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Sample records for two-bladed teetering-hub downwind

  1. A Two-Bladed Teetering Hub configuration for the DTU 10 MW RWT: loads considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Rasmussen, Flemming

    2014-01-01

    , and the rotor solidity is kept constant by increasing the blade chord by 50 %. The configuration allows saving 30 % of the rotor weight and material, corresponding to one blade, but implies several complications: lower power output due to increased tip losses effects, and increased load variations. The increase...

  2. A Two-Bladed Teetering Hub configuration for the DTU 10 MW RWT: loads considerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Rasmussen, Flemming

    , and the rotor solidity is kept constant by increasing the blade chord by 50 %. The configuration allows saving 30 % of the rotor weight and material, corresponding to one blade, but implies several complications: lower power output due to increased tip losses effects, and increased load variations. The increase...

  3. A Two-Bladed Concept Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong

    2012-01-01

    This article shows the potential for reducing extreme loads with an innovative design of wind turbine, a partial pitch two-bladed concept turbine. The most extreme conditions to test a turbine are considered to be stand-still combined with a grid failure in which the wind comes from all directions...... from 0 to 360 degrees. All aeroelastic load simulations are done by using the aeroelastic code HAWC2. From the load comparisons between the partial pitch two-bladed turbine and a conventional three-bladed turbine it is observed that the partial pitch two-bladed turbine can reduce the extreme tower...... bottom bending moment by approximately 33% compared to the three-bladed turbine....

  4. A Two-Bladed Concept Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong

    2012-01-01

    This article shows the potential for reducing extreme loads with an innovative design of wind turbine, a partial pitch two-bladed concept turbine. The most extreme conditions to test a turbine are considered to be stand-still combined with a grid failure in which the wind comes from all directions...... from 0 to 360 degrees. All aeroelastic load simulations are done by using the aeroelastic code HAWC2. From the load comparisons between the partial pitch two-bladed turbine and a conventional three-bladed turbine it is observed that the partial pitch two-bladed turbine can reduce the extreme tower...... bottom bending moment by approximately 33% compared to the three-bladed turbine....

  5. Analysis and test results for a two-bladed, passive cycle pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbine in free and controlled yaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holenemser, K.H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This report surveys the analysis and tests performed at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on a horizontal-axis, two-laded wind turbine with teeter hub. The introduction is a brief account of results obtained during the 5-year period ending December 1985. The wind tunnel model and the test turbine (7.6 m [25 ft.] in diameter) at Washington University`s Tyson Research Center had a 67{degree} delta-three angle of the teeter axis. The introduction explains why this configuration was selected and named the passive cycle pitch (PCP) wind turbine. Through the analysis was not limited to the PCP rotor, all tests, including those done from 1986 to 1994, wee conducted with the same teetered wind rotor. The blades are rather stiff and have only a small elastic coning angle and no precone.

  6. Modal dynamics of structures with bladed isotropic rotors and its complexity for two-bladed rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Hansen

    2016-11-01

    These harmonic terms lead to modal couplings for the two-bladed turbine that do not exist for the three-bladed turbine. A single mode of a two-bladed turbine will also have several resonance frequencies in both the ground-fixed and rotating frames of reference, which complicates the interpretation of simulated or measured turbine responses.

  7. Morphing Downwind-Aligned Rotor Concept Based on a 13-MW Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichter, Brian; Steele, Adam; Loth, Eric; Moriarty, Patrick; Selig, Michael

    2016-04-01

    To alleviate the mass-scaling issues associated with conventional upwind rotors of extreme-scale wind turbines (>/=10 MW), a morphing downwind-aligned rotor (MoDaR) concept is proposed herein. The concept employs a downwind rotor with blades whose elements are stiff (no intentional flexibility) but with hub-joints that can be unlocked to allow for moment-free downwind alignment. Aligning the combination of gravitational, centrifugal and thrust forces along the blade path reduces downwind cantilever loads, resulting in primarily tensile loading. For control simplicity, the blade curvature can be fixed with a single morphing degree of freedom using a near-hub joint for coning angle: 22 degrees at rated conditions. The conventional baseline was set as the 13.2-MW Sandia 100-m all glass blade in a three-bladed upwind configuration. To quantify potential mass savings, a downwind load-aligning, two-bladed rotor was designed. Because of the reduced number of blades, the MoDaR concept had a favorable 33% mass reduction. The blade reduction and coning led to a reduction in rated power, but morphing increased energy capture at lower speeds such that both the MoDaR and conventional rotors have the same average power: 5.4 MW. A finite element analysis showed that quasi-steady structural stresses could be reduced, over a range of operating wind speeds and azimuthal angles, despite the increases in loading per blade. However, the concept feasibility requires additional investigation of the mass, cost and complexity of the morphing hinge, the impact of unsteady aeroelastic influence because of turbulence and off-design conditions, along with system-level Levelized Cost of Energy analysis.

  8. Simulation of Low frequency Noise from a Downwind Wind Turbine Rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helge Aa.; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of a wind turbine with a downwind rotor is the generation of considerable low frequency noise (so-called thumping noise) which can cause annoyance of people at a considerable distance. This was experienced on a number of full-scale turbines in e.g. US and Sweden...... in the period from around 1980 to 1990. One of the common characteristics of this low frequency noise, emerging from analysis of the phenomenon, was that the sound pressure level is strongly varying in time. We have investigated this phenomenon using a model package by which the low frequency noise...... to the aero acoustic model. The results for a 5 MW two-bladed turbine with a downwind rotor showed an increase in the sound pressure level of 5-20 dB due to the unsteadiness in the wake caused mainly by vortex shedding. However, in some periods the sound pressure level can increase additionally 0-10 dB when...

  9. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verelst, D.R.S.; Larsen, T.J.; Van Wingerden, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shel

  10. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2014-01-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off...

  11. Irrigation enhances precipitation at the mountains downwind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jódar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric circulation models predict an irrigation-rainfall feedback. However, actual field evidences are very weak. We present strong field evidence about an increase in rainfall at the mountains located downwind of irrigated zones. We chose two regions, located in semiarid southern Spain, where irrigation started at a well defined date, and we analyzed rainfall statistics before and after the beginning of irrigation. Analyzed statistics include the variation of (1 mean rainfall Δ P, (2 ratio of monthly precipitation to annual precipitation Δ r, and (3 number of months with minimum rainfall episodes Δ Pmin after a transition period from unirrigated to irrigated conditions. All of them show statistically significant increases. Δ P and Δ r show larger and more statistically significant variations in June and July. Their variation is proportional to the mean annual water volume applied in the neighboring upwind irrigation lands. Variations in Δ Pmin are statistically significant in the whole summer. That is, the number of months with some rain displays a relevant increase after irrigation. However, increase in rainfall while statistically significant is distributed over a broad region, so that it is of little relevance from a water resources perspective. The joint increment in Δ P and Δ Pmin after the irrigation transition period denotes a net increase in the number of months having a minimum cumulated precipitation in summer.

  12. Iterative tuning of feedforward IPC for two-bladed wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulders, SP; van Solingen, E.; van Wingerden, JW; Beerens, J.

    2016-09-01

    At present, the cost of offshore wind energy does not meet the level of onshore wind and fossil-based energy sources. One way to extend the turbine lifetime, and thus reduce cost, is by reduction of the fatigue loads of blades and other turbine parts using Individual Pitch Control (IPC). This type of control, which is generally implemented by feedback control using the MultiBlade Coordinate transformation on blade load measurement signals, is capable of mitigating the most dominant periodic loads. The main goal of this article is to develop a self-optimizing feedforward IPC strategy for a two-bladed wind turbine to reduce actuator duty cycle and reduce the dependency on blade load measurement signals. The approach uses blade load measurement data only initially for tuning of the feedforward controller, which is scheduled on the rotor azimuth angle and wind speed. The feedforward strategy will be compared to the feedback implementation in terms of load alleviation capabilities and actuator duty cycle. Results show that the implementation is capable of learning the optimal feedforward IPC controller in constant and turbulent wind conditions, to alleviate the pitch actuator duty cycle, and to considerably reduce harmonic fatigue loads without the need for blade load measurement signals after tuning.

  13. Water Flow Testing and Unsteady Pressure Analysis of a Two-Bladed Liquid Oxidizer Pump Inducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jordan B.; Mulder, Andrew; Zoladz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The unsteady fluid dynamic performance of a cavitating two-bladed oxidizer turbopump inducer was characterized through sub-scale water flow testing. While testing a novel inlet duct design that included a cavitation suppression groove, unusual high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed. With potential implications for inducer blade loads, these high-frequency components were analyzed extensively in order to understand their origins and impacts to blade loading. Water flow testing provides a technique to determine pump performance without the costs and hazards associated with handling cryogenic propellants. Water has a similar density and Reynolds number to liquid oxygen. In a 70%-scale water flow test, the inducer-only pump performance was evaluated. Over a range of flow rates, the pump inlet pressure was gradually reduced, causing the flow to cavitate near the pump inducer. A nominal, smooth inducer inlet was tested, followed by an inlet duct with a circumferential groove designed to suppress cavitation. A subsequent 52%-scale water flow test in another facility evaluated the combined inducer-impeller pump performance. With the nominal inlet design, the inducer showed traditional cavitation and surge characteristics. Significant bearing loads were created by large side loads on the inducer during synchronous cavitation. The grooved inlet successfully mitigated these loads by greatly reducing synchronous cavitation, however high-frequency pressure oscillations were observed over a range of frequencies. Analytical signal processing techniques showed these oscillations to be created by a rotating, multi-celled train of pressure pulses, and subsequent CFD analysis suggested that such pulses could be created by the interaction of rotating inducer blades with fluid trapped in a cavitation suppression groove. Despite their relatively low amplitude, these high-frequency pressure oscillations posed a design concern due to their sensitivity to flow conditions and

  14. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, J.W.

    During February and April 2012 a series of wind tunnel tests were performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility (OJF) with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible...

  15. Wind tunnel tests of a free yawing downwind wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verelst, D. R. S.; Larsen, T. J.; van Wingerden, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    This research paper presents preliminary results on a behavioural study of a free yawing downwind wind turbine. A series of wind tunnel tests was performed at the TU Delft Open Jet Facility with a three bladed downwind wind turbine and a rotor radius of 0.8 meters. The setup includes an off the shelf three bladed hub, nacelle and generator on which relatively flexible blades are mounted. The tower support structure has free yawing capabilities provided at the base. A short overview on the technical details of the experiment is given as well as a brief summary of the design process. The discussed test cases show that the turbine is stable while operating in free yawing conditions. Further, the effect of the tower shadow passage on the blade flapwise strain measurement is evaluated. Finally, data from the experiment is compared with preliminary simulations using DTU Wind Energy's aeroelastic simulation program HAWC2.

  16. Downwind rotor horizontal axis wind turbine noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, F. B.; Klatte, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    NASA and industry are currently cooperating in the conduct of extensive experimental and analytical studies to understand and predict the noise of large, horizontal axis wind turbines. This effort consists of (1) obtaining high quality noise data under well controlled and documented test conditions, (2) establishing the annoyance criteria for impulse noise of the type generated by horizontal axis wind turbines with rotors downwind of the support tower, (3) defining the wake characteristics downwind of the axial location of the plane of rotation, (4) comparing predictions with measurements made by use of wake data, and (5) comparing predictions with annoyance criteria. The status of work by Hamilton Standard in the above areas which was done in support of the cooperative NASA and industry studies is briefly summarized.

  17. Numerical Simulation of Tower Rotor Interaction for Downwind Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isam Janajreh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Downwind wind turbines have lower upwind rotor misalignment, and thus lower turning moment and self-steered advantage over the upwind configuration. In this paper, numerical simulation to the downwind turbine is conducted to investigate the interaction between the tower and the blade during the intrinsic passage of the rotor in the wake of the tower. The moving rotor has been accounted for via ALE formulation of the incompressible, unsteady, turbulent Navier-Stokes equations. The localized CP, CL, and CD are computed and compared to undisturbed flow evaluated by Panel method. The time history of the CP, aerodynamic forces (CL and CD, as well as moments were evaluated for three cross-sectional tower; asymmetrical airfoil (NACA0012 having four times the rotor's chord length, and two circular cross-sections having four and two chords lengths of the rotor's chord. 5%, 17%, and 57% reductions of the aerodynamic lift forces during the blade passage in the wake of the symmetrical airfoil tower, small circular cross-section tower and large circular cross-section tower were observed, respectively. The pronounced reduction, however, is confined to a short time/distance of three rotor chords. A net forward impulsive force is also observed on the tower due to the high speed rotor motion.

  18. Organic Aerosol Formation Downwind from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Warneke, C.; Ahmadov, R.; Atlas, E. L.; Bahreini, R.; Blake, D. R.; Brock, C. A.; Brioude, J.; Fahey, D. W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Holloway, J. S.; Le Henaff, M.; Lueb, R. A.; McKeen, S. A.; Meagher, J. F.; Murphy, D. M.; Paris, C.; Parrish, D. D.; Perring, A. E.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Robinson, A. L.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Srinivasan, A.; Watts, L. A.

    2011-03-01

    A large fraction of atmospheric aerosols are derived from organic compounds with various volatilities. A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research aircraft made airborne measurements of the gaseous and aerosol composition of air over the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that occurred from April to August 2010. A narrow plume of hydrocarbons was observed downwind of DWH that is attributed to the evaporation of fresh oil on the sea surface. A much wider plume with high concentrations of organic aerosol (>25 micrograms per cubic meter) was attributed to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from unmeasured, less volatile hydrocarbons that were emitted from a wider area around DWH. These observations provide direct and compelling evidence for the importance of formation of SOA from less volatile hydrocarbons.

  19. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  20. Large-eddy simulation analysis of turbulent flow over a two-blade horizontal wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Young [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh (United States); You, Dong Hyun [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Unsteady turbulent flow characteristics over a two-blade horizontal wind turbine rotor is analyzed using a large-eddy simulation technique. The wind turbine rotor corresponds to the configuration of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI campaign. The filtered incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in a non-inertial reference frame fixed at the centroid of the rotor, are solved with centrifugal and Coriolis forces using an unstructured-grid finite-volume method. A systematic analysis of effects of grid resolution, computational domain size, and time-step size on simulation results, is carried out. Simulation results such as the surface pressure coefficient, thrust coefficient, torque coefficient, and normal and tangential force coefficients are found to agree favorably with experimental data. The simulation showed that pressure fluctuations, which produce broadband flow-induced noise and vibration of the blades, are especially significant in the mid-chord area of the suction side at around 70 to 95 percent spanwise locations. Large-scale vortices are found to be generated at the blade tip and the location connecting the blade with an airfoil cross section and the circular hub rod. These vortices propagate downstream with helical motions and are found to persist far downstream from the rotor.

  1. Reduction of air pollution levels downwind of a road with an upwind noise barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enayati Ahangar, Faraz; Heist, David; Perry, Steven; Venkatram, Akula

    2017-04-01

    We propose a dispersion model to estimate the impact of a solid noise barrier upwind of a highway on air pollution concentrations downwind of the road. The model, based on data from wind tunnel experiments conducted by Heist et al. (2009), assumes that the upwind barrier has two main effects: 1) it creates a recirculation zone behind the barrier that sweeps the emissions from the highway back towards the wall, and 2) it enhances vertical dispersion and initial mixing. By combining the upwind barrier model with the mixed wake model for a downwind barrier described in Schulte et al. (2014), we are able to model dispersion of emissions from a highway with noise barriers on both sides. The model provides a good description of measurements made in the wind tunnel. The presence of an upwind barrier causes reductions in concentrations relative to those measured downwind of a road with no barriers. The reduction can be as large as that caused by a downwind barrier if the recirculation zone covers the width of the highway. Barriers on both sides of the highway result in larger reductions downwind of the barriers than those caused by a single barrier either upwind or downwind. As expected, barrier effects are small beyond 10 barrier heights downwind of the highway. We also propose a tentative model to estimate on-road concentrations within the recirculation zone induced by the upwind barrier.

  2. Surface Ozone Enrichment Downwind of Manaus City, in Central Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, S.; Rizzo, L. V.; Rodrigues, N. P.; Brito, J.; Cirino, G. G.; Souza, R. A. F. D.; Barbosa, H. M.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Amazonia is a unique place to study the impact of anthropogenic emissions on atmospheric photochemistry, fueled by large inputs of solar radiation, humidity, biogenic emissions and turbulent mixing. In the wet season, thousands of km2 of Amazonian forest areas can be considered pristine, whereas in the dry season biomass burning emissions in regional scale add to picture. The Amazon region is also going through localized urban development, in particular, the Manaus city, with 2 million inhabitants. The GoAmazon2014/5 experiment seeks to understand the interactions between urban and biogenic emissions in Amazonia. The combination of biogenic volatile organic compounds and urban NOx emissions is expected to increase tropospheric O3 production, with impacts to the ecosystem and human health. To investigate this issue, surface O3 measurements were taken between Feb and Dec 2014 at two sites in Amazonia: T2, located in the outflow of the Manaus urban plume, and T3, sitting 60 km downwind of the city. The influence of the urban plume at T3 site was detected by a combination of typical ΔCN/ΔCO ratios, Hysplit backtrajectories and threshold concentrations of tracers such as particle number and black carbon. The transport from T2 to T3 typically lasted 7 hours. At T2, the O3 diurnal cycle showed a diurnal peak of 20 ppb in the wet season and of 35 ppb in the dry season, suggesting the contribution of regional biomass burning to O3 photochemical production. In the absence of urban or biomass burning emissions, O3 diurnal cycle at T3 showed a peak of 15 ppb, similar to observations taken in pristine forest areas in Amazonia. When the Manaus plume reached the T3 site in the afternoon, the diurnal O3 peak increased to 40 ppb, indicating a net O3 production rate of 3.6 ppb h-1 along this diurnal transport. When the Manaus plume reached the T3 site before sunrise, i.e., a transport during the night, the diurnal peak was anticipated and reached 25 ppb.

  3. Comparison of upwind and downwind operation of the NREL Phase VI Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larwood, S. M.; Chow, R.

    2016-09-01

    Wind tunnel data are presented comparing upwind versus downwind operation of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Phase VI wind turbine. Power was not reduced as expected with downwind operation, which may be attributed to inboard three-dimensional effects. Average flap bending loads were reduced with downwind coning and compared well with prediction. Blade fatigue loads were increased with downwind operation; however, fatigue was mitigated with an aerodynamic tower shroud (fairing). The shroud needs to remain aligned with the freestream, demonstrated by an increase in fatigue loads from a 10° error in shroud alignment. Pressure data were acquired of the tower wake at the rotor location with and without the shroud installed. The bare-tower wake data compared well with previously published work. The shroud wake data at 10° error in alignment showed velocity reduction and turbulence approaching the bare tower values. Downwind operation, with an aligning tower shroud, should be considered for future designs given the load benefits of downwind coning.

  4. Primary and secondary organic carbon downwind of Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Y. Yu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study particulate matter transport and transformation in the Megacity environment, fine particulate carbons were measured simultaneously at two supersites, suburban T1 and rural T2, downwind of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006. Organic carbon (OC, element carbon (EC, and total carbon (TC=OC+EC were determined in near real-time using a Sunset semi-continuous OC/EC field analyzer. The semi-empirical EC tracer method was used to derive primary organic carbon (POC and secondary organic carbon (SOC. Diurnal variations of primary and secondary carbons were observed at T1 and T2, which resulted from boundary layer inversion and impacted by local traffic patterns. The majority of organic carbon particles at T1 and T2 were secondary. The SOC% (SOC%=SOC/TC×100% at T1 ranged from 1.2–100% with an average of 80.7±14.4%. The SOC% at T2 ranged from 12.8–100% with an average of 80.1±14.0%. The average EC to PM2.5 percentage (ECPM%=EC/PM2.5×100% and OCPM% were 6.0% and 20.0% over the whole sampling time at T1. The POC to PM percentage (POCPM% and SOCPM% were 3.7% and 16.3%, respectively at the same site. The maximum ECPM% was 21.2%, and the maximum OCPM% was 57.2% at T1. The maximum POCPM% was 12.9%, and the maximum SOCPM% was 49.7% at the suburban site. Comparison of SOC and POC at T1 and T2 showed similar characteristics under favorable meteorological conditions, which indicated that transport between the two supersites took place. Strong correlations between EC and carbon monoxide (CO and odd nitrogen species (NO and NOx were observed at T1. This indicated that EC had nearby sources, such as local traffic emissions. The EC/CO ratio derived by linear regression analysis, when parameters in μg C/m3 and μg/m3, respectively, was 0.0045 at T1. Correlations were also seen

  5. Primary and secondary organic carbon downwind of Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-Y. Yu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to study particulate matter transport and transformation in the Megacity environment, fine particulate carbon was measured simultaneously at two supersites, suburban T1 and rural T2, downwind of Mexico City during the MILAGRO field campaign in March 2006. Organic carbon (OC, element carbon (EC, and total carbon (TC=OC+EC were determined in near real-time using a Sunset semi-continuous OCEC field analyzer. The semi-empirical EC tracer method was used to derive primary organic carbon (POC and secondary organic carbon (SOC. Diurnal variations of primary and secondary carbon were observed at T1 and T2, which resulted from boundary layer inversion and impacted by local traffic patterns. The majority of organic carbon particles at T1 and T2 were secondary. The SOCTC% (SOC%=SOC/TC×100% at T1 ranged from 0.5–93.8% with an average of 63.5±17.2%. The SOCTC% at T2 ranged from 9.3–98.1% with an average of 67.4±12.4%. The average EC to PM2.5 percentage (ECPM%=EC/PM2.5×100% and OCPM% were 6.0% and 20.0% over the whole sampling time at T1. The POC to PM percentage (POCPM% and SOCPM% were 3.7% and 16.3%, respectively at the same site. The maximum ECPM% was 21.2%, and the maximum OCPM% was 57.2% at T1. The maximum POCPM% was 12.9%, and the maximum SOCPM% was 49.7% at T1. Comparison of SOC and POC at T1 and T2 showed similar characteristics under favorable meteorological conditions, which indicated that transport from T1 towards T2 took place. Strong correlations between EC and carbon monoxide (CO and odd nitrogen species (NO and NOx were observed at T1. This indicated that EC had nearby sources, such as local traffic emissions. The EC/CO ratio derived by linear regression analysis, with units of μg C/m3 and μg/m3, respectively, was 0.004 at T1. Correlations were also seen between

  6. Numerical investigations on the aerodynamic performance of wind turbine: Downwind versus upwind configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hu; Wan, Decheng

    2015-03-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  7. Numerical Investigations on the Aerodynamic Performance of Wind Turbine:Downwind Versus Upwind Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhou; Decheng Wan

    2015-01-01

    Although the upwind configuration is more popular in the field of wind energy, the downwind one is a promising type for the offshore wind energy due to its special advantages. Different configurations have different aerodynamic performance and it is important to predict the performance of both downwind and upwind configurations accurately for designing and developing more reliable wind turbines. In this paper, a numerical investigation on the aerodynamic performance of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) phase VI wind turbine in downwind and upwind configurations is presented. The open source toolbox OpenFOAM coupled with arbitrary mesh interface (AMI) method is applied to tackle rotating problems of wind turbines. Two 3D numerical models of NREL phase VI wind turbine with downwind and upwind configurations under four typical working conditions of incoming wind velocities are set up for the study of different unsteady characteristics of the downwind and upwind configurations, respectively. Numerical results of wake vortex structure, time histories of thrust, pressure distribution on the blade and limiting streamlines which can be used to identify points of separation in a 3D flow are presented. It can be concluded that thrust reduction due to blade-tower interaction is small for upwind wind turbines but relatively large for downwind wind turbines and attention should be paid to the vibration at a certain frequency induced by the cyclic reduction for both configurations. The results and conclusions are helpful to analyze the different aerodynamic performance of wind turbines between downwind and upwind configurations, providing useful references for practical design of wind turbine.

  8. Step Sizes for Strong Stability Preservation with Downwind-Biased Operators

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2011-08-04

    Strong stability preserving (SSP) integrators for initial value ODEs preserve temporal monotonicity solution properties in arbitrary norms. All existing SSP methods, including implicit methods, either require small step sizes or achieve only first order accuracy. It is possible to achieve more relaxed step size restrictions in the discretization of hyperbolic PDEs through the use of both upwind- and downwind-biased semidiscretizations. We investigate bounds on the maximum SSP step size for methods that include negative coefficients and downwind-biased semi-discretizations. We prove that the downwind SSP coefficient for linear multistep methods of order greater than one is at most equal to two, while the downwind SSP coefficient for explicit Runge–Kutta methods is at most equal to the number of stages of the method. In contrast, the maximal downwind SSP coefficient for second order Runge–Kutta methods is shown to be unbounded. We present a class of such methods with arbitrarily large SSP coefficient and demonstrate that they achieve second order accuracy for large CFL number.

  9. Numerical and Experimental Results of a Passive Free Yawing Downwind Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    The background of this PhD study concerns a medium sized 3 bladed wind turbine in a free yawing and downwind configuration. Largely funded by an EU Marie-Curie IAPP grant, the project was jointly setup by the renewable energy consultant 3E, DTU Wind Energy and the TU Delft. The 3 bladed free yawing...... downwind concept is pursued in an attempt to increase the robustness of a wind turbine by eliminating the traditionally actively controlled, and sometimes failure prone yawing mechanism. Under certain conditions, such as for remote (off shore) and off grid applications, a decreased failure rate can...... increase the economical competitiveness significantly compared to more traditional power supplies. This work presents aeroelastic analysis and results of a wind tunnel test campaign for the 3 bladed free yawing downwind concept. The investigated topics concern free yawing stability and how it is affected...

  10. Environmental Factors Affecting Asthma and Allergies: Predicting and Simulating Downwind Exposure to Airborne Pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luvall, Jeffrey; Estes, Sue; Sprigg, William A.; Nickovic, Slobodan; Huete, Alfredo; Solano, Ramon; Ratana, Piyachat; Jiang, Zhangyan; Flowers, Len; Zelicoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the environmental factors that affect asthma and allergies and work to predict and simulate the downwind exposure to airborne pollen. Using a modification of Dust REgional Atmosphere Model (DREAM) that incorporates phenology (i.e. PREAM) the aim was to predict concentrations of pollen in time and space. The strategy for using the model to simulate downwind pollen dispersal, and evaluate the results. Using MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), to get seasonal sampling of Juniper, the pollen chosen for the study, land cover on a near daily basis. The results of the model are reviewed.

  11. Modeling of Ammonia Dry Deposition to a Pocosin Landscape Downwind of a Large Poultry Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    A semi-empirical bi-directional flux modeling approach is used to estimate NH3 air concentrations and dry deposition fluxes to a portion of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge (PLNWR) downwind of a large poultry facility. Meteorological patterns at PLNWR are such that som...

  12. Simulation of Low frequency Noise from a Downwind Wind Turbine Rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helge Aa.; Johansen, Jeppe; Sørensen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of a wind turbine with a downwind rotor is the generation of considerable low frequency noise (so-called thumping noise) which can cause annoyance of people at a considerable distance. This was experienced on a number of full-scale turbines in e.g. US and Sweden in the ...

  13. Ozone Tendency in Biomass Burning Plumes: Influence of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Emissions Downwind of Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, D.; Palmer, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    Forest fires emit pollutants that can influence downwind surface concentrations of ozone, with potential implications for exceeding air quality regulations. The influence of emissions from biogenic and anthropogenic sources that are mixed into a biomass burning plume as it travels downwind is not well understood. Using the GEOS-Chem atmospheric chemistry transport model and a novel method to track the centre of biomass burning plumes, we identify the chemical reactions that determine ozone production and loss along the plume trajectory. Using a series of sensitivity runs, we quantify the role of biogenic and anthropogenic emissions on the importance of individual chemical reactions. We illustrate the method using data collected during the BORTAS aircraft campaign over eastern Canada during summer 2011. We focus on two contrasting plume trajectories originating from the same multi-day fire in Ontario. The first plume trajectory on 16th July 2011 travels eastward from the fire and eventually mixes with anthropogenic emissions travelling up the east coast of the United States before outflow over the North Atlantic. The second plume trajectory we follow is three days later and travels eastward with a strong northeast component away from large anthropogenic sources. Both trajectories are influenced by downwind biogenic emissions. We generate a chemical reaction narrative for each plume trajectory, allowing is to quantify how mixing pyrogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic emissions influences downwind ozone photochemistry.

  14. Modeling of Ammonia Dry Deposition to a Pocosin Landscape Downwind of a Large Poultry Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    A semi-empirical bi-directional flux modeling approach is used to estimate NH3 air concentrations and dry deposition fluxes to a portion of the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge (PLNWR) downwind of a large poultry facility. Meteorological patterns at PLNWR are such that som...

  15. User`s Guide for the NREL Teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A D

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute, or SERI) teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP version 2.20). STRAP is a derivative of the Force and Loads Analysis program (FLAP). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for only two-bladed teetering hub wind turbines. The effects of delta-3, undersling, hub mass, and wind turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed teetering hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user`s guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  16. User's Guide for the NREL Teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP). [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.D.

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute, or SERI) teetering Rotor Analysis Program (STRAP version 2.20). STRAP is a derivative of the Force and Loads Analysis program (FLAP). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for only two-bladed teetering hub wind turbines. The effects of delta-3, undersling, hub mass, and wind turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed teetering hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user's guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  17. Numerical and Experimental Results of a Passive Free Yawing Downwind Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    by coning angle, blade sweep, and blade flexibility using both numerical and experimental methods. The wind tunnel tests were organized in the Open Jet Facility of the TU Delft, and the thesis discusses the experiment’s design, construction, operation, and gives an analysis of the results. It provides...... the PhD study is a parametric blade sweep investigation for the NREL 5MW turbine, and a detailed study on load extrapolation methods based on aeroelastic simulations. It is concluded that the 3 bladed, free yawing, and downwind wind turbine can operate in a stable manner. However, numerical studies...... downwind concept is pursued in an attempt to increase the robustness of a wind turbine by eliminating the traditionally actively controlled, and sometimes failure prone yawing mechanism. Under certain conditions, such as for remote (off shore) and off grid applications, a decreased failure rate can...

  18. Open access wind tunnel measurements of a downwind free yawing wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verelst, David Robert; Larsen, Torben J.; van Wingerden, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    A series of free yawing wind tunnel experiments was held in the Open Jet Facility (OJF) of the TU Delft. The ≈ 300 W turbine has three blades in a downwind configuration and is optionally free to yaw. Different 1.6m diameter rotor configurations are tested such as blade flexibility and sweep....... This paper gives a brief overview of the measurement setup and challenges, and continues with presenting some key results. This wind tunnel campaign has shown that a three bladed downwind wind turbine can operate in a stable fashion under a minimal yaw error. Finally, a description of how to obtain this open...... access dataset, including the post-processing scripts and procedures, is made available via a publicly accessible website....

  19. Integrated Design of Downwind Land-Based Wind Turbines using Analytic Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ning, Andrew; Petch, Derek

    2016-12-01

    Wind turbines are complex systems where component-level changes can have significant system-level effects. Effective wind turbine optimization generally requires an integrated analysis approach with a large number of design variables. Optimizing across large variable sets is orders of magnitude more efficient with gradient-based methods as compared with gradient-free method, particularly when using exact gradients. We have developed a wind turbine analysis set of over 100 components where 90% of the models provide numerically exact gradients through symbolic differentiation, automatic differentiation, and adjoint methods. This framework is applied to a specific design study focused on downwind land-based wind turbines. Downwind machines are of potential interest for large wind turbines where the blades are often constrained by the stiffness required to prevent a tower strike. The mass of these rotor blades may be reduced by utilizing a downwind configuration where the constraints on tower strike are less restrictive. The large turbines of this study range in power rating from 5-7MW and in diameter from 105m to 175m. The changes in blade mass and power production have important effects on the rest of the system, and thus the nacelle and tower systems are also optimized. For high-speed wind sites, downwind configurations do not appear advantageous. The decrease in blade mass (10%) is offset by increases in tower mass caused by the bending moment from the rotor-nacelle-assembly. For low-wind speed sites, the decrease in blade mass is more significant (25-30%) and shows potential for modest decreases in overall cost of energy (around 1-2%).

  20. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a twisted airfoil shaped two-bladed H-Darrieus rotor made from fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajat Gupta, Sukanta Roy, Agnimitra Biswas

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available H-Darrieus rotor is a lift type device having two to three blades designed as airfoils. The blades are attached vertically to the central shaft through support arms. The support to vertical axis helps the rotor maintain its shape. In this paper, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD analysis of an airfoil shaped two-bladed H-Darrieus rotor using Fluent 6.2 software was performed. Based on the CFD results, a comparative study between experimental and computational works was carried out. The H-Darrieus rotor was 20cm in height, 5cm in chord and twisted with an angle of 30° at the trailing end. The blade material of rotor was Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic (FRP. The experiments were earlier conducted in a subsonic wind tunnel for various height-to-diameter (H/D ratios. A two dimensional computational modeling was done with the help of Gambit tool using unstructured grid. Realistic boundary conditions were provided for the model to have synchronization with the experimental conditions. Two dimensional steady-state segregated solver with absolute velocity formulation and cell based grid was considered, and a standard k-epsilon viscous model with standard wall functions was chosen. A first order upwind discretization scheme was adopted for pressure velocity coupling of the flow. The inlet velocities and rotor rotational speeds were taken from the experimental results. From the computational analysis, power coefficient (Cp and torque coefficient (Ct values at ten different H/D ratios namely 0.85, 1.0, 1.10, 1.33, 1.54, 1.72, 1.80, 1.92, 2.10 and 2.20 were calculated in order to predict the performances of the twisted H-rotor. The variations of Cp and Ct with tip speed ratios were analyzed and compared with the experimental results. The standard deviations of computational Cp and Ct from experimental Cp and Ct were obtained. From the computational analysis, the highest values of Cp and Ct were obtained at H/D ratios of 1.0 and 1.54 respectively. The

  1. Field investigation of a wake structure downwind of a VAWT in a windfarm array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.T.; Buck, J.W.; Germain, A.C.; Hinchee, M.E.; Solt, T.S.; LeRoy, G.M.; Srnsky, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    The effects of upwind turbine wakes on the performance of a FloWind 17-m VAWT were investigated through a series of field experiments conducted at the FloWind windfarm on Cameron Ridge, Tehachapi, California. The field experiment was conducted within a VAWT array consisting of more than nine VAWTs with separations 3D crosswised by 8D downwind (where D is the turbine diameter) in a staggered configuration. The array is the upwind three rows of VAWTS in a total of six rows that are on top of the Cameron Ridge plateau. The terrain features in the vicinity are reasonably regular, with an upslope of 7 deg on the average; however, several local irregularities are present. The annual hourly averaged wind speed exceeds 8 m/s at the site. The wind field and the power-outputs of nine turbines within the array were measured with wind sensors and power transducers. Nine Gill propeller and 18 Maximum cup anemometers and one direction sensor were mounted on portable and stack-up towers installed upwind and within the turbine array. From the field measurements, the velocity and power/energy deficits were derived under various turbine on/off configurations. Much information was provided to characterize the structure of VAWT wakes and to assess their effects on the performance of downwind turbines. Recommendations are made for optimizing windfarm design and operations as well as for wind energy management.

  2. Using Atmosphere-Forest Measurements To Examine The Potential For Reduced Downwind Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viner, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-13

    A 2-D dispersion model was developed to address how airborne plumes interact with the forest at Savannah River Site. Parameters describing turbulence and mixing of the atmosphere within and just above the forest were estimated using measurements of water vapor or carbon dioxide concentration made at the Aiken AmeriFlux tower for a range of stability and seasonal conditions. Stability periods when the greatest amount of mixing of an airborne plume into the forest were found for 1) very unstable environments, when atmospheric turbulence is usually at a maximum, and 2) very stable environments, when the plume concentration at the forest top is at a maximum and small amounts of turbulent mixing can move a substantial portion of the plume into the forest. Plume interactions with the forest during stable periods are of particular importance because these conditions are usually considered the worst-case scenario for downwind effects from a plume. The pattern of plume mixing into the forest was similar during the year except during summer when the amount of plume mixed into the forest was nearly negligible for all but stable periods. If the model results indicating increased deposition into the forest during stable conditions can be confirmed, it would allow for a reduction in the limitations that restrict facility operations while maintaining conservative estimates for downwind effects. Continuing work is planned to confirm these results as well as estimate specific deposition velocity values for use in toolbox models used in regulatory roles.

  3. Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a SingleDownwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayesian Estimation of Fugitive Methane Point Source Emission Rates from a Single Downwind High-Frequency Gas Sensor With the tremendous advances in onshore oil and gas exploration and production (E&P) capability comes the realization that new tools are needed to support env...

  4. Health Effects of Subchronic Inhalation of Simulated Downwind Coal Combustion Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mauderly

    2009-01-07

    The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive laboratory-based evaluation of selected respiratory and cardiac health hazards of subchronic (up to 6 months) inhalation of simulated key components of 'downwind plume' emissions of coal combustion. This project was performed as an integral part of a joint government-industry program termed the 'National Environmental Respiratory Center' (NERC), which is aimed at disentangling the roles of different physical-chemical air pollutants and their sources in the health effects associated statistically with air pollution. The characterization of the exposure atmosphere and the health assays were identical to those employed in the NERC protocols used to evaluate other pollution source emissions, such as diesel, gasoline, and wood combustion. The project had two phases, each encompassing multiple tasks. Guidelines for the composition of the exposure atmosphere were set by consensus of an expert workshop. Development of the capability to generate the exposure atmosphere and pilot studies of the comparative exposure composition using two coal types were accomplished in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the toxicological study was conducted using Powder River Basin Sub-bituminous coal. NETL provided 50% support for the work in Phase 1 and had intended to provide 20% support for the work in Phase 2. Phase 1 is completed and Phase 2 is in the final stages. All animal exposures were completed without incident, and the composition of the exposure atmospheres met the targets. All of the health sample collections are completed, but some samples remain to be analyzed. Data summaries and final statistical analysis of results remain to be completed. The goal is to submit all publications before the end of FY-08. Repeated exposure to simulated downwind coal emissions caused some significant health effects, but the number of effects tended to be fewer than those caused by the other NERC exposures (diesel and gasoline

  5. Regional-scale modeling of secondary organic aerosol formation downwind from the DWH oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadov, R.; McKeen, S. A.; Bahreini, R.; Brioude, J.; de Gouw, J. A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, D. M.; Pollack, I. B.; Robinson, A. L.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Warneke, C.

    2010-12-01

    In response to the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, the NOAA P3 aircraft performed two flights over the Gulf of Mexico during 8th and 10th of June 2010 with multiple flight legs around the DWH site to quantify the atmospheric impact of the oil spill. The measurements detected high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and organic aerosols (OA) downwind of the spill site. Spatial characteristics of the observed OA distribution indicated a moderate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation in narrow plumes coincident with high concentrations of aromatic VOCs, and also a much broader and larger SOA plume somewhat removed from the spill site. These patterns can qualitatively be explained by a dependence of VOC species volatility on the distance to the DWH spill site, and SOA yield differences associated with lower volatility (C12-C20 alkanes) versus higher volatility VOC (C7-C11 alkanes and aromatics) that comprise the bulk of the spilled oil reaching the surface. In order to test this SOA formation hypothesis the WRF-CHEM model has been applied to the Gulf of Mexico for the period of P3 aircraft operations. Modifications to the original WRF-Chem formulation include the addition of hexadecane (n-C16) within the gas-phase mechanism, and a new volatility basis set approach to simulate SOA formation using the most recent SOA yields from available literature. Emissions of NOx and C6-C11 VOC species are constrained from the P3 aircraft observations. The model has been run with different horizontal resolutions, and different emission scenarios for C12-C20 VOCs that were inferred from the composition of oil collected near the DWH. Model results for SOA and total PM2.5 aerosol are compared with the observations collected aboard the P3 aircraft, and coastal PM2.5 monitors positioned downwind of the DWH spill site, in order to test the veracity of the model formulation and help constrain the conceptual model of SOA formation from

  6. Ammonia emissions, transport, and deposition downwind of agricultural areas at local to regional scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zondlo, Mark; Pan, Da; Golston, Levi; Sun, Kang; Tao, Lei

    2016-04-01

    Ammonia (NH3) emissions from agricultural areas show extreme spatiotemporal variations, yet agricultural emissions dominate the global NH3 budget and ammoniated aerosols are a dominant component of unhealthy fine particulate matter. The emissions of NH3 and their deposition near and downwind of agricultural areas is complex. As part of a multi-year field intensive along the Colorado Front Range (including the NASA DISCOVER-AQ and NSF FRAPPE field experiments), we have examined temporal emissions of NH3 from feedlots, regional transport of ammonia and ammoniated aerosols from the plains to relatively pristine regions in Rocky Mountain National Park, and dry deposition and re-emission of grassland NH3 in the park. Eddy covariance measurements at feedlots and natural grasslands in the mountains were conducted with newly-developed open-path, eddy covariance laser-based sensors for NH3 (0.7 ng NH3/m2/s detection limit at 10 Hz). These measurements were coupled with other NH3/NHx measurements from mobile laboratories, aircraft, and satellite to examine the transport of NH3 from agricultural areas to cleaner regions downwind. At the farm level, eddy covariance NH3 fluxes showed a strong diurnal component correlated with temperature regardless of the season but with higher absolute emissions in summer than winter. While farm-to-farm variability (N=62 feedlots) was high, similar diurnal trends were observed at all sites regardless of individual farm type (dairy, beef, sheep, poultry, pig). Deposition at scales of several km showed relatively small deposition (10% loss) based upon NH3/CH4 tracer correlations, though the NH3 concentrations were so elevated (up to ppmv) that these losses should not be neglected when considering near-farm deposition. Ammonia was efficiently transported at least 150 km during upslope events to the Colorado Front Range (ele. 3000-4000 m) based upon aircraft, mobile laboratory, and model measurements. The gas phase lifetime of NH3 was estimated to

  7. The effect of photochemical dissociation on downwind chlorine dioxide plume concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalowicz, R.; Alp, E. [Bovar Environmental, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The pulp and paper industry handles toxic gases which may present an inherent hazard to the safety of the general public in the surrounding area. One such toxic gas that may pose a hazard is chlorine dioxide. Spills of chlorine dioxide solution result in the gassing off of toxic clouds of chlorine dioxide. Under daytime dry conditions, chlorine dioxide decomposes photolytically to form chlorine and oxygen and intermediates, chlorine trioxide and chlorine hexoxide. Air dispersion modeling of chlorine dioxide releases which does not properly account for its photochemical decomposition will lead to overly conservative hazard zone estimates. Under these conditions, risk control measures and emergency response evacuation zones based on such estimates will be unnecessarily expensive, perhaps prohibitive. This paper investigates the photolytic rate of dissociation of chlorine dioxide under various atmospheric conditions. It was found that modeling based on the decomposition of chlorine dioxide gas, resulted in downwind distances to TLV-Short Term Exposure Limits which are considerably shorter than modeling based on chlorine dioxide dispersion with no decomposition.

  8. Evaluation of air pollution phytotoxicity downwind of a phosphate fertilizer factory in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, J

    2005-01-01

    The effects of air pollution on plants downwind of a fertilizer factory at Udaipur, India, were studied using three woody perennials. Seedlings of these species including a shrub (Carissa carandas L.), a leguminous avenue tree (Cassia fistula L.) and a fruit tree (Psidium guajava L.) were grown in earthen pots at different study sites receiving varying levels of air pollution input. Changes in plant growth, morphological characteristics, photosynthetic pigment, ascorbic acid, N and S contents and in dry matter allocation were considered in relation to the status of ambient air quality. Observations with these parameters have indicated that the ambient air around the factory contained pollutants at phytotoxic levels. Plant height, basal diameter, conopy area, leaf area and chlorophyll, ascorbic acid and foliar-N concentrations decreased with increasing pollution load. However, foliar-S increased slightly at polluted sites. Air pollution load around the factory have also altered the biomass allocation. Root:shoot ratios increased in C. fistula and P. guajava at polluted sites. In contrast, for C. carandas the above ground parts, where foliage assumed predominance showed precedence over the root growth. This species responded characteristically to air pollution stress by allocating more of its photosynthate towards leaf production and shoot growth.

  9. Pu isotopes in soils collected downwind from Lop Nor: regional fallout vs. global fallout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wenting; Ni, Youyi; Guo, Qiuju; Zheng, Jian; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-07-01

    For the first time, soil core samples from the Jiuquan region have been analyzed for Pu isotopes for radioactive source identification and radiological assessment. The Jiuquan region is in downwind from the Lop Nor Chinese nuclear test (CNT) site. The high Pu inventories (13 to 546 Bq/m2) in most of the sampling locations revealed that this region was heterogeneously contaminated by the regional fallout Pu from the CNTs. The contributions of the CNTs to the total Pu in soils were estimated to be more than 40% in most cases. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios in the soils ranged from 0.059 to 0.186 with an inventory-weighted average of 0.158, slightly lower than that of global fallout. This atom ratio could be considered as a mixed fingerprint of Pu from the CNTs. In addition, Pu in soils of Jiuquan region had a faster downward migration rate compared with other investigated places in China.

  10. Comparison of aerosol volume size distributions between column and surface measurements downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. S.; Choi, Y.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    The aerosol volume size distribution is one of the most important parameters in retrieving aerosol optical properties and studying radiative forcing. The column-integrated aerosol volume size distribution for AERONET was obtained from inversion product level 1.5 (22 bins between 0.1 and 30 μm in diameter) from the measurements of CIMEL sunphotometer (CE-318); that for SKYNET was obtained using skyrad.pack V5 (20 bins, 0.02-33 μm) from the measurements of PREDE skyradiometer (POM-02). The aerosol volume size distribution at the surface was measured using a wide range aerosol spectrometer system consisting of a scanning mobility particle scanner (Grimm, Model 5.419; 89 bins, 0.005-0.35 μm) and an optical particle counter (Grimm, Model 1.109; 31 bins, 0.27-34 μm). The measurement was conducted in Yongin, downwind of Seoul, Korea, from April 30 to June 27, 2015. The measurement site is located on the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill (37.34°N, 127.27°E, 167 m above sea level) in the global campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies. To investigate the discrepancy in effective diameter and fine mode volume fraction, we compared the volume size distributions when the measurement time coincided within 5 minutes because the measurement intervals were different between instruments.

  11. Pu isotopes in soils collected downwind from Lop Nor: regional fallout vs. global fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Wenting; Ni, Youyi; Guo, Qiuju; Zheng, Jian; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-07-17

    For the first time, soil core samples from the Jiuquan region have been analyzed for Pu isotopes for radioactive source identification and radiological assessment. The Jiuquan region is in downwind from the Lop Nor Chinese nuclear test (CNT) site. The high Pu inventories (13 to 546 Bq/m(2)) in most of the sampling locations revealed that this region was heterogeneously contaminated by the regional fallout Pu from the CNTs. The contributions of the CNTs to the total Pu in soils were estimated to be more than 40% in most cases. The (240)Pu/(239)Pu atom ratios in the soils ranged from 0.059 to 0.186 with an inventory-weighted average of 0.158, slightly lower than that of global fallout. This atom ratio could be considered as a mixed fingerprint of Pu from the CNTs. In addition, Pu in soils of Jiuquan region had a faster downward migration rate compared with other investigated places in China.

  12. Cross-hemispheric transport of central African biomass burning pollutants: implications for downwind ozone production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pollutant plumes with enhanced concentrations of trace gases and aerosols were observed over the southern coast of West Africa during August 2006 as part of the AMMA wet season field campaign. Plumes were observed both in the mid and upper troposphere. In this study we examined the origin of these pollutant plumes, and their potential to photochemically produce ozone (O3 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Their possible contribution to the Atlantic O3 maximum is also discussed. Runs using the BOLAM mesoscale model including biomass burning carbon monoxide (CO tracers were used to confirm an origin from central African biomass burning fires. The plumes measured in the mid troposphere (MT had significantly higher pollutant concentrations over West Africa compared to the upper tropospheric (UT plume. The mesoscale model reproduces these differences and the two different pathways for the plumes at different altitudes: transport to the north-east of the fire region, moist convective uplift and transport to West Africa for the upper tropospheric plume versus north-west transport over the Gulf of Guinea for the mid-tropospheric plume. Lower concentrations in the upper troposphere are mainly due to enhanced mixing during upward transport. Model simulations suggest that MT and UT plumes are 16 and 14 days old respectively when measured over West Africa. The ratio of tracer concentrations at 600 hPa and 250 hPa was estimated for 14–15 August in the region of the observed plumes and compares well with the same ratio derived from observed carbon dioxide (CO2 enhancements in both plumes. It is estimated that, for the period 1–15 August, the ratio of Biomass Burning (BB tracer concentration transported in the UT to the ones transported in the MT is 0.6 over West Africa and the equatorial South Atlantic.

    Runs using a photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, initialized with the observations, were used to estimate

  13. Cross-hemispheric transport of central African biomass burning pollutants: implications for downwind ozone production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Real, E.; Orlandi, E.; Law, K. S.; Fierli, F.; Josset, D.; Cairo, F.; Schlager, H.; Borrmann, S.; Kunkel, D.; Volk, C. M.; McQuaid, J. B.; Stewart, D. J.; Lee, J.; Lewis, A. C.; Hopkins, J. R.; Ravegnani, F.; Ulanovski, A.; Liousse, C.

    2010-03-01

    Pollutant plumes with enhanced concentrations of trace gases and aerosols were observed over the southern coast of West Africa during August 2006 as part of the AMMA wet season field campaign. Plumes were observed both in the mid and upper troposphere. In this study we examined the origin of these pollutant plumes, and their potential to photochemically produce ozone (O3) downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Their possible contribution to the Atlantic O3 maximum is also discussed. Runs using the BOLAM mesoscale model including biomass burning carbon monoxide (CO) tracers were used to confirm an origin from central African biomass burning fires. The plumes measured in the mid troposphere (MT) had significantly higher pollutant concentrations over West Africa compared to the upper tropospheric (UT) plume. The mesoscale model reproduces these differences and the two different pathways for the plumes at different altitudes: transport to the north-east of the fire region, moist convective uplift and transport to West Africa for the upper tropospheric plume versus north-west transport over the Gulf of Guinea for the mid-tropospheric plume. Lower concentrations in the upper troposphere are mainly due to enhanced mixing during upward transport. Model simulations suggest that MT and UT plumes are 16 and 14 days old respectively when measured over West Africa. The ratio of tracer concentrations at 600 hPa and 250 hPa was estimated for 14-15 August in the region of the observed plumes and compares well with the same ratio derived from observed carbon dioxide (CO2) enhancements in both plumes. It is estimated that, for the period 1-15 August, the ratio of Biomass Burning (BB) tracer concentration transported in the UT to the ones transported in the MT is 0.6 over West Africa and the equatorial South Atlantic. Runs using a photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, initialized with the observations, were used to estimate in-situ net photochemical O3 production rates in these plumes

  14. The Influence of Pyrogenic, Biogenic and Anthropogenic Emissions on Ozone Production Downwind from Boreal Forest Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Douglas; Palmer, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forest fires emit pollutants that can have a strong influence on downwind surface ozone concentrations, with potential implications for exceeding air quality regulations. The influence of the mixing of pyrogenic, biogenic and anthropogenic emissions on ozone is not well understood. Using the nested 0.5° latitude x 0.667° longitude GEOS-Chem chemical transport model we track biomass burning plumes in North America. We identify the changes in key chemical reactions within these plumes as well as the sensitivity of ozone to the different emission sources. We illustrate the importance of this method using a case study of a multi-day forest fire during the BORTAS aircraft campaign over eastern Canada during summer 2011. We focus on emissions from the fire on the 17th of July and follow the plume for eight days. After the initial 24 hours of pyrogenic emissions the main source of VOCs is biogenic with increasing emissions from anthropogenic sources including outflow from Quebec City and Newfoundland. Using a Lagrangian framework, we show that the ozone production efficiency (OPE) of this plume decreases steadily as it moves away from the fire but increases rapidly as the plume reaches the east coast of Canada. Using a Eulerian framework we show that ozone mixing ratios of a east coast receptor region increase by approximately 15% even though the ozone tendency of the regional air mass is negative, which we find is due to the arrival of ozone precursors in the plume. We also consider the contribution of anthropogenic outflow over Nova Scotia that originates from the eastern seaboard of the United States to the local chemistry. Using these sensitivity model runs we generate a chemical reaction narrative for the plume trajectory that helps to understand the attribution of observed ozone variations.

  15. Cross-hemispheric transport of central African biomass burning pollutants: implications for downwind ozone production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Real

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Pollutant plumes with enhanced levels of trace gases and aerosols were observed over the southern coast of West Africa during August 2006 as part of the AMMA wet season field campaign. Plumes were observed both in the mid and upper troposphere. In this study we examined both the origin of these pollutant plumes and their potential to produce O3 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Runs using the BOLAM mesoscale model including biomass burning CO tracers were used to confirm an origin from central African fires. The plumes in the mid troposphere had significantly higher pollutant concentrations due to the fact that transport occurred from a region nearer or even over the fire region. In contrast, plumes transported into the upper troposphere over West Africa had been transported to the north-east of the fire region before being uplifted. Modelled tracer results showed that pollutants resided for between 9 and 12 days over Central Africa before being transported for 4 days, in the case of the mid-troposphere plume and 2 days in the case of the upper tropospheric plume to the measurement location over the southern part of West Africa. Around 35% of the biomass burning tracer was transported into the upper troposphere compared to that remaining in the mid troposphere. Runs using a photochemical trajectory model, CiTTyCAT, were used to estimate the net photochemical O3 production potential of these plumes. The mid tropospheric plume was still very photochemically active (up to 7 ppbv/day especially during the first few days of transport westward over the Atlantic Ocean. The upper tropospheric plume was also still photochemically active, although at a slower rate (1–2 ppbv/day. Trajectories show this plume being recirculated around an upper tropospheric anticyclone back towards the African continent (around 20° S. The potential of theses plumes to produce O3 supports the hypothesis that biomass burning pollutants are

  16. Detection of Legionella spp. by a nested-PCR assay in air samples of a wastewater treatment plant and downwind distances in Isfahan

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    Seyyed Abbas Mirzaee

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The result of this study revealed the presence of Legionella spp. in air samples of a WWTP and downwind distance, which consequently represent a potential health risk to the exposed individuals.

  17. Ozone concentrations at a selected high-elevation forest site downwind Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-JArdon, R.

    2013-05-01

    Torres-Jardón, R.*, Rosas-Pérez, I., Granada-Macías, L. M., Ruiz-Suárez, L. G. Centro de Ciencias de la Atmósfera, UNAM, México D. F. México * rtorres@unam.mx For many years, the vegetation of forest species such as Abies religiosa in natural parks located in the southwest mountains of Mexico City has attracted much attention since these parks have been experiencing a severe decline of unclear etiology. The high ozone levels in the area and the observed naked eye macroscopic, histological and cytological injuries on these species, strongly suggest an important contribution of tropospheric ozone to this deterioration process. Apart of historical short monitoring campaigns for measuring ozone levels in these mountains, it is known just a little is known about the present exposure levels at which the local vegetation is exposed. A continuous ozone analyzer has been in operation since 2011 at a high-elevation forest site (Parque Nacional Miguel Hidalgo, PNMH; 3110 m above mean sea level) located downwind of Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA), in order to characterize the local ozone diel amplitude and its seasonal trend, as well as the influence of MCMA on the local O3 concentrations. Hourly average ozone data in PNMH shows that in general, the diel of ozone concentrations in the forest site has a statistical significant correlation with the pattern of ozone levels observed in several monitoring sites (smog receptor sites) within the MCMA, although the high elevation O3 levels are relatively lower than those in the urban area (around 2200 m above mean sea level). It is possible that a part of the oxidants in the air masses are removed by sink deposition processes during the air mass transport across the hills. The diel amplitude of ozone concentrations is small in the cold season, increasing as the seasons advance to June. As in the city, the highest ozone concentrations occur in April or May and the lowest levels during the rainy season, which extends from

  18. Secondary Organic Aerosol Produced from Non-Measured Hydrocarbons Downwind from the Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouw, J. A.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Warneke, C.; Ahmadov, R.; Atlas, E. L.; Bahreini, R.; Blake, D. R.; Brock, C. A.; Brioude, J.; Fahey, D. W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Gao, R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lueb, R.; McKeen, S. A.; Meagher, J. F.; Murphy, D. M.; Parrish, D. D.; Perring, A. E.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Robinson, A. L.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Srinivasan, A.; Watts, L.

    2010-12-01

    An extensively instrumented NOAA WP-3D research aircraft made airborne measurements of the gaseous and aerosol composition of air over the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill that occurred in April-July of 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico. A narrow plume of hydrocarbons was observed downwind from DWH that is attributed to the evaporation of fresh oil on the sea surface. A much wider plume of organic aerosol (OA) was attributed to secondary (SOA) formation from unmeasured, less volatile hydrocarbons that were emitted from a wider area around DWH. These observations provide compelling evidence for the importance of SOA formation from less volatile hydrocarbons, which has been proposed as a significant source of OA in the atmosphere.

  19. An experimental study on self-output-control characteristics of micro downwind rotor with coning soft blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EGUCHI; Hidenori; YOSHIDA; Kouichi; NISHI; Michihiro

    2010-01-01

    In this short paper,we have treated the aerodynamic performance of micro downwind rotor with coning soft blades experimentally.The test wind rotor has the tip diameter of 1.5 m and three two-dimensional NACA0018 blades of 0.15 m chord whose material is light,soft and pliable foam plastic for perfect safety.From the wind tunnel test,it is realized that the performance is manageable by the coning angle of the rotor blade.In the present case,an improvement of the performance in lower wind speeds is achieved by using the coning blade of 20°.Besides,owing to the torsional deformation of very soft blade,the self-power control characteristic is observed in every test rotor regardless of coning angle in the range of 0°-20° under the wind speed less than 12 m/s.

  20. Day-of-week Effects in Ozone, Nitrogen Oxides, and VOC Reactivity Within and Downwind of Sacramento

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, J. G.; Day, D. A.; Cleary, P. A.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Millet, D. B.; Goldstein, A. H.; Cohen, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    Day-of-week patterns in human activities can be used to examine the ways in which differences in primary emissions result in changes in the rates of photochemical reactions, and the production of secondary pollutants. Data from twelve California Air Resources Board monitoring sites in Sacramento, CA, and the downwind Mountain Counties air basin are analyzed to reveal day of week patterns in ozone and its precursors in the summers of 1998-2002. On the weekends, NOx concentrations drop by 35%, whereas VOC reactivity changes by less than 15%, likely due to significant reductions in diesel truck traffic. The main driver for day-of- week differences in ozone abundance at urban sites is the reduced titration of O3 by fresh NO emissions on weekends. By analyzing day-of-week patterns in odd oxygen (O3+NO2), we can eliminate this complication and focus on the NOx-dependence of ozone production and the related photochemistry. In the downwind Mountain Counties, ozone production is found to be NOx-limited, whereas at the urban and suburban sites of Sacramento, ozone production is NOx-saturated. An analysis of day-of-week cycles in Sacramento reveals that boundary layer chemistry and mixing in of residual air from above both contribute to the observed accumulation of ozone at surface sites. This interpretation is consistent with the day-of-week patterns in a range of VOC with different emission sources and lifetimes and in higher nitrogen oxides that are co-products of ozone. We use isoprene as a probe of local oxidation rates, and infer that on the weekend OH is higher in the urban area and lower at one of the forested Mountain Counties sites, as expected from the NOx- dependence. Our analysis also demonstrates that in NOx-saturated environments, gas phase HNO3, and by extension particulate nitrate, concentrations are relatively insensitive to changes in NOx emissions.

  1. Extensive closed cell marine stratocumulus downwind of Europe—A large aerosol cloud mediated radiative effect or forcing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Tom; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds (MSC) cover large areas over the oceans and possess super sensitivity of their cloud radiative effect to changes in aerosol concentrations. Aerosols can cause transitions between regimes of fully cloudy closed cells and open cells. The possible role of aerosols in cloud cover has a big impact on the amount of reflected solar radiation from the clouds, thus potentially constitutes very large aerosol indirect radiative effect, which can exceed 100 Wm-2. It is hypothesized that continentally polluted clouds remain in closed cells regime for longer time from leaving continent and hence for longer distance away from land, thus occupying larger ocean areas with full cloud cover. Attributing this to anthropogenic aerosols would imply a very large negative radiative forcing with a significant climate impact. This possibility is confirmed by analyzing a detailed case study based on geostationary and polar-orbiting satellite observations of the microphysical and dynamical evolution of MSC. We show that large area of closed cells was formed over the northeast Atlantic Ocean downwind of Europe in a continentally polluted air mass. The closed cells undergo cleansing process that was tracked for 3.5 days that resulted with a rapid transition from closed to open cells once the clouds started drizzling heavily. The mechanism leading to the eventual breakup of the clouds due to both meteorological and aerosol considerations is elucidated. We termed this cleansing and cloud breakup process maritimization. Further study is needed to assess the climatological significance of such situations.

