sources. Concentration of secondary pollutant such as O3 was lower than the background near the ground, where NOX concentrations were high. Building‒roof cooling decreased the concentration of primary pollutants in contrasted to those under non‒cooling conditions. In contrast, building‒roof cooling increased O3 by reducing NO concentrations in urban street canyon compared to concentrations under non‒cooling conditions.

  5. An open-terrain line source model coupled with street-canyon effects to forecast carbon monoxide at traffic roundabout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Suresh; Gokhale, Sharad; Ghoshal, Aloke Kumar

    2011-02-15

    A double-lane four-arm roundabout, where traffic movement is continuous in opposite directions and at different speeds, produces a zone responsible for recirculation of emissions within a road section creating canyon-type effect. In this zone, an effect of thermally induced turbulence together with vehicle wake dominates over wind driven turbulence causing pollutant emission to flow within, resulting into more or less equal amount of pollutants upwind and downwind particularly during low winds. Beyond this region, however, the effect of winds becomes stronger, causing downwind movement of pollutants. Pollutant dispersion caused by such phenomenon cannot be described accurately by open-terrain line source model alone. This is demonstrated by estimating one-minute average carbon monoxide concentration by coupling an open-terrain line source model with a street canyon model which captures the combine effect to describe the dispersion at non-signalized roundabout. The results of the modeling matched well with the measurements compared with the line source model alone and the prediction error reduced by about 50%. The study further demonstrated this with traffic emissions calculated by field and semi-empirical methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dust Storms from Degraded Drylands of Asia: Dynamics and Health Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Otani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Asian dust events are massive meteorological phenomena during which dust particles from Chinese and Mongolian deserts are blown into the atmosphere and carried by westerly winds across Northeast Asia. Recently, there has been steady increase in both the frequency and the severity of Asian atmospheric dust events. Concern has been expressed regarding the potential health hazards in affected areas. The principal nature of the damage associated with Asian dust events differs between the emission (sandstorm and downwind (air pollution regions. In the emission region, the health impacts of dust storms are reflected in the high prevalence of respiratory diseases and severe subjective symptoms. Extreme dust storm events may cause a disaster to happen. In downwind regions such as Japan, analysis of Asian dust particles has shown the presence of ammonium ions, sulfate ions, nitrate ions, and heavy metal compounds that are considered not to originate from soil. Asian dust particles have been thought to adsorb anthropogenic atmospheric pollutants during transport. Therefore, Asian dust events coincide with increases in daily hospital admissions and clinical visits for allergic diseases such as asthma, allergic rhinitis, and conjunctivitis. Although the effect of Asian dust on human health in each region is influenced by a variety of different mechanisms, human activities are partly responsible for such negative effects in many situations. We therefore need to address these environmental problems.

  7. Drift-modeling and monitoring comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Hanna, S.R.

    1977-01-01

    Congress is looking into the conglomeration of nuclear reactors into energy centers of limited area. Drift from cooling towers can corrode and damage structures in the immediate vicinity of the towers, cause a public nuisance if located near parking lots or high-density traffic areas, and endanger local vegetation. The estimation of salt deposition has relied primarily on predictions from a variety of models, with very few direct measurements. One of the major efforts in our program is to evaluate the assumptions, limitations, and applicabilities of various analytical models for drift deposition prediction. Several drift deposition models are compared using a set of standard input conditions. The predicted maximum drift deposition differs by two orders of magnitude, and the downwind locations of the maximum differ by one order of magnitude. The discrepancies are attributed mainly to different assumptions in the models regarding the initial effective height of the droplets. Current programs in which drift characteristics at the tower mouth and drift deposition downwind of the tower are being measured are summarized. At the present time, drift deposition measurements, sufficiently comprehensive for model verifications, are unavailable. Hopefully, the Chalk Point Program will satisfy this need

  8. Air quality impacts analysis for area G. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalewsky, K.; Eklund, B.; Vold, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    The impact of fugitive radioactive emissions from the disposal site, Area G, was evaluated in support of site characterization for the Performance Assessment and for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program. Fugitive emissions of tritiated water and contaminated windblown dust were considered. Data from an extensive field measurement program were used to estimate annual emissions of tritiated water. Fugitive dust models were used to calculate estimates of the annual emissions of windblown dust. These estimates were combined with data on contamination levels in surface soils to develop annual emission rates for specific radionuclides: tritium, uranium-238, cesium-137, plutonium-238, plutonium-239,240, and strontium-90. The CAP-88 atmospheric transport model was used to predict areas potentially affected by long-term dust deposition and atmospheric concentrations. The annual emission rate of tritiated water was estimated from the field data to be 14.0 Ci/yr. The emission rate of soil-borne radionuclides from open areas and from soils handling operations totaled less than 1x10 -4 Ci/yr. The CAP-88 results were used to develop effective dose equivalents (EDEs) for receptor locations downwind of Area G. All EDEs were several orders of magnitude below the national standard of 10 mrem/yr. Fugitive air emissions from Area G were found not to pose a health threat to persons living or working downwind of the facility

  9. Atmospheric redistribution of reactive nitrogen and phosphorus by wildfires and implications for global carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Xu, L.; Wiggins, E. B.; Chen, Y.; Riley, W. J.; Mekonnen, Z. A.; Pellegrini, A.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2017-12-01

    Fires are an important process regulating the redistribution of nutrients within terrestrial ecosystems. Frequently burning ecosystems such as savannas are a net source of N and P to the atmosphere each year, with atmospheric transport and dry and wet deposition increasing nutrient availability in downwind ecosystems and over the open ocean. Transport of N and P aerosols from savanna fires within the Hadley circulation contributes to nutrient deposition over tropical forests, yielding an important cross-biome nutrient transfer. Pyrodenitrification of reactive N increases with fire temperature and modified combustion efficiency, generating a global net biospheric loss of approximately 14 Tg N per year. Here we analyze atmospheric N and P redistribution using the Global Fire Emissions Database version 4s and the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy earth system model. We synthesize literature estimates of N and P concentrations in fire-emitted aerosols and ecosystem mass balance measurements to help constrain model estimates of these biosphere-atmosphere fluxes. In our analysis, we estimate the fraction of terrestrial net primary production (NPP) that is sustained by fire-emitted P and reactive N from upwind ecosystems. We then evaluate how recent global declines in burned area in savanna and grassland ecosystems may be changing nutrient availability in downwind ecosystems.

  10. Intercontinental transport of aerosols and photochemical oxidants from Asia and its consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, Donald J.; Lei, Hang; Lin, Jintai

    2007-01-01

    The intercontinental transport of aerosols and photochemical oxidants from Asia is a crucial issue for air quality concerns in countries downwind of the significant emissions and concentrations of pollutants occurring in this important region of the world. Since the lifetimes of some important pollutants are long enough to be transported over long distance in the troposphere, regional control strategies for air pollution in downwind countries might be ineffective without considering the effects of long-range transport of pollutants from Asia. Field campaigns provide strong evidence for the intercontinental transport of Asian pollutants. They, together with ground-based observations and model simulations, show that the air quality over parts of North America is being affected by the pollutants transported from Asia. This paper examines the current understanding of the intercontinental transport of gases and aerosols from Asia and resulting effects on air quality, and on the regional and global climate system. - Air quality over parts of North America is being affected by pollutants transported from Asia

  11. Impact Assessment of Biomass Burning on Air Quality in Southeast and East Asia During BASE-ASIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Hsu, N. Christina; Gao, Yang; Dong, Xinyi; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lam, Yun Fat

    2013-01-01

    A synergy of numerical simulation, ground-based measurement and satellite observation was applied to evaluate the impact of biomass burning originating from Southeast Asia (SE Asia) within the framework of NASA's 2006 Biomass burning Aerosols in Southeast Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment (BASE-ASIA). Biomass burning emissions in the spring of 2006 peaked in MarcheApril when most intense biomass burning occurred in Myanmar, northern Thailand, Laos, and parts of Vietnam and Cambodia. Model performances were reasonably validated by comparing to both satellite and ground-based observations despite overestimation or underestimation occurring in specific regions due to high uncertainties of biomass burning emission. Chemical tracers of particulate K(+), OC concentrations, and OC/EC ratios showed distinct regional characteristics, suggesting biomass burning and local emission dominated the aerosol chemistry. CMAQ modeled aerosol chemical components were underestimated at most circumstances and the converted AOD values from CMAQ were biased low at about a factor of 2, probably due to the underestimation of biomass emissions. Scenario simulation indicated that the impact of biomass burning to the downwind regions spread over a large area via the Asian spring monsoon, which included Southern China, South China Sea, and Taiwan Strait. Comparison of AERONET aerosol optical properties with simulation at multi-sites clearly demonstrated the biomass burning impact via longrange transport. In the source region, the contribution from biomass burning to AOD was estimated to be over 56%. While in the downwind regions, the contribution was still significant within the range of 26%-62%.

  12. Comparison of some gamma detectors and environmental measurement of small Ar41 releases from a Triga reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Kautto, A.M.T.

    1977-11-01

    GM-detectors, liquid- and NaI(Tl)-scintillation detectors and semiconductor detectors were compared in order to measure small airborne Ar 41 activity concentrations. A 12,5 cm x 12,5 cm NaI(Tl)-scintillation detector was used to semiempirically estimate the radiation exposure arising from airborne Ar 41 release passing 5 meters (estimated) above the detector at a distance of 130 meters from a 250 kW Triga-reactor under downwind conditions. The height of the release point was 19 m. The exposure was found to be 0.45 μR/h at an Ar 41 release rate of 18 mCi/h (670 MBq/h) under downwind conditions and at a wind speed of 3 m/s. The mean annual exposure from 1300 hours reactor operation is of the order of 40...100 μR/y (+100%,-50%) at this test point and at a release rate of 2.5...6μCi/s. The maximum exposure at the ground level is at a distance of about 200 meters (approximately 10 x height of chimney) and it is of the order of 100 μR/y. At close distances from the point of release a line source model can be used for the approximate estimation of the exposure. (author)

  13. Airborne Detection of H5N8 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Genome in Poultry Farms, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoizec, Axelle; Niqueux, Eric; Thomas, Rodolphe; Daniel, Patrick; Schmitz, Audrey; Le Bouquin, Sophie

    2018-01-01

    In southwestern France, during the winter of 2016-2017, the rapid spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 outbreaks despite the implementation of routine control measures, raised the question about the potential role of airborne transmission in viral spread. As a first step to investigate the plausibility of that transmission, air samples were collected inside, outside and downwind from infected duck and chicken facilities. H5 avian influenza virus RNA was detected in all samples collected inside poultry houses, at external exhaust fans and at 5 m distance from poultry houses. For three of the five flocks studied, in the sample collected at 50-110 m distance, viral genomic RNA was detected. The measured viral air concentrations ranged between 4.3 and 6.4 log 10 RNA copies per m 3 , and their geometric mean decreased from external exhaust fans to the downwind measurement point. These findings are in accordance with the possibility of airborne transmission and question the procedures for outbreak depopulation.

  14. Airborne Detection of H5N8 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Genome in Poultry Farms, France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axelle Scoizec

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In southwestern France, during the winter of 2016–2017, the rapid spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N8 outbreaks despite the implementation of routine control measures, raised the question about the potential role of airborne transmission in viral spread. As a first step to investigate the plausibility of that transmission, air samples were collected inside, outside and downwind from infected duck and chicken facilities. H5 avian influenza virus RNA was detected in all samples collected inside poultry houses, at external exhaust fans and at 5 m distance from poultry houses. For three of the five flocks studied, in the sample collected at 50–110 m distance, viral genomic RNA was detected. The measured viral air concentrations ranged between 4.3 and 6.4 log10 RNA copies per m3, and their geometric mean decreased from external exhaust fans to the downwind measurement point. These findings are in accordance with the possibility of airborne transmission and question the procedures for outbreak depopulation.

  15. Do Wind Turbines Affect Weather Conditions?: A Case Study in Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan F. Henschen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines are becoming increasingly widespread in the United States as the world looks for cleaner sources of energy. Scientists, policymakers, and citizens have strong opinions regarding the positive and negative effects of wind energy projects, and there is a great deal of misinformation about wind energy circulating on the Web and other media sources. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how the rotation of hundreds of turbines can influence local weather conditions within a wind farm and in the surrounding areas. This experiment measures temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, and evaporation with five weather instruments at Meadow Lake Wind Farm located in White, Jasper, and Benton Counties, Indiana, from November 4 through November 18, 2010. The data show that as wind passes throughout the wind farm, the air warms during the overnight and early morning hours and cools during daytime hours. Observed lower humidity rates and higher evaporation rates downwind also demonstrate that the air dries out as it travels through the wind farm. Further research over multiple seasons is necessary to examine the effects of warmer nighttime temperatures and drier conditions progressively downwind of the installation. Nevertheless, wind turbines did not negatively affect local weather patterns in our small-scale research and may actually prevent frost, which could have important positive implications for farmers by potentially prolonging the growing season.

  16. In situ observations of the influence of a large onshore wind farm on near-surface temperature, turbulence intensity and wind speed profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig M.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Pryor, S. C.

    2013-09-01

    Observations of wakes from individual wind turbines and a multi-megawatt wind energy installation in the Midwestern US indicate that directly downstream of a turbine (at a distance of 190 m, or 2.4 rotor diameters (D)), there is a clear impact on wind speed and turbulence intensity (TI) throughout the rotor swept area. However, at a downwind distance of 2.1 km (26 D downstream of the closest wind turbine) the wake of the whole wind farm is not evident. There is no significant reduction of hub-height wind speed or increase in TI especially during daytime. Thus, in high turbulence regimes even very large wind installations may have only a modest impact on downstream flow fields. No impact is observable in daytime vertical potential temperature gradients at downwind distances of >2 km, but at night the presence of the wind farm does significantly decrease the vertical gradients of potential temperature (though the profile remains stably stratified), largely by increasing the temperature at 2 m.

  17. In situ observations of the influence of a large onshore wind farm on near-surface temperature, turbulence intensity and wind speed profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Craig M; Barthelmie, R J; Pryor, S C

    2013-01-01

    Observations of wakes from individual wind turbines and a multi-megawatt wind energy installation in the Midwestern US indicate that directly downstream of a turbine (at a distance of 190 m, or 2.4 rotor diameters (D)), there is a clear impact on wind speed and turbulence intensity (TI) throughout the rotor swept area. However, at a downwind distance of 2.1 km (26 D downstream of the closest wind turbine) the wake of the whole wind farm is not evident. There is no significant reduction of hub-height wind speed or increase in TI especially during daytime. Thus, in high turbulence regimes even very large wind installations may have only a modest impact on downstream flow fields. No impact is observable in daytime vertical potential temperature gradients at downwind distances of >2 km, but at night the presence of the wind farm does significantly decrease the vertical gradients of potential temperature (though the profile remains stably stratified), largely by increasing the temperature at 2 m. (letter)

  18. Wildfire Emissions and Their Interaction with Urban and Rural Pollution: Data and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years NASA has conducted a series of airborne campaigns (e. g. SEAC4RS*, ARCTAS, INTEX-A/B) over North America using an instrumented DC-8 aircraft equipped to measure a very large number of gaseous and aerosol constituents including several unique tracers. In these campaigns wild fires were extensively sampled near source as well as downwind after aging. The data provided detailed information on the composition and chemistry of fire emissions under a variety of atmospheric conditions as well as their interactions with rural and urban air pollution. Major fires studied including the California Rim fire in 2013 (SEAC4RS), the 2008 California wildfires (ARCTAS), and the Alaskan fires downwind over eastern US (INTEX-A). Although some fire plumes contained virtually no O3 enhancement, others showed significant ozone formation. Over Los Angeles, the highest O3 mixing ratios were observed in fire influenced urban air masses. Attempts to simulate these interactions using state of the art models were only minimally successful and indicated several shortcomings in simulating fire emission influences on urban smog formation. A variety of secondary oxidation products (e. g. O3, PAN, HCHO) were substantially underestimated. We will discuss the data collected in fire influenced air masses and their potential air quality implications.

  19. Siting wind farms in and around forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, N. [Natural Power Consultants, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation discussed methods of assessing the impact of trees on wind resources. Turbulence is generated and also absorbed by trees. Disturbances generated at tree level are then transported upwards and down-wind by the wind. The turbulence induced by trees can be felt kilometers downwind of forests at wind turbine hub heights. Wind speeds can be less than predicted, and significant over-estimations can occur with modelled results. The effects of high shear and high turbulence can also have an impact on power curve performance and lead to higher levels of mechanical stress. A SCADA analysis was used to demonstrate the impact of forests on power curves. Wind power predictions near forests can be optimized by using a full year of data capture at hub height, full rotor measurements, and a consideration of seasonal variations. Accurate tree maps are needed to determine the effects of trees on wind shear. Various forestry scenarios were modelled to demonstrate the effects of forestry management over time. tabs., figs.

  20. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed

  1. Phreatic eruption clouds: the activity of La Soufriere de Guadeloupe, F. W. I. , August-October, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiken, G.; Crowe, B.; McGetchin, T.; West, F.; Eichelberger, J.; Bartram, D.; Peterson, R.; Wohletz, K.

    1980-01-01

    From August to October, 1976, La Soufriere de Guadeloupe was observed, and recorded with an automated sequence camera and numerous handheld cameras. During the period of observation, the nature of volcanic activity ranged from mild steam emission to moderately energetic phraetic eruptions. The concurrent growth of clouds from separate vents (summit and flank) implies a common source. Simultaneous eruption of tephra-free and tephra-laden clouds from the same vent is puzzling and implies: (i) lateral changes in the degree of alteration of dome rocks along the elongate vent, hence erodability of the dome lavas, or (ii) differences in the gas velocities. These mixed clouds moved westward, downwind and downslope as a density current, with an approximate velocity of 10 to 25 m/sec. Upon reaching the sea the clouds continued to move forward, but at a decreased velocity, and spread laterally, having left behind the restrictions of valley walls. A thin gray veneer of moist tephra, ranging from several cm thick near the dome to less than 1 mm thick several km downwind, was deposited along a narrow corridor southwest of the summit. Tephra from the phreatic eruptions consisted mostly of hydrothermally altered lithic, mineral, and glass fragments derived from dome lavas; no fresh (juvenile) pyroclasts were present in the tephra.

