WorldWideScience

Sample records for twelve invited lectures

  1. Twelve tips for effective lecturing in a PBL curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Alam Sher; Malik, Rukhsana Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Retaining lectures in problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum places new demands on lecturers. In addition to subject knowledge, the lecturers must know the overall aims of the lectures, their context in the course, their relation to the subsequent examinations and the underlying educational philosophy. Aim of this communication is to propose ways that will transform the traditional didactic lectures into PBL-compliant teaching/learning sessions. Insights from the self-experience and that of colleagues and the feedback from students are synthesised with current literature regarding best teaching practices to develop these tips. These tips, ranging from involving students in the learning process to a routine practice of reflection after delivering a lecture, highlight methods of preparing and delivering lectures that follow the educational philosophy underpinning the PBL approach. We believe that these tips by advancing the driving force for meaningful learning will transform the didactic lectures of traditional curriculum to interactive sessions that would enhance understanding, augment critical thinking and promote self-directed learning among students.

  2. Invited series of talks and lectures at Yale University (USA) on Rolf Nordahl's research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Rolf Nordahl , Medialogy in Copenhagen, will be giving an invited series of lectures at Yale University, Connecticut, USA in the last week of March, 2010. Rolf has been invited to give talks to Professors, research fellows, Ph.D.'s and graduate students of Yale University (USA), on his research...... in several topics. The lectures will address his innovative experiments on using methods from Film and Filmsound to inform research in Computer Games and Virtual Reality applications with real-life examples from the Natural Interactive Walking (NIW) project - a EU-funded project headed at Aalborg University...

  3. Prof. Chen Zhiming Invited to Lecture at 2006 International Congress of Mathematicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Chen Zhiming, a mathematician of the CAS Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS), has been invited to make a 45-minute lecture on his work in the field of numerical analysis and scientific computing at the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) in Madrid,in August 2006.

  4. EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

    2007-05-01

    The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The

  5. Invited Lectures from a Spatial Orientation Symposium in Honor of Frederick Guedry, Day 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-10

    errors that are common in spoken but not written expression. Therefore, square brackets -- “[ ]” -- are included in this report to denote our...insertion of any significant words that were not spoken by the lecturers but were inserted by us to help the reader’s understanding. Examples of this...distance [and focus] on a firm, flat surface, and then start moving around, they’ll get rid of that stretch reflex feedback and that helps some of them

  6. Invitation

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    « DEUTSCHE MESSE » BY FRANZ SCHUBERT PERFORMED BY THE « WIENER SCHUBERTBUND » On the occasion of the Organization's Fiftieth Anniversary, Mr Hans-Walter Gérard Schober, Honorary Consul-General of Austria in Geneva, is pleased to invite all those working at CERN to a mass at which Franz Schubert's German Mass will be sung by the Vienna Schubert Choral Society. Sunday, 17 October 2004 at 11 a.m., Saint Joseph's Catholic Church, Place des Eaux-Vives, 1207 Geneva (the church has about 900 seats).

  7. Invitation

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Monday, 11 October Gala-Concert to celebrate 50 years of CERN Jack Liebeck (violin) and Katya Apekisheva (piano) Works by C. Debussy, S. Prokofiev, and L. van Beethoven CERN, Main Auditorium, 20:00 For CERN staff and their families With the assistance of PPARC (UK) Free tickets available at the CERN Press Office (50-1-048). Maximum four tickets per person. For more information on the performers, see: http://www.jackliebeck.com/CERN50/JL.htm http://www.jackliebeck.com/CERN50/KA.htm The "WIENER SCHUBERTBUND" celebrates CERN's 50th "DEUTSCHE MESSE" By Franz Schubert performed by the "WIENER SCHUBERTBUND" On the occasion of the Organization's Fiftieth Anniversary, Mr Hans-Walter Gérard Schober, Honorary Consul-General of Austria in Geneva, is pleased to invite all those working at CERN to a mass at which Franz Schubert's German Mass will be sung by the Vienna Schubert Choral Society. This renown men's choir, founded in 1863. Eminent composers, including Richard Strauss, Wilhelm Kinzel, a...

  8. Twelve lectures on structural dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Preumont, André

    2013-01-01

    This text addresses the modeling of vibrating systems with the perspective of finding the model of minimum complexity which accounts for the physics of the phenomena at play. The first half of the book (Ch.1-6) deals with the dynamics of discrete and continuous mechanical systems; the classical approach emphasizes the use of Lagrange's equations. The second half of the book (Ch.7-12) deals with more advanced topics, rarely encountered in the existing literature: seismic excitation, random vibration (including fatigue), rotor dynamics, vibration isolation and dynamic vibration absorbers; the final chapter is an introduction to active control of vibrations. The first part of this text may be used as a one semester course for 3rd year students in Mechanical, Aerospace or Civil Engineering. The second part of the text is intended for graduate classes. A set of problems is provided at the end of every chapter. The author has a 35 years experience in various aspects of Structural dynamics, both in industry (nuclea...

  9. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  10. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  11. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date. The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  12. The Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, S. Raj

    2011-01-01

    Academic lectures for the purpose of instruction maintain an important presence in most colleges and universities worldwide. This chapter examines the current state of the lecture and how learning sciences research can inform the most effective use of this method. The author presents evidence that the lecture can be an effective element of…

  13. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  14. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service and the Pensioners Association are pleased to invite CERN pensioners to a series of lectures given by professors and specialists from the Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva on the following topic: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The lectures will take place in the Main CERN Auditorium (Building 60) from 2.30 p.m. to 4.30 p.m. on the following dates: Wednesday 12 November 2008: Assessing the extent of brain ageing Dr Dina ZEKRY Friday 12 December 2008: Can memory decline be prevented? Pr Jean-Pierre MICHEL Thursday 15 January 2009: Diagnosing and treating Alzheimer’s disease Pr Gabriel GOLD Wednesday 25 February 2009: What is the brain reserve? Speaker’s name to be announced at a later date The lectures will be given in French, with transparencies in English, and will be followed by a wide-ranging debate with the participants. CERN Medical Service - Pensioners Association - CERN-ESO (GAC-EPA)

  15. CAS paleoichthyologist gives Artedi Lecture in Sweden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Prof. ZHANG Miman (CHANG Mee-mann), a CAS Member from the CAS Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, was invited to give a talk at the Artedi Lectures at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden, on 5 December, 2008.

  16. Sacler lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Bernstein, J

    1995-01-01

    The series of three lectures given at Tel-Aviv University in 1992: 1. Tensor categories. 2. Quantum groups. 3. Topological (quantum) field theories. Published as the preprint IAS 897-92 of Tel-Aviv University and The Mortimer and Raymond Sacler Institute of Advanced Studies.

  17. [Surgical frontal lecture. Still important for teaching students?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierlemann, A; Baur, J; Germer, C T

    2013-10-01

    In times of manifold digital learning resources open to public access lectures in surgery still play a major role in medical training. It is a platform for discussion with the medical teacher and provides the opportunity to create a vivid learning experience by showing live operations via video streaming and inviting patients to the lectures. When then change in paradigm is achieved from pure knowledge transfer to cross-linkage of knowledge, the surgical lecture will be a major future keystone in medical education, where the lecturer can reach the students with his own passion for the field of expertise and get them interested in surgery.

  18. Educational technology and the traditional lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Jacobs

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available I was recently invited to give a lecture at the opening of a new high-technology lecture theatre at Leeds Metropolitan University. It is one of the best examples of its kind I have seen. Its impressive features include hi-fi surround sound, an enormous back-projected screen giving superb picture quality from either a VCR or directly from a computer for live demonstrations, online facilities, the latest remote-control slide-projection equipment, complete lecturer's control panel, and several nice touches such as automatic dimming of the auditorium lights when Play is pressed on any of the hidden video playback machines. The overhead projectors and their screens are of the best quality and correctly positioned for the clearest possible display. There are also video-link facilities for spill-over into a secondary lecture theatre which itself is well fitted out in presentational equipment.

  19. The Twelve Hotel, Barna : Video

    OpenAIRE

    Irish Food Channel

    2014-01-01

    Fergus O'Halloran, Managing Director of The Twelve Hotel in Barna in County Galway, talks about his philosophy in running this unique boutique hotel. Reproduced with kind permission from John & Sally McKenna. 3.35 mins

  20. Summary Lecture

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. O. Stenflo

    2000-09-01

    This summary lecture makes no attempt to summarize what was actually said at the meeting, since this is well covered by the other contributors. Instead I have structured my presentation in three parts: First I try to demonstrate why the Sun is unique by comparing it with laboratory plasmas. This is followed by some personal reminiscences that go back a significant fraction of the century. I conclude in the form of a poem about this memorable conference in honor of the centennial anniversary of the Kodaikanal Observatory.

  1. Twelve tips for getting your manuscript published.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A

    2016-01-01

    The author shares twelve practical tips on how to navigate the process of getting a manuscript published. These tips, which apply to all fields of academic writing, advise that during the initial preparation phase authors should: (1) plan early to get it out the door; (2) address authorship and writing group expectations up front; (3) maintain control of the writing; (4) ensure complete reporting; (5) use electronic reference management software; (6) polish carefully before they submit; (7) select the right journal; and (8) follow journal instructions precisely. Rejection after the first submission is likely, and when this occurs authors should (9) get it back out the door quickly, but first (10) take seriously all reviewer and editor suggestions. Finally, when the invitation comes to revise and resubmit, authors should (11) respond carefully to every reviewer suggestion, even if they disagree, and (12) get input from others as they revise. The author also shares detailed suggestions on the creation of effective tables and figures, and on how to respond to reviewer critiques.

  2. Revisioning Invitational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, John M.

    This paper examines some of the most recent conceptual developments in invitational education. Using some of the new ideas presented in Inviting School Success, Second Edition (Purkey and Novak, in press), a more expansive definition and application of invitational education is offered. New concepts such as theory of practice, stance, and…

  3. Industry Lecture 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010.......Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010....

  4. Industry Lecture 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010.......Sammendrag af "Industry Lecture", Norsk Kjemisk Selskap, Universitetet i Oslo, givet 15/10 2010....

  5. Attention Breaks in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, A. H.; Percival, F.

    1976-01-01

    Describes research into student attention patterns during lectures that suggests that student attention declines steadily during a lecture, and that the rate of decrease is dependent upon several variables including subject difficulty. (MLH)

  6. Collide@CERN - public lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to a public lecture by Gilles Jobin, first winner of the Collide@CERN Geneva Dance and Performance Artist-in-residence Prize, and his CERN inspiration partner, Joao Pequenao. They will present their work in dance and science at the Globe of Science and Innovation on Wednesday, 23 May 2012 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6.30 p.m.).   
                                                  Programme 19:00 Opening address by - Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, - Ariane Koek...

  7. TransLectures

    OpenAIRE

    Silvestre Cerdà, Joan Albert; Del Agua Teba, Miguel Angel; Garcés Díaz-Munío, Gonzalo Vicente; GASCÓ MORA, GUILLEM; Giménez Pastor, Adrián; Martínez-Villaronga, Adrià Agustí; Pérez González de Martos, Alejandro Manuel; Sánchez-Cortina, Isaías; Serrano Martínez-Santos, Nicolás; Spencer, Rachel Nadine; Valor Miró, Juan Daniel; Andrés Ferrer, Jesús; Civera Saiz, Jorge; Sanchis Navarro, José Alberto; Juan Císcar, Alfonso

    2012-01-01

    transLectures (Transcription and Translation of Video Lectures) is an EU STREP project in which advanced automatic speech recognition and machine translation techniques are being tested on large video lecture repositories. The project began in November 2011 and will run for three years. This paper will outline the project¿s main motivation and objectives, and give a brief description of the two main repositories being considered: VideoLectures.NET and poliMedia. The first re...

  8. Laughter in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses laughter in spoken academic discourse, with the aim of discovering why lecturers provoke laughter in their lectures. A further purpose of the paper is to identify episodes in British data which may differ from those in other cultural contexts where other lecturing practices prevail, and thus to inform the design of study skills…

  9. INVITATION to CERN pensioners and personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Swiss Foundation for Research into Ageing, AETAS, will be holding its research award ceremony at CERN on Wednesday 10 June 2009. You are cordially invited to attend the ceremony and, in particular, a lecture given by Professor Osman RATIB Professor of Medicine, Head of the Department of Medical Imaging and Medical Informatics and Head of the Division of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital of Geneva "Progress in medical imaging" WEDNESDAY 10 JUNE 2009 AT 5.00 P.M. CERN MAIN AUDITORIUM, (Bldg.500) The lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Jean-Pierre Michel, President of the AETAS Foundation. Drinks will be offered by the Foundation

  10. INVITATION to CERN pensioners and personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    The Swiss Foundation for Research into Ageing, AETAS, will be holding its research award ceremony at CERN on Wednesday 10 June 2009. You are cordially invited to attend the ceremony and, in particular, a lecture given by Professor Osman RATIB Professor of Medicine, Head of the Department of Medical Imaging and Medical Informatics and Head of the Division of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital of Geneva "Progress in medical imaging" WEDNESDAY 10 JUNE 2009 AT 5:00 P.M. CERN MAIN AUDITORIUM (Bldg.500) The lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Jean-Pierre Michel, President of the AETAS Foundation. Refreshments will be offered by the Foundation

  11. Nobel Lecture: Graphene: Materials in the Flatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, K. S.

    2011-07-01

    Much like the world described in Abbott’s Flatland, graphene is a two-dimensional object. And, as “Flatland” is “a romance of many dimensions,” graphene is much more than just a flat crystal. It possesses a number of unusual properties which are often unique or superior to those in other materials. In this brief lecture I would like to explain the reason for my (and many other people’s) fascination with this material, and invite the reader to share some of the excitement I’ve experienced while researching it.

  12. Graphene: materials in the Flatland (Nobel lecture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselov, Kostya S

    2011-07-25

    Much like the world described in Abbott's "Flatland", graphene is a two-dimensional object. And, as "Flatland" is "A Romance of Many Dimensions", graphene is much more than just a flat crystal. It possesses a number of unusual properties which are often unique or superior to those in other materials. In this brief lecture I would like to explain the reason for my (and many other people's) fascination with this material, and invite the reader to share some of the excitement I've experienced while researching it.

  13. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 13 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 Student Session (3/3) Course Review Course Review Tuesday 14 August 16:00 Poster Session Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: Summer Student Lecture ProgrammeSummer Student Lectures are available at: http://agenda.cern.ch/SSLP2001

  14. E-nhance Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Naber, Larissa; Köhle, Monika

    2006-01-01

    Ever more lecturers find themselves forced to Web-enhance their courses out of economic pressure or prestige. Universities trapped between rising student numbers and decreasing budgets are turning to e-learning as the one-stop solution, with little concern for student or teacher needs. An e-(nhanced) learning environment can only be successful if it fulfils students' and lecturers' needs alike. The student needs to be supported in various stages of learning, whereas the lecturer cannot afford...

  15. Emiliani Lecture: Holocene Changes in the Indonesian Throughflow Region (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppo, D.

    2009-12-01

    Proxy data and model simulations suggest large changes in the coupled ocean-atmospheric system occurred during the Holocene in response to insolation trends. It is unclear whether and how the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), which transports ~ 10-15 Sv of surface and thermocline water from the tropical Pacific to the Indian Ocean through a network of straits and passages in the Indonesian Seas (Gordon et al., 2005, Sprintall et al., 2009), changed over the course the Holocene. Yet, changes in the ITF - its properties, source, and volume transport - influence the heat and freshwater budgets of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. Modern observations suggest that 80% of the ITF is sourced from North Pacific subtropical and intermediate water via the Mindanao Current, and flows through the Makassar Strait (Gordon et al. 2005). The other ~20% of the ITF is sourced from the South Pacific via the South Equatorial Current, and flows through eastern Indonesian Sea passages to the Banda Sea, where it mixes with water from the Makassar Strait before it enters the Indian Ocean. Reconstructions of past ITF variations are preliminary, and the mechanisms underlying the observed changes are poorly constrained. Here I present evidence, collected in collaboration with my colleagues and students, of a Holocene cooling trend in the Makassar Strait, between the surface and ~600m. I discuss possible mechanisms and climate feedbacks associated with this ITF cooling. Late Holocene changes in sea surface temperature (SST) and the hydrologic cycle and other higher frequency climate variability, superimposed on Holocene trends, will also be discussed.

  16. Invited Lecture: From Host Defence Peptides to New Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    Antimicrobial peptides hold promise as the next generation of antimicrobial agents. However, the potential is weakened by their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, poor bioavailabillity , toxicity and high cost. Our research interest is in determining the structure/activity relationships o...... the elucidation of their structure/activity relationships, and our efforts towards developing them into antibiotics....

  17. Invited Lecture: From Host Defence Peptides to New Antibiotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Paul Robert

    Antimicrobial peptides hold promise as the next generation of antimicrobial agents. However, the potential is weakened by their susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, poor bioavailabillity , toxicity and high cost. Our research interest is in determining the structure/activity relationships o...... the elucidation of their structure/activity relationships, and our efforts towards developing them into antibiotics....