  2. Modeling ozone plumes observed downwind of New York City over the North Atlantic Ocean during the ICARTT field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-H. Lee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport and chemical transformation of well-defined New York City (NYC urban plumes over the North Atlantic Ocean were studied using aircraft measurements collected on 20–21 July 2004 during the ICARTT (International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation field campaign and WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry model simulations. The strong NYC urban plumes were characterized by carbon monoxide (CO mixing ratios of 350–400 parts per billion by volume (ppbv and ozone (O3 levels of about 100 ppbv near New York City on 20 July in the WP-3D in-situ and DC-3 lidar aircraft measurements. On 21 July, the two aircraft captured strong urban plumes with about 350 ppbv CO and over 150 ppbv O3 (~160 ppbv maximum about 600 km downwind of NYC over the North Atlantic Ocean. The measured urban plumes extended vertically up to about 2 km near New York City, but shrank to 1–1.5 km over the stable marine boundary layer (MBL over the North Atlantic Ocean. The WRF-Chem model reproduced ozone formation processes, chemical characteristics, and meteorology of the measured urban plumes near New York City (20 July and in the far downwind region over the North Atlantic Ocean (21 July. The quasi-Lagrangian analysis of transport and chemical transformation of the simulated NYC urban plumes using WRF-Chem results showed that the pollutants can be efficiently transported in (isentropic layers in the lower atmosphere (<2–3 km over the North Atlantic Ocean while maintaining a dynamic vertical decoupling by cessation of turbulence in the stable MBL. The O3 mixing ratio in the NYC urban plumes remained at 80–90 ppbv during nocturnal transport over the stable MBL, then grew to over 100 ppbv by daytime oxidation of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 with mixing ratios on the order of 1 ppbv. Efficient transport of reactive nitrogen species (NOy, specifically nitric

  3. Modeling ozone plumes observed downwind of New York City over the North Atlantic Ocean during the ICARTT field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-H. Lee

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Transport and chemical transformation of well-defined New York City (NYC urban plumes over the North Atlantic Ocean were studied using aircraft measurements collected on 20–21 July 2004 during the ICARTT (International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation field campaign and WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting-Chemistry model simulations. The strong NYC urban plumes were characterized by carbon monoxide (CO mixing ratios of 350–400 parts per billion by volume (ppbv and ozone (O3 levels of about 100 ppbv near New York City on 20 July in the WP-3D in-situ and DC-3 lidar aircraft measurements. On 21 July, the two aircraft captured strong urban plumes with about 350 ppbv CO and over 150 ppbv O3 (~160 ppbv maximum about 600 km downwind of NYC over the North Atlantic Ocean. The measured urban plumes extended vertically up to about 2 km near New York City, but shrank to 1–1.5 km over the stable marine boundary layer (MBL over the North Atlantic Ocean. The WRF-Chem model reproduced ozone formation processes, chemical characteristics, and meteorology of the measured urban plumes near New York City (20 July and in the far downwind region over the North Atlantic Ocean (21 July. The quasi-Lagrangian analysis of transport and chemical transformation of the simulated NYC urban plumes using WRF-Chem results showed that the pollutants can be efficiently transported in (isentropic layers in the lower atmosphere (<2–3 km over the North Atlantic Ocean while maintaining a dynamic vertical decoupling by cessation of turbulence in the stable MBL. The O3 mixing ratio in the NYC urban plumes remained at 80–90 ppbv during nocturnal transport over the stable MBL, then grew to over 100 ppbv by daytime oxidation of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 with mixing ratios on the order of 1 ppbv. Efficient transport of reactive nitrogen species (NOy, specifically nitric

  4. Detection of Airborne Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Inside and Downwind of a Swine Building, and in Animal Feed: Potential Occupational, Animal Health, and Environmental Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Dwight D; Smith, Tara C; Hanson, Blake M; Wardyn, Shylo E; Donham, Kelley J

    2016-01-01

    Aerosolized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was sampled inside and downwind of a swine facility. Animal feed was sampled before and after entry into the swine facility. Aerosolized particles were detected using an optical particle counter for real-time measurement and with an Andersen sampler to detect viable MRSA. Molecular typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on samples collected. Viable MRSA organisms isolated inside the swine facility were primarily associated with particles >5 µm, and those isolated downwind from the swine facility were associated with particles airborne MRSA organisms. Air samples collected after power washing with a biocide inside the swine facility resulted in no viable MRSA organisms detected. This pilot study showed that the ecology of MRSA is complex. Additional studies are warranted on the maximum distance that viable MRSA can be emitted outside the facility, and the possibility that animal feed may be a source of contamination.

  5. Interannual variation of springtime biomass burning in Indochina: Regional differences, associated atmospheric dynamical changes, and downwind impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wan-Ru; Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Lin, Neng-Huei; Promchote, Parichart

    2016-09-01

    During March and April, widespread burning occurs across farmlands in Indochina in preparation for planting at the monsoon onset. The resultant aerosols impact the air quality downwind. In this study, we investigate the climatic aspect of the interannual variation of springtime biomass burning in Indochina and its correlation with air quality at Mt. Lulin in Taiwan using long-term (2005-2015) satellite and global reanalysis data. Based on empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, we find that the biomass burning activities vary with two geographical regions: northern Indochina (the primary EOF mode) and southern Indochina (the secondary EOF mode). We determine that the variation of biomass burning over northern Indochina is significantly related with the change in aerosol concentrations at Mt. Lulin. This occurs following the change in the so-called India-Burma Trough in the lower and middle troposphere. When the India-Burma Trough is intensified, a stronger northwesterly wind (to the west of the trough) transports the dryer air from higher latitude into northern Indochina, and this promotes local biomass burning activities. The increase in upward motion to the east of the intensified India-Burma Trough lifts the aerosols, which are transported toward Taiwan by the increased low-level westerly jet. Further diagnoses revealed the connection between the India-Burma Trough and the South Asian jet's wave train pattern as well as the previous winter's El Niño-Southern Oscillation phase. This information highlights the role of the India-Burma Trough in modulating northern Indochina biomass burning and possibly predicting aerosol transport to East Asia on the interannual time scale.

  6. Source Apportionment of Particulate Matter Collected Upwind and Downwind of a Steel Facility in Granite City, IL (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, R. M.; Norris, G. A.; Willis, R. D.; Turner, J. R.; Kaleel, R.; Sweitzer, T.; Preston, B.; Hays, M. D.

    2009-04-01

    St. Louis is currently in nonattainment of the annual PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS). Granite City Steel Works (GSCW), located in Granite City, IL is considered to be a significant source impacting the St. Louis area and the largest PM2.5 point source contributor. Twelve grab samples were collected in and around the steel facility including the basic oxygen furnace, steel and iron slag crushing, coal pulverizing, baghouse dust, paved road dust, and unpaved road dust. The bulk samples were resuspended in a resuspension chamber using a PM2.5 cutpoint and collected on Teflon, quartz and polycarbonate filters. Fine particulate matter (PM) samples (12-hr and 24-hr) were collected upwind and downwind of GSCW from October 13 to December 13, 2007 to identify sources contributing to nonattainment in St. Louis. The samples were analyzed for trace metals (X-Ray Fluorescence), ions (Ion Chromatography), elemental and organic carbon (thermal optical analysis), and organic species (solvent extraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry). Source apportionment was conducted using the EPA Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) Model (v 8.2). Major sources impacting the 12-hr samples included the blast oxygen furnace, secondary sulfate, and road dust. Higher excess steel and coke works contributions were associated with higher wind speeds (greater than 5 mph) and more variability in source impacts was observed. Major sources impacting the 24-hr samples included secondary sulfate and motor vehicles (diesel and gasoline). Contributions were similar between the coke and steel works sources. Disclaimer: Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy.

  7. Dimensional and chemical characterization of particles at a downwind receptor site of a waste-to-energy plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonanno, G; Stabile, L; Avino, P; Vanoli, R

    2010-07-01

    In the last years numerous epidemiological studies were carried out to evaluate the effects of particulate matter on human health. In industrialized areas, anthropogenic activities highly contribute to the fine and ultrafine particle concentrations. Then, it is important to characterize the evolution of particle size distribution and chemical composition near these emission points. Waste incineration represents a favorable technique for reducing the waste volume. However, in the past, municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) had a bad reputation due to the emission of toxic combustion byproducts. Consequently, the risk perception of the people living near MWIs is very high even if in Western countries waste incineration has nowadays to be considered a relatively clean process from a technical point of view. The study here presented has an exemplary meaning for developing appropriate management and control strategies for air quality in the surrounding of MWIs and to perform exposure assessment for populations involved. Environment particles were continuously measured through a SMPS/APS system over 12 months. The monitoring site represents a downwind receptor of a typical MWI. Furthermore, elements and organic fractions were measured by means of the Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and using dichotomous and high volume samplers. Annual mean values of 8.6 x 10(3)+/-3.7 x 10(2)part.cm(-3) and 31.1+/-9.0 microg m(-3) were found for number and mass concentration, typical of a rural site. Most of the elements can be attributed to long-range transport from other natural and/or anthropogenic sources. Finally, the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons present low concentrations with a mean value of 24.6 ng m(-3). Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The relationship between NH3 emissions from a poultry farm and soil NO and N2O fluxes from a downwind forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, U.; Dick, J.; Storeton-West, R.; Lopez-Fernandez, S.; Woods, C.; Tang, S.; Vandijk, N.

    2006-08-01

    Intensive livestock farms emit large concentrations of NH3, most of which is deposited very close to the source. The presence of trees enhances the deposition. Rates to downwind forests can exceed 40 kg N ha-1 y-1. The steep gradient in large NH3 concentrations of 34.3±20.4, 47.6±24.9, 21.7±16.8 µg NH3 m3 at the edge of a forest 15, 30 and 45 m downwind of the farm to near background concentrations within 270 m downwind (1.15±0.7 µg NH3 m3) provides an ideal site to study the effect of different rates of atmospheric NH3 concentrations and inferred deposition on biological and chemical processes under similar environmental conditions. We have investigated the effect of different NH3 concentrations and implied deposition rates on the flux of NO and N2O from soil in a mixed woodland downwind of a large poultry farm (160 000 birds) in Scotland, which has been operating for about 40 years. Measurements were carried out for a 6 month period, with hourly NO flux measurements, daily N2O fluxes close to the farm and monthly at all sites, and monthly cumulative wet and dry N deposition. The increased NH3 and NH4+ deposition to the woodland increased emissions of NO and N2O and soil available NH4+ and NO3- concentrations. Average NO and N2O fluxes measured 15, 25 and 45 m downwind of the farm were 111.2±41.1, 123.3±40.7, 38.3±28.8 µg NO-N m-2 h-1 and 9.9±7.5, 34.3±33.3 and 21.2±6.1 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1, respectively. At the background site 270 m downwind the N2O flux was reduced to 1.75±2.1 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1. NO emissions were significantly influenced by seasonal and daily changes in soil temperature and followed a diurnal pattern with maximum emissions approximately 3 h after noon. For N2O no consistent diurnal pattern was observed. Changes in soil moisture content had a less clear effect on the NO and N2O flux. In spite of the large NO and N2O emissions accounting for >3% of the N deposited to the woodland downwind of the farm, extrapolation to the entire British

  9. The relationship between ammonia emissions from a poultry farm and soil NO and N2O fluxes from a downwind source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tang

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Intensive livestock farms emit large concentrations of NH3, most of which is deposited very close to the source. The presence of trees enhances the deposition. Rates to down wind forests can exceed 40 kg N ha-1. The steep gradient in large NH3 concentration and deposition at the edge of a downwind forest to background concentrations within a few hundred meters provides an ideal site to study the effect of different rates of N deposition on biological and chemical processes under similar environmental conditions. We have investigated the effect of different rates of NH3 deposition (62, 45, 24 and 5 kg NH3-N ha-1 y-1 on the flux of NO and N2O from soil in a mixed woodland downwind of a large poultry farm (160000 birds in Scotland, which has been operating for about 40 years. Measurements were carried out for a 6 month period, with hourly NO flux measurements, daily N2O fluxes close to the farm and monthly at all sites and monthly cumulative wet and dry N deposition. The increased NH3 and NH4+ deposition to the woodland increased emissions of NO and N2O and soil available NH4+ and NO3- concentrations. Average NO and N2O fluxes measured 15, 25 and 45 m downwind of the farm were 111.2±41.1, 123.3±40.7, 38.3±28.8 µg NO-N m-2 h-1 and 9.9±7.5, 34.3±33.3 and 21.2±6.1 µg NO-N m-2 h-1, respectively. At the background site 270 m downwind the N2O flux was reduced to 1.75±2.1 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1. NO emissions were significantly influenced by seasonal and daily changes in soil temperature and followed a diurnal pattern with maximum emissions approximately 3h after noon. For N2O no consistent diurnal pattern was observed. Changes in soil moisture content had a less clear effect on the NO and N2O flux. On average the NO emissions expressed as a fraction of the elevated N deposited were 7.1% (at 15 m, 6% (at 25 m and 2.3% (at 45 m downwind of the farm, whereas for N2O the emissions were only 2.8% (at 15 m, 3% (at 25 m and 3% (at 45 m downwind. These

  10. Characterization of Wet and Dry Deposition in the Downwind of Industrial Sources in a Dry Tropical Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K. Singh

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An atmospheric deposition study was conducted in the downwind of Shaktinagar Thermal Power Plant (STPP, Renusagar Thermal Power Plant (RTPP, and Anpara Thermal Power Plant (ATPP, at Singrauli region, Uttar Pradesh (UP, India to characterize dry and wet deposition in relation to different pollution loading. During the study period, dry and wet depositions and levels of gaseous pollutants (SO2 and NO2 were estimated across the sites. Dry deposition was collected on a monthly basis and wet deposition on an event basis. Depositions were analyzed for pH, nitrate (NO3�, ammonium (NH4+, and sulphate (SO42� contents. Dry deposition rate both collected as clearfall and throughfall varied between 0.15 to 2.28 and 0.33 to 3.48 g m�2 day�1, respectively, at control and maximally polluted sites. The pH of dry deposition varied from 5.81 to 6.89 during winter and 6.09 to 7.02 during summer across the sites. During the rainy season, the mean pH of clear wet deposition varied from 6.56 to 7.04 and throughfall varied from 6.81 to 7.22. The concentrations of NO2 and SO2 pollutants were highest during the winter season. Mean SO2 concentrations varied from 18 to 75 �g m�3 at control and differently polluted sites during the winter season. The variation in NO2 concentrations did not show a pattern similar to that of SO2. The highest NO2 concentration during the winter season was 50 �g m�3, observed near RTPP. NO2 concentration did not show much variation among different sites, suggesting that the sources of NO2 emission are evenly distributed along the sites. The concentrations of NH4+, NO3�, and SO42� ions in dry deposition were found to be higher in summer as compared to the winter season. In dry deposition (clearfall the concentrations of NH4+, NO3�, and SO42� varied from 0.13 to 1.0, 0.81 to 1.95, and 0.82 to 3.27 mg l�1, respectively, during winter. In wet deposition (clearfall, the above varied from 0.14 to 0.74, 0.81 to 1.82, and 0

  11. Measurements of ozone and its precursors in Beijing during summertime: impact of urban plumes on ozone pollution in downwind rural areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Ma, J. Z.; Zhang, X. L.; Xu, X. B.; Xu, X. F.; Lin, W. L.; Wang, Y.; Meng, W.; Ma, Z. Q.

    2011-12-01

    Sea-land and mount-valley circulations are the dominant mesoscale synoptic systems affecting the Beijing area during summertime. Under the influence of these two circulations, the prevailing wind is southwesterly from afternoon to midnight, and then changes to northeasterly till forenoon. In this study, surface ozone (O3), carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were measured at four sites located along the route of prevailing wind, including two upwind urban sites (Fengtai "FT" and Baolian "BL"), an upwind suburban site (Shunyi "SY") and a downwind rural site (Shangdianzi "SDZ") during 20 June-16 September 2007. The purpose is to improve our understanding of ozone photochemistry in urban and rural areas of Beijing and the influence of urban plumes on ozone pollution in downwind rural areas. It is found that ozone pollution was synchronism in the urban and rural areas of Beijing, coinciding with the regional-scale synoptic processes. Due to the high traffic density and local emissions, the average levels of reactive gases NOx and NMHCs at the non-rural sites were much higher than those at SDZ. The level of long-lived gas CO at SDZ was comparable to, though slightly lower than, at the urban sites. We estimate the photochemical reactivity (LOH and the ozone formation potential (OFP) in the urban (BL) and rural (SDZ) areas using measured CO and NMHCs. The OH loss rate coefficient (LOH by total NMHCs at the BL and SDZ sites are estimated to be 50.7 s-1 and 15.8 s-1, respectively. While alkenes make a major contribution to the LOH, aromatics dominate OFP at both urban and rural sites. With respect to the individual species, CO has the largest ozone formation potential at the rural site, and at the urban site aromatic species are the leading contributors. While the O3 diurnal variations at the four sites are typical for polluted areas, the ozone peak values are found to lag behind one site

  12. Measurements of ozone and its precursors in Beijing during summertime: impact of urban plumes on ozone pollution in downwind rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea-land and mount-valley circulations are the dominant mesoscale synoptic systems affecting the Beijing area during summertime. Under the influence of these two circulations, the prevailing wind is southwesterly from afternoon to midnight, and then changes to northeasterly till forenoon. In this study, surface ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, nitric oxide (NO, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, nitrogen oxide (NOx and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs were measured at four sites located along the route of prevailing wind, including two upwind urban sites (Fengtai (FT and Baolian (BL, an upwind suburban site (Shunyi (SY and a downwind rural site (Shangdianzi (SDZ during 20 June–16 September 2007. The purpose is to improve our understanding of ozone photochemistry in urban and rural areas of Beijing and the influence of urban plumes on ozone pollution in downwind rural areas. It is found that ozone pollution was synchronism in the urban and rural areas of Beijing, coinciding with the regional-scale synoptic processes. Due to the high traffic density and local emissions, the average levels of reactive gases NOx and NMHCs at the non-rural sites were much higher than those at SDZ. The level of long-lived gas CO at SDZ was comparable to and slightly lower than it was at other sites. The daily-averaged ozone concentration at SDZ was much higher than at other sites due to weak titration. Ranking by OH loss rate coefficient (LOH, alkenes played a dominant role in total NMHCs reactivity at both urban and rural sites during the experiment, accounting for 48.6 % and 52.1 % of total LOH, respectively. The NMHCs data were also used to estimate the ozone potential formation (OFP in Beijing. The leading contributors to ozone formation were aromatics at both urban and rural sites during the experiment, which accounts for 55.5 % and 49.4 % of total OFP, respectively. The ozone peak values are

  13. An Analysis of Unique Aerial Photographs of Atmospheric Eddies in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Downwind of Complex Terrain Along the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, B. M.; Herbster, C. G.; Mosher, F. R.

    2013-12-01

    Unique aerial photographs of atmospheric eddies in marine stratocumulus clouds downwind of complex terrain along the California coast are presented and analyzed. While satellite imagery of similar eddies have appeared in the scientific literature since the 1960's, it is believed that these are the first close-up photographs of such eddies, taken from an airplane, to appear in publication. Two photographs by a commercial pilot, flying California coastal routes, are presented: one from July 16, 2006 downwind of Santa Cruz Island, a 740 m peak bordering the Santa Barbara Channel off the California coast; and one from September 12, 2006 near Grover Beach, California, downwind of a headland containing the San Luis Range, a region of complex terrain near San Luis Obispo, California, with ridges ranging approximately from 240 to 550 m elevation. Both eddies occurred in the lee of inversion-penetrating terrain, and were marked by a cyclonic vortex in the clouds with a striking cloud-free 'eye' feature roughly 3 km in diameter. The Santa Cruz Island eddy was 25 km in length and 9-10 km in width, while the Grover Beach eddy was 17 km in length and had a width of 9 km, placing it in the meso-gamma scale of atmospheric features. GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) imagery for both cases was obtained and help to define the lifecycle and motions of the eddies captured in the snapshots. Relevant meteorological observations for the Santa Cruz Island eddy were not located, but in-situ observations from the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) pier, and the San Luis Obispo County Air Pollution Control District, made possible a more detailed examination of the Grover Beach eddy and its structure. Additionally, we offer speculation on an eddy formation mechanism consistent with the satellite and in-situ observations described in this presentation, and hypotheses from the literature on low Froude number, continuously

  14. Computational fluid dynamics evaluation of the effect of different city designs on the wind environment of a downwind natural heritage site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BenLi LIU; JianJun QU; QingHe NIU; JunZhan WANG; KeCun ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    Disturbance in wind regime and sand erosion deposition balance may lead to burial and eventual van-ishing of a site. This study conducted 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to evaluate the effect of a proposed city design on the wind environment of the Crescent Spring, a downwind natural heritage site located in Dunhuang, Northwestern China. Satellite terrain data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Re-flection Radiometer (ASTER) Digital Elevation Model (DEM) were used to construct the solid surface model. Steady-state Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) with shear stress transport (SST) k-ωturbulence model were then applied to solve the flow field problems. Land-use changes were modeled implicitly by dividing the underlying surface into different areas and by applying corresponding aerodynamic roughness lengths. Simulations were performed by using cases with different city areas and building heights. Results show that the selected model could capture the surface roughness changes and could adjust wind profile over a large area. Wind profiles varied over the greenfield to the north and over the Gobi land to the east of the spring. Therefore, different wind speed reduction effects were observed from various city construction scenarios. The current city design would lead to about 2 m/s of wind speed reduction at the downwind city edge and about 1 m/s of wind speed reduction at the north of the spring at 35-m height. Reducing the city height in the north greenfield area could efficiently eliminate the negative effects of wind spee. By contrast, restricting the city area worked better in the eastern Gobi area compared with other parts of the study area. Wind speed reduction in areas near the spring could be limited to 0.1 m/s by combining these two abatement strategies. The CFD method could be applied to simulate the wind environment affected by other land-use changes over a large terrain.

  15. Reduction mechanism of dynamic loads on down wind rotor; Furyoku hatsuden system down wind rotor no doteki kaju no keigen kiko ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.; Yasui, T. [Tokai University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    Dynamic force on blades in a large wind mill changes with rotational speed for various reasons, such as wind shear that causes vertical distribution of wind velocity or titling angle. Therefore, a 2-blade system on a teetered hub is a practical selection for the coned, down-wind type. Use of teetered axis greatly reduces bending moment in the flap direction and that at the axis of rotation. An attempt was made to understand dynamic loads by inertial force resulting from oscillation of the blade rotating on the teetered axis, and thereby to avoid them. The in-plane load can be diminished to zero when the teetered axis is coincided with the center of gravity, but generally cannot be avoided when the blade is strained significantly, except it is operated at the rated condition. The in-plane load and bending moment can be avoided, when rotational freedom is given around the y axis. Dynamic load on a down-wind rotor can be avoided by use of universal joint. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Control design for two-bladed wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Solingen, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades wind energy has evolved into a mature source of sustainable energy such that onshore wind turbines have become cost competitive with other fossil-based energy sources. Onshore wind energy, however, faces social resistance and a lack of available locations. Offshore wind energy,

  17. Control design for two-bladed wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Solingen, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades wind energy has evolved into a mature source of sustainable energy such that onshore wind turbines have become cost competitive with other fossil-based energy sources. Onshore wind energy, however, faces social resistance and a lack of available locations. Offshore wind energy,

  18. Aircraft trace gas measurements during the London 2012 Olympics: Air quality and emission fluxes derived from sampling upwind and downwind of a megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, G.; O'Shea, S.; Muller, J.; Jones, B.; O'Sullivan, D.; Lee, J. D.; Bauguitte, S.; Gallagher, M. W.; Percival, C.; Barratt, B.; McQuaid, J. B.; Illingworth, S.

    2013-12-01

    This study presents airborne in situ and remote sensing measurements recorded during July and August 2012, across the period of the London 2012 Summer Olympics and simultaneous with the Clear air for London (ClearfLo) ground-based measurement and modelling campaign. Through long-term (2-year) and intensive observation periods (Winter 2011 and Summer 2012), the ClearfLo programme aims to better understand emissions, as well as the chemical, dynamical and micro-meteorological processes which modulate air quality in the London urban environment - an important risk factor for both acute and chronic health effects. The work presented here focuses on two contrasting case studies within the summer ClearfLo period: 30 July 2012 and 9 August 2012, representing relatively clean background and polluted background cases, respectively, and characterised by well-mixed Atlantic westerly maritime inflow in the former and stagnant air (high pressure) in the latter. Measurements of CO, CO2, CH4, N2O, O3, HCN, and other gases measured on board the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurement (FAAM) BAe-146 aircraft will be presented and interpreted, with emphasis on observed concentration gradients and tracer-tracer correlations as well as airmass vertical structure and airmass history upwind and downwind of central London in each case. By applying a simple advective model and making use of vertically resolved thermodynamic and composition data, we are able to derive emission strengths for these gases that are representative of the total enclosed surface area. Example emissions for these two cases range between 6x105 kg(C)/hr and 9x105 kg(C)/hr for CO2, and ~0.6x105 kg(C)/hr for CH4. This airborne sampling methodology highlights the unique utility of aircraft measurements to routinely and climatologically characterise emissions from area sources such as cities, and points to future missions to target localised hotspots and distributed point sources.

  19. Remote sensing of volcanic CO2, HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, André; Solvejg Dinger, Anna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Kostinek, Julian; Fieber, Lukas; Fischerkeller, Constanze; Giuffrida, Giovanni Bruno; Hase, Frank; Klappenbach, Friedrich; Kuhn, Jonas; Lübcke, Peter; Tirpitz, Lukas; Tu, Qiansi

    2017-01-01

    Remote sensing of the gaseous composition of non-eruptive, passively degassing volcanic plumes can be a tool to gain insight into volcano interior processes. Here, we report on a field study in September 2015 that demonstrates the feasibility of remotely measuring the volcanic enhancements of carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen fluoride (HF), hydrogen chloride (HCl), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and bromine monoxide (BrO) in the downwind plume of Mt. Etna using portable and rugged spectroscopic instrumentation. To this end, we operated the Fourier transform spectrometer EM27/SUN for the shortwave-infrared (SWIR) spectral range together with a co-mounted UV spectrometer on a mobile platform in direct-sun view at 5 to 10 km distance from the summit craters. The 3 days reported here cover several plume traverses and a sunrise measurement. For all days, intra-plume HF, HCl, SO2, and BrO vertical column densities (VCDs) were reliably measured exceeding 5 × 1016, 2 × 1017, 5 × 1017, and 1 × 1014 molec cm-2, with an estimated precision of 2.2 × 1015, 1.3 × 1016, 3.6 × 1016, and 1.3 × 1013 molec cm-2, respectively. Given that CO2, unlike the other measured gases, has a large and well-mixed atmospheric background, derivation of volcanic CO2 VCD enhancements (ΔCO2) required compensating for changes in altitude of the observing platform and for background concentration variability. The first challenge was met by simultaneously measuring the overhead oxygen (O2) columns and assuming covariation of O2 and CO2 with altitude. The atmospheric CO2 background was found by identifying background soundings via the co-emitted volcanic gases. The inferred ΔCO2 occasionally exceeded 2 × 1019 molec cm-2 with an estimated precision of 3.7 × 1018 molec cm-2 given typical atmospheric background VCDs of 7 to 8 × 1021 molec cm-2. While the correlations of ΔCO2 with the other measured volcanic gases confirm the detection of volcanic CO2 enhancements, correlations were found of variable

  20. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Yue

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8×104 cm−3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1×104 cm−3 with intensive traffic emissions. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm−3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm−3. More 20–100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100–660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were also similar at GZ (69±43 μg m−3 and BG (69±58 μg m−3, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformations are two main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO4−2, NO3, and NH4+ accounted for about 60% in 100–660 nm particle mass and PM2.5. When south or south-southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants takes place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase rates of secondary

  1. Variation of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions at the urban and downwind regional sites in the Pearl River Delta during summertime pollution episodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Yue

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to characterize the features of particulate pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD in the summer, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were simultaneously performed at Guangzhou urban site (GZ and Back-garden downwind regional site (BG in July 2006. Particle number concentration from 20 nm to 10 μm at BG was (1.7±0.8×104 cm−3, about 40% lower than that at GZ, (2.9±1.1×104 cm−3. The total particle volume concentration at BG was 94±34 μm3 cm−3, similar to that at GZ, 96±43 μm3 cm−3. More 20–100 nm particles, significantly affected by the traffic emissions, were observed at GZ, while 100–660 nm particle number concentrations were similar at both sites as they are more regional. PM2.5 values were similar at GZ (69±43 μg m−3 and BG (69±58 μg m−3 with R2 of 0.71 for the daily average PM2.5 at these two sites, indicating the fine particulate pollution in the PRD region to be regional. Two kinds of pollution episodes, the accumulation pollution episode and the regional transport pollution episode, were observed. Fine particles over 100 nm dominated both number and volume concentrations of total particles during the late periods of these pollution episodes. Accumulation and secondary transformation are the main reasons for the nighttime accumulation pollution episode. SO42−, NO3 accounted for about 60% in 100–660 nm particle mass and PM2.5 increase. When south or southeast wind prevailed in the PRD region, regional transport of pollutants took place. Regional transport contributed about 30% to fine particulate pollution at BG during a regional transport case. Secondary transformation played an important role during regional transport, causing higher increase

  2. Effect of rotor configuration on guyed tower and foundation designs and estimated costs for intermediate site horizontal axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, G. R.; Winemiller, J. R.; Savino, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Three designs of a guyed cylindrical tower and its foundation for an intermediate size horizontal axis wind turbine generator are discussed. The primary difference in the three designs is the configuration of the rotor. Two configurations are two-blade rotors with teetering hubs - one with full span pitchable blades, the other with fixed pitch blades. The third configuration is a three-bladed rotor with a rigid hub and fixed pitch blades. In all configurations the diameter of the rotor is 38 meters and the axis of rotation is 30.4 meters above grade, and the power output is 200 kW and 400 kW. For each configuration the design is based upon for the most severe loading condition either operating wind or hurricane conditions. The diameter of the tower is selected to be 1.5 meters (since it was determined that this would provide sufficient space for access ladders within the tower) with guy rods attached at 10.7 meters above grade. Completing a design requires selecting the required thicknesses of the various cylindrical segments, the number and diameter of the guy rods, the number and size of soil anchors, and the size of the central foundation. The lower natural frequencies of vibration are determined for each design to ensure that operation near resonance does not occur. Finally, a cost estimate is prepared for each design. A preliminary design and cost estimate of a cantilever tower (cylindrical and not guyed) and its foundation is also presented for each of the three configurations.

  3. Sources of fatigue damage to passive yaw wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laino, D.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Using an integrated computer analysis approach developed at the University of Utah, fatigue damage sources to passive yaw wind turbine blades have been investigated. Models of a rigid hub and teetering hub machine reveal the parameters important to the fatigue design of each type. The teetering hub proved much less susceptible to fatigue damage from normal operation loads. As a result, extreme events were critical to the teetering hub fatigue life. The rigid hub blades experienced extremely large gyroscopic load cycles induced by rapid yaw rates during normal operation. These yaw rates stem from turbulence activity which is shown to be dependent upon atmospheric stability. Investigation revealed that increasing yaw damping is an effective way of significantly reducing these gyroscopic fatigue loads.

  4. CFD analysis of rotating two-bladed flatback wind turbine rotor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, David, CA); Chao, David D.; Berg, Dale E. (University of California, David, CA)

    2008-04-01

    The effects of modifying the inboard portion of the NREL Phase VI rotor using a thickened, flatback version of the S809 design airfoil are studied using a three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A motivation for using such a thicker airfoil design coupled with a blunt trailing edge is to alleviate structural constraints while reducing blade weight and maintaining the power performance of the rotor. The calculated results for the baseline Phase VI rotor are benchmarked against wind tunnel results obtained at 10, 7, and 5 meters per second. The calculated results for the modified rotor are compared against those of the baseline rotor. The results of this study demonstrate that a thick, flatback blade profile is viable as a bridge to connect structural requirements with aerodynamic performance in designing future wind turbine rotors.

  5. Transient power coefficients for a two-blade Savonius wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, K.; Naterer, G. [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada). Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science

    2010-07-01

    The wind power industry had a 29 percent growth rate in installed capacity in 2008, and technological advances are helping to speed up growth by significantly increasing wind turbine power yields. While the majority of the industry's growth has come from large horizontal axis wind turbine installations, small wind turbines can also be used in a wide variety of applications. This study predicted the transient power coefficient for a Savonius vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) wind turbine with 2 blades. The turbine's flow field was used to analyze pressure distribution along the rotor blades in relation to the momentum, lift, and drag forces on the rotor surfaces. The integral force balance was used to predict the transient torque and power output of the turbine. The study examined the implications of the addition of a second blade on the model's ability to predict transient power outputs. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) programs were used to verify that the formulation can be used to accurately predict the transient power coefficients of VAWTs with Savonius blades. 11 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  6. Electric Motor Whirl Test of a Flottorp Standard Two-Blade Propeller and a Flottorp Standard Two-Blade Propeller Incorporating Nemeth Modified Leading Edge (Whirl Test No. 2355)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-08-01

    8217..ment -@onter. The tbest propollers vYre the property of Flottorp 10-nufactur.ing Company, Grand Lapids, ,’Ichigan. The wlhirl test program vas...TYhe fic aciliie of l’jetý’etlh Acronauttical laboratory pr-ohibited them fron A&In Lll scale inet!’llninto the probicrai and t-hey appealcd to Propol

  7. Aerosol Properties Downwind of Biomass Burns Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buseck, Peter R [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We determined the morphological, chemical, and thermal properties of aerosol particles generated by biomass burning during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) campaign during the wildland fire season in the Pacific Northwest from July to mid-September, 2013, and in October, 2013 from prescribed agricultural burns in the lower Mississippi River Valley. BBOP was a field campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. The morphological information was both two-dimensional, as is typical of most microscopy images and that have many of the characteristic of shadows in that they lack depth data, and three-dimensional (3D). The electron tomographic measurements will provided 3D data, including the presence and nature of pores and interstices, and whether the individual particles are coated by or embedded within other materials. These microphysical properties were determined for particles as a function of time and distance from the respective sources in order to obtain detailed information regarding the time evolution of changes during aging.

  8. 基于半分析声线模型计算顺风环境对大气声传播的影响%The Computation of Effects on the Atmosphere Sound Propagation Produced by the Downwind Based on the Semi Analytical Ray Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张攀; 陈新华; 陈琳

    2011-01-01

    建立了顺风条件下大气声传播的声线半分析模型,等效声速为对数声速剖面.模型采用分析迭代的方法,通过积分得到声线轨迹的解析解,并对声线进行分组,每组都由四条声线组成,从而计算出远场声压的超额衰减.较其他方法而言,该模型计算时间较短,最终得到了考虑地面反射和大气折射影响的超额衰减频率响应曲线.%The semi analytical ray model of the atmosphere sound propagation under the downwind condition has been established, the equivalent sound profile is replaced by the power profile of the sound speed. The analysis and iterative method have been employed in this model to solve the analytic solution of the ray tracks through integral , which takes the advantage of the fact that ray paths are ordered in groups of four, therefore the far field excess attenuation can be calculated. Compared with other methods, and this model requires a very small compulation time. Ground reflections and atmosphere refractions are taken into account to evaluate the excess attenuation and other solutions in this model. Finaly, the curve of excess attenuation versus frequency are plotted.

  9. A note on elevated total gaseous mercury concentrations downwind from an agriculture field during tilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bash, Jesse O; Miller, David R

    2007-12-15

    Elevated mercury concentrations were measured at the University of Connecticut's mercury forest flux tower during spring agricultural field operations on an adjacent corn field. Concentrations at the tower were elevated, a peak of 7.03 ng m(-3) over the background concentration of 1.74+/-0.26 ng m(-3), during times when the prevailing wind was from the direction of the corn field and during periods when the soil was disturbed by tilling. Strong deposition to the forest was recorded at the point of measurement when atmospheric mercury concentrations were elevated. The strongest deposition rate was a 1 hour maximum of -4011 ng m(-2) h(-1) following the initial peak in atmospheric concentrations, Analyses of the meteorological conditions and mercury content in agricultural soil, manure and the diesel consumed in the tilling operation indicate that the source of the mercury was from the agricultural tilling operations and it was advected over the tower enriching the atmospheric concentrations above the forest canopy leading to deposition. These results indicate that agriculture operations resulting in a disturbed soil surface may be a source of atmospheric mercury originating from the pool of mercury bound in the soil. This represents a previously undocumented source of mercury emissions resulting from anthropogenic activities.

  10. Observations of Downwind Development of Wind Speed and Variance Profiles at Bognaes and Comparison with Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Højstrup, Jørgen; Peterson, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric flow over a change in surface roughness are reported. Both wind speed and turbulence characteristics were measured. Although the observation site departed from the ideal assumed in roughness change models, it was found that the predictions of `second-order closure...

  11. Characterization of methane plumes downwind of natural gas compressor stations in Pennsylvania and New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Bryce F; Ackley, Robert; Paige Wicker, A; Hildenbrand, Zacariah L; Carlton, Doug D; Schug, Kevin A

    2017-02-15

    The extraction of unconventional oil and natural gas from shale energy reservoirs has raised concerns regarding upstream and midstream activities and their potential impacts on air quality. Here we present in situ measurements of ambient methane concentrations near multiple natural gas compressor stations in New York and Pennsylvania using cavity ring-down laser spectrometry coupled with global positioning system technology. These data reveal discernible methane plumes located proximally to compressor stations, which exhibit high variability in their methane emissions depending on the weather conditions and on-site activities. During atmospheric temperature inversions, when near-ground mixing of the atmosphere is limited or does not occur, residents and properties located within 1 mile of a compressor station can be exposed to rogue methane from these point sources. These data provide important insight into the characterization and potential for optimization of natural gas compressor station operations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Medium-Range Dispersion Experiments Downwind from a Shoreline in Near Neutral Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Lyck, E.

    1980-01-01

    Five atmospheric dispersion experiments, all assigned Pasquill stability class D, were performed at Risø National Laboratory. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released at a height of 60 m from the Risø meteorological tower, situated on a peninsula in the Roskilde Fjord, Denmark, and was sampled...

  13. Mercury accumulation in transplanted Hypogymnia physodes lichens downwind of Wisconsin chlor-alkali plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makholm, M.M.; Bennett, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Emissions of mercury from a chlor-alkali plant in central Wisconsin have raised concern about possible effects on biota in the area. Samples of the lichen Hypogymnia physodes, which no longer grows in the area, were transplanted from a site in northeastern Wisconsin and positioned on plastic stands at varying distances up to 1250 m from the plant and sampled for Hg quarterly for one year to test the hypothesis that Hg would be taken up by the lichens and would decline with distance. Average tissue concentrations were elevated when first sampled at three months and continued to increase at the nearest sites until the study ended after one year. Average concentrations after a year of exposure ranged from 4418 ppb at 250 m from the plant to 403 ppb at 1250 m from the plant. The decrease over distance followed a negative exponential pattern. Background concentrations at a control site in northern Wisconsin averaged 155 ppb.

  14. Contribution of ship traffic to aerosol particle concentrations downwind of a major shipping lane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivekäs, N.; Massling, Andreas; Grythe, H.

    2014-01-01

    by 790 cm(-3) by number and 0.10 gm(-3) by mass. The corresponding daily average values were 170 cm-3 and 0.023 gm-3, respectively. This means that the ship plumes contributed between 11 and 19% to the particle number concentration and between 9 and 18% to PM0.15 during days when air was arriving over......Particles in the atmosphere are of concern due to their toxic properties and effects on climate. In coastal areas, ship emissions can be a significant anthropogenic source. In this study we investigated the contribution from ship emissions to the total particle number and mass concentrations...... at a remote location. We studied the particle number concentration (12 to 490 nm in diameter), the mass concentration (12 to 150 nm in diameter) and number and volume size distribution of aerosol particles in ship plumes for a period of 4.5 months at Hovsore, a coastal site on the western coast of Jutland...

  15. Downwind changes in grain size of aeolian dust; examples from marine and terrestrial archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuut, Jan-Berend; Prins, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    Aeolian dust in the atmosphere may have a cooling effect when small particles in the high atmosphere block incoming solar energy (e.g., Claquin et al., 2003) but it may also act as a 'greenhouse gas' when larger particles in the lower atmosphere trap energy that was reflected from the Earth's surface (e.g., Otto et al., 2007). Therefore, it is of vital importance to have a good understanding of the particle-size distribution of aeolian dust in space and time. As wind is a very size-selective transport mechanism, the sediments it carries typically have a very-well sorted grain-size distribution, which gradually fines from proximal to distal deposition sites. This fact has been used in numerous paleo-environmental studies to both determine source-to-sink changes in the particle size of aeolian dust (e.g., Weltje and Prins, 2003; Holz et al., 2004; Prins and Vriend, 2007) and to quantify mass-accumulation rates of aeolian dust (e.g., Prins and Weltje 1999; Stuut et al., 2002; Prins et al., 2007; Prins and Vriend, 2007; Stuut et al., 2007; Tjallingii et al., 2008; Prins et al., 2009). Studies on modern wind-blown particles have demonstrated that particle size of dust not only is a function of lateral but also vertical transport distance (e.g., Torres-Padron et al., 2002; Stuut et al., 2005). Nonetheless, there are still many unresolved questions related to the physical properties of wind-blown particles like e.g., the case of "giant" quartz particles found on Hawaii (Betzer et al., 1988) that can only originate from Asia but have a too large size for the distance they travelled through the atmosphere. Here, we present examples of dust particle-size distributions from terrestrial (loess) as well as marine (deep-sea sediments) sedimentary archives and their spatial and temporal changes. With this contribution we hope to provide quantitative data for the modelling community in order to get a better grip on the role of wind-blown particles in the climate system. Cited references Betzer, P.R., Carder, K.L., Duce, R.A., Merrill, J.T., Tindale, N.W., Uematsu, M., Costello, D.K., Young, R.W., Feely, R.A., Breland, J.A., Bernstein, R.E., Greco, A.M., 1988. Long-range transport of giant mineral aerosol particles. Nature 336, 568. Claquin, T., Roelandt, C., Kohfeld, K.E., Harrison, S.P., Tegen, I., C., P.I., Balkanski, Y., Bergametti, G., Hansson, M., Mahowald, N.M., Rodhe, H., Schulz, M., 2003. Radiative forcing of climate by ice-age atmospheric dust. Climate Dynamics 20, 193-202. Holz, C., Stuut, J.-B.W., Henrich, R., 2004. Terrigenous sedimentation processes along the continental margin off NW-Africa: implications from grain-size analyses of surface sediments. Sedimentology 51, 1145-1154. Otto, S., de Reus, M., Trautmann, T., Thomas, A., Wendisch, M., Borrmann, S., 2007. Atmospheric radiative effects of an in situ measured Saharan dust plume and the role of large particles. Atmos. Chem. Phys. 7, 4887-4903. Prins, M.A., Weltje, G.J., 1999. End-member modeling of siliciclastic grain-size distributions: the Late Quaternary record of eolian and fluvial sediment supply to the Arabian Sea and its paleoclimatic significance., in: Harbaugh, J., Watney, L., Rankey, G., Slingerland, R., Goldstein, R., Franseen, E. (Eds.), Numerical experiments in stratigraphy: Recent advances in stratigraphic and sedimentologic computer simulations. SEPM Special Publication 62. Society for Sedimentary Geology, pp. 91-111. Prins, M.A., Vriend, M., 2007, Glacial and interglacial eolian dust dispersal patterns across the Chinese Loess Plateau inferred from decomposed loess grain-size records. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems (G-cubed), 8, Q07Q05, doi:10.1029/2006GC001563. Prins, M.A., Vriend, M., Nugteren, G., Vandenberghe, J., Lu, H., Zheng, H., Jan Weltje, G., 2007. Late Quaternary aeolian dust input variability on the Chinese Loess Plateau: inferences from unmixing of loess grain-size records. Quaternary Science Reviews 26, 230-242. Prins, M.A., Zheng, H., Beets, K., Troelstra, S., Bacon, P., Kamerling, I., Wester, W., Konert, M., Huang, X., Ke, W., Vandenberghe, J., 2009. Dust supply from river floodplains: The case of the lower Huang He (Yellow River) recorded in a loess-palaeosol sequence from the Mangshan Plateau. Journal of Quaternary Science 24, 75-84. Stuut, J.-B.W., Prins, M.A., Schneider, R.R., Weltje, G.J., Jansen, J.H.F., Postma, G., 2002. A 300-kyr record of aridity and wind strength in southwestern Africa: inferences from grain-size distributions of sediments on Walvis Ridge, SE Atlantic. Marine Geology 180, 221-233. Stuut, J.-B.W., Zabel, M., Ratmeyer, V., Helmke, P., Schefuß, E., Lavik, G., Schneider, R.R., 2005. Provenance of present-day eolian dust collected off NW Africa. Journal of Geophysical Research 110. Stuut, J.-B.W., Kasten, S., Lamy, F., Hebbeln, D., 2007. Sources and modes of terrigenous sediment input to the Chilean continental slope. Quaternary International 161, 67-76. Tjallingii, R., Claussen, M., Stuut, J.-B.W., Fohlmeister, J., Jahn, A., Bickert, T., Lamy, F., Rohl, U., 2008. Coherent high- and low-latitude control of the northwest African hydrological balance. Nature Geoscience 1, 670-675. Torres-Padrón, M.E., Gelado-Caballero, M.D., Collado-Sánchez, C., Siruela-Matos, V.F., Cardona-Castellano, P.J., Hernández-Brito, J.J., 2002. Variability of dust inputs to the CANIGO zone. Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography 49, 3455-3464. Weltje, G.J., Prins, M.A., 2003. Muddled or mixed? Inferring palaeoclimate from size distributions of deep-sea clastics. Sedimentary Geology 162, 39-62.

  16. Measurement of western U.S. baseline ozone from the surface to the tropopause and assessment of downwind impact regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, O. R.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Ryerson, T. R.; Pollack, I.; Cullis, P. D.; Ives, M. A.; Tarasick, D. W.; Al-Saadi, J.; Stajner, I.

    2011-11-01

    Since 1997, baseline ozone monitoring from the surface to the tropopause along the U.S. west coast has been limited to the weekly ozonesondes from Trinidad Head, California. To explore baseline ozone at other latitudes, an ozonesonde network was implemented during spring 2010, including four launch sites along the California coast. Modeling indicated that North American pollution plumes impacted the California coast primarily below 3 km, but had no measurable impact on the average coastal ozone profiles. Vertical and latitudinal variation in free tropospheric baseline ozone appears to be partly explained by polluted and stratospheric air masses that descend isentropically along the west coast. Above 3 km, the dominant sources of ozone precursors were China and international shipping, while international shipping was the greatest source below 2 km. Approximately 8-10% of the baseline ozone that enters California in the 0-6 km range impacts the surface of the USA, but very little reaches the eastern USA. Within California, the major impact of baseline ozone above 2 km is on the high elevation terrain of eastern California. Baseline ozone below 2 km has its strongest impact on the low elevation sites throughout the state. To quantify ozone production within California we compared inland ozone measurements to baseline measurements. For average daytime conditions, we found no enhancements of lower tropospheric ozone in the northern Central Valley, but enhancements of 12-23% were found in the southern Central Valley. Enhancements above Joshua Tree were greater, 33-41%, while the greatest enhancements occurred over the LA Basin, 32-63%.

  17. Relation between Ocean SST Dipoles and Downwind Continental Croplands Assessed for Early Management Using Satellite-based Photosynthesis Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Daijiro

    2015-04-01

    Crop-monitoring systems with the unit of carbon-dioxide sequestration for environmental issues related to climate adaptation to global warming have been improved using satellite-based photosynthesis and meteorological conditions. Early management of crop status is desirable for grain production, stockbreeding, and bio-energy providing that the seasonal climate forecasting is sufficiently accurate. Incorrect seasonal forecasting of crop production can damage global social activities if the recognized conditions are unsatisfied. One cause of poor forecasting related to the atmospheric dynamics at the Earth surface, which reflect the energy budget through land surface, especially the oceans and atmosphere. Recognition of the relation between SST anomalies (e.g. ENSO, Atlantic Niño, Indian dipoles, and Ningaloo Niño) and crop production, as expressed precisely by photosynthesis or the sequestrated-carbon rate, is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms related to poor production. Solar radiation, surface air temperature, and water stress all directly affect grain vegetation photosynthesis. All affect stomata opening, which is related to the water balance or definition by the ratio of the Penman potential evaporation and actual transpiration. Regarding stomata, present data and reanalysis data give overestimated values of stomata opening because they are extended from wet models in forests rather than semi-arid regions commonly associated with wheat, maize, and soybean. This study applies a complementary model based on energy conservation for semi-arid zones instead of the conventional Penman-Monteith method. Partitioning of the integrated Net PSN enables precise estimation of crop yields by modifying the semi-closed stomata opening. Partitioning predicts production more accurately using the cropland distribution already classified using satellite data. Seasonal crop forecasting should include near-real-time monitoring using satellite-based process crop models to avoid social difficulties that can derive from uncertain seasonal predictions produced from long-term forecasting. Acknowledgement The author appreciates scientific discussions held with the application team of seasonal prediction at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. Key words: crop production, monitoring, forecasting, SST anomaly, remote sensing

  18. Optical and microphysical properties of column-integrated aerosols at a SKYNET site downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y.; Park, J. S.; Ghim, Y. S.

    2014-12-01

    A skyradiometer (POM-02, Prede Co. Ltd.) has been operated to investigate aerosol properties at a SKYNET (SKYradiometer NETwork) site, YGN (Yongin) for six years starting from November 2008. The site is at the rooftop of a five-story building on the hill, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul (37.34 °N, 127.27 °E and 167 m above sea level). POM-02 measures the diffuse radiation at six minute intervals at 11 wavelengths. Using version 5 of the skyrad.pack, aerosol optical (aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo) and microphysical (volume size distribution) properties were retrieved from the measurements at five wavelengths such as 400, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. In comparison with CIMEL sun photometers used in AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork), another worldwide ground-based network, skyradiometers have an advantage that they can provide larger number of aerosol property data at shorter time intervals. However, standard procedures for instrument operation and data retrieval have not been established. In this study, we first showed how we calibrated the instrument and how we obtained cloud screened and quality assured data. Next, we presented variations in aerosol optical and microphysical properties, depending on air masses and/or meteorological conditions, and examined the characteristic of high aerosol loading episodes including Asian dust storm and smog.

  19. New particle formation in the presence of a strong biomass burning episode at a downwind rural site in PRD, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. B.; Hu, M.; Yue, D. L.; Yang, Q.; Zhang, Y. H. [State Key Joint Lab. of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Coll. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking Univ., Beijing (China)], e-mail: minhu@pku.edu.cn; He, L. Y.; Huang, X. F. [Key Lab. for Urban Habitat Environmental Science and Technology, School of Environment and Energy, Peking Univ. Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen (China); Zheng, J. [Dept. of Atmospheric Science, Texas AandM Univ., College Station, Texas (United States); Zhang, R. Y. [State Key Joint Lab. of Environmental Simulation and Pollution Control, Coll. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Department of Atmospheric Science, Texas AandM Univ., College Station, Texas (United States))

    2013-09-15

    In order to characterise the features of particle pollution in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, a 1-month intensive campaign was conducted at the rural supersite (Kaiping) in the autumn of 2008. In total, 12 new particle formation (NPF) events are identified out of 30 campaign days. The results show that in the case of higher source and sink values, the result of the competition between source and sink is more likely the key limiting factor to determine the observation of NPF events at Kaiping. One episode with consecutive NPF events in the presence of strong biomass burning plume was observed between 10 and 15 November. The elevation of particle volume concentration (6.1 mm{sup 3}/cm{sup 3}/day) is due to the coaction by the local biomass burning and secondary transformation. Organics and sulphates are the major components in PM{sub 1}, accounting for 42% and 35% of the mass concentration, respectively. In this study, a rough estimation is applied to quantify the contributions of diverse sources to the particle number concentration. On average, the primary emission and secondary formation provide 28 and 72% of particle number concentration and 21% and 79% of mass concentration, respectively.

  20. Preliminary Results from High Time-Resolution Measurements of Particulate Inorganic Ions and Black Carbon Downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghim, Y.; Lee, Y.; Kim, C.; Choi, Y.; Lee, T.

    2011-12-01

    Concentrations of inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) in PM2.5 were measured using PILS (particle-into-liquid sampler, ADI 2081, Applikon) and MAAP (Multiangle Absorption Photometer, Model 5012, Thermo), respectively, at intervals of 20-30 minutes. The measurements were made at the Yongin campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul, which is affected by prevailing northwesterlies. The site is considered as an ideal place for exploring transport of air pollutants and variations of secondary ion formation caused by photochemical reactions since there are no major emission sources nearby except a 4-lane road running about 1.4 km to the west. The concentration of BC has been continuously measured since July 2010. However, the concentrations of inorganic ions were measured intermittently since February 2011. In the measurements in February, nitrate accounted for about 39% of the total inorganic ion concentrations and showed the highest correlation coefficient of 0.93 with ammonium. The fraction of sulfate among inorganic ions was about 31%, and the correlation coefficient with ammonium was 0.85, lower than that of nitrate. As was in other rural areas in Korea, potassium was highly correlated with major secondary ions such as sulfate, nitrate and ammonium, whose correlation coefficients were 0.70-0.74. Total inorganic ion concentrations were highest at 09:30 local time (LT) on February 9 probably due to the effect of vehicle emissions during the morning rush hour, but the concentration of nitrate was the highest at 13:00 LT on February 17 because of secondary ion formation just before a full development of the convective boundary layer. BC concentrations during the measurement period in February were generally higher at midnight than in the daytime including rush hours. BC showed moderately higher correlations with secondary ions. The BC concentration from MAAP obtained by aerosol absorption coefficient divided by mass absorption efficiency seemed to be overestimated since it reached 26% of the total inorganic ion concentrations.

  1. Characteristics of High Time-Resolved Concentrations of Particulate Inorganic Ions and Black Carbon Downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Choi, Y.; Kim, C.; Ghim, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Concentrations of inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) in PM2.5 were continuously measured using PILS (particle-into-liquid sampler, ADI 2081, Applikon) and MAAP (Multiangle Absorption Photometer, Model 5012, Thermo), respectively, for three and half months from mid-February to May, at intervals of 20-30 minutes. The measurements were made at the Global Campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul, the general area of which is affected by prevailing northwesterlies. The site is considered to be an ideal place for exploring transport of air pollutants and formation of secondary ions by photochemical reactions since there are no major emission sources nearby except a 4-lane road running about 1.4 km to the west. Analyses were made by two stages. In the first stage, typical types of diurnal variations in inorganic ions and BC concentrations were identified using cluster analysis. Diurnal variations in concentrations of each cluster were compared with the mean diurnal variations during the measurement period. Factors causing the differences in diurnal variations were discussed by cluster and by species. In the second stage, high and low concentration episodes were determined based on three-day moving averages of the sum of concentrations of particulate inorganic ions and BC. Mean concentrations and compositions in each episode were compared with those during the measurement period.

  2. Development of large wind energy power generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    The background and development of an experimental 100 kW wind-energy generation system are described, and the results of current field tests are presented. The experimental wind turbine is a two-bladed down-wind horizontal axis propeller type with a 29.4 m diameter rotor and a tower 28 m in height. The plant was completed in March, 1983, and has been undergoing trouble-free tests since then. The present program calls for field tests during two years from fiscal 1983 to 1984. The development of technologies relating to the linkage and operation of wind-energy power generation system networks is planned along with the acquisition of basic data for the development of a large-scale wind energy power generation system.

  3. The EtnaPlumeLab (EPL research cluster: advance the understanding of Mt. Etna plume, from source characterisation to downwind impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Sellitto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013, a multidisciplinary research cluster named EtnaPlumeLab (EPL was established, gathering experts from volcanology and atmospheric science communities. Target of EPL is to advance the understanding of Mt. Etna's gas and aerosol emissions and the related processes, from source to its regional climatic impact in the Mediterranean area. Here, we present the cluster and its three interacting modules: EPL-RADIO (Radioactive Aerosols and other source parameters for better atmospheric Dispersion and Impact estimatiOns, SMED (Sulfur MEditerranean Dispersion and Med-SuV (MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes Work Package 5. Preliminary results have for the first time highlighted the relevance of Mt. Etna's plume impact at the Mediterranean regional scale. These results underline that further efforts need to be made to get insight into a synoptic volcanogenic-atmospheric chemistry/climatic understanding of volcanic plumes impact.

  4. Effects of Local Circulations, Turbulent Internal Boundary Layers, and Elevated Industrial Plumes on Coastal Ozone Pollution in the Downwind Kaohsiung Urban-Industrial Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Lin Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Linyuan (LY is a coastal station located down wind of the industrial city of Kaohsiung in southern Taiwan. This station is often affected by severe ozone pollution during sea breeze events. Intensive tethered ozone soundings were per formed at this station during a 4-day ozone episode in November, 2005. Back air trajectories were also calculated to track the origins of air masses arriving at the station during the experiment. The investigation revealed complicated ozone pro files in the lower at mo sphere (be low 1300 m both day and night. At night, industrial plumes forming no-ozone air layers were frequently distributed at 400 - 800 m. Mixing layers rapidly decreased from 800 - 1100 m down to 200 - 350 m in the late morning hours when sea breezes and thermal internal boundary layers (TIBLs developed. Recirculation of polluted in land air masses over the sea, the development of TIBLs, and the late development of sea-breeze events all are likely responsible for severe ozone pollution at the LY station. Elevated industrial plumes or ozone aloft above TIBLs revealed only aminor contribution to ozone pollution via a downward mixing process. Elevated ozone levels (140 - 170 ppb were of ten trapped within transitional layers of sea-breeze circulations at 600 - 800 m and were accompanied by ambient northerly flows parallel to the coast line, suggesting that an ozone pollution core likely formed over the west coast of Taiwan on ozone-episodic days when sea-breeze circulations developed.

  5. Quantifying methane emission from fugitive sources by combining tracer release and downwind measurements – A sensitivity analysis based on multiple field surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Using a dual species methane/acetylene instrument based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), the dynamic plume tracer dispersion method for quantifying the emission rate of methane was successfully tested in four measurement campaigns: (1) controlled methane and trace gas release with different...... trace gas configurations, (2) landfill with unknown emission source locations, (3) landfill with closely located emission sources, and (4) comparing with an Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) instrument using multiple trace gasses for source separation. The new real-time, high precision...... instrument can measure methane plumes more than 1.2km away from small sources (about 5kgh−1) in urban areas with a measurement frequency allowing plume crossing at normal driving speed. The method can be used for quantification of total methane emissions from diffuse area sources down to 1kg per hour and can...

  6. Measurements of wakes originated from 2-bladed and 3-bladed rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yu-Ting; Lyu, Shao-Dong; Chen, Bo-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of wakes originated from 2-bladed and 3-bladed rotors were carried out using a hot-wire probe system in an open jet wind tunnel. Hot-wire anemometry was adopted to characterize the spanwise profiles of mean wind speed, turbulence intensity and momentum flux for downwind locations at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 rotor diameters. The results showed that the 2-bladed rotor spun faster than the 3-bladed one, where the ratio of the two blade angular velocities was 1.065:1 under the same inflow condition with a uniform distribution of 5.4 m/s flow velocity. The turbulence flow statistics of the rotor wakes showed that the wake originated from the 3-bladed rotor has larger velocity deficit, streamwise turbulence intensity, momentum flux magnitude, but smaller spanwise turbulence intensity. The velocity spectrum showed peaks associated with the presence of the blade-induced tip vortices in the near wake region (approximately within 3 rotor diameters).

  7. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  8. Public health impacts of the severe haze in Equatorial Asia in September-October 2015: demonstration of a new framework for informing fire management strategies to reduce downwind smoke exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplitz, Shannon N.; Mickley, Loretta J.; Marlier, Miriam E.; Buonocore, Jonathan J.; Kim, Patrick S.; Liu, Tianjia; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Schwartz, Joel; Pongsiri, Montira; Myers, Samuel S.

    2016-09-01

    In September-October 2015, El Niño and positive Indian Ocean Dipole conditions set the stage for massive fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), leading to persistently hazardous levels of smoke pollution across much of Equatorial Asia. Here we quantify the emission sources and health impacts of this haze episode and compare the sources and impacts to an event of similar magnitude occurring under similar meteorological conditions in September-October 2006. Using the adjoint of the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model, we first calculate the influence of potential fire emissions across the domain on smoke concentrations in three receptor areas downwind—Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore—during the 2006 event. This step maps the sensitivity of each receptor to fire emissions in each grid cell upwind. We then combine these sensitivities with 2006 and 2015 fire emission inventories from the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) to estimate the resulting population-weighted smoke exposure. This method, which assumes similar smoke transport pathways in 2006 and 2015, allows near real-time assessment of smoke pollution exposure, and therefore the consequent morbidity and premature mortality, due to severe haze. Our approach also provides rapid assessment of the relative contribution of fire emissions generated in a specific province to smoke-related health impacts in the receptor areas. We estimate that haze in 2015 resulted in 100 300 excess deaths across Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore, more than double those of the 2006 event, with much of the increase due to fires in Indonesia’s South Sumatra Province. The model framework we introduce in this study can rapidly identify those areas where land use management to reduce and/or avoid fires would yield the greatest benefit to human health, both nationally and regionally.

  9. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack

  10. Experimental and Numerical Study of Rotor Dynamics of a Two- and Three-Bladed Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben J.; Kim, Taeseong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the dynamics of a two-bladed turbine is investigated numerically as well as experimentally with respect to how the turbine frequencies change with the rotor speed. It is shown how the turbine frequencies of a two-bladed rotor change with the azimuthal position at standstill and how ...

  11. Study of the stall delay phenomenon and of wind turbine blade dynamics using numerical approaches and NREL's wind tunnel tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, Simon-Philippe

    2008-06-15

    The production of electricity from wind has experienced an enormous growth worldwide in the last 20 years. It is now widely seen as a serious alternative to more conventional energy production methods. Improvements are however still possible to make it more cost-effective. This can be done through a better understanding of the fundamental phenomena involved in the interaction of the wind with the wind turbine rotor. This growth in the production of energy from wind is expected to continue at a similar rate in the years to come, helped by the installation of wind turbines at sea, that is becoming a hot topic in the wind energy field today. The phenomenon of stall delay affecting rotating wind turbine blades is an example of an aerodynamic phenomenon that is not yet fully understood. Several models exist to correct for this effect. Five such models were first tested within a vortex wake simulation code based on the modelling of a prescribed wake behind the rotor of the turbine. Comparison was made with wind tunnel test data acquired in head-on flow on a two-bladed 10.1 diameter wind turbine at the National Renewable Energy Laboratories (NREL) in 2000. It revealed a general overprediction of the stall delay effects, at the same time as great disparity was obtained between the different models. Conclusions from this work served as a starting point for a much more thorough investigation on this subject, where several models were tested in terms of different quantities using the same simulation code, and where the application of some of the models was improved. Overprediction of the loads was once again obtained when comparison was made to the NREL results in head-on flow, and none of the models was found to correctly represent the flow physics involved. The premises on which each of the models relies were discussed as a means of better understanding and modelling this phenomenon. The important issue of tip loss was also covered, and guidelines were suggested to improve

  12. Measured and calculated characteristics of wind turbine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    The results of an analytical and experimental investigation of wind turbine noise are presented. Noise calculations indicate that for configurations with the rotor downwind of the support tower, the primary source of noise is the rapid change in rotor loadings which occurs as the rotor passes through the tower wake. Noise measurements are presented for solid and truss type tower models with both upwind and downwind rotors. Upwind rotor configurations are shown to be significantly quieter than downwind configurations. The model data suggest that averaged noise measurements and noise calculations based on averaged tower wake characteristics may not accurately represent the impulsive noise characteristics of downwind rotor configurations.

  13. Assessment of bioaerosols at a concentrated dairy operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased bioaerosol loadings in downwind plumes from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) may increase the risk for allergy and infection in humans. In this study we monitored airborne concentrations of culturable bacteria and fungi at upwind (background) and downwind sites at a 10,000 m...