  2. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

  3. Calculated radiation doses from radionuclides brought to the surface if future drilling intercepts the WIPP repository and pressurized brine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Channell, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes a scenario in which an exploratory borehole connects an underlying brine reservoir with the repository and results in saturation of the waste storage area. A subsequent borehole brings portions of this radionuclide contaminated brine to the surface. Radiation odses are calculated for time periods of 125, 400, and 1000 years after repository closing for the following: (1) external radiation doses for workers at the borehole location; (2) inhalation doses for workers at the borehole location; (3) external and inhalation doses for a resident located 360 meters downwind; (4) ingestion doses for the downwind resident from locally grown produce, milk, and meat; and (5) population doses from inhalation within a 50-mile radius. The probability of the various calculated doses occurring was estimated. Probability was included in the report because of a belief that probability considerations are useful in evaluating the acceptability of unlikely events and to encourage others to provide a more detailed evaluation using more sophisticated methodology. Since the probabilities presented in this report were calculated using a simple methodology, with some parameter values chosen arbitrarily, they should be considered as approximate examples, not accurate numbers. The reasonableness of the scenario and the significance of the results are also discussed

  4. Wind turbine wake interactions at field scale: An LES study of the SWiFT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Xiaolei; Boomsma, Aaron; Sotiropoulos, Fotis; Barone, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The University of Minnesota Virtual Wind Simulator (VWiS) code is employed to simulate turbine/atmosphere interactions in the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility developed by Sandia National Laboratories in Lubbock, TX, USA. The facility presently consists of three turbines and the simulations consider the case of wind blowing from South such that two turbines are in the free stream and the third turbine in the direct wake of one upstream turbine with separation of 5 rotor diameters. Large-eddy simulation (LES) on two successively finer grids is carried out to examine the sensitivity of the computed solutions to grid refinement. It is found that the details of the break-up of the tip vortices into small-scale turbulence structures can only be resolved on the finer grid. It is also shown that the power coefficient C P of the downwind turbine predicted on the coarse grid is somewhat higher than that obtained on the fine mesh. On the other hand, the rms (root-mean-square) of the C P fluctuations are nearly the same on both grids, although more small-scale turbulence structures are resolved upwind of the downwind turbine on the finer grid

  5. Thia-arenes as source apportionment tracers for urban air particulate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarry, B.E.; Allan, L.M.; Mehta, S.; Marvin, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Over sixty respirable air particulate samples were selected from a large number of filters collected in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Depending on the wind direction these sites were either predominantly upwind or predominantly downwind of the industrial sources. The sixty filters were extracted and analyzed using GC-MS for a range of PAH and sulfur-containing PAH (thia-arenes). Various reference standards (coal tar, diesel exhaust, urban air particulate) and source samples (coke oven condensate) were analyzed as well. A set of air particulate samples collected in another city alongside a highway provided an urban vehicular air sample. Unique thia-arene profiles were noted in the reference and source samples which provided the basis for this source apportionment work; two main approaches were used: (1) analysis of alkylated derivatives of thia-arenes with a molecular mass of 184 amu and (2) analysis of 234 amu isomers. The diesel exhaust and urban vehicular samples gave identical profiles while the coal tar and coke oven samples also had identical profiles but in different respects. The air samples collected at samplers located upwind of the coke ovens showed thia-arene profiles which were similar to the profile observed with a diesel exhaust reference material. However, air samples collected downwind of the coke ovens were heavily loaded samples and resembled the coal tar coke and oven condensate samples

  6. Atmospheric characterization through fused mobile airborne and surface in situ surveys: methane emissions quantification from a producing oil field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifer, Ira; Melton, Christopher; Fischer, Marc L.; Fladeland, Matthew; Frash, Jason; Gore, Warren; Iraci, Laura T.; Marrero, Josette E.; Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Yates, Emma L.

    2018-03-01

    Methane (CH4) inventory uncertainties are large, requiring robust emission derivation approaches. We report on a fused airborne-surface data collection approach to derive emissions from an active oil field near Bakersfield, central California. The approach characterizes the atmosphere from the surface to above the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and combines downwind trace gas concentration anomaly (plume) above background with normal winds to derive flux. This approach does not require a well-mixed PBL; allows explicit, data-based, uncertainty evaluation; and was applied to complex topography and wind flows. In situ airborne (collected by AJAX - the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment) and mobile surface (collected by AMOG - the AutoMObile trace Gas - Surveyor) data were collected on 19 August 2015 to assess source strength. Data included an AMOG and AJAX intercomparison transect profiling from the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) floor into the Sierra Nevada (0.1-2.2 km altitude), validating a novel surface approach for atmospheric profiling by leveraging topography. The profile intercomparison found good agreement in multiple parameters for the overlapping altitude range from 500 to 1500 m for the upper 5 % of surface winds, which accounts for wind-impeding structures, i.e., terrain, trees, buildings, etc. Annualized emissions from the active oil fields were 31.3 ± 16 Gg methane and 2.4 ± 1.2 Tg carbon dioxide. Data showed the PBL was not well mixed at distances of 10-20 km downwind, highlighting the importance of the experimental design.

  7. Quantifying the Intercontinental and Global Reach and Effects of Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Guo, Zitan

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling Group is participating in an international effort to explore the projected interactions of the atmosphere with biota, human activity, and the natural environment over the next three decades. The group uses computer simulations and statistical analyses to compare theory and observations of the composition of the lower atmosphere. This study of global habitability change is part of a more ambitious activity to understand global habitability. This broad planetary understanding is central to planetary habitability, biomarker detection, and similar aspects of Astrobiology. The group has made highly detailed studies of immense intercontinental plumes that affect the chemistry of the global atmosphere, especially the region below the ozone (O3) layer whose chemical composition defines the conditions for healthy humans and the biosphere. For some decades there has been concern about the pollution from cities and industrial burning and its possible effect in increasing smog ozone, not only in continental regions, but also in plumes that spread downwind. Recently, there has been new concern about another kind of pollution plume. Projections for a greatly expanded aircraft fleet imply that there will be plumes of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) from jet exhaust in the Northern Hemisphere downwind of major air traffic routes. Both of these are tied to large-scale O3 in the troposphere, where it is toxic to humans and plant tissues.

  8. Application of RADTRAN to estimation of doses to persons in enclosed spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.

    1992-01-01

    The RADTRAN computer code for transportation risk analysis can be used to estimate doses to persons in enclosed volumes. This application was developed in response to a need to examine consequences of a hypothetical container leak during accident-free transportation by cargo air. The original problem addressed tritium containers, but the method can be applied to any gaseous or suspended particulate material potentially released in an airplane or other enclosed area (e.g., warehouse) under accident-free conditions. Such leakage can occur during shipment of any radioactive gas or material with a gaseous phase. Atmospheric dispersion is normally modeled in RADTRAN as a series of downwind isopleths each of which is assigned a dilution factor (also known as time-integrated concentration or X/Q value). These values are located in look-up tables in RADTRAN and are normally taken from externally performed Gaussian dispersion calculations. The dilution factors are used to estimate inhalation dose to persons in the specified downwind areas

  9. Floating wind turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  10. Photochemistry in the Atmospheres of Denver and Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    The composition of atmospheres in and downwind of urban centers has been the subject of study for decades. While early campaigns involved measurements exclusively from the ground, more recent studies have included airborne-based observations. Improved understanding has hinged critically on the development of instrumentation for better qualitifcation of pollutants, and measurement of previously unobserved species in the gas and particulate phases. Comprehensive, well-planned studies have, over time, led to more detailed understanding of chemical transformations and thus improved model representations and directions for further research. This presentation focuses on findings from two case studies of urban atmospheres, namely the MILAGRO study in the Mexico City metropolitan area and the FRAPPE study in the Denver metropolitan region. Both studies made use of extensive ground-based networks and multiple aircraft platforms. The data collected during these studies have been combined with numerical models to derive assessments of the evolution of atmospheric composition due to photochemistry, mixing, and surface processes. Here, analysis of MILAGRO data focuses on the evolution of outflow downwind of the urban region. In FRAPPE, the focus is the possible role of oil and gas exploration on urban air quality. These findings are used to assess the accuracy of current numerical models to reproduce observations, and to point toward areas possibly needing further study.

  11. Green along the highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weijers, E.; Kos, G.; Cornelissen, T.

    2008-01-01

    The results of downwind measurements of air quality around vegetation near a motorway are presented and discussed. The study (first ever in the Netherlands) was performed by order of the Innovation Programme Air Quality. At a carefully selected location measurements of PM and NOx were carried out downwind from a motorway in front of and (at various distances) behind a parallel orientated vegetation strip. Results are compared with synchronized data collected at a nearby location without vegetation (the 'reference' situation) and at the same distances from the motorway. Major findings are: Comparing measurements in front of and behind the vegetation strip show that the presence of vegetation tends to lower PM10 and PM2.5 concentrations immediately behind the vegetation. However, no such change is apparent in the concentrations of NO and NO2. The comparison with measurements executed without vegetation ('reference') indicate that concentration levels close to the vegetation strip are similar or somewhat higher. At a larger distance from motorway and vegetation (>30 m) NO and NO2 concentrations tend to be lower than what is observed in the reference situation. This could not be determined for PM [nl

  12. Measured tritium in groundwater related to atmospheric releases from the Marcoule nuclear site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, F.; Clech, A.; Crochet, P.

    1996-01-01

    Tritium is released into the atmosphere during normal operation from the industrial facilities operated by COGEMA at Marcoule; over a 1 5-year period covered by this study (1979-1994) the quantities ranged from 4940 to 520 TBq·yr -1 . Atmospheric release in rainy weather results in tritium migration into the ground water by a series of mechanisms associated with the water cycle. COGEMA monitors the ground water by means of bore holes. Atmospheric monitoring is also routinely performed; data on the tritium activity concentration in the air and rainwater are available for the same time period. A simplified observation suggests a relation between the atmospheric tritium release and the ground water radioactivity. In 1994, the activity ranged from 100 to 200 Bq·l -1 in the boreholes located 1 km and 2 km downwind from the point of release, diminishing with the distance to less than 20 Bq·l -1 at about 3 km. The authors attempted to model two types of transfers: atmospheric transfer from the release chimney to the borehole, and transfer in the alluvial ground water. The aquifer comprises the alluvial deposits forming the Codolet plain extending to the south of Marcoule, downwind from the point of atmospheric tritium release. The hydrogeology of the entire Marcoule site has been described in previous studies by the French bureau of geological and mineralogical research (BRGM) and ANTEA. (author)

  13. Eyjafjallajokull Volcano Plume Particle-Type Characterization from Space-Based Multi-angle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Limbacher, James

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Research Aerosol algorithm makes it possible to study individual aerosol plumes in considerable detail. From the MISR data for two optically thick, near-source plumes from the spring 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallaj kull volcano, we map aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients and changing aerosol particle types with this algorithm; several days downwind, we identify the occurrence of volcanic ash particles and retrieve AOD, demonstrating the extent and the limits of ash detection and mapping capability with the multi-angle, multi-spectral imaging data. Retrieved volcanic plume AOD and particle microphysical properties are distinct from background values near-source, as well as for overwater cases several days downwind. The results also provide some indication that as they evolve, plume particles brighten, and average particle size decreases. Such detailed mapping offers context for suborbital plume observations having much more limited sampling. The MISR Standard aerosol product identified similar trends in plume properties as the Research algorithm, though with much smaller differences compared to background, and it does not resolve plume structure. Better optical analogs of non-spherical volcanic ash, and coincident suborbital data to validate the satellite retrieval results, are the factors most important for further advancing the remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes from space.

  14. Application of RADTRAN to estimation of doses to persons in enclosed spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The RADTRAN computer code for transportation risk analysis (Neuhauser and Kanipe, 1992) can be used to estimate doses to persons in enclosed volumes. This application was developed in response to a need to examine consequences of a hypothetical container leak during accident-free transportation by cargo air. The original problem addressed tritium containers, but the method can be applied to any gaseous or suspended particulate material potentially released in an airplane or other enclosed area (e.g., warehouse ) under accident-free conditions. Such leakage can occur during shipment of any radioactive gas or material with a gaseous phase. Atmospheric dispersion is normally modeled in RADTRAN as a series of downwind isopleths each of which is assigned a dilution factor (also known as time-integrated concentration or X/Q value). These values are located in look-up tables in RADTRAN and are normally taken from externally performed Gaussian dispersion calculations. The dilution factors are used to estimate inhalation dose to persons in the specified downwind areas. (J.P.N.)

  15. The Gaussian atmospheric transport model and its sensitivity to the joint frequency distribution and parametric variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamby, D M

    2002-01-01

    Reconstructed meteorological data are often used in some form of long-term wind trajectory models for estimating the historical impacts of atmospheric emissions. Meteorological data for the straight-line Gaussian plume model are put into a joint frequency distribution, a three-dimensional array describing atmospheric wind direction, speed, and stability. Methods using the Gaussian model and joint frequency distribution inputs provide reasonable estimates of downwind concentration and have been shown to be accurate to within a factor of four. We have used multiple joint frequency distributions and probabilistic techniques to assess the Gaussian plume model and determine concentration-estimate uncertainty and model sensitivity. We examine the straight-line Gaussian model while calculating both sector-averaged and annual-averaged relative concentrations at various downwind distances. The sector-average concentration model was found to be most sensitive to wind speed, followed by horizontal dispersion (sigmaZ), the importance of which increases as stability increases. The Gaussian model is not sensitive to stack height uncertainty. Precision of the frequency data appears to be most important to meteorological inputs when calculations are made for near-field receptors, increasing as stack height increases.

  16. HARAD, Decay Isotope Concentration from Atmospheric Noble-Gas Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: HARAD calculates concentrations of radioactive daughters in air following the atmospheric release of a parent radionuclide for a variety of release heights and meteorological conditions. It can be applied most profitably to the assessment of doses to man from the noble gases such as Rn-222, Rn-220, and Xe and Kr isotopes. These gases can produce significant quantities of short-lived particulate daughters in an airborne plume, which are the major contributors to dose. The simultaneous processes of radioactive decay, buildup and environmental loss due to wet and dry deposition on ground surfaces are calculated for a daughter chain in an airborne plume as it is dispersed downwind from a point of release of a parent. 2 - Method of solution: The code evaluates the analytic solution to the set of coupled first order differential equations describing time variation of the concentration of a chain of radionuclides. The analytic solutions assume that the coefficient describing the fractional rate of dry deposition is constant with time. To account for the variation the time coordinate is automatically divided into intervals and a set of average values are used. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: - The maximum length of decay chain is 10 nuclides; calculations can be made at a maximum of 24 downwind distances

  17. Distribution and urban-suburban differences in ground-level ozone and its precursors over Shenyang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ningwei; Ren, Wanhui; Li, Xiaolan; Ma, Xiaogang; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Bingkun

    2018-03-01

    Hourly mixing ratio data of ground-level ozone and its main precursors at ambient air quality monitoring sites in Shenyang during 2013-2015 were used to survey spatiotemporal variations in ozone. Then, the transport of ozone and its precursors among urban, suburban, and rural sites was examined. The correlations between ozone and some key meteorological factors were also investigated. Ozone and O x mixing ratios in Shenyang were higher during warm seasons and lower during cold ones, while ozone precursors followed the opposite cycle. Ozone mixing ratios reached maximum and minimum values in the afternoon and morning, respectively, reflecting the significant influence of photochemical production during daytime and depletion via titration during nighttime. Compared to those in downtown Shenyang, ozone mixing ratios were higher and the occurrence of peak values were later in suburban and rural areas downwind of the prevailing wind. The differences were most significant in summer, when the ozone mixing ratios at one suburban downwind site reached a maximum value of 35.6 ppb higher than those at the downtown site. This suggests that photochemical production processes were significant during the transport of ozone precursors, particularly in warm seasons with sufficient sunlight. Temperature, total radiation, and wind speed all displayed positive correlations with ozone concentration, reflecting their important role in accelerating ozone formation. Generally, the correlations between ozone and meteorological factors were slightly stronger at suburban sites than in urban areas, indicating that ozone levels in suburban areas were more sensitive to these meteorological factors.

  18. Validation test for CAP88 predictions of tritium dispersion at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, Erika; Green, Andrew; Whicker, Jeffrey; Eisele, William; Fuehne, David; McNaughton, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Gaussian plume models, such as CAP88, are used regularly for estimating downwind concentrations from stack emissions. At many facilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) requires that CAP88 be used to demonstrate compliance with air quality regulations for public protection from emissions of radionuclides. Gaussian plume models have the advantage of being relatively simple and their use pragmatic; however, these models are based on simplifying assumptions and generally they are not capable of incorporating dynamic meteorological conditions or complex topography. These limitations encourage validation tests to understand the capabilities and limitations of the model for the specific application. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has complex topography but is required to use CAP88 for compliance with the Clean Air Act Subpart H. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the CAP88 predictions against ambient air measurements using released tritium as a tracer. Stack emissions of tritium from two LANL stacks were measured and the dispersion modeled with CAP88 using local meteorology. Ambient air measurements of tritium were made at various distances and directions from the stacks. Model predictions and ambient air measurements were compared over the course of a full year's data. Comparative results were consistent with other studies and showed the CAP88 predictions of downwind tritium concentrations were on average about three times higher than those measured, and the accuracy of the model predictions were generally more consistent for annual averages than for bi-weekly data.

  19. Constraining wintertime sources of inorganic chlorine over the northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, J.; Jaegle, L.; Shah, V.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Schroder, J. C.; Day, D. A.; Fiddler, M. N.; Holloway, J. S.; Sullivan, A.; Veres, P. R.; Weber, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Brown, S. S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Thornton, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Wintertime multiphase chlorine chemistry is thought to play a significant role in the regional distribution of oxidants, the lifetime of VOCs, and the transport of NOx downwind of urban sources. However, the sources and chemistry of reactive chlorine remain highly uncertain. During the WINTER 2015 aircraft campaign, the inorganic chlorine budget was dominated by HCl (g) and total particulate chloride, accounting for greater than 85% of the total chlorine budget within the boundary layer. The total concentration of inorganic chlorine compounds found over marine regions was 1014 pptv and 609 pptv over continental regions with variability found to be driven by changes in meteorological conditions, particle liquid water content, particle pH, and proximity to large anthropogenic sources. However, displacement of particle chloride was often not a large enough source to fully explain the concentrations of gas phase Cly compounds. We use the GEOS-Chem global chemical transport model to simulate the emissions, gas-particle partitioning, and downwind transport and deposition of Cly during winter. Simulated concentrations of HCl, particle chloride, and other dominant Cly compounds are compared to measurements made during the WINTER aircraft campaign. The relative roles of Cly sources from sea-salt aerosol and anthropogenic sources such as power plants, biomass burning and road salt are explored.