  18. Climate Change and Economic Development: A Pragmatic Approach (Invited Lecture)

    OpenAIRE

    John Gowdy; Aneel Salman

    2007-01-01

    Two major problems promise to dominate economic and social policy during the twentyfirst century. These are global climate change and the growing gap between the rich and the poor. Economists are facing these issues at a time when many of the standard tools of economic analysis for example, competitive general equilibrium and the theoretical system that supports it have fallen into disfavour in analysing global issues involving uncertainty and irreversibility. This is both a challenge and an ...

  19. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e......In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid...

  20. Effective lecture presentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelula, M H

    1997-02-01

    Lectures are the most popular form of teaching in medical education. As much as preparation and organization are key to the lecture's success, the actual presentation also depends upon the presenter's ability to reach the audience. Teaching is a lively activity. It calls for more than just offering ideas and data to an audience. It calls for direct contact with the audience, effective use of language, capability to use limited time effectively, and the ability to be entertaining. This article offers a structure to effective lecturing by highlighting the importance of voice clarity and speaking speed, approaches to using audiovisual aids, effectively using the audience to the lecture, and ways to be entertaining.

  1. Inviting Positive Classroom Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkey, William Watson; Strahan, David B.

    Invitational theory addresses the total educational environment and culture of the classroom and school, focusing on the people, places, policies, programs, and processes that constitute any school culture. Invitational teaching is a process for communicating caring and appropriate messages to nurture the realization of student potential as well…

  2. Transanal rectopexy - twelve case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubens Henrique Oleques Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study analyzed the results of transanal rectopexy and showed the benefits of this surgical technique. METHOD: Twelve patients were submitted to rectopexy between 1997 and 2011. The surgical technique used was transanal rectopexy, where the mesorectum was fixed to the sacrum with nonabsorbable suture. Three patients had been submitted to previous surgery, two by the Delorme technique and one by the Thiersch technique. RESULTS: Postoperative hospital stay ranged from 1 to 4 days. One patient (8.3% had intraoperative hematoma, which was treated with local compression and antibiotics. One patient (8.3% had residual mucosal prolapse, which was resected. Prolapse recurrence was seen in one case (8.3%. Improved incontinence occurred in 75% of patients and one patient reported obstructed evacuation in the first month after surgery. No death occurred. CONCLUSION: Transanal rectopexy is a simple, low cost technique, which has shown good efficacy in rectal prolapse control.OBJETIVO: O presente estudo analisou os resultados da retopexia pela via transanal e expôs os benefícios desta técnica cirúrgica. MÉTODO: Doze pacientes com prolapso foram operados no período de 1997 a 2011. A técnica cirúrgica usada foi a retopexia transanal, onde o mesorreto foi fixado ao sacro com fio inabsorvível. Três pacientes tinham cirurgia prévia, dois pela técnica de Delorme e um pela técnica de Thiersch. RESULTADOS: A permanência hospitalar pós-operatória variou de 1- 4 dias. Uma paciente (8,3% apresentou hematoma transoperatório que foi tratado com compressão local e antibioticoterapia. Um paciente apresentou prolapso mucoso residual (8,3%, que foi ressecado. Houve recidiva da procidência em um caso (8,3%. A melhora da incontinência ocorreu em 75% dos pacientes e uma paciente apresentou bloqueio evacuatório no primeiro mês após a cirurgia. Não houve mortalidade entre os pacientes operados. CONCLUSÃO: A retopexia transanal é uma t

  3. Academic Training Lecture - Regular lecture programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Wednesday 28, Thursday 29 and Friday 30 September 2011 Supersymmetric Recipes by Prof. Ben Allanech / University of Cambridge, UK  from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 ) In these lectures, I shall describe the theory of supersymmetry accessible to people with a knowledge of basic quantum field theory. The lectures will contain recipes of how to calculate which interactions (and which special relations) are in supersymmetry, without providing detailed proofs of where they come from. We shall also cover: motivation for weak-scale supersymmetry and the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  4. Lectures on Law Enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettleship, Lois

    Three lectures on law enforcement are presented that were prepared for study purposes at Johnson County Community College. The first lecture examines the fundamental ideas of the Age of Enlightenment and discusses their influence on the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Major provisions of the Bill of…

  5. Lectures on combustion theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burstein, S.Z.; Lax, P.D.; Sod, G.A. (eds.)

    1978-09-01

    Eleven lectures are presented on mathematical aspects of combustion: fluid dynamics, deflagrations and detonations, chemical kinetics, gas flows, combustion instability, flame spread above solids, spark ignition engines, burning rate of coal particles and hydrocarbon oxidation. Separate abstracts were prepared for three of the lectures. (DLC)

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel 73127

    2001-01-01

    28, 29, 30, 31 May and 1 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Quantum computing and Quantum cryptography T. Hey / University of Southampton, GB, and D. Ross / CERN-TH This course will give both an overview and a detailed introduction to quantum computing and quantum cryptography. The first lecture will survey the field, starting from its origins in Feyman's lecture in 1981. The next three lectures will explain in detail the relevance of Bell states and the workings of Grover's Quantum Search and Shor's quantum factorization algorithms. In addition, an explanation of quantum teleportation will be given. The last lecture will survey the recent progress towards realizing working quantum computers and quantum cryptographic systems.

  7. A Report on the Omnibus General Subject "Invitation to the Computer World"

    OpenAIRE

    仙石, 正和; Sengoku, Masakazu

    1998-01-01

    A report on the omnibus general subject "Invitation to the Computer World" was opened to the all of the students in Niigata University. There were students from Faculties of Humanities, Education, Law, Economics, Science, Engineering and Agriculture. This subject consisted of 13 lectures on the Invitation to the Computer World. The computers will affect more and more the human life in the 21st century. As the introduction to computers, this subject includes the history of computers, hardware,...

  8. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    12, 13, 14, 15 & 16 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telecommunication for the future Rob Parker / CERN-IT Few fields have experienced such a high level of technical advance over the last few decades as that of telecommunications. This lecture series will track the evolution of telecommunications systems since their inception, and consider how technology is likely to advance over the next years. A personal view will also be given of the effect of these innovations on our work and leisure activities.The lecture series will be aimed at an audience with no specific technical knowledge of telecommunications.

  9. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their clas

  10. Interactive lectures in engineering education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.A.; van den Berg, G.C.; van Keulen, H.

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses an alternative approach to lecturing: the interactive lecture. In the literature, interactive teaching is forwarded as a means to increase the effectiveness of lectures. Members of lecturing staff still seem, however, reluctant to incorporate interactive teaching in their

  11. Lecture programme The reality of science today

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    John Ellis (CERN): Gauguin’s questions in the context of particle physics.John Ellis (CERN) will speak about: Gauguin’s questions in the context of particle physics In a famous painting, Paul Gauguin asked the universal and eternal questions: Where do we come from? What are we? Where are we going? In this lecture, John Ellis will comment on the prospects of particle physics in an attempt to provide elements of answers to these questions. This is the second in the series of lectures organised by the History and Philosophy of Sciences Unit of Geneva University, in collaboration with ASPERA, the European network for astroparticle physics research, which began with a contribution from Dominique Pestre (EHESS and Centre Koyré, Paris). What are the new challenges and realities facing research? What is its place in today’s society? In this series of lectures covering a range of topics, researchers and members of the general public are invited to think about the state of sc...

  12. Feynman Lectures on Computation

    CERN Document Server

    Feynman, Richard Phillips; Allen, Robin W

    1999-01-01

    "When, in 1984-86, Richard P. Feynman gave his famous course on computation at the California Institute of Technology, he asked Tony Hey to adapt his lecture notes into a book. Although led by Feynman,"

  13. A Geminoid as Lecturer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, Julie Rafn; Schärfe, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report our findings from an experiment with the teleoperated android Geminoid-DK. The geminoid took up the role of a university lecturer and delivered a 45 minute lecture in front of 150 freshmen students at Aalborg University. While considering the role of the geminoid in this e...... in this educational context, we report results relating to large-room teaching, as well as gender differences in the perception of the robot....

  14. [Dr. Michiharu Matsuoka, founder of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kyoto University, and his achievements. Part 4: Prof. M. Matsuoka's lecture to medical and civic communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirotani, Hayato

    2010-03-01

    Dr. M. Matsuoka gave many lectures to physicians at the Postdoctoral Course Lectures sponsored by the Kyoto Eisei Kensasho (Kyoto Bacterial and Biochemical Laboratory) run by the Kyoto Medical Association, and the Postdoctoral Course Lectures of the Kyoto Medical School, Kyoto Imperial University. He was also invited to give lectures at several regional medical associations. He also was a speaker at the Kyoto Imperial University Extension course and he lectured at the Enryakuji Temple on Mt. Hiei, sponsored by a newspaper company. It is remarkable that these activities were carried out in addition to his other notable academic work previously reported.

  15. An Invitation to Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁景宏

    2010-01-01

    In this essay, I wish to invite young scholars to learn, use, and contribute to accounting theory. In this invitation, I argue theory has lineage, is important and can be fun. Its lineage comes from the post-WWII scientific revolution in management education and research. Theory is important because it is the successful interaction between theory and empirical work that ultimately advances an academic discipline. Theory can be fun because when done well, learning, using and contributing to theory can be an enjoyable activity for all scholars, either as consumers or as producers of theory.

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 1 Introduction to particle accelerators E.J.N. Wilson / CERN-AC , Head of the CERN Accelerator School This new series of lectures is intended for anyone with a technical or scientific background who would like to become familiar with the principles of accelerator design. It is a complement to last year's course and includes new lectures on present day accelerators, and their applications as well as colliders and neutrino factories. Beam dynamics, which was treated at length in last year's course, has been compressed into one lecture, intended as revision for those who followed earlier courses and an introduction for newcomers to the field. The course should not be missed by those who will attend the CAS Intermediate Accelerator School in Seville. 1-10 10:00 Present-day Accelerators 11:00 - Beam Dynamics 2-10 10:00 Accelerating Cavities 11:00 - Non-linear Dynamics 3-10 10:00 E...

  17. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Lecture Programme 9 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Inner Tracking Detectors by Pippa Wells (CERN) 10 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Calorimeters (2/5) by Philippe Bloch (CERN) 11 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Muon systems (3/5) by Kerstin Hoepfner (RWTH Aachen) 12 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Particle Identification and Forward Detectors by Peter Krizan (University of Ljubljana and J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia) 13 May 2011 ACT Lectures on Detectors - Trigger and Data Acquisition (5/5) by Dr. Brian Petersen (CERN) from 11:00 to 12:00 at CERN ( Bldg. 222-R-001 - Filtration Plant )

  18. Management of hypothermia: impact of lecture-based interactive workshops on training of pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Insaf; Karakoç, Ali

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the efficacy of interactive workshop on the management of hypothermia and its impact on pediatric nurses' training. This is a pretest-to-posttest quasi-experimental descriptive study. Thirty pediatric nurses attended an interactive lecture-based interactive workshop on the management of hypothermia. Participants had to accept an invitation to the presentation before the training event. They completed the lecture, and a multiple-choice question test before and after the lecture was given. There was a significant improvement in mean test scores after the lecture when compared with those before the lecture (mean [SD], 15.5 [1.3] vs 5.0 [1.7], P < 0.001). The information gained in this study will be valuable as a baseline for further research and help guide improvements in the management of hypothermia with the ultimate goal of enhancing safe and quality patient care.

  19. Mythematics Solving the Twelve Labors of Hercules

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Michael

    2009-01-01

    How might Hercules, the most famous of the Greek heroes, have used mathematics to complete his astonishing Twelve Labors? From conquering the Nemean Lion and cleaning out the Augean Stables, to capturing the Erymanthean Boar and entering the Underworld to defeat the three-headed dog Cerberus, Hercules and his legend are the inspiration for this book of fun and original math puzzles. While Hercules relied on superhuman strength to accomplish the Twelve Labors, Mythematics shows how math could have helped during his quest. How does Hercules defeat the Lernean Hydra and stop its heads from multip

  20. Lectures on functor homology

    CERN Document Server

    Touzé, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    This book features a series of lectures that explores three different fields in which functor homology (short for homological algebra in functor categories) has recently played a significant role. For each of these applications, the functor viewpoint provides both essential insights and new methods for tackling difficult mathematical problems. In the lectures by Aurélien Djament, polynomial functors appear as coefficients in the homology of infinite families of classical groups, e.g. general linear groups or symplectic groups, and their stabilization. Djament’s theorem states that this stable homology can be computed using only the homology with trivial coefficients and the manageable functor homology. The series includes an intriguing development of Scorichenko’s unpublished results. The lectures by Wilberd van der Kallen lead to the solution of the general cohomological finite generation problem, extending Hilbert’s fourteenth problem and its solution to the context of cohomology. The focus here is o...

  1. Lectures on Chevalley groups

    CERN Document Server

    Steinberg, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Robert Steinberg's Lectures on Chevalley Groups were delivered and written during the author's sabbatical visit to Yale University in the 1967-1968 academic year. The work presents the status of the theory of Chevalley groups as it was in the mid-1960s. Much of this material was instrumental in many areas of mathematics, in particular in the theory of algebraic groups and in the subsequent classification of finite groups. This posthumous edition incorporates additions and corrections prepared by the author during his retirement, including a new introductory chapter. A bibliography and editorial notes have also been added. This is a great unsurpassed introduction to the subject of Chevalley groups that influenced generations of mathematicians. I would recommend it to anybody whose interests include group theory. -Efim Zelmanov, University of California, San Diego Robert Steinberg's lectures on Chevalley groups were given at Yale University in 1967. The notes for the lectures contain a wonderful exposition of ...

  2. Albert Einstein memorial lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Mechoulam, Raphael; The Israel Academy for Sciences and Humanities

    2012-01-01

    This volume consists of a selection of the Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures presented annually at the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities. Delivered by eminent scientists and scholars, including Nobel laureates, they cover a broad spectrum of subjects in physics, chemistry, life science, mathematics, historiography and social issues. This distinguished memorial lecture series was inaugurated by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities following an international symposium held in Jerusalem in March 1979 to commemorate the centenary of Albert Einstein's birth. Considering that Einstein's interests, activities and influence were not restricted to theoretical physics but spanned broad fields affecting society and the welfare of humankind, it was felt that these memorial lectures should be addressed to scientists, scholars and erudite laypersons rather than to physicists alone.

  3. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trish L Varao-Sousa

    Full Text Available The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  4. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  6. Lectures in general algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Kurosh, A G; Stark, M; Ulam, S

    1965-01-01

    Lectures in General Algebra is a translation from the Russian and is based on lectures on specialized courses in general algebra at Moscow University. The book starts with the basics of algebra. The text briefly describes the theory of sets, binary relations, equivalence relations, partial ordering, minimum condition, and theorems equivalent to the axiom of choice. The text gives the definition of binary algebraic operation and the concepts of groups, groupoids, and semigroups. The book examines the parallelism between the theory of groups and the theory of rings; such examinations show the

  7. Twenty lectures on thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Buchdahl, H A

    2013-01-01

    Twenty Lectures on Thermodynamics is a course of lectures, parts of which the author has given various times over the last few years. The book gives the readers a bird's eye view of phenomenological and statistical thermodynamics. The book covers many areas in thermodynamics such as states and transition; adiabatic isolation; irreversibility; the first, second, third and Zeroth laws of thermodynamics; entropy and entropy law; the idea of the application of thermodynamics; pseudo-states; the quantum-static al canonical and grand canonical ensembles; and semi-classical gaseous systems. The text

  8. Lectures on quantum mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Dirac, Paul A M

    2001-01-01

    The author of this concise, brilliant series of lectures on mathematical methods in quantum mechanics was one of the shining intellects in the field, winning a Nobel prize in 1933 for his pioneering work in the quantum mechanics of the atom. Beyond that, he developed the transformation theory of quantum mechanics (which made it possible to calculate the statistical distribution of certain variables), was one of the major authors of the quantum theory of radiation, codiscovered the Fermi-Dirac statistics, and predicted the existence of the positron.The four lectures in this book were delivered

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28 February and 1, 2 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Recent Results on CP Violation and B Physics P.F. HARRISON / QMW, London, UK With the advent of the asymmetric B factories in Japan and the US, exciting new results on CP Violation and B Physics are starting to be achieved. In these lectures, we review the existing experimental and phenomenological context of these measurements, we compare and contrast the new experimental facilities and discuss the implications of the recent results on our understanding. Finally we summarise the prospects for future developments.

  10. Lectures on Constrained Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Date, Ghanashyam

    2010-01-01

    These lecture notes were prepared as a basic introduction to the theory of constrained systems which is how the fundamental forces of nature appear in their Hamiltonian formulation. Only a working knowledge of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulation of mechanics is assumed. These notes are based on the set of eight lectures given at the {\\em Refresher Course for College Teachers} held at IMSc during May-June, 2005. These are submitted to the arxiv for an easy access to a wider body of students.

  11. Decision Making in the Biological Field. The 1971 W. O. Atwater Memorial Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Jean

    Established in 1967 by the Agriculture Research Service of the U. S. Department of Agriculture to honor the memory of a gifted scientist . . . and to recognize accomplishment in a field or discipline that relates to the problem of nutrition and food production, the W. O. Atwater Memorial Lecture invited Dr. Jean Mayer, Professor of Nutrition at…

  12. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu Gives Lecture on Nongovernmental Diplomacy to US University Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of China International Travel Service, on the afternoon of May 22, an American international exchange delegation visited the CPAFFC. The delegation, which consists of nearly 80 American students, is organized by the American Envision Program. CPAFFC President Chen Haosu met with the delegation and gave a lecture on China’s non-governmental diplomacy.