  14. Wind tunnel tests on slow-running vertical-axis wind-rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasegaram, S.

    1981-09-01

    This paper summarizes the results of investigations on the Savonius-type, slow-running, vertical-axis wind-rotors as well as on rotor designs on different subclasses under comparable design and test conditions. It is seen that the performance of the conventional Savonius rotor could be considerably improved upon and the best results are achieved by using two-bladed rotors with a more sophisticated sectional profile than in the conventional design. Rotors with several blades, although capable of considerably higher performance than the Savonius rotor, do not appear to be as good as those with two blades and improved sectional geometry.

  15. Aeolian process effects on vegetation communities in an arid grassland ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Lorelei J; Epstein, Howard E; Li, Junran; Okin, Gregory S

    2012-04-01

    Many arid grassland communities are changing from grass dominance to shrub dominance, but the mechanisms involved in this conversion process are not completely understood. Aeolian processes likely contribute to this conversion from grassland to shrubland. The purpose of this research is to provide information regarding how vegetation changes occur in an arid grassland as a result of aeolian sediment transport. The experimental design included three treatment blocks, each with a 25 × 50 m area where all grasses, semi-shrubs, and perennial forbs were hand removed, a 25 × 50 m control area with no manipulation of vegetation cover, and two 10 × 25 m plots immediately downwind of the grass-removal and control areas in the prevailing wind direction, 19° north of east, for measuring vegetation cover. Aeolian sediment flux, soil nutrients, and soil seed bank were monitored on each treatment area and downwind plot. Grass and shrub cover were measured on each grass-removal, control, and downwind plot along continuous line transects as well as on 5 × 10 m subplots within each downwind area over four years following grass removal. On grass-removal areas, sediment flux increased significantly, soil nutrients and seed bank were depleted, and Prosopis glandulosa shrub cover increased compared to controls. Additionally, differential changes for grass and shrub cover were observed for plots downwind of vegetation-removal and control areas. Grass cover on plots downwind of vegetation-removal areas decreased over time (2004-2007) despite above average rainfall throughout the period of observation, while grass cover increased downwind of control areas; P. glandulosa cover increased on plots downwind of vegetation-removal areas, while decreasing on plots downwind of control areas. The relationships between vegetation changes and aeolian sediment flux were significant and were best described by a logarithmic function, with decreases in grass cover and increases in shrub cover

  16. Further development of the swinging-blade Savonius rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoss, T. K.; Najjar, Y. S. H.

    Savonius rotor performance is improved by allowing both downwind and upwind rotor blades to swing back through an optimum angle. This will minimize the drag on the upwind blade and maximize the drag on the down-wind blade. A combination of 50 degrees upwind blade swing angle and 13.5 degrees downwind blade swing angle have been found experimentally to be the optimum swing angles that increased the rotor maximum power coefficient to about 23.5 percent compared with 18 percent with optimum upwind blade swing alone.

  17. Kinetic energy entrainment in wind turbine and actuator disc wakes: an experimental analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lignarolo, L.E.M.; Ragni, D.; Simao Ferreira, C.J.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The present experimental study focuses on the comparison between the wake of a two-bladed wind turbine and the one of an actuator disk. The flow field at the middle plane of the wake is measured with a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, in the low-speed Open Jet Facility wind tunnel of t

  18. Comparison between PIV measurements and computations of the near-wake of an actuator disc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Lignarolo, L. E. M.; Ragni, D.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental stereoscopic PIV measurements in the wake of a two-bladed rotor and a porous actuator disc are compared to numerical simulation of an actuator disc. Compared to previous literature, the focus of the present analysis is on the near wake, where the actuator discs fail to represent...

  19. Kinetic energy entrainment in wind turbine and actuator disc wakes: an experimental analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lignarolo, L.E.M.; Ragni, D.; Simao Ferreira, C.J.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The present experimental study focuses on the comparison between the wake of a two-bladed wind turbine and the one of an actuator disk. The flow field at the middle plane of the wake is measured with a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry setup, in the low-speed Open Jet Facility wind tunnel of t

  20. Effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on small wind turbine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of blade flutter and electrical loading on the noise level of two different size wind turbines was investigated at the Conservation and Production Research Laboratory (CPRL) near Bushland, TX. Noise and performance data were collected on two blade designs tested on a wind turbine rated a...

  1. Special Operations Aerial Mobility Vehicle Training Syllabus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    powered glider. (9) A fixed-pitch, semi-rigid, teetering, two- blade rotor system, if a gyroplane...Kts) Notes NorthWing Apache XC $55K 2 490 335 780 65 Soft, folding wing ParaJet Sky Runner $118 K 1 500 200 100 55 Collapsing wing

  2. Air pollution damage to cell membranes in lichens. Pt. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, L.C.; Rodgers, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Downwind from field furnaces burning sulfur at the rate of 300 g/hr, SO/sub 2/ levels varied from 0.52 ppm at 10 m to 0.23 at 40 m in an open area where fumes could readily disperse but were considerably higher in an area where air movement was chanelled along a swale. The conductivity of water in which pieces of lichens were immersed following exposure to fumes from the field burners increased slightly in liches collected upwind from the burners or over 100 meters downwind, but increased considerably in specimens collected 15-30 m downwind. Leakage of electrolytes, as measured by increase in conductivity of water in which lichen pieces were immersed, was significantly higher downwind from burners in an open area than from those in a densely forested area.

  3. Comparison of toxicological and radiological aspects of K basins sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RITTMANN, P.D.

    1999-10-27

    The composition of various K Basins sludge is evaluated for its toxicological and radiological impacts downwind from accidents. It is shown that the radiological risk evaluation guidelines are always more limiting than the toxicological risk evaluation guidelines.

  4. Review and Assessment of Chlorine Mammalian Lethality Data and the Development of a Human Estimate R-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    downwind hazard distances were consistent with what has been witnessed historically. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF...runs using the general population estimate. The predicted downwind hazard distances were consistent with what has been witnessed historically. 1...Raphson method for the present system of equations (eq B17 to eq B21), the following simultaneous equations are used to determine the next guess for

  5. International Airport Impacts to Air Quality: Size and Related Properties of Large Increases in Ultrafine Particle Number Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudda, N; Fruin, S A

    2016-04-05

    We measured particle size distributions and spatial patterns of particle number (PN) and particle surface area concentrations downwind from the Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) where large increases (over local background) in PN concentrations routinely extended 18 km downwind. These elevations were mostly comprised of ultrafine particles smaller than 40 nm. For a given downwind distance, the greatest increases in PN concentrations, along with the smallest mean sizes, were detected at locations under the landing jet trajectories. The smaller size of particles in the impacted area, as compared to the ambient urban aerosol, increased calculated lung deposition fractions to 0.7-0.8 from 0.5-0.7. A diffusion charging instrument (DiSCMini), that simulates alveolar lung deposition, measured a fivefold increase in alveolar-lung deposited surface area concentrations 2-3 km downwind from the airport (over local background), decreasing steadily to a twofold increase 18 km downwind. These ratios (elevated lung-deposited surface area over background) were lower than the corresponding ratios for elevated PN concentrations, which decreased from tenfold to twofold over the same distance, but the spatial patterns of elevated concentrations were similar. It appears that PN concentration can serve as a nonlinear proxy for lung deposited surface area downwind of major airports.

  6. Mach number scaling of helicopter rotor blade/vortex interaction noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Kenneth P.; Harris, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    A parametric study of model helicopter rotor blade slap due to blade vortex interaction (BVI) was conducted in a 5 by 7.5-foot anechoic wind tunnel using model helicopter rotors with two, three, and four blades. The results were compared with a previously developed Mach number scaling theory. Three- and four-bladed rotor configurations were found to show very good agreement with the Mach number to the sixth power law for all conditions tested. A reduction of conditions for which BVI blade slap is detected was observed for three-bladed rotors when compared to the two-bladed baseline. The advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotor exhibited an angular dependence not present for the two-bladed configuration. The upper limits for the advance ratio boundaries of the four-bladed rotors increased with increasing rotational speed.

  7. Demonstration of partial pitch 2-bladed wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Taeseong; Zahle, Frederik; Troldborg, Niels;

    This is the final report for the EUDP project performed from January 2012 to December 2015. The main objective for the project was to demonstrate the potential of the partial pitch two-bladed (PP-2B) technology. DTU Wind Energy took a responsibility for three workpackages (WPs) among 6 WPs which...... were aerodynamic evaluation of partial pitch technology (WP2), aeroelastic analysis of two-bladed turbine (WP3) and On-site testing (WP4). For the WP2, a comprehensive set of 3D CFD simulations including the gap between inner and outer part of the blade and vortex generators (VGs) of both cross...... pitch concept and detailed load analyses were performed. Also the comparison studies between numerical results and experimental results were performed. Moreover stability analyses for the PP- 2B turbine have been performed with HAWC2 and modal analysis using Hill’s method was performed to calculate...

  8. Wind energy conversion. Volume VII. Effects of tower motion on the dynamic response of windmill rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, D.L.

    1978-09-01

    The effects of tower motion on the dynamic response of a windmill rotor are studied. The blade lagging and side tower motion are taken into consideration in the analysis. The equations of motion for the system are a set of linear ordinary differential equations having periodic coefficients. The periodic coefficients of the equations of motion for a three bladed rotor are eliminated by using the multiblade coordinate transformation method. For a two bladed rotor, the equations of motion are solved by using the harmonic balance method. In addition to both methods, the Floquet Transition Matrix method is shown to be an effective way in dealing with the linear ordinary differential equations having periodic coefficients. The differences between the instability regions for a three bladed system and for a two bladed system are discussed.

  9. Effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a Savonius wind turbine

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Savonius wind turbine is a common vertical axis wind turbine which simply comprises two or three arc-type blades and can generate power under poor wind conditions. With the aim of increasing the turbine’s power efficiency, the effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a typical two-bladed Savonius wind turbine is investigated with a transient computational fluid dynamics method. Simulations were based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes equations, and the renormalization group k ...

  10. Yaw control for active damping of structural dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekelund, T. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Control Engineering Lab.

    1996-12-01

    Yaw torque control for reduction of structural dynamic loads in a two-bladed wind turbine is investigated. The models are obtained using rigid-body mechanics. Linear quadratic control theory is utilized for design and analysis. The analysis of two simple examples, where the teeter angle and the tower lateral bending motion are regarded, shows that a time-varying controller has some advantages compared with a time-invariant controller. 6 refs, 9 figs

  11. Optimization Design and Experimental Study of Low-Pressure Axial Fan with Forward-Skewed Blades

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of the optimization of blade skew in low pressure axial fan. Using back propagation (BP) neural network and genetic algorithm (GA), the optimization was performed for a radial blade. An optimized blade is obtained through blade forward skew. Measurement of the two blades was carried out in aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance. Compared to the radial blade, the optimized blade demonstrated improvements in efficiency, total pres...

  12. Wibault two-seat monoplane 8C2 : an all-metal pursuit and observation airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serryer, J

    1926-01-01

    Michel Wibault's two seat monoplane 8C2, is similar to the Parasol pursuit monoplane which preceded it. It has no perishable parts in its structure and needs no special storage or coverings. The sample aeroplane uses a 500 HP Hispano-Suiza engine but can accept a 400-600HP engine from a variety of manufacturers with little difficulty. It uses a two blade tractor propeller.

  13. The Effect of Blade-Section Thickness Ratio on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Related Full-Scale Propellers at Mach Numbers up to 0.65

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Julian D; Steinberg, Seymour

    1953-01-01

    The results of an investigation of two 10-foot-diameter, two-blade NACA propellers are presented for a range of blade angles from 20 degrees to 55 degrees at airspeeds up to 500 miles per hour. These results are compared with those from previous investigations of five related NACA propellers in order to evaluate the effects of blade-section thickness ratios on propeller aerodynamic characteristics.

  14. Effect of the number of blades and solidity on the performance of a vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafin, PL; Nishino, T.; Wang, L.; Kolios, A.

    2016-09-01

    Two, three and four bladed ϕ-shape Vertical Axis Wind Turbines are simulated using a free-wake vortex model. Two versions of the three and four bladed turbines are considered, one having the same chord length as the two-bladed turbine and the other having the same solidity as the two-bladed turbine. Results of the two-bladed turbine are validated against published experimental data of power coefficient and instantaneous torque. The effect of solidity on the power coefficient is presented and the instantaneous torque, thrust and lateral force of the two-, three- and four-bladed turbines are compared for the same solidity. It is found that increasing the number of blades from two to three significantly reduces the torque, thrust and lateral force ripples. Adding a fourth blade further reduces the ripples except for the torque at low tip speed ratio. This work aims to help choosing the number of blades during the design phase of a vertical axis wind turbine.

  15. Assessing Model Characterization of Single Source Secondary Pollutant Impacts Using 2013 SENEX Field Study Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kirk R; Woody, Matthew C

    2017-03-15

    Aircraft measurements made downwind from specific coal fired power plants during the 2013 Southeast Nexus field campaign provide a unique opportunity to evaluate single source photochemical model predictions of both O3 and secondary PM2.5 species. The model did well at predicting downwind plume placement. The model shows similar patterns of an increasing fraction of PM2.5 sulfate ion to the sum of SO2 and PM2.5 sulfate ion by distance from the source compared with ambient based estimates. The model was less consistent in capturing downwind ambient based trends in conversion of NOX to NOY from these sources. Source sensitivity approaches capture near-source O3 titration by fresh NO emissions, in particular subgrid plume treatment. However, capturing this near-source chemical feature did not translate into better downwind peak estimates of single source O3 impacts. The model estimated O3 production from these sources but often was lower than ambient based source production. The downwind transect ambient measurements, in particular secondary PM2.5 and O3, have some level of contribution from other sources which makes direct comparison with model source contribution challenging. Model source attribution results suggest contribution to secondary pollutants from multiple sources even where primary pollutants indicate the presence of a single source.

  16. Determination of the Maximum Aerodynamic Efficiency of Wind Turbine Rotors with Winglets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunaa, Mac; Johansen, Jeppe [Senior Scientists, Risoe National Laboratory, Roskilde, DK-4000 (Denmark)

    2007-07-15

    The present work contains theoretical considerations and computational results on the nature of using winglets on wind turbines. The theoretical results presented show that the power augmentation obtainable with winglets is due to a reduction of tip-effects, and is not, as believed up to now, caused by the downwind vorticity shift due to downwind winglets. The numerical work includes optimization of the power coefficient for a given tip speed ratio and geometry of the span using a newly developed free wake lifting line code, which takes into account also viscous effects and self induced forces. Validation of the new code with CFD results for a rotor without winglets showed very good agreement. Results from the new code with winglets indicate that downwind winglets are superior to upwind ones with respect to optimization of Cp, and that the increase in power production is less than what may be obtained by a simple extension of the wing in the radial direction. The computations also show that shorter downwind winglets (>2%) come close to the increase in Cp obtained by a radial extension of the wing. Lastly, the results from the code are used to design a rotor with a 2% downwind winglet, which is computed using the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys3D. These computations show that further work is needed to validate the FWLL code for cases where the rotor is equipped with winglets.

  17. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, V H; Majewski, M S; Foreman, W T; Genualdi, S A; Mohammed, A; Massey Simonich, S L

    2014-01-15

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9-126 ng/m(3) (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05-0.71 ng/m(3) (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  18. Effect of upstream fencing on shelter zone behind solid models simulating sand formations and dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Moreover, results indicate that some dune/fence combinations may cause shifting of the dune upwind (instead of downwind in the absence of fence. This effect means that, with such combinations, a dune would eventually disappear. The distance between the model downwind base line and the location of reattachment (length of shelter zone was plotted against the distance of fence from upwind base line of model to determine the best possible dune/fence combination. Solid fencing (constructed from masonry bricks or stones to shelter isolated sand humps and dunes is effective in alleviating dangers on nearby structures (dune shifting upwind and to less sand drift and saltation downwind. Also, the results indicated that, it is recommended to start by dune fencing and give enough time for the project zone to widen and be effectively protected before starting the construction.

  19. Some experiments on Yaw stability of wind turbines with various coning angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundas, D.; Dugundji, J.

    1981-01-01

    A horizontal axis wind turbine was constructed to study the effect of coning angle on the yawing moments produced. Coning angles of 0 deg, +10 deg and -10 deg were studied in the upwind and downwind cases. Moment and rotational frequency of the blades at each yaw angle setting were taken. It was found that as the coning angle increased from -10 deg to +10 deg in either the upwind or downwind case the stability decreased. The downwind case was slightly more stable for all coning angles than was the upwind case. It is found that all the previous cases were stable for high rotation speeds, but at lower rotation speeds, they were all unstable and could not self start unless held in the wind.

  20. Some experiments on yaw stability of wind turbines with various coning angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundas, D.; Dugundji, J.

    1981-07-01

    A horizontal axis wind turbine, 0.61-m (2.0-ft) diameter, was constructed to study the effect of coning angle on the yawing moments produced. Coning angles of 0/sup 0/, +10/sup 0/, and -10/sup 0/ were studied in the upwind and downwind cases. Moment and rotational frequency of the blades at each yaw angle setting were taken. It was found that as the coning angle was increased from -10/sup 0/ to +10/sup 0/ in either the upwind or downwind case the stability was decreased. Also, the downwind case was slightly more stable for all coning angles than was the upwind case. These findings are compared with theoretical predictions. It was found that all the previous cases were stable for high rotation speeds, but at lower rotation speeds, they were all unstable and could not self-start unless held in the wind.

  1. Wind erosion and vegetation interactions in a desert ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, L.; Epstein, H.; Li, J.; Okin, G.

    2006-12-01

    Desert grassland degradation is common in many arid environments and is related to increasing shrub coverage, declines in grass species and loss of soil nutrients. Wind erosion may contribute to this degradation by eroding surface soil and depleting soil nutrients. Areas downwind of wind eroded areas may also be affected because wind eroded soils can be trapped beneath shrub canopies, creating "islands of fertility," while grass species are likely abraded or buried by deposition. We have established a manipulative experiment on the Jornada Experimental Range in southern New Mexico in a predominantly grassland habitat (interspersed with some shrub cover) to examine interactions between wind erosion and vegetation structure and function in the Chihuahuan Desert. Each of three experimental blocks includes five 25x50m treatment plots with different levels of vegetation removed (100%, 75%, 50%, 25%, and 0% - control) to stimulate wind erosion. Dust flux and vegetation composition, coverage (lateral and fractional), and spatial distribution are being monitored on and immediately downwind of treated areas. Additionally, individual grasses and shrubs have been selected for monitoring of leaf-level photosynthesis rates on treated and downwind areas to determine impacts of erosion on plant physiology. Results indicate an exponential increase in dust flux with decreasing lateral coverage of vegetation. The spatial distribution of vegetation also appears to be an important factor influencing wind erosion rates. Specifically, there is a positive correlation between the average gap size (space between plants) and dust flux. Leaf level photosynthesis rates were higher for shrubs than grasses, and were lower for grasses downwind of the 100% removal areas compared to the controls. Additionally, a decrease in grass coverage downwind of treated areas suggests that community composition changes are occurring downwind from eroding areas. These results suggest a significant role for

  2. Transmission identification of Escherichia coli aerosol in chicken houses to their environments using ERIC-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In order to study E. coli aerosol spreading from chicken houses to their surrounding air, air samples, including indoor and outdoor air (upwind 10 and 50 m as well as downwind 10, 50, 100, 200 and 400 m away) of 5 chicken houses were collected using six-stage Andersen microbial samplers and Reuter-Centrifugal samplers (RCS). E. coli concentrations (CFU/m3 air) collected from different sampling sites were calculated. E. coli strains from chicken feces samples were also isolated. Furthermore, the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR method was applied to amplify the isolated E. coli strain DNA samples. Through the genetic similarity analyses of the E. coli obtained from different sampling sites, the spreading of bioaerosol from animal houses to the ambient air was characterized. The results showed that the isolated E. coli concentrations in indoor air (9―63 CFU/m3) in 5 chicken houses were higher than those in upwind and downwind air, but there were no significant differences between the indoor and downwind sites 10 m away from all the 5 houses (P>0.05). The phylogenetic tree indicated that a part of the E. coli (34.1%) isolated from indoor air had 100% similarity with those isolated from feces, and that most of E. coli isolated (54.5%) from downwind at 10, 50, 100 or even 200 m had 100% similarity with those isolated from indoor air or feces too. But those isolated from upwind air had a lower similarity (73%―92%) with corresponding strains isolated from indoor air or feces. Our results suggested that some strains isolated from downwind air and indoor air originated in the chicken feces, but most of isolates obtained from upwind air samples did not come from the chicken feces or indoor air. Effective hygienic measures should be taken in animal farms to prevent or minimize downwind spreading of microorganism aerosol.

  3. Transmission identification of Escherichia coli aerosol in chicken houses to their environments using ERIC-PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN HuiYong; CHAI TongJie; CAI YuMei; ZHONG ZhaoBing; YAO MeiLing; ZHANG XingXiao

    2008-01-01

    In order to study E. coil aerosol spreading from chicken houses to their surrounding air, air samples,Including Indoor and outdoor air (upwind 10 and 50 m as well as downwind 10, 50, 100, 200 and 400 m away) of 5 chicken houses were collected using six-stage Andersen microbial samplers and Reuter-Centrifugal samplers (RCS). E. coli concentrations (CFU/m3 air) collected from different sampling sites were calculated. E. coli strains from chicken feces samples,were also isolated. Furthermore,the enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR method was applied to amplify the isolated E. coil strain DNA samples. Through the genetic similarity analyses of the E. coli obtained from different sampling sites, the spreading of bioaerosol from animal houses to the ambient air was characterized. The results showed that the isolated E. coli concentrations in indoor air (9-63 CFU/m3) in 5chicken houses were higher than those in upwind and downwind air, but there were no significant differences between the indoor and downwind sites 10 m away from all the 5 houses (P>0.05). The phyIogenetic tree indicated that a part of the E. coli (34.1%) isolated from indoor air had 100% similarity with those Isolated from feces, and that most of E. coli isolated (54.5%) from downwind at 10, 50, 100 or even 200 m had 100% similarity with those isolated from indoor air or feces too. But those isolated from upwind air had a lower similarity (73%-92%) with corresponding strains isolated from indoor air or feces. Our results suggested that some strains isolated from downwind air and indoor air originated in the chicken feces, but most of isolates obtained from upwind air samples did not come from the chicken feces or indoor air. Effective hygienic measures should be taken in animal farms to prevent or minimize downwind spreading of microorganism aerosol.

  4. Orthogonal Bases used for Feed Forward Control of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    In optimizing wind turbines it can be of a large help to use information of wind speeds at upwind turbine for the control of downwind turbines, it is, however, problematic to use these measurements directly since they are highly influenced by turbulence behind the wind turbine rotor plane. In this......In optimizing wind turbines it can be of a large help to use information of wind speeds at upwind turbine for the control of downwind turbines, it is, however, problematic to use these measurements directly since they are highly influenced by turbulence behind the wind turbine rotor plane...

  5. Impact of industrialization of the California Delta Area. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.B.; Giroux, H.D.; Knuth, W.A.

    1977-12-15

    A field study to investigate the potential effects of industrialization of the California Delta (Montezuma Hills) was conducted during August and September of 1976. The study consisted of meteorological and air quality observations and tracer studies. Tracer releases were made at Pinole, Matinez, and Montezuma Hills, and samples were taken within a radius of 50 to 70 km downwind. Estimates of the impact of potential emissions on downwind receptor areas were made including estimates of ozone generation resulting from potential emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons from the Montezuma Hills site.

  6. Emission of volatile organic compounds after land application of cattle manure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beef cattle manure can serve as a valuable source of nutrients for crop production. However, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) following land application may pose an odor nuisance to downwind populations. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of application method, diet, so...

  7. Verification of the Gaspar dose assessment module used in Maxigasp and Popgasp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamby, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    The GASPAR module utilized in MAXIGASP and POPGASP has been verified by hand calculations. The program operates as documented by the NRC [Eckerman et. al. 1980]. Equations used in the code to calculate downwind deposition rates, concentrations in air, on ground surfaces, and in vegetables, meat, and milk are provided in this report.

  8. Plants talk, but are they deaf?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicke, M.; Agrawal, A.A.; Bruin, J.

    2003-01-01

    Plants actively respond to damage with the induction of defences. One of these defences involves emitting volatiles that attract the enemies of the enemies of the plant. Whether downwind neighbouring plants ‘eavesdrop’ on these cues and respond with the induction of their defences too has been debat

  9. Measured Aerodynamic Interaction of Two Tiltrotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Wadcock, Alan J.; Derby, Michael R.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamic interaction of two model tilrotors in helicopter-mode formation flight is investigated. Three cenarios representing tandem level flight, tandem operations near the ground, and a single tiltrotor operating above thc ground for varying winds are examined. The effect of aircraft separation distance on the thrust and rolling moment of the trailing aircraft with and without the presence of a ground plane are quantified. Without a ground plane, the downwind aircraft experiences a peak rolling moment when the right (left) roto- of the upwind aircraft is laterally aligned with the left (right) rotor of the downwind aircraft. The presence of the ground plane causes the peak rolling moment on the downwind aircraft to occur when the upwind aircraft is further outboard of the downwind aircraft. Ground plane surface flow visualization images obtained using rufts and oil are used to understand mutual interaction between the two aircraft. These data provide guidance in determining tiltrotor flight formations which minimize disturbance to the trailing aircraft.

  10. Absorbed dose evaluations in retrospective dosimetry: Methodological developments using quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailiff, I.K.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Correcher, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dose evaluation procedures based on luminescence techniques were applied to 50 quartz samples extracted from bricks that had been obtained from populated or partly populated settlements in Russia and Ukraine downwind of the Chernobyl NPP. Determinations of accrued dose in the range similar to 30...

  11. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  12. Diurnal ozone cycle in the tropical and subtropical marine boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, A.T.J. de; Lelieveld, J.

    2000-01-01

    A conceptual analysis of diurnal ozone (O3 ) changes in the marine boundary layer (MBL) is presented. Such changes are most pronounced downwind of O3 sources in tropical and subtropical latitudes, and during summer at higher latitudes. Previously, it has been assumed that daytime photochemical O3

  13. Evaluation of the surface roughness effect on suspended particle deposition near unpaved roads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Dongzi; Gillies, J. A.; Etyemezian, V.; Nikolich, G.; Shaw, William J.

    2015-11-11

    The downwind transport and deposition of suspended dust raised by a vehicle driving on unpaved roads was studied for four differently vegetated surfaces in the USA states of Kansas and Washington, and one barren surface in Nevada. A 10 m high tower adjacent to the source (z10 m downwind) and an array of multi-channel optical particle counters at three positions downwind of the source measured the flux of particles and the particle size distribution in the advecting dust plumes in the horizontal and vertical directions. Aerodynamic parameters such as friction velocity (u*) and surface roughness length (z0) were calculated from wind speed measurements made on the tower. Particle number concentration, PM10 mass exhibited an exponential decay along the direction of transport. Coarse particles accounted for z95% of the PM10 mass, at least to a downwind distance of 200 m from the source. PM10 removed by deposition was found to increase with increasing particle size and increasing surface roughness under similar moderate wind speed conditions. The surface of dense, long grass (1.2 m high and complete surface cover) had the greatest reduction of PM10 among the five surfaces tested due to deposition induced by turbulence effects created by the rougher surface and by enhanced particle impaction/ interception effects to the grass blades.

  14. Modelling and measurements of wakes in large wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Rathmann, Ole; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs;

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models of flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve...

  15. Exposure of Lima bean leaves to volatiles from herbivore-induced conspecific plants results in emission of carnivore attractants: active or passive process?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choh, Y.; Shimoda, T.; Ozawa, R.; Dicke, M.; Takabayashi, J.

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that volatiles emitted by herbivore-damaged plants can cause responses in downwind undamaged neighboring plants, such as the attraction of carnivorous enemies of herbivores. One of the open questions is whether this involves an active (production of volatiles) or passive

  16. The effect of motion on presence during virtual sailing for advanced training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, F.A.; Verlinden, J.C.; Dukalski, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the amount of motion simulation required to influence presence and immersion on a dinghy sailing simulator. We specifically focused on the effects of roll, pitch and heave, when sailing an course with up-, side-and down-wind sections in a virtual environment. A real dingy was

  17. Concentration Fluctuations in Smoke Plumes Released Near the Ground

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Mikkelsen, Torben; Pécseli, H.L.

    2010-01-01

    results are tested against these hypotheses. We find strong evidence for a simple scaling of the standard deviation, skewness and kurtosis with the average concentrations at the downwind distances observed in our experiments. Near-ground concentration fluctuations in fixed as well as moving frames...

  18. Symposium on intermediate-range atmospheric-transport processes and technology assessment. [Lead Abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 47 papers in this proceedings. The purpose of this meeting was to assess the state of the art of modeling atmospheric transport processes 10 to 100 km downwind of point and area sources of pollution. (KRM)

  19. Dispersion model studies for Space Shuttle environmental effects activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/MSFC REED computer code was developed for predicting concentrations, dosage, and deposition downwind from rocket vehicle launches. The calculation procedures and results of nine studies using the code are presented. Topics include plume expansion, hydrazine concentrations, and hazard calculations for postulated fuel spills.

  20. Respiratory-cancer clustering associated with localised industrial air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, O L

    1978-02-11

    Between 1968 and 1974 there was a significantly large number of deaths from respiratory cancer among members of a Scottish community living near and downwind from a steel foundry. The air in that area was polluted by metallic particles from the foundry.

  1. Noise generation of upwind motor wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Noise sources of wind turbines with rotors upstream of the support structure are discussed along with methodology for sound level prediction. Estimated noise levels for the MOD-2 wind turbine are presented operating in both the upwind and downwind configurations. Results indicate that upwind rotor configurations may be advantageous from an acoustical standpoint.

  2. LF airport ground noise mitigation using scattering sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosschaart, C.; Eisses A.R.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    Ground noise due to aircraft starting from the Amsterdam airport runway ‘Polderbaan’ has been an issue since its construction in 2003. Take off operation in headwind conditions causes downwind sound propagation towards a residential area situated 2,5 km Southwest of the runway. Due to the large

  3. Greenhouse gas emission quantification from wastewater treatment plants, using a tracer gas dispersion method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delre, Antonio; Mønster, Jacob; Scheutz, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Plant-integrated methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emission quantifications were performed at five Scandinavian wastewater treatment plants, using a ground-based remote sensing approach that combines a controlled release of tracer gas from the plant with downwind concentration measurements. C...

  4. Temporal and spatial changes in the microbial bioaerosol communities in green-waste composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankhurst, Louise J; Whitby, Corinne; Pawlett, Mark; Larcombe, Lee D; McKew, Boyd; Deacon, Lewis J; Morgan, Sarah L; Villa, Raffaella; Drew, Gillian H; Tyrrel, Sean; Pollard, Simon J T; Coulon, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the microbial community within compost, emitted into the airstream, downwind and upwind from a composting facility was characterized and compared through phospholipid fatty acid analysis and 16S rRNA gene analysis using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and bar-coded pyrosequencing techniques. All methods used suggested that green-waste composting had a significant impact upon bioaerosol community composition. Daily variations of the on-site airborne community showed how specific site parameters such as compost process activity and meteorological conditions affect bioaerosol communities, although more data are required to qualify and quantify the causes for these variations. A notable feature was the dominance of Pseudomonas in downwind samples, suggesting that this genus can disperse downwind in elevated abundances. Thirty-nine phylotypes were homologous to plant or human phylotypes containing pathogens and were found within compost, on-site and downwind microbial communities. Although the significance of this finding in terms of potential health impact was beyond the scope of this study, it clearly illustrated the potential of molecular techniques to improve our understanding of the impact that green-waste composting emissions may have on the human health.

  5. Flow and wakes in complex terrain and offshore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Schepers, J.G.; Pihl, Sander van der

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models for flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve ...

  6. Modelling and measurements of wakes in large wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Rathmann, Ole; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models of flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve p...

  7. LF airport ground noise mitigation using scattering sections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosschaart, C.; Eisses A.R.; Eerden, F.J.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    Ground noise due to aircraft starting from the Amsterdam airport runway ‘Polderbaan’ has been an issue since its construction in 2003. Take off operation in headwind conditions causes downwind sound propagation towards a residential area situated 2,5 km Southwest of the runway. Due to the large prop

  8. Reduction of the performance of a noise screen due to screen-induced wind-speed gradients: numerical computations and wind-tunnel experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salomons, E.M.

    1999-01-01

    Downwind sound propagation over a noise screen is investigated by numerical computations and scale model experiments in a wind tunnel. For the computations, the parabolic equation method is used, with a range-dependent sound-speed profile based on wind-speed profiles measured in the wind tunnel and

  9. Concentrations of airborne endotoxin and microorganisms at a 10,000 cow open-freestall dairy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Confined animal production systems produce elevated bioaerosol concentrations, which are a potential respiratory health risk to individuals on site and downwind. In this study, airborne endotoxin and microorganisms were collected during the spring, summer, and fall at a large open-freestall dairy i...

  10. The Making of a Second-generation Wind Farm Efficiency Model Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Ejsing Jørgensen, Hans; Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane

    2009-01-01

    kilometres down to the size of the individual wind turbine. Flow within wind farms is difficult to predict. The analytical and modified WAsP/park models show promise; however, these require further development/evaluation. For the flow downwind of the wind farm, several intermediate-scale models fit...

  11. Impact of inland shipping emissions on elemental carbon concentrations near waterways in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuken, M.P.; Moerman, M.; Jonkers, J.; Hulskotte, J.; Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.; Hoek, G.; Sokhi, R.S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to quantify the impact of black carbon from inland shipping on air quality, expressed as elemental carbon (EC) near inland waterways in The Netherlands. Downwind measurements of particle numbers and EC were used to establish emission factors for EC from inland shipping using inverse

  12. The effect of nitrogen additions on bracken fern and its insect herbivores at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Jones; M.E. Fenn; T.D. Paine

    2011-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric pollution, including nitrogen deposition, on bracken fern herbivores has never been studied. Bracken fern is globally distributed and has a high potential to accumulate nitrogen in plant tissue. We examined the response of bracken fern and its herbivores to N fertilization at a high and low pollution site in forests downwind of Los Angeles,...

  13. Interactive effects of O3 exposure on California black oak (Quercus kelloggii Newb.) seedlings with and without N amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. Handley; Nancy Grulke

    2008-01-01

    We examined the short-term separate and combined effects of simulated nitrogen (N) deposition (fertilization) and ozone (O3) exposure on California black oak seedlings (Quercus kelloggii Newb.), an ecologically important tree of the San Bernardino Mountains downwind of Los Angeles. Realistic concentrations of O3...

  14. Wind reduction patterns around isolated biomass for wind erosion control in a desertified area of Central Sudan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nasr Al-amin, N.K.; Stigter, C.J.; El-Tayeb Mohammed, A.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of sparse vegetation, feature common in arid zone, to reduce wind force (velocity) and hence protect the surface and regions downwind from drifting sand and their consequences. Respectively 4 (with heights h of 4, 3.2, 2 and 1.66 m), 2 (with h of

  15. Preventing desert locust plagues: optimizing management interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huis, van A.; Cressman, K.; Magor, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    Solitarious desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria (Forskål) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), inhabit the central, arid, and semi-arid parts of the species¿ invasion area in Africa, the Middle East, and South-West Asia. Their annual migration circuit takes them downwind to breed sequentially where winter, sp

  16. The insertion loss of screens under the influence of wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo; Arranz, Marta Galindo

    1997-01-01

    A hard screen on an absorbing ground is investigated experimentally and theoretically under the influence of wind. Upwind as well as downwind conditions are investigated. The experimental data are the result of model experiments in a 1:25 scale model within a wind tunnel. These experiments are me...

  17. Further Evaluation of Spray Characterization of Sprayers Typically Used in Vector Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    generated. For each replication, the entire spray plume was measured (ASTM 2005). Ap- propriate personal protective equipment, includ- ing respirators ...being made that called for lateral downwind movement of sprays to impact flying insects (Brown 1968), a sprayer with a VMD between 8 and 30 mm would be

  18. Source contributions to PM2.5 and PM10 at an urban background and a street location

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Voogt, M.; Blom, M.; Weijers, E. P.; Rockmann, T.; Dusek, U.

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of regional, urban and traffic sources to PM2.5 and PM10 in an urban area was investigated in this study. The chemical composition of PM2.5 and PM10 was measured over a year at a street location and up- and down-wind of the city of Rotterdam, the Netherlands. The C-14 content in EC

  19. Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) Communications Program: Non-Ionizing Electromagnetic Radiation Literature Evaluation and Assessment, 1986-1987 Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    and electric fields downwind of HVDC transmission lines. Vernon Chartier of the Bonneville Power Administration presented their work measuring the...phase-advances. Torpor remained essentially unaffected. Dr. Walter R. Rogers of the Department of Bioengineering, Southwest Research Institute...Bracken, Inc. (Portland, OR ) and V.L. Chartier (Bonneville Power Administration, Vancouver, WA) reported preliminary data on the measurements of

  20. Radon emissions from natural gas power plants at The Pennsylvania State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stidworthy, Alison G; Davis, Kenneth J; Leavey, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Burning natural gas in power plants may emit radon ((222)Rn) into the atmosphere. On the University Park campus of The Pennsylvania State University, atmospheric radon enhancements were measured and modeled in the vicinity of their two power plants. The three-part study first involved measuring ambient outdoor radon concentrations from August 2014 through January 2015 at four sites upwind and downwind of the power plants at distances ranging from 80 m to 310 m. For each plant, one site served as a background site, while three other sites measured radon concentration enhancements downwind. Second, the radon content of natural gas flowing into the power plant was measured, and third, a plume dispersion model was used to predict the radon concentrations downwind of the power plants. These predictions are compared to the measured downwind enhancements in radon to determine whether the observed radon concentration enhancements could be attributed to the power plants' emissions. Atmospheric radon concentrations were consistently low as compared to the EPA action level of 148 Bq m(-3), averaging 34.5 ± 2.7 Bq m(-3) around the East Campus Steam Plant (ECSP) and 31.6 ± 2.7 Bq m(-3) around the West Campus Steam Plant (WCSP). Significant concentrations of radon, ranging from 516 to 1,240 Bq m(-3), were detected in the natural gas. The measured enhancements downwind of the ECSP averaged 6.2 Bq m(-3) compared to modeled enhancements of 0.08 Bq m(-3). Measured enhancements around the WCSP averaged -0.2 Bq m(-3) compared to the modeled enhancements of 0.05 Bq m(-3), which were not significant compared to observational error. The comparison of the measured to modeled downwind radon enhancements shows no correlation over time. The measurements of radon levels in the vicinity of the power plants appear to be unaffected by the emissions from the power plants. Radon measurements at sites surrounding power plants that utilize natural gas did not indicate that the radon concentrations

  1. Night-time formation and occurrence of new particles associated with orographic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedensohler, A.; Hansson, H.-C.; Orsini, D.; Wendisch, M.; Wagner, F.; Bower, K. N.; Chourlarton, T. W.; Wells, M.; Parkin, M.; Acker, K.; Wieprecht, W.; Facchini, M. C.; Lind, J. A.; Fuzzi, S.; Arends, B. G.; Kulmalao, M.

    The formation and occurrence of new ultrafine aerosol particles were studied in association with an orographic cloud during a field experiment at Great Dun Fell (GDF), Northern England. Three size spectrometers to measure submicrometer aerosol particles were located upwind, on top, and downwind of GDF Summit to investigate changes in the aerosol size distribution. During two night-time cloud periods, ultrafine particles were observed downwind of the hill while no particles were detected upwind of the hill. During one cloud event, there was some evidence of entrainment. In this case, the occurrence of ultrafine particles may have been due to entrainment from aloft or by homogenous nucleation downwind of the hill. During the other cloud event, the formation of an ultrafine particle mode (nucleation mode) occurred probably after the cloud passage. There was no evidence of entrainment during this time period. Multicomponent homogeneous nucleation models were used to simulate the formation of new particle downwind of an orographic cloud. Possible homogeneous nucleation processes for this could be the formation of sulphuric acid or ammonium chloride due to outgassing of hydrochloric acid. It was not possible, however, to simulate formation rates of new particles as observed downwind the hill using a model for the binary or ternary homogeneous nucleation process of ammonia and hydrochloric acid. During the first event with high sulphur dioxide concentrations, the formation of new particle via binary homogeneous nucleation of sulphuric acid and water could be only predicted using a high nighttime hydroxyl radical concentration. No formation of sulphuric acid particle could be simulated during the second event with low sulphur dioxide concentrations.

  2. The importance of tree size and fecundity for wind dispersal of big-leaf mahogany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian M Norghauer

    Full Text Available Seed dispersal by wind is a critical yet poorly understood process in tropical forest trees. How tree size and fecundity affect this process at the population level remains largely unknown because of insufficient replication across adults. We measured seed dispersal by the endangered neotropical timber species big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King, Meliaceae in the Brazilian Amazon at 25 relatively isolated trees using multiple 1-m wide belt transects extended 100 m downwind. Tree diameter and fecundity correlated positively with increased seed shadow extent; but in combination large, high fecundity trees contributed disproportionately to longer-distance dispersal events (>60 m. Among three empirical models fitted to seed density vs. distance in one dimension, the Student-t (2Dt generally fit best (compared to the negative exponential and inverse power. When seedfall downwind was modelled in two dimensions using a normalised sample, it peaked furthest downwind (c. 25 m for large, high-fecundity trees; with the inverse Gaussian and Weibull functions providing comparable fits that were slightly better than the lognormal. Although most seeds fell within 30 m of parent trees, relatively few juveniles were found within this distance, resulting in juvenile-to-seed ratios peaking at c. 35-45 m. Using the 2Dt model fits to predict seed densities downwind, coupled with known fecundity data for 2000-2009, we evaluated potential Swietenia regeneration near adults (≤30 m dispersal and beyond 30 m. Mean seed arrival into canopy gaps >30 m downwind was more than 3× greater for large, high fecundity trees than small, high-fecundity trees. Tree seed production did not necessarily scale up proportionately with diameter, and was not consistent across years, and this resulting intraspecific variation can have important consequences for local patterns of dispersal in forests. Our results have important implications for management and conservation of big

  3. The importance of tree size and fecundity for wind dispersal of big-leaf mahogany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norghauer, Julian M; Nock, Charles A; Grogan, James

    2011-03-07

    Seed dispersal by wind is a critical yet poorly understood process in tropical forest trees. How tree size and fecundity affect this process at the population level remains largely unknown because of insufficient replication across adults. We measured seed dispersal by the endangered neotropical timber species big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King, Meliaceae) in the Brazilian Amazon at 25 relatively isolated trees using multiple 1-m wide belt transects extended 100 m downwind. Tree diameter and fecundity correlated positively with increased seed shadow extent; but in combination large, high fecundity trees contributed disproportionately to longer-distance dispersal events (>60 m). Among three empirical models fitted to seed density vs. distance in one dimension, the Student-t (2Dt) generally fit best (compared to the negative exponential and inverse power). When seedfall downwind was modelled in two dimensions using a normalised sample, it peaked furthest downwind (c. 25 m) for large, high-fecundity trees; with the inverse Gaussian and Weibull functions providing comparable fits that were slightly better than the lognormal. Although most seeds fell within 30 m of parent trees, relatively few juveniles were found within this distance, resulting in juvenile-to-seed ratios peaking at c. 35-45 m. Using the 2Dt model fits to predict seed densities downwind, coupled with known fecundity data for 2000-2009, we evaluated potential Swietenia regeneration near adults (≤30 m dispersal) and beyond 30 m. Mean seed arrival into canopy gaps >30 m downwind was more than 3× greater for large, high fecundity trees than small, high-fecundity trees. Tree seed production did not necessarily scale up proportionately with diameter, and was not consistent across years, and this resulting intraspecific variation can have important consequences for local patterns of dispersal in forests. Our results have important implications for management and conservation of big-leaf mahogany

  4. The Importance of Tree Size and Fecundity for Wind Dispersal of Big-Leaf Mahogany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norghauer, Julian M.; Nock, Charles A.; Grogan, James

    2011-01-01

    Seed dispersal by wind is a critical yet poorly understood process in tropical forest trees. How tree size and fecundity affect this process at the population level remains largely unknown because of insufficient replication across adults. We measured seed dispersal by the endangered neotropical timber species big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla King, Meliaceae) in the Brazilian Amazon at 25 relatively isolated trees using multiple 1-m wide belt transects extended 100 m downwind. Tree diameter and fecundity correlated positively with increased seed shadow extent; but in combination large, high fecundity trees contributed disproportionately to longer-distance dispersal events (>60 m). Among three empirical models fitted to seed density vs. distance in one dimension, the Student-t (2Dt) generally fit best (compared to the negative exponential and inverse power). When seedfall downwind was modelled in two dimensions using a normalised sample, it peaked furthest downwind (c. 25 m) for large, high-fecundity trees; with the inverse Gaussian and Weibull functions providing comparable fits that were slightly better than the lognormal. Although most seeds fell within 30 m of parent trees, relatively few juveniles were found within this distance, resulting in juvenile-to-seed ratios peaking at c. 35–45 m. Using the 2Dt model fits to predict seed densities downwind, coupled with known fecundity data for 2000–2009, we evaluated potential Swietenia regeneration near adults (≤30 m dispersal) and beyond 30 m. Mean seed arrival into canopy gaps >30 m downwind was more than 3× greater for large, high fecundity trees than small, high-fecundity trees. Tree seed production did not necessarily scale up proportionately with diameter, and was not consistent across years, and this resulting intraspecific variation can have important consequences for local patterns of dispersal in forests. Our results have important implications for management and conservation of big

  5. Effect of wind turbine wakes on cropland surface fluxes in the US Great Plains during a Nocturnal Low Level Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M. E.; Aitken, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Takle, E. S.; Prueger, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Installation of large scale wind farms is becoming a common operation in the Midwest, and wind farms frequently are situated among fields of agricultural crops. Each wind turbine is known to alter the behavior of the air mass downwind of the rotor; consequently, the rotor wakes alter the local microclimate. Quantification of the effects of wind turbine wakes on local microclimate is required to understand how large-scale wind deployment affects large-scale agriculture. This study examines the potential effect of wind turbine wakes on a corn crop in central Iowa during summer 2010. The field site consisted of one surface flux tower upwind of a row of five modern wind turbine generators, an identical surface flux station downwind of the turbine row, and a ground based LIDAR system downwind of the wind turbines. Each flux tower was instrumented with an array consisting of radiometers, a three-dimensional sonic anemometer, an open cell CO2 analyzer, a cup anemometer and wind vane, temperature and relative humidity sensors, and a tipping bucket. The LIDAR system reliably obtained readings up to 200 m above ground level (AGL), spanning the entire rotor disk (~40 m to 120 m AGL). This presentation examines wake-surface interaction on one particular night, during which the prevailing winds situated the LIDAR directly behind a wind turbine approximately 2 rotor diameters downwind of the turbine tower. As expected preliminary LIDAR results indicate that in the turbine rotor shadow there is a strong deficit of horizontal momentum. Additionally, a strong nocturnal low-level jet occurred above the turbine rotor disk. Wavelet spectral analysis indicates that oscillatory behavior, with frequencies characteristic of wind turbine wakes, is observed in the LIDAR horizontal and vertical winds and in the downwind flux station datastreams. The characterization of wake effects provided by this unique dataset will allow for better parameterization and modeling of wind turbine wake

  6. Artificial ultra-fine aerosol tracers for highway transect studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Thomas A.; Barnes, David E.; Wuest, Leann; Gribble, David; Buscho, David; Miller, Roger S.; De la Croix, Camille

    2016-07-01

    The persistent evidence of health impacts of roadway aerosols requires extensive information for urban planning to avoid putting populations at risk, especially in-fill projects. The required information must cover both highway aerosol sources as well as transport into residential areas under a variety of roadway configurations, traffic conditions, downwind vegetation, and meteorology. Such studies are difficult and expensive to do, but were easier in the past when there was a robust fine aerosol tracer uniquely tied to traffic - lead. In this report we propose and test a modern alternative, highway safety flare aerosols. Roadway safety flares on vehicles in traffic can provide very fine and ultra-fine aerosols of unique composition that can be detected quantitatively far downwind of roadways due to a lack of upwind interferences. The collection method uses inexpensive portable aerosol collection hardware and x-ray analysis protocols. The time required for each transect is typically 1 h. Side by side tests showed precision at ± 4%. We have evaluated this technique both by aerosol removal in vegetation in a wind tunnel and by tracking aerosols downwind of freeways as a function of season, highway configuration and vegetation coverage. The results show that sound walls for at-grade freeways cause freeway pollution to extend much farther downwind than standard models predict. The elevated or fill section freeway on a berm projected essentially undiluted roadway aerosols at distances well beyond 325 m, deep into residential neighborhoods. Canopy vegetation with roughly 70% cover reduced very fine and ultra-fine aerosols by up to a factor of 2 at distances up to 200 m downwind.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of a Modified Savonius Wind Turbine with Novel Blade Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The Savonius wind turbine is a type of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWTs) that is simply composed of two or three arc-type blades which can generate power even under poor wind conditions. A modified Savonius wind turbine with novel blade shapes is introduced with the aim of increasing the power coefficient of the turbine. The effect of blade fullness, which is a main shape parameter of the blade, on the power production of a two-bladed Savonius wind turbine is investigated using transient com...

  8. Rotor/body aerodynamic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzina, M. D.; Smith, C. A.; Shinoda, P.

    1985-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in which independent, steady state aerodynamic forces and moments were measured on a 2.24 m diam. two bladed helicopter rotor and on several different bodies. The mutual interaction effects for variations in velocity, thrust, tip-path-plane angle of attack, body angle of attack, rotor/body position, and body geometry were determined. The results show that the body longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics are significantly affected by the presence of a rotor and hub, and that the hub interference may be a major part of such interaction. The effects of the body on the rotor performance are presented.

  9. Wind turbine wake structure and yawed effect analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuntian

    In this research, the three-dimensional CFD simulation of the complex flow around a two-bladed rotor based on NREL Phase VI Experiment is presented. Its accuracy is demonstrated by comparing torque, thrust, power and power coefficient with experimental data. Then the wake structure behind the rotor is analyzed by showing the vorticity contour and comparing the velocity distribution behind the rotor with previous studies. Furthermore, a triangle relationship among power, upstream wind speed and yaw angle is given by setting control groups simulation. Reasonable explanations to the simulation results are presented. Finally, a linear relationship between power output and cosine value of yaw angle is found and analyzed.

  10. Effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a small horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, A.F.; Freris, L.L.; Graham, J.M.R. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-09-01

    An experiment into the effect of control activity on blade fatigue damage rate for a 5 kW, two bladed, teetered HAWT has been performed. It has been shown that control activity influences the distribution of strain in the blade but that in a high rotor speed, high cycle fatigue regime this has little influence on damage rate. The experiment was conducted on a small test turbine by implementing variable speed stall, pitch and yaw control strategies and measuring blade flapwise strain response at root and midspan locations. A full description of the investigation is provided. (au)

  11. U.S. Navy: A History of Stagnation and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Confederate blockade runners and commerce on a wide scale. Along with the change in strategy came the change in technology that was in train in the mid...all steam ships with sail, full rigging and to change the propellers from four blades to two, set the stage for what has been argued as the technical...and two blade screws they made a ship that was ill suited for coastal defense or commerce raiding. The shift in propulsion also had an impact on

  12. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Junkermann

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs, predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18~March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19~March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19~March plume and to help interpret

  13. Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, A. E.; Ryerson, T. B.; Peischl, J.; Parrish, D. D.; Trainer, M.; Tans, P. P.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic point and area source CO2 plume measurements: Implications for spaceborne CO2 sensor design A. Andrews, T. Ryerson, J. Peischl, D. Parrish, M. Trainer, P. Tans An extensive dataset of CO2 concentrations including enhancements in point and area source plumes is available from in situ measurements collected using the NOAA P-3 and NCAR Electra research aircraft during seven major field projects from 1999 through 2010. Research flights sampled emission plumes from coal-, oil-, and natural gas-fired electric utility power plants, industrial facilities, and urban areas. Plume sampling often included horizontal transects at several altitudes and multiple distances downwind. CO2 data from crosswind transects upwind and downwind, coupled with ancillary measurements of co-emitted nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide, along with plume location, and wind speed and direction permit unambiguous attribution and quantification of atmospheric plumes from individual sources. Certain point sources were revisited on multiple flights over the course of 1-2 month long field projects and on successive field projects spanning several years. Sampling occurred primarily in the summertime, daytime continental boundary layer, with some plume studies performed after dark and in the spring, fall, and winter seasons. The data provide rigorously calibrated, measurement-based constraints on the expected range of atmospheric CO2 plume enhancements that can be used to assess satellite sensor concepts. Crosswind near-field (~5 km) transects in the summer daytime mixed-layer downwind of the strongest point sources were characterized by peak plume CO2 mixing ratio enhancements >100 ppm above background for the 100-m spatial averages reported from the moving aircraft. On many flights, the aircraft tracked such emissions plumes beyond 150 km downwind, or up to 10 hours of transport time, until plume enhancements were indistinguishable from background variability in CO2

  14. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH

  15. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH

  16. A soft rotor concept - design, verification and potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, F.; Thirstrup Petersen, J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    This paper contains results from development and testing of a two-bladed soft rotor for an existing 15 kW flexible wind turbine. The new concept is characterised as a free yawing down wind turbine with nacelle tilting flexibility and a two-bladed teetering rotor with three-point supported flexible blades with built-in structural couplings. The power and the loads are controlled by active stall and active coning. The concept has been developed by extensive application of aero-elastic predictions, numerical optimisation and stability analysis in order to obtain optimal aero-elastic response and minimal loads. The flexible blades and the principle of active coning allow the blades to deflect with the wind to such an extent that the loads are reduced to between 25 and 50% of the loads for a similar rigid rotor. All conceptual design principles have been focused on application to large MW turbines, and aero-elastic predictions for an upscale 1 MW version show that this would have approximately identical characteristisc, without being particularly optimised for the actual size. (au)

  17. German chemical plant manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobbing, J.H.W.

    1946-01-01

    This report was about some equipment which was used in the chemical plant. Mixing machines with one or two blades were built in a large variety of sizes up to 7,500 liters. Several different types of drive were arranged for the blades, but the main one which was illustrated in the report was not altered. Because of shortage of special metals, like stainless steel, only very few of those machines were made of these metals. The two-bladed mixers, known as the universal mixers, were developed and built in sizes up to a total capacity of 15,000 liters, with a top stirring blade to keep the upper layers of the material being treated in a state of agitation. Bronze and stainless steel were frequently used to make the smaller-size machine. Cast iron was used to encase the gears in more substantial guards. A new internal rubber mixer was developed which contained many new features. A laboratory size of this machine was also made. A disc shredder with outputs of 800 to 1,000 kgs of alkali cellulose per hour was made in that time. The centrifuge sifter which was used to screen viscose, a small liquid mixer, and a grinder of a conical type were the other kinds of equipment which were used in the chemical plant and were discussed in this report. Seven pictures of different kinds of equipment were given with the report. 7 photographs

  18. Unsteady flow analysis of an axial flow hydraulic turbine with collection devices comprising a different number of blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Yasuyuki; Inagaki, Terumi; Li, Yanrong; Hirama, Sou; Kikuchi, Norio

    2015-06-01

    We previously devised a new type of portable hydraulic turbine that uses the kinetic energy of an open-channel flow to improve output power by catching and accelerating the flow. The turbine contains an axial flow runner with an appended collection device and a diffuser section that is not axisymmetric. The objective of this study is to determine how interference between the collection device and the runner influences performance characteristics of the turbine. We investigated the performance characteristics of the turbine and flow field for different numbers of blades during both unsteady and steady flow. During an unsteady flow, the maximum values of power coefficients for three and two blades increased by approximately 8.8% and 21.4%, respectively, compared to those during a steady flow. For the three-blade runner, the power coefficient showed small fluctuations, but for the two-blade runner, the power coefficient showed large fluctuations. These fluctuations in the power coefficient are attributed to fluctuations in the loading coefficient, which were generated by interference between the runner and the diffuser section of the collection device.

  19. Using DUSTRAN to Simulate Fog-Oil Dispersion and Its Impacts on Local Insect Populations at Ft. Hood: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Rutz, Frederick C.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2006-12-29

    Smokes and obscurants (S&O) are important screening agents used during military training exercises on many military installations. Although the use of S&O is subject to environmental laws, the fate and effects of S&O on natural habitats are not well documented. One particular concern is the impact S&O may have on local insect populations, which can be important components of terrestrial food chains of endangered species. Fog-oil (FO) is an S&O that is of particular concern. An important part of assessing potential ecosystem impacts is the ability to predict downwind FO concentrations. This report documents the use of the comprehensive atmospheric dispersion modeling system DUST TRANsport (DUSTRAN) to simulate the downwind transport and diffusion of a hypothetical FO release on the U.S. Army installation at Ft. Hood, TX.

  20. Far Field Modeling Methods For Characterizing Surface Detonations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrett, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed particle samples collected during experiments that were designed to replicate tests of nuclear weapons components that involve detonation of high explosives (HE). SRNL collected the particle samples in the HE debris cloud using innovative rocket propelled samplers. SRNL used scanning electronic microscopy to determine the elemental constituents of the particles and their size distributions. Depleted uranium composed about 7% of the particle contents. SRNL used the particle size distributions and elemental composition to perform transport calculations that indicate in many terrains and atmospheric conditions the uranium bearing particles will be transported long distances downwind. This research established that HE tests specific to nuclear proliferation should be detectable at long downwind distances by sampling airborne particles created by the test detonations.

  1. Analyzing precipitationsheds to understand the vulnerability of rainfall dependent regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. W. Keys

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that rivers connect upstream and downstream ecosystems within watersheds. Here we describe the concept of precipitationsheds to show how upwind terrestrial evaporation source areas contribute moisture for precipitation in downwind sink regions. We illustrate the importance of upwind land cover in precipitationsheds to sustain precipitation in critically water stressed downwind areas, i.e. dryland agricultural areas. We first identify seven regions where rainfed agriculture is particularly vulnerable to reductions in precipitation, and then map their precipitationsheds. We further develop a framework for qualitatively assessing the vulnerability of precipitation for these seven agricultural regions. We illustrate that the sink regions have varying degrees of vulnerability to changes in upwind evaporation rates depending on the extent of the precipitationshed, source region land use intensity and expected land cover changes in the source region.

  2. Using Atmospheric Dispersion Theory to Inform the Design of a Short-lived Radioactive Particle Release Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rishel, Jeremy P.; Keillor, Martin E.; Arrigo, Leah M.; Baciak, James E.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Seifert, Allen; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Smart, John E.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric dispersion theory can be used to predict ground deposition of particulates downwind of a radionuclide release. This paper utilizes standard formulations found in Gaussian plume models to inform the design of an experimental release of short-lived radioactive particles into the atmosphere. Specifically, a source depletion algorithm is used to determine the optimum particle size and release height that maximizes the near-field deposition while minimizing the both the required source activity and the fraction of activity lost to long-distance transport. The purpose of the release is to provide a realistic deposition pattern that might be observed downwind of a small-scale vent from an underground nuclear explosion. The deposition field will be used, in part, to investigate several techniques of gamma radiation survey and spectrometry that could be utilized by an On-Site Inspection team under the verification regime of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty.

  3. Lyman-alpha Absorption from Heliosheath Neutrals

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, B E; Linsky, J L; Malama, Y G; Wood, Brian E.; Izmodenov, Vladislav V.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Malama, Yury G.

    2006-01-01

    We assess what information HST observations of stellar Ly-alpha lines can provide on the heliosheath, the region of the heliosphere between the termination shock and heliopause. To search for evidence of heliosheath absorption, we conduct a systematic inspection of stellar Ly-alpha lines reconstructed after correcting for ISM absorption (and heliospheric/astrospheric absorption, if present). Most of the stellar lines are well centered on the stellar radial velocity, as expected, but the three lines of sight with the most downwind orientations relative to the ISM flow (Chi1 Ori, HD 28205, and HD 28568) have significantly blueshifted Ly-alpha lines. Since it is in downwind directions where heliosheath absorption should be strongest, the blueshifts are almost certainly caused by previously undetected heliosheath absorption. We make an initial comparison between the heliosheath absorption and the predictions of a pair of heliospheric models. A model with a complex multi-component treatment of plasma within the he...

  4. Noise radiation characteristics of the Westinghouse WWG-0600 (600kW) wind turbine generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Kevin P.; Hubbard, Harvey H.

    1989-01-01

    Acoustic data are presented from five different WWG-0600 machines for the wind speed range 6.7 to 13.4 m/s, for a power output range of 51 to 600 kW and for upwind, downwind and crosswind locations. Both broadband and narrowband data are presented and are compared with calculations and with similar data from other machines. Predicted broadband spectra are in good agreement with measurements at high power and underestimate them at low power. Discrete frequency rotational noise components are present in all measurements and are believed due to terrain induced wind gradients. Predictions are in general agreement with measurements upwind and downwind but underestimate them in the crosswind direction.

  5. Radar detection of drones responding to honeybee queen pheromone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loper, G M; Wolf, W W; Taylor, O R

    1993-09-01

    The response of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) drones to queen pheromone(s) (either natural from a mated queen, or synthetic from a lure) was recorded using an X-band, ground-based radar. The distribution of drones (insect targets on the radar screen) changed from a scattered distribution to a line concentration (downwind) when the pheromone was released. Displacement within the line concentration was toward the pheromone. This response was seen as far as 800±15 m downwind from a lure with 10 mg of synthetic 9-oxodec-trans-2-enoic acid (9-ODA) and as far as 420±15 m from a mated queen. These studies demonstrate that queen pheromone can be detected by drones at much greater distances than previously believed and illustrate how X-band radar may be used to establish the distances at which insects of similar or larger size respond to pheromones.

  6. Power augmentation of cheap, sail-type, horizontal-axis wind-turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, P. D.; Probert, S. D.

    1982-09-01

    A history of the development of windpowered machinery is presented, and the installation of tipvanes and centerbodies to enhance the performance of low cost WECS for developing countries are examined experimentally. Particular attention is given to sail wing rotors equipped with tip fins, peristaltic pumps reparable by semiskilled labor, and various configurations of tip fins and center bodies, which deflect the wind outward from the hub to the sails. Cheap, flat-plate tip fins were found to effective in augmenting rotor performance by as much as 1.6 when facing only downwind. Best results were obtained with one tip vane per sail, with the fins downwind a distance at least equal to the pitch of a wind-filled sail. Further experimentation with stationary deflectors which redirect wind into the buckets of a Savonius rotor or the sails of a horizontal axis WECS are suggested.