  20. Atmospheric Fate and Transport of Agricultural Dust and Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Thornton, D. C.; Auvermann, B. W.; Fitz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    Agricultural fugitive dust and odor are significant sources of localized air pollution in the semi-arid southern Great Plains. Daily episodes of ground-level fugitive dust emissions from the cattle feedlots associated with increased cattle activity in the early evenings are routinely observed, while consistently high ammonia is observed throughout the day. Here we present measurements of aerosol size distributions and concentrations of gas and particulate phase ammonia species collected at a feedlot in Texas during summers of 2006, 2007 and 2008. A GRIMM sequential mobility particle sizer and GRIMM 1.108 aerosol spectrometer were used to determine aerosol size distributions in the range of 10 nm to 20 µm aerodynamic diameter at the downwind and upwind edges of the facility. Using aqueous scrubbers, simultaneous measurements of both gas phase and total ammonia species present in the gas and particle phases were also collected. In addition to the continuous measurements at the edges of the facility, coincident aerosol and ammonia measurements were obtain at an additional site further downwind (~3.5 km). Taken together our measurements will be used to quantify aerosol and ammonia dispersion and transport. Relationships between the fate and transport of the aerosols and ammonia will be discussed.

  1. FY17 Accomplishments - Testing Facilities and Capabilities at SWiFT, SNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Jonathan Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    The Scaled Wind Farm Technologies (SWiFT) facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has, in support of the Atmosphere to electrons (A2e) research program, acquired measurements of wind turbine wake dynamics under various atmospheric conditions and while interacting with a downstream wind turbine. SNL researchers, in collaboration with National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers, installed a customized LIDAR system created by the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) in one of the SWiFT wind turbines (Figure 1) and operated that turbine with intentional yaw-versus-winddirection misalignment to study the behavior of the turbine wake under numerous combinations of atmospheric conditions and turbine yaw offsets. The DTU-customized LIDAR provided detailed measurements of the wake’s shape and location at many distances downwind of the turbine (Figure 2). These measurements will benefit wind energy researchers looking to understand wind turbine wake behavior and improve modeling and simulation of wake dynamics, including the “wake steering” affect that is observed when turbine yaw offset is controlled. During the test campaign, two SWiFT wind turbines were operated at the same time to observe the influence of the turbines on each other as the wake of the upwind turbine was observed sweeping over and interacting with the downwind turbine.

  2. Concentration and distribution of elements in plants and soils near phosphate processing factories, Pocatello, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severson, R.C.; Gough, L.P.

    1976-01-01

    The processing of phosphatic shale near Pocatello, Idaho has a direct influence on the element content of local vegetation and soil. Samples of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. subsp. tridentata) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) show important negative relations between the concentration of certain elements (Cd, Cr, F, Ni, P, Se, U, V, and Zn) and distance from phosphate processing factories. Plant tissues within 3 km of the processing factories contain unusually high amounts of these elements except Ni and Se. Important negative relations with distance were also found for certain elements (Be, F, Fe, K, Li, Pb, Rb, Th, and Zn) in A-horizon soil. Amounts of seven elements (Be, F, Li, Pb, Rb, Th, and Zn) being contributed to the upper 5 cm of the soil by phosphate processing, as well as two additional elements (U and V) suspected as being contributed to soil, were estimated, with F showing the greatest increase (about 300 kg/ha) added to soils as far as 4 km downwind from the factories. The greatest number of important relations for both plants and soils was found downwind (northeast) of the processing factories

  3. Evaluation and monitoring of an household waste incineration plant in Paris area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Person, A.; Le Moullec, Y.; Gilibert, E.

    1995-01-01

    Urban population is more and more concerned by air quality and waste disposal. In Paris Area, municipal waste are incinerated in three large plants all equipped with gas cleaning systems, except one that will be equipped in June 1995. It appeared interesting to characterize and evaluate the impact of this incinerator on ambient air quality in an area where other sources interfere. An sampling campaign was set up on six sites of AIRPARIF (ile de France Air Quality Monitoring Network). Nitrogen oxides. Sulphur dioxide and black smokes are measured in continuously. Other pollutants, considered more specific of waste incineration plants were analysed on a 24 h-sampling basis (heavy metals, hydrochloride acid, Chlorides). The first results seem to show some trends. Regarding usual pollutants, it appears downwind sites present higher average level that upwind sites. For hydrochloric acid, 24 h. averages are higher when the site was frequently downwind during the day. The size of the data set is small for heavy metals, however it seems that an impact can be detected for Cd and Zn. (author)

  4. Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, J K; Chan, S T

    2005-11-30

    The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that experiment. Four releases of sulfur hexafluoride, during two daytime and two nighttime intensive observing periods, are simulated using the building-resolving computational fluid dynamics model, FEM3MP to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with two options of turbulence parameterizations. One option omits stability effects but has a superior turbulence parameterization using a non-linear eddy viscosity (NEV) approach, while the other considers buoyancy effects with a simple linear eddy viscosity (LEV) approach for turbulence parameterization. Model performance metrics are calculated by comparison with observed winds and tracer data in the downtown area, and with observed winds and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) profiles at a location immediately downwind of the central business district (CBD) in the area we label as the urban shadow. Model predictions of winds, concentrations, profiles of wind speed, wind direction, and friction velocity are generally consistent with and compare reasonably well with the field observations. Simulations using the NEV turbulence parameterization generally exhibit better agreement with observations. To further explore this assumption of a neutrally-stable atmosphere within the urban area, TKE budget profiles slightly downwind of the urban wake region in the 'urban shadow' are examined. Dissipation and shear production are the largest terms which may be calculated directly. The advection of TKE is calculated as a residual; as would be expected downwind of an urban area, the advection of TKE produced within the urban area is a very large term. Buoyancy effects may be neglected in favor of advection, shear production, and dissipation. For three of the IOPs, buoyancy

  5. Quantification of urban atmospheric boundary layer greenhouse gas dry mole fraction enhancements in the dormant season: Results from the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L. Miles

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the detectability of city emissions via a tower-based greenhouse gas (GHG network, as part of the Indianapolis Flux (INFLUX experiment. By examining afternoon-averaged results from a network of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, and carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction measurements in Indianapolis, Indiana for 2011–2013, we quantify spatial and temporal patterns in urban atmospheric GHG dry mole fractions. The platform for these measurements is twelve communications towers spread across the metropolitan region, ranging in height from 39 to 136 m above ground level, and instrumented with cavity ring-down spectrometers. Nine of the sites were deployed as of January 2013 and data from these sites are the focus of this paper. A background site, chosen such that it is on the predominantly upwind side of the city, is utilized to quantify enhancements caused by urban emissions. Afternoon averaged mole fractions are studied because this is the time of day during which the height of the boundary layer is most steady in time and the area that influences the tower measurements is likely to be largest. Additionally, atmospheric transport models have better performance in simulating the daytime convective boundary layer compared to the nighttime boundary layer. Averaged from January through April of 2013, the mean urban dormant-season enhancements range from 0.3 ppm CO2 at the site 24 km typically downwind of the edge of the city (Site 09 to 1.4 ppm at the site at the downwind edge of the city (Site 02 to 2.9 ppm at the downtown site (Site 03. When the wind is aligned such that the sites are downwind of the urban area, the enhancements are increased, to 1.6 ppm at Site 09, and 3.3 ppm at Site 02. Differences in sampling height affect the reported urban enhancement by up to 50%, but the overall spatial pattern remains similar. The time interval over which the afternoon data are averaged alters the calculated urban enhancement by an average of 0.4 ppm

  6. Air toxics exposure from vehicle emissions at a U.S. border crossing: Buffalo Peace Bridge Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, John; Lwebuga-Mukasa, Jamson; Vallarino, Jose; Melly, Steve; Chillrud, Steve; Baker, Joel; Minegishi, Taeko

    2011-07-01

    The Peace Bridge in Buffalo, New York, which spans the Niagara River at the east end of Lake Erie, is one of the busiest U.S. border crossings. The Peace Bridge plaza on the U.S. side is a complex of roads, customs inspection areas, passport control areas, and duty-free shops. On average 5000 heavy-duty diesel trucks and 20,000 passenger cars traverse the border daily, making the plaza area a potential "hot spot" for emissions from mobile sources. In a series of winter and summer field campaigns, we measured air pollutants, including many compounds considered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA*) as mobile-source air toxics (MSATs), at three fixed sampling sites: on the shore of Lake Erie, approximately 500 m upwind (under predominant wind conditions) of the Peace Bridge plaza; immediately downwind of (adjacent to) the plaza; and 500 m farther downwind, into the community of west Buffalo. Pollutants sampled were particulate matter (PM) days. Other metals (beryllium, sodium, magnesium, potassium, titanium, manganese, cobalt, strontium, tin, cesium, and lanthanum) showed significant increases downwind as well. Sulfur, arsenic, selenium, and a few other elements appeared to be markers for regional transport as their upwind and downwind concentrations were correlated, with ratios near unity. Using positive matrix factorization (PMF), we identified the sources for PAHs at the three fixed sampling sites as regional, diesel, general vehicle, and asphalt volatilization. Diesel exhaust at the Peace Bridge plaza accounted for approximately 30% of the PAHs. The NPAH sources were identified as nitrate (NO3) radical reactions, diesel, and mixed sources. Diesel exhaust at the Peace Bridge plaza accounted for 18% of the NPAHs. Further evidence for the impact of the Peace Bridge plaza on local air quality was found when the differences in 10-minute average UFP counts and pPAH concentrations were calculated between pairs of sites and displayed by wind direction. With

  7. Identifying the impacts of climate on the regional transport of haze pollution and inter-cities correspondence within the Yangtze River Delta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Hang; Huang, Zhongwen; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhang, Huiling; Chen, Jinsheng; Zhang, Han; Tong, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Regional haze pollution has become an important environmental issue in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region. Regional transport and inter-influence of PM 2.5 among cities occurs frequently as a result of the subtropical monsoon climate. Backward trajectory statistics indicated that a north wind prevailed from October to March, while a southeast wind predominated from May to September. The temporal relationships of carbon and nitrogen isotopes among cities were dependent on the prevailing wind direction. Regional PM 2.5 pollution was confirmed in the YRD region by means of significant correlations and similar cyclical characteristics of PM 2.5 among Lin'an, Ningbo, Nanjing and Shanghai. Granger causality tests of the time series of PM 2.5 values indicate that the regional transport of haze pollutants is governed by prevailing wind direction, as the PM 2.5 concentrations from upwind area cities generally influence that of the downwind cities. Furthermore, stronger correlation coefficients were identified according to monsoon pathways. To clarify the impacts of the monsoon climate, a vector autoregressive (VAR) model was introduced. Variance decomposition in the VAR model also indicated that the upwind area cities contributed significantly to PM 2.5 in the downwind area cities. Finally, we attempted to predict daily PM 2.5 concentrations in each city based on the VAR model using data from all cities and obtained fairly reasonable predictions. These indicate that statistical methods of the Granger causality test and VAR model have the potential to evaluate inter-influence and the relative contribution of PM 2.5 among cities, and to predict PM 2.5 concentrations as well. - Graphical abstract: The above figures clearly show that the variation of PM 2.5 concentrations at a city could be Granger cause for the corresponding changes at the other cities. Panel A and B represent the statistically significant correlations during winter time for 2014 and 2015 respectively

  8. Long-range pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico City outflow event using free-floating altitude-controlled balloons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Voss

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the major objectives of the Megacities Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations (MILAGRO-2006 campaign was to investigate the long-range transport of polluted Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA outflow and determine its downwind impacts on air quality and climate. Six research aircraft, including the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C-130, made extensive chemical, aerosol, and radiation measurements above MCMA and more than 1000 km downwind in order to characterize the evolution of the outflow as it aged and dispersed over the Mesa Alta, Sierra Madre Oriental, Coastal Plain, and Gulf of Mexico. As part of this effort, free-floating Controlled-Meteorological (CMET balloons, commanded to change altitude via satellite, made repeated profile measurements of winds and state variables within the advecting outflow. In this paper, we present an analysis of the data from two CMET balloons that were launched near Mexico City on the afternoon of 18 March 2006 and floated downwind with the MCMA pollution for nearly 30 h. The repeating profile measurements show the evolving structure of the outflow in considerable detail: its stability and stratification, interaction with other air masses, mixing episodes, and dispersion into the regional background. Air parcel trajectories, computed directly from the balloon wind profiles, show three transport pathways on 18–19 March: (a high-altitude advection of the top of the MCMA mixed layer, (b mid-level outflow over the Sierra Madre Oriental followed by decoupling and isolated transport over the Gulf of Mexico, and (c low-level outflow with entrainment into a cleaner northwesterly jet above the Coastal Plain. The C-130 aircraft intercepted the balloon-based trajectories three times on 19 March, once along each of these pathways; in all three cases, peaks in urban tracer concentrations and LIDAR backscatter are consistent with MCMA pollution. In comparison with the transport models

  9. Assessment of rice yield loss due to exposure to ozone pollution in Southern Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danh, Ngo Thanh; Huy, Lai Nguyen; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim, E-mail: kimoanh@ait.ac.th

    2016-10-01

    The study domain covered the Eastern region of Southern of Vietnam that includes Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) and five other provinces. Rice production in the domain accounted for 13% of the national total with three crop cycles per year. We assessed ozone (O{sub 3}) induced rice production loss in the domain for 2010 using simulated hourly surface O{sub 3} concentrations (WRF/CAMx; 4 km resolution). Simulated O{sub 3} was higher in January–February (largely overlaps the first crop) and September–December (third crop), and lower in March–June (second crop). Spatially, O{sub 3} was higher in downwind locations of HCMC and were comparable with observed data. Relative yield loss (RYL) was assessed for each crop over the respective growing period (105 days) using three metrics: AOT40, M7 and flux-based O{sub 3} dose of POD{sub 10}. Higher RYL was estimated for the downwind of HCMC. Overall, the rice production loss due to O{sub 3} exposure in the study domain in 2010 was the highest for the first crop (up to 25,800 metric tons), the second highest for the third crop (up to 21,500 tons) and the least for the second crop (up to 6800 tons). The low RYL obtained for the second crop by POD{sub 10} may be due to the use of a high threshold value (Y = 10 nmol m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). Linear regression between non-null radiation POD{sub 0} and POD{sub 10} had similar slopes for the first and third crop when POD{sub 0} was higher and very low slope for the second crop when POD{sub 0} was low. The results of this study can be used for the rice crop planning to avoid the period of potential high RYL due to O{sub 3} exposure. - Highlights: • Simulated O{sub 3} was used to assess rice yield loss in a domain of Southern Vietnam. • Exposure metrics of AOT40, M7, POD{sub 0} and POD{sub 10} were considered. • POD{sub 10} gave the highest rice production loss. • Higher production loss was found downwind of Ho Chi Minh City.

  10. Spatial and temporal characterization of traffic emissions in urban microenvironments with a mobile laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirjola, L.; Lähde, T.; Niemi, J. V.; Kousa, A.; Rönkkö, T.; Karjalainen, P.; Keskinen, J.; Frey, A.; Hillamo, R.

    2012-12-01

    A measurement campaign by a mobile laboratory van was performed in urban microenvironments bounded by a busy street Mannerheimintie in the city center of Helsinki, Finland. The characteristics of spatiotemporally high-resolution pollutant concentrations were studied such as ultrafine particles in the size range of 3-414 nm, black carbon BC, fine particle mass PM2.5, as well as nitrogen oxides NO and NO2. In addition, the effects of street geometry and roadside structure on the local dispersion of traffic emissions were analyzed as well. Meteorological conditions stayed stable and the wind direction was perpendicular to Mannerheimintie during the campaign. The highest particle concentrations were ˜8 × 105 cm-3, of which around 94% was smaller than 40 nm. At the pavement, the average concentration was in maximum 5 × 104 cm-3; around 80% of the particles was smaller than 40 nm. The volatility fraction was 75% by number. Due to the street canyon effect by the surrounding buildings, the downwind concentrations were around 24% of the upwind concentrations for particle number, 28% of NO, 39% of BC and 70% of NO2 concentrations. Furthermore, the upwind concentrations were higher than the simultaneously measured concentrations within the traffic flow. In fact, the particle count was around 3-fold, BC 2.5-fold, PM2.5 and NO2 1.5-fold compared to the concentrations while driving. Thus, for this measurement site and under these meteorological conditions, the exposure to pedestrians and cyclist on the upwind pavement is even higher than the driver's exposure. If the downwind buildings were parallel to Mannerheimintie, the concentrations dropped significantly at the pavement and continued decreasing slightly in the courtyards. When the downwind buildings were perpendicular to Mannerheimintie, a gradual reduction in the concentrations between the buildings was observed. However, at a distance of approximately a hundred meters a parallel side street which was a street canyon

  11. Thermoregulatory demands of elite professional America's Cup yacht racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, V; Gant, N; Folland, J P

    2010-06-01

    America's Cup yacht racing predominantly occurs during the summer months under hot and humid conditions, with athletes exposed to the environment for prolonged periods, and yet the thermoregulatory responses to competitive sailing are largely unappreciated. This study aimed to assess the thermoregulatory responses to elite professional big-boat yacht racing, according to crew position and upwind and downwind sailing. Intestinal (T(core)) and skin temperature, fluid balance and regional sweat compositions were measured in two America's Cup crews (n=32) during 100 min of racing. The environmental conditions were as follows: 32 degrees C, 52% RH and 5 m/s wind speed. Subjective race intensity was moderate. Bowmen recorded the greatest elevation in the heart rate (184 +/- 10 beats/min) and T(core) (39.2 degrees C, P<0.01). Both heart rate and T(core) were higher during downwind sailing (P<0.001). Regional skin temperatures were significantly different according to site (P=0.05), with tibia being the lowest (33.3 +/- 1.2 degrees C). The mean sweat loss during racing was 1.34 +/- 0.58 L/h (range: 0.44-2.40 L/h), with bowmen experiencing the greatest loss of sweat (3.7 +/- 0.9% of body mass). The mean fluid intake was highly correlated to sweat loss (r=0.74, P<0.001), with 72 +/- 41% of sweat losses replaced. The mean sodium concentration of sweat was 27.2 +/- 9.2 mmol/L (range: 12.0-43.5 mmol/L) and the total NaCl loss during sailing was 3.8 +/- 2.4 g (range 0.7-10.0 g). America's Cup sailing is a demanding sport that presents considerable challenges to thermoregulation, fluid and electrolyte balance. Certain crew roles (bowmen) present an increased risk of developing exertional heat illness, and for the majority of crew downwind sailing results in greater thermal strain than upwind sailing - which may have implications for clothing selection and boat design.