  13. The Harvey lectures, Series 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botstein, D.; Cech, T.R.; Hille, B.; Lodish, H.F.; Majerus, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    The Harvey Lecture Series is published annually and provides reviews of research topics in the biomedical sciences. Eight lectures by investigators are included in the volume representing the most recent work in the major laboratories.

  14. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 1 Introduction to particle accelerators E.J.N. Wilson / CERN-AC , Head of the CERN Accelerator School This new series of lectures is intended for anyone with a technical or scientific background who would like to become familiar with the principles of accelerator design. It is a complement to last year's course and includes new lectures on present day accelerators, and their applications as well as colliders and neutrino factories. Beam dynamics, which was treated at length in last year's course, has been compressed into one lecture, intended as revision for those who followed earlier courses and an introduction for newcomers to the field. The course should not be missed by those who will attend the CAS Intermediate Accelerator School in Seville. 1-10 10:00 Present-day Accelerators 11:00 - Beam Dynamics 2-10 10:00 Accelerating Cavities 11:00 - Non-linear Dynamics 3-10 10:00 Electron Dynamics 11:00 - ...

  15. Podcasting a Physics Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The technology of podcasting, or creating audio or video files that can be subscribed to over the Internet, has grown in popularity over the past few years. Many educators have already begun realizing the potential of delivering such customized content, but most efforts have focused on lecture-style humanities courses or multimedia arts courses.…

  16. When Lecturing: Teach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  17. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  18. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Wells (CERN) The Higgs Saga at LEP 10:15 - 11:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 G. Cowan (Univ. of London) Introduction to Statistics (3/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 3 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (1/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) G. Cowan (University of London) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 4 August 09:15 - 10:00 P. Sphicas (CERN) Trigger and Data Acquisition Systems (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Jacobsen (LBLN) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 5 August 09:15 - 10:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 N. Palanque-Delabrouille (CEA) A...

  19. Optimising Lecture Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst-Christensen, Bo

    the students problems from the educator to the students. By using techniques that put more weight on student participation, cooperation and preparation, I have been able to cut significantly down on the time used for lecturing, allowing more time for student work and reflection. As an example by getting...

  20. When Lecturing: Teach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  1. Computer Aided Lecturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Donald E.

    1994-01-01

    Surveyed students taking a natural resource conservation course to determine the effects of computer software that provides tools for creating and managing visual presentations to students. Results indicated that 94% of the respondents believed computer-aided lectures helped them and recommended their continued use; note taking was more effective,…

  2. Usage Reporting on Recorded Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Bruggen, Jan van; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    This study analyses the interactions of students with the recorded lectures. We report on an analysis of students' use of recorded lectures at two Universities in the Netherlands. The data logged by the lecture capture system (LCS) is used and combined with collected survey data. We describe the pro

  3. In Defence of the Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  4. Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borcherds, P

    2003-05-21

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics

  5. Handouts: making the lecture portable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, K

    1991-01-01

    Previous medical literature on preparing lecture handouts has focused on their use in student education, where as part of a course there is a series of lectures followed by an examination. Conversely, resident and practising physicians usually attend single lectures on individual topics in order to update and improve their clinical skills. Handouts designed for the latter type of lecture can serve as a useful resource in subsequent day-to-day teaching and patient care. This article examines the purpose, distribution, structure, and substance of such handouts. Guidelines to assist the speaker in preparing lecture handouts are discussed.

  6. Comparative analysis of twelve Dothideomycete plant pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohm, Robin; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Grigoriev, Igor

    2011-03-11

    The Dothideomycetes are one of the largest and most diverse groups of fungi. Many are plant pathogens and pose a serious threat to agricultural crops grown for biofuel, food or feed. Most Dothideomycetes have only a single host and related Dothideomycete species can have very diverse host plants. Twelve Dothideomycete genomes have currently been sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute and other sequencing centers. They can be accessed via Mycocosm which has tools for comparative analysis

  7. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  8. Lectures on Classical Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Torrielli, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We review some essential aspects of classically integrable systems. The detailed outline of the lectures consists of: 1. Introduction and motivation, with historical remarks; 2. Liouville theorem and action-angle variables, with examples (harmonic oscillator, Kepler problem); 3. Algebraic tools: Lax pairs, monodromy and transfer matrices, classical r-matrices and exchange relations, non-ultralocal Poisson brackets, with examples (non-linear Schroedinger model, principal chiral field); 4. Features of classical r-matrices: Belavin-Drinfeld theorems, analyticity properties, and lift of the classical structures to quantum groups; 5. Classical inverse scattering method to solve integrable differential equations: soliton solutions, spectral properties and the Gel'fand-Levitan-Marchenko equation, with examples (KdV equation, Sine-Gordon model). Prepared for the Durham Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network. This is part of a collection of lecture notes.

  9. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    18, 19, 20, 21, 22 November LECTURE FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Telling the Truth with Statistics R. Barlow / Univ. of Manchester, UK This course of lectures will cover probability, distributions, fitting, errors and confidence levels, for practising High Energy Physicists who need to use Statistical techniques to express their results. Concentrating on these appropriate specialist techniques means that they can be covered in appropriate depth, while assuming only the knowledge and experience of a typical Particle Physicist. The different definitions of probability will be explained, and it will be appear why this basic subject is so controversial; there are several viewpoints and it is important to understand them all, rather than abusing the adherents of different beliefs. Distributions will be covered: the situations they arise in, their useful properties, and the amazing result of the Central Limit Theorem. Fitting a parametrisation to a set of data is one of the m...

  10. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500, on 23 April from 11:15 to 12:15 hrs Searches for Dark Matter F. Feinstein / CPPM, Marseille, F The fact that the mass of the visible stars could not account for the gravitational cohesion of the galaxy clusters was the first manifestation of non-radiating matter in the Universe. Since then, many observations imply that most of the matter is indeed dark. Its nature is still unknown and likely to have several contributions. Recent results indicate that most of it may not be composed of normal matter. These lectures will review the experimental methods, which have been developed to unravel this 70-year long mystery and confront their results with the current theoretical framework of cosmology.

  11. Globe: Lecture series

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The LHC: an accelerator of science This series of lectures is all about understanding the scientific and technological challenges of the phenomenal LHC project and assessing its innovations through their everyday applications. Come and take a sneak preview of the LHC! Communicate: the Grid, a computer of global dimensions François Grey, head of communication in CERN’s Information Technology Department How will it be possible for the 15 million billion bytes of data generated by the LHC every year to be handled and stored by a computer that doesn’t have to be the size of a skyscraper? The computer scientists have the answer: the Grid, which will harness the power of tens of thousands of computers all over the world by creating a network of computers and making them operate as one. >>> Lectures are free and require no specialist knowledge. In french. 
 >>> By reservation only: tel. +41 (0)22 767 76 76

  12. Lectures on instantons

    CERN Document Server

    Vandoren, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    This is a self-contained set of lecture notes on instantons in (super) Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions and in quantum mechanics. First the basics are derived from scratch: the regular and singular one-instanton solutions for Yang-Mills theories with gauge groups SU(2) and SU(N), their bosonic and fermionic zero modes, the path integral instanton measure, and supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories in Euclidean space. Then we discuss applications: the \\theta-angle of QCD, the solution of the U(1) problem, the way Higgs fields solve the large-instanton problem, and tunneling and phase transitions in quantum mechanics and in nonabelian gauge theories. These lecture notes are an extension of a review on Yang-Mills and D-instantons written in 2000 by both authors and A.Belitsky

  13. Lecture 2: Software Security

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture addresses the following question: how to create secure software? The lecture starts with a definition of computer security and an explanation of why it is so difficult to achieve. It then introduces the main security principles (like least-privilege, or defense-in-depth) and discusses security in different phases of the software development cycle. The emphasis is put on the implementation part: most common pitfalls and security bugs are listed, followed by advice on best practice for security development, testing and deployment. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and ...

  14. Lectures on Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gomberoff, Andres

    2006-01-01

    The 2002 Pan-American Advanced Studies Institute School on Quantum Gravity was held at the Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS),Valdivia, Chile, January 4-14, 2002. The school featured lectures by ten speakers, and was attended by nearly 70 students from over 14 countries. A primary goal was to foster interaction and communication between participants from different cultures, both in the layman’s sense of the term and in terms of approaches to quantum gravity. We hope that the links formed by students and the school will persist throughout their professional lives, continuing to promote interaction and the essential exchange of ideas that drives research forward. This volume contains improved and updated versions of the lectures given at the School. It has been prepared both as a reminder for the participants, and so that these pedagogical introductions can be made available to others who were unable to attend. We expect them to serve students of all ages well.

  15. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 April REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 New Developments in Supersymmetry S. Raby / CERN-TH Introduction to supersymmetric grand unified theories. An introduction to the MSSM and different mechanisms for supersymmetry breaking. Then the details of SU(5) and SO(10) unification, the new gauge sector beyond the standard model, representations of quarks and leptons. Gauge and Yukawa coupling unification and some predictions.

  16. Lectures on knot homology

    CERN Document Server

    Nawata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We provide various formulations of knot homology that are predicted by string dualities. In addition, we also explain the rich algebraic structure of knot homology which can be understood in terms of geometric representation theory in these formulations. These notes are based on lectures in the workshop "Physics and Mathematics of Link Homology" at Centre de Recherches Math\\'ematiques, Universit\\'e de Montr\\'eal.

  17. Lectures on classical electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Englert, Berthold-Georg

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes cover classical electrodynamics at the level of advanced undergraduates or postgraduates. There is a strong emphasis on the general features of the electromagnetic field and, in particular, on the properties of electromagnetic radiation. It offers a comprehensive and detailed, as well as self-contained, account of material that can be covered in a one-semester course for students with a solid undergraduate knowledge of basic electricity and magnetism.

  18. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    9, 10 and 11 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 10:00 to 12:00 hrs on 9 and 10 May and on 11 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Cosmology and Particle Physics K. Olive / CERN-TH A general overview of the standard big bang model will be presented with special emphasis on astro-particle physics. Specific topics will include: Inflation, Baryoogenesis, Nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter.

  19. B.Gregory Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    Jacob,M

    1987-01-01

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  20. An LHC Lecture

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    When we try to advance from a solid knowledge of field theory to LHC physics we usually encounter a frustrating problem: in particular Higgs physics and QCD techniques appear as a impenetrable granite block of phenomenological know-how, common lores, and historically grown intuition what works and what does not. I hope this lecture can drill a few holes into the rock and put you into a position to digest advanced writeups as well as some first research papers on the topic.

  1. Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 More Information DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 7 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Fayard, O. Ullaland, D. Heagerty (CERN) Programme Presentation Workshops presentation Information on Computing Rules 10:15 - 11:00 R. Aymar (CERN) Introduction to CERN (1/2) 11:15 - 12:00 J. Engelen (CERN) Introduction to CERN (2/2) 15:00 - 16:30 H. Menzel (CERN) An Introduction to Radiation Protection DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 8 july 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (1/2) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Friday 9 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (3/4) 10:15 - 11:00 P. Chomaz (GANIL / CERN) Fundamental questions in modern nuclear physics: The challenge of exotic nuclei (2/2) 11:15 - 12:00 P....

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Tracking at the LHC K. Safarik / CERN-EP The lecture will start with a short history of particle tracking in high-energy physics. Then we will concentrate on tracking in the LHC experiments. We will discuss various tracking devices proposed for these experiments, dividing them into two large groups: solid state detectors and gas detectors. Their characteristics, as well as their behaviour in different external conditions (i.e. magnetic field, radiation) will be compared. Furthermore, we will turn to the question: how to design a tracker using these various technologies, what are the essential parameters to be taken into account and we will apply these considerations to the proposed the LHC detectors. The last part of the lecture will be devoted to tracking software. We will mention simulation and concentrate on track finding and reconstruction, reviewing different algorithms prototyped for the LHC experiments. We will ...

  3. Most recent Web Lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    Steven Goldfarb

    Web Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials recorded over the past two years are available via the University of Michigan portal here. Most recent additions include the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27, the Physics Analysis Tools Workshop held in Bergen, Norway on April 23-27, and the CTEQ Workshop: "Physics at the LHC: Early Challenges" held at Michigan State University on May 14-15. Viewing requires a standard web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the web or downloaded locally. In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Suggestions for events or tutorials to record in 2007, as well as feedback on existing archives is always welcome. Please contact us at wlap@umich.edu. Thank you and enjoy the lectures! The Michigan Web Lecture Team Tushar Bhatnagar, Steven Goldfarb, Jeremy Herr, Mitch McLachlan, Homer A....

  4. Twelve tips for "flipping" the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    The flipped classroom is a pedagogical model in which the typical lecture and homework elements of a course are reversed. The following tips outline the steps involved in making a successful transition to a flipped classroom approach. The tips are based on the available literature alongside the author's experience of using the approach in a medical education setting. Flipping a classroom has a number of potential benefits, for example increased educator-student interaction, but must be planned and implemented carefully to support effective learning.

  5. An Invitation to Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dierk

    2011-01-01

    This "Invitation to Mathematics" consists of 14 contributions, many from the world's leading mathematicians, which introduce the readers to exciting aspects of current mathematical research. The contributions are as varied as the personalities of active mathematicians, but together they show mathematics as a rich and lively field of research. The contributions are written for interested students at the age of transition between high school and university who know high school mathematics and perhaps competition mathematics and who want to find out what current research mathematics is

  6. Twelve tips for peer observation of teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Zarrin Seema; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana; Carr, Sandra E

    2007-05-01

    This paper outlines twelve tips for undertaking peer observation of teaching in medical education, using the peer review model and the experiences of the authors. An accurate understanding of teaching effectiveness is required by individuals, medical schools, and universities to evaluate the learning environment and to substantiate academic and institutional performance. Peer Observation of Teaching is one tool that provides rich, qualitative evidence for teachers, quite different from closed-ended student evaluations. When Peer Observation of Teaching is incorporated into university practice and culture, and is conducted in a mutually respectful and supportive way, it has the potential to facilitate reflective change and growth for teachers.

  7. Three lectures on free probability

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    These are notes from a three-lecture mini-course on free probability given at MSRI in the Fall of 2010 and repeated a year later at Harvard. The lectures were aimed at mathematicians and mathematical physicists working in combinatorics, probability, and random matrix theory. The first lecture was a staged rediscovery of free independence from first principles, the second dealt with the additive calculus of free random variables, and the third focused on random matrix models.

  8. Weak decays. [Lectures, phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  9. Lectures in Micro Meteorology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Søren Ejling

    This report contains the notes from my lectures on Micro scale meteorology at the Geophysics Department of the Niels Bohr Institute of Copenhagen University. In the period 1993-2012, I was responsible for this course at the University. At the start of the course, I decided that the text books...... available in meteorology at that time did not include enough of the special flavor of micro meteorology that characterized the work of the meteorology group at Risø (presently of the Institute of wind energy of the Danish Technical University). This work was focused on Boundary layer flows and turbulence...

  10. Lectures on quantum chromodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, Andrei

    2001-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is the fundamental theory of strong interactions. It is a physical theory describing Nature. Lectures on Quantum Chromodynamics concentrates, however, not on the phenomenological aspect of QCD; books with comprehensive coverage of phenomenological issues have been written. What the reader will find in this book is a profound discussion on the theoretical foundations of QCD with emphasis on the nonperturbative formulation of the theory: What is gauge symmetry on the classical and on the quantum level? What is the path integral in field theory? How to define the path integ

  11. Lectures on electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    These lecture notes on electromagnetism have evolved from graduate and undergraduate EM theory courses given by the author at the University of Rochester, with the basics presented with clarity and his characteristic attention to detail. The thirteen chapters cover, in logical sequence, topics ranging from electrostatics, magnetostatics and Maxwell's equations to plasmas and radiation. Boundary value problems are treated extensively, as are wave guides, electromagnetic interactions and fields. This second edition comprises many of the topics expanded with more details on the derivation of vari

  12. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    26, 27, 28, 29 and 30 March REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes T. Damour / IHES, Bures-sur-Yvette, F. Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  13. Lectures in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book on particle physics is to present the theory in a simple way. The style and organization of the material is unique in that intuition is employed, not formal theory or the Monte Carlo method. This volume attempts to be more physical and less abstract than other texts without degenerating into a presentation of data without interpretation.This book is based on four courses of lectures conducted at Fermilab. It should prove very useful to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

  14. Joseph Mountin Lecture

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-26

    In this podcast, William H. Foege, MD, MPH delivers the 29th Annual Joseph W. Mountin Lecture. Dr. Foege was a key leader in the smallpox effort and worked as an epidemiologist in the successful eradication campaign in the 1970s. Dr. Foege became chief of the Smallpox Eradication Program at CDC, and was appointed director of CDC in 1977.  Created: 10/26/2009 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/29/2009.

  15. English for Business Occasions Invitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄协安

    2000-01-01

    It s very usual for people to invite business partners to a dinner or a party for the sake of improv-ingrelations.We d better keep in mind the appropriate and thus effective ways of inviting people toour parties.The following examples may be of help.