  7. Estimating the volcanic emission rate and atmospheric lifetime of SO2 from space: a case study for Kīlauea volcano, Hawai`i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Beirle

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of SO2 column densities derived from GOME-2 satellite measurements for the Kīlauea volcano (Hawai`i for 2007–2012. During a period of enhanced degassing activity in March–November 2008, monthly mean SO2 emission rates and effective SO2 lifetimes are determined simultaneously from the observed downwind plume evolution and meteorological wind fields, without further model input. Kīlauea is particularly suited for quantitative investigations from satellite observations owing to the absence of interfering sources, the clearly defined downwind plumes caused by steady trade winds, and generally low cloud fractions. For March–November 2008, the effective SO2 lifetime is 1–2 days, and Kīlauea SO2 emission rates are 9–21 kt day−1, which is about 3 times higher than initially reported from ground-based monitoring systems.

  8. Transport of biologically important nutrients by wind in an eroding cold desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankey, Joel B.; Germino, Matthew J.; Benner, Shawn G.; Glenn, Nancy F.; Hoover, Amber N.

    2012-01-01

    Wind erosion following fire is an important landscape process that can result in the redistribution of ecologically important soil resources. In this study we evaluated the potential for a fire patch in a desert shrubland to serve as a source of biologically important nutrients to the adjacent, downwind, unburned ecosystem. We analyzed nutrient concentrations (P, K, Ca, Mg, Cu, Fe, Mn, Al) in wind-transported sediments, and soils from burned and adjacent unburned surfaces, collected during the first to second growing seasons after a wildfire that burned in 2007 in Idaho, USA in sagebrush steppe; a type of cold desert shrubland. We also evaluated the timing of potential wind erosion events and weather conditions that might have contributed to nutrient availability in downwind shrubland. Findings indicated that post-fire wind erosion resulted in an important, but transient, addition of nutrients on the downwind shrubland. Aeolian sediments from the burned area were enriched relative to both the up- and down-wind soil and indicated the potential for a fertilization effect through the deposition of the nutrient-enriched sediment during the first, but not second, summer after wildfire. Weather conditions that could have produced nutrient transport events might have provided increased soil moisture necessary to make nutrients accessible for plants in the desert environment. Wind transport of nutrients following fire is likely important in the sagebrush steppe as it could contribute to pulses of resource availability that might, for example, affect plant species differently depending on their phenology, and nutrient- and water-use requirements.

  9. Atmospheric monitoring of a perfluorocarbon tracer at the 2009 ZERT Center experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekney, Natalie; Wells, Arthur; Rodney Diehl, J.; McNeil, Matthew; Lesko, Natalie; Armstrong, James; Ference, Robert

    2012-02-01

    Field experiments at Montana State University are conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Zero Emissions Research and Technology Center (ZERT) to test and verify monitoring techniques for carbon capture and storage (CCS). A controlled release of CO 2 with an added perfluorocarbon tracer was conducted in July 2009 in a multi-laboratory study of atmospheric transport and detection technologies. Tracer plume dispersion was measured with various meteorological conditions using a tethered balloon system with Multi-Tube Remote Samplers (MTRS) at elevations of 10 m, 20 m, and 40 m above ground level (AGL), as well as a ground-based portable tower with monitors containing sorbent material to collect the tracer at 1 m, 2 m, 3 m, and 4 m AGL. Researchers designed a horizontal grid of sampling locations centered at the tracer plume source, with the tower positioned at 10 m and 30 m in both upwind and downwind directions, and the MTRS spaced at 50 m and 90 m downwind and 90 m upwind. Tracer was consistently detected at elevated concentrations at downwind sampling locations. With very few exceptions, higher tracer concentrations correlated with lower elevations. Researchers observed no statistical difference between sampling at 50 m and 90 m downwind at the same elevation. The US EPA AERMOD model applied using site-specific information predicted transport and dispersion of the tracer. Model results are compared to experimental data from the 2009 ZERT experiment. Successful characterization of the tracer plume simulated by the ZERT experiment is considered a step toward demonstrating the feasibility of remote sampling with unmanned aerial systems (UAS's) at future sequestration sites.

  10. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    OpenAIRE

    Kunkel, D.; Tost, H.; Lawrence, M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Major population centers (MPCs) or mega-cities represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 46 ...

  11. Measuring Concentrations of Particulate 140La in the Air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Colin E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Keillor, Martin E.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Sorom, Rich D.; Van Etten, Don M.

    2016-05-01

    Air sampling systems were deployed to measure the concentration of radioactive material in the air during the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device experiments. The air samplers were positioned 100-600 meters downwind of the release point. The filters were collected immediately and analyzed in the field. Quantities for total activity collected on the air filters are reported along with additional information to compute the average or integrated air concentrations.

  12. Ocean Battlespace Sensing (OBS) S&T Department Annual Report High Resolution Upper Ocean Microstructure Measurements in the Bay of Bengal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    with 6 Hz pressure records, this system allows us to remove wave contamination from the CTD records, which is effectively at 50 cm in the vertical...km) physical context and 2) record the evolution of the upwind and downwind edges of a salty filament. The cruise consisted of two major components...interpret as a cold, freshwater layer propagating over a warmer, saltier water with an underlying N-S gradient. The front is starkly visible in the bow

  13. Dispersion modeling to compare alternative technologies for odor remediation at swine facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Susan S; Graham, Brevick G; Williams, C Mike

    2008-09-01

    The effectiveness of 18 alternative technologies for reducing odor dispersion at and beyond the boundary of swine facilities was assessed in conjunction with an initiative sponsored through agreements between the Attorney General of North Carolina and Smithfield Foods, Premium Standard Farms, and Frontline Farmers. The trajectory and spatial distribution of odor emitted at each facility were modeled at 200 and 400 m downwind from each site under two meteorological conditions (daytime and nighttime) using a Eulerian-Lagrangian model. To predict the dispersion of odor downwind, the geographical area containing the odorant sources at each facility was partitioned into 10-m2 grids on the basis of satellite photographs and architectural drawings. Relative odorant concentrations were assigned to each grid point on the basis of intensity measurements made by the trained odor panel at each facility using a 9-point rating scale. The results of the modeling indicated that odor did not extend significantly beyond 400 m downwind of any of the test sites during the daytime when the layer of air above the earth's surface is usually turbulent. However, modeling indicated that odor from all full-scale farms extended beyond 400 m onto neighboring property in the evenings when deep surface cooling through long-wave radiation to space produces a stable (nocturnal) boundary layer. The results also indicated that swine housing, independent of waste management type, plays a significant role in odor downwind, as do odor sources of moderate to moderately high intensity that emanate from a large surface area such as a lagoon. Human odor assessments were utilized for modeling rather than instrument measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or particulates less than 10 microm in diameter (PM10) because these physical measurements obtained simultaneously with human panel ratings were not found to accurately predict human odor intensity in the field.

  14. An Elevated Reservoir of Air Pollutants over the Mid-Atlantic States During the 2011 DISCOVER-AQ Campaign: Airborne Measurements and Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hao; Loughner, Christopher P.; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Arkinson, Heather L.; Brent, Lacey C.; Follette-Cook, Melanie B.; Tzortziou, Maria A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Thompson, Anne M.; Martins, Douglas K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Crawford, James H.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Lee, Pius; Hains, Jennifer C.; Dickerson, Russell R.

    2013-01-01

    During a classic heat wave with record high temperatures and poor air quality from July 18 to 23, 2011, an elevated reservoir of air pollutants was observed over and downwind of Baltimore, MD, with relatively clean conditions near the surface. Aircraft and ozonesonde measurements detected approximately 120 parts per billion by volume ozone at 800 meters altitude, but approximately 80 parts per billion by volume ozone near the surface. High concentrations of other pollutants were also observed around the ozone peak: approximately 300 parts per billion by volume CO at 1200 meters, approximately 2 parts per billion by volume NO2 at 800 meters, approximately 5 parts per billion by volume SO2 at 600 meters, and strong aerosol optical scattering (2 x 10 (sup 4) per meter) at 600 meters. These results suggest that the elevated reservoir is a mixture of automobile exhaust (high concentrations of O3, CO, and NO2) and power plant emissions (high SO2 and aerosols). Back trajectory calculations show a local stagnation event before the formation of this elevated reservoir. Forward trajectories suggest an influence on downwind air quality, supported by surface ozone observations on the next day over the downwind PA, NJ and NY area. Meteorological observations from aircraft and ozonesondes show a dramatic veering of wind direction from south to north within the lowest 5000 meters, implying that the development of the elevated reservoir was caused in part by the Chesapeake Bay breeze. Based on in situ observations, Community Air Quality Multi-scale Model (CMAQ) forecast simulations with 12 kilometers resolution overestimated surface ozone concentrations and failed to predict this elevated reservoir; however, CMAQ research simulations with 4 kilometers and 1.33 kilometers resolution more successfully reproduced this event. These results show that high resolution is essential for resolving coastal effects and predicting air quality for cities near major bodies of water such as

  15. Total Observed Organic Carbon (TOOC): A synthesis of North American observations

    OpenAIRE

    Heald, C. L.; Goldstein, A. H.; Allan, J. D.; Aiken, A. C.; Apel, E.; Atlas, E. L.; Baker, A. K; T. S. Bates; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Blake, D. R.; CAMPOS, T. de; Coe, H; Crounse, J. D.; P. F. DeCarlo; J. A. de Gouw

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of organic carbon compounds in both the gas and particle phases measured upwind, over and downwind of North America are synthesized to examine the total observed organic carbon (TOOC) over this region. These include measurements made aboard the NOAA WP-3 and BAe-146 aircraft, the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown, and at the Thompson Farm and Chebogue Point surface sites during the summer 2004 ICARTT campaign. Both winter and summer 2002 measurements during the Pittsburgh Air ...

  16. Wake Characteristics of a Single Turbine During the CWEX-10/11 Crop Wind-Energy EXperiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajewski, D. A.; Takle, E. S.; Lundquist, J. K.; Rhodes, M. E.; Prueger, J. H.; Oncley, S. O.; Horst, T. W.; Pfeiffer, R.; Hatfield, J.; Spoth, K. K.; Doorenbos, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2010 and 2011 for the Crop Wind-energy EXperiment (CWEX), flux stations measured differences in micrometeorology upstream and downstream of a single turbine within a large wind farm in Iowa. Profiling LiDARs were positioned upwind and downwind of a single turbine for two months in 2011 to document the wake profiles of mean wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Nacelle-based measurements of wind speed, wind direction, and power produced verified the likely presence of a wake above the downwind flux station. As described in the CWEX overview paper (Rajewski et al. 2013) the flux stations detected (1) turbine-wake events for wakes overhead but not intersecting the surface, (2) wakes with a direct surface influence, and (3) flow perturbations caused by the static pressure field around a line of turbines. We refine our conceptual model of wind turbine flow by comparing downwind-upwind flux and profile station differences for categories of waked and non-waked flow according to turbine hub-height speed and direction, ambient thermal stratification, and the operating status of the turbines. For nighttime stable conditions (some for which a low level jet is present) we measured both within the rotor depth and at the surface higher turbulence and stronger intermittency of the flow on the wake edges as compared to the wake core. We additionally observe frequent periods with 20-30° of directional shear from the surface to the top of the rotor as evidenced by a downwind flux station in non-waked flow with concurrent LiDAR measurement of a wake in the rotor layer. Momentum power spectra and co-spectra of 20-Hz surface data corroborate with previous wind tunnel and numerical simulations of wake turbulence with higher energy intensity but at reduced scales than for non-waked conditions. The spectra demonstrate a return to ambient flow when the wind farm is brought offline.

  17. ERIC-PCR identification of the spread of airborne Escherichia coli in pig houses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, W; Chai, T J; Miao, Z M

    2010-02-15

    To understand the spread of microbial aerosols in pig houses, with Escherichia coli (E. coli) as indicator, the airborne E. coli in 4 pig houses and their surroundings at different points 10, 50m upwind and 10, 50, 100, 200 and 400m downwind respectively from the pig houses were collected, and the concentrations were calculated at each sampling point. Furthermore, the feces of pigs were collected to separate E. coli. The ERIC-PCR (Enterobacterial Repetitive Intergenic Consensus-Polymerase Chain Reaction) technology was used to amplify the isolated E. coli DNA samples, then the amplified results were analyzed by NTSYS-pc (Version 2.10) to identify the similarity of isolated E. coli. The results showed that the airborne E. coli concentrations in indoor air of the 4 pig houses (21-35CFUm(-)(3) air) were much higher than those in upwind and downwind air (P0.05) at downwind distances. The ERIC-PCR results also showed that 52.4% of the fecal E. coli (four houses being respectively 2/4, 50%; 2/4, 50%; 3/6, 50%; 4/7, 57.1%) were identical to the indoor airborne E. coli isolates, and there was more than 90% similarity between the majority of E. coli (50%, 21/42) isolated from downwind air at 10, 50, 100 and 200m and those from indoor air or feces. It could be concluded that the aerosols in pig houses can spread to the surroundings, and thus effective measures should be taken to control and minimize the spread of microbial aerosols.

  18. Relocation impacts of an H-Separations coil and tube failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-03-06

    The relocation impacts of an accidental release, scenario 1-RD-2.35, are evaluated for H-Separations. The extent of the area potentially contaminated to a level that would result in doses exceeding the relocation protective action guide (PAG) is calculated. The maximum calculated distance downwind from the accident at which the relocation PAG is exceeded is also determined. The consequences of the release are evaluated using the HOTSPOT model and an EXCEL spreadsheet.

  19. COMBIC, Combined Obscuration Model for Battlefield Induced Contaminants: Volume 2 - Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Battalino Point Mugu CA 93042-5000 Redstone Scientific Info Ctr Attn AMSMI-RD-CS-R Bldg 4484 Redstone Arsenal AL 35898 Science & Technology 101...Computational and Information Sciences Directorate Scarlett D. Ayres Survivabilty/Lethality Analysis Directorate Approved for public release; distribution...source, one simply uses 15St in the stored cloud tables. Similarly, when one finds the average mass per unit downwind concentration, the average mass

  20. Nitrogen emissions, deposition, and monitoring in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark E. Fenn; Richard Haeuber; Gail S. Tonnesen; Jill S. Baron; Susanne Grossman-Clarke; Diane Hope; Daniel A. Jaffe; Scott Copeland; Linda Geiser; Heather M. Rueth; James O. Sickman

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition in the western United States ranges from 1 to 4 kilograms (kg) per hectare (ha) per year over much of the region to as high as 30 to 90 kg per ha per year downwind of major urban and agricultural areas. Primary N emissions sources are transportation, agriculture, and industry. Emissions of N as ammonia are about 50% as great as emissions of N as...

  1. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Petrography of Glassy Particles Produced by Lava Fountain Eruptions. Ph.D. Thesis - Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladle, G. H.

    1978-01-01

    A conceptual model of a lava fountain consists of a vent, spatter ramparts, fountain column, downwind plume and associated pumice deposits. Glassy particles produced by lava fountain eruptions consist primarily of sideromelane glass and minor to moderate amounts of vesicles and crystals. Particles are classified on the basis of morphology as: (1) spherical, (2) elongate, (3) glass-coated mineral grain, (4) shard, (5) reticulite, (6) composite particle, and (7) lithic fragment.

  2. Passive measurement of nitrogen oxides to assess traffic-related pollutant exposure for the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Brett C.; Hodgson, Alfred T.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Kim, Janice J.

    The East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study is examining associations between traffic-related pollutant exposures and respiratory health among children who reside and attend schools at varied proximity to northern California freeways. Chronic exposures are being inferred from outdoor pollutant concentrations at neighborhood schools. This paper reports primarily weeklong integrated NO 2 and NO X concentrations measured with passive samplers placed outside at 10 elementary schools during 14 weeks in spring and 8 weeks in fall 2001. Measurements were also made outside selected student residences to examine spatial variability within three school neighborhoods. Regional concentrations of NO 2 and NO X varied widely from week to week. School site data were normalized to measurements at a nearby regional monitoring station to facilitate analysis of relative pollutant exposures at the neighborhood schools. Normalized concentrations were consistent at each school throughout the study. Schools located upwind or far downwind of freeways were generally indistinguishable from one another and regional pollution levels. For school and neighborhood sites within 350 m downwind of a freeway, concentrations increased with decreasing downwind distance. The highest normalized concentrations occurred at a school located directly adjacent to a major freeway and a shopping center. In this case, normalized NO 2 and NO X were ˜60% and ˜100% higher than regional background levels. At three schools within 130-230 m downwind of a freeway, normalized NO 2 and NO X were ˜20-30% and ˜50-80% higher than regional levels. Validation testing of the passive samplers indicated precision of better than 5% for both NO 2 and NO X when samplers were deployed outside for 1-week periods. Passive sampler results agreed with co-located chemiluminescence measurements to within 8% for NO 2 and 3% for NO X.

  3. Forecasting Lake-Effect Snow in the Great Lakes Using NASA Satllite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipullo, Michelle; Molthan, Andrew; Shafer, Jackie; Case, Jonathan; Jedlovec, Gary

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the forecast of the lake effect snow in the Great Lakes region using models and infrared estimates of Great Lake Surface Temperatures (GLSTs) from the MModerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on Terra and Aqua satellites, and other satellite data. This study analyzes Lake Erie and Lake Ontario which produce storm total snowfall ranged from 8-18 inches off of Lake Ontario and 10-12 inches off of Lake Erie for the areas downwind.

  4. Aerosol dynamics in the Copenhagen urban plume during regional transport

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, F.; P. Roldin; Massling, A.; A. Kristensson; E. Swietlicki; Fang, D.; M. Ketzel

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the submicrometer size range (PM1) have serious impacts on human health and climate. This work aims at studying the processes relevant for physical particle properties in and downwind Copenhagen and evaluating the capability of a detailed aerosol dynamics and chemistry model (ADCHEM) to describe the submicrometer aerosol dynamics in a complex urbanized region, subjected to a variety of important anthropogenic sources. The study area is the Oresund R...

  5. ANEMOS: A computer code to estimate air concentrations and ground deposition rates for atmospheric nuclides emitted from multiple operating sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Begovich, C.L.; Hermann, O.W.

    1986-11-01

    This code estimates concentrations in air and ground deposition rates for Atmospheric Nuclides Emitted from Multiple Operating Sources. ANEMOS is one component of an integrated Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) developed for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in performing radiological assessments and in developing radiation standards. The concentrations and deposition rates calculated by ANEMOS are used in subsequent portions of the CRRIS for estimating doses and risks to man. The calculations made in ANEMOS are based on the use of a straight-line Gaussian plume atmospheric dispersion model with both dry and wet deposition parameter options. The code will accommodate a ground-level or elevated point and area source or windblown source. Adjustments may be made during the calculations for surface roughness, building wake effects, terrain height, wind speed at the height of release, the variation in plume rise as a function of downwind distance, and the in-growth and decay of daughter products in the plume as it travels downwind. ANEMOS can also accommodate multiple particle sizes and clearance classes, and it may be used to calculate the dose from a finite plume of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides passing overhead. The output of this code is presented for 16 sectors of a circular grid. ANEMOS can calculate both the sector-average concentrations and deposition rates at a given set of downwind distances in each sector and the average of these quantities over an area within each sector bounded by two successive downwind distances. ANEMOS is designed to be used primarily for continuous, long-term radionuclide releases. This report describes the models used in the code, their computer implementation, the uncertainty associated with their use, and the use of ANEMOS in conjunction with other codes in the CRRIS. A listing of the code is included in Appendix C.

  6. Predictability of Pilot Performance from Simulated to Real Flight in the UH-60 (Black Hawk) Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    making two 90-degree turns to the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, was required to hold the aircraft to straight and level flight at 1000 ft MSL and...simulator, there were no delays caused by heavy aircraft traffic in the area or maintenance delays from equipment malfunctions or failures. Despite all...vibration exposures, or true depth of field/ stereopsis , might only be meaningful in the real aircraft environment. Conclusions The use of operational

  7. Die-Away Kinetics of Aerosolized Bacteria from Sprinkler Application of Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Teltsch, B; Shuval, H I; Tadmor, J

    1980-01-01

    A methodology for estimating, under field conditions, the microbial die-away constant (lambda) is presented. This constant may be used in predicting the aerosolized pathogenic microorganism concentrations downwind from a wastewater spray or aeration site by means of modified atmospheric diffusion equations. The mean lambda of Escherichia coli for very early morning runs was 8.8 X 10(-3)s-1, and that for afternoon runs was 6.6 X 10(-2)s-1.

  8. Radiation Dose Reconstruction U.S. Occupation Forces in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, 1945-1946.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-06

    downwind contami- nated areas approximately 30 minutes after the bomb detonation. This is indicative of precipitation scavenging of the nuclear cloud...in a [ "n of fled of tarn Forest dvi v Me isa S )c hoolI o f Ci i cage( AT’ Li bra ry ATTN: C i1)ra y 1)1w .:n i v P1 seraulI ill Medicinn Unvrsi ty

  9. Process analysis of typical summertime ozone episodes over the Beijing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yuanhang; Fu, Joshua S; Zheng, Shaoqing; Wang, Wei

    2008-07-25

    The 2008 Summer Olympic Games will be held in Beijing; however, summer is the season in which Beijing is marked by frequent high-O(3) episodes. Observation analysis reveals that the urban plume is transported by a southerly wind and undergoes chemical reaction during propagation, resulting in the common occurrence of high O(3) concentrations in the urban downwind area; this is the typical scenario of the formation of high summertime O(3) levels over the Beijing area. The typical high-O(3) episode is well reproduced by the 3-dimensional air-quality model CMAQ-MADRID (Community Multi-scale Air-Quality Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization, and Dissolution). Radical cycle analysis reveals that the Beijing urban area was in a VOC-limited regime for O(3) formation, while the urban downwind area changed gradually to a NO(x)-limited condition. The urban downwind area, Dingling, is readily affected by intrusion of the urban plume. Detailed process analysis indicated that although the O(3) peaks reached the same level on 26 and 27 June 2000, the dominant process contributing to the O(3) increase was different on each day. On 26 June, the major contributor to the O(3) peak at Dingling was the arrival of high O(3) levels with propagation of the urban plume; in contrast, on 27 June O(3) precursors were transported rapidly to the urban downwind area by strong transportation processes that occurred earlier than those on the previous day, resulting in O(3) production by local photochemistry becoming the major contributor to the high-O(3) episode.

  10. Observations of sulfur dioxide uptake and new particle formation in a midlatitude cumulus cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, J. R.; S. T. Siems; Jensen, J.B.; Gras, J. L.; Ishizaka, Y.; Hacker, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Airborne measurements, obtained during the Asian Aerosol Characterisation Experiment (ACE-Asia), of SO2 and condensation nuclei (CN) concentrations were made in the local environment of a cumulus cloud band. Conserved quantities, wet equivalent potential temperature ?q, and total water content Q, were used to identify the sources of air detrained on the downwind side of the cumulus band. It was found that ~65% of the detrained air originated from below cloud base and t...

  11. Aerosol pollution potential from major population centers

    OpenAIRE

    D. Kunkel; Tost, H; Lawrence, M G

    2013-01-01

    Major population centers (MPCs), or megacities, represent the largest of growing urban agglomerations with major societal and environmental implications. In terms of air quality, they are seen as localized but strong emission sources of aerosols and trace gases which in turn affect air pollution levels in the city or in downwind regions. In the state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC, generic aerosol and gas-phase tracers with equal emission source strengths at 4...

  12. High ozone at rural sites in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, D.; Lal, S.

    2004-06-01

    Past observations of O3 at urban, rural and lower free tropospheric sites in India have shown generally low values rarely exceeding 60 ppbv. We show that this can not be generated to all over India. Surface ozone (O3) concentrations are obtained from measurements in rural, urban and free tropospheric environments in January 2001 and 2002 as a part of Mobile Lab Experiments (MOLEX) conducted in western India. Elevated O3 from 70 to 110 ppbv (nmole/mole) are recorded during afternoon hours at rural sites in downwind of major industrial region of Gujarat adjoining the Arabian Sea. Repeated observations during both the years indicate that this is a regular process in this region. The average background ozone is found to be 42±6 ppbv. The elevated ozone in the downwind site is about 60% higher than that in the major urban center and its surroundings and by a factor of 2 higher than the background levels of O3 in this region. In comparison to the downwind observations; the ozone observed at the continental stations in rural (Gadanki), urban (Ahmedabad) and free tropospheric (Mt. Abu) sites in India are low and rarely exceeded 60 ppbv during the month of January. Forward trajectory analysis shows that the polluted plumes from this urban area can get transported more than 3000 km to the marine boundary layer over the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean within a week. Similar transport of pollutants from major urban sites like Delhi and other cities can enhance O3 in their downwind rural sites and can affect the human health as well as vegetation significantly.

  13. Soil Sampling Plan in Support of the Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment for the Operation of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facilitiy at Site 300 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terusaki, S

    2007-12-13

    LLNL proposes to obtain soil samples from the following areas: (1) Four areas downwind of the Explosives Waste Treatment Facility (EWTF) Burn Units (i.e., Thermal Treatment Unit and Burn Pan); (2) One area upwind of the Burn Units and Detonation Pad; (3) Two areas downwind of the EWTF Detonation Pad; and (4) Three areas unaffected (representing ambient conditions) by EWTF operations approximately 7000-8000 feet upwind of the facility. The purpose of the sampling in areas 1, 2, and 3 is to detect if operations cause increases in concentrations of materials downwind of the Burn Units or downwind of the Detonation Pad. The purpose of the sampling in area 4 is to determine if previously developed background screening levels can be applied to EWTF operations. A 20 foot diameter circle will define each sample area. Soil samples will be obtained from four random locations inside each 20 foot circle. The samples will be obtained immediately below the surface, free of any organic matter (e.g., roots) and other surface and subsurface material (e.g., rocks) that is not conducive to analysis. The random identification of four discrete sample locations in each circle will allow the variability between sample locations and areas, if present, to be evaluated statistically. At a minimum, data will be evaluated by the Wilcoxon Rank Sum test. All future sampling will occur in the same 20 foot diameter circle; however, only one randomly located sample (instead of four) will be obtained. Future samples will be analyzed for the same chemicals of potential ecological concern (CPECs) as the initial sample. Sample areas and locations will be recorded by Global Positioning System coordinates.

  14. Photo-oxidants and precursors at Schauinsland, Black Forest: chemistry and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volz-Thomas, A.; Buers, H.J.; Flocke, F.; Geiss, H.; Heil, T.; Heitlinger, M.; Houben, N.; Jansen, S.; Klemp, D.; Kramp, F.; Mihelcic, D.; Muesgen, P.; Paetz, H.W.; Schultz, M.; Su, Y.; Kley, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie and Dynamik der Geosphaere (ICG-2)

    1997-12-31

    The main goal of this contribution was to contribute to a better understanding of the processes that control the budget of ozone and other photo-oxidants over Europe. Besides establishing a climatology of ozone and precursors in the context of TOR, particular emphasis was given to the role that meteorological and chemical processes play in controlling the concentrations observed at Schauinsland, an elevated rural site situated about three hours downwind of an urban settlement. (orig.)

  15. Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) Integrated Program Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    surrounding area. Agent has generated a downwind vapor hazard. Approx. contamination = over 5 miles o Several high value properties ...Agent YELLOW, which is a mixture of the chemical warfare agents Sulfur Mustard and Lewisite, is a liquid with a garlic -like odor. Sulfur mustard...infrastructure, commercial, military & private property . Approx. contamination = 2 areas of 10 sq. miles each o Hundreds of buildings contaminated o

  16. Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) Knowledge Enhancement Events: Behavioral Health Working Group After Action Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    generated a downwind vapor hazard. Approx. contamination = over 5 miles o Several high value properties contaminated including Coors Field, Pepsi...of the chemical warfare agents Sulfur Mustard and Lewisite, is a liquid with a garlic -like odor. Sulfur mustard, also known as mustard gas, has the...private property . Approx. contamination = 2 areas of 10 sq. miles each o Hundreds of buildings contaminated o Basic services affected o Local

  17. Wide Area Recovery and Resiliency Program (WARRP) Knowledge Enhancement Events: Waste Management Workshop After Action Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    and surrounding area. Agent has generated a downwind vapor hazard. Approx. contamination = over 5 miles o Several high value properties ...Background Agent YELLOW, which is a mixture of the chemical warfare agents Sulfur Mustard and Lewisite, is a liquid with a garlic -like odor. Sulfur...infrastructure, commercial, military & private property . Approx. contamination = 2 areas of 10 sq. miles each o Hundreds of buildings contaminated

  18. Verification of AXAIRQ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpkins, A. A.

    1995-10-01

    AXAIR89Q, designed to determine downwind doses following acute atmospheric releases at SRS, has been improved; the new version is AXAIRQ. Improvements include deposition option, new diffusion coefficients, ability to calculate 95% dose at user selected distances, and user-input mixing height. Other improvements also have been made to the format of the output. The user has the option to select the new features or operate the code as AXAIR89Q.

  19. Terrain-Induced Midtropospheric Frontogenesis and Jet Streak Development During Storm-Fest IOP-17, 8 & 9 March 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-21

    the Eastern Range providing meteorological consultation to both government and commercial launch programs. He is also was responsible for the...a barrier. Significant mountain ranges such as the Alps, Pyrenees , Tibetan Plateau, and the Rockies all influence the environment on their downwind...CCOPE) over Montana, the 1982 Alpine Experiment (ALPEX) over southern Europe, and the Pyrenees Experiment (PYREX) along the border of France and

  20. Airborne sound propagation over sea during offshore wind farm piling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Renterghem, T; Botteldooren, D; Dekoninck, L

    2014-02-01

    Offshore piling for wind farm construction has attracted a lot of attention in recent years due to the extremely high noise emission levels associated with such operations. While underwater noise levels were shown to be harmful for the marine biology, the propagation of airborne piling noise over sea has not been studied in detail before. In this study, detailed numerical calculations have been performed with the Green's Function Parabolic Equation (GFPE) method to estimate noise levels up to a distance of 10 km. Measured noise emission levels during piling of pinpiles for a jacket-foundation wind turbine were assessed and used together with combinations of the sea surface state and idealized vertical sound speed profiles (downwind sound propagation). Effective impedances were found and used to represent non-flat sea surfaces at low-wind sea states 2, 3, and 4. Calculations show that scattering by a rough sea surface, which decreases sound pressure levels, exceeds refractive effects, which increase sound pressure levels under downwind conditions. This suggests that the presence of wind, even when blowing downwind to potential receivers, is beneficial to increase the attenuation of piling sound over the sea. A fully flat sea surface therefore represents a worst-case scenario.

  1. Airborne test flight of HY-2A satellite microwave scatterometer and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Juhong; Guo, Maohua; Cui, Songxue; Zhou, Wu

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces the background, aim, experimental design, configuration and data processing for an airborne test flight of the HY-2 Microwave scatterometer (HSCAT). The aim was to evaluate HSCAT performance and a developed data processing algorithm for the HSCAT before launch. There were three test flights of the scatterometer, on January 15, 18 and 22, 2010, over the South China Sea near Lingshui, Hainan. The test flights successfully generated simultaneous airborne scatterometer normalized radar cross section (NRCS), ASCAT wind, and ship-borne-measured wind datasets, which were used to analyze HSCAT performance. Azimuthal dependence of the NRCS relative to the wind direction was nearly cos(2w), with NRCS minima at crosswind directions, and maxima near upwind and downwind. The NRCS also showed a small difference between upwind and downwind directions, with upwind crosssections generally larger than those downwind. The dependence of airborne scatterometer NRCS on wind direction and speed showed favorable consistency with the NASA scatterometer geophysical model function (NSCAT GMF), indicating satisfactory HSCAT performance.

  2. Reactive bromine chemistry in Mt. Etna's volcanic plume: the influence of total Br, high temperature processing, aerosol loading and plume-air mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Roberts

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic emissions present a source of reactive halogens to the troposphere, through rapid plume chemistry that converts the emitted HBr to more reactive forms such as BrO. The nature of this process is poorly quantified, yet is of interest to understand volcanic impacts on the troposphere, and infer volcanic activity from volcanic gas measurements (i.e. BrO / SO2 ratios. Recent observations from Etna report an initial increase and subsequent plateau or decline in BrO / SO2 ratios with distance downwind. We present daytime PlumeChem model simulations that reproduce and explain the reported trend in BrO / SO2 at Etna including the initial rise and subsequent plateau. Through suites of model simulations we also investigate the influences of volcanic aerosol loading, bromine emission, and plume-air mixing rate on the downwind plume chemistry. Emitted volcanic HBr is converted into reactive bromine by autocatalytic bromine chemistry cycles whose onset is accelerated by the model high-temperature initialisation. These rapid chemistry cycles also impact the reactive bromine speciation through inter-conversion of Br, Br2, BrO, BrONO2, BrCl, HOBr. Formation of BrNO2 is also discussed. We predict a new evolution of Br-speciation in the plume, with BrO, Br2, Br and HBr as the main plume species in the near downwind plume whilst BrO, and HOBr are present in significant quantities further downwind (where BrONO2 and BrCl also make up a minor fraction. The initial rise in BrO / SO2 occurs as ozone is entrained into the plume whose reaction with Br promotes net formation of BrO. Aerosol has a modest impact on BrO / SO2 near-downwind (2 occurs as entrainment of oxidants HO2 and NO2 promotes net formation of HOBr and BrONO2, whilst the plume dispersion dilutes volcanic aerosol so slows the heterogeneous loss rates of these species. A higher volcanic aerosol loading enhances BrO / SO2 in the (> 6 km downwind plume. Simulations assuming low/medium and high Etna

  3. On Rainfall Modification by Major Urban Areas. Part 1; Observations from Space-borne Rain Radar on TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall; Pierce, Harold; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This study represents one of the first published attempts to identify rainfall modification by urban areas using satellite-based rainfall measurements. Data from the first space-based rain-radar, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, are employed. Analysis of the data enables identification of rainfall patterns around Atlanta, Montgomery, Nashville, San Antonio, Waco, and Dallas during the warm season. Results reveal an average increase of -28% in monthly rainfall rates within 30-60 kilometers downwind of the metropolis with a modest increase of 5.6% over the metropolis. Portions of the downwind area exhibit increases as high as 51%. The percentage chances are relative to an upwind CONTROL area. It was also found that maximum rainfall rates in the downwind impact area can exceed the mean value in the upwind CONTROL area by 48%-116%. The maximum value was generally found at an average distance of 39 km from the edge of the urban center or 64 km from the center of the city. These results are consistent with METROMEX studies of St. Louis almost two decades ago and more recent studies near Atlanta. Future work will investi(yate hypothesized factors causing rainfall modification by urban areas. Additional work is also needed to provide more robust validation of space-based rain estimates near major urban areas. Such research has implications for urban planning, water resource management, and understanding human impact on the environment.

  4. Effect of Large Finite-Size Wind Farms and Their Wakes on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ka Ling; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Through the use of large-eddy simulation, the effect of large finite-size wind farms and their wakes on conventionally-neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) dynamics and power extraction is investigated. Specifically, this study focuses on a wind farm that comprises 25 rows of wind turbines, spanning a distance of 10 km. It is shown that large wind farms have a significant effect on internal boundary layer growth both inside and downwind of the wind farms. If the wind farm is large enough, the internal boundary layer interacts with the thermally-stratified free atmosphere above, leading to a modification of the ABL height and power extraction. In addition, it is shown that large wind farms create extensive wakes, which could have an effect on potential downwind wind farms. Specifically, for the case considered here, a power deficit as large as 8% is found at a distance of 10 km downwind from the wind farm. Furthermore, this study compares the wind farm wake dynamics for cases in which the conventionally neutral ABLs are driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient and Coriolis forces.

  5. Study on the formation and transport of ozone in relation to the air quality management and vegetation protection in Tenerife (Canary Islands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Juan-Carlos; Rodríguez, Sergio; Arencibia, M-Teresa; García, M-Dolores

    2004-09-01

    An experimental study on the formation and transport of ozone in ambient air was performed in Tenerife (Canary Islands) in order to investigate the processes affecting ozone levels and air quality. The special features of Tenerife (prevalence of the trade wind pattern (NE), orography and the specific location of the local ozone sources) permit to quantify the role of the 'long-range transport from northern latitudes' versus the 'formation and transport of ozone downwind of the main urban areas' of Tenerife. Levels of O(3), NO(2) and O(X) were monitored in different types of environments to achieve this purpose. The results showed that: (1) upwind of the urban areas ozone is mainly transported from the ocean by trade winds, (2) local ozone titration (by NO) and ozone replenishment from the ocean are the main causes of ozone variations in urban and suburban areas, and (3) photochemical ozone production occurs downwind of the urban areas. Photochemical production causes daylight O(3) and O(X) levels downwind of urban areas to be frequently (60% and 35% days/year, respectively) higher than upwind of the urban sites (O(3) and O(X) excess frequently in the range 5-20 ppbv). Due to the above processes, different daily ozone cycles occur in short distances (Tenerife.

  6. Mercury accumulation in sediment cores from three Washington state lakes: evidence for local deposition from a coal-fired power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furl, Chad V; Meredith, Callie A

    2011-01-01

    Mercury accumulation rates measured in age-dated sediment cores were compared at three Washington state lakes. Offutt Lake and Lake St. Clair are located immediately downwind (18 and 28 km, respectively) of a coal-fired power plant and Lake Sammamish is located outside of the immediate area of the plant (110 km). The sites immediately downwind of the power plant were expected to receive increased mercury deposition from particulate and reactive mercury not deposited at Lake Sammamish. Mercury accumulation in cores was corrected for variable sedimentation, background, and sediment focusing to estimate the anthropogenic contribution (Hg(A,F)). Results indicated lakes immediately downwind of the power plant contained elevated Hg(A,F) levels with respect to the reference lake. Estimated fluxes to Lake Sammamish were compared to measured values from a nearby mercury wet deposition collector to gauge the efficacy of the core deconstruction techniques. Total deposition calculated through the sediment core (20.7 μg/m²/year) fell just outside of the upper estimate (18.9 μg/m²/year) of total deposition approximated from the wet deposition collector.

  7. Application of ray theory to propagation of low frequency noise from wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, James A.

    1987-01-01

    Ray theory is used to explain data from two experiments (1985 and 1985) on the propagation of low frequency sound generated by the WTS-4 wind turbine. Emphasis is on downwind data, but some upwind measurements taken during the 1985 experiment are also considered. General ray theory for a moving medium is reviewed and ray equations obtained. Restrictions are introduced simplifying the equations and permitting the use of a ray theory program MEDUSA, the computed propagation loss curve of which is compared to the measurements. Good qualitative agreement is obtained with 1984 downwind data. The results indicate that the downwind sound field is that of a near-ground sound channel. Although more scatter is seen in the 1985 data, agreement between theory and data is also good. In particular, the position and magnitude of the jump in the sound levels associated with the beginning of the sound channel is correctly predicted. The theoretical explanation of the upwind data is less successful. Ray theory calculations indicate the formation of a shadow zone that, in fact, does not occur. While no sharp shadow zone is apparent in the data, the general expectation (based on ray theory) that sound levels should be much reduced upwind is confirmed by the data.

  8. Dry deposition and resuspension of particle-associated metals near a freeway in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabin, Lisa D.; Hee Lim, Jeong; Teresa Venezia, Maria; Winer, Arthur M.; Schiff, Kenneth C.; Stolzenbach, Keith D.

    Dry atmospheric deposition represents a potentially large source of pollutant metal contamination in urban stormwater runoff, yet there is a limited amount of research on the relationship between atmospheric emissions and water quality problems in urban areas. In Los Angeles, with air quality that ranks among the worst in the United States, significant quantities of toxic materials are released into the atmosphere every day, and paved road dust represents the largest source of particle-associated metal emissions to the atmosphere. In order to better understand the role of roadways as a source of localized metal deposition, we characterized the horizontal dry deposition patterns of chromium, copper, lead, nickel and zinc upwind and at increasing distances downwind of the I-405 Freeway in coastal Los Angeles. Dry deposition fluxes and atmospheric concentrations of these metals were highest at the site closest to the freeway, and reduced to approximately urban background concentrations between 10 and 150 m downwind of the freeway. Compared with urban background, atmospheric particle size distributions indicated the freeway was a significant source of these metals on large particles >6 μm in diameter, which deposit close to their source and account for the increased dry deposition flux rates observed near the freeway. The spatial pattern of measured deposition flux was well predicted by a relatively simple line-source Gaussian plume model modified to include particle deposition and resuspension. The model results indicated dilution by vertical dispersion of the plume was the most important mechanism regulating downwind concentrations and deposition.

  9. Bioaerosol Deposition to Food Crops near Manure Application: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahne, Michael A; Rogers, Shane W; Holsen, Thomas M; Grimberg, Stefan J; Ramler, Ivan P; Kim, Seungo

    2016-03-01

    Production of both livestock and food crops are central priorities of agriculture; however, food safety concerns arise where these practices intersect. In this study, we investigated the public health risks associated with potential bioaerosol deposition to crops grown in the vicinity of manure application sites. A field sampling campaign at dairy manure application sites supported the emission, transport, and deposition modeling of bioaerosols emitted from these lands following application activities. Results were coupled with a quantitative microbial risk assessment model to estimate the infection risk due to consumption of leafy green vegetable crops grown at various distances downwind from the application area. Inactivation of pathogens ( spp., spp., and O157:H7) on both the manure-amended field and on crops was considered to determine the maximum loading of pathogens to plants with time following application. Overall median one-time infection risks at the time of maximum loading decreased from 1:1300 at 0 m directly downwind from the field to 1:6700 at 100 m and 1:92,000 at 1000 m; peak risks (95th percentiles) were considerably greater (1:18, 1:89, and 1:1200, respectively). Median risk was below 1:10,000 at >160 m downwind. As such, it is recommended that a 160-m setback distance is provided between manure application and nearby leafy green crop production. Additional distance or delay before harvest will provide further protection of public health.

  10. Multiple origins of linear dunes on Earth and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David M.; Hesp, Patrick A.

    2009-01-01

    Dunes with relatively long and parallel crests are classified as linear dunes. On Earth, they form in at least two environmental settings: where winds of bimodal direction blow across loose sand, and also where single-direction winds blow over sediment that is locally stabilized, be it through vegetation, sediment cohesion or topographic shelter from the winds. Linear dunes have also been identified on Titan, where they are thought to form in loose sand. Here we present evidence that in the Qaidam Basin, China, linear dunes are found downwind of transverse dunes owing to higher cohesiveness in the downwind sediments, which contain larger amounts of salt and mud. We also present a compilation of other settings where sediment stabilization has been reported to produce linear dunes. We suggest that in this dune-forming process, loose sediment accumulates on the dunes and is stabilized; the stable dune then functions as a topographic shelter, which induces the deposition of sediments downwind. We conclude that a model in which Titan's dunes formed similarly in cohesive sediments cannot be ruled out by the existing data.

  11. Ultrafine particle size distributions near freeways: Effects of differing wind directions on exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozawa, Kathleen H.; Winer, Arthur M.; Fruin, Scott A.

    2012-12-01

    High ambient ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations may play an important role in the adverse health effects associated with living near busy roadways. However, UFP size distributions change rapidly as vehicle emissions dilute and age. These size changes can influence UFP lung deposition rates and dose because deposition in the respiratory system is a strong function of particle size. Few studies to date have measured and characterized changes in near-road UFP size distributions in real-time, thus missing transient variations in size distribution due to short-term fluctuations in wind speed, direction, or particle dynamics. In this study we measured important wind direction effects on near-freeway UFP size distributions and gradients using a mobile platform with 5-s time resolution. Compared to more commonly measured perpendicular (downwind) conditions, parallel wind conditions appeared to promote formation of broader and larger size distributions of roughly one-half the particle concentration. Particles during more parallel wind conditions also changed less in size with downwind distance and the fraction of lung-deposited particle number was calculated to be 15% lower than for downwind conditions, giving a combined decrease of about 60%. In addition, a multivariate analysis of several variables found meteorology, particularly wind direction and temperature, to be important in predicting UFP concentrations within 150 m of a freeway (R2 = 0.46, p = 0.014).

  12. Trace-metal concentrations in African dust: effects of long-distance transport and implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Virginia; Lamothe, Paul; Morman, Suzette; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Gilkes, Robert; Prakongkep, Nattaporn

    2010-01-01

    The Sahara and Sahel lose billions of tons of eroded mineral soils annually to the Americas and Caribbean, Europe and Asia via atmospheric transport. African dust was collected from a dust source region (Mali, West Africa) and from downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad-Tobago (TT) and U.S. Virgin Islands (VI)] and analysed for 32 trace-elements. Elemental composition of African dust samples was similar to that of average upper continental crust (UCC), with some enrichment or depletion of specific trace-elements. Pb enrichment was observed only in dust and dry deposition samples from the source region and was most likely from local use of leaded gasoline. Dust particles transported long-distances (VI and TT) exhibited increased enrichment of Mo and minor depletion of other elements relative to source region samples. This suggests that processes occurring during long-distance transport of dust produce enrichment/depletion of specific elements. Bioaccessibility of trace-metals in samples was tested in simulated human fluids (gastric and lung) and was found to be greater in downwind than source region samples, for some metals (e.g., As). The large surface to volume ratio of the dust particles (<2.5 µm) at downwind sites may be a factor.

  13. Reduced-form modeling of public health impacts of inorganic PM2.5 and precursor emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Jinhyok; Adams, Peter J.; Gao, H. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    It is challenging to estimate the public health costs of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and its precursor emissions accurately and quickly for policy research because of their complex physical and chemical processes occurring over a large downwind area. We developed a method for building statistical regressions that estimate public health cost of emissions accurately like a state-of-the-art chemical transport model (CTM) but without its high computational cost. This method achieves detailed spatial resolution according to the location of the emission source, accounting for differences in the exposed population downwind. Using tagged CTM simulations, our method builds a large dataset of air quality public health costs from marginal emissions throughout the United States. Two methods were developed to describe exposed population, one that assumes a generic downwind plume concentration profile derived from CTM outputs and a simpler method that uses the size of population within certain distances as variables. Using the former method, we parameterized marginal public health cost [/t] and intake fraction [ppm] as a function of exposed population and key atmospheric variables. We derived models for elemental carbon, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and ammonia. Compared to estimates calculated directly using CTM outputs, our models generally show mean fractional errors of only 10%-30% and up to 50% for NOx in some seasons, which are generally similar to or less than CTM's performance. Our results show that the public health costs of emissions can be efficiently parameterized for policy analyses based on state-of-the-art CTMs.

  14. Sierra Nevada Winter Storms: a Study Using Microwave Radiometry, Ice Crystal and Isotopic Analysis Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demoz, Belay Berhane

    An observational study has been made of ice-phase winter storm clouds over the Sierra Nevada mountains. In Part I, two microwave radiometers, one designed with a spinning reflector to shed precipitation particles while the other radiometer's reflector was fixed, are compared. The absence/presence of contaminated periods in the data was attributed to difference in design. These apparent contaminated periods led to lower correlation coefficients between the radiometers. Comparison of radiometer and rawinsonde resulted in a correlation coefficient of 0.97 for the spinning reflector as opposed to 0.8 for the fixed reflector radiometer. In Part II, stable water isotopes were used to study mesoscale and microscale storm modifications by the Sierra Nevada. Initially, a low level warm front lay across the region and its elevation lowered with time from 2.5 km to 1.7 km. This decrease of frontal surface height was accompanied by a steady increase in the delta ^{18}O values. In the pre-cold frontal period, the delta^{18 }O values at the upwind site signified warmer origin ice crystals than the downwind site. This is explained by orographic effects and the production of supercooled liquid water at low elevations on the upslope side. The delta^{18}O value peaked around -13perthous which translates to an "equivalent temperature" of -10.7^circC for ice phase water capture at the upwind site. At the downwind site, this was some 5 to 6 centigrade degrees colder. During surface cold front passage, the differences in delta^{18}O at the two sites are small probably because, during frontal passage, the orography plays a less significant role in the precipitation production process. In Part III, observations of precipitation rates, ice crystals, wind and supercooled liquid water (SLW) upwind and downwind of the Sierra Nevada are presented. Observations show that the stage of development of the storms was important in the liquid and vapor development. High SLW, and increased riming were

  15. Oil Spill Field Trial at Sea: Measurements of Benzene Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjesteland, Ingrid; Hollund, Bjørg Eli; Kirkeleit, Jorunn; Daling, Per; Bråtveit, Magne

    2017-07-01

    Characterize personal exposure to airborne hydrocarbons, particularly carcinogenic benzene, during spill of two different fresh crude oils at sea. The study included 22 participants taking part in an «oil on water» field trial in the North Sea. Two types of fresh crude oils (light and heavy) were released six times over two consecutive days followed by different oil spill response methods. The participants were distributed on five boats; three open sampling boats (A, B, and C), one release ship (RS), and one oil recovery (OR) vessel. Assumed personal exposure was assessed a priori, assuming high exposure downwind and close to the oil slick (sampling boats), low exposure further downwind (100-200 m) and upwind from the oil slick (main deck of RS and OR vessel), and background exposure indoors (bridge of RS/OR vessel). Continuous measurements of total volatile organic compounds in isobutylene equivalents were performed with photoionization detectors placed in all five boats. Full-shift personal exposure to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, and n-hexane was measured with passive thermal desorption tubes. Personal measurements of benzene, averaged over the respective sample duration, on Day 1 showed that participants in the sampling boats (A, B, and C) located downwind and close to the oil slick were highest exposed (0.14-0.59 ppm), followed by participants on the RS main deck (0.02-0.10 ppm) and on the bridge (0.004-0.03 ppm). On Day 2, participants in sampling boat A had high benzene exposure (0.87-1.52 ppm) compared to participants in sampling boat B (0.01-0.02 ppm), on the ships (0.06-0.10 ppm), and on the bridge (0.004-0.01 ppm). Overall, the participants in the sampling boats had the highest exposure to all of the compounds measured. The light crude oil yielded a five times higher concentration of total volatile organic compounds in air in the sampling boats (max 510 ppm) than the heavy crude oil (max 100 ppm) but rapidly declined to

  16. Effect of Number of Blades on Performance of Ceiling Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeeb Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect of number of blades on ceiling fan performance is discussed. This approach helps to satisfy tradeoff between high air flow (performance and power consumption (energy efficiency. Specifically, variation from two to six blades is considered with nonlinear forward sweep profile. Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS technique is used to model the flow field induced by the ceiling fan inside a generic room. The performance is gauged through response parameters namely volumetric flow rate, mass flow rate, torque and energy efficiency. The results indicate that mass and volumetric flow rates are maximized for six blade configuration and energy efficiency is maximized for two blade configuration. The study indicates the importance of tradeoff between high air flow through ceiling fan and associated energy efficiency.

  17. Numerical simulation and optimization of clearance in sheet shearing process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦泗吉; 李洪波; 彭加耕; 李硕本

    2003-01-01

    An analysis model to simplify the shearing and blanking process was developed. Based on the simplified model, the shearing process was simulated by FEM and analyzed for various clearances. An optimum clearance in the process was determined by new approach based on orientation of the maximum shearing stress on the characteristic line linking two blades, according to the law of crack propagation and experiments. The optimum clearance determined by this method can be used to dictate the range of reasonable clearance. By the new approach, the optimum clearance can be obtained conveniently and accurately even if there is some difference between the selected points, where the initial crack is assumed originated, and the actual one, where the initial crack occurs really.

  18. Linearization of friction effects in vibration of two rotating blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajžman M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is aimed at modelling of friction effects in blade shrouding which are realized by means of friction elements placed between blades. In order to develop a methodology of modelling, two blades with one friction element in between are considered only. Flexible blades fixed to a rotating disc are discretized by FEM using 1D Rayleigh beam elements derived in rotating space as well as the friction element modelled as a rigid body. The blades and the friction element are connected through two concurrent friction planes, where the friction forces arise on the basis of centrifugal force acting on the friction element. The linearization of friction is performed using the harmonic balance method to determine equivalent damping coefficients in dependence on the amplitudes of relative slip motion between the blades and the friction element. The methodology is applied to a model of two real blades and will be extended for the whole bladed disc with shrouding.

  19. Tests of Full-Scale Helicopter Rotors at High Advancing Tip Mach Numbers and Advance Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggers, James C.; McCloud, John L., III; Stroub, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    As a continuation of the studies of reference 1, three full-scale helicopter rotors have been tested in the Ames Research Center 40- by SO-foot wind tunnel. All three of them were two-bladed, teetering rotors. One of the rotors incorporated the NACA 0012 airfoil section over the entire length of the blade. This rotor was tested at advance ratios up to 1.05. Both of the other rotors were tapered in thickness and incorporated leading-edge camber over the outer 20 percent of the blade radius. The larger of these rotors was tested at advancing tip Mach numbers up to 1.02. Data were obtained for a wide range of lift and propulsive force, and are presented without discussion.

  20. Model predictive control of trailing edge flaps on a wind turbine blade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castaignet, Damien Bruno

    , in Roskilde, Denmark. One blade of the turbine was equipped with three independent trailing edge flaps. In spite of the failure of several sensors and actuators, the test of the trailing edge flaps controller described in this thesis showed a consistent flapwise blade root fatigue load reduction. An average......Trailing edge flaps on wind turbine blades have been investigated for several years. Aero-servoelastic simulations carried out with different simulation tools, trailing edge flaps configurations and controller designs proved that trailing edge flaps are a suitable solution for reducing some...... of the wind turbine fatigue and extreme loads. This potential was confirmed with wind tunnel tests made on blade sections with trailing edge flaps and on a scaled two-bladed wind turbine in a wind tunnel. The work presented in this thesis includes a full-scale test run on a Vestas V27 wind turbine equipped...

  1. The fast code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, L.N.; Wilson, R.E. [Oregon State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The FAST Code which is capable of determining structural loads on a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data are given at two wind speeds for the ESI-80. The FAST Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees of freedom for blade bending, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffnesses, and weights to differ and models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting, occurrence histograms, and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST Code and test results is good. (au)

  2. Reduced design load basis for ultimate blade loads estimation in multidisciplinary design optimization frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavese, Christian; Tibaldi, Carlo; Larsen, Torben J.;

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to provide a fast and reliable approach to estimate ultimate blade loads for a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework. For blade design purposes, the standards require a large amount of computationally expensive simulations, which cannot be efficiently run each cost...... function evaluation of an MDO process. This work describes a method that allows integrating the calculation of the blade load envelopes inside an MDO loop. Ultimate blade load envelopes are calculated for a baseline design and a design obtained after an iteration of an MDO. These envelopes are computed...... for a full standard design load basis (DLB) and a deterministic reduced DLB. Ultimate loads extracted from the two DLBs with the two blade designs each are compared and analyzed. Although the reduced DLB supplies ultimate loads of different magnitude, the shape of the estimated envelopes are similar...

  3. CFD simulation of a 2 bladed multi megawatt wind turbine with flexible rotor connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, L.; Luhmann, B.; Rösch, K.-N.; Lutz, T.; Cheng, P.-W.; Krämer, E.

    2016-09-01

    An innovative passive load reduction concept for a two bladed 3.4 MW wind turbine is investigated by a conjoint CFD and MBS - BEM methodology. The concept consists of a flexible hub mount which allows a tumbling motion of the rotor. First, the system is simulated with a MBS tool coupled to a BEM code. Then, the resulting motion of the rotor is extracted from the simulation and applied on the CFD simulation as prescribed motion. The aerodynamic results show a significant load reduction on the support structure. Hub pitching and yawing moment amplitudes are reduced by more than 50% in a vertically sheared inflow. Furthermore, the suitability of the MBS - BEM approach for the simulation of the load reduction system is shown.

  4. Five-axis rough machining for impellers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruolong QI; Weijun LIU; Hongyou BIAN; Lun LI

    2009-01-01

    The most important components used in aero-space, ships, and automobiles are designed with free form surfaces. An impeller is one of the most important components that is difficult to machine because of its twisted blades. Rough machining is recognized as the most crucial procedure influencing machining efficiency and is critical for the finishing process. An integrated rough machining course with detailed algorithms is presented in this paper. An algorithm for determining the minimum distance between two surfaces is applied to estimate the tool size. The space between two blades that will be cleared from the roughcast is divided to generate CC points. The tool axis vector is confirmed based on flank milling using a simple method that could eliminate global interference between the tool and the blades. The result proves that the machining methodology presented in this paper is useful and successful.

  5. Modelling the peopling of Australia: 1900-1930.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, D

    1981-12-01

    An analysis of migration from the United Kingdom to Australia during the period 1900 to 1930 is presented. The author attempts "first to explicitly develop and estimate a model of the behavioural relations of the two blades of the Marshallian scissors, rather than mixing supply and demand (under the polyglot terms of 'push-pull') in a single equation without regard to the problem of identification. And second, [he attempts] to incorporate in these structural equations key elements of government intervention in the migration process." The relationship between economic factors and Australian government support for immigration is considered. The author also identifies three factors influencing annual variations in the flow of migration from the United Kingdom: expected income gains, transport costs, and the costs of job search.

  6. Low-cost optical data acquisition system for blade vibration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posta, Stephen J.

    1988-01-01

    A low cost optical data acquisition system was designed to measure deflection of vibrating rotor blade tips. The basic principle of the new design is to record raw data, which is a set of blade arrival times, in memory and to perform all processing by software following a run. This approach yields a simple and inexpensive system with the least possible hardware. Functional elements of the system were breadboarded and operated satisfactorily during rotor simulations on the bench, and during a data collection run with a two-bladed rotor in the Lewis Research Center Spin Rig. Software was written to demonstrate the sorting and processing of data stored in the system control computer, after retrieval from the data acquisition system. The demonstration produced an accurate graphical display of deflection versus time.

  7. A low-cost optical data acquisition system for vibration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posta, S. J.; Brown, G. V.

    1986-01-01

    A low cost optical data acquisition system was designed to measure deflection of vibrating rotor blade tips. The basic principle of the new design is to record raw data, which is a set of blade arrival times, in memory and to perform all processing by software following a run. This approach yields a simple and inexpensive system with the least possible hardware. Functional elements of the system were breadboarded and operated satisfactorily during rotor simulations on the bench, and during a data collection run with a two-bladed rotor in the Lewis Research Center Spin Rig. Software was written to demonstrate the sorting and processing of data stored in the system control computer, after retrieval from the data acquisition system. The demonstration produced an accurate graphical display of deflection versus time.

  8. Effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a Savonius wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyong Mao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Savonius wind turbine is a common vertical axis wind turbine which simply comprises two or three arc-type blades and can generate power under poor wind conditions. With the aim of increasing the turbine’s power efficiency, the effect of the blade arc angle on the performance of a typical two-bladed Savonius wind turbine is investigated with a transient computational fluid dynamics method. Simulations were based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes equations, and the renormalization group k − ε turbulent model was utilized. The numerical method was validated with existing experimental data. The results indicate that the turbine with a blade arc angle of 160 ∘ generates the maximum power coefficient, 0.2836, which is 8.37% higher than that from a conventional Savonius turbine.

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF PARTICLE MOTION IN TURBO CLASSIFIER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Xu; Guohua Li; Zhichu Huang

    2005-01-01

    Research on the flow field inside a turbo classifier is complicated though important. According to the stochastic trajectory model of particles in gas-solid two-phase flow, and adopting the PHOENICS code, numerical simulation is carried out on the flow field, including particle trajectory, in the inner cavity of a turbo classifier, using both straight and backward crooked elbow blades. Computation results show that when the backward crooked elbow blades are used, the mixed stream that passes through the two blades produces a vortex in the positive direction which counteracts the attached vortex in the opposite direction due to the high-speed turbo rotation, making the flow steadier, thus improving both the grade efficiency and precision of the turbo classifier. This research provides positive theoretical evidences for designing sub-micron particle classifiers with high efficiency and accuracy.

  10. Optimization Design and Experimental Study of Low-Pressure Axial Fan with Forward-Skewed Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of the optimization of blade skew in low pressure axial fan. Using back propagation (BP neural network and genetic algorithm (GA, the optimization was performed for a radial blade. An optimized blade is obtained through blade forward skew. Measurement of the two blades was carried out in aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance. Compared to the radial blade, the optimized blade demonstrated improvements in efficiency, total pressure ratio, stable operating range, and aerodynamic noise. Detailed flow measurement was performed in outlet flow field for investigating the responsible flow mechanisms. The optimized blade can cause a spanwise redistribution of flow toward the blade midspan and reduce tip loading. This results in reduced significantly total pressure loss near hub and shroud endwall region, despite the slight increase of total pressure loss at midspan. In addition, the measured spectrums show that the broadband noise of the impeller is dominant.

  11. INTERNAL FLOW MECHANISM AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH OF LOW PRESSURE AXIAL FAN WITH FORWARD-SKEWED BLADES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang; LIU Jie; OUYANG Hua; DU Zhao-Hui

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the flow mechanism analysis and experimental study of a forward-skewed impeller and a radial impeller in low pressure axial fan. The forward-skewed blade was obtained by the optimization design of the radial blade and CFD technique. Measurement of the two blades was carried out in aerodynamic and aeroacoustic performance. Compared to the radial blade, the forward-skewed blade has demonstrated the improvements in efficiency, total pressure ratio, Stable Operating Range (SOR) and less aerodynamic noise. Detailed flow measurement and computation were performed for outlet flow field for investigating the responsible flow mechanisms. The results show the forward-skewed blade can cause a spanwise redistribution of flow toward the blade mid-span and reduce tip loading. This results in reduced significantly total pressure loss near hub and shroud endwall region, despite the slight increase of total pressure loss at mid-span.

  12. Biomimetic mechanism for micro aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Darryll J. (Inventor); Bohorquez, Felipe A. (Inventor); Sirohi, Jayant (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A biomimetic pitching and flapping mechanism including a support member, at least two blade joints for holding blades and operatively connected to the support member. An outer shaft member is concentric with the support member, and an inner shaft member is concentric with the outer shaft member. The mechanism allows the blades of a small-scale rotor to be actuated in the flap and pitch degrees of freedom. The pitching and the flapping are completely independent from and uncoupled to each other. As such, the rotor can independently flap, or independently pitch, or flap and pitch simultaneously with different amplitudes and/or frequencies. The mechanism can also be used in a non-rotary wing configuration, such as an ornithopter, in which case the rotational degree of freedom would be suppressed.