  12. Efficacy of using multiple open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers in an odor emission episode investigation at a semiconductor manufacturing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsao, Yung-Chieh; Wu, Chang-Fu; Chang, Pao-Erh; Chen, Shin-Yu; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of simultaneously employing three open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers with 3-day consecutive monitoring, using an odor episode as an example. The corresponding monitoring paths were allocated among the possible emission sources of a semiconductor manufacturing plant and the surrounding optoelectronic and electronic-related factories, which were located in a high-tech industrial park. There was a combined total odor rate of 43.9% for the three monitoring paths, each comprised of 736 continuous 5-minute monitoring records and containing detectable odor compounds, such as ammonia, ozone, butyl acetate, and propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA). The results of the logistic regression model indicated that the prevailing south wind and the OP-FTIR monitoring path closest to the emission source in down-wind direction resulted in a high efficacy for detecting odorous samples with odds ratios (OR) of 3.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.9-5.0) and 5.1 (95% CI: 3.6-7.2), respectively. Meanwhile, the odds ratio for detecting ammonia odorous samples was 7.5 for Path II, which was downwind closer to the possible source, as compared to Path III, downwind far away from the possible source. PGMEA could not be monitored at Path II but could be at Path III, indicating the importance of the monitoring path and flow ejection velocities inside the stacks on the monitoring performance of OP-FTIR. Besides, an odds ratio of 5.1 for odorous sample detection was obtained with south prevailing wind comprising 65.0% of the monitoring time period. In general, it is concluded that OP-FTIR operated with multiple paths simultaneously shall be considered for investigation on relatively complicated episodes such as emergency of chemical release, multiple-source emission and chemical monitoring for odor in a densely populated plant area to enhance the efficacy of OP-FTIR monitoring. - Research highlights: → To conduct multi

  13. High levels of hair manganese in children living in the vicinity of a ferro-manganese alloy production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Filho, José A; Paes, Ciro R; Pontes, Angela M de C; Moreira, Josino C; Sarcinelli, Paula N; Mergler, Donna

    2009-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element, but an effective toxic at high concentrations. While there is an extensive literature on occupational exposure, few studies have examined adults and children living near important sources of airborne Mn. The objective of this study was to analyze hair Mn of children living in the vicinity of a ferro-manganese alloy production plant in the Great Salvador region, State of Bahia, Brazil and examine factors that influence this bioindicator of exposure. We examined 109 children in the age range of 1-10 years, living near the plant. Four separate housing areas were identified a priori on the bases of proximity to the emission sources and downwind location. A non-exposed group (n=43) of similar socio-economic status was also evaluated. Mn hair (MnH) concentration was measured by graphite atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Possible confounding hematological parameters were also assessed. Mean MnH concentration was 15.20 microg/g (1.10-95.50 microg/g) for the exposed children and 1.37 microg/g (0.39-5.58 microg/g) for the non-exposed. For the former, MnH concentrations were 7.95+/-1.40 microg/g (farthest from the plant), 11.81+/-1.11 microg/g (mid-region), 34.43+/-8.66 microg/g (closest to the plant) and 34.22+/-9.15 microg/g (directly downwind). Multiple regression analysis on log transformed MnH concentrations for the exposed children derived a model that explained 36.8% of the variability. In order of importance, area of children's residence, gender (girls>boys) and time of mother's residence in the area at the birth of the child, were significantly associated with MnH. Post hoc analyses indicated two groupings for exposure areas, with those living closest to and downwind of the plant displaying higher MnH concentrations compared to the others. The contribution of the time the mother lived in the community prior to the child's birth to the children's current MnH suggests that in utero exposure may play a role. A study of

  14. Efficacy of using multiple open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers in an odor emission episode investigation at a semiconductor manufacturing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Yung-Chieh; Wu, Chang-Fu [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei City 100, Taiwan (China); Chang, Pao-Erh; Chen, Shin-Yu [Green Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu City 310, Taiwan 310 (China); Hwang, Yaw-Huei, E-mail: yhhwang@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei City 100, Taiwan (China); Department of Public Health, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 100, Taiwan (China)

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of simultaneously employing three open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers with 3-day consecutive monitoring, using an odor episode as an example. The corresponding monitoring paths were allocated among the possible emission sources of a semiconductor manufacturing plant and the surrounding optoelectronic and electronic-related factories, which were located in a high-tech industrial park. There was a combined total odor rate of 43.9% for the three monitoring paths, each comprised of 736 continuous 5-minute monitoring records and containing detectable odor compounds, such as ammonia, ozone, butyl acetate, and propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA). The results of the logistic regression model indicated that the prevailing south wind and the OP-FTIR monitoring path closest to the emission source in down-wind direction resulted in a high efficacy for detecting odorous samples with odds ratios (OR) of 3.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.9-5.0) and 5.1 (95% CI: 3.6-7.2), respectively. Meanwhile, the odds ratio for detecting ammonia odorous samples was 7.5 for Path II, which was downwind closer to the possible source, as compared to Path III, downwind far away from the possible source. PGMEA could not be monitored at Path II but could be at Path III, indicating the importance of the monitoring path and flow ejection velocities inside the stacks on the monitoring performance of OP-FTIR. Besides, an odds ratio of 5.1 for odorous sample detection was obtained with south prevailing wind comprising 65.0% of the monitoring time period. In general, it is concluded that OP-FTIR operated with multiple paths simultaneously shall be considered for investigation on relatively complicated episodes such as emergency of chemical release, multiple-source emission and chemical monitoring for odor in a densely populated plant area to enhance the efficacy of OP-FTIR monitoring. - Research highlights: {yields} To conduct

  15. The Effect of Wind-Turbine Wakes on Summertime US Midwest Atmospheric Wind Profiles as Observed with Ground-Based Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Michael E.; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2013-07-01

    We examine the influence of a modern multi-megawatt wind turbine on wind and turbulence profiles three rotor diameters (D) downwind of the turbine. Light detection and ranging (lidar) wind-profile observations were collected during summer 2011 in an operating wind farm in central Iowa at 20-m vertical intervals from 40 to 220 m above the surface. After a calibration period during which two lidars were operated next to each other, one lidar was located approximately 2D directly south of a wind turbine; the other lidar was moved approximately 3D north of the same wind turbine. Data from the two lidars during southerly flow conditions enabled the simultaneous capture of inflow and wake conditions. The inflow wind and turbulence profiles exhibit strong variability with atmospheric stability: daytime profiles are well-mixed with little shear and strong turbulence, while nighttime profiles exhibit minimal turbulence and considerable shear across the rotor disk region and above. Consistent with the observations available from other studies and with wind-tunnel and large-eddy simulation studies, measurable reductions in wake wind-speeds occur at heights spanning the wind turbine rotor (43-117 m), and turbulent quantities increase in the wake. In generalizing these results as a function of inflow wind speed, we find the wind-speed deficit in the wake is largest at hub height or just above, and the maximum deficit occurs when wind speeds are below the rated speed for the turbine. Similarly, the maximum enhancement of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity occurs at hub height, although observations at the top of the rotor disk do not allow assessment of turbulence in that region. The wind shear below turbine hub height (quantified here with the power-law coefficient) is found to be a useful parameter to identify whether a downwind lidar observes turbine wake or free-flow conditions. These field observations provide data for validating turbine-wake models and wind

  16. Measurement of atmospheric pollutants associated with oil and natural gas exploration and production activity in Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekney, Natalie J; Veloski, Garret; Reeder, Matthew; Tamilia, Joseph; Rupp, Erik; Wetzel, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Oil and natural gas exploration and production (E&P) activities generate emissions from diesel engines, compressor stations, condensate tanks, leaks and venting of natural gas, construction of well pads, and well access roads that can negatively impact air quality on both local and regional scales. A mobile, autonomous air quality monitoring laboratory was constructed to collect measurements of ambient concentrations of pollutants associated with oil and natural gas E&P activities. This air-monitoring laboratory was deployed to the Allegheny National Forest (ANF) in northwestern Pennsylvania for a campaign that resulted in the collection of approximately 7 months of data split between three monitoring locations between July 2010 and June 2011. The three monitoring locations were the Kane Experimental Forest (KEF) area in Elk County, which is downwind of the Sackett oilfield; the Bradford Ranger Station (BRS) in McKean County, which is downwind of a large area of historic oil and gas productivity; and the U.S. Forest Service Hearts Content campground (HC) in Warren County, which is in an area relatively unimpacted by oil and gas development and which therefore yielded background pollutant concentrations in the ANF. Concentrations of criteria pollutants ozone and NO2 did not vary significantly from site to site; averages were below National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with oil and natural gas (ethane, propane, butane, pentane) were highly correlated. Applying the conditional probability function (CPF) to the ethane data yielded most probable directions of the sources that were coincident with known location of existing wells and activity. Differences between the two impacted and one background site were difficult to discern, suggesting the that the monitoring laboratory was a great enough distance downwind of active areas to allow for sufficient dispersion with background air such that the localized

  17. Atmospheric electrical field measurements near a fresh water reservoir and the formation of the lake breeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lopes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to access the effect of the lakes in the atmospheric electrical field, measurements have been carried out near a large man-made lake in southern Portugal, the Alqueva reservoir, during the ALqueva hydro-meteorological EXperiment 2014. The purpose of these conjoint experiments was to study the impact of the Alqueva reservoir on the atmosphere, in particular on the local atmospheric electric environment by comparing measurements taken in the proximity of the lake. Two stations 10 km apart were used, as they were located up- and down-wind of the lake (Amieira and Parque Solar, respectively, in reference to the dominant northwestern wind direction. The up-wind station shows lower atmospheric electric potential gradient (PG values than the ones observed in the down-wind station between 12 and 20 UTC. The difference in the atmospheric electric PG between the up-wind and the down-wind station is ~30 V/m during the day. This differential occurs mainly during the development of a lake breeze, between 10 and 18 UTC, as a consequence of the surface temperature gradient between the surrounding land and the lake water. In the analysis presented, a correlation is found between the atmospheric electric PG differences and both wind speed and temperature gradients over the lake, thus supporting the influence of the lake breeze over the observed PG variation in the two stations. Two hypotheses are provided to explain this observation: (1 The air that flows from the lake into the land station is likely to increase the local electric conductivity through the removal of ground dust and the transport of cleaner air from higher altitudes with significant light ion concentrations. With such an increase in conductivity, it is expected to see a reduction of the atmospheric electric PG; (2 the resulting air flow over the land station carries negative ions formed by wave splashing in the lake's water surface, as a result of the so-called balloelectric effect

  18. The primary volcanic aerosol emission from Mt Etna: Size-resolved particles with SO2 and role in plume reactive halogen chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T. J.; Vignelles, D.; Liuzzo, M.; Giudice, G.; Aiuppa, A.; Coltelli, M.; Salerno, G.; Chartier, M.; Couté, B.; Berthet, G.; Lurton, T.; Dulac, F.; Renard, J.-B.

    2018-02-01

    Volcanoes are an important source of aerosols to the troposphere. Within minutes after emission, volcanic plume aerosol catalyses conversion of co-emitted HBr, HCl into highly reactive halogens (e.g. BrO, OClO) through chemical cycles that cause substantial ozone depletion in the dispersing downwind plume. This study quantifies the sub-to-supramicron primary volcanic aerosol emission (0.2-5 μm diameter) and its role in this process. An in-situ ground-based study at Mt Etna (Italy) during passive degassing co-deployed an optical particle counter and Multi-Gas SO2 sensors at high time resolution (0.1 Hz) enabling to characterise the aerosol number, size-distribution and emission flux. A tri-modal volcanic aerosol size distribution was found, to which lognormal distributions are fitted. Total particle volume correlates to SO2 (as a plume tracer). The measured particle volume:SO2 ratio equates to a sulfate:SO2 ratio of 1-2% at the observed meteorological conditions (40% Relative Humidity). A particle mass flux of 0.7 kg s-1 is calculated for the measured Mt Etna SO2 flux of 1950 tonnes/day. A numerical plume atmospheric chemistry model is used to simulate the role of the hygroscopic primary aerosol surface area and its humidity dependence on volcanic plume BrO and OClO chemistry. As well as predicting volcanic BrO formation and O3 depletion, the model achieves OClO/SO2 in broad quantitative agreement with recently reported Mt Etna observations, with a predicted maximum a few minutes downwind. In addition to humidity - that enhances aerosols surface area for halogen cycling - background ozone is predicted to be an important control on OClO/SO2. Dependence of BrO/SO2 on ambient humidity is rather low near-to-source but increases further downwind. The model plume chemistry also exhibits strong across-plume spatial variations between plume edge and centre.

  19. The development and validation of an unmanned aerial system (UAS) for the measurement of methane flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G.; Shah, A.; Williams, P. I.; Ricketts, H.; Hollingsworth, P.; Kabbabe, K.; Bourn, M.; Pitt, J. R.; Helmore, J.; Lowry, D.; Robinson, R. A.; Finlayson, A.

    2017-12-01

    Emission controls for CH4are a part of the Paris Agreement and other national emissions strategies. This work represents a new method for precise quantification of point-source and facility-level methane emissions flux rates to inform both the climate science community and policymakers. In this paper, we describe the development of an integrated Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) for the measurement of high-precision in-situ CH4 concentrations. We also describe the development of a mass balance flux calculation model tailored to UAS plume sampling downwind; and the validation of this method using a known emission flux from a controlled release facility. A validation field trial was conducted at the UK Met Office site in Cardington, UK, between 31 Oct and 4 Nov 2016 using the UK National Physical Laboratory's Controlled Release Facility (CRF). A modified DJI-S900 hexrotor UAS was tethered via an inlet to a ground-based Los Gatos Ultraportable Greenhouse Gas Analyser to record geospatially-referenced methane (and carbon dioxide) concentrations. Methane fluxes from the CRF were emitted at 5 kg/hr and 10 kg/hr in a series of blind trials (fluxes were not reported to the team prior to the calculation of UAS-derived flux) for a total of 7 UAS flights, which sampled 200 m downwind of source(s), each lasting around 20 minutes. The flux calculation method was adapted for sampling considerations downwind of an emission source that has not had sufficient time to develop a Gaussian morphology. The UAS-measured methane fluxes, and representative flux uncertainty (derived from an error propagation model), were found to compare well with the controlled CH4 emission rate. For the 7 experiments, the standard error between the measured and emitted CH4 flux was found to be +/-6% with a mean bias of +0.4 kg/hr. Limits of flux sensitivity (to within 25% uncertainty) were found to extend to as little as 0.12 kg/h. Further improvements to the accuracy of flux calculation could be made by

  20. Assessment of rice yield loss due to exposure to ozone pollution in Southern Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danh, Ngo Thanh; Huy, Lai Nguyen; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim

    2016-01-01

    The study domain covered the Eastern region of Southern of Vietnam that includes Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) and five other provinces. Rice production in the domain accounted for 13% of the national total with three crop cycles per year. We assessed ozone (O 3 ) induced rice production loss in the domain for 2010 using simulated hourly surface O 3 concentrations (WRF/CAMx; 4 km resolution). Simulated O 3 was higher in January–February (largely overlaps the first crop) and September–December (third crop), and lower in March–June (second crop). Spatially, O 3 was higher in downwind locations of HCMC and were comparable with observed data. Relative yield loss (RYL) was assessed for each crop over the respective growing period (105 days) using three metrics: AOT40, M7 and flux-based O 3 dose of POD 10 . Higher RYL was estimated for the downwind of HCMC. Overall, the rice production loss due to O 3 exposure in the study domain in 2010 was the highest for the first crop (up to 25,800 metric tons), the second highest for the third crop (up to 21,500 tons) and the least for the second crop (up to 6800 tons). The low RYL obtained for the second crop by POD 10 may be due to the use of a high threshold value (Y = 10 nmol m −2 s −1 ). Linear regression between non-null radiation POD 0 and POD 10 had similar slopes for the first and third crop when POD 0 was higher and very low slope for the second crop when POD 0 was low. The results of this study can be used for the rice crop planning to avoid the period of potential high RYL due to O 3 exposure. - Highlights: • Simulated O 3 was used to assess rice yield loss in a domain of Southern Vietnam. • Exposure metrics of AOT40, M7, POD 0 and POD 10 were considered. • POD 10 gave the highest rice production loss. • Higher production loss was found downwind of Ho Chi Minh City.