  16. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lecture's Absent Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciullo, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    According to the "Oxford English Dictionary" ("OED"), the noun "lecture" dates from the 14th century and means the "action of reading, perusal. Also, that which is read or perused." This definition, while accurate and resonates today in many college classrooms, ignores a key feature of any lecture. The…

  17. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions.

  18. Lectures on Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Beautifully illustrated and engagingly written, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics presents theoretical physics with a breathtaking array of examples and anecdotes. Basdevant's style is clear and stimulating, in the manner of a brisk classroom lecture that students can follow with ease and enjoyment. Here is a sample of the book's style, from the opening of Chapter 1: "If one were to ask a passer-by to quote a great formula of physics, chances are that the answer would be 'E = mc2'. Nevertheless, the formula 'E=hV' which was written in the same year 1905 by the same Albert Einstein, and which started quantum theory, concerns their daily life considerably more. In fact, of the three watershed years for physics toward the beginning of the 20th century - 1905: the Special Relativity of Einstein, Lorentz and Poincaré; 1915: the General Relativity of Einstein, with its extraordinary reflections on gravitation, space and time; and 1925: the full development of Quantum Mechanics - it is surely the last which has the mos...

  19. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 5 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (1/3) 10:15-12:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (3&4/4) Tuesday 6 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (2/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) 11:15-12:00 R. JACOBSEN / T. NAKADA Discussion Session Wednesday 7 August 09:15-10:00 F. GIANOTTI LHC Physics (3/3) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) 11:15-12:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (1/4) 14:00-16:00 C. BENVENUTI Basic Science, Society, and Technological Innovation (Council Chamber, bldg. 503) Thursday 8 August 09:15-10:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (2/4) 10:15-11:00 R. JACOBSEN From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) 11:15-12:00 J. CARR / J. LESGOURDES Discussion Session Friday 9 August 09:15-11:00 J. LESGOURDES Cosmology (3&4/4) 11:15-12:00 C. JARLSKOG Historic Lecture 14:00-16:00 Course Review Monday 12 August 09:15-12:00 Students Sessi...

  20. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 P. WELLS Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 R. ASSMANN The CLIC Concept for a Future Particle Collider at the Energy Frontier Tuesday 30 July 09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (1/2) 10:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (1&2/4) Wednesday 31 July  09:15 - 10:00 F. ANTINORI Heavy Ions (2/2) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. DYDAK / F. ANTINORI Discussion Session Thursday 1 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (1/4) 10:15 - 11:00 F. DYDAK Neutrino Physics (4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (1/2) Friday 2 August 09:15 - 10:00 T. NAKADA CP Violation (2/4) 10:15 ? 11:00 F. BEDESCHI Experimental test of the SM Tevatron (2/2) 11:15 ? 12:00 F. BEDESCHI / T. NAKADA Di...

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: i. New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. ii. Efficient computational algorithms are available. iii. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related construct...

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15 and 16 May REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME 14, 15 May from 10:00 to 12:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 16 May from 11:00 to 12:00 hrs - Council Chamber, bldg 503 Modern Signal Processing: Wavelets vs. Fourier M. Vetterli / EPFL, Lausanne, CH and UC Berkeley Wavelets have established themselves as an important tool in modern signal processing as well as in applied mathematics. This is linked to several facts, among others: New theoretical advances have been achieved, like new forms of 4 time-frequency bases for signal analysis. Efficient computational algorithms are available. Many applications either used similar ideas, like for example the concept of multiresolution, or took advantage of the unified framework provided by wavelets. This combination of elegant theory, efficient algorithms, and successful applications makes the field of wavelets and signal processing quite exciting. It is the purpose of these lectures to establish the theory necessary to understand wavelets and related constructions. A...

  3. Combining ability of twelve maize populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacaro Elton

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic progress depends on germplasm quality and breeding methods. Twelve maize populations and their crosses were evaluated to estimate combining ability and potential to be included as source populations in breeding programs. Plant height, point of insertion of the first ear, number of ears per plant, number of grains per ear, root and stalk lodging and grain yield were studied in two locations in Brazil, during the 1997/98 season. Genotype sum of squares was divided into general (GCA and specific (SCA combining ability. Results indicated the existence of genetic divergence for all traits analyzed, where additive effects were predominant. The high heterosis levels observed, mainly in Xanxerê, suggested the environmental influence on the manifestation of this genetic phenomenon. Populations revealed potential to be used in breeding programs; however, those more intensively submitted to selection could provide larger genetic progress, showing the importance of population improvement for the increment of the heterosis in maize.

  4. By invitation only

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2011-01-01

    The Hôtel Métropole in Brussels is a legendary conference venue that will ring a bell to all physicists. 100 years after the first meeting of the Conseil de Physique Solvay, a representative group of the world’s most eminent physicists met again in October this year in the Excelsior Room to discuss “The Theory of the Quantum World”. Three members of CERN's Theory Group were invited to participate. Gian Giudice, one of them, shares with us his thoughts and impressions about this exclusive conference.   Attendees at the 25th Solvay Conference on Physics, Brussels. Photo provided by "International Solvay Institutes". “In the tradition of the Solvay Conferences, this is a discussion-oriented meeting with few talks by rapporteurs.” Thus reads the Introduction to the Scientific Programme of the Solvay Conference on Physics. In the Conference programme, the rapporteurs speak for only 30 minutes,...

  5. Surviving Lecture: A Pedagogical Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Lecture is the approach traditionally used to teach music theory courses. Although efficient in the delivery of large amounts of information in a short period of time, lecture lacks the effectiveness of an active learning approach. "Theory Survivor" is a unique cooperative-learning method based on the Student Teams-Achievement Divisions technique…

  6. La lecture à voix haute

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria Reyzabal, Maria

    2015-01-01

    La lecture à voix haute apparaît comme une technique pour la compréhension active des textes, elle ajoute d’autres possibilités de compréhension à la lecture silencieuse et peut préparer à des pratiques créatives et des productions personnelles.

  7. Lecture Notes: Approximate Molecular Orbital Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanget-Larsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Lecture Notes for the introductory course "Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy" (Dept. Science, Roskilde University)......Lecture Notes for the introductory course "Quantum Chemistry & Spectroscopy" (Dept. Science, Roskilde University)...

  8. Lectures on LHC physics

    CERN Document Server

    Plehn, Tilman

    2015-01-01

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LHC experiments have closed the most important gap in our understanding of fundamental interactions, confirming that such interactions between elementary particles can be described by quantum field theory, more specifically by a renormalizable gauge theory. This theory is a priori valid for arbitrarily high energy scales and does not require an ultraviolet completion. Yet, when trying to apply the concrete knowledge of quantum field theory to actual LHC physics - in particular to the Higgs sector and certain regimes of QCD - one inevitably encounters an intricate maze of phenomenological know-how, common lore and other, often historically developed intuitions about what works and what doesn’t. These lectures cover three aspects to help understand LHC results in the Higgs sector and in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model: they discuss the many facets of Higgs physics, which is at the core of this significantly expanded second edition; then QCD, to the deg...

  9. TASI Lectures on Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    In a series of five lectures I review inflationary cosmology. I begin with a description of the initial conditions problems of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmology and then explain how inflation, an early period of accelerated expansion, solves these problems. Next, I describe how inflation transforms microscopic quantum fluctuations into macroscopic seeds for cosmological structure formation. I present in full detail the famous calculation for the primordial spectra of scalar and tensor fluctuations. I then define the inverse problem of extracting information on the inflationary era from observations of cosmic microwave background fluctuations. The current observational evidence for inflation and opportunities for future tests of inflation are discussed. Finally, I review the challenge of relating inflation to fundamental physics by giving an account of inflation in string theory.

  10. Lectures on Yangian Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-01-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfeld's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dila...

  11. Lectures on amenability

    CERN Document Server

    Runde, Volker

    2002-01-01

    The notion of amenability has its origins in the beginnings of modern measure theory: Does a finitely additive set function exist which is invariant under a certain group action? Since the 1940s, amenability has become an important concept in abstract harmonic analysis (or rather, more generally, in the theory of semitopological semigroups). In 1972, B.E. Johnson showed that the amenability of a locally compact group G can be characterized in terms of the Hochschild cohomology of its group algebra L^1(G): this initiated the theory of amenable Banach algebras. Since then, amenability has penetrated other branches of mathematics, such as von Neumann algebras, operator spaces, and even differential geometry. Lectures on Amenability introduces second year graduate students to this fascinating area of modern mathematics and leads them to a level from where they can go on to read original papers on the subject. Numerous exercises are interspersed in the text.

  12. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  13. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    11, 12, 13, 14 and 15 June REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 What have we learned from LEP J. Ellis / CERN-TH The basic formalism of the Standard Model will be reviewed, and the limited state of our knowledge before the start-up of LEP will be recalled. Neutrino counting at LEP will be compared with astrophysical and cosmological constraints. The interpretation of precision electroweak data will be discussed, including their predictions for the top quark and the Higgs boson, and the hints they offer for the future direction beyond the Standard Model: probably a weakly-interacting theory that may be extrapolated up to a grand unification scale. Topics in QCD and heavy-flavour physics will be discussed briefly, and topics in W physics at greater length. Direct LEP searches for the Higgs boson and supersymmetric particles will be discussed, and the prospects for their discoveries at future accelerators will be previewed.

  14. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  15. Lectures on algebraic statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Drton, Mathias; Sullivant, Seth

    2009-01-01

    How does an algebraic geometer studying secant varieties further the understanding of hypothesis tests in statistics? Why would a statistician working on factor analysis raise open problems about determinantal varieties? Connections of this type are at the heart of the new field of "algebraic statistics". In this field, mathematicians and statisticians come together to solve statistical inference problems using concepts from algebraic geometry as well as related computational and combinatorial techniques. The goal of these lectures is to introduce newcomers from the different camps to algebraic statistics. The introduction will be centered around the following three observations: many important statistical models correspond to algebraic or semi-algebraic sets of parameters; the geometry of these parameter spaces determines the behaviour of widely used statistical inference procedures; computational algebraic geometry can be used to study parameter spaces and other features of statistical models.

  16. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    21, 22, 23 November LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 21 November Auditorium, bldg 500 on 22, 23 November Introduction to symmetry breaking phenomena in physics E. Brezin / ENS, Paris, F. The notion of broken symmetries started slowly to emerge in the 19th century. The early studies of Pasteur on the parity asymmetry of life, the studies of Curie on piezoelectricity and on the symmetries of effects versus the symmetry of causes (which clearly excluded spontaneous symmetry breaking), are important historical landmarks. However the possibility of spontaneous symmetry breaking within the usual principles of statistical mechanics, waited for the work of Peierls and Onsager. The whole theory of phase transitions and critical phenomena, as well as the construction of field theoretic models as long distance limit of yet unknown physics, relies nowadays on the concept of criticality associated to spontaneous symmetry breaking. The phenomena of Goldstone bosons, of Meissn...

  17. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 February REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - 19, 20 and 21 February Main Auditorium bldg. 500, 22 and 23 February Council Chamber, bldg 503 Introduction to Cryogenic Engineering J.G. Weisend / SLAC, Stanford, USA Cryogenic engineering is an important speciality at CERN. With the construction of LHC, this technology will have an even greater impact on machine operations. The goal of the course is to give people not working in cryogenics an appreciation of the basic principals and problems associated with the field. The course will also provide a foundation for future learning in cryogenics. Topics to be covered will include: properties of cryogenic fluids and materials, refrigeration, cryostat design, instrumentation, safety and propertiesof He II. Examples of working cryogenic systems, many of them from high energy physics, will be presented.

  18. Lecture critique de Luttwak

    OpenAIRE

    Guichaoua, Mickaël

    2016-01-01

    La grande stratégie de l’Empire romain d’Edward Luttwak, qui fut conseiller militaire du président Reagan, parut pour la première fois en 1974 mais ne fut éditée en français qu’en 1989. Cet ouvrage connaît toujours un grand succès dans les milieux universitaires et particulièrement chez les étudiants. Cette lecture entre dans le cadre de nos préoccupations sur le dialogue militaire entre Anciens et Modernes, sinon les contemporains. En effet, Luttwak explique, dans son introduction, qu’«  il ...

  19. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 October LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 10:00 hrs - Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Introduction to Field Theory R. Kleiss / University of Nijmegen, NL Starting from the notion of path integrals as developed by Feynman, we discuss field theory in zero spacetime dimensions. The concepts of perturbation expansions, connected amplitudes, Feynman diagrams, classical solutions, renormalization and the effective action are developed. The model is extended to four spacetime dimensions, and the full Feynman rules for relativisitc scalar theory derived. The S matrix and the concept of unitarity are discussed, leading to the amputation rules for S matrix elements from considerations of unitarity. The rules are extended to include particles with spin-1/2 and spin-1. The high-energy behaviour of the theory is discussed as a method to derive the gauge symmetry of the various models.

  20. Göttingen Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Woyczyński, Wojbor A

    1998-01-01

    These lecture notes are woven around the subject of Burgers' turbulence/KPZ model of interface growth, a study of the nonlinear parabolic equation with random initial data. The analysis is conducted mostly in the space-time domain, with less attention paid to the frequency-domain picture. However, the bibliography contains a more complete information about other directions in the field which over the last decade enjoyed a vigorous expansion. The notes are addressed to a diverse audience, including mathematicians, statisticians, physicists, fluid dynamicists and engineers, and contain both rigorous and heuristic arguments. Because of the multidisciplinary audience, the notes also include a concise exposition of some classical topics in probability theory, such as Brownian motion, Wiener polynomial chaos, etc.

  1. Antifouling activity of twelve demosponges from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SM. Ribeiro

    Full Text Available Benthic marine organisms are constantly exposed to fouling, which is harmful to most host species. Thus, the production of secondary metabolites containing antifouling properties is an important ecological advantage for sessile organisms and may also provide leading compounds for the development of antifouling paints. High antifouling potential of sponges has been demonstrated in the Indian and Pacific oceans and in the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas. Brazilian sponges remain understudied concerning antifouling activities. Only two scientific articles reported this activity in sponges of Brazil. The objective of this study was to test crude extracts of twelve species of sponges from Brazil against the attachment of the mussel Perna perna through laboratorial assays, and highlight promising species for future studies. The species Petromica citrina, Amphimedon viridis, Desmapsamma anchorata, Chondrosia sp., Polymastia janeirensis, Tedania ignis, Aplysina fulva, Mycale angulosa, Hymeniacidon heliophila, Dysidea etheria, Tethya rubra, and Tethya maza were frozen and freeze-dried before extraction with acetone or dichloromethane. The crude extract of four species significantly inhibited the attachment of byssus: Tethya rubra (p = 0.0009, Tethya maza (p = 0.0039, Petromica citrina (p = 0.0277, and Hymeniacidon heliophila (p = 0.00003. These species, specially, should be the target of future studies to detail the substances involved in the ability antifouling well as to define its amplitude of action.

  2. Twelve Elastic Constants of Betula platyphylla Suk.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Liyu; Lu Zhenyou

    2004-01-01

    Wood elastic constants are needed to describe the elastic behaviors of wood and be taken as an important design parameter for wood-based composite materials and structural materials. This paper clarified the relationships between compliance coefficients and engineering elastic constants combined with orthotropic properties of wood, and twelve elastic constants of Betula platyphylla Suk. were measured by electrical strain gauges. Spreading the adhesive quantity cannot be excessive or too little when the strain flakes were glued. If excessive, the glue layer was too thick which would influence the strain flakes' performance, and if too little, glues plastered were not firm, which could not accurately transmit the strain. Wood as an orthotropic material, its modulus of elasticity and poisson's ratios are related by two formulas:μij /Ei =μji /Ej and μij 0.95) between the reciprocal of elastic modulus MOE-1 and the square of the ratio of depth to length (h/l)2, which indicate that shear modulus values measured were reliable by three point bending experiment.

  3. The Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures

    CERN Document Server

    1991-01-01

    The Oskar Klein Memorial Lectures, instituted in 1988 and supported by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences through its Nobel Committee for Physics, are given at Stockholm University in Sweden, where Oskar Klein was professor in Theoretical Physics 1930-1962.Volume 1 contains the 1988 lectures on "Symmetry and Physics" and "From the Bethe-Hulthén Hypothesis to the Yang-Baxter Equation," given by C N Yang, Nobel Prize winner (1957) and professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The 1989 lectures on "Beyond the Standard Models," referring to models for cosmology and elementar

  4. An Invitation to Wander

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrova L.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available "An invitation to wander" is Lyudmila Lavrova’s introduction to the book Contrasts, collection of poems by Hamlet Isaxanli which were translated from Azerbaijani into Russian by Alla Akhundova (Izograf, Moscow, 2006. Lavrova describes Isaxanli’s poetry as "transparent and simple", comparing him to a medieval Arab-Islamic philosopher because of the themes throughout his works of "Many and One". Even in small details of life and nature, he finds cause to revere the Divine. His poetry is also notable for its connection to mathematics and its foundation of reason. This is logical given Isakhanli’s background as a mathematician; Lavrova offers an extensive biography of the poet and a list of awards he has won. Despite the mathematic and rational foundations of his work, his poetry is not limited to being appreciated by a Western audience; Lavrova points out that Isakhanli’s poetry is also considered beautiful by Eastern standards of aesthetics. In fact, from an Eastern perspective, even more important than his "success" is his personal character, which is also worthy of esteem. Lavrova also discusses the origins of his inspiration for his works, concluding that the goal of Isakhanli’s poetry is to "nurture morality".‖

  5. INVITATION FROM THE UBS

    CERN Multimedia

    UBS SA

    2000-01-01

    Via its Web pages (http://www.ubs.com), the UBS offers you direct access to all its telebanking services, namely:information relating to accounts and custody accounts (balances, debits and credits);stock market information and placing of orders;domestic and foreign payment transactions.These supplementary and inexpensive banking services mean that you no longer have to go to the bank to obtain the information you require and are not therefore limited by bank opening times.The UBS will be holding two sessions on the CERN site to present this modern product on:25.4.2000 (in French),26.4.2000 (in English).The agenda will be as follows:12.00 to 12.40 p.m.Presentation of the product;12.40 to 13.10 p.m.Question-and-answer session;13.10 to 14.00 p.m.Buffet and discussions.To enable us to meet your requirements and to expedite matters, we invite you to register for one of these sessions by sending an e-mail or letter to:pierre.guyenon@ubs.com before 7.4.2000 indicating:your surname and first name, the account number(...