  13. Validation of four LES and a vortex model against stereo-PIV measurements in the near wake of an actuator disc and a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lignarolo, Lorenzo E.M.; Mehta, Dhruv; Stevens, Richard J.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry was employed to obtain the velocity field and turbulence statistics in the near wake of a two-bladed wind turbine model and of a porous disc, which mimics the numerical actuator used in the simulations. Researchers have been invited to simulate the experimental case......In this paper we report the results of a workshop organised by the Delft University of Technology in 2014, aiming at the comparison between different state-of-the-art numerical models for the simulation of wind turbine wakes. The chosen benchmark case is a wind tunnel measurement, where...... based on the disc drag coefficient and the inflow characteristics. Four large eddy simulation (LES) codes from different institutions and a vortex model are part of the comparison. The purpose of this benchmark is to validate the numerical predictions of the flow field statistics in the near wake...

  14. The ASPEC teeter: price/performance improvement of existing wind turbine technology by using a revolutionary concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorenspleet, F. [Aerpac Special Products B.V., Amelo (Netherlands); Prats, J. [Ecotecnia S. Coop, Barcelona (Spain); Hagg, F. [Stork Product Engineering B.V. Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31

    Improvement of the price/performance ratio of wind turbines is essential if wind energy is to be taken seriously in the world energy market in the coming century. The key to improvement of the price/performance ratio lies in the minimisation of loads by inexpensive means, at a simultaneous increase in annual production of the wind turbine. On basis of the NOVEM/CEC Flexhat project, this design project is a first step towards commercialisation of flexible rotor technology. The goal of the project was to redesign an existing stall-regulated wind turbine to improve the original price/performance ratio by 20%. This goal has been reached by the use of a larger, two-bladed rotor with elastomeric tester, variable speed drivetrain and fast active tip pitch control with an advanced peakshaving function. The project has been sponsored by the European Commission under contract nr. Jou2CT93-0281. (author)

  15. An approach to the development and analysis of wind turbine control algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.C.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of this project is to develop the capability of symbolically generating an analytical model of a wind turbine for studies of control systems. This report focuses on a theoretical formulation of the symbolic equations of motion (EOMs) modeler for horizontal axis wind turbines. In addition to the power train dynamics, a generic 7-axis rotor assembly is used as the base model from which the EOMs of various turbine configurations can be derived. A systematic approach to generate the EOMs is presented using d`Alembert`s principle and Lagrangian dynamics. A Matlab M file was implemented to generate the EOMs of a two-bladed, free yaw wind turbine. The EOMs will be compared in the future to those of a similar wind turbine modeled with the YawDyn code for verification. This project was sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories as part of the Adaptive Structures and Control Task. This is the final report of Sandia Contract AS-0985.

  16. Modeling the effects of control systems of wind turbine fatigue life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, K.G.; Laino, D.J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In this study we look at the effect on fatigue life of two types of control systems. First, we investigate the Micon 65, an upwind, three bladed turbine with a simple yaw control system. Results indicate that increased fatigue damage to the blade root can be attributed to continuous operation at significant yaw error allowed by the control system. Next, we model a two-bladed teetered rotor turbine using three different control systems to adjust flap deflections. The first two limit peak power output, the third limits peak power and cyclic power output over the entire range of operation. Results for simulations conducted both with and without active control are compared to determine how active control affects fatigue life. Improvement in fatigue lifetimes were seen for all control schemes, with increasing fatigue lifetime corresponding to increased flap deflection activity. 13 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Vortex shedding by a Savonius rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrini, M.; Beguier, C.; Chauvin, A.; Brun, R.

    1984-05-01

    A series of flow visualizations was performed to characterize the wake vortices of a Savonius rotor. The trials were undertaken in an attempt to account for discrepancies between theoretical and experimentally-derived power coefficients. The Savonius examined was two-bladed with a center offset. All tests were made in a water tunnel. Dye injection provided the visualization, and average velocities and velocity fluctuations were measured using a laser Doppler anemometer. A system of three vortices was found to be periodically shed by the rotor. Flow velocity fluctuation intensity peaked as a vortex was shed. The vortex shedding alternated from blade to blade, so that one was shed from a blade moving upstream.

  18. The optimum design configurations of savonius wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiyama, I.; Nagai, H.; Mino, M.

    The results of wind tunnel and water channel trials to optimize the Savonius rotor windmill are reported. The design simplicity, omnidirectional wind acceptance, self-starting characteristics, and lack of a need for overspeed control encouraged the tests. The rotor aspect ratio, blade overlap, blade separation gap, the blade cross-section profile, and the guide vane attachment were investigated, together with the flow pattern through the blades. Two-bladed semicircular and Bach type configurations were examined. Every factor was found to significantly affect performance, and the Bach blades with a 30-50% overlap and no blade separation were determined to be effective. Inclusion of separation gap degraded performance. High aspect ratios are favored for high wind velocity regions, while low aspect ratios are preferable in regions with low winds. Guide vanes augmented the power coefficient, which approached 0.35 at 4 m/s.

  19. Pressure coefficient evolutions on the blades of a Savonius rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauvin, A.; Guignard, S. [UMRR 7343, Marseilles (France). Lab. IUSTI; Kamoun, B. [Faculte des Sciences de Sfax (Tunisia). Lab. de Physique

    2012-07-01

    Measurements of the pressure field distribution on the blades of a vertical axis Savonius wind machine are presented. The rotor used in the wind tunnel is a two blades cylindrical shape with a central gap. Pressure gauges are placed on each side of a blade, so the pressure jumps between intrados and extrados of a blade during a whole rotation are drawn. In the static configuration, the machine is disposed at various incidences. The determination of pressure jumps allows to calculate the static torque of the machine versus the incidence angle. In the dynamic situation the machine is rotating at various frequencies and gauges signals are varying dynamically of course with the incidence. The dynamic torque coefficient is calculated. Evolutions of the starting torque and starting conditions are then described and dynamic effects on torque evolution are presented. (orig.)

  20. An experimental study on improvement of Savonius rotor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.H. Mahmoud

    2012-03-01

    In this work different geometries of Savonius wind turbine are experimentally studied in order to determine the most effective operation parameters. It was found that, the two blades rotor is more efficient than three and four ones. The rotor with end plates gives higher efficiency than those of without end plates. Double stage rotors have higher performance compared to single stage rotors. The rotors without overlap ratio (β are better in operation than those with overlap. The results show also that the power coefficient increases with rising the aspect ratio (α. The conclusions from the measurements of the static torque for each rotor at different wind speeds verify the above summarized results of this work.

  1. The effect of shielding on the aerodynamic performance of Savonius wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcos, S. M.; Khalafallah, M. G.; Heikel, H. A.

    The effect of the flat plate shield on the performance of two-bladed Savonius rotor has been experimentally determined. Tests were carried out in a low speed wind tunnel with a working section of 1.0 sq m. Flat plate shields with various values of plate width and inclination angle were tested in order to determine the optimum configuration. The maximum power coefficient of the Savonius rotor was increased from 0.22 for the case without shielding to 0.34 for the case with an optimum shielding configuration. The addition of a flat plate shield to the Savonius rotor can, therefore, enhance the power coefficient to values approaching the more elaborate wind turbines without affecting the simplicity of the Savonius rotor.

  2. Ethic Control:A New Domain of Internet Control%伦理治理:网络治理的新视域

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许亚非

    2014-01-01

    The internet is a two-blade sword, and can be controlled from the angle of ethic control. The sound methods concerned are, firstly, to formulate internet ethic rules, and regulation; secondly, to strengthen internet ethic education and observe the ground line of internet ethic control.%网络是一柄双刃剑。对于网络问题,新形势下可从伦理治理的角度,进行网络治理。建立网络伦理原则,构建网络伦理规范,强化网络伦理教育,坚守网络伦理底线,是伦理治理的有效途径。

  3. Multi-model evaluation of short-lived pollutant distributions over east Asia during summer 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quennehen, B.; Raut, J.-C.; Law, K. S.; Daskalakis, N.; Ancellet, G.; Clerbaux, C.; Kim, S.-W.; Lund, M. T.; Myhre, G.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Safieddine, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Thomas, J. L.; Tsyro, S.; Bazureau, A.; Bellouin, N.; Hu, M.; Kanakidou, M.; Klimont, Z.; Kupiainen, K.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Quaas, J.; Rumbold, S. T.; Schulz, M.; Cherian, R.; Shimizu, A.; Wang, J.; Yoon, S.-C.; Zhu, T.

    2016-08-01

    The ability of seven state-of-the-art chemistry-aerosol models to reproduce distributions of tropospheric ozone and its precursors, as well as aerosols over eastern Asia in summer 2008, is evaluated. The study focuses on the performance of models used to assess impacts of pollutants on climate and air quality as part of the EU ECLIPSE project. Models, run using the same ECLIPSE emissions, are compared over different spatial scales to in situ surface, vertical profiles and satellite data. Several rather clear biases are found between model results and observations, including overestimation of ozone at rural locations downwind of the main emission regions in China, as well as downwind over the Pacific. Several models produce too much ozone over polluted regions, which is then transported downwind. Analysis points to different factors related to the ability of models to simulate VOC-limited regimes over polluted regions and NOx limited regimes downwind. This may also be linked to biases compared to satellite NO2, indicating overestimation of NO2 over and to the north of the northern China Plain emission region. On the other hand, model NO2 is too low to the south and west of this region and over South Korea/Japan. Overestimation of ozone is linked to systematic underestimation of CO particularly at rural sites and downwind of the main Chinese emission regions. This is likely to be due to enhanced destruction of CO by OH. Overestimation of Asian ozone and its transport downwind implies that radiative forcing from this source may be overestimated. Model-observation discrepancies over Beijing do not appear to be due to emission controls linked to the Olympic Games in summer 2008.With regard to aerosols, most models reproduce the satellite-derived AOD patterns over eastern China. Our study nevertheless reveals an overestimation of ECLIPSE model mean surface BC and sulphate aerosols in urban China in summer 2008. The effect of the short-term emission mitigation in Beijing

  4. Characterizing uncertainty in the motion, future location and ash concentrations of volcanic plumes and ash clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webley, P.; Patra, A. K.; Bursik, M. I.; Pitman, E. B.; Dehn, J.; Singh, T.; Singla, P.; Stefanescu, E. R.; Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Jones, M.; Morton, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasting the location and airborne concentrations of volcanic ash plumes and their dispersing clouds is complex and knowledge of the uncertainty in these forecasts is critical to assess and mitigate the hazards that could exist. We show the results from an interdisciplinary project that brings together scientists drawn from the atmospheric sciences, computer science, engineering, mathematics, and geology. The project provides a novel integration of computational and statistical modeling with a widely-used volcanic particle dispersion code, to provide quantitative measures of confidence in predictions of the motion of ash clouds caused by volcanic eruptions. We combine high performance computing and stochastic analysis, resulting in real time predictions of ash cloud motion that account for varying wind conditions and a range of model variables. We show how coupling a real-time model for ash dispersal, PUFF, with a volcanic eruption model, BENT, allows for the definition of the variability in the dispersal model inputs and hence classify the uncertainty that can then propagate for the ash cloud location and downwind concentrations. We additionally analyze the uncertainty in the numerical weather prediction forecast data used by the dispersal model by using ensemble forecasts and assess how this affects the downwind concentrations. These are all coupled together and by combining polynomical chaos quadrature with stochastic integration techniques, we provide a quantitative measure of the reliability (i.e. error) of those predictions. We show comparisons of the downwind height calculations and mass loadings with observations of ash clouds available from satellite remote sensing data. The aim is to provide a probabilistic forecast of location and ash concentration that can be generated in real-time and used by those end users in the operational ash cloud hazard assessment environment.

  5. Segmented Ultralight Pre-Aligned Rotor for Extreme-Scale Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, E.; Steele, A.; Ichter, B.; Selig, M.; Moriarty, P.

    2012-01-01

    To alleviate the mass-scaling issues associated with conventional upwind rotors of extreme-scale turbines, a downwind rotor concept is proposed which employs fixed blade curvature based on force alignment at rated conditions. For a given peak stress constraint, the reduction in downwind cantilever loads allows reduced shell and spar thickness, and thus a reduced blade mass as compared with a conventional upwind rotor, especially as rotor sizes approach extreme-scales. To quantify this mass reduction, a Finite Element Analysis was conducted for a 10 MW rated rotor based on the NREL offshore 5 MW baseline wind turbine. The results show that this 'pre-alignment' yields a net downstream deflection of 32 deg, a downward hub-pitch angle of 6 deg, a 20% increase in blade length (to maintain the same radius as the conventional blade), and a net mass savings of about 50% through decreased shell and spar thicknesses. The pre-alignment may also allow a more straightforward and efficient segmentation of the blade since shear stresses near joints are substantially reduced. Segmenting, in turn, can dramatically reduce costs associated with fabrication, transport and assembly for extreme-scale off-shore systems. The pre-aligned geometric curvature can also help alleviate tower wake effects on the blades since blade tips (where shadow effects can be most problematic) are shifted downstream where the tower wake is weaker. In addition, the portion of the tower that is upstream of the blade tips can be faired with an externally-rotating aerodynamic shroud. Furthermore, the downwind rotor can allow a floating off-shore tri-pod platform to reduce tower weight and yaw-control requirements. A simple economic analysis of the segmented ultralight pre-aligned rotor (SUPAR) concept suggests that the overall system cost savings can be as much as 25%, indicating that more detailed (numerical and experimental) investigations are warranted.

  6. Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from both of point and area sources of an electric-arc furnace-dust treatment plant and their impacts to the vicinity environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuei-Min; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Fang, Kenneth; Lin, Mark

    2010-08-01

    This study was set out to investigate emissions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) from both the stack (i.e., point source) and plant fugitives (i.e., area source) of an electric-arc furnace-dust treatment plant (EAFDTP) and their impact to the vicinity environments. The emission rate of the point source (2,360 ng I-TEQh(-1)) was determined directly by measuring PCDD/F concentrations of the stack flue gas. The emission rate of the area source (1,080 ng I-TEQ m(-2)h(-1)) was estimated by using the Industrial Sources Complex Short-Term (ISCST3) model based on concentrations measured at the downwind side of the plant. The mean emission factors of 785 and 893 ng I-TEQ ton(-1) ZnO were found for the point and area source, respectively. The above results suggest that the area source accounted for more than 50% of total PCDD/F emissions for the selected EAFDTP. The contribution of the point source to the atmospheric PCDD/F concentrations of the upwind site and downwind site of the EAFDTP were 0 and 0.27 fg I-TEQ Nm(-3), respectively. The contributions of the area source were 0.020 and 3.3 fg I-TEQ Nm(-3), respectively. The total contribution of the selected EAFDTP (including both the point and area sources) to the concentrations in both upwind and downwind side vicinities were all less than 10%. Finally, the impact of PCDD/F emissions from the selected EAFDTP to the vicinity atmospheric environments was discussed in the present study.

  7. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory-derived NO emission from soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis centre, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three-dimensional (3-D) NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modelled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory-derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  8. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory derived NO emission from soil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2014-07-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW-China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis center, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis' (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol-Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three dimensional NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modeled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  9. How do Humans interact with the Biotic Pump of South America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajar; Pande, Saket; Renata Cordeiro Ortigara, Angela; Uhlenbrook, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The negative effects of the deforestation have been both advertised and down played. However, the effects are far more tangible than what they seem to be. It has been shown that the change in forest cover causes the rainfall patterns to change as the forests work as so-called Biotic Pumps. This changes the water availability in the area by modifying the water balance. Local water balances affect the changes that may take longer to be visible on the larger scales. The Amazon rain forest, one of the most bio-diverse areas worldwide, is an essential part of the biosphere of South America. However, there are clear links between deforestation carried out for agricultural purposes, specifically, Soybean and Sugarcane and the variability in global food prices. Here we analyse the anthropogenic actions that may influence the biotic pump. Variables such as volatility in commodity prices, risk taking capacities, land availability, government subsidies are used to drive the decision making of farmers. These variables are embedded in a lumped biotic pump model made for Brazil, utilizing data from different sources including MODIS, Centro de Previsão do Tempo e Estudos Climáticos (CPTEC), European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). The biotic pump model essentially transports atmospheric moisture downwind, part of which falls as rain. The atmospheric moisture 'upwind' accounts for evaporation, incorporating land cover changes in response to land use decisions made by farmers and rainfall. The model is run for scenarios to demonstrate how rain downwind is affected by upwind land cover and provides first insights in to how much rain and productivity (agriculture) downwind is caused by the Amazonian rain forest upwind We then discuss the value of environmental conservation based on marginal productivity analysis, i.e., finding harmony between the conservation of rainforest and the economic growth of the country.

  10. An Examination of Carbon Monoxide and Organic Aerosol Mass Sources in the Southeastern United States during the SENEX Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Angevine, W. M.; Brioude, J. F.; Brock, C. A.; De Gouw, J. A.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Holloway, J. S.; Horowitz, L. W.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Lerner, B. M.; Liao, J.; Mao, J.; Trainer, M.; Warneke, C.; Welti, A.; Wolfe, G. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    The NOAA Southeast Nexus (SENEX) project occurred during the summer of 2013 over the southeastern United States and involved studying the interactions between natural and anthropogenic emissions at the nexus of climate change and air quality. As part of the project, a suite of instruments for aerosol and gas-phase species was deployed on the NOAA WP-3D aircraft and models were used to calculate trace gas and aerosol species in the region and along the aircraft flight tracks. Throughout the study, the measured non-refractory submicron aerosol mass was dominated by organic material (58% +/- 9%) with smaller contributions from sulfate (27% +/- 8%), ammonium (10% +/- 3%), nitrate (3% +/- 1%), and chloride (0.1% +/- 0.1%). Here we examine the influence of urban emissions on the organic aerosol (OA) mass in regions characterized by higher and lower biogenic emissions. For the air around and downwind of urban areas, OA mass is highly correlated with carbon monoxide (CO), a tracer of anthropogenic emissions as well as an oxidation product of isoprene, a biogenic species. The slope of this correlation is roughly 0.15 micrograms per standard cubic meter per ppbv, which is significantly higher than observed in prior studies downwind of urban areas. The enhancement in OA mass relative to the enhancement in CO is independent of the concentration of biogenic species. In contrast, formaldehyde enhancements are clearly higher in the presence of biogenic species in agreement with the NOAA GFDL AM3 model. Downwind from the urban areas, CO and OA mass were not strongly enhanced relatively to a region-wide enhancement in these species that can only be explained from the accumulation of emissions in the eastern U.S. for several days. Back-trajectories of air parcels with emissions from biogenic and anthropogenic sources will be examined to elucidate the impact of both sources on CO and OA mass.

  11. Potential radiological impacts of upper-bound operational accidents during proposed waste disposal alternatives for Hanford defense waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, J.; Sutter, S.L.; Hawley, K.A.; Jenkins, C.E.; Napier, B.A.

    1986-02-01

    The Geologic Disposal Alternative, the In-Place Stabilization and Disposal Alternative, and the Reference Disposal Alternative are being evaluated for disposal of Hanford defense high-level, transuranic, and tank wastes. Environmental impacts associated with disposal of these wastes according to the alternatives listed above include potential doses to the downwind population from operation during the application of the handling and processing techniques comprising each disposal alternative. Scenarios for operational accident and abnormal operational events are postulated, on the basis of the currently available information, for the application of the techniques employed for each waste class for each disposal alternative. From these scenarios, an upper-bound airborne release of radioactive material was postulated for each waste class and disposal alternative. Potential downwind radiologic impacts were calculated from these upper-bound events. In all three alternatives, the single postulated event with the largest calculated radiologic impact for any waste class is an explosion of a mixture of ferri/ferro cyanide precipitates during the mechanical retrieval or microwave drying of the salt cake in single shell waste tanks. The anticipated downwind dose (70-year dose commitment) to the maximally exposed individual is 3 rem with a total population dose of 7000 man-rem. The same individual would receive 7 rem from natural background radiation during the same time period, and the same population would receive 3,000,000 man-rem. Radiological impacts to the public from all other postulated accidents would be less than that from this accident; furthermore, the radiological impacts resulting from this accident would be less than one-half that from the natural background radiation dose.

  12. The composite effect of transgenic plant volatiles for acquired immunity to herbivory caused by inter-plant communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroi, Atsushi; Ramadan, Abdelaziz; Nishihara, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Ozawa, Rika; Takabayashi, Junji; Arimura, Gen-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    A blend of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from plants induced by herbivory enables the priming of defensive responses in neighboring plants. These effects may provide insights useful for pest control achieved with transgenic-plant-emitted volatiles. We therefore investigated, under both laboratory and greenhouse conditions, the priming of defense responses in plants (lima bean and corn) by exposing them to transgenic-plant-volatiles (VOCos) including (E)-β-ocimene, emitted from transgenic tobacco plants (NtOS2) that were constitutively overexpressing (E)-β-ocimene synthase. When lima bean plants that had previously been placed downwind of NtOS2 in an open-flow tunnel were infested by spider mites, they were more defensive to spider mites and more attractive to predatory mites, in comparison to the infested plants that had been placed downwind of wild-type tobacco plants. This was similarly observed when the NtOS2-downwind maize plants were infested with Mythimna separata larvae, resulting in reduced larval growth and greater attraction of parasitic wasps (Cotesia kariyai). In a greenhouse experiment, we also found that lima bean plants (VOCos-receiver plants) placed near NtOS2 were more attractive when damaged by spider mites, in comparison to the infested plants that had been placed near the wild-type plants. More intriguingly, VOCs emitted from infested VOCos-receiver plants affected their conspecific neighboring plants to prime indirect defenses in response to herbivory. Altogether, these data suggest that transgenic-plant-emitted volatiles can enhance the ability to prime indirect defenses via both plant-plant and plant-plant-plant communications.

  13. Ammonia and Methane Dairy Emission Plumes in the San Joaquin Valley of California from Individual Feedlot to Regional Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David J.; Sun, Kang; Pan, Da; Zondlo, Mark A.; Nowak, John B.; Liu, Zhen; Diskin, Glenn; Sachse, Glen; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Ferrare, Richard; Scarino, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural ammonia (NH3) emissions are highly uncertain, with high spatiotemporal variability and a lack of widespread in situ measurements. Regional NH3 emission estimates using mass balance or emission ratio approaches are uncertain due to variable NH3 sources and sinks as well as unknown plume correlations with other dairy source tracers. We characterize the spatial distributions of NH3 and methane (CH4) dairy plumes using in situ surface and airborne measurements in the Tulare dairy feedlot region of the San Joaquin Valley, California, during the NASA Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality 2013 field campaign. Surface NH3 and CH4 mixing ratios exhibit large variability with maxima localized downwind of individual dairy feedlots. The geometric mean NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio derived from surface measurements is 0.15 +/- 0.03 ppmv ppmv-1. Individual dairy feedlots with spatially distinct NH3 and CH4 source pathways led to statistically significant correlations between NH3 and CH4 in 68% of the 69 downwind plumes sampled. At longer sampling distances, the NH3:CH4 enhancement ratio decreases 20-30%, suggesting the potential for NH3 deposition as a loss term for plumes within a few kilometers downwind of feedlots. Aircraft boundary layer transect measurements directly above surface mobile measurements in the dairy region show comparable gradients and geometric mean enhancement ratios within measurement uncertainties, even when including NH3 partitioning to submicron particles. Individual NH3 and CH4 plumes sampled at close proximity where losses are minimal are not necessarily correlated due to lack of mixing and distinct source pathways. Our analyses have important implications for constraining NH3 sink and plume variability influences on regional NH3 emission estimates and for improving NH3 emission inventory spatial allocations.

  14. Using models to interpret the impact of roadside barriers on near-road air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Seyedmorteza; Ahangar, Faraz Enayati; Schulte, Nico; Venkatram, Akula

    2016-08-01

    The question this paper addresses is whether semi-empirical dispersion models based on data from controlled wind tunnel and tracer experiments can describe data collected downwind of a sound barrier next to a real-world urban highway. Both models are based on the mixed wake model described in Schulte et al. (2014). The first neglects the effects of stability on dispersion, and the second accounts for reduced entrainment into the wake of the barrier under unstable conditions. The models were evaluated with data collected downwind of a kilometer-long barrier next to the I-215 freeway running next to the University of California campus in Riverside. The data included measurements of 1) ultrafine particle (UFP) concentrations at several distances from the barrier, 2) micrometeorological variables upwind and downwind of the barrier, and 3) traffic flow separated by automobiles and trucks. Because the emission factor for UFP is highly uncertain, we treated it as a model parameter whose value is obtained by fitting model estimates to observations of UFP concentrations measured at distances where the barrier impact is not dominant. Both models provide adequate descriptions of both the magnitude and the spatial variation of observed concentrations. The good performance of the models reinforces the conclusion from Schulte et al. (2014) that the presence of the barrier is equivalent to shifting the line sources on the road upwind by a distance of about HU/u∗ where H is the barrier height, U is the wind velocity at half of the barrier height, and u∗ is the friction velocity. The models predict that a 4 m barrier results in a 35% reduction in average concentration within 40 m (10 times the barrier height) of the barrier, relative to the no-barrier site. This concentration reduction is 55% if the barrier height is doubled.

  15. The composite effect of transgenic plant volatiles for acquired immunity to herbivory caused by inter-plant communications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Muroi

    Full Text Available A blend of volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from plants induced by herbivory enables the priming of defensive responses in neighboring plants. These effects may provide insights useful for pest control achieved with transgenic-plant-emitted volatiles. We therefore investigated, under both laboratory and greenhouse conditions, the priming of defense responses in plants (lima bean and corn by exposing them to transgenic-plant-volatiles (VOCos including (E-β-ocimene, emitted from transgenic tobacco plants (NtOS2 that were constitutively overexpressing (E-β-ocimene synthase. When lima bean plants that had previously been placed downwind of NtOS2 in an open-flow tunnel were infested by spider mites, they were more defensive to spider mites and more attractive to predatory mites, in comparison to the infested plants that had been placed downwind of wild-type tobacco plants. This was similarly observed when the NtOS2-downwind maize plants were infested with Mythimna separata larvae, resulting in reduced larval growth and greater attraction of parasitic wasps (Cotesia kariyai. In a greenhouse experiment, we also found that lima bean plants (VOCos-receiver plants placed near NtOS2 were more attractive when damaged by spider mites, in comparison to the infested plants that had been placed near the wild-type plants. More intriguingly, VOCs emitted from infested VOCos-receiver plants affected their conspecific neighboring plants to prime indirect defenses in response to herbivory. Altogether, these data suggest that transgenic-plant-emitted volatiles can enhance the ability to prime indirect defenses via both plant-plant and plant-plant-plant communications.

  16. On Rainfall Modification by Major Urban Areas. Part 1; Observations from Space-borne Rain Radar Aboard TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, J. Marshell; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A novel approach is introduced to correlating urbanization and rainfall modification. This study represents one of the first published attempts (possibly the first) to identify and quantify rainfall modification by urban areas using satellite-based rainfall measurements. Previous investigations successfully used rain gauge networks and around-based radar to investigate this phenomenon but still encountered difficulties due to limited, specialized measurements and separation of topographic and other influences. Three years of mean monthly rainfall rates derived from the first space-based rainfall radar, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, are employed. Analysis of data at half-degree latitude resolution enables identification of rainfall patterns around major metropolitan areas of Atlanta, Montgomery, Nashville, San Antonio, Waco, and Dallas during the warm season. Preliminary results reveal an average increase of 5.6% in monthly rainfall rates (relative to a mean upwind CONTROL area) over the metropolis but an average increase of approx. 28%, in monthly rainfall rates within 30-60 kilometers downwind of the metropolis. Some portions of the downwind area exhibit increases as high as 51%. It was also found that maximum rainfall rates found in the downwind impact area exceeded the mean value in the upwind CONTROL area by 48%-116% and were generally found at an average distance of 39 km from the edge of the urban center or 64 km from the center of the city. These results are quite consistent studies of St. Louis (e.g' METROMEX) and Chicago almost two decades ago and more recent studies in the Atlanta and Mexico City areas.

  17. Sensitivity study of particulate loss processes within HY-SPLIT4, SCIPUFF, and MATHEW/ADPIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seely, S.L.

    1999-07-01

    Three transport and dispersion models equipped to simulate the transport, diffusion, and deposition of particulate pollutants were compared and contrasted in a sensitivity study. The input parameters were controlled and similar for each model tested. The airborne concentrations along a straight line 100 km downwind from the source were estimated by virtual samplers located at 5 km intervals. Downwind concentrations produced by the three models were examined for changes after dry deposition, decay, and light and heavy rain during both stable and unstable conditions. The assumed distribution of particle diameters was centered around two sizes: 8 and 14 mm. Large differences in the relative change in concentration of downwind particulates were found depending upon the model used. This was likely due to the parameterization of the loss processes within each model. SCIPUFF produced consistent losses when decay or wet or dry deposition were activated. ADPIC produced intermittent losses during the daytime when dry deposition was activated. HY-SPLIT4 produced intermittent losses both day and night when dry deposition was activated. Washout in ADPIC and HY-SPLIT4 was more rapid and complete than in SCIPUFF. Anomalous results were observed with HY-SPLIT4 during nighttime simulations of decay, with intermittent increases in near-ground particulate concentrations. Finally, all three models produced similar losses due to decay during daytime simulations. This research is significant and relevant to decision-making organizations that utilize model outputs for emergency preparedness and response. By understanding the effects of selecting different deposition input parameters and the manner in which deposition is implemented within each model, the emergency planner is better equipped for decision-making when confronted with output from more than one model.

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation of Fast-Response, Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes, and Large-Eddy Simulation Methods Against High-Spatial-Resolution Wind-Tunnel Data in Step-Down Street Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Arash Nemati; Stoll, Rob; Kim, J. J.; Harman, Todd; Nelson, Matthew A.; Brown, Michael J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.

    2017-08-01

    Three computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods with different levels of flow-physics modelling are comprehensively evaluated against high-spatial-resolution wind-tunnel velocity data from step-down street canyons (i.e., a short building downwind of a tall building). The first method is a semi-empirical fast-response approach using the Quick Urban Industrial Complex (QUIC-URB) model. The second method solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations, and the third one utilizes a fully-coupled fluid-structure interaction large-eddy simulation (LES) model with a grid-turbulence inflow generator. Unlike typical point-by-point evaluation comparisons, here the entire two-dimensional wind-tunnel dataset is used to evaluate the dynamics of dominant flow topological features in the street canyon. Each CFD method is scrutinized for several geometric configurations by varying the downwind-to-upwind building-height ratio (H_d/H_u) and street canyon-width to building-width aspect ratio ( S / W) for inflow winds perpendicular to the upwind building front face. Disparities between the numerical results and experimental data are quantified in terms of their ability to capture flow topological features for different geometric configurations. Overall, all three methods qualitatively predict the primary flow topological features, including a saddle point and a primary vortex. However, the secondary flow topological features, namely an in-canyon separation point and secondary vortices, are only well represented by the LES method despite its failure for taller downwind building cases. Misrepresentation of flow-regime transitions, exaggeration of the coherence of recirculation zones and wake fields, and overestimation of downwards vertical velocity into the canyon are the main defects in QUIC-URB, RANS and LES results, respectively. All three methods underestimate the updrafts and, surprisingly, QUIC-URB outperforms RANS for the streamwise velocity component, while RANS is

  19. Fast evolution of tropospheric Pb- and Zn-rich particles in the vicinity of a lead smelter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choël, M.; Deboudt, K.; Flament, P.; Lecornet, G.; Perdrix, E.; Sobanska, S.

    Dusts collected on air filters at a Pb-Zn refinery located in northern France were sampled in 1997, 1999 and 2002. The low temporal variability in major elements (Pb, Zn and S) abundances suggested chemical composition of particulate emissions was stable over time. In July 2001 and March 2002, atmospheric aerosols were sampled in the vicinity of the Pb-Zn refinery upwind and downwind from the smelters. Bulk concentrations of major elements (Al, Fe, Pb and Zn) and hydrosoluble ions (Na +, NH 4+, Mg 2+, K +, Ca 2+, Cl - NO 3- and SO 42-) were, respectively, determined by atomic absorption spectrometry and ion chromatography. Elemental and molecular individual particle analyses were, respectively, performed by automated SEM-EDX and Raman microspectrometry. Continental air masses (campaign 2001) were characterized by low Na + and high SO 42-, NO 3- and NH 4+ contents upwind from the smelters. Individual particle analysis of Pb- and Zn-rich airborne particles collected downwind from the refinery indicated elemental associations and molecular speciation were similar to those obtained at the emission: Pb compounds were mainly identified as oxides, sulfates and oxy-sulfates whereas Zn compounds were identified as sulfides. Marine air masses (campaign 2002) were characterized by high Na + contents upwind from the smelters. Individual particle analysis of Pb- and Zn-rich particles collected downwind from the refinery pointed out a systematic association with Na, not emitted by the refinery, suggesting internal mixing of marine aerosols with heavy-metals dusts emitted by the refinery. Such fast evolution of airborne particles chemical composition in the vicinity of the refinery was further proven by SEM-EDX and Raman microspectrometry mappings showing physical evolution by aggregation or coagulation of Zn- and Pb-rich particles with aged sea-salts.

  20. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bouarar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere into higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, dominate the ozone changes in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region. Convective uplift of soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region also makes a significant contribution to ozone in the upper troposphere. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they make a lower contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The influence of Asian emissions should also be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa since they make a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, the model calculations suggest largest changes in ozone due to the growth of emissions over Asia than over Africa over the next 20 years.

  1. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over Equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouarar, I.; Law, K. S.; Pham, M.; Liousse, C.; Schlager, H.; Hamburger, T.; Reeves, C. E.; Cammas, J.-P.; Nédéléc, P.; Szopa, S.; Ravegnani, F.; Viciani, S.; D'Amato, F.; Ulanovsky, A.; Richter, A.

    2011-12-01

    A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over Central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to Central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over Central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere to higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, lead to maximum ozone changes in the lower stratosphere region. Soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region make a significant contribution to ozone in the lower troposphere. In addition, convective uplift of these emissions and subsequent ozone production are also an important source of ozone in the upper troposphere over West Africa. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they only make a small contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The import of Asian emissions also makes a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa and has to be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report) estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, model calculations show larger changes in ozone over Africa due to growth in Asian emissions compared to African emissions

  2. Seasonal and annual variation of carbon dioxide surface fluxes in Helsinki, Finland, in 2006–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Järvi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Five years of carbon dioxide exchange measured with the eddy covariance technique at the world's northernmost urban flux station SMEAR III located in Helsinki, Finland, were analyzed. The long-term measurements and high-latitude location enabled us to examine the seasonal and annual variations of CO2 exchange, and to identify different factors controlling the measured exchange. Furthermore, the advantage of the station is that the complex surrounding area enables us to distinguish three different surface cover areas than can be evaluated separately. We also tested different methods (artificial neural networks and median diurnal cycles to fill gaps in CO2 flux time series and examined their effect on annual emission estimates.

    The measured fluxes were highly dependent on the prevailing wind direction with the highest fluxes downwind from a large road and lowest downwind from the area of high fraction of vegetation cover. On an annual level, the difference in CO2 emission of the two areas was 75% showing the impact of complex measurement surroundings in the flux measurements. Seasonal differences in the CO2 exchange downwind from the road were mainly caused by reduced traffic rates in summer, whereas in other directions seasonality was more determined by vegetation activity. Differences between the gap filling methods were small, but slightly better (0.6 μmol m−2 s−1 smaller RMSE results were obtained when the artificial neural network with traffic counts was used instead of the without traffic network and method based on median diurnal cycles. The measurement site was a net carbon source with an average annual emission of 1760 g C m−2, with a biased error of 6.1 g C m−2 caused by the gap filling. The annual value varied 16% between the different years.

  3. Fluoride accumulation and toxicity in grapevines Vitis vinifera L. in New South Wales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leece, D.R.; Scheltema, J.H.; Anttonen, T.; Weir, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The accumulation of fluoride by fully expanded basal leaves of grapevines was measured through two seasons in ten vineyards 9-25 km downwind of an aluminium smelter near Cessnock. Accumulation was linear with time until mid-summer then declined somewhat as leaves aged. Heavy rainfall and lowered emissions reduced accumulation. The impact of fluoride on the vines each season could be readily assessed from the leaf fluoride concentration in January, just prior to harvest. Fluoride accumulation by grapevines was assessed in four districts each January from 1981 to 1983. At Griffith and Mudgee, two districts which lacked an industrial source of fluoride, vine leaves did not accumulate fluoride (< 2..mu..g Fg/sup -1/). At Muswellbrook, vines growing 15-37 km downwind of a power station generally had slightly elevated leaf fluoride concentrations (1-10 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/), but certain higher values were recorded (18-27 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/) in vineyards under the direct influence of the plume. These higher values did not produce leaf necrosis. At Cessnock, 9-23 km downwind of the aluminium smelter, elevated leaf fluoride concentrations (4-42 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/) were also recorded, with highest levels 9-11 km from the smelter. These levels did not produce leaf necrosis in well managed vineyards. In certain non-irrigated vineyards, fluoride accumulation was retarded by water-deficit stress when experienced throughout the growing season. In contrast, where severe water-deficit stress was not experienced until mid-summer, certain leaves which had accumulated 26-36 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/ developed marginal necrotic lesions which reduced effective leaf photosynthetic area by 5-10%.

  4. Characteristics of cloud-to-ground lightning activity over Seoul, South Korea in relation to an urban effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Kar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-to-ground (CG lightning flash data collected by the lightning detection network installed at the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA have been used to study the urban effect on lightning activity over and around Seoul, the largest metropolitan city of South Korea, for the period of 1989–1999. Negative and positive flash density and the percentage of positive flashes have been calculated. Calculation reveals that an enhancement of approximately 60% and 42% are observed, respectively, for negative and positive flash density over and downwind of the city. The percentage decrease of positive flashes occurs over and downwind of Seoul and the amount of decrease is nearly 20% compared to upwind values. The results are in good agreement with those obtained by Steiger et al. (2002 and Westcott (1995. CG lightning activities have also been considered in relation to annual averages of PM10 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm and sulphur dioxide (SO2 concentrations. Interesting results are found, indicating that the higher concentration of SO2 contributes to the enhancement of CG lightning flashes. On the other hand, the contribution from PM10 concentration has not appeared in this study to be as significant as SO2 in the enhancement of CG lightning flashes. Correlation coefficients of 0.33 and 0.64 are found between the change in CG lightning flashes and the PM10 and SO2, respectively, for upwind to downwind areas, suggesting a significant influence of the increased concentration of SO2 on the enhancement of CG flashes.

  5. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China: MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory derived NO emission from soil samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mamtimin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW-China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis center, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i soil moisture and (ii soil temperature of Milan oasis' (iii different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol-Transport was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three dimensional NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modeled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2 to the size of an entire

  6. EERA-DTOC Project: Design Tools for Offshore Wind Farm Clusters; Proyecto EERA-DTOC: herramientas para el diseno de clusters de Parques Eolicos Marinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    In the EERA-DTOC Project an integrated and validated software design tool for the optimization of offshore wind farms and wind farm clusters has been developed. The CIEMAT contribution to this project has change the view on mesoscale wind forecasting models, which were not so far considered capable of modeling wind farm scale phenomena. It has been shown the ability of the WRF model to simulate the wakes caused by the wind turbines on the downwind ones (inter-turbine wakes within a wind farm) as well as the wakes between wind farms within a cluster. (Author)

  7. Analysis of the inversion monitoring capabilities of a monostatic acoustic radar in complex terrain. [Tennessee River Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepf, D.; Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    A qualitative interpretation of the records from a monostatic acoustic radar is presented. This is achieved with the aid of airplane, helicopter, and rawinsonde temperature soundings. The diurnal structure of a mountain valley circulation pattern is studied with the use of two acoustic radars, one located in the valley and one on the downwind ridge. The monostatic acoustic radar was found to be sufficiently accurate in locating the heights of the inversions and the mixed layer depth to warrant use by industry even in complex terrain.

  8. Long-range pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico City outflow event using free-floating altitude-controlled balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, Paul B.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Flocke, Frank M.; Mao, Huitimg; Hartley, Tom; DeAmicis, Pam; Deonandan, Indira; Contrerars-Jimenez, G.; Martinez-Antonio, O.; Figueroa Estrada, M.; Greenberg, David; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Montzka, DeeDee; Crounse, J. D.; Wennberg, P. O.; Apel, Eric; Madronich, Sasha; de Foy, B.

    2010-08-04

    One of the major objectives of the Megacities Initiative: Local And Global Research 3 Observations (MILAGRO 2006) campaign was to investigate the long-range transport of 4 Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) pollution outflow and its downwind impacts on air 5 quality and climate. Four aircraft (DOE G-1, NSF/NCAR C-130, NASA-J31, and NASA 6 DC-8) made extensive chemical, aerosol, and radiation measurements above MCMA and over 7 1000 km downwind in order to characterize the evolution of MCMA pollution as it aged and 8 dispersed over the central Mexican plateau and the Gulf of Mexico. As part of this effort, 9 free-floating Controlled-Meteorological (CMET) balloons, capable of changing altitude on 10 command via satellite, characterized the MCMA outflow by performing repeated soundings 11 during the transit. In this paper, we present an analysis based on the data from two CMET 12 balloons that were launched near Mexico City on the afternoon of 18 March 2006 and floated 13 downwind with the outflow for nearly 30 hours. Continuous profile measurements made by 14 the balloons show the evolving structure of the MCMA outflow in considerable detail: its 15 stability and stratification, interaction with other air masses, mixing episodes, and dispersion 16 into the regional background. Air parcel trajectories, computed directly from the balloon 17 wind profiles, show three different transport pathways for Mexico City outflow on 18-19 18 March: (a) high-altitude advection of the top of the MCMA mixed layer, (b) low-altitude flow 19 over the Sierra Madre Oriental followed by decoupling and isolated transport over the Gulf, 20 and (c) the same decoupling scenario with entrainment into a cleaner westerly jet below the 21 plateau. The C-130 intercepted the balloon-based trajectories three times on 19 March, once 22 along each transport pathway. In all three cases, distinct peaks in the urban tracer signature 23 and LIDAR backscatter imagery provided evidence for Mexico City air

  9. The fence experiment – full-scale lidar-based shelter observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Bechmann, Andreas; Conti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We present shelter measurements of a fence from a field experiment in Denmark. The measurements were performed with three lidars scanning on a vertical plane downwind of the fence. Inflow conditions are based on sonic anemometer observations of a nearby mast. For fence-undisturbed conditions......, the lidars’ measurements agree well with those from the sonic anemometers and, at the mast position, the average inflow conditions are well described by the logarithmic profile. Seven cases are defined based on the relative wind direction to the fence, the fence porosity, and the inflow conditions...

  10. The fence experiment – full-scale lidar-based shelter observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Bechmann, Andreas; Conti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We present shelter measurements of a fence from a field experiment in Denmark. The measurements were performed with three lidars scanning on a vertical plane downwind of the fence. Inflow conditions are based on sonic observations of a nearby mast. For fence-undisturbed conditions, the lidars......’ measurements agree well with those from the sonics and, at the mast position, the average inflow conditions are well described by the logarithmic profile. Seven cases are defined based on the 5 relative wind direction to the fence, the fence porosity, and the inflow conditions. The larger the relative...

  11. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Mauzerall, D. L.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA) sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2). We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R) relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80% 20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate), EA sources account for approximately 30% 50% (over the Western US) and 10% 20% (over the Eastern US). The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3), and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3). Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m-3 of sulfate originates from EA) over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase). We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be obtained using either sensitivity (i.e., varying emissions from a region to examine the effects on downwind concentrations

  12. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2. We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80%–20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. Surface sulfate concentrations are dominated by local anthropogenic sources. Of the sulfate produced from sources other than local anthropogenic emissions (defined here as "background" sulfate, EA sources account for approximately 30%–50% (over the Western US and 10%–20% (over the Eastern US. The surface concentrations of sulfate from EA sources over the Western US are highest in MAM (up to 0.15 μg/m3, and lowest in DJF (less than 0.06 μg/m3. Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence (represented by the areas where at least 0.1 μg m−3 of sulfate originates from EA over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 hPa in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (in particular of H2O2, which oxidizes SO2 to sulfate in the aqueous phase. We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be

  13. Effects of rotor location, coning, and tilt on critical loads in large wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, D. A.; Janetzke, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Several large (1500 kW) horizontal rotor configurations were analyzed to determine the effects on dynamic loads of upwind downwind rotor locations, coned and radial blade positions, and tilted and horizontal rotor axis positions. Loads were calculated for a range of wind velocities at three locations in the structure: (1) the blade shank; (2) the hub shaft; and (3) the yaw drive. Blade axis coning and rotor axis tilt were found to have minor effects on loads. However, locating the rotor upwind of the tower significantly reduced loads at all locations analyzed.

  14. Concentration fluctuations and averaging time in vapor clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, David J

    2010-01-01

    This book contributes to more reliable and realistic predictions by focusing on sampling times from a few seconds to a few hours. Its objectives include developing clear definitions of statistical terms, such as plume sampling time, concentration averaging time, receptor exposure time, and other terms often confused with each other or incorrectly specified in hazard assessments; identifying and quantifying situations for which there is no adequate knowledge to predict concentration fluctuations in the near-field, close to sources, and far downwind where dispersion is dominated by atmospheric t

  15. Relocation impacts of a major release from SRTC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.; Thompson, E.A.; Thompson, J.M.

    1999-06-01

    The relocation impacts of an accidental release, scenario 1-RD-3 , are evaluated for the Savannah River Technology Center. The extent of the area potentially contaminated to a level that would result in doses exceeding the relocation protective action guide(PAG)is calculated. The maximum calculated distance downwind from the accident at which the relocation PAG is exceeded is also determined. The consequences of the particulate portion of the release are evaluated using the HOTSPOT model and an EXCEL spreadsheet. The consequences of the tritium release are evaluated using UFOTRI.

  16. Radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren bone-coal power station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The radioactivity level of the ambient environment of Anren Bonc-coalPower Station (BCPS) was investigated systematically. The γ radiation dose ratelevel in the environment, the content of 238U and 226Ra in the ambient soil and thefarmland in the direction of downwind, the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 40Kand 222Rn, as well as α potential energy in air, and the concentrations of natural Uand Th in effluent are all higher than the corresponding values of the reference site.The additional annual effective dose equivalent to the residents living in the housesmade of bone-coal cinder brick is 2.7mSv.

  17. Mitigation of methane emission from an old unlined landfill in Klintholm, Denmark using a passive biocover system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Pedersen, Rasmus Broen; Petersen, Per Haugsted

    2014-01-01

    as to their usefulness as bioactive methane oxidizing material and a suitable compost mixture was selected. Whole site methane emission quantifications based on combined tracer release and downwind measurements in combination with several local experimental activities (gas composition within biocover layers, flux...... chamber based emission measurements and logging of compost temperatures) proved that the biocover system had an average mitigation efficiency of approximately 80%. The study showed that the system also had a high efficiency during winter periods with temperatures below freezing. An economic analysis...... indicated that the mitigation costs of the biocover system were competitive to other existing greenhouse gas mitigation options....

  18. The wind-frequency allocation method on discharge loading of function zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Gao, Tingyao; Hu, Chenyan; Shi, Jiekuan

    2002-06-01

    This paper introduces a new allocation method on discharge loading of each function zone in a total emission control region. The wind frequency, the position of each district, and the pollutant's influence area were taken into account in this new method. The concept of "average downwind distance" was brought forward in this paper. The method here is more reasonable than the original method of area distribution, which was proposed by the "A-value" method in regulation of total emissions in China, by means of the simulation of annual average concentration in the total emission control region.

  19. Transport of Aerosols: Regional and Global Implications for Climate, Weather, and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Mian; Diehl, Thomas; Yu, Hongbin; Bian, Huisheng; Remer, Lorraine; Kahn, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Long-range transport of atmospheric aerosols can have a significant impact on global climate, regional weather, and local air quality. In this study, we use a global model GOCART together with satellite data and ground-based measurements to assess the emission and transport of pollution, dust, biomass burning, and volcanic aerosols and their implications. In particular, we will show the impact of emissions and long-range transport of aerosols from major pollution and dust source regions to (1) the surface air quality, (2) the atmospheric heating rates, and (3) surface radiation change near the source and downwind regions.

  20. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25

    This report examines the complex interactions between atmospheric stability and turbine-induced wakes on downwind turbine wind speed and power production at a West Coast North American multi-MW wind farm. Wakes are generated when the upwind flow field is distorted by the mechanical movement of the wind turbine blades. This has two consequences for downwind turbines: (1) the downwind turbine encounters wind flows with reduced velocity and (2) the downwind turbine encounters increased turbulence across multiple length scales via mechanical turbulence production by the upwind turbine. This increase in turbulence on top of ambient levels may increase aerodynamic fatigue loads on the blades and reduce the lifetime of turbine component parts. Furthermore, ambient atmospheric conditions, including atmospheric stability, i.e., thermal stratification in the lower boundary layer, play an important role in wake dissipation. Higher levels of ambient turbulence (i.e., a convective or unstable boundary layer) lead to higher turbulent mixing in the wake and a faster recovery in the velocity flow field downwind of a turbine. Lower levels of ambient turbulence, as in a stable boundary layer, will lead to more persistent wakes. The wake of a wind turbine can be divided into two regions: the near wake and far wake, as illustrated in Figure 1. The near wake is formed when the turbine structure alters the shape of the flow field and usually persists one rotor diameter (D) downstream. The difference between the air inside and outside of the near wake results in a shear layer. This shear layer thickens as it moves downstream and forms turbulent eddies of multiple length scales. As the wake travels downstream, it expands depending on the level of ambient turbulence and meanders (i.e., travels in non-uniform path). Schepers estimates that the wake is fully expanded at a distance of 2.25 D and the far wake region begins at 2-5 D downstream. The actual distance traveled before the wake

  1. Characterization of aerosolized bacteria and fungi from desert dust events in Mali, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, C.A.; Griffin, Dale W.; Garrison, V.H.; Peak, K.K.; Royall, N.; Smith, R.R.; Shinn, E.A.

    2004-01-01

    Millions of metric tons of African desert dust blow across the Atlantic Ocean each year, blanketing the Caribbean and southeastern United States. Previous work in the Caribbean has shown that atmospheric samples collected during dust events contain living microbes, including plant and opportunistic human pathogens. To better understand the potential downwind public health and ecosystem effects of the dust microbes, it is important to characterize the source population. We describe 19 genera of bacteria and 3 genera of fungi isolated from air samples collected in Mali, a known source region for dust storms, and over which large dust storms travel.

  2. Long-range pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico City outflow event using free-floating altitude-controlled balloons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Voss

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the major objectives of the Megacities Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations (MILAGRO-2006 campaign was to investigate the long-range transport of polluted Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA outflow and determine its downwind impacts on air quality and climate. Six research aircraft, including the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C-130, made extensive chemical, aerosol, and radiation measurements above MCMA and more than 1000 km downwind in order to characterize the evolution of the outflow as it aged and dispersed over the Mesa Alta and Gulf of Mexico. As part of this effort, free-floating Controlled-Meteorological (CMET balloons, commanded to change altitude via satellite, made repeated profile measurements of winds and state variables within the advecting outflow. In this paper, we present an analysis based on the data from two CMET balloons that were launched near Mexico City on the afternoon of 18 March 2006 and floated downwind with the MCMA pollution for nearly 30 h. The repeating profile measurements show the evolving structure of the outflow in considerable detail: its stability and stratification, interaction with other air masses, mixing episodes, and dispersion into the regional background. Air parcel trajectories, computed directly from the balloon wind profiles, show three different transport pathways on 18–19 March: (a high-altitude advection of the top of the MCMA mixed layer, (b mid-level outflow over the Sierra Madre Oriental followed by decoupling and isolated transport over the Gulf, and (c low-altitude outflow with entrainment into a cleaner westerly jet below the plateau. The C-130 aircraft intercepted the balloon-based trajectories three times on 19 March, once along each of these pathways. In all three cases, distinct peaks in the urban tracer signatures and LIDAR backscatter imagery were consistent with MCMA pollution. The coherence of the high-altitude outflow was well preserved

  3. Development of a large reactive silencer to attenuate mid frequency broad band sound: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, M. P.; Kane, J.

    1996-08-01

    Development of a large reactive silencer, modifying the pollution control system of a fluid catalytic cracking unit at an east coast oil refinery, was described. The modification was necessitated by complaints from nearby residents, and company determination that sound levels in the community could reach 75dBA to 80 dBA under frequent downwind conditions in an otherwise quiet residential area. Design, construction and testing of a scale model, static testing of the full size silencer prior to delivery and installation, and preliminary in situ results were reviewed and discussed. 1 ref., 5 figs.

  4. Low frequency noise from wind turbines mechanisms of generation and its modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    model which computes the sound pressure level (SPL) at a specified distance from the turbine. The influences on LFN on a number of turbine design parameters are investigated and the position of the rotor relative to the tower (upwind or downwind rotor) is found to be the most important design parameter....... For an upwind rotor the LFN levels are so low that it should not cause annoyance of neighbouring people. Important turbine design parameters with strong influence on LFN are the blade tip speed and the distance between rotor and tower....

  5. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Apel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The volatile organic compound (VOC distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs, predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers were able to approximate the observed MCMA daytime patterns and absolute values of the VOC OH reactivity. The MOZART model is also in agreement with observations showing that NMHCs dominate the reactivity distribution except in the afternoon hours. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height.

    A northeast transport event was studied in which air originating in the MCMA was intercepted aloft with the Department of Energy (DOE G1 on 18 March and downwind with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind; ozone was shown to be photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial extent and temporal evolution of the plume

  6. Carbon fiber dispersion models used for risk analysis calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    For evaluating the downwind, ground level exposure contours from carbon fiber dispersion, two fiber release scenarios were chosen. The first is the fire and explosion release in which all of the fibers are released instantaneously. This model applies to accident scenarios where an explosion follows a short-duration fire in the aftermath of the accident. The second is the plume release scenario in which the total mass of fibers is released into the fire plume. This model applies to aircraft accidents where only a fire results. These models are described in detail.

  7. An in situ survey of Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range, Central Nevada. Date of survey: September--November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    A ground-based in situ radiological survey was conducted downwind of the Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3 nuclear safety test sites at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada from September through November 1993. The purpose of the study was to corroborate the americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) soil concentrations that were derived from the aerial radiological survey of the Clean Slate areas, which was conducted from August through October 1993. The presence of {sup 241}Am was detected at 140 of the 190 locations, with unrecoverable or lost data accounting for fifteen (15) of the sampling points. Good agreement was obtained between the aerial and in situ results.

  8. Environmental effects of solar thermal power systems: ecological observations during construction of the Barstow 10 MWe pilot STPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, F.B. (ed.)

    1981-10-01

    The environmental monitoring plan used consists of comparisons of a few meteorological variables and changes in the states of a limited array of indicator species or assemblages of species of plants and animals. Observations inlude aerial photography of the site, saltation meter measurements downwind from the site to measure fluxes of windblown sand, measurements of airborne particulates and atmospheric pollutants, and baseline temperature profiles made at two sites near the heliostat field to measure micro-meteorological patterns. Observations were made of annual plants both in off-field plots and in heliostat field, of shrubs, birds, rodents, reptiles, and sensitive species listed as rare or endangered. (LEW)

  9. Numerical Investigation of the Influence of Reynolds Number on Probe Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The influence of Reynolds number (Re) on probe measurements was investigated numerically, including the effects of the pressure holes and their geometry to obtain accurate hole-pressures. The results indicate that Re influences the probe measurements and cannot be neglected for Re larger than 105 and that the influence increases with Mach number (Ma). The calculations show that the pressures in the downwind holes are influenced more by Re than those of the upwind and central holes when the probe is at an angle. Thus, 7-hole probes may be more suitable for measurements at different Re than 5-hole probes.

  10. The Biogeohydroclimatology of Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. B.

    2008-05-01

    When John Donne wrote his Meditation XVII, which includes the famous"No man is an island" passage, he was thinking about connections between people; no human being is isolated from another. Donne might just as well have been writing about the science of land use, however. What happens on one plot of land clearly affects what happens on another, whether downhill, downstream, or downwind. I will explore the consequences of land use for mass and energy fluxes, focusing on pasture, crop, and forest transitions in the Americas. I'll discuss my own work, some work of collaborators, and a few examples from the literature. No man is an island.

  11. Internal boundary-layer height formulae — A comparison with atmospheric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, John L.

    1989-04-01

    The height of the internal boundary layer (IBL) downwind of a step change in surface roughness is computed using formulae of Elliott (1958), Jackson (1976) and Panofsky and Dutton (1984). The results are compared with neutral-stratification atmospheric data extracted from the set of wind-tunnel and atmospheric data summarized by Jackson (1976) as well as neutral-stratification data presented by Peterson et al. (1979) and new data measured at Cherrywood, Ontario. It is found that the Panofsky-Dutton formulation gives the least root-mean-square (RMS) absolute errors for atmospheric applications.

  12. Notes on an Internal Boundary-Layer Height Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyev, Sergiya.; Taylor, Petera.

    The derivation of the Panofsky-Dutton internal boundary-layer(IBL) height formula has been revisited. We propose that the upwindroughness length (rather than downwind) should be used in theformula and that a turbulent vertical velocity (w) ratherthan the surface friction velocity (u*) should be considered asthe appropriate scaling for the rate of propagation ofdisturbances into the turbulent flow. A published set ofwind-tunnel and atmospheric data for neutral stratification hasbeen used to investigate the influence of the magnitude ofroughness change on the IBL height.

  13. A mechanism for the origin and development of the large-scale dunefield on the right flank of the lower reach of Laoha River, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Han; GuiFang Zhang; Li You; Liang Zhou; Lin Yang; XueYong Zhao; YuLin Li; TongHui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    By viewing satellite imagery, a striking large-scale dunefield can be clearly perceived, with a size of nearly 63 km long and 11 km wide, and trending NE–SW, on the right flank of the lower Laoha River, Northeast China. By means of remote sensing imagery analysis and field observation as well as a comparison with a small-scale dunefield on the right flank of the lower Xiangshui River, analogous to the case of the lower Laoha River, this paper presents a new mechanism for its origin and development. The results show that:(1) the large-scale dunefield bears a tile-style framework overwhelmingly composed of transverse barchanoid ridges perpendicular to the predominant winds, and inlaid diverse blowouts. (2) The small-scale dunefield, referred to as a primary structural unit of the large one, is typical of an incipient dunefield, following the same rules of evolution as the larger. (3) A succession of barchanoid ridge chains can steadily migrate downwind in much the same manner as surface wave propagation in air or water stimulated by an incised valley, and ultimately tend to bear roughly the same wavelength and amplitude under stable climate and hydrologic regimes. (4) The first ridge chain acquires its sand source substantially from the downwind escarpments exposing the loose Quaternary sandy sediments to the air, while the ensuing ridges derive their sands dominantly from in situ deflation of the underlain Quaternary loose sandy sediments in blowouts, partly from the upwind ridges through northern elongated horns. Theoretically, the sands from riparian escarpments can be transported by wind to the downwind distal end of a dunefield after sufficient long du-ration. (5) The lower Laohahe region experienced probably three significant climatic changes in the past, corresponding to the three active dune belts, suggesting that once a large-scale dunefield occurs, it is nearly impossible to be completely stabilized, at least in its central portions. At present, seasonal

  14. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Windpower, Nautica [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States); Marrone, Joseph [OCC COWI, Vancouver (Canada); Wagner, Thomas [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States)

    2013-08-29

    was developed and implemented in FAST to extend its capability for ice load modeling.Both upwind and downwind 2-bladed rotor wind turbine designs were developed and studied. The new rotor blade uses a new twist angle distribution design and a new pitch control algorithm compared with the baseline model. The coning and tilt angles were selected for both the upwind and downwind configurations to maximize the annual energy production. The risk of blade-tower impact is greater for the downwind design, particularly under a power grid fault; however, this risk was effectively reduced by adjusting the tilt angle for the downwind configuration.

  15. Downward particle fluxes of biogenic matter and Saharan dust across the equatorial North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Laura F.; Brummer, Geert-Jan A.; van der Does, Michèlle; Guerreiro, Catarina V.; Hennekam, Rick; van Hateren, Johannes A.; Jong, Dirk; Munday, Chris I.; Schouten, Stefan; Stuut, Jan-Berend W.

    2017-05-01

    Massive amounts of Saharan dust are blown from the coast of northern Africa across the Atlantic Ocean towards the Americas each year. This dust has, depending on its chemistry, direct and indirect effects on global climate which include reflection and absorption of solar radiation as well as transport and deposition of nutrients and metals fertilizing both ocean and land. To determine the temporal and spatial variability of Saharan dust transport and deposition and their marine environmental effects across the equatorial North Atlantic Ocean, we have set up a monitoring experiment using deep-ocean sediment traps as well as land-based dust collectors. The sediment traps were deployed at five ocean sites along a transatlantic transect between north-west Africa and the Caribbean along 12° N, in a downwind extension of the land-based dust collectors placed at 19° N on the Mauritanian coast in Iouîk. In this paper, we lay out the setup of the monitoring experiment and present the particle fluxes from sediment trap sampling over 24 continuous and synchronized intervals from October 2012 through to November 2013. We establish the temporal distribution of the particle fluxes deposited in the Atlantic and compare chemical compositions with the land-based dust collectors propagating to the downwind sediment trap sites, and with satellite observations of Saharan dust outbreaks. First-year results show that the total mass fluxes in the ocean are highest at the sampling sites in the east and west, closest to the African continent and the Caribbean, respectively. Element ratios reveal that the lithogenic particles deposited nearest to Africa are most similar in composition to the Saharan dust collected in Iouîk. Downwind increasing Al, Fe and K contents suggest a downwind change in the mineralogical composition of Saharan dust and indicate an increasing contribution of clay minerals towards the west. In the westernmost Atlantic Ocean, admixture of re-suspended clay

  16. Evaluation and modeling of the size fractionated aerosol particle number concentration measurements nearby a major road in Helsinki ─ Part II: Aerosol measurements within the SAPPHIRE project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karppinen

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an evaluation and modeling exercise of the size fractionated aerosol particle number concentrations measured nearby a major road in Helsinki during 23 August–19 September 2003 and 14 January–11 February 2004. The available information also included electronic traffic counts, on-site meteorological measurements, and urban background particle number size distribution measurement. The ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter<100 nm number concentrations at the roadside site were approximately an order of magnitude higher than those at the urban background site during daytime and downwind conditions. Both the modal structure analysis of the particle number size distributions and the statistical correlation between the traffic density and the UFP number concentrations indicate that the UFP were evidently from traffic related emissions. The modeling exercise included the evolution of the particle number size distribution nearby the road during downwind conditions. The model simulation results revealed that the evaluation of the emission factors of aerosol particles might not be valid for the same site during different time.