  1. An Overview of the Lightning - Atmospheric Chemistry Aspects of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. E.; Barth, M. C.; Koshak, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Weinheimer, A.; Ryerson, T.; Huntrieser, H.; Bruning, E.; MacGorman, D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Some of the major goals of the DC3 experiment are to determine the contribution of lightning to NO(x) in the anvils of observed thunderstorms, examine the relationship of lightning NO(x) production to flash rates and to lightning channel lengths, and estimate the relative production per flash for cloud-to-ground flashes and intracloud flashes. In addition, the effects of lightning NO(x) production on photochemistry downwind of thunderstorms is also being examined. The talk will survey the observation types that were conducted during DC3 relevant to these goals and provide an overview of the analysis and modeling techniques which are being used to achieve them. NO(x) was observed on three research aircraft during DC3 (the NCAR G-V, the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon) in flights through storm anvils in three study regions (NE Colorado, Central Oklahoma to West Texas, and northern Alabama) where lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) and radar coverage were available. Initial comparisons of the aircraft NOx observations in storm anvils relative to flash rates have been conducted, which will be followed with calculations of the flux of NO(x) through the anvils, which when combined with observed flash rates can be used to estimate storm-average lightning NOx production per flash. The WRF-Chem model will be run for cloud-resolved simulations of selected observed storms during DC3. Detailed lightning information from the LMAs (flash rates and flash lengths as a function of time and vertical distributions of flash channel segments) will be input to the model along with assumptions concerning NO(x) production per CG flash and per IC flash. These assumptions will be tested through comparisons with the aircraft NOx data from anvil traverses. A specially designed retrieval method for lightning NO2 column amounts from the OMI instrument on NASA fs Aura satellite has been utilized to estimate NO2 over the region affected by selected DC3 storms. Combined with NO(x) to NO2 ratios from the

  2. Horizontal and vertical structure of reactive bromine events probed by bromine monoxide MAX-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Simpson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous photochemistry converts bromide (Br− to reactive bromine species (Br atoms and bromine monoxide, BrO that dominate Arctic springtime chemistry. This phenomenon has many impacts such as boundary-layer ozone depletion, mercury oxidation and deposition, and modification of the fate of hydrocarbon species. To study environmental controls on reactive bromine events, the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX was carried out from early March to mid-April 2012 near Barrow (Utqiaġvik, Alaska. We measured horizontal and vertical gradients in BrO with multiple-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS instrumentation at three sites, two mobile and one fixed. During the campaign, a large crack in the sea ice (an open lead formed pushing one instrument package ∼ 250 km downwind from Barrow (Utqiaġvik. Convection associated with the open lead converted the BrO vertical structure from a surface-based event to a lofted event downwind of the lead influence. The column abundance of BrO downwind of the re-freezing lead was comparable to upwind amounts, indicating direct reactions on frost flowers or open seawater was not a major reactive bromine source. When these three sites were separated by ∼ 30 km length scales of unbroken sea ice, the BrO amount and vertical distributions were highly correlated for most of the time, indicating the horizontal length scales of BrO events were typically larger than ∼ 30 km in the absence of sea ice features. Although BrO amount and vertical distribution were similar between sites most of the time, rapid changes in BrO with edges significantly smaller than this ∼ 30 km length scale episodically transported between the sites, indicating BrO events were large but with sharp edge contrasts. BrO was often found in shallow layers that recycled reactive bromine via heterogeneous reactions on snowpack. Episodically, these surface-based events propagated aloft when

  3. Quantifying error of lidar and sodar Doppler beam swinging measurements of wind turbine wakes using computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Churchfield, M. J.; Lee, S.; Clifton, A.

    2015-02-01

    Wind-profiling lidars are now regularly used in boundary-layer meteorology and in applications such as wind energy and air quality. Lidar wind profilers exploit the Doppler shift of laser light backscattered from particulates carried by the wind to measure a line-of-sight (LOS) velocity. The Doppler beam swinging (DBS) technique, used by many commercial systems, considers measurements of this LOS velocity in multiple radial directions in order to estimate horizontal and vertical winds. The method relies on the assumption of homogeneous flow across the region sampled by the beams. Using such a system in inhomogeneous flow, such as wind turbine wakes or complex terrain, will result in errors. To quantify the errors expected from such violation of the assumption of horizontal homogeneity, we simulate inhomogeneous flow in the atmospheric boundary layer, notably stably stratified flow past a wind turbine, with a mean wind speed of 6.5 m s-1 at the turbine hub-height of 80 m. This slightly stable case results in 15° of wind direction change across the turbine rotor disk. The resulting flow field is sampled in the same fashion that a lidar samples the atmosphere with the DBS approach, including the lidar range weighting function, enabling quantification of the error in the DBS observations. The observations from the instruments located upwind have small errors, which are ameliorated with time averaging. However, the downwind observations, particularly within the first two rotor diameters downwind from the wind turbine, suffer from errors due to the heterogeneity of the wind turbine wake. Errors in the stream-wise component of the flow approach 30% of the hub-height inflow wind speed close to the rotor disk. Errors in the cross-stream and vertical velocity components are also significant: cross-stream component errors are on the order of 15% of the hub-height inflow wind speed (1.0 m s-1) and errors in the vertical velocity measurement exceed the actual vertical velocity

  4. Unsteady analysis on the instantaneous forces and moment arms acting on a novel Savonius-style wind turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Sukanta; Ducoin, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-dimensional unsteady simulations on a novel Savonius-style wind turbine. • Instantaneous behavior of drag and lift coefficients, and corresponding moment arms. • Effect of tip speed ratio on the instantaneous force coefficients and moments arms. • Effect of force coefficients and moment arms on the instantaneous moment and power. • Analysis of power and moment coefficients at different tip speed ratios. - Abstract: This paper aims to present a transient analysis on the forces acting on a novel two-bladed Savonius-style wind turbine. Two-dimensional unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved using shear stress transport k–ω turbulence model at a Reynolds number of 1.23 × 10"5. The instantaneous longitudinal drag and lateral lift forces acting on each of the blades and their acting points are calculated. The corresponding moment arms responsible for the torque generation are obtained. Further, the effect of tip speed ratio on the force coefficients, moment arms and overall turbine performances are observed. Throughout the paper, the obtained results for the new design are discussed with reference to conventional semi-circular design of Savonius turbines. A significant performance improvement is achieved with the new design due to its increased lift and moment arm contribution as compared to the conventional design. More interestingly, the present study sets a platform for future aerodynamic research and improvements for Savonius-style wind turbines.

  5. Overview and performance of the ATLAS Level-1 Topological Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Damp, Johannes Frederic; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC provided proton-proton collisions to the ATLAS experiment with high luminosity (up to 2.06x10^34), placing stringent operational and physical requirements on the ATLAS trigger system in order to reduce the 40 MHz collision rate to a manageable event storage rate of 1 kHz, while not rejecting interesting physics events. The Level-1 trigger is the first rate-reducing step in the ATLAS trigger system with an output rate of 100 kHz and decision latency of less than 2.5 μs. An important role is played by its newly commissioned component: the L1 topological trigger (L1Topo). This innovative system consists of two blades designed in AdvancedTCA form factor, mounting four individual state-of-the-art processors, and providing high input bandwidth and low latency data processing. Up to 128 topological trigger algorithms can be implemented to select interesting events by applying kinematic and angular requirements on electromagnetic clusters, jets, muons and total energy. This results in a significantly...

  6. Materials for MW sized aerogenerators. I - The influence of design on operating parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, L. M.

    1983-09-01

    Materials and fatigue design deficiencies in the development and production of MW-scale wind turbines with 30-yr, reliable, cost-effective lifetimes are surveyed. Attention is given to existing wind turbines, the performance of materials to date, and fundamental materials properties. Failures thus far have arisen from the coincidence of fundamental vibration frequency or a low order harmonic of components with an exciting frequency, malfunction of control mechanisms, and inadequate engineering. All the failures can be avoided, and most occur in the rotor. Two-bladed horizontal configurations permit use of a through-center section while requiring teetering to reduce stresses; three-bladed designs offer higher output for the same diameter and less of a stress moment on the tower and yaw components. Hydraulic components have caused trouble, which could be eliminated with redundancy. The torsional vibrations to which a Darrieus wind turbine is subject in every revolution can be ameliorated with three blades and eradicated with four. The Musgrove wind turbine requires thin blades to maintain a high aspect ratio, but simultaneously introduces buckling stresses. Blade materials used or proposed are carbon steel, GFRP, wood, stainless steel, CFRP, aluminum, titanium, and prestressed concrete.

  7. User`s Guide for the NREL Force and Loads Analysis Program. Version 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A D

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of and instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP, version 2.2). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for two- or three-bladed rigid hub wind turbines. The effects of turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed rigid hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user`s guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  8. The possible hindrance of a 10 MW wind farm along the Noordermeerdijk in the Noordoostpolder, Netherlands, for birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bergh, L.M.J.; Spaans, A.L.

    1993-01-01

    The title farm comprises 14 two-bladed 750 kW wind turbines. Hindrance of wind turbines are collisions with the wind turbines and in the wake behind the blades and loss or disintegration of the natural habitat because of the presence of the wind turbines (aspect of disturbance). The title study is focused on counting the number of collision bird victims per year, and analyzing the disturbance effects on hibernating and foraging birds. It appeared that almost 150 to more than 1500 birds will collide with one of the 16 wind turbines. A few hundred tufted ducks, some tens of pochard and some tens of wild ducks per kilometer of the array will leave their natural habitat. Based on the results it is concluded that the site south of the kilometre marker 7.0 is preferred to the site directly south of kilometre marker 5.0. It is also concluded that the above-mentioned array is preferred to a wind turbine array of 16 wind turbines of 500 kW each. The results of the investigation on that array are published in a separate report for which a separate abstract has been prepared. 2 figs., 6 tabs., 2 appendices, 34 refs

  9. The possible hindrance of a 10 MW wind farm along the Noordermeerdijk in the Noordoostpolder, Netherlands, for birds. De mogelijke hinder van een 10 MW windpark langs de Noordermeerdijk (NOP) voor vogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bergh, L M.J.; Spaans, A L

    1993-01-01

    The title farm comprises 14 two-bladed 750 kW wind turbines. Hindrance of wind turbines are collisions with the wind turbines and in the wake behind the blades and loss or disintegration of the natural habitat because of the presence of the wind turbines (aspect of disturbance). The title study is focused on counting the number of collision bird victims per year, and analyzing the disturbance effects on hibernating and foraging birds. It appeared that almost 150 to more than 1500 birds will collide with one of the 16 wind turbines. A few hundred tufted ducks, some tens of pochard and some tens of wild ducks per kilometer of the array will leave their natural habitat. Based on the results it is concluded that the site south of the kilometre marker 7.0 is preferred to the site directly south of kilometre marker 5.0. It is also concluded that the above-mentioned array is preferred to a wind turbine array of 16 wind turbines of 500 kW each. The results of the investigation on that array are published in a separate report for which a separate abstract has been prepared. 2 figs., 6 tabs., 2 appendices, 34 refs.

  10. Wake Survey of a Marine Current Turbine Under Steady Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2016-11-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to study the wake of a horizontal axis marine current turbine. The turbine was tested in a large tow tank facility at the United States Naval Academy. The turbine is a 1/25th scale model of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Reference Model 1 (RM1) tidal turbine. It is a two-bladed turbine measuring 0.8 m in diameter and featuring a NACA 63-618 airfoil cross section. Separate wind tunnel testing has shown the foil section used on the turbine to be Reynolds number independent with respect to lift at the experimental parameters of tow carriage speed (Utow = 1 . 68 m/s) and tip speed ratio (TSR = 7). The wake survey was conducted over an area extending 0.25D forward of the turbine tip path to 2.0D aft, and to a depth of 1.0D beneath the turbine output shaft in the streamwise plane. Each field of view was approximately 30 cm by 30 cm, and each overlapped the adjacent fields of view by 5 cm. The entire flow field was then reconstructed into a single field of investigation. Results include streamwise and vertical ensemble average velocity fields averaged over approximately 1,000 realizations, as well as higher-order statistics. Turbine tip vortex centers were identified and plotted showing increasing aperiodicity with wake age. keywords: horizontal axis marine current turbine, particle image velocimetry, towing tank, wake survey

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of a Modified Savonius Wind Turbine with Novel Blade Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlong Tian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Savonius wind turbine is a type of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWTs that is simply composed of two or three arc-type blades which can generate power even under poor wind conditions. A modified Savonius wind turbine with novel blade shapes is introduced with the aim of increasing the power coefficient of the turbine. The effect of blade fullness, which is a main shape parameter of the blade, on the power production of a two-bladed Savonius wind turbine is investigated using transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Simulations are based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with a renormalization group turbulent model. This numerical method is validated with existing experimental data and then utilized to quantify the performance of design variants. Results quantify the relationship between blade fullness and turbine performance with a blade fullness of 1 resulting in the highest coefficient of power, 0.2573. This power coefficient is 10.98% higher than a conventional Savonius turbine.

  12. Experimental assessment of blade tip immersion depth from free surface on average power and thrust coefficients of marine current turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Flack, Karen; Luznik, Luksa

    2014-11-01

    Results from an experimental study on the effects of marine current turbine immersion depth from the free surface are presented. Measurements are performed with a 1/25 scale (diameter D = 0.8m) two bladed horizontal axis turbine towed in the large towing tank at the U.S. Naval Academy. Thrust and torque are measured using a dynamometer, mounted in line with the turbine shaft. Shaft rotation speed and blade position are measured using a shaft position indexing system. The tip speed ratio (TSR) is adjusted using a hysteresis brake which is attached to the output shaft. Two optical wave height sensors are used to measure the free surface elevation. The turbine is towed at 1.68 m/s, resulting in a 70% chord based Rec = 4 × 105. An Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) is installed one turbine diameter upstream of the turbine rotation plane to characterize the inflow turbulence. Measurements are obtained at four relative blade tip immersion depths of z/D = 0.5, 0.4, 0.3, and 0.2 at a TSR value of 7 to identify the depth where free surface effects impact overall turbine performance. The overall average power and thrust coefficient are presented and compared to previously conducted baseline tests. The influence of wake expansion blockage on the turbine performance due to presence of the free surface at these immersion depths will also be discussed.

  13. Measuring the Angular Velocity of a Propeller with Video Camera Using Electronic Rolling Shutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Zhao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Noncontact measurement for rotational motion has advantages over the traditional method which measures rotational motion by means of installing some devices on the object, such as a rotary encoder. Cameras can be employed as remote monitoring or inspecting sensors to measure the angular velocity of a propeller because of their commonplace availability, simplicity, and potentially low cost. A defect of the measurement with cameras is to process the massive data generated by cameras. In order to reduce the collected data from the camera, a camera using ERS (electronic rolling shutter is applied to measure angular velocities which are higher than the speed of the camera. The effect of rolling shutter can induce geometric distortion in the image, when the propeller rotates during capturing an image. In order to reveal the relationship between the angular velocity and the image distortion, a rotation model has been established. The proposed method was applied to measure the angular velocities of the two-blade propeller and the multiblade propeller. The experimental results showed that this method could detect the angular velocities which were higher than the camera speed, and the accuracy was acceptable.

  14. Counting Possibilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tomasetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object (MPO, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible objects. This paper defends the idea that one can avoid reference and ontological commitment to MPOs. My proposal is that MPOs can be dispensed with by using the notion of rules of knife-making. I first present a solution according to which we count lists of instructions - selected by the rules - describing physical combinations between components. This account, however, has its own difficulties and I eventually suggest that one can find a way out by admitting possible worlds, entities which are more commonly accepted - at least by philosophers - than MPOs. I maintain that, in answering Williamson’s questions, we count classes of physically possible worlds in which the same instance of a general rule is applied.

  15. High-resolution multi-code implementation of unsteady Navier-Stokes flow solver based on paralleled overset adaptive mesh refinement and high-order low-dissipation hybrid schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gaohua; Fu, Xiang; Wang, Fuxin

    2017-10-01

    The low-dissipation high-order accurate hybrid up-winding/central scheme based on fifth-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) and sixth-order central schemes, along with the Spalart-Allmaras (SA)-based delayed detached eddy simulation (DDES) turbulence model, and the flow feature-based adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), are implemented into a dual-mesh overset grid infrastructure with parallel computing capabilities, for the purpose of simulating vortex-dominated unsteady detached wake flows with high spatial resolutions. The overset grid assembly (OGA) process based on collection detection theory and implicit hole-cutting algorithm achieves an automatic coupling for the near-body and off-body solvers, and the error-and-try method is used for obtaining a globally balanced load distribution among the composed multiple codes. The results of flows over high Reynolds cylinder and two-bladed helicopter rotor show that the combination of high-order hybrid scheme, advanced turbulence model, and overset adaptive mesh refinement can effectively enhance the spatial resolution for the simulation of turbulent wake eddies.

  16. Investigation of load reduction for a variable speed, variable pitch, and variable coning wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A two bladed, variable speed and variable pitch wind turbine was modeled using ADAMS{reg_sign} to evaluate load reduction abilities of a variable coning configuration as compared to a teetered rotor, and also to evaluate control methods. The basic dynamic behavior of the variable coning turbine was investigated and compared to the teetered rotor under constant wind conditions as well as turbulent wind conditions. Results indicate the variable coning rotor has larger flap oscillation amplitudes and much lower root flap bending moments than the teetered rotor. Three methods of control were evaluated for turbulent wind simulations. These were a standard IPD control method, a generalized predictive control method, and a bias estimate control method. Each control method was evaluated for both the variable coning configuration and the teetered configuration. The ability of the different control methods to maintain the rotor speed near the desired set point is evaluated from the RMS error of rotor speed. The activity of the control system is evaluated from cycles per second of the blade pitch angle. All three of the methods were found to produce similar results for the variable coning rotor and the teetered rotor, as well as similar results to each other.