  6. To Lecture or Not to Lecture? That is the Question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oja, Kenneth John; Kelly, Lesly

    2016-01-01

    A quasi-experimental mixed-methods study compared the effects of an unfolding case study with lecture in a nursing orientation class on new graduate registered nurses' knowledge, perceived learning, and satisfaction with the instructional method. Although results showed that the unfolding case study was engaging, learners who received content in a lecture format achieved significantly higher posttest scores. Nursing professional development specialists will find this article helpful when considering instructional methods for new graduate registered nurses.

  7. The Oskar Fehr Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J S

    2016-06-01

    The first Oskar Fehr lecture is given in honour of Professor Fehr, a well respected ophthalmologist, who was head physician of the Department of Eye Diseases at the Rudolf Virchow Hospital from 1918. He practiced there until 1938, when he was forbidden to enter the clinic because he was Jewish and subject to the anti-Semitic laws that were instituted after the rise of the Nazi party. Dr. Fehr escaped to Great Britain, where he practiced ophthalmology into his eighties. He was the first to distinguish between granular corneal dystrophy, lattice corneal dystrophy and macular corneal dystrophy. The topic of the first Oskar Fehr lecture is Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD), an autosomal dominantly inherited corneal dystrophy associated with abnormal cholesterol deposition in the cornea. The clinical, histopathologic and genetic findings of 115 individuals with SCD followed over 18 years are discussed. The impact of systemic cholesterol metabolism on other diseases is reviewed. Corneal findings in SCD are predictable on the basis of patient age. All patients develop progressive corneal haze because of abnormal deposition of corneal lipid, but only half of patients with SCD have evidence of corneal crystals. The prior name for this disease, Schnyder crystalline corneal dystrophy, led me to create the International Committee for the Classification of Corneal Dystrophies, in order to create a more up-to-date and accurate nomenclature for SCD and other corneal dystrophies. The name was then changed to Schnyder corneal dystrophy. Histopathology of excised SCD corneas demonstrates abnormal deposition of only HDL cholesterol. Mutations in the UBIAD1 gene result in SCD. Three dimensional protein modeling shows that mutations result in impaired vitamin K synthesis, suggesting a common link between vitamin K and cholesterol metabolism. UBIAD1 mutations are associated with other diseases, such as bladder carcinoma and Parkinson's disease like findings in Drosophila. Studies of the

  8. Introductory Lectures on Collider Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    These are elementary lectures about collider physics. They are aimed at graduate students who have some background in computing Feynman diagrams and the Standard Model, but assume no particular sophistication with the physics of high energy colliders.

  9. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Service and the CERN and ESO Pensioners Association invite CERN pensioners to a series of presentations given by professors and specialists at the University Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Geneva on the subject of: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The final series of presentations will be held in CERN’s Main Auditorium (Building 500) on: Wednesday, 25 February 2009, from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. What is cerebral reserve ? Historique et importance de la notion de «réserve cérébrale» Prof. Ezio GIACOBINI Intervention de la réserve cérébrale sur les troubles de la cognition Prof. Jean-Pierre MICHEL Comment est-il possible d’évaluer la réserve cérébrale ? Prof. Gabriel GOLD Projet de recherche «Optimum Brain Ageing» -\tAspects méthodologiques - Dr François HERRMANN -\tAspects pratiques - Dr Dina ZEKRY The presentations will be given in French with overheads in English and will be followed by a wide-rangi...

  10. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Service and the CERN and ESO Pensioners Association invite CERN pensioners to a series of presentations given by professors and specialists at the University Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Geneva on the subject of: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The final series of presentations will be held in CERN’s Main Auditorium (Building 500) on: Wednesday, 25 February 2009, from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. What is cerebral reserve ? Historique et importance de la notion de «réserve cérébrale» Prof. Ezio GIACOBINI Intervention de la réserve cérébrale sur les troubles de la cognition Prof. Jean-Pierre MICHEL Comment est-il possible d’évaluer la réserve cérébrale? Prof. Gabriel GOLD Projet de recherche «Optimum Brain Ageing» - Aspects méthodologiques - Dr François HERRMANN -\tAspects pratiques - Dr Dina ZEKRY The presentations will be given in French with overheads in English and will be followed by a wide-rangin...

  11. Lectures for CERN pensioners

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Medical Service and the CERN and ESO Pensioners Association invite CERN pensioners to a series of presentations given by professors and specialists at the University Teaching Hospitals and the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Geneva on the subject of: PROMOTION OF OPTIMUM BRAIN AGEING The final presentation will be given in CERN’s Main Auditorium (Building 500) on: Wednesday, 25 February 2009, from 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. What is cerebral reserve ? Historique et importance de la notion de «réserve cérébrale» - Prof. Ezio GIACOBINI Intervention de la réserve cérébrale sur les troubles de la cognition - Prof. Jean-Pierre MICHEL Comment est-il possible d’évaluer la réserve cérébrale? - Prof. Gabriel GOLD Projet de recherche «Optimum Brain Ageing» - Aspects méthodologiques - Dr François HERRMANN - Aspects pratiques - Dr Dina ZEKRY The presentations will be given in French with overheads in English and will be followed by a wide-ranging disc...

  12. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  13. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (1/8) Accelerators (1/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 17 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (2/8) Accelerators (2/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 18 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (3/8) Accelerators (3/5) Discussion Session Thursday 19 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN C. Gaspar / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (4/8) Accelerators (4/5) Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 20 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning / CERN A. Pich and O. Brüning Particle Physics: the Standard Model (5/8) Accelerators (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobse...

  14. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 23 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (6/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (1/3) Computing at CERN (1/3) Tuesday 24 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) T. Cass / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (7/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (2/3) Computing at CERN (2/3) Wednesday 25 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich R. Jacobsen / LBLN, Berkeley (USA) A. Pich and R. Jacobsen J. Tuckmantel / CERN Particle Physics: the Standard Model (8/8) From Raw Data to Physics Results (3/3) Discussion Session Superconducting cavities Thursday 26 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Cass / CERN Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (1/3) LEP Physics (1/4) Computing at CERN (3/3) Friday 27July 9:15 10:15 11:15 T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN T. Nakada; T. Cass T. Nakada in main auditorium T. Cass in TH auditorium Violati...

  15. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 30 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN T. Nakada / CERN P. Wells / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) Violation of Particle Anti-particle Symmetry (3/3) LEP Physics (3/4) Tuesday 31 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN P. Wells / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN P. Lebrun / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) Neutrino Physics (1/4) LEP Physics (4/4) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (1/2) Superconducting Technology for particle accelerators (2/2) Wednesday 1 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Guidice / CERN F. Dydak / CERN G. Guidice; P. Wells G. Guidice in main auditorium, P. Wells in TH auditorium) O. Grobner / CERN O. Grobner / CERN Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) Neutrino Physics (2/4) Discussion Session Ultra High Vacuum Technology (1/2) Ultra High Vacuum Technology (2/2) Thursday 2 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Antinori / CERN F. Dydak / CERN J. Aysto / CERN Heavy Ions (1/2) Neutrino Physics (3/4) Isolde Physics O...

  16. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experime...

  17. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Wednesday 4 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 15:45 L. Maiani / CERN L. Maiani / CERN M. Franklin / CERN G. Stevenson M. Diemoz O. Ullaland Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (1/2) Introduction to CERN & Particle Physics (2/2) Classic Experiments (1/3) CERN Radiation Protection CERN Information on Activities CERN Intro to workshops Thursday 5 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 16:30 M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN M. Franklin / CERN F. Close F. Close   Classic Experiments (2/3) Classic Experiments (3/3) Discussion session Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (1/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (2/4) Welcome Drink Friday 6 July 9:15 10:15 F. Close F. Close Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (3/4) Particle Physics (for non-physics students) (4/4) Further information can be obtained on the web at the following URL: http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/HRS/Recruitment/sum_prog99.html

  18. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 6 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (1/3) Astroparticle Physics (1/3) Introduction to Cosmology (1/2) Tuesday 7 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN E. Copeland / Centre for Theoretical Physics University of Sussex, UK LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Introduction to Cosmology (2/2) Wednesday 8 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 14:00 15:00 F. Gianotti / CERN J. Carr / CERN J. Carr; F. Gianotti J. Carr in main auditorium F. Gianotti in TH auditorium LHC Physics (2/3) Astroparticle Physics (2/3) Discussion Session Thursday 9 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN G. Veneziano; E. Copeland G. Veneziano in main auditorium E. Copeland in TH auditorium Dreams of a Finite Theory (1/2) Student Session (1/3) Discussion Session Friday 10 August 9:15 10:15 11:15 G. Veneziano / CERN L. Okun / CERN Student Se...

  19. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Main Auditorium bldg. 500 Date Time Lecturer Title Monday 9 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN L. Rolandi / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) Big Experiments Discussion Session Tuesday 10 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) Particle Detectors (1/5) Wednesday 11 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) Particle Detectors (2/5) Discussion Session Thursday 12 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN C. Joram / CERN Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5/6) Particle Detectors (3/5) Particle Detectors (4/5) Friday 13 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 R. Kleiss / CERN C. Joram / CERN R. Kleiss / C. Joram Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (6/6) Particle Detectors (5/5) Discussion Session Monday 16 July 9:15 10:15 11:15 A. Pich O. Brüning C...

  20. Lectures on Bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Even a first approximation of bound states requires contributions of all powers in the coupling. This means that the concept of "lowest order bound state" needs to be defined. In these lectures I discuss the "Born" (no loop, lowest order in $\\hbar$) approximation. Born level states are bound by gauge fields which satisfy the classical field equations. As a check of the method, Positronium states of any momentum are determined as eigenstates of the QED Hamiltonian, quantized at equal time. Analogously, states bound by a strong external field $A^\\mu(\\xv)$ are found as eigenstates of the Dirac Hamiltonian. Their Fock states have dynamically created $e^+e^-$ pairs, whose distribution is determined by the Dirac wave function. The linear potential of $D=1+1$ dimensions confines electrons but repels positrons. As a result, the mass spectrum is continuous and the wave functions have features of both bound states and plane waves. The classical solutions of Gauss' law are explored for hadrons in QCD. A non-vanishing bo...

  1. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURES FOR POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes...

  2. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2002-01-01

    14, 15, 16, 17, 18 January LECTURE SERIES From 11:00 hrs - Auditorium, bldg 500 Superconducting materials suitable for magnets D.C. Larbalestier / Univ. of Wisconsin, USA The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes of material - Nb-Ti...

  3. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  4. John Adams Lecture

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    13 December 2010 14:30 - Council Chamber, Bldg.503-1-001 Accelerator Breakthroughs, Achievements and Lessons from the Tevatron Collider V. Shiltsev / Fermilab’s Accelerator Physics Centre This year we celebrate the 25th anniversary of the first proton-antiproton collisions in the Tevatron. For two and a half decades the Tevatron at Fermilab (Batavia, IL, USA) was a centerpiece of the US and world’s High Energy Physics as the world’s highest energy particle collider at 1.8 TeV center of mass energy. While funding agencies are deciding on a 3-year extension of the Collider Run II operation through 2014, we – in this 2010 John Adams Lecture - will take a look in exciting story of the Tevatron: the story of long preparations, great expectations, numerous difficulties, years of “blood and sweat”, continuous upgrades, exceeding original goals (by a factor of 400) and high emotions. An accelerator scientist prospective will be given on a wide spectrum o...

  5. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    27, 28, 29 June and 2, 3 July REGULAR LECTURE PROGRAMME From 11:00 hrs - Council Chamber bldg. 503 on 27, 28, 29 June and Auditorium, bldg 500 on 2, 3 July Particle Identification at the LHC P. Eerola / Lund University, SE The LHC experiments will explore new frontiers of particle physics. To maximize the physics potential of LHC, we need identification of leptons, hadrons, photons and 'invisible' particles. This is realized through reconstruction of electrons and muons, charged particle tracking and identification, b- and tau-tagging, and jet reconstruction. In addition, missing energy has to be measured in order to look for signatures of invisible particles. The experimental conditions posed by the collider, which will be operating at higher energy and luminosity than the present ones, are demanding. A large dynamical range is required in order to measure energies and momenta ranging from below one GeV to several TeVs. The detectors should be able to cope with the 40 MHz collision rate, with a large number ...

  6. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (1/3) Tuesday 23 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (2/3) Wednesday 24July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 J. CARR  Astroparticles (3/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session 14:00 - 16:00 O. GROBNER UHV Technology Thursday 25 July (Theory Auditorium) 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) (TH) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (1/3) (TH) 11:15 - 12:00 J. SHIERS Computing (3/3) (TH) Friday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. RATTAZZI Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 10:15 - 11:00 P. WELLS Experimental test of the SM - LEP (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00  R...

  7. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 15 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (1/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (1/3) Tuesday 16 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (2/3) Wednesday 17 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 18 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (4/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 C. GASPAR Trigger and Data Acquisition (3/3) Friday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. BRÜNING Accelerators (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH Standard Model (6/8) 10:15 - 11:00 T. WENAUS From Raw Data to Physics ...

  8. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (2/3) Wednesday 10 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Thursday 11 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (4/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (5/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (3/3) Friday 12 July 09:15 - 11:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (5&6/6) 11:15 ...

  9. SUMMER STUDENT LECTURE PROGRAMME

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500   DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 3 July 09:15 - 10:00 L. FAYARD, O. ULLALAND Presentation of the Summer Student Programm 10:15 - 12:00 L. MAIANI Introduction to CERN (1&2/2) 14:00 - 15:00 G. Stevenson Radiation Protection (Council Chamber, bldg.503) Thursday 4 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (1&2/4) 11:15 - 12:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (1/5) Friday 5 July 09:15 - 11:00 F. CLOSE Introduction to Particle Physics for non Physics Students (3&4/4) 11:15 - 12:00 Discussion Session Monday 8 July 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Particle Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 M. FRANKLIN Classic Experiments (1/3) 14:00 - 15:00 M. LINDROOS Isolde 15:30 - 16:30 M. LINDROOS Visit of the Experiment Tuesday 9 july 09:15 - 10:00 R. KLEISS Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 C. JORAM Part...

  10. Optional Student Use of Online Lecture Resources: Resource Preferences, Performance and Lecture Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabe, M.; Christopherson, K.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common uses of a course management system in the on-campus environment is to offer lecture resources to students. Few researchers have investigated how students use such resources. This study considers student use of lecture resources that offer a representation of the lecture presented (i.e. lecture outline, lecture summary, audio…

  11. Hepatic Angiosarcoma: a Review of Twelve Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Li; Xishan Hao

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Hepatic angiosarcoma (HAS), a lethal disease, is the most common sarcoma arising in the liver. Little information about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and management of HAS has been reported. Increased familiarity with this disease will facilitate correct diagnosis and help to improve management of this condition in the future.The objective of this study was to describe cases of hepatic angiosarcoma and to discuss the etiologic, diagnostic, therapeutic features and prognosis of this tumor. This report not only serves to give more evidence of the relationship between hepatic angiosarcoma and carcinogenic exposure, but also demonstrates the key points in different methods of diagnosis and the optimal treatment of hepatic angiosarcoma.METHODS Twelve cases of hepatic angiosareoma were analyzed retrospectively, representing the different character in clinical presentations and laboratory computed tomographical scans; pathological data and treatment are described. Clinical and biologic follow-up was carried out for two years after surgical treatment.RESULTS There were nine men and three women varying in ages from 57 to 71 years with an average of 64.3 years. Ten patientshad a history of exposure to vinyl chloride or thorotrast. Mild or moderate abdominal pain and bloating, abdominal mass and fever were the common clinical presentations. Tumors were visualized by ultrasonography and CT scans in all patients. Biochemical profiles yielded variable results and proved to be of little value in detection or diagnosis. Surgical resection was feasible for each patient who was treated as follows: two wedge resections, six segementectomies and four bisegmentectomies. Five patients received Neoadjuvant chemotherapy postoperatively. The survival rate of those cases was poor. The maximum survival time was fourteen months. The mean survival time for this chemotherapeutic group was 11 months. The difference between the survival time of those treated with an operation

  12. Exploring medical student decisions regarding attending live lectures and using recorded lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anmol; Saks, Norma Susswein

    2013-09-01

    Student decisions about lecture attendance are based on anticipated effect on learning. Factors involved in decision-making, the use of recorded lectures and their effect on lecture attendance, all warrant investigation. This study was designed to identify factors in student decisions to attend live lectures, ways in which students use recorded lectures, and if their use affects live lecture attendance. A total of 213 first (M1) and second year (M2) medical students completed a survey about lecture attendance, and rated factors related to decisions to attend live lectures and to utilize recorded lectures. Responses were analyzed overall and by class year and gender. M1 attended a higher percentage of live lectures than M2, while both classes used the same percentage of recorded lectures. Females attended more live lectures, and used a smaller percentage of recorded lectures. The lecturer was a key in attendance decisions. Also considered were the subject and availability of other learning materials. Students use recorded lectures as replacement for live lectures and as supplement to them. Lectures, both live and recorded, are important for student learning. Decisions about lecture placement in the curriculum need to be based on course content and lecturer quality.