  17. General Motors sulfate dispersion experiment: assessment of the EPA HIWAY model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chock, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    A major objective of the General Motors Sulfate Dispersion Experiment was to investigate the validity of the Environmental Protection Agency's HIWAY dispersion model. This model was the basis for the high roadside predictions made by EPA in 1975. Comparisons of measurements with predictions show that at the pedestrian level downwind from the road, the model works fairly well under unstable conditions, but overpredicts for stable conditions. The overpredictions get worse as the wind speed decreases, as the wind direction becomes parallel to the road, and as the distance from the road increases. For the upwind dispersion, however, the model is inapplicable. Under extremely stable or worst meteorological conditions, variable winds at different heights and plume-rise due to the heated exhaust completely invalidate the model. The overpredictions at the bottom level downwind can be very substantial. When the wind is parallel to the road, overpredictions occur at all sampling positions. New dispersion parameters were determined which substantiate the expectation that mechanical mixing due to the traffic wake completely dominates the effects of atmospheric stability, except under extremely stable conditions. It is believed that the overprediction of the HIWAY model at ground level will become worse as the number of traffic lanes increases.

  18. General Motors sulfate dispersion experiment - An analysis of the wind field near a road

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chock, D.P.

    1980-06-01

    An investigation of the mean wind field fluctuations observed near a controlled, heavily traveled level roadway is presented. The mean wind field was studied in terms of velocity defects relative to the ambient mean wind the wind fluctuations were analyzed in terms of energy spectra, velocity cross-spectra, excesses of velocity variances, and cross-covariances over their ambient values. The influence of traffic on the ambient wind field extended vertically up to at least 4.5 m above ground, and horizontally to at least 30 m downwind of the road the wind tended to move up as it approached the road and down as it left the road except when the cross-road wind was low. When intense traffic shear existed between the local wind field and an opposing traffic direction, large turbulent energy productions generated large eddies. The large eddies also increased the mixing volume, so that when the ambient wind opposed the traffic generation on the upwind lanes, the pollutant concentration upwind of the road could be higher than that of downwind.

  19. Applications of dendrochronology and sediment geochronology to establish reference episodes for evaluations of environmental radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, W.J.; Carroll, J.; Abraham, J.D.; Landeen, D.S. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B 3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503 (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Dendrochronology and sediment geochronology have been used to demonstrate retrospective monitoring of environmental radioactivity at United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites. {sup 14}C in annual growth rings of sagebrush preserved the temporal and spatial patterns of {sup 14}C resulting from dispersion downwind of a nuclear fuel processing facility at the Hanford Site in Washington State. As far as 10 km downwind of the facility, {sup 14}C concentrations were significantly higher in growth rings formed during a fuel processing episode than in rings produced during preoperational or postoperational episodes. An episode of uranium mill tailings deposition in pond sediments at the Grand Junction Office in Colorado was reconstructed using {sup 210}Pb geochronology constrained by a marker of peak {sup 137}Cs fallout. Uranium concentrations in ponds sediments deposited after the processing episode provide a reasonable cleanup standard. These reference episodes of environmental radioactivity reconstructed from measurements taken within contaminated environments can improve or replace reference area data as baseline information for dose reconstructions, risk assessments, and the establishment of cleanup standards. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. A new approach for evaluating measured wake data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Mikael [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1996-12-01

    Wind turbine wakes have been studied by analysing a large set of atmospheric data, from a wind farm with four turbines sited on a flat coastal area. The results obtained have ben generalized to allow tests against data from other full scale wind turbines as well as wind tunnel simulations. These comparisons are found to give very satisfactory results. The thrust coefficient is found to be a better parameter for description than wind speed, of wake characteristics because it implicitly includes the effect of regulation. It is also found that down-wind travel time is more convenient to use than down-wind distance in this context. The travel time to the end of the near wake region, i.e. to the point where a single velocity deficit peak first appears, is found to be inversely proportional to the rotational frequency of the turbine and to the turbulence intensity of the ambient air flow and proportional to the ratio of the wake radius and the hub height. For larger travel times, i.e. for the far wake region, it is found that the centre line relative velocity deficit decreases with the logarithm of the time traveled and is parametrically dependent on the time constant and the thrust coefficient. 3 refs, 5 figs

  1. Wildfire Emissions and Their Interaction with Urban and Rural Pollution: Data and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H. B.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years NASA has conducted a series of airborne campaigns (e. g. SEAC4RS*, ARCTAS, INTEX-A/B) over North America using an instrumented DC-8 aircraft equipped to measure a very large number of gaseous and aerosol constituents including several unique tracers. In these campaigns wild fires were extensively sampled near source as well as downwind after aging. The data provided detailed information on the composition and chemistry of fire emissions under a variety of atmospheric conditions as well as their interactions with rural and urban air pollution. Major fires studied including the California Rim fire in 2013 (SEAC4RS), the 2008 California wildfires (ARCTAS), and the Alaskan fires downwind over eastern US (INTEX-A). Although some fire plumes contained virtually no O3 enhancement, others showed significant ozone formation. Over Los Angeles, the highest O3 mixing ratios were observed in fire influenced urban air masses. Attempts to simulate these interactions using state of the art models were only minimally successful and indicated several shortcomings in simulating fire emission influences on urban smog formation. A variety of secondary oxidation products (e. g. O3, PAN, HCHO) were substantially underestimated. We will discuss the data collected in fire influenced air masses and their potential air quality implications.

  2. TIGER Burned Brightly in JAMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sandra L.; Kashiwagi, Takashi

    2001-01-01

    The Transition From Ignition to Flame Growth Under External Radiation in 3D (TIGER- 3D) experiment, which is slated to fly aboard the International Space Station, conducted a series of highly successful tests in collaboration with the University of Hokkaido using Japan's 10-sec JAMIC drop tower. The tests were conducted to test engineering versions of advanced flight diagnostics such as an infrared camera for detailed surface temperature measurements and an infrared spectroscopic array for gas-phase species concentrations and temperatures based on detailed spectral emissions in the near infrared. Shown in the top figure is a visible light image and in the bottom figure is an infrared image at 3.8 mm obtained during the microgravity tests. The images show flames burning across cellulose samples against a slow wind of a few centimeters per second (wind is from right to left). These flow velocities are typical of spacecraft ventilation systems that provide fresh air for the astronauts. The samples are ignited across the center with a hot wire, and the flame is allowed to spread upwind and/or downwind. As these images show, the flames prefer to spread upwind, into the fresh air, which is the exact opposite of flames on Earth, which spread much faster downwind, or with the airflow, as in forest fires.

  3. Examining the Role of N2O5 Hydrolysis and ClNO2 Production Over the Northeast United States: Results from WINTER 2015 Aircraft Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, J.; Jaegle, L.; Thornton, J. A.; Shah, V.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Lee, B. H.; Fibiger, D. L.; McDuffie, E.; Brown, S. S.; Jimenez, J. L.; Weber, R. J.; Dibb, J. E.; Day, D. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Fiddler, M. N.; Campuzano Jost, P.; Schroder, J. C.; Sullivan, A.; Veres, P. R.; Green, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneous uptake of N2O5 on liquid aerosol particles plays a critical role in regulating tropospheric reactive nitrogen (NOx) availability, particle nitrate loadings, and halogen activity, which, in turn, have downwind effects on oxidant availability and ozone production. However, parameterizations of this process in regional and global models remain relatively untested. Measurements taken during the 2015 Wintertime Investigation of Transportation, Emissions, & Reactivity (WINTER) allow both empirical and theoretical calculations of the N2O5 reactive uptake coefficient (γ) and ClNO2 yield (Y) during 13 winter flights over the eastern US. We use observations of gas and particle composition as inputs to the offline thermodynamic equilibrium models, ISORROPIA II and AIM, to generate outputs of particulate aqueous phase concentrations of NO3-(aq), Cl-(aq), and H2O(l) . These outputs are used to theoretically calculate γ (N2O5) and Y(ClNO2), using the parameterizations described in Bertram & Thornton, 2009. The calculated values are then compared to the empirical counterparts to assess the validity of the parameterization's representation of temperature, humidity, and composition dependences. The updated parameterization is then used in the online GEOS-Chem chemical transport model to examine the role of wintertime multiphase chemistry in controlling the regional distribution and export of NOx and Cl-atom source downwind of the northeast United States.

  4. Quantifying the Intercontinental and Global Reach and Effects of Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatfield, Robert B.; Guo, Zitan

    2000-01-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling Group is participating in an international effort to explore the projected interactions of the atmosphere with biota, human activity, and the natural environment over the next three decades. The group uses computer simulations and statistical analyses to compare theory and observations of the composition of the lower atmosphere. This study of global habitability change is part of a more ambitious activity to understand global habitability. This broad planetary understanding is central to planetary habitability, biomarker detection, and similar aspects of Astrobiology. The group has made highly detailed studies of immense intercontinental plumes that affect the chemistry of the global atmosphere, especially the region below the ozone (O3) layer whose chemical composition defines the conditions for healthy humans and the biosphere. For some decades there has been concern about the pollution from cities and industrial burning and its possible effect in increasing smog ozone, not only in continental regions, but also in plumes that spread downwind. Recently, there has been new concern about another kind of pollution plume. Projections for a greatly expanded aircraft fleet imply that there will be plumes of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) from jet exhaust in the Northern Hemisphere downwind of major air traffic routes. Both of these are tied to large-scale O3 in the troposphere, where it is toxic to humans and plant tissues.

  5. Assessment for the impact of dust events on measles incidence in western China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuxia; Zhou, Jianding; Yang, Sixu; Zhao, Yuxin; Zheng, Xiaodong

    2017-05-01

    Dust events affect human health in both drylands and downwind environments. In this study, we used county-level data during the period of 1965-2005 to assess the impact of dust events on measles incidence in Gansu province in Western China. We used Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to set up the cyclical regression model; in particular, we set the model to downwind direction for the typical cities in the Hexi Corridor as well as the capital city Lanzhou. The results showed that Spring measles incidence was the highest in the Hexi Corridor, where dust events occur the most frequently over Gansu province. Measles incidence declined on the pathway of dust storms from west to east due to the weakening of both intensity and duration in dust storms. Measles incidence was positively correlated with monthly wind speed and negatively correlated with rainfall amount, relative humidity, and air pressure. Measles incidence was significantly (p ≤ 0.01) positively correlated with daily coarse particles, e.g., TSP and PM10. According to the cyclical regression model, average monthly excess measles that is related to dust events was 39.1 (ranging from 17.3 to 87.6), 149.9 (ranging from 7.1 to 413.4), and 31.3 (ranging from 20.6 to 63.5) in Zhangye, Lanzhou, and Jiuquan, respectively.

  6. Investigation of the sources and formation mechanisms of regional haze in autumn over Pearl River Delta region, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.; Wang, X.; Fan, Q.; Fan, S.; Chen, L.; Chang, M.; Huang, M.

    2015-12-01

    China has experienced severe haze and visibility degradation problems in recent years accompanying with rapid urbanization and industrialization. In this study, daily fine aerosol samples were concurrently collected during 01-29 October, 2014 in four sites (2 urban sites, 1 upwind site and 1 downwind site) in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region (Figure 1), a mega metropolitan area and manufacturing hub in south China. Main chemical components of PM2.5 including sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, organic carbon, element carbon and elements, as well as individual particles morphology and mixing state and atmospheric boundary layer information were obtained and analyzed to investigate the sources and evolution mechanisms of typical haze events in the PRD region. The preliminary results showed that daily average PM2.5 concentrations varied from 25.4 to 174.8 μg m-3 with an average PM2.5 concentration of 64.5 μg m-3. We noted that PM2.5 concentrations in the downwind site were slightly higher than those in the upwind and urban sites during the haze episodes, indicating the formation and evolution of fine particles during the transport. Further detailed studies, including interpreting observational data and WRF/Chem model simulation, will be carried out to understand the sources and evolution mechanisms of the typical autumn regional haze in the PRD region.

  7. Photochemical Age Determinations in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Daum, Peter H.; Lee, Y.- N.; Nunnermacker, L. J.; Springston, S. R.; Weinstein-Lloyd, J.; Hyde, P.; Doskey, Paul; Rudolph, Jochen; Fast, Jerome D.; Berkowitz, Carl M.

    2003-02-05

    An extensive VOC data set was gathered as part of a photochemical oxidant field campaign conducted in the Phoenix air basin in the late spring of 1998. Sampling was done at the surface and by aircraft at mid-boundary layer height; in regions with emission sources and downwind in the urban plume. VOC concentration ratios were used to calculate photochemical age, defined as the time integrated exposure of an air mass to OH radical. Based on the VOC ratios of 15 compounds (with OH reactivity varying between acetylene and p,m-xylene), we present estimates for photochemical age and dilution factors for several regions within the air basin. Geographic trends are in agreement with the expectation that pollutants are transported in a generally eastward direction so that older and more dilute mixtures occur to the east of the city. Photochemical ages determined from aircraft samples agree with those determined at a downwind surface site. The bias in photochemical age that occurs because fresh pollutants are added to an aged mixture has been quantified by using a particle trajectory model. A combination of trajectory results (actual age of the pollutants in an air mass) and photochemical age yields an estimate of the average OH concentration experienced by the air parcel. OH obtained in this way is somewhat lower, but has the same trends as OH concentrations calculated using a photochemical box model that is constrained with observed concentrations coincident with the VOC samples.

  8. Mobile monitoring of fugitive methane emissions from natural gas consumer industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Albertson, J. D.; Gaylord, A.; von Fischer, J.; Rudek, J.; Thoma, E. D.

    2015-12-01

    Natural gas is used as a feedstock for major industrial processes, such as ammonia and fertilizer production. However, fugitive methane emissions from many major end-use sectors of the natural gas supply chain have not been quantified yet. This presentation introduces new tools for estimating emission rates from mobile methane measurements, and examines results from recent field measurements conducted downwind of several industrial plants using a specialized vehicle equipped with fast response methane sensor. Using these data along with local meteorological data measured by a 3-D sonic anemometer, a Bayesian approach is applied to probabilistically infer methane emission rates based on a modified Gaussian dispersion model. Source rates are updated recursively with repeated traversals of the downwind methane plume when the vehicle was circling around the targeted facilities. Data from controlled tracer release experiments are presented and used to validate the approach. With access via public roads, this mobile monitoring method is able to quickly assess the emission strength of facilities along the sensor path. This work is developing the capacity for efficient regional coverage of potential methane emission rates in support of leak detection and mitigation efforts.

  9. Micrometeorological Mass Balance Measurements of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Composting Green-waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, E. R.; Bailey, S.; Stephens, J.; Horwath, W. R.; Paw U, K.

    2013-12-01

    Managed decomposition of organic materials is increasingly being used as an alternative waste management option and the resulting compost can be used as a fertilizer and soil amendment in home gardens and agriculture. An additional benefit is the avoidance of methane emissions associated with anaerobic decomposition in landfills. Greenhouse gases are still emitted during the composting process, but few studies have measured emissions from a full-scale windrow of composting green-waste. This study uses a micrometeorological mass balance technique (upwind and downwind vertical profile measurements of trace gas concentrations and wind velocity) to calculate emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide from a pile of composting green-waste during the dry season in Northern California. The expected source pattern was observed in measured upwind-downwind concentration differences of all three gases averaged over the study period despite substantial noise seen in the half-hourly emission calculations. Sources of uncertainty are investigated and temporal patterns analyzed. An in-situ zero-source test was conducted to examine the mass balance technique when the source of emissions was removed. Results from the micrometeorological mass balance measurements are compared with measurements taken using the more common open chamber technique.

  10. Observed trends in ground-level O3 in Monterrey, Mexico, during 1993-2014: comparison with Mexico City and Guadalajara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Paniagua, Iván Y.; Clemitshaw, Kevin C.; Mendoza, Alberto

    2017-07-01

    Here, we present an assessment of long-term trends in O3 and odd oxygen (O3 + NO2) at the industrial Monterrey metropolitan area (MMA) in NE Mexico. Diurnal amplitudes in Ox (AVd) are used as a proxy for net O3 production, which is influenced by the NO2 photolysis rate. No significant differences in the AVd are observed between weekends and weekdays, although the largest AVd values are observed at sites downwind of industrial areas. The highest O3 mixing ratios are observed in spring, with minimum values in winter. The largest annual variations in O3 are typically observed downwind of the MMA, with the lowest variations generally recorded in highly populated areas and close to industrial areas. A wind sector analysis of mixing ratios of O3 precursors revealed that the dominant sources of emissions are located in the industrial regions within the MMA and surrounding area. Significant increasing trends in O3 in spring, summer, and autumn are observed depending on site location, with trends in annual averages ranging between 0.19 and 0.33 ppb yr-1. Overall, from 1993 to 2014, within the MMA, O3 has increased at an average rate of 0.22 ppb yr-1 (p Guadalajara metropolitan area (GMA).

  11. The effects of sorting by aeolian processes on the geochemical characteristics of surface materials: a wind tunnel experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Lang, Lili; Hua, Ting; Zhang, Caixia; Li, Hui

    2017-03-01

    The geochemical characteristics of aeolian and surface materials in potential source areas of dust are frequently employed in environmental reconstructions as proxies of past climate and as source tracers of aeolian sediments deposited in downwind areas. However, variations in the geochemical characteristics of these aeolian deposits that result from near-surface winds are currently poorly understood. In this study, we collected surface samples from the Ala Shan Plateau (a major potential dust source area in Central Asia) to determine the influence of aeolian processes on the geochemical characteristics of aeolian transported materials. Correlation analyses show that compared with surface materials, the elements in transported materials (e.g., Cu, As, Pb, Mn, Zn, Al, Ca, Fe, Ga, K, Mg, P, Rb, Co, Cr, Na, Nb, Si, and Zr) were subjected to significant sorting by aeolian processes, and the sorting also varied among different particle size fractions and elements. Variations in wind velocity were significantly correlated with the contents of Cr, Ga, Sr, Ca, Y, Nd, Zr, Nb, Ba, and Al, and with the Zr/Al, Zr/Rb, K/Ca, Sr/Ca, Rb/Sr, and Ca/Al ratios. Given the great variation in the geochemical characteristics of materials transported under different aeolian processes relative to those of the source materials, these results indicate that considerable uncertainty may be introduced to analyses by using surface materials to trace the potential source areas of aeolian deposits that accumulate in downwind areas.

  12. The climate penalty for clean fossil fuel combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Junkermann

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To cope with the world's growing demand for energy, a large number of coal-fired power plants are currently in operation or under construction. To prevent environmental damage from acidic sulphur and particulate emissions, many such installations are equipped with flue gas cleaning technology that reduces the emitted amounts of sulphur dioxide (SO2 and nitrogen dioxide (NO2. However, the consequences of this technology for aerosol emissions, and in particular the regional scale impact on cloud microphysics, have not been studied until now. We performed airborne investigations to measure aerosol size distributions in the air masses downwind of coal-fired power installations. We show how the current generation of clean technology reduces the emission of sulphur and fine particulate matter, but leads to an unanticipated increase in the direct emission of ultrafine particles (1–10 nm median diameter which are highly effective precursors of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. Our analysis shows how these additional ultrafine particles modify cloud microphysics, as well as precipitation intensity and distribution on a regional scale downwind of emission sources. Effectively, the number of small water droplets is increased, thus reducing the water available for large droplets and rain formation. The corresponding changes in the precipitation budget with a shift from more frequent steady rain to occasionally more vigorous rain events, or even a significant regional reduction of annual precipitation, introduce an unanticipated risk for regional climate and agricultural production, especially in semi-arid climate zones.

  13. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

  14. Orientation of Culex mosquitoes to carbon dioxide-baited traps: flight manoeuvres and trapping efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperband, M F; Cardé, R T

    2006-03-01

    Females of Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Culex tarsalis Coquillet (Diptera: Culicidae) in the host-seeking stage were released and video recorded in three dimensions in a large field wind tunnel as they flew to four kinds of CO2-baited mosquito traps. The trapping efficiency (number of mosquitoes approaching compared to the number caught) was determined for each trap type. The Encephalitis Virus Surveillance (EVS), Mosquito Magnet Freedom (MMF) and Mosquito Magnet Liberty (MML) traps captured only 13-16% of approaching Cx. quinquefasciatus females, whereas the Mosquito Magnet-X (MMX) trap captured 58%. Similar results were obtained for Cx. tarsalis. Orientation behaviour and flight parameters of mosquitoes approaching the four traps were compared. Mosquitoes spent the most time orienting to the EVS trap. Flight speed decreased as mosquitoes entered the vicinity of each trap and a large portion of their time was spent within 30 cm downwind of the traps. Flights became highly tortuous downwind of the poorly performing traps and just upwind of the MMX trap. Differences between traps and possible explanations for the superior performance of the MMX trap are considered.

  15. Floating wind turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterna, Larry A. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A floating wind turbine system with a tower structure that includes at least one stability arm extending therefrom and that is anchored to the sea floor with a rotatable position retention device that facilitates deep water installations. Variable buoyancy for the wind turbine system is provided by buoyancy chambers that are integral to the tower itself as well as the stability arm. Pumps are included for adjusting the buoyancy as an aid in system transport, installation, repair and removal. The wind turbine rotor is located downwind of the tower structure to allow the wind turbine to follow the wind direction without an active yaw drive system. The support tower and stability arm structure is designed to balance tension in the tether with buoyancy, gravity and wind forces in such a way that the top of the support tower leans downwind, providing a large clearance between the support tower and the rotor blade tips. This large clearance facilitates the use of articulated rotor hubs to reduced damaging structural dynamic loads. Major components of the turbine can be assembled at the shore and transported to an offshore installation site.

  16. Midwest interstate sulfur transformation and transport project: aerial measurements of urban and power plant plumes, summer 1974. Final report, Jul 1974--Jun 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, W.H.; Anderson, J.A.; Knuth, W.R.; Blumenthal, D.L.; Husar, R.B.

    1976-11-01

    A portion of the research activities of the Midwest Interstate Sulfur Transformation and Transport Project (Project MISTT) during the summer of 1974 is documented. Using a light plane equipped with instruments for measuring air pollutants and meteorological parameters, investigators mapped the three-dimensional distribution of aerosols and pollutant gases originating in the St. Louis area. Each day's flight plan was designed to characterize a large pollutant plume at discrete distances downwind from its source. The plume from the coal-fired power plant at Labadie, Missouri was followed out to 45 km. Secondary aerosol production within the plume was documented. The estimated average conversion rate for sulfur dioxide to sulfate was about three percent/hour at the distances sampled. The overall removal rate of SO/sub 2/ was too small to detect, and no net production of ozone was observed. Large pollutant plumes were also identified downwind of central St. Louis and the Wood River refineries. These urban-industrial plumes were followed out to 60-70 km, where they were characterized by elevated concentrations of ozone and light-scattering aerosols.

  17. Investigation of the validity of BEM for simulation of wind turbines in complex load cases and comparison with experiment and CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, H.; Dose, B.; Stoevesandt, B.; Peinke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the validity of simulation codes based on the Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory for three important design load conditions. This paper includes the cases of yawed inflow, rotor tower interaction for downwind turbines and the standstill case. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and experimental data (when available) are used for the evaluation of the obtained results. For the yawed inflow, the results indicate that significant deviations between BEM and experiments & CFD can be observed. This discrepancy is caused by unsteady phenomena such as the advancing & retreating blade effect and the skewed wake effect. In the case of the rotor and tower interaction of the downwind turbine, the results show that the BEM based code overpredicts the sectional forces in terms of the normal and tangential forces by 20%. In the case of standstill, the evaluation of the results based on tip deflections shows clear differences in the output of both numerical approaches. While the flapwise deflections show a reasonable agreement, the CFD-based coupled solver predicts much larger edgewise vibrations.

  18. Air Quality Impact of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Ahmadov, R.; Atlas, E. L.; Bahreini, R.; Blake, D. R.; Brioude, J.; Brock, C. A.; de Gouw, J. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Gao, R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lueb, R.; McKeen, S. A.; Meagher, J. F.; Meinardi, S.; Murphy, D. M.; Parrish, D. D.; Peischl, J.; Perring, A.; Pollack, I. B.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Robinson, A. L.; Ryerson, T. B.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L.

    2010-12-01

    On April 20, 2010, an explosion led to a rupture of the wellhead underneath the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) drilling platform. In addition to impacts on marine life and coasts, the resulting oil spill and cleanup operations also affected air quality. We measured a wide range of gas and aerosol species in the air close to and downwind of the DWH site. Among all of the measured species, the most important air quality concern for populations along the Gulf coast and inland was aerosols in respirable sizes. Since the measured gas-phase hydrocarbons were distributed in a fairly narrow plume evaporating from fresh surface oil and organic aerosol was measured in a much broader plume, the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) evidently formed from unmeasured, less volatile hydrocarbons that were emitted from a wider area around the site. Older surface oil near the coasts of Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida had little effect on SOA formation. The SOA mass increased with distance downwind of the DWH site. Preliminary results indicate that at least a few percent by mass of the spilled oil is converted into SOA. From the flaring, surface recovery, and cleanup operations, initial calculations of emission ratios also indicate that a few percent by mass of oil burned on the surface was emitted as black carbon aerosols. These organic and black carbon aerosols from the DWH oil spill influence local visibility and radiation and have potential health effects. Furthermore, they likely occasionally reached populated areas at concentrations that were a significant fraction of air quality standards.

  19. Air pathway report: Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    Phase 1 of the air-pathway portion of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the 10 counties nearest the Hanford Site from atmospheric releases of iodine-131 from the site from 1944--1947. Phase 1 demonstrated the following: HEDR-calculated source-term estimates of iodine-131 releases to the atmosphere were within 20% of previously published estimates; calculated vegetation concentrations of iodine-131 agree well with previously published measurements; the highest of the Phase 1 preliminary dose estimates to the thyroid are consistent with independent, previously published estimates of doses to maximally exposed individuals; and, relatively crude, previously published measurements of thyroid burdens for Hanford workers are in the range of average burdens that the HEDR model estimated for similar reference individuals'' for the period 1944--1947. Preliminary median dose estimates summed over the year 1945--1947 for the primary pathway, air-pasture-cow-milk-thyroid, ranged from low median values of 0.006 rad for upwind adults who obtained milk from backyard cows not on pasture to high median values of 68.0 rad for downwind infants who drank milk from pasture-fed cows. Extremes of the estimated range are a low of essentially zero to upwind adults and a high of almost 3000 rem to downwind infants. 37 refs., 37 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Quantifying methane emissions and sources in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S.; Townsend-Small, A.; Schroeder, J.; Blake, N. J.; Blake, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is relatively constant throughout the atmosphere, at 1.8 ppmv. This value, however, is increasing primarily due to anthropogenic sources, including agriculture and natural gas extraction. Here we present atmospheric methane fluxes measured during the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) in July - August 2014 in the Colorado Front Range on the NCAR C-130. During this campaign 775 advanced whole air samples (AWAS) were collected onboard the aircraft and 248 samples were collected on the ground in order to quantify and evaluate air pollution sources. Methane concentrations were measured continuously aboard the aircraft using cavity ringdown spectroscopy. Major sources of methane in this region are oil and natural gas extraction and distribution, landfills, and cattle feed lots. In order to assess the impact of methane emissions on this area, methane flux was evaluated by comparing upwind and downwind concentrations where significant enhancements were observed downwind. We also present information from other hydrocarbons measured in canisters to attribute methane emissions to urban, agricultural, and oil and gas sources. The state of Colorado recently enacted legislation to reduce emissions of hydrocarbons from oil and gas facilities and our measurements will provide a preliminary estimate of whether these regulations are effective.

  1. Thirteen years of observations on biomass burning organic tracers over Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific: An outflow region of Asian aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh Kumar; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Jing; Fu, Pingqing; Zhu, Chunmao

    2015-05-01

    East Asia is the world's greatest source region for the emission of anthropogenic aerosols and their precursors due to the rapid industrialization and intensive biomass burning (BB) activities. BB emits specific organic tracers such as levoglucosan, mannosan, and galactosan, which are produced by pyrolysis of cellulose and hemicellulose and then transported downwind to the western North Pacific by westerly winds. Here we present long-term observations of BB tracers over the remote Chichijima Island in the western North Pacific (WNP) from 2001 to 2013. Elevated concentrations of BB tracers by an order of magnitude were found in midautumn to midspring with winter maxima, which are strongly involved with the atmospheric transport by westerly winds from the Asian continent to the WNP, as supported by backward trajectory analyses. Throughout the observations, we found an increase in the averaged concentrations of BB tracers from 2006 to 2013, which is mainly caused by enhanced BB events in Asian urban and rural areas, as supported by enhanced fire/hot spots in East Asia via satellite images. We also found that the period of the high concentrations was prolonged from 2006 to 2013. Comparison between monthly averaged concentrations of BB tracers and backward air mass trajectories clearly demonstrates that the winter/spring maxima over Chichijima are involved with the seasonal shifting of atmospheric circulation followed by downwind transport of BB aerosols to the WNP. High abundances of BB tracers over the WNP indicate that BB-laden air masses can be transported to remote marine environments.

  2. Re-visiting of plentiful food sources and food search strategies in desert ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald eWolf

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available North African desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis, are established model organisms in animal navigation research. Cataglyphis re-visit plentiful feeding sites, but their decision to return to a feeder and the organisation of food searches has been little studied. Here we provide a review of recent advances regarding this topic. At least two parameters determine the ants’ assessment of site quality, namely, amount of food available and reliability of food encounter on subsequent visits. The amount of food appears to be judged by the concentration of items at the food uptake site. Initially the amount of food in a feeder dominates the foragers’ decision to return, whereas learning about reliability takes precedence in the course of a few visits. The location of a worthwhile site is determined by the animals’ path integration system. In particular, the distance of the feeding site is memorised as the arithmetic average of the distances covered during the previous outbound and homebound journeys. Feeding sites that are small and inconspicuous cannot be approached directly with sufficient certainty, due to inevitable inaccuracies of the path integrator. Instead, desert ants steer downwind of the goal to encounter the odour plume emanating from the food and they follow this plume to the feeder. The angle steered downwind reflects the animals’ maximal navigation error and is adjusted according to experience. In summary, food searches of desert ants provide an unexpected wealth of features that may advance our understanding of search, navigation and decision strategies. There are several aspects that warrant further scrutiny.

  3. Validation test for CAP88 predictions of tritium dispersion at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelotti, Erika; Green, Andrew; Whicker, Jeffrey; Eisele, William; Fuehne, David; McNaughton, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Gaussian plume models, such as CAP88, are used regularly for estimating downwind concentrations from stack emissions. At many facilities, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) requires that CAP88 be used to demonstrate compliance with air quality regulations for public protection from emissions of radionuclides. Gaussian plume models have the advantage of being relatively simple and their use pragmatic; however, these models are based on simplifying assumptions and generally they are not capable of incorporating dynamic meteorological conditions or complex topography. These limitations encourage validation tests to understand the capabilities and limitations of the model for the specific application. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has complex topography but is required to use CAP88 for compliance with the Clean Air Act Subpart H. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the CAP88 predictions against ambient air measurements using released tritium as a tracer. Stack emissions of tritium from two LANL stacks were measured and the dispersion modeled with CAP88 using local meteorology. Ambient air measurements of tritium were made at various distances and directions from the stacks. Model predictions and ambient air measurements were compared over the course of a full year's data. Comparative results were consistent with other studies and showed the CAP88 predictions of downwind tritium concentrations were on average about three times higher than those measured, and the accuracy of the model predictions were generally more consistent for annual averages than for bi-weekly data.

  4. Pollen-Mediated Movement of Herbicide Resistance Genes in Lolium rigidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Iñigo; Escorial, María-Concepción; Chueca, María-Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of herbicide resistance genes by pollen is a major concern in cross-pollinated species such as annual ryegrass (Lolium rigidum). A two-year study was conducted in the greenhouse, under favorable conditions for pollination, to generate information on potential maximum cross-pollination. This maximum cross-pollination rate was 56.1%. A three-year field trial was also conducted to study the cross-pollination rates in terms of distance and orientation to an herbicide-resistant pollen source. Under field conditions, cross-pollination rates varied from 5.5% to 11.6% in plants adjacent to the pollen source and decreased with increasing distances (1.5 to 8.9% at 15 m distance and up to 4.1% at 25 m in the downwind direction). Environmental conditions influenced the cross-pollination both under greenhouse and field conditions. Data were fit to an exponential decay model to predict gene flow at increasing distances. This model predicted an average gene flow of 7.1% when the pollen donor and recipient plants were at 0 m distance from each other. Pollen-mediated gene flow declined by 50% at 16.7 m from the pollen source, yet under downwind conditions gene flow of 5.2% was predicted at 25 m, the farthest distance studied. Knowledge of cross-pollination rates will be useful for assessing the spread of herbicide resistance genes in L. rigidum and in developing appropriate strategies for its mitigation.

  5. Impact Assessment of Biomass Burning on Air Quality in Southeast and East Asia During BASE-ASIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kan; Fu, Joshua S.; Hsu, N. Christina; Gao, Yang; Dong, Xinyi; Tsay, Si-Chee; Lam, Yun Fat

    2013-01-01

    A synergy of numerical simulation, ground-based measurement and satellite observation was applied to evaluate the impact of biomass burning originating from Southeast Asia (SE Asia) within the framework of NASA's 2006 Biomass burning Aerosols in Southeast Asia: Smoke Impact Assessment (BASE-ASIA). Biomass burning emissions in the spring of 2006 peaked in MarcheApril when most intense biomass burning occurred in Myanmar, northern Thailand, Laos, and parts of Vietnam and Cambodia. Model performances were reasonably validated by comparing to both satellite and ground-based observations despite overestimation or underestimation occurring in specific regions due to high uncertainties of biomass burning emission. Chemical tracers of particulate K(+), OC concentrations, and OC/EC ratios showed distinct regional characteristics, suggesting biomass burning and local emission dominated the aerosol chemistry. CMAQ modeled aerosol chemical components were underestimated at most circumstances and the converted AOD values from CMAQ were biased low at about a factor of 2, probably due to the underestimation of biomass emissions. Scenario simulation indicated that the impact of biomass burning to the downwind regions spread over a large area via the Asian spring monsoon, which included Southern China, South China Sea, and Taiwan Strait. Comparison of AERONET aerosol optical properties with simulation at multi-sites clearly demonstrated the biomass burning impact via longrange transport. In the source region, the contribution from biomass burning to AOD was estimated to be over 56%. While in the downwind regions, the contribution was still significant within the range of 26%-62%.

  6. Significant increase of aerosol number concentrations in air masses crossing a densely trafficked sea area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonas Kecorius

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated 10 months data (September 2009 to June 2010 of atmospheric aerosol particle number size distribution at three atmospheric observation stations along the Baltic Sea coast: Vavihill (upwind, Sweden, Utö (upwind, Finland, and Preila (downwind, Lithuania. Differences in aerosol particle number size distributions between the upwind and downwind stations during situations of connected atmospheric flow, when the air passed each station, were used to assess the contribution of ship emissions to the aerosol number concentration (diameter interval 50–400 nm in the Lithuanian background coastal environment. A clear increase in particle number concentration could be noticed, by a factor of 1.9 from Utö to Preila (the average total number concentration at Utö was 791 cm−3, and by a factor of 1.6 from Vavihill to Preila (the average total number concentration at Vavihill was 998 cm−3. The simultaneous measurements of absorption Ångström exponents close to unity at Preila supported our conclusion that ship emissions in the Baltic Sea contributed to the increase in particle number concentration at Preila.

  7. Reducing bioaerosol dispersion from wastewater treatment and its land application: a review and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Richard E; Rubin, Robert

    2005-09-01

    Wastewater treatment systems and spray irrigation of treated water may spread microorganisms such as bacteria and viruses through dispersion of aerosol particles. A recent review (Brooks, Josephson, Gerba, & Pepper, 2004) identifies appropriate reports. Teltsch and co-authors report findings that suggest effective management controls involve providing buffer zones, irrigating in the daytime and in times of low humidity, reducing microorganism levels in water used for spraying, and testing for multiple types of viruses and bacteria (Teltsch & Katzenelson, 1978; Teltsch, Shuval, & Tadmor, 1980; Teltsch, Kedmi, Bonnet, Borenzstajn-Rotem, & Katzenelson, 1980). Camann, Moore, Harding, and Sorber support these findings. They also note that fecal streptococci are hardier than fecal coliform and appear frequently in background samples, suggesting that this bacterium is a better indicator of background and downwind conditions than are fecal coliform bacteria. In their study, storage prior to spray irrigation reduced microorganism concentrations by 99 percent. Downwind concentrations of sprayed reservoir water were often comparable to background values (Camann, Moore, Harding, & Sorber, 1988). Italian researchers (Brandi, Sisti, & Amagliani, 2000; Carducci, Gemelli, Cantiani, Casini, & Rovini, 1999; Carducci et al., 2000) confirm variable die-away rates of microorganisms, observe a positive association between fecal streptococci and the presence of viruses, and recommend consideration of submerged aeration for sludge digestion at sewage treatment plants. No reports are available that measure dispersion of bioaerosols from wastewater consistently treated to meet contemporary disinfection standards.

  8. Do Wind Turbines Affect Weather Conditions?: A Case Study in Indiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan F. Henschen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines are becoming increasingly widespread in the United States as the world looks for cleaner sources of energy. Scientists, policymakers, and citizens have strong opinions regarding the positive and negative effects of wind energy projects, and there is a great deal of misinformation about wind energy circulating on the Web and other media sources. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of how the rotation of hundreds of turbines can influence local weather conditions within a wind farm and in the surrounding areas. This experiment measures temperature, atmospheric pressure, wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity, and evaporation with five weather instruments at Meadow Lake Wind Farm located in White, Jasper, and Benton Counties, Indiana, from November 4 through November 18, 2010. The data show that as wind passes throughout the wind farm, the air warms during the overnight and early morning hours and cools during daytime hours. Observed lower humidity rates and higher evaporation rates downwind also demonstrate that the air dries out as it travels through the wind farm. Further research over multiple seasons is necessary to examine the effects of warmer nighttime temperatures and drier conditions progressively downwind of the installation. Nevertheless, wind turbines did not negatively affect local weather patterns in our small-scale research and may actually prevent frost, which could have important positive implications for farmers by potentially prolonging the growing season.

  9. Experimental & Numerical Modeling of Non-combusting Model Firebrands' Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel

    2016-11-01

    Fire spotting is one of the major mechanisms of wildfire spread. Three phases of this phenomenon are firebrand formation and break-off from burning vegetation, lofting and downwind transport of firebrands through the velocity field of the wildfire, and spot fire ignition upon landing. The lofting and downwind transport phase is modeled by conducting large-scale wind tunnel experiments. Non-combusting rod-like model firebrands with different aspect ratios are released within the velocity field of a jet in a boundary layer cross-flow that approximates the wildfire velocity field. Characteristics of the firebrand dispersion are quantified by capturing the full trajectory of the model firebrands using the developed image processing algorithm. The results show that the lofting height has a direct impact on the maximum travel distance of the model firebrands. Also, the experimental results are utilized for validation of a highly scalable coupled stochastic & parametric firebrand flight model that, couples the LES-resolved velocity field of a jet-in-nonuniform-cross-flow (JINCF) with a 3D fully deterministic 6-degrees-of-freedom debris transport model. The validation results show that the developed numerical model is capable of estimating average statistics of the firebrands' flight. Authors would like to thank support of the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1200560. Also, the presenter (Ali Tohid) would like to thank Dr. Michael Gollner from the University of Maryland College Park for the conference participation support.

  10. CFD model simulation of dispersion from chlorine railcar releases in industrial and urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Steven R.; Hansen, Olav R.; Ichard, Mathieu; Strimaitis, David

    To assist in emergency response decisions and planning in case of releases of pressurized liquefied chlorine from railroad tank cars in industrial sites and cities, the FLACS Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model has been used to simulate the transport and dispersion of the dense chlorine cloud. Two accident locations are studied: an actual railcar accident at an industrial site in Festus, MO, and a hypothetical railcar accident at a rail junction in the Chicago urban area. The results show that transport of a large dense gas release at ground level in an industrial site or large city could initially extend a hundred meters or more in the upwind and crosswind directions. The dense cloud may follow terrain drainage, such as river channels. Near the source, the obstacles tend to slow down the dense gas cloud and may constrain it and cause increased concentrations. Farther downwind, the obstacles may cause enhanced mixing and dilution once the cloud has grown larger. In some cases, significant amounts of cloud mass may become "trapped" in obstacle wakes for many minutes after the main cloud has passed. Although the CFD model can account for the details of the flow and dispersion much better than standard widely-used simple dense gas models, many similarities are found among the various models in their simulated variations with downwind distance of the maximum cloud centerline concentration.

  11. A modification of the method of Carey and Sparks (1986) to estimate eruption column height from maximum clast dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espindola, J.

    2010-12-01

    The method of Carey and Sparks (1986) has been widely applied to estimate the hight of eruptive columns from the dispersal of the maximum clast size. These authors presented curves of maximum downwind range versus crosswind range for different clast diameters and wind speeds obtained from the numerical solution of a column model developed by Sparks(1986). An improved model of eruptive column was later developed by Woods (1988). In this work we present the results of the simulation of clast dispersal following the procedure of Carey and Sparks (1986) and the eruption column of Woods (1988). The numerical calculations were carried out with a code that computes the height of the column and the vertical velocity, the density and the radius along the column. The code determines then the support envelopes for a given clast size and their fall, after leaving the column, are computed from the equations of motion with viscous friction. For the same downwind and crosswind ranges, this method yields column heights about 10% smaller than the method of Carey and Sparks and about 20% higher wind velocities. The height of the crater above sea level plays also a small role in the results. We present comparisons for the 1982 eruption columns from El Chichon volcano. References Carey S and RSJ Sparks (1986) Bull. Volcanol. 48: 109-125 Sparks RSJ (1986) Bull. Volcanol. 48: 3-15 Woods AW (1988) Bull. Volcanol. 50: 169-193

  12. LES of Langmuir supercells under constant crosswind tidal forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachel; Zhang, Jie; Juha, Mario; Gosch, Chester; Tejada-Martinez, Andres

    2015-11-01

    We report on the impact of a crosswind tidal current on Langmuir supercells (LSCs) in shallow water computed via LES. LSCs consist of parallel counter rotating vortices engulfing the water column in unstratified conditions. These cells have been observed in shallow continental shelf regions of ~15 meters depth during the passage of storms. The cells are aligned roughly in the wind direction and are generated by the interaction of the wind-driven shear current with the Stokes drift velocity induced by surface gravity waves. Without tides, LES reveals that the typical crosswind width of a LSC is ~4 times the water column depth (H). Under a relatively weak crosswind tidal current (weaker than the downwind current), the constant crosswind tidal forcing applied causes a merging of cells leading to cells of width ~8H. The opposite occurs under a crosswind tidal current stronger than the downwind current as the constant crosswind tidal force is able to break up the LSCs giving rise to smaller scale cells with different turbulent structure than that associated with LSC. Statistics of the turbulence during strong and weak crosswind tides will be contrasted and implications of an oscillating crosswind tidal force will be discussed. Support from the US National Science Foundation and the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. Air quality impacts analysis for area G. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalewsky, K.; Eklund, B. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Vold, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-05

    The impact of fugitive radioactive emissions from the disposal site, Area G, was evaluated in support of site characterization for the Performance Assessment and for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program. Fugitive emissions of tritiated water and contaminated windblown dust were considered. Data from an extensive field measurement program were used to estimate annual emissions of tritiated water. Fugitive dust models were used to calculate estimates of the annual emissions of windblown dust. These estimates were combined with data on contamination levels in surface soils to develop annual emission rates for specific radionuclides: tritium, uranium-238, cesium-137, plutonium-238, plutonium-239,240, and strontium-90. The CAP-88 atmospheric transport model was used to predict areas potentially affected by long-term dust deposition and atmospheric concentrations. The annual emission rate of tritiated water was estimated from the field data to be 14.0 Ci/yr. The emission rate of soil-borne radionuclides from open areas and from soils handling operations totaled less than 1x10{sup -4} Ci/yr. The CAP-88 results were used to develop effective dose equivalents (EDEs) for receptor locations downwind of Area G. All EDEs were several orders of magnitude below the national standard of 10 mrem/yr. Fugitive air emissions from Area G were found not to pose a health threat to persons living or working downwind of the facility.

  14. Characterization and source apportionment of particulate matter Indonesia, during a recent peat fire episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Siao Wei; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar; Rianawati, Elisabeth; Karthikeyan, Sathrugnan; Streets, David G

    2007-05-15

    An intensive field study was conducted in Sumatra, Indonesia, during a peat fire episode to investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of particulate emissions in peat smoke and to provide necessary data for source-receptor analyses. Ambient air sampling was carried out at three different sites located at varying distances from the peatfires to determine changes in mass and number concentrations of PM2.5 and its chemical composition (carbonaceous and nitrogenous materials, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, water-soluble inorganic and organic ions, and total and water-soluble metals). The three sites represent a rural site directly affected by the local peat combustion, a semirural site, and an urban site situated downwind of the peat fires. The mass concentration of PM2.5 and the number concentration of airborne particles were as high as 1600 microg/m3 and 1.7 x 10(5) cm(-3), respectively, in the vicinity of peat fires. The major components of PM2.5 in peat smoke haze were carbonaceous particles, particularly organic carbon, NO3-, and SO4(2-), while the less abundant constituents included ions such as NH4+, NO2-, Na+, K+, organic acids, and metals such as Al, Fe, and Ti. Source apportionment by chemical mass balance receptor modeling indicates that peat smoke can travel long distances and significantly affect the air quality at locations downwind.

  15. Reactive puff model SCICHEM: Model enhancements and performance studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, B.; Karamchandani, P. K.; Sykes, R. I.; Henn, D. S.; Knipping, E.

    2015-09-01

    The SCICHEM model incorporates complete gas phase, aqueous and aerosol phase chemistry within a state-of-the-science Gaussian puff model SCIPUFF (Second-order Closure Integrated Puff). The model is a valuable tool that can be used to calculate the impacts of a single source or a small number of sources on downwind ozone and PM2.5. The model has flexible data requirements: it can be run with routine surface and upper air observations or with prognostic meteorological model outputs and source emissions are specified in a simple text format. This paper describes significant advances to the dispersion and chemistry components of the model in the latest release, SCICHEM 3.0. Some of the major advancements include modeling of skewed turbulence for convective boundary layer and updated chemistry schemes (CB05 gas phase chemical mechanism; AERO5 aerosol and aqueous modules). The results from SCICHEM 3.0 are compared with observations from a tracer study as well as aircraft measurements of reactive species in power plant plumes from two field studies. The results with the tracer experiment (Copenhagen study) show that the incorporation of skewed turbulence improves the calculation of tracer dispersion and transport. The comparisons with the Cumberland and Dolet Hills power plume measurements show good correlation between the observed and predicted concentrations of reactive gaseous species at most downwind distances from the source.

  16. Fine particle exposure of prescribed fire workers in the Southeastern United States and a comparison of several particulate matter sampling methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanosky, Jeffrey, David

    2001-07-01

    Personal exposure concentrations of particles with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) of prescribed fire workers were measured at two locations in the southeastern United States. Non-impacted ambient concentrations were measured as an estimate of background concentrations during burn activities. Four sampling method comparison studies were designed and performed to compare the FRM with 1) other gravimetric PM2.5 sampling methods in ambient air, 2) optical PM2.5 sampling methods in indoor air, 3) an optical sampling method (Grimm) for particles with aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM10) in ambient air, and 4) a gravimetric PM2.5 sampling method downwind of prescribed fires. The gravimetric PM2.5 sampling methods agreed well in ambient air (R2>0.96 for all) except for the MiniVol, the optical PM2.5 sampling methods agree less well in indoor air,(R2>0.592), the Grimm optical PM10 method agrees well in ambient air(R2>0.944 for all), and the personal method agrees well (n=9, R2=0.994) downwind of prescribed fires.

  17. Atmospheric flow measurements using the PIV and HWA techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bassi Marinho Pires

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Alcântara Space Center (ASC is the Brazilian gate to the space where rockets of different sizes are launched. At ASC there is a relative topographical variation, coastal cliff, which modifies the atmospheric boundary layer characteristics and can cause interference for operations of rockets. In the present work, a simplified model (mock-up was studied in a wind tunnel. A scale factor of 1:1000 was used and the atmospheric flow was measured using the hot wire anemometer (HWA and particle image velocimetry (PIV techniques. Using of HWA it was possible to calculate values of average wind speed and fluctuations in a set of points of the section of tests that representing the region of the ASC. Through these measures, other meteorological parameters that represent the atmospheric flow, such as the friction velocity (u*, the roughness length (z0 from the logarithmic profile and the alpha exponent (ɑ of the power law were calculated. With the use of the PIV´s technique, the streamlines and the vorticity fields were obtained and it was noticed that the vorticity generated downwind of the coastal cliff has a strong turbulence (vorticities around 2000 sˉ¹. A rectangular building (simulating the mobile integration tower was inserted at the mock-up and the downwind turbulence was similar to the one generated by the coastal cliff.

  18. Fine particle exposure of prescribed fire workers in the Southeastern United States and a comparison of several particulate matter sampling methods.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanosky, Jeffrey, David

    2001-07-01

    Personal exposure concentrations of particles with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) of prescribed fire workers were measured at two locations in the southeastern United States. Non-impacted ambient concentrations were measured as an estimate of background concentrations during burn activities. Four sampling method comparison studies were designed and performed to compare the FRM with 1) other gravimetric PM2.5 sampling methods in ambient air, 2) optical PM2.5 sampling methods in indoor air, 3) an optical sampling method (Grimm) for particles with aerodynamic diameter <10 μm (PM10) in ambient air, and 4) a gravimetric PM2.5 sampling method downwind of prescribed fires. The gravimetric PM2.5 sampling methods agreed well in ambient air (R2>0.96 for all) except for the MiniVol, the optical PM2.5 sampling methods agree less well in indoor air,(R2>0.592), the Grimm optical PM10 method agrees well in ambient air(R2>0.944 for all), and the personal method agrees well (n=9, R2=0.994) downwind of prescribed fires.

  19. PM2.5 and Carbon Emissions from Prescribed Fire in a Longleaf Pine Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strenfel, S. J.; Clements, C. B.; Hiers, J. K.; Kiefer, C. M.

    2008-12-01

    Prescribed fires are a frequently utilized land-management tool in the Southeastern US. In order to better characterize emissions and impacts from prescribed fire in longleaf pine ecosystems, in situ data were obtained within the burn perimeter using a 10-m instrumented flux tower. Turbulence and temperature data at 10-m were sampled at 10 Hz using a sonic anemometer and fine-wire thermocouples respectively. Measurements of PM2.5, CO and CO2 emissions were sampled at 10-m within the burn perimeter and PM2.5 and Black Carbon PM2.5 were sampled 0.5 km downwind of the fire front using a 2-m instrumented tripod. Preliminary results indicate PM2.5 and carbon emissions significantly increased during the fire-front passage, and downwind PM concentrations were amplified beyond pre-fire ambient concentrations. In addition, the considerable amount a heat release and flux data gathered from these prescribed fires suggests that near surface atmospheric conditions were directly impacted by increased turbulence generation.

  20. Air quality impacts of a scheduled 36-h closure of a major highway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiros, David C.; Zhang, Qunfang; Choi, Wonsik; He, Meilu; Paulson, Suzanne E.; Winer, Arthur M.; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Yifang

    2013-03-01

    Elevated concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs, traffic flow was reduced by ˜90% relative to non-closure Saturday observations. Downwind of I-405, fixed-site measurements showed the following reductions: 83% of particle number concentration (PNC), 36% of PM2.5, and 62% of black carbon. Fixed-site measurements showed daily average UFP size distributions were bimodal for non-closure conditions (nucleation modes ˜20 nm, accumulation modes ˜60 nm), but only showed an accumulation mode ˜50 nm during closure. Spatial measurements from the MMP confirmed no nucleation mode was detected at any location 0-300 m downwind during closure. In 2011, non-closure particle emission factors were 5.0, 2.7, and 3.4 × 1013 particles vehicle-1 km-1 for Friday through Sunday respectively. After accounting for instrumental and traffic flow differences, weekday PNC in 2011 was 60% lower than 2001 at the same study location. During the closure event, regional freeway traffic was reduced compared to four selected control Saturdays. Eight stationary monitoring stations throughout the South Coast Air Basin showed PM2.5 was reduced between 18 and 36% relative to the same control days. The outcome of this natural experiment during the I-405 closure confirms that substantial traffic reduction can improve local and regional air quality in sprawled urban regions such as Los Angeles, CA.

  1. Aeolian Sediment Transport Pathways and Aerodynamics at Troughs on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Mary C.; Bullard, Joanna E.; Barnouin-Jha, Olivier S.

    2004-01-01

    Interaction between wind regimes and topography can give rise to complex suites of aeolian landforms. This paper considers aeolian sediment associated wit11 troughs on Mars and identifies a wider range of deposit types than has previously been documented. These include wind streaks, falling dunes, "lateral" dunes, barchan dunes, linear dunes, transverse ridges, sand ramps, climbing dunes, sand streamers, and sand patches. The sediment incorporated into these deposits is supplied by wind streaks and ambient Planitia sources as well as originating within the trough itself, notably from the trough walls and floor. There is also transmission of sediment between dneTsh. e flow dynamics which account for the distribution of aeolian sediment have been modeled using two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. The model predicts flow separation on the upwind side of the trough followed by reattachment and acceleration at the downwind margin. The inferred patterns of sediment transport compare well with the distribution of aeolian forms. Model data indicate an increase of wind velocity by approx. 30 % at the downwind trough margin. This suggests that the threshold wind speed necessary for sand mobilization on Mars will be more freqentmlye t in these inclined locations.

  2. Presence of pathogenic microorganisms in power-plant cooling waters. Final report, October 1, 1981-June 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1983-07-01

    Air was sampled at the point of discharge and at short distances downwind and upwind from industrial and power-plant cooling towers. Both high-volume electrostatic and impinger type samplers were used. Concentrates of the air samples were analyzed for Legionnaires' Disease Bacteria (LDB). In some cases, the samples were also tested for the presence of free-living amoebae. The concentrations of LDB in the air samples were well below the minimal infectious dose for guinea pigs and precluded testing of the samples for infectious LDB. Results of LDB analysis were related to the meteorological conditions at the time of sampling. Generally, the concentrations of LDB in the air at the discharge of the cooling towers were 1 x 10/sup -6/ to 1 x 10/sup -7/ of that found in comparable volumes of tower basin water. During periods of high humidity and wind speed, LDB was detected in a few downwind samples and one upwind sample. One site with extensive construction and excavation activity had higher LDB concentrations in air samples relative to other sites. Nonpathogenic Naegleria were present in one of two air samples taken in the mist at the base of a natural-draft cooling tower.

  3. Radon dispersion modeling and dose assessment for uranium mine ventilation shaft exhausts under neutral atmospheric stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dong; Wang, Hanqing; Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Liu, Zehua; Mo, Shunquan

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, the roles of atmospheric wind profiles in the neutral atmosphere and surface roughness parameters in a complex terrain were examined to determine their impacts on radon ((222)Rn) dispersion from an actual uranium mine ventilation shaft. Simulations were completed on (222)Rn dispersion extending from the shaft to a vulnerable distance, near the location of an occupied farmhouse. The eight dispersion scenarios for the ventilation shaft source included four downwind velocities (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 m s(-1)) and two underlying surface roughness characteristics (0.1 m and 1.0 m). (222)Rn distributions and elevated pollution regions were identified. Effective dose estimation methods involving a historical weighting of wind speeds in the direction of interest coupled to the complex dispersion model were proposed. Using this approach, the radiation effects on the residents assumed to be outside at the location of the farm house 250 m downwind from the ventilation shaft outlet were computed. The maximum effective dose rate calculated for the residents at the outside of the farm house was 2.2 mSv y(-1), which is less than the low limit action level of 3-10 mSv y(-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) occupational exposure action level for radon.

  4. Simulation of large particle transport near the surface under stable conditions: comparison with the Hanford tracer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Larson, Timothy

    A plume model is presented describing the downwind transport of large particles (1-100 μm) under stable conditions. The model includes both vertical variations in wind speed and turbulence intensity as well as an algorithm for particle deposition at the surface. Model predictions compare favorably with the Hanford single and dual tracer experiments of crosswind integrated concentration (for particles: relative bias=-0.02 and 0.16, normalized mean square error=0.61 and 0.14, for the single and dual tracer experiments, respectively), whereas the US EPA's fugitive dust model consistently overestimates the observed concentrations at downwind distances beyond several hundred meters (for particles: relative bias=0.31 and 2.26, mean square error=0.42 and 1.71, respectively). For either plume model, the measured ratio of particle to gas concentration is consistently overestimated when using the deposition velocity algorithm of Sehmel and Hodgson (1978. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA). In contrast, these same ratios are predicted with relatively little bias when using the algorithm of Kim et al. (2000. Atmospheric Environment 34 (15), 2387-2397).

  5. Radiation of lamp and optimized experiment using artificial light in the Arctic Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jin-ping; David Barber; LI Tao; LI Shu-jiang; LI Xiang

    2008-01-01

    A winter optical experiment by an artificial lamp was conducted in the Amundsen Bay of Arctic Ocean from November of 2007 to January of 2008. The radiation field emitted from an artificial lamp was measured and is introduced in this paper, and the optimized experiment project is discussed. It is demonstrated that the minimum size allowed of the lamp is determined by both the field of view (FOV) of optical instrument and the measuring distance from the lamp. Some problems that might influence on the experiment result often occur for a simple fluorescent lamp,such as instability, spatial nonuniformity, light divergence, effect of lamp temperature, etc. By the analysis of the light radiation, three kind of measures are proposed to control the quality of the experiment, i.e. keeping consistency of lamp size with FOV of instrument, calibrating in situ downwind, and conducting measurement in effective range. Among them, the downwind calibration is the key step to overcome most problems arose by the lamp. The experiment indicated that the reliable results can be obtained only when the optical measurement is coordinated with the radiation field of artificial lamp. The measured radiation property of the lamp was used to advise the field experiment to minimize measuring error. As the experiment by artificial lamp was the first attempt in the Arctic Ocean, the experience given by this paper is a valuable reference to the correlative studies.

  6. PIV study of the wake of a model wind turbine transitioning between operating set points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Dan; Cowen, Edwin (Todd)

    2016-11-01

    Wind turbines are ideally operated at their most efficient tip speed ratio for a given wind speed. There is increasing interest, however, in operating turbines at other set points to increase the overall power production of a wind farm. Specifically, Goit and Meyers (2015) used LES to examine a wind farm optimized by unsteady operation of its turbines. In this study, the wake of a model wind turbine is measured in a water channel using PIV. We measure the wake response to a change in operational set point of the model turbine, e.g., from low to high tip speed ratio or vice versa, to examine how it might influence a downwind turbine. A modified torque transducer after Kang et al. (2010) is used to calibrate in situ voltage measurements of the model turbine's generator operating across a resistance to the torque on the generator. Changes in operational set point are made by changing the resistance or the flow speed, which change the rotation rate measured by an encoder. Single camera PIV on vertical planes reveals statistics of the wake at various distances downstream as the turbine transitions from one set point to another. From these measurements, we infer how the unsteady operation of a turbine may affect the performance of a downwind turbine as its incoming flow. National Science Foundation and the Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future.

  7. An LES study of vertical-axis wind turbine wakes aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Dabiri, John O.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) combined with a turbine model is used to investigate the structure of the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). In the simulations, a recently developed minimum dissipation model is used to parameterize the subgrid-scale stress tensor, while the turbine-induced forces are modeled with an actuator-line technique. The LES framework is first tested in the simulation of the wake behind a model straight-bladed VAWT placed in the water channel, and then used to study the wake structure downwind of a full-scale VAWT sited in the atmospheric boundary layer. In particular, the self-similarity of the wake is examined, and it is found that the wake velocity deficit is well characterized by a two-dimensional elliptical Gaussian distribution. By assuming a self-similar Gaussian distribution of the velocity deficit, and applying mass and momentum conservation, an analytical model is developed and tested to predict the maximum velocity deficit downwind of the turbine.

  8. Modelling airborne concentration and deposition rate of maize pollen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Nathalie; Loubet, Benjamin; Huber, Laurent

    2004-10-01

    The introduction of genetically modified (GM) crops has reinforced the need to quantify gene flow from crop to crop. This requires predictive tools which take into account meteorological conditions, canopy structure as well as pollen aerodynamic characteristics. A Lagrangian Stochastic (LS) model, called SMOP-2D (Stochastic Mechanistic model for Pollen dispersion and deposition in 2 Dimensions), is presented. It simulates wind dispersion of pollen by calculating individual pollen trajectories from their emission to their deposition. SMOP-2D was validated using two field experiments where airborne concentration and deposition rate of pollen were measured within and downwind from different sized maize (Zea mays) plots together with micrometeorological measurements. SMOP-2D correctly simulated the shapes of the concentration profiles but generally underestimated the deposition rates in the first 10 m downwind from the source. Potential explanations of this discrepancy are discussed. Incorrect parameterisation of turbulence in the transition from the crop to the surroundings is probably the most likely reason. This demonstrates that LS models for particle transfer need to be coupled with air-flow models under complex terrain conditions.

  9. A mesoscale modeling study of wind blown dust on the Mexico City Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villasenor, Rafael; López-Villegas, M. T.; Eidels-Dubovoi, S.; Quintanar, Arturo; Gallardo, J. C.

    The latest phase of the program to improve the air quality in the Valley of Mexico, also known, as Pro Aire is about to go into effect for the next 10 years. Pro Aire puts emphasis on agricultural wind erosion and associated dust emissions impacting downwind air quality. The main objective of this investigation was to use an empirical USEPA erosion model coupled to a meteorological/transport-dispersion prediction model, CALMET/CALPUFF, to estimate dust emissions and concentrations in the Mexico City Basin. The model simulations for particulate matter (PM 10) are validated against observations taken at the most recent research field study, the IMADA-AVER field campaign, conducted during the spring of 1997 to provide information about high ozone, particulate matter concentrations and visibility impairment. The spatial and temporal PM distribution in the region is presented for a specific wind blown dust event consisting of two IMADA days, in order to understand how soil dust emissions from agricultural fallow land affect downwind areas during the dry season. Results show good agreement with the main spatial features of the local wind circulation and wind blown dust concentrations. A correlation coefficient of nearly 0.8 between predictions and observations for a modeled day suggests that an important portion of the total measured concentration had geological origin. This work constitutes an essential advancement on the mesoscale air quality problem on the MCMA due to wind erosion.