  17. Large-scale wind energy and birds in Friesland: A survey of the possible hindrance for birds of the project Windstreek: Environmental Effect Report Windstreek, Base report A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bergh, L.M.J.; Spaans, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    For several alternative sites in the Dutch province Friesland, where it is planned to install 500 kW and 1 MW wind turbines on a large scale (the Windstreek project), the possible hindrance for breeding birds, stopping birds and migratory birds has been investigated. First an overview is given of basic data from the literature and experts in the field with regard to the possible hindrances for birds and the situation of the birds in the areas considered. Next, several criteria are used to determine which locations are the most suitable sites for placing the wind turbines. For the 500 kW wind turbines (worst case) the suitability differs strongly per site. The variation is the largest for the option of decentralized sites. Realization of 200 MW large-scale generated wind power is the least unfavourable option, regarding the effects on birds, by means of decentralized sites. The super-structure option Afsluitdijk-Waddenkust and the Project Memorandum alternative are for that matter the least favourable options. The combined alternative and the super-structure Middelzeetrechter take the in-between position. The 1MW variants of the alternatives score better than the similar 500 kW options. The hindrance for birds can be reduced further by applying two-bladed rotors instead of three-bladed rotors and to adjust the site. 20 figs., 9 tabs., 2 appendices, 42 refs

  18. The Influence of Waves on the Near-Wake of an Axial-Flow Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2017-11-01

    Flow field results are presented for the near-wake of an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine in the presence of surface gravity waves. The turbine is a 1/25 scale, 0.8 m diameter, two bladed turbine based on the U.S. Department of Energy's Reference Model 1 tidal current turbine. Measurements were obtained in the large towing tank facility at the U.S. Naval Academy with the turbine towed at a constant carriage speed and a tip speed ratio selected to provide maximum power. The turbine has been shown to be nearly scale independent for these conditions. Velocity measurements were obtained using an in-house designed and manufactured, submersible, planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) system at streamwise distances of up to two diameters downstream of the rotor plane. Phase averaged results for steady and unsteady conditions are presented for comparison showing further expansion of the wake in the presence of waves as compared to the quiescent case. The impact of waves on turbine tip vortex characteristics is also examined showing variation in core radius, swirl velocity, and circulation with wave phase. Some aspects of the highly coherent wake observed in the steady case are recognized in the unsteady wake, however, the unsteady velocities imposed by the waves, particularly the vertical velocity component, appears to convect tip vortices into the wake, potentially enhancing energy transport and accelerating the re-energization process.

  19. Structural Testing of the Blade Reliability Collaborative Effect of Defect Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hughes, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Paquette, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Two 8.3-meter (m) wind turbine blades intentionally constructed with manufacturing flaws were tested to failure at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) south of Boulder, Colorado. Two blades were tested; one blade was manufactured with a fiberglass spar cap and the second blade was manufactured with a carbon fiber spar cap. Test loading primarily consisted of flap fatigue loading of the blades, with one quasi-static ultimate load case applied to the carbon fiber spar cap blade. Results of the test program were intended to provide the full-scale test data needed for validation of model and coupon test results of the effect of defects in wind turbine blade composite materials. Testing was part of the Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) led by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The BRC seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the causes of unexpected blade failures (Paquette 2012), and to develop methods to enable blades to survive to their expected operational lifetime. Recent work in the BRC includes examining and characterizing flaws and defects known to exist in wind turbine blades from manufacturing processes (Riddle et al. 2011). Recent results from reliability databases show that wind turbine rotor blades continue to be a leading contributor to turbine downtime (Paquette 2012).

  20. The FX/90: A proposal in response to a low Reynolds Number station keeping mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirthman, David; Palmer, Julie; Gleixner, Aaron; Russell, Scott; Nevala, Tom; Nosek, Mark

    1990-01-01

    The FX/90 is a remotely piloted vehicle designed to fly at Reynolds numbers below 2 x 10 to the 5th power. Several applications exist for this type of flight, such as low altitude flight of very small aircraft. The design presented here allows investigation into the unique problems involved in low Reynolds number flight, which will, in turn, further understanding of this flight regime. The aircraft will operate in a steady flight environment, free from significant atmospheric turbulence and weather effects. The F-90 has a 39 in. fuselage which is constructed of balsa and plywood. The landing gear for the aircraft is a detachable carriage on which the aircraft rests. The aerodynamic planform is a rectangular wing (no taper or sweep) with a chord of 9 in., a wingspan of 72 in., and is constructed entirely out of styrofoam. The propulsion system is a puller configuration mounted on the front of the fuselage. It consists of an Astro 05 engine and a 10-6 two bladed propeller. Control of the aircraft is accomplished through the use of two movable control surfaces: elevators for pitch control, and a rudder for yaw control. The aircraft is soundly constructed, highly maneuverable, and adequately powered. Furthermore, the investigation into alternative technologies, most notably the styrofoam wing and the detachable landing gear, holds promise to improve the performance of the aircraft.

  1. Study of the velocity distribution influence upon the pressure pulsations in draft tube model of hydro-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, V.; Ustimenko, A.; Kuibin, P.; Litvinov, I.; Shtork, S.

    2016-11-01

    One of the mechanisms of generation of powerful pressure pulsations in the circuit of the turbine is a precessing vortex core, formed behind the runner at the operation points with partial or forced loads, when the flow has significant residual swirl. To study periodic pressure pulsations behind the runner the authors of this paper use approaches of experimental modeling and methods of computational fluid dynamics. The influence of velocity distributions at the output of the hydro turbine runner on pressure pulsations was studied based on analysis of the existing and possible velocity distributions in hydraulic turbines and selection of the distribution in the extended range. Preliminary numerical calculations have showed that the velocity distribution can be modeled without reproduction of the entire geometry of the circuit, using a combination of two blade cascades of the rotor and stator. Experimental verification of numerical results was carried out in an air bench, using the method of 3D-printing for fabrication of the blade cascades and the geometry of the draft tube of hydraulic turbine. Measurements of the velocity field at the input to a draft tube cone and registration of pressure pulsations due to precessing vortex core have allowed building correlations between the velocity distribution character and the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pulsations.

  2. Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor Discharge-Flow Overexpansion and Limit-Loading Condition, Part I: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2017-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) investigation is conducted over a two-dimensional axial-flow turbine rotor blade row to study the phenomena of turbine rotor discharge flow overexpansion at subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. Quantitative data of the mean-flow Mach numbers, mean-flow angles, the tangential blade pressure forces, the mean-flow mass flux, and the flow-path total pressure loss coefficients, averaged or integrated across the two-dimensional computational domain encompassing two blade-passages, are obtained over a series of 14 inlet-total to exit-static pressure ratios, from 1.5 (un-choked; subcritical condition) to 10.0 (supercritical with excessively high pressure ratio.) Detailed flow features over the full domain-of-computation, such as the streamline patterns, Mach contours, pressure contours, blade surface pressure distributions, etc. are collected and displayed in this paper. A formal, quantitative definition of the limit loading condition based on the channel flow theory is proposed and explained. Contrary to the comments made in the historical works performed on this subject, about the deficiency of the theoretical methods applied in analyzing this phenomena, using modern CFD method for the study of this subject appears to be quite adequate and successful. This paper describes the CFD work and its findings.

  3. Thermo-mechanical and hydrophilic properties of polysaccharide/gluten-based bioplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate-Ramírez, L S; Romero, A; Bengoechea, C; Partal, P; Guerrero, A

    2014-11-04

    The influence of adding different polysaccharides (locust bean gum, LBG; methyl cellulose, MC; and carboxymethyl cellulose, CMC) to gluten-based biodegradable polymeric materials was assessed in this work. Gluten/polysaccharide/plasticiser bioplastics were prepared at different polysaccharide concentrations (0-4.5%) and pH values by mixing in a two-blade counter-rotating batch mixer (at 25 °C under adiabatic conditions) and thermomoulding at 9MPa and 130 °C. Bioplastic probes were evaluated through dynamic mechanical thermal analysis, tensile strength and water absorption capacity tests. Results pointed out that a moderate enhancement of the network structure may be achieved by adding polysaccharide at a pH close to the protein isoelectric point (pH 6), which also conferred a further thermosetting capacity to the system. Moreover, the addition of MC and CMC was found to significantly enhance material elongation properties. However, the presence of charges induced by pH leaded to a higher incompatibility between the polysaccharide and protein domains forming the composite. The pH value played a relevant role in the material water absorption, which significantly increased under acidic or basic conditions (particularly at pH 3). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Monitoring the petroleum bitumen characteristics changes during their interaction with the polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, P. S.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Belyaev, V. P.; Frolov, V. A.

    2017-08-01

    The subject of the study is the characteristics (penetration, softening temperature, ductility and elasticity) of a road binder based on petroleum bitumen. The work purpose is to monitor the changes in the characteristics of petroleum bitumen when it interacting with polymers: thermoplastic elastomer, low-density polyethylene, including the adhesive additive presence. To carry out the research a special laboratory facility was designed and manufactured with two blade mixers providing intensive turbulent mixing and the possibility to effect on the transition process of combining the components in a polymer-bitumen binder. To construct a mathematical model of the polymer-bitumen binder characteristics dependence from the composition, methods of statistical experiments planning were used. The possibility of the expensive thermoplastic elastomers replacement with polyethylene is established while maintaining acceptable polymer-bitumen binder quality parameters. The obtained results are proposed for use in road construction. They allow to reduce the roads construction cost with solving the problem of recycling long-term waste packaging from polyethylene.

  5. Experimental calibration of the mathematical model of Air Torque Position dampers with non-cascading blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić Siniša M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the mathematical model of the Air Torque Position dampers. The mathematical model establishes a link between the velocity of air in front of the damper, position of the damper blade and the moment acting on the blade caused by the air flow. This research aims to experimentally verify the mathematical model for the damper type with non-cascading blades. Four different types of dampers with non-cascading blades were considered: single blade dampers, dampers with two cross-blades, dampers with two parallel blades and dampers with two blades of which one is a fixed blade in the horizontal position. The case of a damper with a straight pipeline positioned in front of and behind the damper was taken in consideration. Calibration and verification of the mathematical model was conducted experimentally. The experiment was conducted on the laboratory facility for testing dampers used for regulation of the air flow rate in heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The design and setup of the laboratory facility, as well as construction, adjustment and calibration of the laboratory damper are presented in this paper. The mathematical model was calibrated by using one set of data, while the verification of the mathematical model was conducted by using the second set of data. The mathematical model was successfully validated and it can be used for accurate measurement of the air velocity on dampers with non-cascading blades under different operating conditions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31058

  6. Comparative study of Danish and foreign wind turbine economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godtfredsen, F.

    1993-02-01

    This comparative study indicates that Denmark still is the leading nation in wind turbine technology in regard to economics as well as energy output and nacelle weight per swept rotor area. For roughness class 1, the levellized socioeconomic costs of wind power from Danish wind turbines is DKK 0.396 - 0.536 per kWh compared with production costs of DKK 0.525 for the most economic of the foreign wind turbines investigated. Furthermore it is pointed out, that there seems to be no correlation between generator capacity or swept rotor area and costs of windpower for the wind turbines investigated. Nevertheless there are arguments for the statement that large scale wind turbines will be relatively more economic in the future. Danish wind turbine manufacturers only produce tree-bladed, stall- or pitch regulated wind turbines with constant rotational speed. In Holland, Germany and UK two-bladed wind turbines and turbines with variable speed has been introduced. Still the new concepts are less economic, but not without future interest. (au)

  7. Experimental demonstration of wind turbine noise reduction through optimized airfoil shape and trailing-edge serrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerlemans, S. [National Aerospace Laboratory NLR, Emmeloord (Netherlands); Schepers, J.G. [Unit Wind Energy, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands); Guidati, G.; Wagner, S. [Institut fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik IAG, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2001-07-15

    The objective of the European project DATA (Design and Testing of Acoustically Optimized Airfoils for Wind Turbines) is a reduction of trailing-edge (TE) noise by modifying the airfoil shape and/or the application of trailing-edge serrations. This paper describes validation measurements that were performed in the DNW-LLF wind tunnel, on a model scale wind turbine with a two-bladed 4.5 m diameter rotor which was designed in the project. Measurements were done for one reference- and two acoustically optimized rotors, for varying flow conditions. The aerodynamic performance of the rotors was measured using a torque meter in the hub, and further aerodynamic information was obtained from flow visualization on the blades. The acoustic measurements were done with a 136 microphone out-of-flow acoustic array. Besides the location of the noise sources in the (stationary) rotor plane, a new acoustic processing method enabled identification of dominant noise source regions on the rotating blades. The results show dominant noise sources at the trailing-edge of the blade, close to the tip. The optimized airfoil shapes result in a significant reduction of TE noise levels with respect to the reference rotor, without loss in power production. A further reduction can be achieved by the application of trailing-edge serrations. The aerodynamic measurements are generally in good agreement with the aerodynamic predictions made during the design of the model turbine.

  8. Influence of modern studded and bladed soccer boots and sidestep cutting on knee loading during match play conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaila, Rajiv

    2007-09-01

    The influence of modern studded and bladed soccer boots and sidestep cutting on noncontact knee loading during match play conditions is not fully understood. Modern soccer boot type and sidestep cutting compared with straight-ahead running do not significantly influence knee internal tibia axial and valgus moments, anterior joint forces, and flexion angles. Controlled laboratory study. Fifteen professional male outfield soccer players undertook trials of straight-ahead running and sidestep cutting at 30 degrees and 60 degrees with a controlled approach velocity on a Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) approved soccer surface. Two bladed and 2 studded soccer boots from 2 manufacturers were investigated. Three-dimensional inverse dynamics analysis determined externally applied internal/external tibia axial and valgus/varus moments, anterior forces, and flexion angles throughout stance. The soccer boot type imparted no significant difference on knee loading for each maneuver. Internal tibia and valgus moments were significantly greater for sidestep cutting at 30 degrees and 60 degrees compared with straight-ahead running. Sidestep cutting at 60 degrees compared with straight-ahead running significantly increased anterior joint forces. Varying soccer boot type had no effect on knee loading for each maneuver, but sidestep cutting significantly increased internal tibia and valgus moments and anterior joint forces. Sidestep cutting, irrespective of the modern soccer boot type worn, may be implicated in the high incidence of noncontact soccer anterior cruciate ligament injuries by significantly altering knee loading.

  9. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  10. Studies of behavior of the fuel compound based on the U-Zr micro-heterogeneous quasialloy during cyclic thermal tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, D. A.; Repnikov, V. M.; Soldatkin, D. M.; Solntsev, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    This paper provides the description of temperature cycle testing of U-Zr heterogeneous fuel composition. The composition is essentially a niobium-doped zirconium matrix with metallic uranium filaments evenly distributed over the cross section. The test samples 150 mm long had been fabricated using a fiber-filament technology. The samples were essentially two-bladed spiral mandrel fuel elements parts. In the course of experiments the following temperatures were applied: 350, 675, 780 and 1140 °C with total exposure periods equal to 200, 30, 30 and 6 hours respectively. The fuel element samples underwent post-exposure material science examination including: geometry measurements, metallographic analysis, X-ray phase analysis and electron-microscopic analysis as well as micro-hardness measurement. It has been found that no significant thermal swelling of the samples occurs throughout the whole temperature range from 350 °C up to 1140 °C. The paper presents the structural changes and redistribution of the fuel component over the fuel element cross section with rising temperature.

  11. Optimization of Savonius turbines using an obstacle shielding the returning blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, M.H.; Janiga, G.; Pap, E.; Thevenin, D. [Lab. of Fluid Dynamics and Technical Flows, University of Magdeburg ' ' Otto von Guericke' ' (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Due to the worldwide energy crisis, research and development activities in the field of renewable energy have been considerably increased in many countries. In Germany, wind energy is becoming particularly important. Although considerable progress has already been achieved, the available technical design is not yet adequate to develop reliable wind energy converters for conditions corresponding to low wind speeds and urban areas. The Savonius turbine appears to be particularly promising for such conditions, but suffers from a poor efficiency. The present study considers a considerably improved design in order to increase the output power of a Savonius turbine with either two or three blades. In addition, the improved design leads to a better self-starting capability. To achieve these objectives, the position of an obstacle shielding the returning blade of the Savonius turbine and possibly leading to a better flow orientation toward the advancing blade is optimized. This automatic optimization is carried out by coupling an in-house optimization library (OPAL) with an industrial flow simulation code (ANSYS-Fluent). The optimization process takes into account the output power coefficient as target function, considers the position and the angle of the shield as optimization parameters, and relies on Evolutionary Algorithms. A considerable improvement of the performance of Savonius turbines can be obtained in this manner, in particular a relative increase of the power output coefficient by more than 27%. It is furthermore demonstrated that the optimized configuration involving a two-blade rotor is better than the three-blade design. (author)

  12. Phase Resolved Angular Velocity Control of Cross Flow Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strom, Benjamin; Brunton, Steven; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Cross flow turbines have a number of operational advantages for the conversion of kinetic energy in marine or fluvial currents, but they are often less efficient than axial flow devices. Here a control scheme is presented in which the angular velocity of a cross flow turbine with two straight blades is prescribed as a function of azimuthal blade position, altering the time-varying effective angle of attack. Flume experiments conducted with a scale model turbine show approximately an 80% increase in turbine efficiency versus optimal constant angular velocity and constant resistive torque control schemes. Torque, drag, and lateral forces on one- and two-bladed turbines are analyzed and interpreted with bubble flow visualization to develop a simple model that describes the hydrodynamics responsible for the observed increase in mean efficiency. Challenges associated with implementing this control scheme on commercial-scale devices are discussed. If solutions are found, the performance increase presented here may impact the future development of cross flow turbines.

  13. Why do Cross-Flow Turbines Stall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, Robert; Strom, Benjamin; Polagye, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Hydrokinetic turbines are prone to instability and stall near their peak operating points under torque control. Understanding the physics of turbine stall may help to mitigate this undesirable occurrence and improve the robustness of torque controllers. A laboratory-scale two-bladed cross-flow turbine operating at a chord-based Reynolds number ~ 3 ×104 is shown to stall at a critical tip-speed ratio. Experiments are conducting bringing the turbine to this critical speed in a recirculating current flume by increasing resistive torque and allowing the rotor to rapidly decelerate while monitoring inflow velocity, torque, and drag. The turbine stalls probabilistically with a distribution generated from hundreds of such events. A machine learning algorithm identifies stall events and indicates the effectiveness of available measurements or combinations of measurements as predictors. Bubble flow visualization and PIV are utilized to observe fluid conditions during stall events including the formation, separation, and advection of leading-edge vortices involved in the stall process.