  13. Basic investigation project for energy consumption efficiency improvement in developing countries. Invitation of engineers from developing countries (Vietnam, Philippines, and India); Hatten tojokoku energy shohi koritsuka kiso chosa nado jigyo. Hatten tojokoku gijutsusha shohei jigyo (Betonamu, Philippines, Indo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The International Center of Environmental Technology Transfer has invited seven engineers from Vietnam, eight from Philippines and two from India for human resource education project for environmental preservation in developing countries. Those who were invited are administrative officials and engineers who work at administrative agents, research institutes and corporations related to energy conservation and environment preservation. In this invitation program, lecturers were invited from governmental offices, universities and corporations according to their expertise fields to carry out lectures and site training. With respect to energy conservation, lectures were given on a `summary of energy saving methods` by a lecturer invited from the Chubu Governmental Department of Trade and Industry, and on an `introduction to new energies` by Prof. Shimizu at the Engineering Faculty of the Mie University. Both lecturers emphasized the necessity of energy conservation, and importance of new energies as clean energies. The trainees showed strong interest when they visited a `cement factory` and a `coal burning thermal power plant` as the key industries. Their experience would be reflected strongly on guiding operations of factories in their own countries. 56 figs., 15 tabs.

  14. Work environment perceptions following relocation to open-plan offices: A twelve-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Jessica; Miller, Michael; Horneij, Eva

    2015-01-01

    A workplace's design can have various positive or negative effects on the employees and since the 1970s the advantages and disadvantages of open-plan offices have been discussed. The aim of this study was to investigate perceived health, work environment and self-estimated productivity one month before and at three, six and twelve months after relocation from individual offices to an open-plan office environment. Employees from three departments within the same company group and who worked with relatively similar tasks and who were planned to be relocated from private offices to open-plan offices were invited to participate. Questionnaires comprising items from The Salutogenic Health Indicator Scale, The Work Experience Measurement Scale, the questionnaire by Brennan et al. about perceived performance and one question from the Work Ability Index were sent to participants one month before relocation (baseline) to open-plan offices and then at three, six and twelve months after relocation. At baseline, 82 questionnaires were sent out. The response rate was 85%. At the follow-ups 77-79 questionnaires were sent out and the response-rate was 70%-81%. At follow-ups, perceived health, job satisfaction and performance had generally deteriorated. The results of the study indicate that employees' perception of health, work environment and performance decreased during a 12 month period following relocation from individual offices to open-plan offices.

  15. Practical strategies for effective lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Peter H; McCallister, Jennifer W; Luks, Andrew M; Le, Tao T; Fessler, Henry E

    2015-04-01

    Lecturing is an essential teaching skill for scientists and health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, few medical or scientific educators have received training in contemporary techniques or technology for large audience presentation. Interactive lecturing outperforms traditional, passive-style lecturing in educational outcomes, and is being increasingly incorporated into large group presentations. Evidence-based techniques range from the very simple, such as inserting pauses for audience discussion, to more technologically advanced approaches such as electronic audience response systems. Alternative software platforms such as Prezi can overcome some of the visual limits that the ubiquitous PowerPoint imposes on complex scientific narratives, and newer technology formats can help foster the interactive learning environment. Regardless of the technology, adherence to good principles of instructional design, multimedia learning, visualization of quantitative data, and informational public speaking can improve any lecture. The storyline must be clear, logical, and simplified compared with how it might be prepared for scientific publication. Succinct outline and summary slides can provide a roadmap for the audience. Changes of pace, and summaries or other cognitive breaks inserted every 15-20 minutes can renew attention. Graphics that emphasize clear, digestible data graphs or images over tables, and simple, focused tables over text slides, are more readily absorbed. Text slides should minimize words, using simple fonts in colors that contrast to a plain background. Adherence to these well-established principles and addition of some new approaches and technologies will yield an engaging lecture worth attending.

  16. Lecture Quiz Extended: An Improvement of the Lecture Quiz Game

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Long Tien

    2008-01-01

    Lecture Quiz is a game used to provide more active and participant students in lectures. The game is based on a server, a teacher client and a student client. In a master thesis done in 2007, Ole Kristian Mørch-Storstein and Terje Øfsdahl have explored concept of game to be used in higher education and develop a prototype game to further evaluate that concept. Their game has three components; the first one is the server part running on a server. This component connect to a database and provid...

  17. Lectures on Conformal Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Qualls, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures notes are based on courses given at National Taiwan University, National Chiao-Tung University, and National Tsing Hua University in the spring term of 2015. Although the course was offered primarily for graduate students, these lecture notes have been prepared for a more general audience. They are intended as an introduction to conformal field theories in various dimensions, with applications related to topics of particular interest: topics include the conformal bootstrap program, boundary conformal field theory, and applications related to the AdS/CFT correspondence. We assume the reader to be familiar with quantum mechanics at the graduate level and to have some basic knowledge of quantum field theory. Familiarity with string theory is not a prerequisite for this lectures, although it can only help.

  18. "Don't Lecture Me"

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called "Don't Lecture Me" and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  19. ``Don't Lecture Me''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called ``Don't Lecture Me'' and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  20. Eight lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Planck, Max

    1997-01-01

    In 1909 the great German physicist and Nobel Prize winner Max Planck (1858-1947) delivered a series of eight lectures at Columbia University giving a fascinating overview of the new state of physics, which he had played a crucial role in bringing about. The first, third, fifth, and sixth lectures present his account of the revolutionary developments occasioned when he first applied the quantum hypothesis to blackbody radiation. The reader is given an invaluable opportunity to witness Planck's thought processes both on the level of philosophical principles as well as their application to physi

  1. Displacement ventilation in lecture halls

    OpenAIRE

    Egorov, Artem

    2013-01-01

    This thesis considers several important goals. The main purpose is to see how displacement ventilation sys-tem works in the lecture hall of M-building and compare obtained results with D2 and Indoor Climate Classi-fication. The second one is to analyze the function of the ventilation system. The last one is to realize when displacement ventilation is preferable to mixing ventilation. Analysis of the system was carried out with instruments from MUAS HVAC laboratory. In lecture hall were me...

  2. TASI Lectures on Flavor Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    These notes overlap with lectures given at the TASI summer schools in 2014 and 2011, as well as at the European School of High Energy Physics in 2013. This is primarily an attempt at transcribing my hand-written notes, with emphasis on topics and ideas discussed in the lectures. It is not a comprehensive introduction or review of the field, nor does it include a complete list of references. I hope, however, that someone may find it useful to better understand the reasons for excitement about recent progress and future opportunities in flavor physics.

  3. TASI Lectures on Flavor Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligeti, Zoltan

    These notes overlap with lectures given at the TASI summer schools in 2014 and 2011, as well as at the European School of High Energy Physics in 2013. This is primarily an attempt at transcribing my handwritten notes, with emphasis on topics and ideas discussed in the lectures. It is not a comprehensive introduction or review of the field, nor does it include a complete list of references. I hope, however, that some may find it useful to better understand the reasons for excitement about recent progress and future opportunities in flavor physics.

  4. 68 INVITED Personalized surgical treatment for sarcoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hohenberger, P

    2007-01-01

    ... belongtothemodernsurgicalapproachinthebattleagainstlocalisedand locallyadvancedprostatecancer. 67 INVITED Personalized surgical treatment for early breast cancer E.Rutgers. The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department...

  5. A Response to Our Invitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.NEIL; KILLALEA

    1999-01-01

    A form for readers can be found at the back of every odd-numberedissue of Women of China,including an invitation to give us any opinionsand suggestions regarding this magazine or any questions concerningChinese women.Women of China welcomes all forms of feedback or

  6. Genuineness: An Overlooked Element of Inviting Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    Genuineness, the condition of sincerity in behaving as one's unadulterated self, is a concept that is inherently congruent with inviting behavior yet is not directly addressed in the literature concerned with Invitational Theory. The author discusses the concept of genuineness, describes how it fits Invitational Theory and argues for its inclusion…

  7. Invitational Education: Theory, Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Invitational Theory argues that learning is enhanced when learners are positively encouraged or "invited" into the educational experience. Arising from perceptual and self-concept theory, Invitational Pedagogy is constructed on four principles: respect for people, trust, optimism and intentionality, and upon five pillars: people, places, policies,…

  8. Symmetry, Spin Dynamics and the Properties of Nanostructures : Lecture Notes of the 11th International School on Theoretical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wal, Andrzej; Barnaś, Józef

    2016-01-01

    This book is a collection of lecture notes which were presented by invited speakers at the Eleventh School on Theoretical Physics "Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter SSPCM 2014" in Rzeszów (Poland) in September 2014. The main challenge for the lecturers was the objective to present their subject as a review as well as in the form of introduction for beginners. Topics considered in the volume concentrate on: spin dynamics and spin transport in magnetic and non-magnetic structures, spin-orbit interaction in two-dimensional systems and graphene, and new mathematical method used in the condensed matter physics.

  9. Videotaped Lectures in a Graduate Cytogenetics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R. L.; Jellen, E. N.

    1994-01-01

    Graduate students evaluated the use of videotape recordings of lectures on chromosome configurations in a cytogenetics course. Ninety-two percent of the students indicated that videotaping was worthwhile. Advantages for using the videotaped cytogenetics lectures are presented. (MDH)

  10. Rudolf Ahlswede’s lectures on information theory

    CERN Document Server

    Althöfer, Ingo; Deppe, Christian; Tamm, Ulrich

    Volume 1 : The volume “Storing and Transmitting Data” is based on Rudolf Ahlswede's introductory course on "Information Theory I" and presents an introduction to Shannon Theory. Readers, familiar or unfamiliar with the technical intricacies of Information Theory, will benefit considerably from working through the book; especially Chapter VI with its lively comments and uncensored insider views from the world of science and research offers informative and revealing insights. This is the first of several volumes that will serve as a collected research documentation of Rudolf Ahlswede’s lectures on information theory. Each volume includes comments from an invited well-known expert. Holger Boche contributed his insights in the supplement of the present volume. Classical information processing concerns the main tasks of gaining knowledge, storage, transmitting and hiding data. The first task is the prime goal of Statistics. For the two next, Shannon presented an impressive mathematical theory called Informat...

  11. Computational geometry lectures at the morningside center of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Ren-Hong

    2003-01-01

    Computational geometry is a borderline subject related to pure and applied mathematics, computer science, and engineering. The book contains articles on various topics in computational geometry, which are based on invited lectures and some contributed papers presented by researchers working during the program on Computational Geometry at the Morningside Center of Mathematics of the Chinese Academy of Science. The opening article by R.-H. Wang gives a nice survey of various aspects of computational geometry, many of which are discussed in more detail in other papers in the volume. The topics include problems of optimal triangulation, splines, data interpolation, problems of curve and surface design, problems of shape control, quantum teleportation, and others.

  12. Investigating Veterinary Medicine Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Capture: Issues, Concerns, and Promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Alison C; Demirbilek, Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    Lecture capture technology is becoming more pervasive in today's classrooms. Students are demanding their lectures be recorded, but many instructors remain resistant. The goal of this study was to investigate faculty perceptions of lecture capture and to understand their concerns with the technology. Through a review of the existing literature, three common reasons for not recording were identified: impact on class attendance, incompatible pedagogy, and technical concerns. To test the hypotheses, an electronic survey was created and distributed to the faculty of a veterinary college in the southeastern US. The survey included both quantitative and qualitative questions. An invitation was emailed to all 134 faculty members, garnering 50 responses. Results were consistent with the hypotheses. Impact on class attendance, teaching styles, and technical considerations have dissuaded many instructors from adopting lecture capture technology. However, a fourth theme that emerged was faculty lack of awareness/familiarity. According to the qualitative responses, many faculty either did not know lecture recording was available in their teaching spaces or were not trained in how to use the technology. Recommendations for future research include distributing the survey campus-wide and providing more opportunities for faculty training. It would also be worthwhile to repeat the survey after providing more information and training materials to faculty, or after switching from an opt-in to an opt-out approach, to see whether perceptions have changed among the college's faculty.

  13. TASI Lectures on Jet Substructure

    CERN Document Server

    Shelton, Jessie

    2013-01-01

    Jet physics is a rich and rapidly evolving field, with many applications to physics in and beyond the Standard Model. These notes, based on lectures delivered at the June 2012 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute, provide an introduction to jets at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics covered include sequential jet algorithms, jet shapes, jet grooming, and boosted Higgs and top tagging.

  14. Koshiba, Tanaka give Nobel lectures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Masatoshi Kosiba and Koichi Tanaka presented lectures in English on Sunday, touching on topics ranging from particle physics, to teamwork to commemorate their reception of this year's Nobel Prize for Physics and Chemistry. The two will receive their respective prizes in an awards ceremony scheduled for Tuesday (1 page).

  15. Six Lectures on Commutative Algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Elias, J; Miro-Roig, Rosa Maria; Zarzuela, Santiago

    2009-01-01

    Interest in commutative algebra has surged over the years. In order to survey and highlight the developments in this rapidly expanding field, the Centre de Recerca Matematica in Bellaterra organized a ten-days Summer School on Commutative Algebra in 1996. This title offers a synthesis of the lectures presented at the Summer School

  16. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  17. TASI lectures on complex structures

    CERN Document Server

    Denef, Frederik

    2011-01-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  18. TASI Lectures on Complex Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denef, Frederik

    2012-11-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  19. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  20. Embedding Laboratory Experience in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James R.; Barroso, Luciana R.; Simpson, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrations can be very effective at enhancing student learning and represent a mechanism for embedding laboratory experiences within a classroom setting. A key component to an effective demonstration is active student engagement throughout the entire process, leading to a guided laboratory experience in a lecture setting. Students are involved…

  1. College Students' Perception of Lecturers Using Humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; Zillmann, Dolf

    1981-01-01

    Audio-taped lectures by male or female professors were produced in four versions: no humor; sexual humor; other-disparaging humor; and self-disparaging humor. Male and female students rated lecturers' intelligence and appeal. Intelligence ratings were unaffected by humor variations, but significant lecturer-student sex interactions were found on…

  2. Interactive Lecture Discourse for University EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Interactive lectures play an important role in improving comprehension and in enhancing communicative competence in the English language for EFL university students taking content lecture courses. This article considers the interactive discourse in lectures of the English Studies Department at the University of Alicante, Spain. It describes an…

  3. Clickers and Formative Feedback at University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egelandsdal, Kjetil; Krumsvik, Rune Johan

    2017-01-01

    Lecturing is often criticized for being a monological and student passive way of teaching. However, digital technology such as Student Response Systems (SRS) can be used to reconstruct the traditional lecturing format. During a series of five two-hour lectures in "qualitative methods" for first year psychology students, we used SRS to…

  4. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in bar...

  5. Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics lectures notes

    CERN Document Server

    Coecke, B

    2005-01-01

    These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns `doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I in quant-ph/0402130 and [4]) which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement quant-ph/0402014. For a survey on the `what', the `why' and the `hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes quant-ph/0506132. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  7. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures, first given at the TASI 2015 summer school, provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive P...

  8. Lectures on matrix field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-01-01

    These lecture notes provide a systematic introduction to matrix models of quantum field theories with non-commutative and fuzzy geometries. The book initially focuses on the matrix formulation of non-commutative and fuzzy spaces, followed by a description of the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. As an example, the phase structure of non-commutative phi-four theory is treated in great detail, with a separate chapter on the multitrace approach. The last chapter offers a general introduction to non-commutative gauge theories, while two appendices round out the text. Primarily written as a self-study guide for postgraduate students – with the aim of pedagogically introducing them to key analytical and numerical tools, as well as useful physical models in applications – these lecture notes will also benefit experienced researchers by providing a reference guide to the fundamentals of non-commutative field theory with an emphasis on matrix models and fuzzy geometries.

  9. Lectures on Matrix Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydri, Badis

    The subject of matrix field theory involves matrix models, noncommutative geometry, fuzzy physics and noncommutative field theory and their interplay. In these lectures, a lot of emphasis is placed on the matrix formulation of noncommutative and fuzzy spaces, and on the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. In particular, the phase structure of noncommutative $\\phi^4$ theory is treated in great detail, and an introduction to noncommutative gauge theory is given.