  10. Eyjafjallajokull Volcano Plume Particle-Type Characterization from Space-Based Multi-angle Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Limbacher, James

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) Research Aerosol algorithm makes it possible to study individual aerosol plumes in considerable detail. From the MISR data for two optically thick, near-source plumes from the spring 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallaj kull volcano, we map aerosol optical depth (AOD) gradients and changing aerosol particle types with this algorithm; several days downwind, we identify the occurrence of volcanic ash particles and retrieve AOD, demonstrating the extent and the limits of ash detection and mapping capability with the multi-angle, multi-spectral imaging data. Retrieved volcanic plume AOD and particle microphysical properties are distinct from background values near-source, as well as for overwater cases several days downwind. The results also provide some indication that as they evolve, plume particles brighten, and average particle size decreases. Such detailed mapping offers context for suborbital plume observations having much more limited sampling. The MISR Standard aerosol product identified similar trends in plume properties as the Research algorithm, though with much smaller differences compared to background, and it does not resolve plume structure. Better optical analogs of non-spherical volcanic ash, and coincident suborbital data to validate the satellite retrieval results, are the factors most important for further advancing the remote sensing of volcanic ash plumes from space.

  11. Comparison of size and geography of airborne tungsten particles in Fallon, Nevada, and Sweet Home, Oregon, with implications for public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Paul R; Bierman, Brian J; Rhodes, Kent; Ridenour, Gary; Witten, Mark L

    2012-01-01

    To improve understanding of possible connections between airborne tungsten and public health, size and geography of airborne tungsten particles collected in Fallon, Nevada, and Sweet Home, Oregon, were compared. Both towns have industrial tungsten facilities, but only Fallon has experienced a cluster of childhood leukemia. Fallon and Sweet Home are similar to one another by their particles of airborne tungsten being generally small in size. Meteorologically, much, if not most, of residential Fallon is downwind of its hard metal facility for at least some fraction of time at the annual scale, whereas little of residential Sweet Home is downwind of its tungsten facility. Geographically, most Fallon residents potentially spend time daily within an environment containing elevated levels of airborne tungsten. In contrast, few Sweet Home residents potentially spend time daily within an airborne environment with elevated levels of airborne tungsten. Although it cannot be concluded from environmental data alone that elevated airborne tungsten causes childhood leukemia, the lack of excessive cancer in Sweet Home cannot logically be used to dismiss the possibility of airborne tungsten as a factor in the cluster of childhood leukemia in Fallon. Detailed modeling of all variables affecting airborne loadings of heavy metals would be needed to legitimately compare human exposures to airborne tungsten in Fallon and Sweet Home.

  12. Quantification of urban atmospheric boundary layer greenhouse gas dry mole fraction enhancements in the dormant season: Results from the Indianapolis Flux Experiment (INFLUX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha L. Miles

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We assess the detectability of city emissions via a tower-based greenhouse gas (GHG network, as part of the Indianapolis Flux (INFLUX experiment. By examining afternoon-averaged results from a network of carbon dioxide (CO2, methane (CH4, and carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction measurements in Indianapolis, Indiana for 2011–2013, we quantify spatial and temporal patterns in urban atmospheric GHG dry mole fractions. The platform for these measurements is twelve communications towers spread across the metropolitan region, ranging in height from 39 to 136 m above ground level, and instrumented with cavity ring-down spectrometers. Nine of the sites were deployed as of January 2013 and data from these sites are the focus of this paper. A background site, chosen such that it is on the predominantly upwind side of the city, is utilized to quantify enhancements caused by urban emissions. Afternoon averaged mole fractions are studied because this is the time of day during which the height of the boundary layer is most steady in time and the area that influences the tower measurements is likely to be largest. Additionally, atmospheric transport models have better performance in simulating the daytime convective boundary layer compared to the nighttime boundary layer. Averaged from January through April of 2013, the mean urban dormant-season enhancements range from 0.3 ppm CO2 at the site 24 km typically downwind of the edge of the city (Site 09 to 1.4 ppm at the site at the downwind edge of the city (Site 02 to 2.9 ppm at the downtown site (Site 03. When the wind is aligned such that the sites are downwind of the urban area, the enhancements are increased, to 1.6 ppm at Site 09, and 3.3 ppm at Site 02. Differences in sampling height affect the reported urban enhancement by up to 50%, but the overall spatial pattern remains similar. The time interval over which the afternoon data are averaged alters the calculated urban enhancement by an average of 0.4 ppm

  13. Study on a similar-flapping wing ornithopter and flow-field characteristic of blades%类扑翼飞行器及其叶片流场特性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉华; 代强; 周进

    2013-01-01

    为了简化扑翼机构的结构和运动控制,采用半转机构及内凸轮传动,设计了一种新型的类扑翼飞行器.对类扑翼飞行器的结构组成及叶片运动原理进行了分析.基于FLUENT建立了叶片流场分析模型,对双叶片运动流场进行了仿真分析,获得了叶片流场特性的变化规律.研究结果表明:在一个运动周期中双叶片周围的流场速度矢量、压力分布和升力系数是随叶片方位变化的,两个叶片之间存在很强的相互影响;前半周的叶片升力系数大于后半周的升力系数;增加叶片大小和两叶片的中心距可有效提高升力系数.该研究为类扑翼飞行器的升力计算提供了可行的方法,对于修正该飞行器的升力计算模型具有重要的指导意义.%In order to simplify the construction and motion control of the flapping wing mechanism, a new similar-flapping wing ornithopter was designed based on the half-rotating mechanism and inner cam with rotational follower. Its construction and blade motion principle were analyzed. A blade-fluid FE model was established using Fluent software. Changes of flow field characteristic around the two blades were discovered after the simulation analysis of the flow field with double blades in motion. The results indicate that the fluid velocity and pressure around the blades and the lift coefficient of a blade change with the position and orientation of the blades within a motional period, and are mutually affected by the movement of two blades, and the lift coefficient of a blade in former half of the period is greater than in latter half of the period, and the increase in the size of blade can effectively raise the lift coefficient. These provide practicable approaches for the lift calculation and offer important guidance to modify the lift calculation model of the similar ornithopter.

  14. TX-100 manufacturing final project report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S. (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

    2007-11-01

    This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three

  15. A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Hyeonsoo

    A comprehensive vibration analysis of a coupled rotor/fuselage system for a two-bladed teetering rotor using finite element methods in space and time is developed which incorporates consistent rotor/fuselage structural, aerodynamic, and inertial couplings and a modern free wake model. A coordinate system is developed to take into account a teetering rotor's unique characteristics, such as teetering motion and undersling. Coupled nonlinear periodic blade and fuselage equations are transformed to the modal space in the fixed frame and solved simultaneously. The elastic line and detailed 3-D NASTRAN finite element models of the AH-1G helicopter airframe from the DAMVIBS program are integrated into the elastic rotor finite element model. Analytical predictions of rotor control angles, blade loads, hub forces, and vibration are compared with AH-1G Operation Load Survey flight test data. The blade loads predicted by present analysis show generally fair agreement with the flight test data, especially blade chord bending moment estimation shows good agreement. Calculated 2/rev vertical vibration levels at pilot seat show good correlation with the flight test data both in magnitude and phase, but 4/rev vibration levels show fair correlation only in magnitude. Lateral vibration results show more disagreement than vertical vibration results. Pylon flexibility effect is essential in the two-bladed teetering rotor vibration analysis. The pylon flexibility increases the first lag frequency by about 14%, and decreases 2/rev longitudinal and lateral hub forces by more than half. Rotor/fuselage coupling reduces 2/rev vertical and lateral vibration levels by 60% to 70% and has a small effect on 4/rev vibration levels. Modeling of difficult components (secondary structures, doors/panels, etc) is essential in predicting airframe natural frequencies. Refined aerodynamics such as free wake and unsteady aerodynamics have an important role in the prediction of vibration. For example, free

  16. Assessment of suspended dust from pipe rattling operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ju-Myon

    Six types of aerosol samplers were evaluated experimentally in a test chamber with polydisperse fly ash. The Andersen sampler overestimates the mass of small particles due to particle bounce between stages and therefore provides a conservative estimate of respirable particulate mass and thoracic particulate mass. The TSP sampler provides an unbiased estimate of total particulate mass. TSP/CCM provides no information below ESD 2 mum and therefore underestimates respirable particulate mass. The PM10 sampler provides a reasonable estimate of the thoracic particulate fraction. The RespiCon sampler provides an unbiased estimate of respirable, thoracic, and inhalable fractions. DustTrak and SidePak monitors provide relative particle concentrations instead of absolute concentrations because it could not be calibrated for absolute particle concentrations with varying particle shape, composition, and density. Six sampler technologies were used to evaluate airborne dust concentrations released from oilfield pipe rattling operations. The task sampled was the removal of scale deposited on the inner wall of the pipe before it was removed from service in a producing well. The measured mass concentrations of the aerosol samplers show that a Gaussian plume model is applicable to the data of pipe rattling operations for finding an attainment area. It is estimated that workers who remain within 1 m of the machine centerline and directly downwind have an 8-hour TWA exposure opportunity of (13.3 +/- 9.7) mg/m3 for the Mud Lake pipe scale and (11.4 +/- 9.7) mg/m3 for the Lake Sand pipe scale at 95% confidence. At distances more than 4 m downwind from the machine centerline, dust concentrations are below the TWA-TLV of 10 mg/m3 for the worker in both scales. At positions crosswind or upwind from the machine centerline there is no measurable exposure. Available data suggest that the attainment area for the public starts at about 9 m downwind from the machine centerline in both scales, as

  17. Size-Time-Composition Resolved Study of Aerosols Across El Paso, Texas in Fall 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, T. A.; Gill, T. E.; Pingitore, N. E.; Olvera, H. A.; Clague, J. W.; Barnes, D. E.; Perry, K. D.; Li, W.; Amaya, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Systematic variations in the absolute amounts, size and composition of airborne particulate matter (PM) across the El Paso, Texas metropolitan area may differentially impact the respiratory status (e.g., asthma) and overall health of the local population. To understand these variations, we collected size-time resolved samples of PM with DRUM samplers during a one-month period in late autumn 2008 at three sites along a NW-SE (roughly upwind-downwind) transect across El Paso’s airshed. The DRUM sampler is a rotating-drum impactor separating and collecting aerosols on Mylar strips mounted on the drums, in 8 size stages from 10 μm to Mexico (a minimally developed area NW of El Paso, at the edge of a sparsely-inhabited expanse of the Chihuahuan Desert), at the edge of the University of Texas- El Paso (UTEP) campus (in the urban core of El Paso), and at Socorro, Texas (a suburban area in the valley of the Rio Grande, SE of the urban core). Results illustrate sharp excursions in mass and element concentrations in aerosol-laden periods lasting from several hours to several days, associated with stagnant air, inversions, smoke events, dust/high wind/frontal passage, and/or daily traffic patterns, punctuated by several periods of reduced aerosol levels after Pacific frontal passages. Mass and absorption data show an increasing influence of carbonaceous (absorbing) aerosols with decreasing particle size ~1 μm. Calcium/silicon ratios were high (>1), especially in coarser stages and during high wind events, reflecting wind erosion of the Chihuahuan Desert’s calcareous soils. Concentrations of chlorine, silicon, calcium, coarse potassium, and lead increased during high wind events, while fine chlorine and fine potassium increased during smoke events, and zinc, sulfur, and fine potassium concentrations increased during inversion/stagnation events. Concentrations of most elements, especially crustal elements, increased overall from Santa Teresa to UTEP to Socorro, reflecting

  18. Assessment of rice yield loss due to exposure to ozone pollution in Southern Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danh, Ngo Thanh; Huy, Lai Nguyen; Oanh, Nguyen Thi Kim, E-mail: kimoanh@ait.ac.th

    2016-10-01

    The study domain covered the Eastern region of Southern of Vietnam that includes Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) and five other provinces. Rice production in the domain accounted for 13% of the national total with three crop cycles per year. We assessed ozone (O{sub 3}) induced rice production loss in the domain for 2010 using simulated hourly surface O{sub 3} concentrations (WRF/CAMx; 4 km resolution). Simulated O{sub 3} was higher in January–February (largely overlaps the first crop) and September–December (third crop), and lower in March–June (second crop). Spatially, O{sub 3} was higher in downwind locations of HCMC and were comparable with observed data. Relative yield loss (RYL) was assessed for each crop over the respective growing period (105 days) using three metrics: AOT40, M7 and flux-based O{sub 3} dose of POD{sub 10}. Higher RYL was estimated for the downwind of HCMC. Overall, the rice production loss due to O{sub 3} exposure in the study domain in 2010 was the highest for the first crop (up to 25,800 metric tons), the second highest for the third crop (up to 21,500 tons) and the least for the second crop (up to 6800 tons). The low RYL obtained for the second crop by POD{sub 10} may be due to the use of a high threshold value (Y = 10 nmol m{sup −2} s{sup −1}). Linear regression between non-null radiation POD{sub 0} and POD{sub 10} had similar slopes for the first and third crop when POD{sub 0} was higher and very low slope for the second crop when POD{sub 0} was low. The results of this study can be used for the rice crop planning to avoid the period of potential high RYL due to O{sub 3} exposure. - Highlights: • Simulated O{sub 3} was used to assess rice yield loss in a domain of Southern Vietnam. • Exposure metrics of AOT40, M7, POD{sub 0} and POD{sub 10} were considered. • POD{sub 10} gave the highest rice production loss. • Higher production loss was found downwind of Ho Chi Minh City.

  19. Efficacy of using multiple open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers in an odor emission episode investigation at a semiconductor manufacturing plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yung-Chieh; Wu, Chang-Fu; Chang, Pao-Erh; Chen, Shin-Yu; Hwang, Yaw-Huei

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of simultaneously employing three open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometers with 3-day consecutive monitoring, using an odor episode as an example. The corresponding monitoring paths were allocated among the possible emission sources of a semiconductor manufacturing plant and the surrounding optoelectronic and electronic-related factories, which were located in a high-tech industrial park. There was a combined total odor rate of 43.9% for the three monitoring paths, each comprised of 736 continuous 5-minute monitoring records and containing detectable odor compounds, such as ammonia, ozone, butyl acetate, and propylene glycol monomethyl ether acetate (PGMEA). The results of the logistic regression model indicated that the prevailing south wind and the OP-FTIR monitoring path closest to the emission source in down-wind direction resulted in a high efficacy for detecting odorous samples with odds ratios (OR) of 3.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.9-5.0) and 5.1 (95% CI: 3.6-7.2), respectively. Meanwhile, the odds ratio for detecting ammonia odorous samples was 7.5 for Path II, which was downwind closer to the possible source, as compared to Path III, downwind far away from the possible source. PGMEA could not be monitored at Path II but could be at Path III, indicating the importance of the monitoring path and flow ejection velocities inside the stacks on the monitoring performance of OP-FTIR. Besides, an odds ratio of 5.1 for odorous sample detection was obtained with south prevailing wind comprising 65.0% of the monitoring time period. In general, it is concluded that OP-FTIR operated with multiple paths simultaneously shall be considered for investigation on relatively complicated episodes such as emergency of chemical release, multiple-source emission and chemical monitoring for odor in a densely populated plant area to enhance the efficacy of OP-FTIR monitoring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  20. In situ measurements and modeling of reactive trace gases in a small biomass burning plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Crawford, James H.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Eichler, Philipp; Fried, Alan; Keutsch, Frank N.; Mikoviny, Tomas; Thornhill, Kenneth L.; Walega, James G.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Yang, Melissa; Yokelson, Robert J.; Wisthaler, Armin

    2016-03-01

    An instrumented NASA P-3B aircraft was used for airborne sampling of trace gases in a plume that had emanated from a small forest understory fire in Georgia, USA. The plume was sampled at its origin to derive emission factors and followed ˜ 13.6 km downwind to observe chemical changes during the first hour of atmospheric aging. The P-3B payload included a proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS), which measured non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution (10 m spatial/0.1 s temporal). Quantitative emission data are reported for CO2, CO, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, and 16 NMOGs (formaldehyde, methanol, acetonitrile, propene, acetaldehyde, formic acid, acetone plus its isomer propanal, acetic acid plus its isomer glycolaldehyde, furan, isoprene plus isomeric pentadienes and cyclopentene, methyl vinyl ketone plus its isomers crotonaldehyde and methacrolein, methylglyoxal, hydroxy acetone plus its isomers methyl acetate and propionic acid, benzene, 2,3-butanedione, and 2-furfural) with molar emission ratios relative to CO larger than 1 ppbV ppmV-1. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-furfural, and methanol dominated NMOG emissions. No NMOGs with more than 10 carbon atoms were observed at mixing ratios larger than 50 pptV ppmV-1 CO. Downwind plume chemistry was investigated using the observations and a 0-D photochemical box model simulation. The model was run on a nearly explicit chemical mechanism (MCM v3.3) and initialized with measured emission data. Ozone formation during the first hour of atmospheric aging was well captured by the model, with carbonyls (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2,3-butanedione, methylglyoxal, 2-furfural) in addition to CO and CH4 being the main drivers of peroxy radical chemistry. The model also accurately reproduced the sequestration of NOx into peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and the OH-initiated degradation of furan and 2-furfural at an average OH concentration of 7.45 ± 1.07 × 106 cm-3 in the

  1. Horizontal and vertical structure of reactive bromine events probed by bromine monoxide MAX-DOAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, William R.; Peterson, Peter K.; Frieß, Udo; Sihler, Holger; Lampel, Johannes; Platt, Ulrich; Moore, Chris; Pratt, Kerri; Shepson, Paul; Halfacre, John; Nghiem, Son V.

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneous photochemistry converts bromide (Br-) to reactive bromine species (Br atoms and bromine monoxide, BrO) that dominate Arctic springtime chemistry. This phenomenon has many impacts such as boundary-layer ozone depletion, mercury oxidation and deposition, and modification of the fate of hydrocarbon species. To study environmental controls on reactive bromine events, the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) was carried out from early March to mid-April 2012 near Barrow (Utqiaġvik), Alaska. We measured horizontal and vertical gradients in BrO with multiple-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instrumentation at three sites, two mobile and one fixed. During the campaign, a large crack in the sea ice (an open lead) formed pushing one instrument package ˜ 250 km downwind from Barrow (Utqiaġvik). Convection associated with the open lead converted the BrO vertical structure from a surface-based event to a lofted event downwind of the lead influence. The column abundance of BrO downwind of the re-freezing lead was comparable to upwind amounts, indicating direct reactions on frost flowers or open seawater was not a major reactive bromine source. When these three sites were separated by ˜ 30 km length scales of unbroken sea ice, the BrO amount and vertical distributions were highly correlated for most of the time, indicating the horizontal length scales of BrO events were typically larger than ˜ 30 km in the absence of sea ice features. Although BrO amount and vertical distribution were similar between sites most of the time, rapid changes in BrO with edges significantly smaller than this ˜ 30 km length scale episodically transported between the sites, indicating BrO events were large but with sharp edge contrasts. BrO was often found in shallow layers that recycled reactive bromine via heterogeneous reactions on snowpack. Episodically, these surface-based events propagated aloft when aerosol extinction was higher (> 0.1 km

  2. Examination of temporal and spatial variability of NO2 VCDs measured using mobile-MAX-DOAS in Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Zoe; Baray, Sabour; Khanbabkhani, Aida; Fujs, William; Csukat, Csilla; McLaren, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Mobile-MAX-DOAS is an innovative technique used to estimate pollutant emission rates and validate satellite measurements and air quality models. It is essential to identify and examine factors that can significantly impact the accuracy of this developing technique. Mobile-MAX-DOAS measurements were conducted in Toronto, Canada with a mini-MAX-DOAS instrument mounted (pointing backwards) on top of a car during August and September, 2016. Scattered sunlight spectra were collected every 45 seconds in the continuously repeated sequence of elevation angles of 30o, 30o, 30o, 30o, 40o, 30o, 90o. Tropospheric VCDs were determined using the geometric approximation from DSCDs fitted using a near-noon, low NO2 VCD FRS spectrum. The study goal was to examine the validity of the assumption that VCDs remain relatively constant at each measured location on a driving route encircling an urban area of interest with typical time periods of 1.5-3 hours to estimate emissions and whether driving direction significantly impacts results. NO2 VCD temporal variability was therefore determined by repeating driving routes in both directions in quick succession on multiple days. Strong temporal variability in NO2 VCDs of up to a factor of two were observed for some routes for the same vehicle locations under constant prevailing wind conditions within indicates sufficient horizontal inhomogeneity for the instrument to view significantly different NO2 regimes while at the same vehicle geographical location due to the different azimuth direction. NO2line fluxes were determined during weekday afternoon rush-hours by driving repeatedly in both directions under tangential prevailing winds conditions on a road that is 8km downwind of Toronto and 4km downwind of a major highway. During one afternoon the average NO2 VCD was 6(±2)x1016 molec. cm-2with a standard deviation of 3x1015 molec. cm-2. This average value is consistent with NO2 VCDs retrieved using optimal estimation methods from stationary

  3. Long-range pollution transport during the MILAGRO-2006 campaign: a case study of a major Mexico City outflow event using free-floating altitude-controlled balloons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Voss

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the major objectives of the Megacities Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations (MILAGRO-2006 campaign was to investigate the long-range transport of polluted Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA outflow and determine its downwind impacts on air quality and climate. Six research aircraft, including the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR C-130, made extensive chemical, aerosol, and radiation measurements above MCMA and more than 1000 km downwind in order to characterize the evolution of the outflow as it aged and dispersed over the Mesa Alta, Sierra Madre Oriental, Coastal Plain, and Gulf of Mexico. As part of this effort, free-floating Controlled-Meteorological (CMET balloons, commanded to change altitude via satellite, made repeated profile measurements of winds and state variables within the advecting outflow. In this paper, we present an analysis of the data from two CMET balloons that were launched near Mexico City on the afternoon of 18 March 2006 and floated downwind with the MCMA pollution for nearly 30 h. The repeating profile measurements show the evolving structure of the outflow in considerable detail: its stability and stratification, interaction with other air masses, mixing episodes, and dispersion into the regional background. Air parcel trajectories, computed directly from the balloon wind profiles, show three transport pathways on 18–19 March: (a high-altitude advection of the top of the MCMA mixed layer, (b mid-level outflow over the Sierra Madre Oriental followed by decoupling and isolated transport over the Gulf of Mexico, and (c low-level outflow with entrainment into a cleaner northwesterly jet above the Coastal Plain. The C-130 aircraft intercepted the balloon-based trajectories three times on 19 March, once along each of these pathways; in all three cases, peaks in urban tracer concentrations and LIDAR backscatter are consistent with MCMA pollution. In comparison with the transport models

  4. Assumptions about footprint layer heights influence the quantification of emission sources: a case study for Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüser, Imke; Harder, Hartwig; Heil, Angelika; Kaiser, Johannes W.

    2017-09-01

    Lagrangian particle dispersion models (LPDMs) in backward mode are widely used to quantify the impact of transboundary pollution on downwind sites. Most LPDM applications count particles with a technique that introduces a so-called footprint layer (FL) with constant height, in which passing air tracer particles are assumed to be affected by surface emissions. The mixing layer dynamics are represented by the underlying meteorological model. This particle counting technique implicitly assumes that the atmosphere is well mixed in the FL. We have performed backward trajectory simulations with the FLEXPART model starting at Cyprus to calculate the sensitivity to emissions of upwind pollution sources. The emission sensitivity is used to quantify source contributions at the receptor and support the interpretation of ground measurements carried out during the CYPHEX campaign in July 2014. Here we analyse the effects of different constant and dynamic FL height assumptions. The results show that calculations with FL heights of 100 and 300 m yield similar but still discernible results. Comparison of calculations with FL heights constant at 300 m and dynamically following the planetary boundary layer (PBL) height exhibits systematic differences, with daytime and night-time sensitivity differences compensating for each other. The differences at daytime when a well-mixed PBL can be assumed indicate that residual inaccuracies in the representation of the mixing layer dynamics in the trajectories may introduce errors in the impact assessment on downwind sites. Emissions from vegetation fires are mixed up by pyrogenic convection which is not represented in FLEXPART. Neglecting this convection may lead to severe over- or underestimations of the downwind smoke concentrations. Introducing an extreme fire source from a different year in our study period and using fire-observation-based plume heights as reference, we find an overestimation of more than 60  % by the constant FL height

  5. Airborne measurements of the spatial distribution of aerosol chemical composition across Europe and evolution of the organic fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Morgan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of aerosol chemical composition and the evolution of the Organic Aerosol (OA fraction is investigated based upon airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition in the planetary boundary layer across Europe. Sub-micron aerosol chemical composition was measured using a compact Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (cToF-AMS. A range of sampling conditions were evaluated, including relatively clean background conditions, polluted conditions in North-Western Europe and the near-field to far-field outflow from such conditions. Ammonium nitrate and OA were found to be the dominant chemical components of the sub-micron aerosol burden, with mass fractions ranging from 20–50% each. Ammonium nitrate was found to dominate in North-Western Europe during episodes of high pollution, reflecting the enhanced NOx and ammonia sources in this region. OA was ubiquitous across Europe and concentrations generally exceeded sulphate by 50–100%. A factor analysis of the OA burden was performed in order to probe the evolution across this large range of spatial and temporal scales. Two separate Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (OOA components were identified; one representing an aged-OOA, termed Low Volatility-OOA and another representing fresher-OOA, termed Semi Volatile-OOA on the basis of their mass spectral similarity to previous studies. The factors derived from different flights were not chemically the same but rather reflect the range of OA composition sampled during a particular flight. Significant chemical processing of the OA was observed downwind of major sources in North-Western Europe, with the LV-OOA component becoming increasingly dominant as the distance from source and photochemical processing increased. The measurements suggest that the aging of OA can be viewed as a continuum, with a progression from a less oxidised, semi-volatile component to a highly oxidised, less-volatile component. Substantial amounts of

  6. Horizontal and vertical structure of reactive bromine events probed by bromine monoxide MAX-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Simpson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous photochemistry converts bromide (Br− to reactive bromine species (Br atoms and bromine monoxide, BrO that dominate Arctic springtime chemistry. This phenomenon has many impacts such as boundary-layer ozone depletion, mercury oxidation and deposition, and modification of the fate of hydrocarbon species. To study environmental controls on reactive bromine events, the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX was carried out from early March to mid-April 2012 near Barrow (Utqiaġvik, Alaska. We measured horizontal and vertical gradients in BrO with multiple-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS instrumentation at three sites, two mobile and one fixed. During the campaign, a large crack in the sea ice (an open lead formed pushing one instrument package ∼ 250 km downwind from Barrow (Utqiaġvik. Convection associated with the open lead converted the BrO vertical structure from a surface-based event to a lofted event downwind of the lead influence. The column abundance of BrO downwind of the re-freezing lead was comparable to upwind amounts, indicating direct reactions on frost flowers or open seawater was not a major reactive bromine source. When these three sites were separated by ∼ 30 km length scales of unbroken sea ice, the BrO amount and vertical distributions were highly correlated for most of the time, indicating the horizontal length scales of BrO events were typically larger than ∼ 30 km in the absence of sea ice features. Although BrO amount and vertical distribution were similar between sites most of the time, rapid changes in BrO with edges significantly smaller than this ∼ 30 km length scale episodically transported between the sites, indicating BrO events were large but with sharp edge contrasts. BrO was often found in shallow layers that recycled reactive bromine via heterogeneous reactions on snowpack. Episodically, these surface-based events propagated aloft when

  7. Atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific: seasonal variation and source attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanhong; Zhang, Lin; Pan, Yuepeng; Wang, Yuesi; Paulot, Fabien; Henze, Daven

    2016-04-01

    Rapid Asian industrialization has lead to increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition downwind threatening the marine environment. We present an analysis of the sources and processes controlling atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific, using the GEOS-Chem global chemistry model and its adjoint model at 1/2°× 2/3° horizontal resolution over the East Asia and its adjacent oceans. We focus our analyses on the marginal seas: the Yellow Sea and the South China Sea. Asian nitrogen emissions in the model are 28.6 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 15.7 Tg N a-1 as NOx. China has the largest sources with 12.8 Tg N a-1 as NH3 and 7.9 Tg N a-1 as NOx; the much higher NH3 emissions reflect its intensive agricultural activities. We improve the seasonality of Asian NH3 emissions; emissions are a factor of 3 higher in summer than winter. The model simulation for 2008-2010 is evaluated with NH3 and NO2 column observations from satellite instruments, and wet deposition flux measurements from surface monitoring sites. Simulated atmospheric nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific ranges 0.8-20 kg N ha-1 a-1, decreasing rapidly downwind the Asian continent. Deposition fluxes average 11.9 kg N ha-1 a-1 (5.0 as reduced nitrogen NHx and 6.9 as oxidized nitrogen NOy) to the Yellow Sea, and 5.6 kg N ha-1 a-1 (2.5 as NHx and 3.1 as NOy) to the South China Sea. Nitrogen sources over the ocean (ship NOx and oceanic NH3) have little contribution to deposition over the Yellow Sea, about 7% over the South China Sea, and become important (greater than 30%) further downwind. We find that the seasonality of nitrogen deposition to the northwestern Pacific is determined by variations in meteorology largely controlled by the East Asian Monsoon and in nitrogen emissions. The model adjoint further points out that nitrogen deposition to the Yellow Sea originates from sources over China (92% contribution) and the Korean peninsula (7%), and by sectors from fertilizer use (24%), power plants

  8. Atmospheric electrical field measurements near a fresh water reservoir and the formation of the lake breeze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Lopes

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to access the effect of the lakes in the atmospheric electrical field, measurements have been carried out near a large man-made lake in southern Portugal, the Alqueva reservoir, during the ALqueva hydro-meteorological EXperiment 2014. The purpose of these conjoint experiments was to study the impact of the Alqueva reservoir on the atmosphere, in particular on the local atmospheric electric environment by comparing measurements taken in the proximity of the lake. Two stations 10 km apart were used, as they were located up- and down-wind of the lake (Amieira and Parque Solar, respectively, in reference to the dominant northwestern wind direction. The up-wind station shows lower atmospheric electric potential gradient (PG values than the ones observed in the down-wind station between 12 and 20 UTC. The difference in the atmospheric electric PG between the up-wind and the down-wind station is ~30 V/m during the day. This differential occurs mainly during the development of a lake breeze, between 10 and 18 UTC, as a consequence of the surface temperature gradient between the surrounding land and the lake water. In the analysis presented, a correlation is found between the atmospheric electric PG differences and both wind speed and temperature gradients over the lake, thus supporting the influence of the lake breeze over the observed PG variation in the two stations. Two hypotheses are provided to explain this observation: (1 The air that flows from the lake into the land station is likely to increase the local electric conductivity through the removal of ground dust and the transport of cleaner air from higher altitudes with significant light ion concentrations. With such an increase in conductivity, it is expected to see a reduction of the atmospheric electric PG; (2 the resulting air flow over the land station carries negative ions formed by wave splashing in the lake's water surface, as a result of the so-called balloelectric effect

  9. Nitorgen Deposition Impacts on a Sensitive Grassland Ecosystem: Conservation, Management, and Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, S. B.; Luth, D. C.

    2002-12-01

    Humans have greatly increased the flux of reactive nitrogen in the biosphere, altering many terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. In the San Francisco Bay Area, CA, grasslands on nutrient-poor serpentinitic soils are being invaded by nutrient-demanding introduced annual grasses, driven by dry N-deposition on the order of 10 kg ha-1 yr-1. These grass invasions threaten the rich native biodiversity of the serpentinitic grasslands, including the federally-protected Bay checkerspot butterfly and several endemic plant species. A passive monitoring network for reactive nitrogen gases (NOx, NO2, NH3, HNO3, and O3) has been set up to investigate regional and local N-deposition gradients. The regional gradient extends from clean coastal areas to inland valleys downwind of the highly urbanized Santa Clara Valley, driven by prevailing NW winds. A local gradient extends upwind and downwind of an 8-lane freeway carrying 100,000 cars/day, located in a relatively clean near-coastal area. Plant surveys at the clean-air site bisected by the freeway show greater grass invasion closer to the freeway, but only on the downwind side (controlling for soil depth, the other main factor affecting grass density). Grassed-over areas build up thatch that suppresses native plants. Restoration experiments include mowing, goat grazing, and prescribed fire. Carefully-timed mowing appears to be an effective treatment for small areas. Removal of cuttings removes 5-8 kg-N/ha, the same order of magnitude as the estimated N-inputs from the freeway. Additional NOx and NH3 sources planned for the region include a 600 MW natural gas fired power plant, industrial parks that may eventually draw 20,000 to 50,000 additional cars per day, 25,000 housing units, and associated highway improvements. Mitigation proposals include purchase and long-term management of hundreds of hectares of habitat. Management of the larger areas necessitates continued moderate cattle grazing. Cattle selectively crop nitrogen

  10. Measurements of Greenhouse Gases around the Sacramento Area: The Airborne Greenhouse Emissions Survey (AGES) Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karion, A.; Fischer, M. L.; Turnbull, J. C.; Sweeney, C.; Faloona, I. C.; Zagorac, N.; Guilderson, T. P.; Saripalli, S.; Sherwood, T.

    2009-12-01

    The state of California is leading the United States by enacting legislation (AB-32) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. The success of reduction efforts can be gauged with accurate emissions inventories and potentially verified with atmospheric measurements of greenhouse gases (GHGs) over time. Measurements of multiple GHGs and associated trace gas species in a specific region also provide information on emissions ratios for source apportionment. We conducted the Airborne Greenhouse Emissions Survey (AGES) campaign to determine emissions signature ratios for the sources that exist in the San Francisco Bay and Sacramento Valley areas. Specifically, we attempt to determine the emissions signatures of sources that influence ongoing measurements made at a tall-tower measurement site near Walnut Grove, CA. For two weeks in February and March of 2009, a Cessna 210 was flown throughout the Sacramento region, making continuous measurements of CO2, CH4, and CO while also sampling discrete flasks for a variety of additional tracers, including SF6, N2O, and 14C in CO2 (Δ14CO2). Flight paths were planned using wind predictions for each day to maximize sampling of sources whose emissions would also be sampled contemporaneously by the instrumentation at the Walnut Grove tower (WGC), part of the ongoing California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project between NOAA/ESRL’s Carbon Cycle group and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Flights were performed in two distinct patterns: 1) flying across a plume upwind and downwind of the Sacramento urban area, and 2) flying across the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta from Richmond to Walnut Grove, a region consisting of natural wetlands as well as several power plants and refineries. Results show a variety of well-correlated mixing ratio signals downwind of Sacramento, documenting the urban signature emission ratios, while emissions ratios in the Delta region were more variable, likely due

  11. Spectral Light Absorption and Scattering by Aerosol Particles in Central Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artaxo, P.; Holanda, B. A.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Carbone, S.; Barbosa, H. M.; Rizzo, L. V.; Cirino, G. G.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Martin, S. T.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the GoAmazon2014/5, a detailed characterization of spectral light absorption and light scattering was performed at four research sites located in the central Amazon forest at different distances upwind and downwind of Manaus. The sites ATTO (T0a) and Embrapa (T0e) are located upwind of Manaus where it is possible to observe very pristine atmospheric conditions in wet season. The site Tiwa (T2) is being operated under the direct influence of the Manaus plume at 5 km downwind of Manaus and, finally, the Manacapuru (T3) site is located at about 60 km downwind of Manaus. The spectral dependence of light absorption and light scattering were measured using Aethalometers (7-wavelengths) and Nephelometers (3-wavelengths), respectively. By calculating the Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), it was possible to get information about the source of the aerosol whereas the Scattering Angstrom Exponent (SAE) gives information about its size distribution. Sunphotometers from the AERONET network were set up at T3 and T0e sites to measure column Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD). For all the stations, much higher absorption and scattering coefficients were observed during the dry season in comparison to the wet season, as a result of the larger concentration of BC and OC present in the biomass burning events. Additionally, we also observed Manaus plume pollution that alters the BC signal. There is also an increase of the AAE during the dry season due to the larger amount of aerosols from biomass burning compared with urban pollution. High values of AAE are also observed during the wet season, attributed to the presence of long-range transport of aerosols from Africa. The SAE for all the sites are lower during the wet season, with the dominance of large biological particles, and increases during the dry season as a consequence of fine particles emitted from both biomass and fossil fuel burning. The AOD at T0e and T3 (Jan-Jun/2014) showed very similar values ranging from 0.05 to

  12. Emission sources contributing to tropospheric ozone over Equatorial Africa during the summer monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bouarar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A global chemistry-climate model LMDz_INCA is used to investigate the contribution of African and Asian emissions to tropospheric ozone over Central and West Africa during the summer monsoon. The model results show that ozone in this region is most sensitive to lightning NOx and to Central African biomass burning emissions. However, other emission categories also contribute significantly to regional ozone. The maximum ozone changes due to lightning NOx occur in the upper troposphere between 400 hPa and 200 hPa over West Africa and downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Biomass burning emissions mainly influence ozone in the lower and middle troposphere over Central Africa, and downwind due to westward transport. Biogenic emissions of volatile organic compounds, which can be uplifted from the lower troposphere to higher altitudes by the deep convection that occurs over West Africa during the monsoon season, lead to maximum ozone changes in the lower stratosphere region. Soil NOx emissions over the Sahel region make a significant contribution to ozone in the lower troposphere. In addition, convective uplift of these emissions and subsequent ozone production are also an important source of ozone in the upper troposphere over West Africa. Concerning African anthropogenic emissions, they only make a small contribution to ozone compared to the other emission categories. The model results indicate that most ozone changes due to African emissions occur downwind, especially over the Atlantic Ocean, far from the emission regions. The import of Asian emissions also makes a considerable contribution to ozone concentrations above 150 hPa and has to be taken into account in studies of the ozone budget over Africa. Using IPCC AR5 (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; Fifth Assessment Report estimates of anthropogenic emissions for 2030 over Africa and Asia, model calculations show larger changes in ozone over Africa due to

  13. Nitrogen oxide chemistry in an urban plume: investigation of the chemistry of peroxy and multifunctional organic nitrates with a Lagrangian model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Pérez

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Air quality in the outflow from urban centers affects millions of people, as well as, natural and managed ecosystems downwind. In locations where there are large sources of biogenic VOCs downwind of urban centers, the outflow is characterized by a high VOC reactivity due to biogenic emissions and low NOx. However most field and chamber studies have focused on limiting cases of high NOx or of near zero NOx. Recent measurements of a wide suite of VOCs, O3 and meteorological parameters at several locations within the Sacramento urban plume have provided a detailed benchmark for testing our understanding of chemistry in a plume transitioning from high NOx to low NOx and high VOC reactivity. As an additional simplification, the strong mountain valley circulation in the region makes this urban plume a physical realization of a nearly idealized Lagrangian plume. Here, we describe a model of this plume. We use a Lagrangian model representing chemistry based on the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1 along with mixing and deposition. We discuss the effects of entrainment of background air, the branching ratio for the production of isoprene nitrates and the effects of soil NOx emissions on the composition of the evolving plume. The model predicts that after 2–3 h of chemical processing only 45% of the peroxynitrates (ΣPNs are PAN and that most (69% RONO2 are secondary alkyl nitrate products of the reaction of OH with RONO2. We find the model is more consistent with the observations if: a the yield of ΣPNs from large and multi-functional aldehydes is close to zero; and b the reaction between OH and RONO2 produces multifunctional nitrates as opposed to either HNO3 or NO2 as is typical in most currently adopted reaction mechanisms. Model results also show that adding NOx emissions throughout the transect increases

  14. Studies of the Kuwait oil fire plume during midsummer 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, P. H.; Al-Sunaid, A.; Busness, K. M.; Hales, J. M.; Mazurek, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports aircraft observations of the Kuwait oil fire plume conducted during the period July 31-August 17, 1991. During this study the plume was transported almost exclusively to the south of Kuwait over the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Peninsula. The plume base was generally found to be well above the surface, in some cases as high as 1-2 km; plume tops did not exceed 5 km. Aerosol mass (based on measured aerosol constituents) in the central section of the plume, ca. 150-200 km downwind of the source region, was found to be >500 μg/m3, with number densities in the size range (approximate) 0.2 carbon, and organic carbon. Sodium chloride constituted a surprisingly large component of the soluble inorganic mass. The aerosol particles appeared to function as good cloud condensation nuclei, with a large fraction of accumulation mode particles (by number) activated at a supersaturation of 0.6%. Under conditions in which the plume was relatively compact, transmittance of solar radiation to the surface was only 10-20%. Plume albedo was observed to be as low as 2-3% close to the source region, consistent with the high elemental-carbon concentrations present in the plume. Trace gas concentrations were consistent with fuel composition and with current knowledge of atmospheric chemical processes. Sulfur dioxide concentrations close to the source region were found to be as high as 300-400 ppb. The emissions factor for S (expressed as a percentage) was estimated to be 1.8%, which is consistent with estimates of a fuel sulfur content of 2-2.5%. SO2 was found to be only slowly oxidized (<1%/h). Nitrogen oxide concentrations were found to be quite low (<50 ppb near the source, decreasing to 1-2 ppb well downwind), which is consistent with a crude oil nitrogen source. Despite relatively low concentrations, sufficient NOx was present to act as a catalyst to generate excess ozone in the plume as the plume was transported downwind and dispersed.

  15. Wind-Turbine Wakes in a Convective Boundary Layer: A Wind-Tunnel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    Thermal stability changes the properties of the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer, and in turn affects the behaviour of wind-turbine wakes. To better understand the effects of thermal stability on the wind-turbine wake structure, wind-tunnel experiments were carried out with a simulated convective boundary layer (CBL) and a neutral boundary layer. The CBL was generated by cooling the airflow to 12-15 °C and heating up the test section floor to 73-75 °C. The freestream wind speed was set at about 2.5 m s-1, resulting in a bulk Richardson number of -0.13. The wake of a horizontal-axis 3-blade wind-turbine model, whose height was within the lowest one third of the boundary layer, was studied using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) and triple-wire (x-wire/cold-wire) anemometry. Data acquired with the S-PIV were analyzed to characterize the highly three-dimensional turbulent flow in the near wake (0.2-3.2 rotor diameters) as well as to visualize the shedding of tip vortices. Profiles of the mean flow, turbulence intensity, and turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were measured with the triple-wire anemometer at downwind locations from 2-20 rotor diameters in the centre plane of the wake. In comparison with the wake of the same wind turbine in a neutral boundary layer, a smaller velocity deficit (about 15 % at the wake centre) is observed in the CBL, where an enhanced radial momentum transport leads to a more rapid momentum recovery, particularly in the lower part of the wake. The velocity deficit at the wake centre decays following a power law regardless of the thermal stability. While the peak turbulence intensity (and the maximum added turbulence) occurs at the top-tip height at a downwind distance of about three rotor diameters in both cases, the magnitude is about 20 % higher in the CBL than in the neutral boundary layer. Correspondingly, the turbulent heat flux is also enhanced by approximately 25 % in the lower part of the wake, compared to that

  16. Source-receptor relationships between East Asian sulfur dioxide emissions and Northern Hemisphere sulfate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the effect of varying East Asian (EA sulfur emissions on sulfate concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere, using a global coupled oxidant-aerosol model (MOZART-2. We conduct a base and five sensitivity simulations, in which sulfur emissions from each continent are tagged, to establish the source-receptor (S-R relationship between EA sulfur emissions and sulfate concentrations over source and downwind regions. We find that from west to east across the North Pacific, EA sulfate contributes approximately 80%–20% of sulfate at the surface, but at least 50% at 500 hPa. In addition, EA SO2 emissions account for approximately 30%–50% and 10%–20% of North American background sulfate over the western and eastern US, respectively. The contribution of EA sulfate to the western US at the surface is highest in MAM and JJA, but is lowest in DJF. Reducing EA SO2 emissions will significantly decrease the spatial extent of the EA sulfate influence over the North Pacific both at the surface and at 500 mb in all seasons, but the extent of influence is insensitive to emission increases, particularly in DJF and JJA. We find that EA sulfate concentrations over most downwind regions respond nearly linearly to changes in EA SO2 emissions, but sulfate concentrations over the EA source region increase more slowly than SO2 emissions, particularly at the surface and in winter, due to limited availability of oxidants (mostly H2O2. We find that similar estimates of the S-R relationship for trans-Pacific transport of EA sulfate would be obtained using either sensitivity or tagging techniques. Our findings suggest that future changes in EA sulfur emissions may cause little change in the sulfate induced health impact over downwind continents but SO2 emission reductions may significantly reduce the sulfate related climate cooling over the North Pacific and the United States.

  17. An Overview of the Lightning - Atmospheric Chemistry Aspects of the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, K. E.; Barth, M. C.; Koshak, W.; Bucsela, E. J.; Allen, D. J.; Weinheimer, A.; Ryerson, T.; Huntrieser, H.; Bruning, E.; MacGorman, D.; Krehbiel, P.; Thomas, R.; Carey, L.

    2012-01-01

    Some of the major goals of the DC3 experiment are to determine the contribution of lightning to NO(x) in the anvils of observed thunderstorms, examine the relationship of lightning NO(x) production to flash rates and to lightning channel lengths, and estimate the relative production per flash for cloud-to-ground flashes and intracloud flashes. In addition, the effects of lightning NO(x) production on photochemistry downwind of thunderstorms is also being examined. The talk will survey the observation types that were conducted during DC3 relevant to these goals and provide an overview of the analysis and modeling techniques which are being used to achieve them. NO(x) was observed on three research aircraft during DC3 (the NCAR G-V, the NASA DC-8, and the DLR Falcon) in flights through storm anvils in three study regions (NE Colorado, Central Oklahoma to West Texas, and northern Alabama) where lightning mapping arrays (LMAs) and radar coverage were available. Initial comparisons of the aircraft NOx observations in storm anvils relative to flash rates have been conducted, which will be followed with calculations of the flux of NO(x) through the anvils, which when combined with observed flash rates can be used to estimate storm-average lightning NOx production per flash. The WRF-Chem model will be run for cloud-resolved simulations of selected observed storms during DC3. Detailed lightning information from the LMAs (flash rates and flash lengths as a function of time and vertical distributions of flash channel segments) will be input to the model along with assumptions concerning NO(x) production per CG flash and per IC flash. These assumptions will be tested through comparisons with the aircraft NOx data from anvil traverses. A specially designed retrieval method for lightning NO2 column amounts from the OMI instrument on NASA fs Aura satellite has been utilized to estimate NO2 over the region affected by selected DC3 storms. Combined with NO(x) to NO2 ratios from the

  18. Role of urban land use on mesoscale circulations and precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Matthew Drennan

    A high resolution mesoscale meteorological model (MM5) was employed to study urban effects on rainfall over Oklahoma City, U.S.A. and Chennai, India. Numerical modeling results for Oklahoma City show that urban land use increases the daytime sensible heat flux while it decreases the latent heat flux over the city. Height of the level of free convection (LFC) is reduced by 100 hPa downwind of Oklahoma City because of increased vertical mixing. Increased friction over the city reduced the near surface wind speed by up to 30% as compared to that over the surrounding rural regions during the simulation period. Surface stress over an urban area is shown to increase convergence on the wind ward side of the city and decrease convergence on the lee side of the city. Simulated maximum vertical velocity associated with a line of thunderstorms is enhanced by 1.4 m s-1 by the urban effect of Oklahoma City. Increased rainfall amounts of 25 mm were simulated around 55 km downwind of Oklahoma City. Rainfall observations and numerical modeling results were used to investigate the impact of Chennai urban land use on the sea breeze circulation and rainfall amounts during the southwest monsoon. Simulated wind speeds show that the urban region of Chennai increases onshore flow associated with the sea breeze by 4.0 m s-1. Inland propagation of the sea breeze front is reduced over and immediately downwind of the city due to higher friction. During the research period, positive vertical velocity is enhanced along the leading edge of the sea breeze front by more than 1.0 m s-1 because of increased low-level convergence over the city. Rainfall amounts were increased up to 25 mm well inland due to urban effects. Observations indicate occurrence of rainfall over the city during late evening and nocturnal hours, possibly due to the interaction between receding sea breeze circulation and the urban heat island. This process could not be simulated due to possible deficiencies in the model

  19. Airborne Measurements of Aerosol Emissions From the Alberta Oil Sands Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, S. G.; Clarke, A. D.; McNaughton, C. S.; Freitag, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Alberta oil sands contain a vast reservoir of fossil hydrocarbons. The extremely viscous bitumen requires significant energy to extract and upgrade to make a fluid product suitable for pipelines and further refinement. The mining and upgrading process constitute a large industrial complex in an otherwise sparsely populated area of Canada. During the ARCTAS project in June/July 2008, while studying forest fire plumes, the NASA DC-8 and P-3B flew through the plume a total of 5 times. Once was a coordinated visit by both aircraft; the other 3 were fortuitous passes downwind. One study has been published about gas emissions from the complex. Here we concentrate on aerosol emissions and aging. As previously reported, there appear to be at least 2 types of plumes produced. One is an industrial-type plume with vast numbers of ultrafine particles, SO2, sulfate, black carbon (BC), CO, and NO2. The other, probably from the mining, has more organic aerosol and BC together with dust-like aerosols at 3 μm and a 1 μm mode of unknown origin. The DC-8 crossed the plume about 10 km downwind of the industrial site, giving time for the boundary layer to mix and enabling a very crude flux calculation suggesting that sulfate and organic aerosols were each produced at about 500 g/s (estimated errors are a factor of 2, chiefly due to concerns about vertical mixing). Since this was a single flight during a project dedicated to other purposes and operating conditions and weather may change fluxes considerably, this may not be a typical flux. As the plume progresses downwind, the ultrafine particles grow to sizes effective as cloud condensation nucei (CCN), SO2 is converted to sulfate, and organic aerosol is produced. During fair weather in the summer, as was the case during these flights, cloud convection pumps aerosol above the mixed layer. While the aerosol plume is difficult to detect from space, NO2 is measured by the OMI instrument an the Aura satellite and the oil sands plume

  20. Airborne measurements of the spatial distribution of aerosol chemical composition across Europe and evolution of the organic fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Morgan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The spatial distribution of aerosol chemical composition and the evolution of the Organic Aerosol (OA fraction is investigated based upon airborne measurements of aerosol chemical composition in the planetary boundary layer across Europe. Sub-micron aerosol chemical composition was measured using a compact Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (cToF-AMS. A range of sampling conditions were evaluated, including relatively clean background conditions, polluted conditions in North-Western Europe and the near-field to far-field outflow from such conditions. Ammonium nitrate and OA were found to be the dominant chemical components of the sub-micron aerosol burden, with mass fractions ranging from 20–50% each. Ammonium nitrate was found to dominate in North-Western Europe during episodes of high pollution, reflecting the enhanced NOx and ammonia sources in this region. OA was ubiquitous across Europe and concentrations generally exceeded sulphate by 30–160%. A factor analysis of the OA burden was performed in order to probe the evolution across this large range of spatial and temporal scales. Two separate Oxygenated Organic Aerosol (OOA components were identified; one representing an aged-OOA, termed Low Volatility-OOA and another representing fresher-OOA, termed Semi Volatile-OOA on the basis of their mass spectral similarity to previous studies. The factors derived from different flights were not chemically the same but rather reflect the range of OA composition sampled during a particular flight. Significant chemical processing of the OA was observed downwind of major sources in North-Western Europe, with the LV-OOA component becoming increasingly dominant as the distance from source and photochemical processing increased. The measurements suggest that the aging of OA can be viewed as a continuum, with a progression from a less oxidised, semi-volatile component to a highly oxidised, less-volatile component. Substantial amounts of

  1. Ambient exposure to coarse and fine particle emissions from building demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmi, Farhad; Kumar, Prashant

    2016-07-01

    Demolition of buildings produce large quantities of particulate matter (PM) that could be inhaled by on-site workers and people living in the neighbourhood, but studies assessing ambient exposure at the real-world demolition sites are limited. We measured concentrations of PM10 (≤10 μm), PM2.5 (≤2.5 μm) and PM1 (≤1 μm) along with local meteorology for 54 working hours over the demolition period. The measurements were carried out at (i) a fixed-site in the downwind of demolished building, (ii) around the site during demolition operation through mobile monitoring, (iii) different distances away from the demolition site through sequential monitoring, and (iv) inside an excavator vehicle cabin and on-site temporary office for engineers. Position of the PM instrument was continuously recorded using a Global Positioning System on a second basis during mobile measurements. Fraction of coarse particles (PM2.5-10) contributed 89 (with mean particle mass concentration, PMC ≈ 133 ± 17 μg m-3), 83 (100 ± 29 μg m-3), and 70% (59 ± 12 μg m-3) of total PMC during the fixed-site, mobile monitoring and sequential measurements, respectively, compared with only 50% (mean 12 ± 6 μg m-3) during the background measurements. The corresponding values for fine particles (PM2.5) were 11, 17 and 30% compared with 50% during background, showing a much greater release of coarse particles during demolition. The openair package in R and map source software (ArcGIS) were used to assess spatial variation of PMCs in downwind and upwind of the demolition site. A modified box model was developed to determine the emission factors, which were 210, 73 and 24 μg m-2 s-1 for PM10, PM2.5 and PM1, respectively. The average respiratory deposited doses to coarse (and fine) particles inside the excavator cabin and on-site temporary office increased by 57- (and 5-) and 13- (and 2-) times compared with the local background level, respectively. The monitoring stations in downwind direction

  2. Interaction of Nocturnal Low-Level Jets with Urban Geometries as seen in Joint URBAN 2003 Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.Lundquist, J; D.Mirocha, J

    2006-09-06

    As accurate modeling of atmospheric flows in urban environments requires sophisticated representation of complex urban geometries, much work has been devoted to treatment of the urban surface. However, the importance of the larger-scale flow impinging upon the urban complex to the flow, transport and dispersion within it and downwind has received less attention. Building-resolving computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are commonly employed to investigate interactions between the flow and three-dimensional structures comprising the urban environment, however such models are typically forced with simplified boundary conditions that fail to include important regional-scale phenomena that can strongly influence the flow within the urban complex and downwind. This paper investigates the interaction of an important and frequently occurring regional-scale phenomenon, the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ), with urban-scale turbulence and dispersion in Oklahoma City using data from the Joint URBAN 2003 (JU2003) field experiment. Two simulations of nocturnal tracer release experiments from JU2003 using Lawrence Livermore National laboratory's FEM3MP CFD model yield differing levels of agreement with the observations in wind speed, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and concentration profiles in the urban wake, approximately 750m downwind of the central business district. Profiles of several observed turbulence parameters at this location indicate characteristics of both bottom-up and top-down boundary layers during each of the experiments. These data are consistent with turbulence production due to at least two sources, the complex flow structures of the urban area and the region of strong vertical wind shear occurring beneath the LLJs present each night. While strong LLJs occurred each night, their structures varied considerably, resulting in significant differences in the magnitudes of the turbulence parameters observed during the two experiments. As FEM3MP was forced

  3. High levels of hair manganese in children living in the vicinity of a ferro-manganese alloy production plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Filho, José A; Paes, Ciro R; Pontes, Angela M de C; Moreira, Josino C; Sarcinelli, Paula N; Mergler, Donna

    2009-11-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element, but an effective toxic at high concentrations. While there is an extensive literature on occupational exposure, few studies have examined adults and children living near important sources of airborne Mn. The objective of this study was to analyze hair Mn of children living in the vicinity of a ferro-manganese alloy production plant in the Great Salvador region, State of Bahia, Brazil and examine factors that influence this bioindicator of exposure. We examined 109 children in the age range of 1-10 years, living near the plant. Four separate housing areas were identified a priori on the bases of proximity to the emission sources and downwind location. A non-exposed group (n=43) of similar socio-economic status was also evaluated. Mn hair (MnH) concentration was measured by graphite atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Possible confounding hematological parameters were also assessed. Mean MnH concentration was 15.20 microg/g (1.10-95.50 microg/g) for the exposed children and 1.37 microg/g (0.39-5.58 microg/g) for the non-exposed. For the former, MnH concentrations were 7.95+/-1.40 microg/g (farthest from the plant), 11.81+/-1.11 microg/g (mid-region), 34.43+/-8.66 microg/g (closest to the plant) and 34.22+/-9.15 microg/g (directly downwind). Multiple regression analysis on log transformed MnH concentrations for the exposed children derived a model that explained 36.8% of the variability. In order of importance, area of children's residence, gender (girls>boys) and time of mother's residence in the area at the birth of the child, were significantly associated with MnH. Post hoc analyses indicated two groupings for exposure areas, with those living closest to and downwind of the plant displaying higher MnH concentrations compared to the others. The contribution of the time the mother lived in the community prior to the child's birth to the children's current MnH suggests that in utero exposure may play a role. A study of

  4. Wind energy in Manitoba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Various types of wind energy systems were described. The most popular wind energy system uses a high speed propeller, and has a typical efficiency of 40 per cent. A 3 kW two blade propeller wind energy system was set up as a demonstration project at Fort Whyte Centre in Winnipeg, Manitoba. It generates about four per cent of the electrical requirements of the centre. Other types of wind energy systems include the Darrieus wind energy system using a wind turbine, the Savonius and Multiblade systems, and Hybrid systems. A group of wind energy systems working together is known as a wind farm; such farms have been in operation for many years in high wind areas of the USA. In Manitoba, no wind energy system operates for the sole purpose of generating and selling electricity to a local utility, but some wind energy systems can feed surplus energy into the utility system. A review of environmental impacts, economic considerations and an assessment of wind resources within Manitoba, was also provided. 4 figs.

  5. Numerical simulation for Savonius rotors. ; Running performance and flow fields. Savonius fusha ni kansuru suchi keisan. ; Unten tokusei to nagareba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishimatsu, K.; Shinohara, T. (Oita University, Oita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering); Takuma, F. (Kyushu Matsushita Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-01-25

    This paper reports numerical calculations on flow around Savonius wind turbine (rotating) with blades in a semi-circular shape and their output characteristics. The two-dimensional non-compressive Navier-Stokes equations were discretized by a fractional step method with regard to time, and by a finite volume method using non-structural grids with regard to space. Upon the discretization, the flow field in a region 20 times as large as the wind turbine diameter was analyzed for the cases that the Reynolds number is 10[sup 5], the ratios of clearance between two blades to the blade diameter are zero and 0.16, and the circumferential velocity ratio is in a range from 0.25 to 1.75. The paper describes the result as follows: the circumferential velocity ratio when the output is at a maximum is slightly smaller than one, and the circumferential velocity ratio when the output is zero is about 1.7, which agree approximately with values in the previous experiments on the circumferential velocity ratio and output; and vortices are discharged also from rear of the blades in addition to from tips of the blades. Several examples of flow fields as seen from static coordinates are illustrated. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  6. The high Reynolds number flow through an axial-flow pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierke, W. C.; Straka, W. A.; Taylor, P. D.

    1993-11-01

    The high Reynolds number pump (HIREP) facility at ARL Penn State has been used to perform a low-speed, large-scale experiment of the incompressible flow of water through a two-blade-row turbomachine. HIREP can involve blade chord Reynolds numbers as high as 6,000,000 and can accommodate a variety of instrumentation in both a stationary and a rotating frame of reference. The objectives of this experiment were as follows: to provide a database for comparison with three-dimensional, viscous (turbulent) flow computations; to evaluate the engineering models; and to improve our physical understanding of many of the phenomena involved in this complex flow field. The experimental results include a large quantity of data acquired throughout HIREP. A five-hole probe survey of the inlet flow 37.0 percent chord upstream of the inlet guide vane (IGV) leading edge is sufficient to give information for the inflow boundary conditions, while some static-pressure information is available to help establish an outflow boundary condition.

  7. Modal testing of the TX-100 wind turbine blade.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Sarah; Griffith, Daniel Todd; Casias, Miguel; Simmermacher, Todd William; Smith, Gregory A.

    2006-05-01

    This test report covers the SNL modal test results for two nominally identical TX-100 wind turbine blades. The TX-100 blade design is unique in that it features a passive braking, force-shedding mechanism where bending and torsion are coupled to produce desirable aerodynamic characteristics. A specific aim of this test is to characterize the coupling between bending and torsional dynamics. The results of the modal tests and the subsequent analysis characterize the natural frequencies, damping, and mode shapes of the individual blades. The results of this report are expected to be used for model validation--the frequencies and mode shapes from the experimental analysis can be compared with those of a finite-element analysis. Damping values are included in the results of these tests to potentially improve the fidelity of numerical simulations, although numerical finite element models typically have no means of predicting structural damping characteristics. Thereafter, an additional objective of the test is achieved in evaluating the test to test and unit variation in the modal parameters of the two blades.

  8. Development of a towing tank PIV system and a wake survey of a marine current turbine under steady conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2015-11-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was designed and built at the U.S. Naval Academy. The system was used to study the wake of a scale-independent horizontal axis marine current turbine. The turbine is a 1/25th scale model of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Reference Model 1 (RM1) tidal turbine. It is a two-bladed turbine measuring 0.8 m in diameter and featuring a NACA 63-618 airfoil cross-section. The wake survey was conducted over an area extending 0.25D forward of the turbine tip path to 2.0D aft to a depth of 1.0D beneath the turbine output shaft in the streamwise plane. Each field of view was approximately 30 cm by 30 cm, and each overlapped the adjacent fields of view by 5 cm. The entire flow field was then reconstructed by registering the resultant vector fields together into a single field of investigation. Results include the field of investigation from a representative case, for the mean velocity field averaged over approximately 1,000 realizations, and turbulent statistics including turbulence intensities, Reynolds shear stresses, and turbulent kinetic energy. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research.

  9. User's Guide for the NREL Force and Loads Analysis Program. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.D.

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of and instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP, version 2.2). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for two- or three-bladed rigid hub wind turbines. The effects of turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed rigid hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user's guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  10. User`s Guide for the NREL Force and Loads Analysis Program. Version 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A D

    1992-08-01

    The following report gives the reader an overview of and instructions on the proper use of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Force and Loads Analysis Program (FLAP, version 2.2). It is intended as a tool for prediction of rotor and blade loads and response for two- or three-bladed rigid hub wind turbines. The effects of turbulence are accounted for. The objectives of the report are to give an overview of the code and also show the methods of data input and correct code execution steps in order to model an example two-bladed rigid hub turbine. A large portion of the discussion (Sections 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0) is devoted to the subject of inputting and running the code for wind turbulence effects. The ability to include turbulent wind effects is perhaps the biggest change in the code since the release of FLAP version 2.01 in 1988. This report is intended to be a user`s guide. It does not contain a theoretical discussion on equations of motion, assumptions, underlying theory, etc. It is intended to be used in conjunction with Wright, Buhl, and Thresher (1988).

  11. Analytical comparison of three stiffened panel concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Jill M.; Wu, K. Chauncey; Robinson, James C.