  14. Development of a towing tank PIV system and a wake survey of a marine current turbine under steady conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2015-11-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was designed and built at the U.S. Naval Academy. The system was used to study the wake of a scale-independent horizontal axis marine current turbine. The turbine is a 1/25th scale model of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Reference Model 1 (RM1) tidal turbine. It is a two-bladed turbine measuring 0.8 m in diameter and featuring a NACA 63-618 airfoil cross-section. The wake survey was conducted over an area extending 0.25D forward of the turbine tip path to 2.0D aft to a depth of 1.0D beneath the turbine output shaft in the streamwise plane. Each field of view was approximately 30 cm by 30 cm, and each overlapped the adjacent fields of view by 5 cm. The entire flow field was then reconstructed by registering the resultant vector fields together into a single field of investigation. Results include the field of investigation from a representative case, for the mean velocity field averaged over approximately 1,000 realizations, and turbulent statistics including turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stresses, and turbulent kinetic energy. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  15. Calculation of design load for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirandy, L.; Strain, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Design loads are presented for the General Electric MOD-SA wind turbine. The MOD-SA system consists of a 400 ft. diameter, upwind, two-bladed, teetered rotor connected to a 7.3 mW variable-speed generator. Fatigue loads are specified in the form of histograms for the 30 year life of the machine, while limit (or maximum) loads have been derived from transient dynamic analysis at critical operating conditions. Loads prediction was accomplished using state of the art aeroelastic analyses developed at General Electric. Features of the primary predictive tool - the Transient Rotor Analysis Code (TRAC) are described in the paper. Key to the load predictions are the following wind models: (1) yearly mean wind distribution; (2) mean wind variations during operation; (3) number of start/shutdown cycles; (4) spatially large gusts; and (5) spatially small gusts (local turbulence). The methods used to develop statistical distributions from load calculations represent an extension of procedures used in past wind programs and are believed to be a significant contribution to Wind Turbine Generator analysis. Test/theory correlations are presented to demonstrate code load predictive capability and to support the wind models used in the analysis. In addition MOD-5A loads are compared with those of existing machines. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department, under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  16. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seinfeld, John H. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    This project addressed the following research need in the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Program Plan: "Measurements downwind of urban sources of aerosol particles and precursor gases have shown that the mass concentration of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be several-fold greater than can be explained on the basis of current model calculations using observed precursor concentrations. ASR will continue conducting laboratory experiments on both gas-phase and aqueous-phase SOA formation to characterize the particle formation and the organic gases that react to form new organic aerosol material on aerosol seeds. ASR will use these experiments to guide the development of comprehensive chemical mechanisms... to guide the development of parameterizations that are simple enough to be applied to aerosol life cycle models."

  17. Aerodynamic analysis of the Darrieus rotor including secondary effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschivoiu, I.; Delclaux, F.; Fraunie, P.; Beguier, C.

    1983-10-01

    An aerodynamic analysis is made of two variants of the two-actuator-disk theory for modeling the Darrieus wind turbine. The double-multiple-streamtube model with constant and variable interference factors, including secondary effects, is examined for a Darrieus rotor. The influence of the secondary effects, namely, the blade geometry and profile type, the rotating tower, and the presence of struts and aerodynamic spoilers, is relatively significant, especially at high tip-speed ratios. Variation of the induced velocity as a function of the azimuthal angle allows a more accurate calculation of the aerodynamic loads on the downwind zone of the rotor with respect to the assumed constant interference factors. The theoretical results were compared with available experimental data for the Magdalen Islands wind turbine and Sandia-type machines (straight-line/circular-arc shape).

  18. Improved double-multiple streamtube model for the Darrieus-type vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, D. E.

    Double streamtube codes model the curved blade (Darrieus-type) vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) as a double actuator fish arrangement (one half) and use conservation of momentum principles to determine the forces acting on the turbine blades and the turbine performance. Sandia National Laboratories developed a double multiple streamtube model for the VAWT which incorporates the effects of the incident wind boundary layer, nonuniform velocity between the upwind and downwind sections of the rotor, dynamic stall effects and local blade Reynolds number variations. The theory underlying this VAWT model is described, as well as the code capabilities. Code results are compared with experimental data from two VAWT's and with the results from another double multiple streamtube and a vortex filament code. The effects of neglecting dynamic stall and horizontal wind velocity distribution are also illustrated.

  19. Aerodynamic loads and rotor performance for the Darrieus wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschivoiu, I.

    1981-12-01

    Aerodynamic blade loads and rotor performance are studied for the Darrieus windmill by using a double-multiple streamtube model. The Darrieus is represented as a pair of actuator disks in tandem at each level of the rotor, with upstream and downstream half-cycles. An equilibrium velocity exists in the center plane, and the upwind velocity is higher than the downwind velocity; lift and drag coefficients are calculated from the Reynolds number and the local angle of attack. Half-rotor torque and power are found by averaging the contributions from each streamtube at each position of the rotor in the upwind cycle. An example is provided for a 17 m Darrieus employing NACA blades. While the method is found to be suitable for predicting blade and rotor performance, the need to incorporate the effects of dynamic stall in the model is stressed as a means to improve accuracy.

  20. Particle size distribution of airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores emitted from compost using membrane filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, L. J.; Pankhurst, L. J.; Drew, G. H.; Hayes, E. T.; Jackson, S.; Longhurst, P. J.; Longhurst, J. W. S.; Liu, J.; Pollard, S. J. T.; Tyrrel, S. F.

    Information on the particle size distribution of bioaerosols emitted from open air composting operations is valuable in evaluating potential health impacts and is a requirement for improved dispersion simulation modelling. The membrane filter method was used to study the particle size distribution of Aspergillus fumigatus spores in air 50 m downwind of a green waste compost screening operation at a commercial facility. The highest concentrations (approximately 8 × 10 4 CFU m -3) of culturable spores were found on filters with pore diameters in the range 1-2 μm which suggests that the majority of spores are emitted as single cells. The findings were compared to published data collected using an Andersen sampler. Results were significantly correlated ( p < 0.01) indicating that the two methods are directly comparable across all particles sizes for Aspergillus spores.

  1. Theoretical and experimental studies of the waveforms associated with stratospheric infrasonic returns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxler, R.; Talmadge, C. L.; Blom, P.

    2009-12-01

    Theory predicts that for ground to ground infrasound propagation along paths which travel downwind, relative to the stratospheric jet, there is a shadow zone which ends about 200 km from the source where the first return from the stratosphere strikes the earth. With increasing range the single stratospheric arrival splits into two distinct arrivals, a fast arrival with the trace velocity of the effective sound speed at the stratopause, and a slower arrival with the trace velocity of the sound speed on the ground. To test the theory we have deployed eight infrasound arrays along an approximate line directly west of the site of the US Navy's Trident Missile rocket motor eliminations. The arrays were deployed during the summer of 2009 spaced roughly 10 km apart along a segment from 180 to 260 km west of the site. Comparisons between the theoretical predictions and the received data will be presented.

  2. Tracking of smokestack and cooling tower plumes using wind measurements at different levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Patrinos, A.A.N.

    1980-08-01

    Relationships between cooling tower and smokestack plumes at the Bowen Electric Generating Plant in northwestern Georgia and wind direction measurements at levels from the surface at 850 mb (approx. 1.5 km) are examined. The wind measurements play an important role in estimating plume directions which in turn are utilized to establish control and target (upwind and downwind) areas for a study of plant-induced precipitation modification. Fifty-two plume observations were made during a three week period in December 1979. Results indicate that a windset (4.5 km from the plant) mounted at a level approximating that of the cooling tower plume is a better predictor of plume direction than surface windsets (1.0 km from the plant) or 850 mb level winds. However, an apparent topographical influence on the wind direction measurements at the plume-level windset site somewhat limits its plume tracking capability, at least for ambient winds from the SW quadrant

  3. Ecological Monitoring Program at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. First semiannual report, July-December 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reith, C.C.; Louderbough, E.T.; Eastmond, R.J.; Rodriguez, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents a general framework for the Ecological Monitoring Program, as well as specific methods and objectives for the component subprograms. Also included are results and preliminary interpretations from the first round of sampling. In many cases, statistically valid findings will be possible only after several years of data have been accumulated. Interpretation of the aerial photographs indicates that surface disturbance and habitat change resulting from construction at the WIPP site is about 83% of the FEIS projected total. At present, the only statistically significant relationship which may reflect a site-related impact is an increased chloride concentration in surface soils downwind from the northwestern salt storage pile, but still well below thresholds for potential toxicity. Microbial and vegetation parameters appear unaffected by the elevated chloride levels. Somewhat higher ambient air temperatures relative to conditions at meteorological stations elsewhere in southeastern New Mexico is probably due to topographic influences from the cool air drainage patterns in the southeastern New Mexico region

  4. Impacts of second-generation biofuel feedstock production in the central U.S. on the hydrologic cycle and global warming mitigation potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, K. J.; Twine, T. E.; VanLoocke, A.; Bagley, J. E.; Hill, J.

    2016-10-01

    Biofuel feedstocks provide a renewable energy source that can reduce fossil fuel emissions; however, if produced on a large scale they can also impact local to regional water and carbon budgets. Simulation results for 2005-2014 from a regional weather model adapted to simulate the growth of two perennial grass biofuel feedstocks suggest that replacing at least half the current annual cropland with these grasses would increase water use efficiency and drive greater rainfall downwind of perturbed grid cells, but increased evapotranspiration (ET) might switch the Mississippi River basin from having a net warm-season surplus of water (precipitation minus ET) to a net deficit. While this scenario reduces land required for biofuel feedstock production relative to current use for maize grain ethanol production, it only offsets approximately one decade of projected anthropogenic warming and increased water vapor results in greater atmospheric heat content.

  5. Near-surface flow of volcanic gases on Io

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.W.; Thomas, P.C.

    1980-01-01

    Significant near-surface flow of gas several hundred kilometers from Pele (Plume 1) on Io is indicated by a series of bright, elongate albedo markings. Particles produced at small, local vents are apparently carried as much as 70 km farther 'downwind' from Pele. The gas densities and velocities necessary to suspend 0.1 to 10 micron particles at such a distance imply mass flow rates of 10 to the 7th - 10 to the 9th g/sec. Such flow rates are consistent with other estimates of mass transport by the plume. The large flow rates so far from the source allow an estimate of the rate of resurfacing of Io by lava flows and pyroclastics that is independent of estimates based on meteorite flux or on the amount of solids carried within the plumes themselves

  6. Plume rise from multiple sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, G.A.

    1975-01-01

    A simple enhancement factor for plume rise from multiple sources is proposed and tested against plume-rise observations. For bent-over buoyant plumes, this results in the recommendation that multiple-source rise be calculated as [(N + S)/(1 + S)]/sup 1/3/ times the single-source rise, Δh 1 , where N is the number of sources and S = 6 (total width of source configuration/N/sup 1/3/ Δh 1 )/sup 3/2/. For calm conditions a crude but simple method is suggested for predicting the height of plume merger and subsequent behavior which is based on the geometry and velocity variations of a single buoyant plume. Finally, it is suggested that large clusters of buoyant sources might occasionally give rise to concentrated vortices either within the source configuration or just downwind of it

  7. Recommendations on dose buildup factors used in models for calculating gamma doses for a plume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedemann Jensen, P.; Thykier-Nielsen, S.

    1980-09-01

    Calculations of external γ-doses from radioactivity released to the atmosphere have been made using different dose buildup factor formulas. Some of the dose buildup factor formulas are used by the Nordic countries in their respective γ-dose models. A comparison of calculated γ-doses using these dose buildup factors shows that the γ-doses can be significantly dependent on the buildup factor formula used in the calculation. Increasing differences occur for increasing plume height, crosswind distance, and atmospheric stability and also for decreasing downwind distance. It is concluded that the most accurate γ-dose can be calculated by use of Capo's polynomial buildup factor formula. Capo-coefficients have been calculated and shown in this report for γ-energies below the original lower limit given by Capo. (author)

  8. How Forest Inhomogeneities Affect the Edge Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreault, Louis-Étienne; Dupont, Sylvain; Bechmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Most of our knowledge on forest-edge flows comes from numerical and wind-tunnel experiments where canopies are horizontally homogeneous. To investigate the impact of tree-scale heterogeneities (>1 m) on the edge-flow dynamics, the flow in an inhomogeneous forest edge on Falster island in Denmark...... is investigated using large-eddy simulation. The three-dimensional forest structure is prescribed in the model using high resolution helicopter-based lidar scans. After evaluating the simulation against wind measurements upwind and downwind of the forest leading edge, the flow dynamics are compared between...... the scanned forest and an equivalent homogeneous forest. The simulations reveal that forest inhomogeneities facilitate flow penetration into the canopy from the edge, inducing important dispersive fluxes in the edge region as a consequence of the flow spatial variability. Further downstream from the edge...

  9. Flow distortion at a dense forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Bingöl, Ferhat; Mann, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The flow near tall forest edges is complex, yet poorly described. A field experiment using two meteorological masts equipped with sonic anemometers and a horizontally staring lidar was performed upwind and downwind of the interface between an open flat farmland and a tall (hc = 24 m) beech forest......, relative to the measurements upwind of the edge. The lidar data taken at several positions between the masts at 1.25hc show that the minimum wind speed occurred just upwind of the edge. At the 1.25hc level, at the forest mast, the momentum flux (\\documentclass...... qualitatively be explained with the concept of eddy‐blocking by the canopy top, which could also explain the observed increase in lateral variance and the decrease in the vertical variance. Despite the short distance to the edge of approximately 1.5hc, the beginning of a new internal boundary layer was visible...

  10. Plume rise measurements at Turbigo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anfossi, D

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents analyses of plume measurements obtained during that campaign by the ENEL ground-based Lidar. The five stacks of Turbigo Power Plant have different heights and emission parameters and their plumes usually combine, so a model for multiple sources was used to predict the plume rises. These predictions are compared with the observations. Measurements of sigma/sub v/ and sigma/sub z/ over the first 1000 m are compared with the curves derived from other observations in the Po Valley, using the no-lift balloon technique over the same range of downwind distance. Skewness and kurtosis distributions are shown, both along the vertical and the horizontal directions. In order to show the plume structure in more detail, we present two examples of Lidar-derived cross sections and the corresponding vertically and horizontally integrated concentration profiles.

  11. Assessment of impacts and evaluation of restoration methods on areas affected by a well blowout, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warrick, G.D.; Kato, T.T.; Phillips, M.V. [and others

    1996-12-01

    In June 1994, an oil well on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 blew-out and crude oil was deposited downwind. After the well was capped, information was collected to characterize the release and to assess effects to wildlife and plants. Oil residue was found up to 13.7 km from the well site, but deposition was relatively light and the oil quickly dried to form a thin crust on the soil surface. Elevated levels of hydrocarbons were found in livers collected from Heermann`s kangaroo rats (Dipodomys heermanni) from the oiled area but polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (known carcinogens or mutagens) were not detected in the livers. Restoration techniques (surface modification and bioremediation) and natural recovery were evaluated within three portions of the oiled area. Herbaceous cover and production, and survival and vigor of desert saltbush (Atriplex polycarpa) were also monitored within each trapping grid.

  12. Reliability of numerical wind tunnels for VAWT simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, M. Raciti; Masi, M.; Battisti, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.; Dossena, V.; Persico, G.

    2016-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based on the Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations have long been widely used to study vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs). Following a comprehensive experimental survey on the wakes downwind of a troposkien-shaped rotor, a campaign of bi-dimensional simulations is presented here, with the aim of assessing its reliability in reproducing the main features of the flow, also identifying areas needing additional research. Starting from both a well consolidated turbulence model (k-ω SST) and an unstructured grid typology, the main simulation settings are here manipulated in a convenient form to tackle rotating grids reproducing a VAWT operating in an open jet wind tunnel. The dependence of the numerical predictions from the selected grid spacing is investigated, thus establishing the less refined grid size that is still capable of capturing some relevant flow features such as integral quantities (rotor torque) and local ones (wake velocities). (paper)

  13. Reliability of numerical wind tunnels for VAWT simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raciti Castelli, M.; Masi, M.; Battisti, L.; Benini, E.; Brighenti, A.; Dossena, V.; Persico, G.

    2016-09-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based on the Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) equations have long been widely used to study vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs). Following a comprehensive experimental survey on the wakes downwind of a troposkien-shaped rotor, a campaign of bi-dimensional simulations is presented here, with the aim of assessing its reliability in reproducing the main features of the flow, also identifying areas needing additional research. Starting from both a well consolidated turbulence model (k-ω SST) and an unstructured grid typology, the main simulation settings are here manipulated in a convenient form to tackle rotating grids reproducing a VAWT operating in an open jet wind tunnel. The dependence of the numerical predictions from the selected grid spacing is investigated, thus establishing the less refined grid size that is still capable of capturing some relevant flow features such as integral quantities (rotor torque) and local ones (wake velocities).

  14. Meteorological perspective on intermediate range atmospheric dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Hoven, I.

    1981-01-01

    The intermediate range of atmospheric transport and diffusion is defined as those dispersion processes which take place at downwind distances of 10 to 100 kilometers from pollutant sources. Meteorologists often define this range as the mesoscale. It is the range of distances where certain environmental assessments are of concern such as the determination of significant deterioration of visibility, the effect of effluent releases from tall stacks, and the effect of pollutant sources in rural settings upon the more distant urban centers. Atmospheric diffusion theory is based on steady state conditions and spatial homogeniety. Techniques must be developed to measure the inhomogenieties, models must be devised to account for the complexities, and a data base consisting of appropriate measured meteorological parameters concurrent with tracer gas concentrations should be collected

  15. Landing performance by low-time private pilots after the sudden loss of binocular vision - Cyclops II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C. E., Jr.; Swaroop, R.; Mcmurty, T. C.; Blakeley, W. R.; Masters, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    Study of low-time general aviation pilots, who, in a series of spot landings, were suddenly deprived of binocular vision by patching either eye on the downwind leg of a standard, closed traffic pattern. Data collected during these landings were compared with control data from landings flown with normal vision during the same flight. The sequence of patching and the mix of control and monocular landings were randomized to minimize the effect of learning. No decrease in performance was observed during landings with vision restricted to one eye, in fact, performance improved. This observation is reported at a high level of confidence (p less than 0.001). These findings confirm the previous work of Lewis and Krier and have important implications with regard to aeromedical certification standards.