  10. Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2010-01-01

    Tuesday 25 & Wednesday 26 May 2010 from 11:00 to 12:30 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe by Prof. Hitoshi Murayama (University of California, Berkeley) In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  11. Lecture Notes on Differential Forms

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This is a series of lecture notes, with embedded problems, aimed at students studying differential topology. Many revered texts, such as Spivak's "Calculus on Manifolds" and Guillemin and Pollack's "Differential Topology" introduce forms by first working through properties of alternating tensors. Unfortunately, many students get bogged down with the whole notion of tensors and never get to the punch lines: Stokes' Theorem, de Rham cohomology, Poincare duality, and the realization of various t...

  12. TASI 2006 Lectures on Leptogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine

    2007-03-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter of the Universe has been one of the great challenges in particle physics and cosmology. Leptogenesis as a mechanism for generating the cosmological baryon asymmetry of the Universe has gained significant interests ever since the advent of the evidence of non-zero neutrino masses. In these lectures presented at TASI 2006, I review various realizations of leptogenesis and allude to recent developments in this subject.

  13. MGMT 30100: Management Career Lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Landis, Maureen Huffer

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Management Career Lectures (MGMT 30100) is designed to help undergraduate management students with their overall career/professional development whether that focus on internship/job search processes or graduate school attendance. The course also supports the development, refinement and enrichment of the competencies within the “Launching Business Leaders” initiative. Students develop skills useful for the internship/job search process, gain knowledge that benefits short and long-ter...

  14. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  15. The twelve dimensional super (2+2)-brane

    CERN Document Server

    Hewson, S F

    1996-01-01

    We discuss supersymmetry in twelve dimensions and present a covariant supersymmetric action for a brane with worldsheet signature (2,2), called a super (2+2)-brane, propagating in the osp(64,12) superspace. This superspace is explicitly constructed, and is trivial in the sense that the spinorial part is a trivial bundle over spacetime, unlike the twisted superspace of usual Poincare supersymmetry. For consistency, it is necessary to take a projection of the superspace. This is the same as the projection required for worldvolume supersymmetry. Upon compactification of this superspace, a torsion is naturally introduced and we produce the membrane and type IIB string actions in 11 and 10 dimensional Minkowski spacetimes. In addition, the compactification of the twelve dimensional supersymmetry algebra produces the correct algebras for these theories, including central charges. These considerations thus give the type IIB string and M-theory a single twelve dimensional origin.

  16. On the Persian Wedding Invitation Genre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sharif

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is an attempt to conduct a genre analysis of Persian wedding invitations. Drawing on the model of genre analysis proposed by Swales, a sample of 70 Persian wedding invitation cards has been analyzed in terms of their component moves, obligatory and optional moves, and move order. The results of the analysis have revealed seven generic components by means of which Iranian inviters ritually structure their wedding invitation texts in Persian. The results of the study will shed light on how the Persian wedding invitation genre is constructed drawing on the linguistic features of its generic moves and why the wedding invitation texts are structured in this particular way in Persian providing hints of the underlying socio-cultural conventions responsible for shaping this very genre in Persian. It is hoped that the results of this study will be illuminating for raising cultural awareness.

  17. Students distracted by electronic devices perform at the same level as those who are focused on the lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romesh P. Nalliah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Little is known about the characteristics of internet distractions that students may engage in during lecture. The objective of this pilot study is to identify some of the internet-based distractions students engage in during in-person lectures. The findings will help identify what activities most commonly cause students to be distracted from the lecture and if these activities impact student learning.Methods. This study is a quasi-experimental pilot study of 26 students from a single institution. In the current study, one class of third-year students were surveyed after a lecture on special needs dentistry. The survey identified self-reported utilization patterns of “smart” devices during the lecture. Additionally, twelve quiz-type questions were given to assess the students’ recall of important points in the lecture material that had just been covered.Results. The sample was comprised of 26 students. Of these, 17 were distracted in some form (either checking email, sending email, checking Facebook, or sending texts. The overall mean score on the test was 9.85 (9.53 for distracted students and 10.44 for non-distracted students. There were no significant differences in test scores between distracted and non-distracted students (p = 0.652. Gender and types of distractions were not significantly associated with test scores (p > 0.05. All students believed that they understood all the important points from the lecture.Conclusions. Every class member felt that they acquired the important learning points during the lecture. Those who were distracted by electronic devices during the lecture performed similarly to those who were not. However, results should be interpreted with caution as this study was a small quasi-experimental design and further research should examine the influence of different types of distraction on different types of learning.

  18. Students distracted by electronic devices perform at the same level as those who are focused on the lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Background. Little is known about the characteristics of internet distractions that students may engage in during lecture. The objective of this pilot study is to identify some of the internet-based distractions students engage in during in-person lectures. The findings will help identify what activities most commonly cause students to be distracted from the lecture and if these activities impact student learning. Methods. This study is a quasi-experimental pilot study of 26 students from a single institution. In the current study, one class of third-year students were surveyed after a lecture on special needs dentistry. The survey identified self-reported utilization patterns of "smart" devices during the lecture. Additionally, twelve quiz-type questions were given to assess the students' recall of important points in the lecture material that had just been covered. Results. The sample was comprised of 26 students. Of these, 17 were distracted in some form (either checking email, sending email, checking Facebook, or sending texts). The overall mean score on the test was 9.85 (9.53 for distracted students and 10.44 for non-distracted students). There were no significant differences in test scores between distracted and non-distracted students (p = 0.652). Gender and types of distractions were not significantly associated with test scores (p > 0.05). All students believed that they understood all the important points from the lecture. Conclusions. Every class member felt that they acquired the important learning points during the lecture. Those who were distracted by electronic devices during the lecture performed similarly to those who were not. However, results should be interpreted with caution as this study was a small quasi-experimental design and further research should examine the influence of different types of distraction on different types of learning.

  19. Alcoholics anonymous and other twelve-step programs in recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detar, D Todd

    2011-03-01

    Recovery is a new way of life for many patients; a life without substances to alter their moods but with a major change improving the physical, psychological, and emotional stability with improved overall health outcomes. The Twelve Steps of the Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) are the foundation of the AA, describing both the necessary actions and the spiritual basis for the recovery program of the AA. The Twelve Steps of the AA provide a structure for which a patient with alcoholism may turn for an answer to their problem of alcohol use, abuse, or dependence. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. How Interactive can a Lecture Become?

    OpenAIRE

    Koohgilani,Mehran

    2014-01-01

    The uses of technology have been well documented and many people have tried to use the available technology. In an age of increasingly idevices dependent generation where on average students check their portable devices at least every 15 minutes for 15 seconds, the way students engage with the lecture and the lecturer has changed. The dynamic environment of the lecture is one which can be very enjoyable, demanding and noisy. It requires the attention of the student, note taking skills, teachi...

  1. Invited Lectures from a Spatial Orientation Symposium in Honor of Frederick Guedry, Day 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    being unencumbered by any sort of academic rigor, I did not have to work within a validated model and I could make some assumptions. So, we took the...model has to have inputs. Now, in the academic world and in my experiments, I was able to instrument the person. I had a centrifuge that was able to...Slide 6, page 102] I plagiarized this blatantly from Alan’s [Benson] work, many years ago as part of my thesis, I believe I changed the helicopter

  2. The strong coupling regime of twelve flavors QCD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, Tiago Nunes da; Pallante, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the results recently reported in Ref.[1] [A. Deuzeman, M.P. Lombardo, T. Nunes da Silva and E. Pallante,"The bulk transition of QCD with twelve flavors and the role of improvement"] for the SU(3) gauge theory with Nf=12 fundamental flavors, and we add some numerical evidence and theoret

  3. EFFORTS Technical annex for the twelve month progress report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Eriksen, Morten; Thomas christensen, Thomas Vennick;

    The present report is documentation for the work carried out at DTU during the second year of project activity. The report describes the work completed by DTU in general as well as on the active sub-tasks within materials properties, friction modelling and physical modelling, over the last twelve...

  4. Human Evolution in Science Textbooks from Twelve Different Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quessada, Marie-Pierre; Clement, Pierre; Oerke, Britta; Valente, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    What kinds of images of human beings illustrate human evolution in school textbooks? A comparison between the textbooks of eighteen different countries (twelve European countries and six non-European countries) was attempted. In six countries (Algeria, Malta, Morocco, Mozambique, Portugal, and Tunisia), we did not find any chapter on the topic of…

  5. Bibliography of Spanish Materials for Students, Grades Seven through Twelve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This annotated bibliography of Spanish materials for students in grades seven through twelve is divided into the following categories: (1) Art, Drama, Music, and Poetry; (2) Books in Series; (3) Culture; (4) Dictionaries and Encyclopedias; (5) Literature; (6) Mathematics; (7) Physical Education, Health, and Recreation; (8) Reading and Language…

  6. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  7. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  8. Mechanics lectures on theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerfeld, Arnold Johannes Wilhelm

    1952-01-01

    Mechanics: Lectures on Theoretical Physics, Volume I covers a general course on theoretical physics. The book discusses the mechanics of a particle; the mechanics of systems; the principle of virtual work; and d'alembert's principle. The text also describes oscillation problems; the kinematics, statics, and dynamics of a rigid body; the theory of relative motion; and the integral variational principles of mechanics. Lagrange's equations for generalized coordinates and the theory of Hamilton are also considered. Physicists, mathematicians, and students taking Physics courses will find the book

  9. Lectures on the Strominger system

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Fernandez, Mario

    2016-01-01

    These notes give an introduction to the Strominger system of partial differential equations, and are based on lectures given in September 2015 at the GEOQUANT School, held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT) in Madrid. We describe the links with the theory of balanced metrics in hermitian geometry, the Hermite-Yang-Mills equations, and its origins in physics, that we illustrate with many examples. We also cover some recent developments in the moduli problem and the interrelation of the Strominger system with generalized geometry, via the cohomological notion of string class.

  10. Lectures on quantum field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ashok

    2008-01-01

    This book consists of the lectures for a two-semester course on quantum field theory, and as such is presented in a quite informal and personal manner. The course starts with relativistic one-particle systems, and develops the basics of quantum field theory with an analysis of the representations of the Poincaré group. Canonical quantization is carried out for scalar, fermion, Abelian and non-Abelian gauge theories. Covariant quantization of gauge theories is also carried out with a detailed description of the BRST symmetry. The Higgs phenomenon and the standard model of electroweak interactio

  11. Lectures on Logic and Computation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    foundational, introductory and advanced courses, as well as workshops, covering a wide variety of topics within the three areas of interest: Language and Computation, Language and Logic, and Logic and Computation. During two weeks, around 50 courses and 10 workshops are offered to the attendants, each of 1.......5 hours per day during a five days week, with up to seven parallel sessions. ESSLLI also includes a student session (papers and posters by students only, 1.5 hour per day during the two weeks) and four evening lectures by senior scientists in the covered areas. The 6 course notes were carefully reviewed...

  12. Lecture Notes in Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, D

    2006-01-01

    These lecture notes cover undergraduate textbook topics (e.g. as in Sakurai), and also additional advanced topics at the same level of presentation. In particular: EPR and Bell; Basic postulates; The probability matrix; Measurement theory; Entanglement; Quantum computation; Wigner-Weyl formalism; The adiabatic picture; Berry phase; Linear response theory; Kubo formula; Modern approach to scattering theory with mesoscopic orientation; Theory of the resolvent and the Green function; Gauge and Galilei Symmetries; Motion in magnetic field; Quantum Hall effect; Quantization of the electromagnetic field; Fock space formalism.

  13. The Relative Effects of Traditional Lectures and Guided Notes Lectures on University Student Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W. Larry; Weil, Timothy M.; Porter, James C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Guided notes were employed in two undergraduate Psychology courses involving 71 students. The study design utilized an alternating treatments format to compare Traditional Lectures with Guided Notes lectures. In one of the two courses, tests were administered after each class lecture, whereas the same type of test was administered at the beginning…

  14. The Use of Lecture Recordings in Higher Education: A Review of Institutional, Student, and Lecturer Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Frances V.; Neumann, David L.; Jones, Liz; Creed, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Web-based lecture technologies are being used increasingly in higher education. One widely-used method is the recording of lectures delivered during face-to-face teaching of on-campus courses. The recordings are subsequently made available to students on-line and have been variously referred to as lecture capture, video podcasts, and Lectopia. We…

  15. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. Lecture and Active Learning as a Dialectical Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallin, Irwin

    2017-01-01

    Lecture remains a valuable tool in the student learning toolbox--one that at its best helps students unpack what they read for class, place course material in context, and see how a subject matter expert solves problems. It may be useful to think of lecture and active learning as a dialectical tension satisfied by the interactive lecture. Just as…

  16. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  17. An invitation to critical mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsmose, Ole

    An Invitation to Critical Mathematics Education deals with a range of crucial topics. Among these are students’ foreground, landscapes of investigation, and mathematics in action. The book is intended for a broad audience: educators, students, teachers, policy makers, anybody interested...... in the further development of mathematics education. The book discusses concerns and preoccupation. This way it provides an invitation into critical mathematics education....

  18. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  19. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, as well as lighter-mass alternatives. As an application of these concepts, the phenomenology of direct and indirect detection experiments is discussed in detail.

  20. Web Lectures - ATLAS Overview Week

    CERN Multimedia

    Tushar Bhatnagar; Jeremy Herr; Mitch McLachlan; Homer A. Neal

    2007-01-01

    ATLAS Web Archives Web Archives of the ATLAS Overview Week in Glasgow are now available from the University of Michigan portal here. Archives of ATLAS Plenary Sessions, Workshops, Meetings, and Tutorials recorded over the past two years are available via the University of Michigan Lecture Portal. Other recent additions include the ROOT Workshop held at CERN on March 26-27, the Physics Analysis Tools Workshop held in Bergen, Norway on April 23-27, and the CTEQ Workshop: "Physics at the LHC: Early Challenges" held at Michigan State University on May 14-15. Viewing requires a standard Web browser with RealPlayer plug-in (included in most browsers automatically) and works on any major platform. Lectures can be viewed directly over the Web or downloaded locally. In addition, you will find access to a variety of general tutorials and events via the portal. Feedback & Suggestions Welcome Suggestions for events or tutorials to record in 2007, as well as feedback on existing archives, is always welcome...

  1. Multiple strategies for quality improvement and patient safety-money alone is not the answer, nor is trust. Conclusions of the 6th EQuiP Invitational conference April 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, S.M.; Eriksson, T.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract On 7-9 April 2011 the 6th EQuiP Invitational Conference took place in Copenhagen. Key note lectures were delivered by Professor Frede Olesen (Denmark), Professor Andreas Christian Soennichsen (Austria), Professor Martin Roland (UK) and Professor Richard Roberts (US), and a key note panel di

  2. Influencing factors on lecture attendance at a tertiary institution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The tendency towards decreasing class attendance by students is a concern for ... Various factors contribute to the motivation of students, which in turn directly or ... lecture attendance, lecture/r quality as well as reasons for attending classes.

  3. 新世纪伊始考古研究所专家讲座纪要%A Summary of the Lectures by Specialists of the Institute of Archaeology at the Beginning of the New Century

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    本刊记者

    2001-01-01

    At the beginning of the new century, the Institute of Archaeology invited eight famous specialists of the Institute, who enjoy great prestige in academic circles, to give lectures. They told of their archaeological theories and methods formed in their long practice of scientific research, as well as their road of learning and their achievements.

  4. 超越始于反思--张江教授“强制阐释论”学术报告感评%Transcending from Reflection:Rethinking on professor Zhangjiang′s lecture on "forced interpretation"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何俊

    2015-01-01

    Editor′s word:June 16, 2015, Professor Zhangjiang from Chinese Academy of Social Sciences was invited in Editorial Of-fice of Journal of Aesthetic Education, Hangzhou Normal University, to have a lecture, which focused on the topic"Forced interpretation".The vice-president Hejun make a review on it.

  5. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...... methods for analysing and changing products’ environmental profiles . Sustainability as a driver for innovation...

  6. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  7. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  8. In Defense of the Populist Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrad, Mark Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) programs like Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple Keynote have become the norm for large university lecture classes, but their record in terms of student engagement and active learning is mixed at best. Here, the author presents the merits of a "populist" lecture style that takes full advantage of the…

  9. Lectures on Composite Materials for Aircraft Structures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    lectures are related to structural applications of composites . In Lecture 7, the basic theory that is needed for composite structural analysis is...which composites have been taken up for aeronautical applications. Several specific applications of composites in aircraft structures am described in

  10. Short lecture series in sustainable product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2005-01-01

    Three lectures in sustainable product development models, methods and mindsets should give insight into the way of thinking about the environment when developing products. The first two lectures will guide you through: . Environmental problems in industry & life-cycle thinking . Professional...

  11. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business....

  12. Lecture 11: Some More Suggestions and Remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This lecture discusses how the careful preparation of the observer, control of conditions, and precise use of materials will allow the child to "be free to manifest the phenomena which we wish to observe." This lecture was delivered at the International Training Course, London, 1921. [Reprinted from "AMI Communications" (2008).

  13. Sir Nevill F. Mott Lecture Award

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    The Mott Lecture is awarded to scientists working in the tradition of Nobel laureate Sir Nevill F. Mott, with exceptional contributions to the fields important to the ICANS conference. The ICANS23 Mott Lecture was awarded to Prof. Dr. Sigurd Wagner of Princeton University. He is recognized for his g

  14. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  15. A Case Against Mandatory Lecture Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Richard M.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Students' lecture attendance, course grades, class rank at the end of the first year of medical school, and scores on the NBME Part I examinations were correlated. The data suggest that a significant number of students who did not attend lectures did well academically. (MLW)

  16. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements of the curriculum for the 3rd smester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business....