    1995-01-01

    Three stiffened panel concepts are evaluated to find optimized designs for integral stiffeners in the barrels of Reusable Launch Vehicle fuel tanks. The three panel concepts considered are a T-stiffened panel, a panel with one blade stiffener centered between each pair of T-stiffeners, and a panel with two blade stiffeners equally spaced between each pair of T-stiffeners. The panels are optimized using PASCO for a range of compressive loads, and the computed areal weight for each panel is used to compare the concepts and predict tank weights. The areal weight of the T-stiffened panel with one blade is up to seven-percent lower than the other panel concepts. Two tank construction methods are compared for a representative tank design with three barrels. In the first method, 45-degree circumferential sections of a barrel are each designed to carry the same maximum load in the barrel. In the second method, each barrel section is designed for the maximum load in that section. Representative tanks designed with the first method are over 250 lb heavier than tanks designed using the second method. Optimized panel designs and areal weights are also computed for variation of the nominal panel length and skin thickness.

  12. Effect of Favorable Pressure Gradients on Turbine Blade Pressure Surface Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Giel, P. W.

    2002-01-01

    Recent measurements on a turbine rotor showed significant relaminarization effects. These effects were evident on the pressure surface heat transfer measurements. The character of the heat transfer varied with Reynolds number. Data were obtained for exit Reynolds numbers between 500,000 and 880,000. Tests were done with a high level of inlet turbulence, 7.5%. At lower Reynolds numbers the heat transfer was similar to that for laminar flow, but at a level higher than for laminar flow. At higher Reynolds numbers the heat transfer was similar to turbulent flow, when the acceleration parameter, K, was sufficiently small. The proposed paper discusses the experimental results, and also discusses approaches to calculating the surface heat transfer for the blade surface. Calculations were done using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD analysis. The results of these tests, when compared with previous blade tests in the same facility, illustrate modeling difficulties that were encountered in CFD predictions. The two blades were in many ways similar. However, the degree of agreement between the same analysis and the experimental data was significantly different. These differences are highlighted to illustrate where improvements in modeling approaches are needed for transitional flows.

  13. Experimental calibration of the mathematical model of Air Torque Position dampers with non-cascading blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bikić Siniša M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on the mathematical model of the Air Torque Position dampers. The mathematical model establishes a link between the velocity of air in front of the damper, position of the damper blade and the moment acting on the blade caused by the air flow. This research aims to experimentally verify the mathematical model for the damper type with non-cascading blades. Four different types of dampers with non-cascading blades were considered: single blade dampers, dampers with two cross-blades, dampers with two parallel blades and dampers with two blades of which one is a fixed blade in the horizontal position. The case of a damper with a straight pipeline positioned in front of and behind the damper was taken in consideration. Calibration and verification of the mathematical model was conducted experimentally. The experiment was conducted on the laboratory facility for testing dampers used for regulation of the air flow rate in heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. The design and setup of the laboratory facility, as well as construction, adjustment and calibration of the laboratory damper are presented in this paper. The mathematical model was calibrated by using one set of data, while the verification of the mathematical model was conducted by using the second set of data. The mathematical model was successfully validated and it can be used for accurate measurement of the air velocity on dampers with non-cascading blades under different operating conditions. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31058

  14. Calculation of design load for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirandy, L.; Strain, J. C.

    1995-01-01

    Design loads are presented for the General Electric MOD-SA wind turbine. The MOD-SA system consists of a 400 ft. diameter, upwind, two-bladed, teetered rotor connected to a 7.3 mW variable-speed generator. Fatigue loads are specified in the form of histograms for the 30 year life of the machine, while limit (or maximum) loads have been derived from transient dynamic analysis at critical operating conditions. Loads prediction was accomplished using state of the art aeroelastic analyses developed at General Electric. Features of the primary predictive tool - the Transient Rotor Analysis Code (TRAC) are described in the paper. Key to the load predictions are the following wind models: (1) yearly mean wind distribution; (2) mean wind variations during operation; (3) number of start/shutdown cycles; (4) spatially large gusts; and (5) spatially small gusts (local turbulence). The methods used to develop statistical distributions from load calculations represent an extension of procedures used in past wind programs and are believed to be a significant contribution to Wind Turbine Generator analysis. Test/theory correlations are presented to demonstrate code load predictive capability and to support the wind models used in the analysis. In addition MOD-5A loads are compared with those of existing machines. The MOD-5A design was performed by the General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Program Department, under Contract DEN3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and sponsored by the Department of Energy.

  15. Reduced Design Load Basis for Ultimate Blade Loads Estimation in Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavese, Christian; Tibaldi, Carlo; Larsen, Torben J.; Kim, Taeseong; Thomsen, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    The aim is to provide a fast and reliable approach to estimate ultimate blade loads for a multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) framework. For blade design purposes, the standards require a large amount of computationally expensive simulations, which cannot be efficiently run each cost function evaluation of an MDO process. This work describes a method that allows integrating the calculation of the blade load envelopes inside an MDO loop. Ultimate blade load envelopes are calculated for a baseline design and a design obtained after an iteration of an MDO. These envelopes are computed for a full standard design load basis (DLB) and a deterministic reduced DLB. Ultimate loads extracted from the two DLBs with the two blade designs each are compared and analyzed. Although the reduced DLB supplies ultimate loads of different magnitude, the shape of the estimated envelopes are similar to the one computed using the full DLB. This observation is used to propose a scheme that is computationally cheap, and that can be integrated inside an MDO framework, providing a sufficiently reliable estimation of the blade ultimate loading. The latter aspect is of key importance when design variables implementing passive control methodologies are included in the formulation of the optimization problem. An MDO of a 10 MW wind turbine blade is presented as an applied case study to show the efficacy of the reduced DLB concept.

  16. Variable structure control for maximum wind power extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barambones, O.; Gonzalez de Durana, J.M.; Alcorta, P. [Univ. of the Basque Country, Vitoria (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The future development of wind power technology will affect the level of impact that wind power will have on the power system. Very large wind farms can pose complex technical challenges while also paving the way for other new technologies that will help with electric grid integration. Increasingly complicated power electronic and computerized control schemes will lead to significant improvements and full controllability of available wind power. Reactive power compensation is an important issue in the control of distribution and transmission systems as it increases feeder system losses, reduces system power factor, and can cause large-amplitude variations in load-side voltage. Moreover, rapid changes in the reactive power consumption of large load centers can cause voltage amplitude oscillations, leading to a change in the electric system real power demand resulting in power oscillation. This paper described a sliding mode vector control for a double fed induction generator (DFIG) drive, used in variable speed wind power generation. The study proposed a new variable structure control which has an integral sliding surface to relax the requirement of the acceleration signal, commonly used in conventional sliding mode speed control techniques. The paper discussed the system modelling, DFIG control scheme, and simulation results. A test of the proposed method based on a two-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine was conducted using the Matlab/Simulink software. In this test, several operating conditions were simulated and the study concluded that satisfactory results were obtained. 14 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Structural and Biochemical Insights into MLL1 Core Complex Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Groulx, Adam; Tremblay, Véronique; Brunzelle, Joseph; Couture, Jean-François (Ottawa); (NWU)

    2012-05-02

    Histone H3 Lys-4 methylation is predominantly catalyzed by a family of methyltransferases whose enzymatic activity depends on their interaction with a three-subunit complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. Here, we report that a segment of 50 residues of RbBP5 bridges the Ash2L C-terminal domain to WDR5. The crystal structure of WDR5 in ternary complex with RbBP5 and MLL1 reveals that both proteins binds peptide-binding clefts located on opposite sides of WDR5s {beta}-propeller domain. RbBP5 engages in several hydrogen bonds and van der Waals contacts within a V-shaped cleft formed by the junction of two blades on WDR5. Mutational analyses of both the WDR5 V-shaped cleft and RbBP5 residues reveal that the interactions between RbBP5 and WDR5 are important for the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Overall, this study provides the structural basis underlying the formation of the WDR5-RbBP5 subcomplex and further highlight the crucial role of WDR5 in scaffolding the MLL1 core complex.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of a Modified Savonius Wind Turbine with Novel Blade Shapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlong Tian

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Savonius wind turbine is a type of vertical axis wind turbine (VAWTs that is simply composed of two or three arc-type blades which can generate power even under poor wind conditions. A modified Savonius wind turbine with novel blade shapes is introduced with the aim of increasing the power coefficient of the turbine. The effect of blade fullness, which is a main shape parameter of the blade, on the power production of a two-bladed Savonius wind turbine is investigated using transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Simulations are based on the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations with a renormalization group turbulent model. This numerical method is validated with existing experimental data and then utilized to quantify the performance of design variants. Results quantify the relationship between blade fullness and turbine performance with a blade fullness of 1 resulting in the highest coefficient of power, 0.2573. This power coefficient is 10.98% higher than a conventional Savonius turbine.

  19. An experimental investigation into cavitation behaviour and pressure characteristics of alternative blade sections for propellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkut, Emin; Atlar, Mehmet; Wang, Dazheng

    2013-03-01

    During the final quarter of the last century considerable efforts have been spent to reduce the hull pressure fluctuations caused by unsteady propeller cavitation. This has resulted in further changes in propeller design characteristics including increased skew, tip unloading and introduction of "New Blade Sections" (NBS) designed on the basis of the so-called Eppler code. An experimental study was carried out to investigate flow characteristics of alternative two-dimensional (2-D) blade sections of rectangular planform, one of which was the New Blade Section (NBS) developed in Newcastle University and other was based on the well-known National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) section. The experiments comprised the cavitation observations and the measurements of the local velocity distribution around the blade sections by using a 2-D Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) system. Analysis of the cavitation tests demonstrated that the two blade sections presented very similar bucket shapes with virtually no width at the bottom but relatively favourable buckets arms at the suction and pressure sides for the NACA section. Similarly, pressure analysis of the sections displayed a slightly larger value for the NBS pressure peak. The comparative overall pressure distributions around the sections suggested that the NBS might be more susceptible to cavitation than the NACA section. This can be closely related to the fundamental shape of the NBS with very fine leading edge. Therefore a further investigation into the modification of the leading edge should be considered to improve the cavitation behaviour of the NBS.

  20. Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor Discharge-Flow Overexpansion and Limit-Loading Condition, Part I: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-Cheng S.

    2017-01-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) investigation is conducted over a two-dimensional axial-flow turbine rotor blade row to study the phenomena of turbine rotor discharge flow overexpansion at subcritical, critical, and supercritical conditions. Quantitative data of the mean-flow Mach numbers, mean-flow angles, the tangential blade pressure forces, the mean-flow mass flux, and the flow-path total pressure loss coefficients, averaged or integrated across the two-dimensional computational domain encompassing two blade-passages, are obtained over a series of 14 inlet-total to exit-static pressure ratios, from 1.5 (un-choked; subcritical condition) to 10.0 (supercritical with excessively high pressure ratio.) Detailed flow features over the full domain-of-computation, such as the streamline patterns, Mach contours, pressure contours, blade surface pressure distributions, etc. are collected and displayed in this paper. A formal, quantitative definition of the limit loading condition based on the channel flow theory is proposed and explained. Contrary to the comments made in the historical works performed on this subject, about the deficiency of the theoretical methods applied in analyzing this phenomena, using modern CFD method for the study of this subject appears to be quite adequate and successful. This paper describes the CFD work and its findings.

  1. Monitoring the petroleum bitumen characteristics changes during their interaction with the polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, P. S.; Mishchenko, S. V.; Belyaev, V. P.; Frolov, V. A.

    2017-08-01

    The subject of the study is the characteristics (penetration, softening temperature, ductility and elasticity) of a road binder based on petroleum bitumen. The work purpose is to monitor the changes in the characteristics of petroleum bitumen when it interacting with polymers: thermoplastic elastomer, low-density polyethylene, including the adhesive additive presence. To carry out the research a special laboratory facility was designed and manufactured with two blade mixers providing intensive turbulent mixing and the possibility to effect on the transition process of combining the components in a polymer-bitumen binder. To construct a mathematical model of the polymer-bitumen binder characteristics dependence from the composition, methods of statistical experiments planning were used. The possibility of the expensive thermoplastic elastomers replacement with polyethylene is established while maintaining acceptable polymer-bitumen binder quality parameters. The obtained results are proposed for use in road construction. They allow to reduce the roads construction cost with solving the problem of recycling long-term waste packaging from polyethylene.

  2. Counting Possibilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tomasetta

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Williamson supports the thesis that every possible entity necessarily exists and so he needs to explain how a possible son of Wittgenstein’s, for example, exists in our world:he exists as a merely possible object (MPO, a pure locus of potential. Williamson presents a short argument for the existence of MPOs: how many knives can be made by fitting together two blades and two handles? Four: at the most two are concrete objects, the others being merely possible knives and merely possible objects. This paper defends the idea that one can avoid reference and ontological commitment to MPOs. My proposal is that MPOs can be dispensed with by using the notion of rules of knife-making. I first present a solution according to which we count lists of instructions - selected by the rules - describing physical combinations between components. This account, however, has its own difficulties and I eventually suggest that one can find a way out by admitting possible worlds, entities which are more commonly accepted - at least by philosophers - than MPOs. I maintain that, in answering Williamson’s questions, we count classes of physically possible worlds in which the same instance of a general rule is applied.

  3. A new blade element method for calculating the performance of high and intermediate solidity axial flow fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, H. V.

    1978-01-01

    A method is presented to design and predict the performance of axial flow rotors operating in a duct. The same method is suitable for the design of ducted fans and open propellers. The unified method is based on the blade element approach and the vortex theory for determining the three dimensional effects, so that two dimensional airfoil data can be used for determining the resultant force on each blade element. Resolution of this force in the thrust and torque planes and integration allows the total performance of the rotor, fan or propeller to be predicted. Three different methods of analysis, one based on a momentum flow theory; another on the vortex theory of propellers; and a third based on the theory of ducted fans, agree and reduce cascade airfoil data to single line as a function of the loading and induced angle of attack at values of constant inflow angle. The theory applies for any solidity from .01 to over 1 and any blade section camber. The effects of the duct and blade number can be determined so that the procedure applies over the entire range from two blade open propellers, to ducted helicopter tail rotors, to axial flow compressors with or without guide vanes, and to wind tunnel drive fans.

  4. Wake Survey of a Marine Current Turbine Under Steady Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2016-11-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to study the wake of a horizontal axis marine current turbine. The turbine was tested in a large tow tank facility at the United States Naval Academy. The turbine is a 1/25th scale model of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Reference Model 1 (RM1) tidal turbine. It is a two-bladed turbine measuring 0.8 m in diameter and featuring a NACA 63-618 airfoil cross section. Separate wind tunnel testing has shown the foil section used on the turbine to be Reynolds number independent with respect to lift at the experimental parameters of tow carriage speed (Utow = 1 . 68 m/s) and tip speed ratio (TSR = 7). The wake survey was conducted over an area extending 0.25D forward of the turbine tip path to 2.0D aft, and to a depth of 1.0D beneath the turbine output shaft in the streamwise plane. Each field of view was approximately 30 cm by 30 cm, and each overlapped the adjacent fields of view by 5 cm. The entire flow field was then reconstructed into a single field of investigation. Results include streamwise and vertical ensemble average velocity fields averaged over approximately 1,000 realizations, as well as higher-order statistics. Turbine tip vortex centers were identified and plotted showing increasing aperiodicity with wake age. keywords: horizontal axis marine current turbine, particle image velocimetry, towing tank, wake survey

  5. Validation of an axial flow blood pump: computational fluid dynamics results using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Boyang; Chua, Leok Poh; Wang, Xikun

    2012-04-01

    A magnetically suspended axial flow blood pump is studied experimentally in this article. The pump casing enclosed a three-blade straightener, a two-blade impeller shrouded by a permanent magnet-embedded cylinder, and a three-blade diffuser. The internal flow fields were simulated earlier using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the pump characteristic curves were determined. The simulation results showed that the internal flow field was basically streamlined, except the diffuser region. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement of the 1:1 pump model was conducted to validate the CFD result. In order to ensure the optical access, an acrylic prototype was fabricated with the impeller driven by a servomotor instead, as the magnet is opaque. In addition to the transparent model, the blood analog fluid with the refractive index close to that of acrylic was used to avoid refraction. According to the CFD results, the axial flow blood pump could generate adequate pressure head at the rotating speed of 9500rpm and flow rate of 5L/min, and the same flow condition was applied during the PIV measurement. Through the comparisons, it was found that the experimental results were close to those obtained by CFD and had thus validated the CFD model, which could complement the limitation of the measurement in assessing the more detailed flow fields of the axial flow pump.

  6. Development and optimisation of a procedure for the production of Parapoxvirus ovis by large-scale microcarrier cell culture in a non-animal, non-human and non-plant-derived medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlscheidt, M; Langer, U; Minuth, T; Bödeker, B; Apeler, H; Hörlein, H-D; Paulsen, D; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H; Henzler, H-J; Reichl, U

    2008-03-17

    For the production of a chemically inactivated Parapoxvirus ovis (PPVO), an adherent bovine kidney cell line was cultivated on Cytodex-3 microcarriers in suspension culture. The inactivated and purified virus particles have shown immune modulatory activity in several animal models. PPVO was produced by a biphasic batch process at the 3.5 and 10 L scale. Aeration was realised by bubble-free membrane oxygenation via a tube stator with a central two-blade anchor impeller. In order to increase efficiency, process robustness and safety, the established process was optimised. The cell line was adapted to a protein-free medium (except recombinant insulin) in order to increase biosafety. A scale up to a 50 L pilot plant with direct cell expansion was performed successfully. In parallel, the biphasic batch process was optimised with special emphasis on different operating conditions (cell number, Multiplicity of Infection (MOI), etc.) and process management (fed-batch, dialysis, etc.). The quality and concentration of the purified virus particles was assessed by quantitative electron microscopy, residual host cell protein and DNA-content and, finally, biologic activity in a transgenic mouse model. This integrated approach led to a new, safe, robust and highly productive large-scale production process, called "Volume-Expanded-Fed" Batch with cell densities up to 6-7e06 cells/mL. By subsequent dilution of infected cells into the next process scale, an increase in total productivity by a factor of 40 (related to an established biphasic batch process) was achieved.

  7. Metal Linear Expansion Coefficient Measuring Based on Laser Diffraction%激光衍射法测金属线胀系数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许巧平

    2015-01-01

    In this paper,we proposed a new method for measuring metal linear expansion coefficient based on the principle of single slit diffraction of light. By using the two blades to make a slit,one blade is fixed on the hob,the other is fixed on the metal bar indirectly. Activity slit width becomes smaller when the metal bar heated to be expanded. And the diffraction fringe width changes when the laser passes through the slit. The elongation of metal bar can be calculated by measuring fringe change.%介绍了一种利用光的衍射原理测量金属线胀系数的新方法。利用两个刀片构成一活动狭缝。其中一刀片固定在铁架台支架上,另一刀片间接固定在金属棒上,当金属棒受热膨胀时,活动狭缝变小。在激光照射下,形成单缝衍射条纹的宽度发生变化,通过测量条纹的变化计算出金属丝的伸长量。

  8. Structural Testing of the Blade Reliability Collaborative Effect of Defect Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hughes, S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Paquette, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-08

    Two 8.3-meter (m) wind turbine blades intentionally constructed with manufacturing flaws were tested to failure at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) south of Boulder, Colorado. Two blades were tested; one blade was manufactured with a fiberglass spar cap and the second blade was manufactured with a carbon fiber spar cap. Test loading primarily consisted of flap fatigue loading of the blades, with one quasi-static ultimate load case applied to the carbon fiber spar cap blade. Results of the test program were intended to provide the full-scale test data needed for validation of model and coupon test results of the effect of defects in wind turbine blade composite materials. Testing was part of the Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) led by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The BRC seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the causes of unexpected blade failures (Paquette 2012), and to develop methods to enable blades to survive to their expected operational lifetime. Recent work in the BRC includes examining and characterizing flaws and defects known to exist in wind turbine blades from manufacturing processes (Riddle et al. 2011). Recent results from reliability databases show that wind turbine rotor blades continue to be a leading contributor to turbine downtime (Paquette 2012).

  9. Study of the velocity distribution influence upon the pressure pulsations in draft tube model of hydro-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, V.; Ustimenko, A.; Kuibin, P.; Litvinov, I.; Shtork, S.

    2016-11-01

    One of the mechanisms of generation of powerful pressure pulsations in the circuit of the turbine is a precessing vortex core, formed behind the runner at the operation points with partial or forced loads, when the flow has significant residual swirl. To study periodic pressure pulsations behind the runner the authors of this paper use approaches of experimental modeling and methods of computational fluid dynamics. The influence of velocity distributions at the output of the hydro turbine runner on pressure pulsations was studied based on analysis of the existing and possible velocity distributions in hydraulic turbines and selection of the distribution in the extended range. Preliminary numerical calculations have showed that the velocity distribution can be modeled without reproduction of the entire geometry of the circuit, using a combination of two blade cascades of the rotor and stator. Experimental verification of numerical results was carried out in an air bench, using the method of 3D-printing for fabrication of the blade cascades and the geometry of the draft tube of hydraulic turbine. Measurements of the velocity field at the input to a draft tube cone and registration of pressure pulsations due to precessing vortex core have allowed building correlations between the velocity distribution character and the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the pulsations.

  10. Numerical simulation of the tip aerodynamics and acoustics test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejero E, F.; Doerffer, P.; Szulc, O.; Cross, J. L.

    2016-04-01

    The application of an efficient flow control system on helicopter rotor blades may lead to improved aerodynamic performance. Recently, our invention of Rod Vortex Generators (RVGs) has been analyzed for helicopter rotor blades in hover with success. As a step forward, the study has been extended to forward flight conditions. For this reason, a validation of the numerical modelling for a reference helicopter rotor (without flow control) is needed. The article presents a study of the flow-field of the AH-1G helicopter rotor in low-, medium- and high-speed forward flight. The CFD code FLOWer from DLR has proven to be a suitable tool for the aerodynamic analysis of the two-bladed rotor without any artificial wake modelling. It solves the URANS equations with LEA (Linear Explicit Algebraic stress) k-ω model using the chimera overlapping grids technique. Validation of the numerical model uses comparison with the detailed flight test data gathered by Cross J. L. and Watts M. E. during the Tip Aerodynamics and Acoustics Test (TAAT) conducted at NASA in 1981. Satisfactory agreements for all speed regimes and a presence of significant flow separation in high-speed forward flight suggest a possible benefit from the future implementation of RVGs. The numerical results based on the URANS approach are presented not only for a popular, low-speed case commonly used in rotorcraft community for CFD codes validation but preferably for medium- and high-speed test conditions that have not been published to date.

  11. Investigation of load reduction for a variable speed, variable pitch, and variable coning wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A two bladed, variable speed and variable pitch wind turbine was modeled using ADAMS{reg_sign} to evaluate load reduction abilities of a variable coning configuration as compared to a teetered rotor, and also to evaluate control methods. The basic dynamic behavior of the variable coning turbine was investigated and compared to the teetered rotor under constant wind conditions as well as turbulent wind conditions. Results indicate the variable coning rotor has larger flap oscillation amplitudes and much lower root flap bending moments than the teetered rotor. Three methods of control were evaluated for turbulent wind simulations. These were a standard IPD control method, a generalized predictive control method, and a bias estimate control method. Each control method was evaluated for both the variable coning configuration and the teetered configuration. The ability of the different control methods to maintain the rotor speed near the desired set point is evaluated from the RMS error of rotor speed. The activity of the control system is evaluated from cycles per second of the blade pitch angle. All three of the methods were found to produce similar results for the variable coning rotor and the teetered rotor, as well as similar results to each other.

  12. Study of the turbulent wake behind a tidal turbine through different numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymour Javaherchi Mozafari, Amir; Aliseda, Alberto; Antheaume, Sylvain; Seydel, Joseph; Polagye, Brian

    2009-11-01

    As developing sources of renewable energy becomes a critical priority, research in this field become more essential. A novel method to produce clean renewable energy is extraction from ocean tides via a turbine. Although energy generation from tidal currents has many similarities to wind, the balance between kinetic and potential energy is a key element in tidal channels that invalidates ``Betz's'' limit. Other practical differences arise from the concentrated nature of tidal resources which impose very close turbine spacing for economic reasons. These, together with the potential influence of geometric constraints imposed by free surface and tidal channel walls, makes the study of the turbulent wake in tidal energy extraction a very important problem in development of this technology from economical and environmental aspects. We will present numerical simulations of turbulent wake behind a well characterized two-bladed turbine using a hierarchy of different models: Actuator Disk, Virtual Blade, the Single and Multiple Reference Frame and Sliding Mesh model with various boundary conditions and inlet velocity profiles. We will compare the results, discuss the differences among these models and the potential for each one to answer questions about optimization of energy extraction and environmental impacts.

  13. Optimization of Savonius turbines using an obstacle shielding the returning blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, M.H.; Janiga, G.; Pap, E.; Thevenin, D. [Lab. of Fluid Dynamics and Technical Flows, University of Magdeburg ' ' Otto von Guericke' ' (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Due to the worldwide energy crisis, research and development activities in the field of renewable energy have been considerably increased in many countries. In Germany, wind energy is becoming particularly important. Although considerable progress has already been achieved, the available technical design is not yet adequate to develop reliable wind energy converters for conditions corresponding to low wind speeds and urban areas. The Savonius turbine appears to be particularly promising for such conditions, but suffers from a poor efficiency. The present study considers a considerably improved design in order to increase the output power of a Savonius turbine with either two or three blades. In addition, the improved design leads to a better self-starting capability. To achieve these objectives, the position of an obstacle shielding the returning blade of the Savonius turbine and possibly leading to a better flow orientation toward the advancing blade is optimized. This automatic optimization is carried out by coupling an in-house optimization library (OPAL) with an industrial flow simulation code (ANSYS-Fluent). The optimization process takes into account the output power coefficient as target function, considers the position and the angle of the shield as optimization parameters, and relies on Evolutionary Algorithms. A considerable improvement of the performance of Savonius turbines can be obtained in this manner, in particular a relative increase of the power output coefficient by more than 27%. It is furthermore demonstrated that the optimized configuration involving a two-blade rotor is better than the three-blade design. (author)

  14. CFD simulation and analysis for Savonius rotors with different blade configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Klimina, Liubov A.

    2014-12-01

    Savonius rotor is seldom applied in wind power generation system due to its lower aerodynamic efficiency. But studies about Savonius rotor still continued since the rotor structure is simpler and the manufacturing cost is lower. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are adopted to compare the output power, torque and power coefficient (Cp) for the conventional two-blade Savonius rotors with three different aspect ratios but the same swept area under the same wind condition to investigate the optimum blade configuration. The rotor with tall and thin configuration is found to have the maximum output power and Cp. The rotor with short and wide configuration has the maximum torque but the minimum Cp. The current result suggests the optimum aspect ratio is 4/1. The influence related to the circular cover plates at two ends of rotor was studied also. It reveals that both the torque and power coefficient for Savonius rotor with end-plates are larger than that without end-plates.

  15. General motors sulfate dispersion experiment: an overview of the wind, temperature, and concentration fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chock, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    A major purpose of the General Motors Sulfate Dispersion Experiment was to study the influence of traffic on the dispersion of pollutants near the roadway. It was found that when the crossroad wind component was low there was upwind dispersion within a few meters of the road. This dispersion was further enhanced when a component of the wind was opposing the traffic in the upwind lanes. The vertical velocity fluctuation (sigma/sub w/) was generally higher in the downwind region than in the upwind region of the road, especially at low wind speeds. Thus, mechanical mixing due to the traffic contributed significantly to the vertical expansion of the plume. Waste heat generated from the traffic also resulted in plume rise near the roadway. Due to the relatively long time scale associated with the buoyancy effect, appreciable plume rise was observed mainly at very low crossroad winds. The implications of the experiment on the Gaussian model are discussed.

  16. Effects of revegetation and new artificial water bodies on the climate of Northeast Mexico City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauregui, E. (Center for Atmospheric Sciences, National Univ. of Mexico (UNAM), Mexico City (Mexico))

    1991-01-01

    An area of 10000 ha of the ex-Lake Texcoco bed on the NE fringes of Mexico City has been protected since about 1975. At present, some 5500 ha of previously almost denuded, salty, semi-arid land have been covered with native grass. According to current thought, the changes in albedo and infrared emission caused by vegetating a previously bare region result in an increase in net radiation absorbed at the surface. This increase in available energy is used for evaporation and, depending on the type and cover of vegetation, to heat the air. The new vegetated cover would result in a moister lower atmosphere with higher equivalent potential temperature. The construction of lakes and ponds has augmented advection of moisture downwind at the airport, which is observed both as an increase of mean dew-joint temperatures as well as a higher occurrence of ground fog. (orig./BWI).

  17. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste...

  18. Fatigue distribution optimization for offshore wind farms using intelligent agent control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Rongyong; Shen, Wen Zhong; Knudsen, Torben

    2012-01-01

    A novel control approach is proposed to optimize the fatigue distribution of wind turbines in a large‐scale offshore wind farm on the basis of an intelligent agent theory. In this approach, each wind turbine is considered to be an intelligent agent. The turbine at the farm boundary communicates...... with its neighbouring downwind turbines and organizes them adaptively into a wind delivery group along the wind direction. The agent attributes and the event structure are designed on the basis of the intelligent agent theory by using the unified modelling language. The control strategy of the intelligent...... coefficient for every wind turbine. The optimization is constrained such that the average fatigue for every turbine is smaller than what would be achieved by conventional dispatch and such that the total power loss of the wind farm is restricted to a few percent of the total power. This intelligent agent...

  19. Locating air quality monitoring station using wind impact area diagram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K V; Verma, P; Devotta, S

    2008-10-01

    In this study a new methodology is suggested to approximate the impact area downwind of an air pollution source, where air quality monitoring can be carried out to capture the maximum pollutant concentration. Hourly wind speed for a given month is grouped in to different wind speed ranges and the distance of pollutant travel is approximated from the average wind speed of that wind speed range. Since change in wind direction causes the impact distance to rotate, its rotation is approximated by the SD of wind direction change. Using this approach, area or region down wind of a source is determined and plotted. The pattern of monthly change of wind is better represented by the new type of diagram as compared to the wind rose diagram.

  20. On the Effects of Imaging Geometry on Multipolarization SAR Features for Oil Spill Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrunes, Stine; Jones, Cathleen E.; Brekke, Camilla; Holt, Benjamin; Espeseth, Martine M.

    2016-08-01

    Polarimetric SAR is increasingly used for oil spill observation. In order to develop reliable methods for oil spill detection and characterization, the sensitivity of these measurements to the imaging geometry, including incidence angle and look direction relative to the wind, must be investigated. In this paper, we study the effects of these parameters on L-band SAR data collected with the UAVSAR instrument over experimental oil spills. The relative look direction is found to have a larger effect on the slick detectability than the incidence angle, and the detectability is better in the downwind direction compared to upwind. The features showing the best slick detectability in the conditions investigated here are the VV intensity, HV intensity, the geometric intensity and the polarization difference. The latter feature shows low dependency on imaging geometry.

  1. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant.

  2. Advanced Materials Laboratory hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, B.; Banda, Z.

    1995-10-01

    The Department of Energy Order 55OO.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the AML. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distance at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the Early Severe Health Effects threshold is 23 meters. The highest emergency classification is a General Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is a nominal area that conforms to DOE boundaries and physical/jurisdictional boundaries such as fence lines and streets.

  3. Increased toxicity of malathion diluted with heavy aromatic naphtha on adult Aedes taeniorhynchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunner, B L; Boobar, L R; Vorgetts, L J; Broski, F H

    1987-03-01

    Field tests of ground ULV application of Cythion diluted with heavy aromatic naphtha (HAN), 1:4 ratio, at 0.45 oz AI/acre resulted in a 96% and 49% mortality of caged adult Aedes taeniorhynchus located 150 and 300 ft downwind. Cythion, 0.45 oz AI/acre produced a 33% mortality at 150 ft and a 21% mortality at 300 ft. This compares with an 8% mortality at 150 ft on a plot treated with HAN only (0.45 oz/acre), and a 6% mortality in an untreated area. The study was repeated on four successive nights, reversing test plots, and the data pooled. Statistical analysis shows that the toxicity of the active ingredient, malathion, is significantly increased with the addition of the diluent, HAN.

  4. Temporal and spatial variations of the Vienna aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, H; Habenreich, T A; Kreiner, I; Norek, C

    1989-07-01

    For several intensive sampling periods the mass concentration, light extinction, light scattering and light absorption coefficients, and the mass size distribution of the aerosol have been determined at up to eleven location in the non-industrial town of Vienna. Obviously, large variations of the measured values have been found. The following factors influenced the aerosol markedly: wind speed, wind direction, increased aerosol production such as by space heating or traffic and resuspension. Most of the variations in aerosol were found to be caused by these factors. A comparison of the mass concentration and light absorption of the aerosol upwind and downwind of Vienna permitted the estimation of locally produced aerosols: about 50% of the mass of the aerosol and 75% of the light-absorbing aerosol appears to be produced locally.

  5. Evapotranspiration and heat fluxes over a patchy forest - studied using modelling and measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Dellwik, Ebba; Boegh, Eva

    Most forests in Europe are too small to fulfill strict fetch requirements associated with idealized flux observations. As a consequence of limited fetch, the flux measured above the canopy will often deviate from the source strength underlying the measurements, i.e. observations of sensible...... and latent heat flux above forest downwind of a forest edge show these fluxes to be larger than the available energy over the forest (Klaassen et al. 2002, Theor. Appl. Climatol. 72, 231-243). Because such flux measurements are very often used for calibration of forest parameters or model constants, further...... using these parameters without a proper interpretation in mesoscale or global circulation models can results in serious bias of estimates of modelled evapotranspiration or heat fluxes from given area. Since representative measurements focused on heterogeneous effects are scarce numerical modelling can...

  6. Effect of climate change on surface ozone over North America, Europe, and East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Jordan L.; Prather, Michael J.; Josse, Beatrice; Naik, Vaishali; Horowitz, Larry W.; Zeng, Guang; Shindell, Drew T.; Faluvegi, Greg

    2016-04-01

    The effect of future climate change on surface ozone over North America, Europe, and East Asia is evaluated using present-day (2000s) and future (2100s) hourly surface ozone simulated by four global models. Future climate follows RCP8.5, while methane and anthropogenic ozone precursors are fixed at year 2000 levels. Climate change shifts the seasonal surface ozone peak to earlier in the year and increases the amplitude of the annual cycle. Increases in mean summertime and high-percentile ozone are generally found in polluted environments, while decreases are found in clean environments. We propose that climate change augments the efficiency of precursor emissions to generate surface ozone in polluted regions, thus reducing precursor export to neighboring downwind locations. Even with constant biogenic emissions, climate change causes the largest ozone increases at high percentiles. In most cases, air quality extreme episodes become larger and contain higher ozone levels relative to the rest of the distribution.

  7. Increased risk of exposure to microcystins in the scum of the filamentous cyanobacterium Aphanizomenon flos-aquae accumulated on the western shoreline of the Curonian Lagoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulčius, Sigitas; Pilkaitytė, Renata; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Kasperovičienė, Jūratė; Ezhova, Elena; Błaszczyk, Agata; Paškauskas, Ričardas

    2015-10-15

    Concentration of toxic cyanobacteria blooms on the downwind shore of high recreational amenity water bodies with largely increases the risk of exposure to cyanotoxins. In this study analysis of phytoplankton structure, cyanotoxin composition and concentration was performed on cyanobacteria scum material, high- and low-density bloom samples in the Curonian Lagoon. We found that the concentration of cyanotoxins in the scum material increased from ∼30 to ∼300-fold compared to bloom samples. In Microcystis aeruginosa dominated samples microcystin-LR was present at the highest concentration, while the dominance of Planktothrix agardhii was associated with the occurrence of dmMC-RR as the major microcystin variant. The toxicological potential of cyanobacterial scums in the Curonian Lagoon is emphasized, and management by removal of these scums is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Short History of Hanford Waste Generation, Storage, and Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gephart, Roy E.

    2003-10-01

    Nine nuclear reactors and four reprocessing plants at Hanford produced nearly two-thirds of the plutonium used in the United States for government purposes . These site operations also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste. Some contaminants were released into the environment, exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Other contaminants were stored. The last reactor was shut down in 1987, and the last reprocessing plant closed in 1990. Most of the human-made radioactivity and about half of the chemicals remaining onsite are kept in underground tanks and surface facilities. The rest exists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Hanford contains about 40% of all the radioactivity that exists across the nuclear weapons complex. Today, environmental restoration activities are under way.

  9. Overview of Megacity Air Pollutant Emissions and Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, C. E.

    2013-05-01

    The urban metabolism that characterizes major cities consumes very large qualities of humanly produced and/or processed food, fuel, water, electricity, construction materials and manufactured goods, as well as, naturally provided sunlight, precipitation and atmospheric oxygen. The resulting urban respiration exhalations add large quantities of trace gas and particulate matter pollutants to urban atmospheres. Key classes of urban primary air pollutants and their sources will be reviewed and important secondary pollutants identified. The impacts of these pollutants on urban and downwind regional inhabitants, ecosystems, and climate will be discussed. Challenges in quantifying the temporally and spatially resolved urban air pollutant emissions and secondary pollutant production rates will be identified and possible measurement strategies evaluated.

  10. Model analysis of the currents and wind waves in the Vistula Lagoon of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubarenko, B. V.; Leitsina, L. V.; Esiukova, E. E.; Kurennoy, D. N.

    2012-11-01

    This paper considers the results of the numerical simulation of the steady currents and waves field structures in the Vistula Lagoon under constant wind forcing. The currents' structure is essentially 3-dimensional. The direction of the near-shore drift is determined by the wind and shore orientation, but the currents involve two layers in the deeper part of the basin: the upper layer downwind current and the upwind compensative current in the underlying layer. The wind waves depend upon the wind speed, fetch, and depth until the wind speed is less than 6-8 m/s. As the wind increases, the fetch's dependence disappears. The wind height depends only on the wind's magnitude, and, under stormy conditions (when the wind's speed exceeds 15 m/s), the waves are limited by the water depth alone.

  11. Role of volcanic dust in the atmospheric transport and deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracquadanio, Milena; Dinelli, Enrico; Trombini, Claudio

    2003-12-01

    The role of volcanic ash as scavenger of atmospheric pollutants, in their transport and final deposition to the ground is examined. Attention is focused on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and on particulate mercury (Hgp). The ash-fall deposits studied belong to the 2001 and 2002 eruptive activity of Mount Etna, Southern Italy, and were investigated at three (2001) and four (2002) sites downwind of the major tephra dispersal pattern. The dry deposition of mercury and PAHs was determined, and, in particular, a downward flux to the ground of PAHs (approximately 7.29 microg m(-2) per day) and mercury (750 ng m(-2) per day) was estimated in Catania from October 26 to October 28, 2002. Finally, evidence on the anthropogenic origin of PAHs scavenged from the troposphere by volcanic ash is supported by the analysis of PAH compositions in granulometrically homogeneous fractions.

  12. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  13. Ammonia emissions from seabird colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackall, Trevor D.; Wilson, Linda J.; Theobald, Mark R.; Milford, Celia; Nemitz, Eiko; Bull, Jennifer; Bacon, Philip J.; Hamer, Keith C.; Wanless, Sarah; Sutton, Mark A.

    2007-05-01

    Ammonia emissions were measured from two entire seabird colonies with contrasting species assemblages, to ascertain the ammonia volatilisation potentials among seabird species in relation to their nesting behaviour. Emissions were calculated from downwind plume measurements of ammonia concentration using both inverse dispersion and tracer ratio methods. Measured colony emissions ranged 1-90 kg NH3 hour-1, and equated to 16 and 36% volatilization of excreted nitrogen for colonies dominated by ground/burrow nesting and bare rock nesting birds, respectively. The results were applied in a bioenergetics model with a global seabird database. Seabird colonies are found to represent the largest point sources of ammonia globally (up to ~6 Gg NH3 colony-1 year-1). Moreover the largest emissions occur mainly in remote environments with otherwise low NH3 emissions. These ammonia ``hot spots'' explain significant perturbations of the nitrogen cycle in these regions and add ~20% to oceanic ammonia emissions south of latitude 45°S.

  14. Effect of Vapor Pressure Scheme on Multiday Evolution of SOA in an Explicit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Emmons, L. K.; Tyndall, G. S.; Valorso, R.

    2011-12-01

    Recent modeling of the evolution of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) has led to the critically important prediction that SOA mass continues to increase for several days after emission of primary pollutants. This growth of organic aerosol in dispersing plumes originating from urban point sources has direct implications for regional aerosol radiative forcing. We investigate the robustness of predicted SOA mass growth downwind of Mexico City in the model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), by assessing its sensitivity to the choice of vapor pressure prediction scheme. We also explore the implications for multi-day SOA mass growth of glassification / solidification of SOA constituents during aging. Finally we use output from the MOZART-4 chemical transport model to evaluate our results in the regional and global context.

  15. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-24

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 × 36 m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications.

  16. A high-resolution multi-proxy record of late Cenozoic environment change from central Taklimakan Desert, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Taklimakan Desert in the Tarim Basin is the largest desert in Central Asia, and is regarded as one of the main dust sources to the Northern Hemisphere. Late Cenozoic sedimentary sequences with intercalated in-situ aeolian dune sands in this area preserve direct evidence for the Asian desertification. Herein, we report a high-resolution multi-proxy climatic record from the precise magnetostratigraphic dated Hongbaishan section in the central Taklimakan Desert. Our results show that a fundamental climate change, characterized by significant cooling, enhanced aridity, and intensified atmospheric circulation, occurred at 2.8 Ma. Good correlations between climate records in the dust sources and downwind areas suggest a broadly consistent climate evolution of northwestern China during the late Cenozoic, which is probably driven by the uplift of the Tibet Plateau and the Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  17. Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seinfeld, John H. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-08-06

    This project addressed the following research need in the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Program Plan: "Measurements downwind of urban sources of aerosol particles and precursor gases have shown that the mass concentration of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be several-fold greater than can be explained on the basis of current model calculations using observed precursor concentrations. ASR will continue conducting laboratory experiments on both gas-phase and aqueous-phase SOA formation to characterize the particle formation and the organic gases that react to form new organic aerosol material on aerosol seeds. ASR will use these experiments to guide the development of comprehensive chemical mechanisms... to guide the development of parameterizations that are simple enough to be applied to aerosol life cycle models."

  18. Modeling huddling penguins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Francois; Waters, Aaron; Kim, Arnold

    2012-11-01

    We present a model of the behavior of huddling penguins. We focus on the densest huddles, formed during storms, where penguins may be considered to leave no openings in the interior of the huddle. We compute a temperature distribution around the huddle, accounting for the effects of the wind. The dynamics of the huddle are based on an iterative process where the most exposed penguin relocates to the most sheltered location available. We study the effects of wind strength, number of penguins, and random perturbations. We find that our model produces huddles that agree qualitatively with actual huddles in terms of shape and downwind displacement. Moreover, the exposure to the wind appears to be shared nearly equally among penguins, despite the fact that our model assumes only that each penguin aims to minimize its own heat loss.

  19. Simulation of rotor aerodynamics : use of the actuator surface method to model the MEXICO wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, S.P.; Watters, C.S.; Masson, C. [Ecole de Technologie Superieure, Montreal, PQ (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed the model rotor experiments under controlled conditions (MEXICO) project. The experiments are being conducted in the largest wind tunnel in Europe in order to determine optimal yaw and pitch angles for wind turbines as well as to test the performance of blade aerodynamic profiles and rotor instrumentation. Data obtained during the experiments are used to determine velocity component points in order to develop a greater understanding of wind turbine aerodynamics and improve calculation methods. Blade element momentum (BEM) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and vortex wake codes are used in the program, which includes an actuator surface method embedded in a customized CFD finite element method. To date, the project has validated various models with experimental data, and mapped the induced velocities upwind and downwind from rotors. Further research is being conducted to compare experimental results with other results in the literature related to blade loading, root bending moments, and detailed flow characteristics. Charts of experimental results were included. tabs., figs.

  20. Lyman-alpha observations in the vicinity of Saturn with Copernicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, E.; Cazes, S.; Emerich, C.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Owen, T.

    1980-01-01

    For the first time, high-resolution Ly-alpha observations of the Saturn vicinity were completed with the Princeton spectrometer on board the Copernicus satellite. They showed that near a minimum solar activity the emissions related to several sources are 250 + or - 50 rayleighs for the interplanetary medium in a near-downwind direction, less than 100 rayleighs for the rings, 200 + or - 100 rayleighs for a torus linked to the Titan orbit, and 1400 + or - 450 rayleighs for the disk of Saturn. These results induce some constraints through the corresponding theoretical evaluations: the B ring as the primary source of the atoms for the ring emissions; an efficient production mechanism for hydrogen atoms in the Titan torus; and a slightly larger eddy diffusion coefficient in the Saturn atmosphere than in the Jupiter atmosphere near solar minimum.

  1. Santa Ana Winds of Southern California: Their climatology, extremes, and behavior spanning six and a half decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Morales, Janin; Gershunov, Alexander; Theiss, Jurgen; Li, Haiqin; Cayan, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Santa Ana Winds (SAWs) are an integral feature of the regional climate of Southern California/Northern Baja California region, but their climate-scale behavior is poorly understood. In the present work, we identify SAWs in mesoscale dynamical downscaling of a global reanalysis from 1948 to 2012. Model winds are validated with anemometer observations. SAWs exhibit an organized pattern with strongest easterly winds on westward facing downwind slopes and muted magnitudes at sea and over desert lowlands. We construct hourly local and regional SAW indices and analyze elements of their behavior on daily, annual, and multidecadal timescales. SAWs occurrences peak in winter, but some of the strongest winds have occurred in fall. Finally, we observe that SAW intensity is influenced by prominent large-scale low-frequency modes of climate variability rooted in the tropical and north Pacific ocean-atmosphere system.

  2. Contribution of regional-scale fire events to ozone and PM2.5 air quality estimated by photochemical modeling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. R.; Woody, M. C.; Tonnesen, G. S.; Hutzell, W.; Pye, H. O. T.; Beaver, M. R.; Pouliot, G.; Pierce, T.

    2016-09-01

    Two specific fires from 2011 are tracked for local to regional scale contribution to ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) using a freely available regulatory modeling system that includes the BlueSky wildland fire emissions tool, Spare Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model, Weather and Research Forecasting (WRF) meteorological model, and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) photochemical grid model. The modeling system was applied to track the contribution from a wildfire (Wallow) and prescribed fire (Flint Hills) using both source sensitivity and source apportionment approaches. The model estimated fire contribution to primary and secondary pollutants are comparable using source sensitivity (brute-force zero out) and source apportionment (Integrated Source Apportionment Method) approaches. Model estimated O3 enhancement relative to CO is similar to values reported in literature indicating the modeling system captures the range of O3 inhibition possible near fires and O3 production both near the fire and downwind. O3 and peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) are formed in the fire plume and transported downwind along with highly reactive VOC species such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde that are both emitted by the fire and rapidly produced in the fire plume by VOC oxidation reactions. PAN and aldehydes contribute to continued downwind O3 production. The transport and thermal decomposition of PAN to nitrogen oxides (NOX) enables O3 production in areas limited by NOX availability and the photolysis of aldehydes to produce free radicals (HOX) causes increased O3 production in NOX rich areas. The modeling system tends to overestimate hourly surface O3 at routine rural monitors in close proximity to the fires when the model predicts elevated fire impacts on O3 and Hazard Mapping System (HMS) data indicates possible fire impact. A sensitivity simulation in which solar radiation and photolysis rates were more aggressively attenuated by aerosol in the plume

  3. Using public relations strategies to prompt populations at risk to seek health information: the Hanford Community Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory D; Smith, Stephen M; Turcotte, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The Hanford Community Health Project (HCHP) addressed health concerns among "downwinders" exposed to releases of radioactive iodine (I-131) from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the 1940s and 1950s. After developing educational materials and conducting initial outreach, HCHP had to decide whether to apply its limited resources to an advertising or public relations approach. The decision to apply public relations strategies was effective in driving awareness of the risk communication message at the community level, reinvigorating the affected community, and ultimately increasing the number of people who sought information about their risk of exposure and related health issues. HCHP used a series of communication tools to reach out to local and regional media, medical and health professionals, and community organizations. The campaign was successful in increasing the number of unique visitors to HCHP Web site and educating and activating the medical community around the releases of I-131 and patient care choices.

  4. Escoamento atmosférico no Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA: parte II - ensaios no túnel de vento Atmospheric flow at the Alcantara Lauching Center (ALC: part II - experiments at a wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Trindade Roballo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se o escoamento atmosférico no Centro de Lançamento de Alcântara (CLA, localizado junto a uma falésia de 50 m de altura, através de simulações em túnel de vento (TV do CTA/ITA, na escala geométrica 1:1000, com a realização de quatro diferentes ensaios. No TV, os ensaios com degraus de 90° e de 70°, correspondentes à falésia, ambos sem e com simulação de rugosidade adicional a sotavento deles, mostraram: (i perfeita simulação do perfil de vento oceânico (α = 0,15 sobre a posição do degrau representativo da falésia, utilizando pista de tapete, a montante, para prover a rugosidade necessária; (ii número de Reynolds máximo possível com comprimento característico igual à altura do degrau neste TV foi 6,52.10(4, enquanto no CLA é da ordem de 3.10(7, razão pela qual é necessário um túnel mais potente; (iii os expoentes mais próximos dos observados em Roballo e Fisch (2008 foram obtidos com um degrau reto, sem nenhum revestimento especial no piso normal do túnel, exceto o tapete a montante do degrau; (iv a fixação de cubos a jusante do degrau para representar a vegetação resultou em rugosidades bem maiores que as observadas sobre a vegetação do CLA, possivelmente simulando situações urbanas ou industriais; (v simulação das características típicas do escoamento após o degrau, tais como o descolamento, a formação de bolha de circulação e nova aderência; (vi uso de TVs mais potentes certamente permitirá a simulação da situação atmosférica do CLA.The atmospheric flow at the Alcantara Launching Center (ALC, which is localized near a 50 m cliff, was studied through analysis of wind tunnel (WT experiments, using a 1:1000 geometric scale and floor level configurations to represent the cliff and its downwind roughness. The WT experiments, with 90° and 70° steps representing the cliff, both with and without additional downwind roughness, did show: (i a perfect simulation of the ocean wind

  5. Ensemble-based simultaneous emission estimates and improved forecast of radioactive pollution from nuclear power plant accidents: application to ETEX tracer experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X L; Li, Q B; Su, G F; Yuan, M Q

    2015-04-01

    The accidental release of radioactive materials from nuclear power plant leads to radioactive pollution. We apply an augmented ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with a chemical transport model to jointly estimate the emissions of Perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), a tracer substitute for radionuclides, from a point source during the European Tracer Experiment, and to improve the forecast of its dispersion downwind. We perturb wind fields to account for meteorological uncertainties. We expand the state vector of PMCH concentrations through continuously adding an a priori emission rate for each succeeding assimilation cycle. We adopt a time-correlated red noise to simulate the temporal emission fluctuation. The improved EnKF system rapidly updates (and reduces) the excessively large initial first-guess emissions, thereby significantly improves subsequent forecasts (r = 0.83, p 80% average reduction of the normalized mean square error).

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF HEAVY METALS ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION FOR ASSESSMENT OF URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY IN THE BOLOGNA CITY (ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Vittori Antisari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The suburban area of Bologna city in southeast portion of Po Valley (Northern Italy is characterized by high emission from industrial, urban, agriculture and traffic sources. The presence of an urban waste incinerator get inhabitants to require answers about impact of its emissions on the environmental quality related to human health. The concentrations of some pollutants (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, V and Zn were determined in topsoil, plants and mosses tissues sampled in sites selected according to different falling out conditions, due to the incinerator and other sources of atmospheric emissions that affect the monitoring area. No correlation was found between metal content and the distance of the incinerator plant. The pollution load index (PLI calculated for soil and moss indicated a low environmental pollution, while highest values in sites downwind of incinerator and in craft area indicate a moderate pollution.

  7. The impact of flue gas cleaning technologies in coal-fired power plants on the CCN distribution and cloud properties in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, M.; Vogel, B.; Junkermann, W.; Brachert, L.; Schaber, K.

    2013-05-01

    Gas-cleaning technologies used in modern coal-fired power plants cause an unintended nucleation of H2SO4 aerosol droplets during the cleaning process. As a result, high concentrations of ultra-fine aerosol droplets are emitted into the atmosphere. In this study, the impact of these emissions on the atmospheric aerosol distribution, on the cloud condensation nuclei number concentration, and consequently on cloud properties is investigated. Therefore, a sophisticated modeling framework is used combining regional simulations of the atmospheric aerosol distribution and its impact on cloud properties with detailed process simulations of the nucleation during the cleaning process inside the power plant. Furthermore, the simulated aerosol size distributions downwind of the coal-fired power plants are compared with airborne aerosol measurements performed inside the plumes.

  8. Lidar-based wake tracking for closed-loop wind farm control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raach, Steffen; Schlipf, David; Cheng, Po Wen

    2016-09-01

    This work presents two advancements towards closed-loop wake redirecting of a wind turbine. First, a model-based estimation approach is presented which uses a nacelle-based lidar system facing downwind to obtain information about the wake. A reduced order wake model is described which is then used in the estimation to track the wake. The tracking is demonstrated with lidar measurement data from an offshore campaign and with simulated lidar data from a SOWFA simulation. Second, a controller for closed-loop wake steering is presented. It uses the wake tracking information to set the yaw actuator of the wind turbine to redirect the wake to a desired position. Altogether, this paper aims to present the concept of closed-loop wake redirecting and gives a possible solution to it.

  9. Predictive wind turbine simulation with an adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for moving boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiterding, Ralf; Wood, Stephen L.

    2016-09-01

    Operating horizontal axis wind turbines create large-scale turbulent wake structures that affect the power output of downwind turbines considerably. The computational prediction of this phenomenon is challenging as efficient low dissipation schemes are necessary that represent the vorticity production by the moving structures accurately and that are able to transport wakes without significant artificial decay over distances of several rotor diameters. We have developed a parallel adaptive lattice Boltzmann method for large eddy simulation of turbulent weakly compressible flows with embedded moving structures that considers these requirements rather naturally and enables first principle simulations of wake-turbine interaction phenomena at reasonable computational costs. The paper describes the employed computational techniques and presents validation simulations for the Mexnext benchmark experiments as well as simulations of the wake propagation in the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWIFT) array consisting of three Vestas V27 turbines in triangular arrangement.

  10. Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed...... in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar....... The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be noted as a limitation of the model. As the general conclusion of the study, it was stated that the lidars can be used in complex...

  11. Flow distortion at a dense forest edge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Bingöl, Ferhat; Mann, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The flow near tall forest edges is complex, yet poorly described. A field experiment using two meteorological masts equipped with sonic anemometers and a horizontally staring lidar was performed upwind and downwind of the interface between an open flat farmland and a tall (hc = 24 m) beech forest......, relative to the measurements upwind of the edge. The lidar data taken at several positions between the masts at 1.25hc show that the minimum wind speed occurred just upwind of the edge. At the 1.25hc level, at the forest mast, the momentum flux (\\documentclass....... Data obtained during near‐neutral conditions are presented for the wind direction towards the forest. Results from a high leaf area index period are compared with those from a low leaf area index period. For both periods, the wind speed increased above the forest and decreased within the forest...

  12. How Forest Inhomogeneities Affect the Edge Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreault, Louis-Étienne; Dupont, Sylvain; Bechmann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    is investigated using large-eddy simulation. The three-dimensional forest structure is prescribed in the model using high resolution helicopter-based lidar scans. After evaluating the simulation against wind measurements upwind and downwind of the forest leading edge, the flow dynamics are compared between......Most of our knowledge on forest-edge flows comes from numerical and wind-tunnel experiments where canopies are horizontally homogeneous. To investigate the impact of tree-scale heterogeneities (>1 m) on the edge-flow dynamics, the flow in an inhomogeneous forest edge on Falster island in Denmark...... the scanned forest and an equivalent homogeneous forest. The simulations reveal that forest inhomogeneities facilitate flow penetration into the canopy from the edge, inducing important dispersive fluxes in the edge region as a consequence of the flow spatial variability. Further downstream from the edge...

  13. The OML-SprayDrift model for predicting pesticide drift and deposition from ground boom sprayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løfstrøm, Per; Bruus, Marianne; Andersen, Helle Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    at increasing distances. The vertical concentration profile downwind has a maximum just above the ground in our observations and calculations. The model accounts for the meteorological conditions, droplet ejection velocity and size spectrum. Model validation led to an R2 value of 0.78, and 91% of the calculated......In order to predict the exposure of hedgerows and other neighboring biotopes to pesticides from field-spray applications, an existing Gaussian atmospheric dispersion and deposition model was developed to model the changes in droplet size due to evaporation affecting the deposition velocity....... The Gaussian tilting plume principle was applied inside the stayed track. The model was developed on one set of field experiments using a flat-fan nozzle and validated against another set of field experiments using an air-induction nozzle. The vertical spray-drift profile was measured using hair curlers...

  14. Bioindication of air pollution effects near a copper smelter in Brazil using mango trees and soil microbiological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpp, Andreas; Hintemann, Therese; Lima, Josanídia Santana; Kandeler, Ellen

    2003-01-01

    A field study near the copper smelter of a large industrial complex examined air pollution effects on vegetation and soil parameters in Camaçari (northeast Brazil). Close to the smelter, soil pH-value was lower and total acidity as well as organic carbon contents were higher compared with a site far from the source and two reference sites. The acidification of top soil particularly and the drastically enhanced plant-available copper concentrations were caused by atmospheric deposition. High sulphur and copper deposition significantly reduced microbial biomass and altered functional diversity of soil microorganisms (arylsulphatase and xylanase). Large accumulations of sulphur, arsenic and copper were detected in mango leaves (Mangifera indica) growing downwind from the smelter suggesting potential food chain-mediated risk.

  15. Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864, Hazards assessment document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banda, Z.; Wood, C.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy Order 5500.3A requires facility-specific hazards assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. This hazards assessment document describes the chemical and radiological hazards associated with the Glass Formulation and Fabrication Laboratory, Building 864. The entire inventory was screened according to the potential airborne impact to onsite and offsite individuals. The air dispersion model, ALOHA, estimated pollutant concentrations downwind from the source of a release, taking into consideration the toxicological and physical characteristics of the release site, the atmospheric conditions, and the circumstances of the release. The greatest distances at which a postulated facility event will produce consequences exceeding the ERPG-2 threshold is 96 meters. The highest emergency classification is a Site Area Emergency. The Emergency Planning Zone is 100 meters.

  16. 'Is Ash Falling?', an online ashfall reporting tool in support of improved ashfall warnings and investigations of ashfall processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kristi; Snedigar, Seth; Cameron, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    The primary volcano hazard in Alaska is airborne ash, which endangers aircraft flying the busy North Pacific air routes and consequently affects global commerce. Downwind ashfall is also a significant threat to commerce, transportation and day-to-day activities in nearby Alaska communities. A web-enabled database, "Is Ash Falling?" has been developed to collect ashfall observations and encourage sample collections from the public during eruptions, enabling volcano observatory staff to concentrate on eruption response. Knowing the locations of filed ashfall reports improves public ashfall warnings and forecasts by providing on-the-ground checks for ash dispersion and fallout computer models and satellite imagery interpretation. Reports of ashfall are shared with emergency management agencies and the wider public. These reports also give scientists a more complete record of the amount, duration and other conditions of ashfall.

  17. Atmospheric microbiology in the northern Caribbean during African dust events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Garrison, V.H.; Lisle, J.T.; Borden, T.C.; Shinn, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Between July 2000 and August 2001 forty-three air samples were collected in the northern Caribbean: Twenty-six in the US Virgin Islands, and 17 samples aboard ship during two 1-week cruises. Samples were collected during African dust events and non-dust conditions and screened for the presence of culturable bacteria and fungi. A total of 3,652 liters of air were collected during non-dust conditions, with 19 bacteria and 28 fungi being recovered. During dust conditions a total of 2,369 liters of air were screened resulting in the recovery of 171 bacteria and 76 fungi. A statistically significant difference was found between the two data sets. These results support previous African dust research and further demonstrate that dust particles can serve as a vessel for the global dispersion of bacteria and fungi. Dustborne microorganisms may play a significant role in the ecology and health of downwind ecosystems.

  18. Computation of Optimal Monotonicity Preserving General Linear Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Ketcheson, David I.

    2009-07-01

    Monotonicity preserving numerical methods for ordinary differential equations prevent the growth of propagated errors and preserve convex boundedness properties of the solution. We formulate the problem of finding optimal monotonicity preserving general linear methods for linear autonomous equations, and propose an efficient algorithm for its solution. This algorithm reliably finds optimal methods even among classes involving very high order accuracy and that use many steps and/or stages. The optimality of some recently proposed methods is verified, and many more efficient methods are found. We use similar algorithms to find optimal strong stability preserving linear multistep methods of both explicit and implicit type, including methods for hyperbolic PDEs that use downwind-biased operators.

  19. Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, A.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-11-01

    We present a numerical study aimed at quantifying the effects of concentration-dependent density on the spread of a seeping plume of CO{sub 2} into the atmosphere such as could arise from a leaking geologic carbon sequestration site. Results of numerical models can be used to supplement field monitoring estimates of CO{sub 2} seepage flux by modelling transport and dispersion between the source emission and concentration-measurement points. We focus on modelling CO{sub 2} seepage dispersion over relatively short distances where density effects are likely to be important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with density dependence in the gravity term. Results for a two-dimensional system show that a density dependence emerges at higher fluxes than prior estimates. A universal scaling relation is derived that allows estimation of the flux from concentrations measured downwind and vice versa.

  20. Instrumentation and model development for the Proven 2.2 kW wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lloyd, S.H.; Infield, D.G. [Loughborough University (United Kingdom). Dept. of Electronic and Electrical Engineering

    1996-07-01

    This paper gives details of the work done during the first phase of a 3-year project, the aims of which are to design, develop and build a controller for optimum load matching a small variable speed wind turbine. The Proven (WT2200) 2.2kW turbine is a three bladed passive pitching and coning turbine which operates downwind with passive yawning and uses a permanent magnet three phase generator. The control of the rotor speed will result in a maximisation of the energy yield and will limit transient loads on the rotor and drive train. To design a controller for the load the characteristics of the turbine generator and drive train must first be determined and a mathematical model derived. It is envisaged that the controller will also allow export of electricity to the local grid through a rectifier/inverter stage. A simple model is presented here and comparisons made with experimental results. (author)