  16. Radioelement studies in the oceans. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, V.T.

    1979-01-01

    A bibliographic summary of reports published, submitted, in press or presented at meetings was included. A discussion of 3 cruises taken to collect samples from water, sediment cores, and plankton tows was also included. The geographical areas covered on these cruises were: (1) downwind and down-current from the U.S. Pacific Test Site, (2) across the equator in the Central Pacific, and (3) the Mid-Pacific Gyrie region. Maps are included. Samples were analyzed for a cesium 137, and plutonium on the ship. The samples were also retained for further radionuclide analysis and taxonomy (plankton) at Woods Hole. The dredging operations and problems encounted with in-situ water filtrations and chemical preparations on the first cruise were also discussed. Nutrient analysis of seawater was performed on the second cruise. The results of testing a new recording instrument are included for the third cruise

  17. Rural measurements of the chemical composition of airborne particles in the Eastern United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, G.T.; Kelly, N.A.; Ferman, M.A.; Morrissey, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of particulate composition was made at three rural sites: in central South Dakota, on the Louisiana Gulf Coastal, and in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. The first two sites were selected to determine background concentrations in continental polar and maritime tropical air masses, respectively, which affect the eastern United State during the summer. The Virginia site was selected as a receptor site, downwind of the midwestern source area. The South Dakota data established the background concentrations. These concentrations were similar to the levels in Louisiana when air parcels arrived from the Gulf of Mexico, without recently passing over the United States. Levels of fine particles (diameters less than 2.5 μm) were highest in Virginia and were due chiefly to sulfate. Using trajectory and statistical analyses, it is shown that the residence time of an air parcel over the midwestern source area was the most important variable in determining the sulface levels in the Blue Ridge Mountains

  18. Effects of a chemical weapons incineration plant on red-tailed tropicbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, E.A.; Doherty, P.F.; Schenk, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    From 1990 to 2000, the Johnston Atoll Chemical Agent Disposal System (JACADS) incinerated part of the U.S. stockpile of chemical weapons on Johnston Atoll, central Pacific Ocean, which also is a National Wildlife Refuge and home to approximately a half-million breeding seabirds. The effect on wildlife of incineration of these weapons is unknown. Using a multi-strata mark-recapture analysis, we investigated the effects of JACADS on reproductive success, survival, and movement probabilities of red-tailed tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda) nesting both downwind and upwind of the incineration site. We found no effect of chemical incineration on these tropicbird demographic parameters over the 8 years of our study. An additional 3 years of monitoring tropicbird demography will take place, post-incineration.

  19. Navigation errors encountered using weather-mapping radar for helicopter IFR guidance to oil rigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. D.; Bull, J. S.; Hegarty, D. M.; Dugan, D. C.

    1980-01-01

    In 1978 a joint NASA-FAA helicopter flight test was conducted to examine the use of weather-mapping radar for IFR guidance during landing approaches to oil rig helipads. The following navigation errors were measured: total system error, radar-range error, radar-bearing error, and flight technical error. Three problem areas were identified: (1) operational problems leading to pilot blunders, (2) poor navigation to the downwind final approach point, and (3) pure homing on final approach. Analysis of these problem areas suggests improvement in the radar equipment, approach procedure, and pilot training, and gives valuable insight into the development of future navigation aids to serve the off-shore oil industry.

  20. A Numerical Study on Characteristics of Flow and Reactive Pollutant Dispersion in Step‒up Street Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. R.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    For decades, many metro‒ and/or mega‒cities have grown and densities of population and building have increased. Because pollutants released from sources near ground surface such as vehicles are not easy to escape from street canyons which are spaces between buildings standing along streets pedestrians, drivers and residents are likely to be exposed to high concentrations of hazardous pollutants. Therefore, it is important to understand characteristics of flow and pollutant dispersion in street canyons. In this study, step‒up street canyons with higher downwind buildings are considered for understanding flow and reactive pollutants' dispersion characteristics there as a basic step to understand the characteristics in wider urban areas. This study used a CFD model coupled to a chemistry module. Detailed flow and air pollutant concentration are analyzed in step‒up street canyons with different upwind building heights.

  1. Establishing a link between vehicular PM sources and PM measurements in urban street canyons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Alfred D; Richmond-Bryant, Jennifer; Wiener, Russell W; Hahn, Intaek; Drake-Richman, Zora E; Ellenson, William D

    2009-12-01

    The Brooklyn Traffic Real-Time Ambient Pollutant Penetration and Environmental Dispersion (B-TRAPPED) study, conducted in Brooklyn, NY, USA, in 2005, was designed with multiple goals in mind, two of which were contaminant source characterization and street canyon transport and dispersion monitoring. In the portion of the study described here, synchronized wind velocity and azimuth as well as particulate matter (PM) concentrations at multiple locations along 33rd Street were used to determine the feasibility of using traffic emissions in a complex urban topography as a sole tracer for studying urban contaminant transport. We demonstrate in this paper that it is possible to link downwind concentrations of contaminants in an urban street canyon to the vehicular traffic cycle using Eigen-frequency analysis. In addition, multivariable circular histograms are used to establish directional frequency maxima for wind velocity and contaminant concentration.

  2. Effect of Climate Change on Surface Ozone over North America, Europe, and East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Jordan L.; Prather, Michael J.; Josse, Beatrice; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Zeng, Guang; Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The effect of future climate change on surface ozone over North America, Europe, and East Asia is evaluated using present-day (2000s) and future (2100s) hourly surface ozone simulated by four global models. Future climate follows RCP8.5, while methane and anthropogenic ozone precursors are fixed at year-2000 levels. Climate change shifts the seasonal surface ozone peak to earlier in the year and increases the amplitude of the annual cycle. Increases in mean summertime and high-percentile ozone are generally found in polluted environments, while decreases are found in clean environments. We propose climate change augments the efficiency of precursor emissions to generate surface ozone in polluted regions, thus reducing precursor export to neighboring downwind locations. Even with constant biogenic emissions, climate change causes the largest ozone increases at high percentiles. In most cases, air quality extreme episodes become larger and contain higher ozone levels relative to the rest of the distribution.

  3. Evaluation of ARAC`s participation in a long-range transport experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, J.C.; Pobanz, B.M.; Foster, C.S.; Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W. III

    1995-08-01

    The 1994 European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) involved two releases of inert tracer gas in western France, allowing subsequent detection at many locations across Europe. Twenty four operational and research facilities from 20 countries made predictions of the motion of the released plume and the resulting concentrations detected at the sampler locations. This paper describes participation by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in ETEX. In its role as a real-time emergency response center, ARAC operates a suite of numerical models which simulate the advection and diffusion of airborne releases, and which calculate the estimated downwind concentration of the released material. The models and procedures used by ARAC to participate in ETEX were essentially the same as those which would be used to respond to a release at any previously unspecified location.

  4. Wind farm array wake losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W. [Impact Weather, Washougal, WA (United States); McCarthy, E.F. [Wind Economics & Technology, Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  5. Evaluation of ARAC's participation in a long-range transport experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, J.C.; Pobanz, B.M.; Foster, C.S.; Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W. III.

    1995-08-01

    The 1994 European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) involved two releases of inert tracer gas in western France, allowing subsequent detection at many locations across Europe. Twenty four operational and research facilities from 20 countries made predictions of the motion of the released plume and the resulting concentrations detected at the sampler locations. This paper describes participation by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in ETEX. In its role as a real-time emergency response center, ARAC operates a suite of numerical models which simulate the advection and diffusion of airborne releases, and which calculate the estimated downwind concentration of the released material. The models and procedures used by ARAC to participate in ETEX were essentially the same as those which would be used to respond to a release at any previously unspecified location

  6. Electrical activity during the 2006 Mount St. Augustine volcanic eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ronald J.; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Rison, William; Edens, H. E.; Aulich, G. D.; McNutt, S.R.; Tytgat, Guy; Clark, E.

    2007-01-01

    By using a combination of radio frequency time-of-arrival and interferometer measurements, we observed a sequence of lightning and electrical activity during one of Mount St. Augustine's eruptions. The observations indicate that the electrical activity had two modes or phases. First, there was an explosive phase in which the ejecta from the explosion appeared to be highly charged upon exiting the volcano, resulting in numerous apparently disorganized discharges and some simple lightning. The net charge exiting the volcano appears to have been positive. The second phase, which followed the most energetic explosion, produced conventional-type discharges that occurred within plume. Although the plume cloud was undoubtedly charged as a result of the explosion itself, the fact that the lightning onset was delayed and continued after and well downwind of the eruption indicates that in situ charging of some kind was occurring, presumably similar in some respects to that which occurs in normal thunderstorms.

  7. A Short History of Hanford Waste Generation, Storage, and Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2003-01-01

    Nine nuclear reactors and four reprocessing plants at Hanford produced nearly two-thirds of the plutonium used in the United States for government purposes . These site operations also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste. Some contaminants were released into the environment, exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Other contaminants were stored. The last reactor was shut down in 1987, and the last reprocessing plant closed in 1990. Most of the human-made radioactivity and about half of the chemicals remaining onsite are kept in underground tanks and surface facilities. The rest exists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Hanford contains about 40% of all the radioactivity that exists across the nuclear weapons complex. Today, environmental restoration activities are under way.

  8. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste...

  9. An American hibakusha in Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, Kenneth E

    2011-01-01

    A magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami originating off the east coast of Japan triggered the explosive release of radioactive isotopes from one of four nuclear power plants in the affected area. This event has been compared with the 1986 nuclear accident at Chernobyl, the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the intervening era of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. The credibility of any comparison depends on the source, for which reason various specialists were invited to address an audience of media, healthcare, and disaster response professionals on July 18, 2011 in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture. This article is based on a presentation given July 18, and interprets the Fukushima nuclear crisis from the perspective of an American doctor who grew up downwind of an atomic bomb test site, and who now works at Fukushima Medical University.

  10. Dust Storm Hits Canary Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A thick pall of sand and dust blew out from the Sahara Desert over the Atlantic Ocean yesterday (January 6, 2002), engulfing the Canary Islands in what has become one of the worst sand storms ever recorded there. In this scene, notice how the dust appears particularly thick in the downwind wake of Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands. Perhaps the turbulence generated by the air currents flowing past the island's volcanic peaks is churning the dust back up into the atmosphere, rather than allowing it to settle toward the surface. This true-color image was captured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on January 7, 2002. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  11. Sandia Administrative Micrographics Facility, Building 802: Hazards assessment document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swihart, A.

    1994-12-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Sandia Administrative Micrographics Facility, Building 802. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 33 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 75 meters

  12. Overview of Megacity Air Pollutant Emissions and Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, C. E.

    2013-05-01

    The urban metabolism that characterizes major cities consumes very large qualities of humanly produced and/or processed food, fuel, water, electricity, construction materials and manufactured goods, as well as, naturally provided sunlight, precipitation and atmospheric oxygen. The resulting urban respiration exhalations add large quantities of trace gas and particulate matter pollutants to urban atmospheres. Key classes of urban primary air pollutants and their sources will be reviewed and important secondary pollutants identified. The impacts of these pollutants on urban and downwind regional inhabitants, ecosystems, and climate will be discussed. Challenges in quantifying the temporally and spatially resolved urban air pollutant emissions and secondary pollutant production rates will be identified and possible measurement strategies evaluated.

  13. Experimental determination of the atmospheric dispersion at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center for 160 m and 195 m emission heights. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.; Huebschmann, W.; Schuettelkopf, H.; Vogt, S.

    1983-03-01

    Diffusion experiments have been carried out at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center in order to investigate the atmospheric diffusion of pollutants and to determine specifically the influence on atmospheric diffusion of topographic conditions specific to the site. For this purpose, halogenated hydrocarbons are emitted at 160 m and 195 m height, their local concentration distribution is measured at ground level downwind of the source. Part 1 of the report describes the diffusion experiments performed and presents the detailed data of measurements. These include the coordinates of the sampling positions, the measured concentrations and the relevant meteorological data recorded during the experiments. The stability classes prevailing during the experiments are derived from these data and are indicated. (orig.) [de

  14. Assessing the regional impact of indonesian biomass burning emissions based on organic molecular tracers and chemical mass balance modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engling, G.; He, J.; Betha, R.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2014-08-01

    Biomass burning activities commonly occur in Southeast Asia (SEA), and are particularly intense in Indonesia during the dry seasons. The effect of biomass smoke emissions on air quality in the city state of Singapore was investigated during a haze episode in October 2006. Substantially increased levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) and associated chemical species were observed during the haze period. Specifically, the enhancement in the concentration of molecular tracers for biomass combustion such as levoglucosan by as much as two orders of magnitude and the diagnostic ratios of individual organic compounds indicated that biomass burning emissions caused a regional smoke haze episode due to their long-range transport by prevailing winds. With the aid of air mass backward trajectories and chemical mass balance modeling, large-scale forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan were identified as the sources of the smoke aerosol, exerting a significant impact on air quality in downwind areas, such as Singapore.

  15. Contribution of regional-scale fire events to ozone and PM2.5 air quality estimated by photochemical modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. R.; Woody, M. C.; Tonnesen, G. S.; Hutzell, W.; Pye, H. O. T.; Beaver, M. R.; Pouliot, G.; Pierce, T.

    2016-09-01

    Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model, Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model, and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical grid model. The modeling system was applied to track the contribution from a wildfire (Wallow) and prescribed fire (Flint Hills) using both source sensitivity and source apportionment approaches. The model estimated fire contribution to primary and secondary pollutants are comparable using source sensitivity (brute-force zero out) and source apportionment (Integrated Source Apportionment Method) approaches. Model estimated O3 enhancement relative to CO is similar to values reported in literature indicating the modeling system captures the range of O3 inhibition possible near fires and O3 production both near the fire and downwind. O3 and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are formed in the fire plume and transported downwind along with highly reactive VOC species such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde that are both emitted by the fire and rapidly produced in the fire plume by VOC oxidation reactions. PAN and aldehydes contribute to continued downwind O3 production. The transport and thermal decomposition of PAN to nitrogen oxides (NOX) enables O3 production in areas limited by NOX availability and the photolysis of aldehydes to produce free radicals (HOX) causes increased O3 production in NOX rich areas. The modeling system tends to overestimate hourly surface O3 at routine rural monitors in close proximity to the fires when the model predicts elevated fire impacts on O3 and Hazard Mapping System (HMS) data indicates possible fire impact. A sensitivity simulation in which solar radiation and photolysis rates were more aggressively attenuated by aerosol in the plume

  16. Optimal Monotonicity-Preserving Perturbations of a Given Runge–Kutta Method

    KAUST Repository

    Higueras, Inmaculada

    2018-02-14

    Perturbed Runge–Kutta methods (also referred to as downwind Runge–Kutta methods) can guarantee monotonicity preservation under larger step sizes relative to their traditional Runge–Kutta counterparts. In this paper we study the question of how to optimally perturb a given method in order to increase the radius of absolute monotonicity (a.m.). We prove that for methods with zero radius of a.m., it is always possible to give a perturbation with positive radius. We first study methods for linear problems and then methods for nonlinear problems. In each case, we prove upper bounds on the radius of a.m., and provide algorithms to compute optimal perturbations. We also provide optimal perturbations for many known methods.

  17. The rise of hot gases resulting from hydrogen combustion at a tritium recovery plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selander, W.N.

    1981-10-01

    An accidental release of hydrogen isotopes at a proposed tritium recovery plant may result in a fire or explosion. In this report estimates are given for the initial transient rise and final height of the cloud of hot gasses which results from various modes of combustion. The radiation dose equivalent caused by the downwind passage of the tritium-bearing cloud is estimated to be less than 100 mrem in any mode of combustion or weather condition. The model used for calculating the final height of the cloud depends on an entrainment assumption, and the low-density cloud loses energy by entrainment at a slower rate than in conventional atmospheric processes. Consequently, the estimated final cloud height is conservative, and, therefore, the actual radiation dose equivalent would be lower than predicted

  18. Bioindication of air pollution effects near a copper smelter in Brazil using mango trees and soil microbiological properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Hintemann, Therese; Santana Lima, Josanidia; Kandeler, Ellen

    2003-01-01

    A field study near the copper smelter of a large industrial complex examined air pollution effects on vegetation and soil parameters in Camacari (northeast Brazil). Close to the smelter, soil pH-value was lower and total acidity as well as organic carbon contents were higher compared with a site far from the source and two reference sites. The acidification of top soil particularly and the drastically enhanced plant-available copper concentrations were caused by atmospheric deposition. High sulphur and copper deposition significantly reduced microbial biomass and altered functional diversity of soil microorganisms (arylsulphatase and xylanase). Large accumulations of sulphur, arsenic and copper were detected in mango leaves (Mangifera indica) growing downwind from the smelter suggesting potential food chain-mediated risk. - Atmospheric emissions in northeast Brazil have transformed soil pH, accumulated in soil and plants as sulphur and heavy metals, and affected the functional diversity of soil microorganisms

  19. Bioindication of air pollution effects near a copper smelter in Brazil using mango trees and soil microbiological properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Hintemann, Therese; Santana Lima, Josanidia; Kandeler, Ellen

    2003-12-01

    A field study near the copper smelter of a large industrial complex examined air pollution effects on vegetation and soil parameters in Camacari (northeast Brazil). Close to the smelter, soil pH-value was lower and total acidity as well as organic carbon contents were higher compared with a site far from the source and two reference sites. The acidification of top soil particularly and the drastically enhanced plant-available copper concentrations were caused by atmospheric deposition. High sulphur and copper deposition significantly reduced microbial biomass and altered functional diversity of soil microorganisms (arylsulphatase and xylanase). Large accumulations of sulphur, arsenic and copper were detected in mango leaves (Mangifera indica) growing downwind from the smelter suggesting potential food chain-mediated risk. - Atmospheric emissions in northeast Brazil have transformed soil pH, accumulated in soil and plants as sulphur and heavy metals, and affected the functional diversity of soil microorganisms.

  20. Vertical-axis turbine/propeller for ship propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkla, H.M.

    1984-01-01

    There are so many variables in the design and operating conditions of a vertical-axis turbine/propeller for the propulsion of a ship by wind that a preliminary study is offered, based on two simplified models. Study of a linear motion of blades in air and water shows optimum conditions for blade-speed and blade-incidence. Analysis of the second, cyclical model is simplified by the assumption of constant angles of incidence. While the logical superiority of the vertical-axis system, with its low transmission loss, may not alone give it the advantage over all other systems in upwind and downwind sailing, there are indications that in the beam wind it is in a class of its own; the Voith-Schneider-Type propeller then produces a thrust with a major component to windward, so that the combined unit leaves little or no athwartships force.