  17. Richard Feynman's popular lectures on quantum electrodynamics: The 1979 Robb lectures at Auckland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, J. M.; Kwan, A. M.

    1996-06-01

    The subject of quantum electrodynamics (QED) was the subject of QED—The Strange Theory of Light and Matter, the popular book by Richard Feynman which was published by Princeton University Press in 1985. On p. 1, Feynman makes passing reference to the fact that the book is based on a series of general lectures on QED which were, however, first delivered in New Zealand. At Auckland University, these lectures were delivered in 1979, as the Sir Douglas Robb lectures, and videotapes of the lectures are held by the Auckland University Physics Department. We have carried out a detailed examination of these videotapes, and we discuss here the major differences between the original Auckland lectures and the published version. We use selected quotations from the lectures to show that the original lectures provide additional insight into Feynman's character, and have great educational value.

  18. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Rojas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  19. Lectures on Foliation Dynamics: Barcelona 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Hurder, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This survey is based on a series of five lectures, given May 3--7, 2010, at the Centre de Recerca Matematica, Barcelona. The goal of the lectures was to present aspects of the theory of foliation dynamical systems which have particular importance for the classification of foliations of compact manifolds. The lectures emphasized intuitive concepts and informal discussion, while taking the reader into topics of active research in this subject. These notes update and expand on the lectures, and include more recent progress. This article also includes an extensive set of references, as well as highlighting many open questions and problems. A set of "homework problems" is also included, one for each day of lecture.

  20. Anthropocentric Video Segmentation for Lecture Webcasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Raul

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many lecture recording and presentation systems transmit slides or chalkboard content along with a small video of the instructor. As a result, two areas of the screen are competing for the viewer's attention, causing the widely known split-attention effect. Face and body gestures, such as pointing, do not appear in the context of the slides or the board. To eliminate this problem, this article proposes to extract the lecturer from the video stream and paste his or her image onto the board or slide image. As a result, the lecturer acting in front of the board or slides becomes the center of attention. The entire lecture presentation becomes more human-centered. This article presents both an analysis of the underlying psychological problems and an explanation of signal processing techniques that are applied in a concrete system. The presented algorithm is able to extract and overlay the lecturer online and in real time at full video resolution.

  1. Twelve Theses on Reactive Rules for the Web

    OpenAIRE

    Bry, François; Eckert, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Reactivity, the ability to detect and react to events, is an essential functionality in many information systems. In particular, Web systems such as online marketplaces, adaptive (e.g., recommender) sys- tems, and Web services, react to events such as Web page updates or data posted to a server. This article investigates issues of relevance in designing high-level programming languages dedicated to reactivity on the Web. It presents twelve theses on features desira...

  2. "Pulse pair technique in high resolution NMR" a reprint of the historical 1971 lecture notes on two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeener, Jean; Alewaeters, Gerrit

    2016-05-01

    The review articles published in "Progress in NMR Spectroscopy" are usually invited treatments of topics of current interest, but occasionally the Editorial Board may take an initiative to publish important historical material that is not widely available. The present article represents just such a case. Jean Jeener gave a lecture in 1971 at a summer school in Basko Polje, in what was then called Yugoslavia. As is now widely known, Jean Jeener laid down the foundations in that lecture of two - and higher - dimensional NMR spectroscopy by proposing the homonuclear COSY experiment. Jeener realized that the new proposal would open the door towards protein NMR and molecular structure determinations, but he felt that useful versions of such experiments could not be achieved with the NMR, computer and electronics technology available at that time, so that copies of the lecture notes were circulated (the Basko Polje lecture notes by J. Jeener and G. Alewaeters), but no formal publication followed. Fortunately, Ernst, Freeman, Griffin, and many others were more far-sighted and optimistic. An early useful extension was Ernst's proposal to replace the original projection/reconstruction technique of MRI by the widely adopted Fourier transform method inspired by the Basko Polje lecture. Later, the pulse method spread over many fields of spectroscopy as soon as the required technology became available. Jean Jeener, Emeritus professor, Université Libre de Bruxelles. Geoffrey Bodenhausen, Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris.

  3. Lecture notes on diophantine analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zannier, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    These lecture notes originate from a course delivered at the Scuola Normale in Pisa in 2006. Generally speaking, the prerequisites do not go beyond basic mathematical material and are accessible to many undergraduates. The contents mainly concern diophantine problems on affine curves, in practice describing the integer solutions of equations in two variables. This case historically suggested some major ideas for more general problems. Starting with linear and quadratic equations, the important connections with Diophantine Approximation are presented and Thue's celebrated results are proved in full detail. In later chapters more modern issues on heights of algebraic points are dealt with, and applied to a sharp quantitative treatment of the unit equation. The book also contains several Supplements, hinted exercises and an Appendix on recent work on heights.

  4. Lectures on Gravity and Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Van Raamsdonk, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence provides quantum theories of gravity in which spacetime and gravitational physics emerge from ordinary non-gravitational quantum systems with many degrees of freedom. Recent work in this context has uncovered fascinating connections between quantum information theory and quantum gravity, suggesting that spacetime geometry is directly related to the entanglement structure of the underlying quantum mechanical degrees of freedom and that aspects of spacetime dynamics (gravitation) can be understood from basic quantum information theoretic constraints. In these notes, we provide an elementary introduction to these developments, suitable for readers with some background in general relativity and quantum field theory. The notes are based on lectures given at the CERN Spring School 2014, the Jerusalem Winter School 2014, the TASI Summer School 2015, and the Trieste Spring School 2015.

  5. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (1/3), by Maria Teresa Dova (Universidad Nacional de La Plata & CONICET, Argentina).   Wednesday, April 25, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN (500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) The origin of the highest energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 1000 TeV, is still unknown. The discovery of their sources will reveal the engines of the most energetic astrophysical accelerators in the universe. In these lectures we present the recent observational results from HiRes, Telescope Array and Pierre Auger Observatory as well as (some of) the possible astrophysical origins of UHECR. These experiments deal with particle interactions at energies orders of magnitude higher than achieved in terrestrial accelerators. Organised by Luis Alvarez-Gaume.

  6. Lecture notes: Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, Gordon I

    2016-01-01

    These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes, and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is 'frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, includin...

  7. Lecture 3: Web Application Security

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    Computer security has been an increasing concern for IT professionals for a number of years, yet despite all the efforts, computer systems and networks remain highly vulnerable to attacks of different kinds. Design flaws and security bugs in the underlying software are among the main reasons for this. This lecture focuses on security aspects of Web application development. Various vulnerabilities typical to web applications (such as Cross-site scripting, SQL injection, cross-site request forgery etc.) are introduced and discussed. Sebastian Lopienski is CERN’s deputy Computer Security Officer. He works on security strategy and policies; offers internal consultancy and audit services; develops and maintains security tools for vulnerability assessment and intrusion detection; provides training and awareness raising; and does incident investigation and response. During his work at CERN since 2001, Sebastian has had various assignments, including designing and developing software to manage and support servic...

  8. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  9. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  10. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  11. Lecture de l'autre, écriture de soi: une lecture de Maïs en Grégorien d’Arnaldo Calveyra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabel Franzone

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Cet article est une invitation à considérer la lecture d’un auteur comme un type d’écriture de soi, car, l’ouvrage ici traité a la vertu d’interpeller constamment le lecteur, de le faire réfléchir sur les grands drames de l’humanité. La structure est complexe, à cheval entre plusieurs genres, écrit dans des versets, avec des caractéristiques de l’autobiographie, mais pas reconnue comme telle de façon explicite. Nous utilisons des données théoriques : l’herméneutique amplificatrice du symbole, les structures anthropologiques de l’imaginaire, les théories de la lecture et des notions sur le monde imaginal, la résonance et le retentissement. Néanmoins la dynamique du livre ne permet point de s’attarder dans des considérations théoriques, car il exige totale concentration. Par la ruse d’un miroir, où vont se refléter les pires crimes commis à travers les temps et les espaces, l’auteur rappelle le devoir de prendre une commune responsabilité. Notre pire ennemi sera alors le silence. Par cette mise en branle, l’écrivain nous emmène à nous poser des questions sur notre place dans le monde, sur nos actions et sur notre propre mort. Sûrement ce petit livre peut avoir des multiples lectures, nous avons choisi de nous concentrer sur celle de la « mise en question » aux fins d’aborder la lecture comme un moyen de transformation de l’être, ce qui peut aboutir à l’écriture de soi et ce dans un sens strict comme dans un sens plus large.

  12. Instructional analysis of lecture video recordings and its application for quality improvement of medical lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sunyong; Im, Sun Ju; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung; Yune, So Joung; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jung A; Lee, Yuna; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2011-12-01

    The lecture is a technique for delivering knowledge and information cost-effectively to large medical classes in medical education. The aim of this study was to analyze teaching quality, based on triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures, to strengthen teaching competency in medical school. The subjects of this study were 13 medical professors who taught 1st- and 2nd-year medical students and agreed to a triangle analysis of video recordings of their lectures. We first performed triangle analysis, which consisted of a professional analysis of video recordings, self-assessment by teaching professors, and feedback from students, and the data were crosschecked by five school consultants for reliability and consistency. Most of the distress that teachers experienced during the lecture occurred in uniform teaching environments, such as larger lecture classes. Larger lectures that primarily used PowerPoint as a medium to deliver information effected poor interaction with students. Other distressing factors in the lecture were personal characteristics and lack of strategic faculty development. Triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures gives teachers an opportunity and motive to improve teaching quality. Faculty development and various improvement strategies, based on this analysis, are expected to help teachers succeed as effective, efficient, and attractive lecturers while improving the quality of larger lecture classes.

  13. [THE DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE PLACE OF LECTURES AND COMPULSORY LECTURE ATTENDANCE IN MEDICAL EDUCATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Luder shows that there is a lack of correlation between lecture attendance in medical school and examination performance, and thus draws attention to a discourse concerning the place of lectures and lecture attendance enforcement in 2015 and beyond. The paper addresses 4 questions: First, what is the current place of the traditional lecture in the education of medical students? Second, are there alternatives to this format of teaching? Third, what are the educational consequences of mandating lecture attendance; and fourth, should there be such enforcement? The author discusses these questions and concludes that lectures should be used sparingly, after a careful evaluation that they have an added value over learning away from the classroom. Furthermore, that there are clear guidelines on how to make the traditional lecture enhanced and educationally effective, as well as alternatives such as the "flipped classroom", e-learning and more to lectures. In addition, that lectures frequently drive learning negatively and enforcing attendance in Israel entails serious unintended consequences such as a need to monitor attendance, and a host of disciplinary adverse reactions. Finally, that besides lecture efficiency and economy (when having added value) one reason to consider compulsory attendance, may be when poor attendance negatively influences teachers morale.

  14. The Lecture Video Scene Extracting System

    OpenAIRE

    石黒, 信啓; 白井,治彦; 黒岩,丈介; 小高, 知宏; 小倉, 久和; ISHIGURO, Nobuhiko; SHIRAI, Haruhiko; KUROIWA, Josuke; ODAKA, Tomohiko; OGURA, Hisakazu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the system of extracting feature of scenes in a lecture video. To avoid a hand work on a lecture video, we propose a new method automate the judgment of importance of a scene. This system uses the TF-IDF method that is the technique of the natural language processing. Our system has four functions to watch a lecture video efficiently. They are the function of extracting feature of scenes, character string choice, keyword search and important scene choice.These functi...

  15. KNMR Aircraft Hangar Invitation to Bid 121575

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Invitation to bid on materials, equipment and labor necessary to construct a metal aircraft hangar on Government-furnished concrete foundation at the City Airport,...

  16. Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_163264.html Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia Study found being sedentary may make you as ... TV may make you as likely to develop dementia as people genetically predisposed to the condition, a ...

  17. The twelve theses: a call to a new reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Shelby Spong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available With every discovery emerging from the world of science over the last 500 years concerning the origins of the universe and of life itself, the traditional explanations offered by the Christian Church appeared to be more and more dated and irrelevant.  Christian leaders, unable to embrace the knowledge revolution seemed to believe  that the only way to save Christianity was not to disturb the old patterns either by listening to, much less by entertaining the new knowledge. I tried to articulate this challenge in a book entitled: Why Christianity Must Change or Die, published in 1998.  In that book I examined in detail the issues that I was convinced Christianity must address. Shortly after that book was published I reduced its content to twelve theses, which I attached in Luther-like fashion to the great doors on the Chapel of Mansfield College at Oxford University in the United Kingdom. I then mailed copies of those Twelve Theses to every acknowledged Christian leader of the world. It was an attempt to call them into a debate on the real issues that I was certain the Christian Church now faced.  I framed my twelve theses in the boldest, most provocative language possible, designed primarily to elicit response and debate. I welcome responses from Christians everywhere.  I claim no expertise or certainty in developing answers, but I am quite confident that I do understand the problems we are facing as Christians who are seeking to relate to the 21st century.

  18. Towards Automated Lecture Capture, Navigation and Delivery System for Web-Lecture on Demand

    CERN Document Server

    Kannan, Rajkumar

    2010-01-01

    Institutions all over the world are continuously exploring ways to use ICT in improving teaching and learning effectiveness. The use of course web pages, discussion groups, bulletin boards, and e-mails have shown considerable impact on teaching and learning in significant ways, across all disciplines. ELearning has emerged as an alternative to traditional classroom-based education and training and web lectures can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures. They can even serve as a main content source for learning, provided users can quickly navigate and locate relevant pages in a web lecture. A web lecture consists of video and audio of the presenter and slides complemented with screen capturing. In this paper, an automated approach for recording live lectures and for browsing available web lectures for on-demand applications by end users is presented.

  19. Gilles Jobin Final residency lecture - Collision between dance and physics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Doser, Michael; Dimou, Maria; Jobin, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    CERN, the Republic and Canton of Geneva, and the City of Geneva are delighted to invite you to the final public lecture about collisions between dance and physics by the first winner of Collide@CERN Geneva, the choreographer Gilles Jobin. The event marks the end of his residency and will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation on 6th November at 1800. Doors open at 17.30 Programme 18.00 - Opening address by Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director General, Ariane Koek, CERN Cultural Specialist, Sami Kanaan, Administrative Councilor in charge of the Department of Culture and Sport of the City of Geneva, and Charles Beer, Vice President of the State Council in charge of the Department of Education, Culture and Sport. 18.30 - Presentation by Gilles Jobin (Switzerland) of his residency experience at CERN with live demonstrations with his dancers 19.15 - Discussion on CERN as a Place of Collisions and Interventions between Dance and Physics with Gilles Jobin (Switzerland) and CERN scientists Maria Dimo...

  20. Why do students miss lectures? A study of lecture attendance amongst students of health science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bati, A Hilal; Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Orgun, Fatma; Govsa, Figen

    2013-06-01

    In the domain of health sciences, attendance by students at lectures is more critical. Lecture attendance is an issue which has been widely neglected. This study aims to determine those factors which affect the lecture attendance. The research data was collected by means of a questionnaire during the second semester of the academic year 2010-2011 from second-year students of the Faculties of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing. Together with demographic data, the questionnaire includes a Likert-type scale aiming to determine the factors influencing attendance at lectures. 663 participated in this study on a voluntary basis from Medical, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing Faculties. Raising attainment levels, being able to take their own lecture notes, learning which aspects of the lecture content were being emphasized, and the opportunity to ask questions were amongst the chief reasons for attending lectures. It appears that the factors preventing students from attending lectures are mainly individual. Amongst the most frequently cited causes of non-attendance, sleeplessness, ill health and the inefficiency of lectures in overcrowded halls are emphasized. In the totals and sub-dimensions of the Lecture Attendance Scale, Medical Faculty students have average scores higher than those of students at other faculties. The vital nature of professional expertise and its applications, health sciences students' attendance at lectures carries greater importance. It is important to strengthen the mentoring system with regard to individual and external factors, which have been implicated as having a substantial influence on lecture attendance by students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding is that…

  2. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  3. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  4. Factors Shaping Mathematics Lecturers' Service Teaching in Different Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingolbali, E.; Ozmantar, M. F.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we focus on university lecturers' approaches to the service teaching and factors that influence their approaches. We present data obtained from the interviews with 19 mathematics and three physics lecturers along with the observations of two mathematics lecturers' calculus courses. The findings show that lecturers' approaches to…

  5. Add a Teacher-Led Stimulation to Your Lecturing Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlbaw, Lynn Matthew

    1991-01-01

    Provides a way to enliven the classroom lecture by involving students in the lecture. Students role-play characters in the teacher's lecture becoming active learners through participation. Students learn their roles and make decisions based on the lecture situation presented. Provides an example unit on the growth of big business in U.S. history…

  6. Understanding resident learning preferences within an internal medicine noon conference lecture series: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatsky, Adam P; Zickmund, Susan L; Berlacher, Kathryn; Lesky, Dan; Granieri, Rosanne

    2014-03-01

    The lecture remains the most common approach for didactic offerings in residency programs despite conflicting evidence about the effectiveness of this format. The purpose of this study was to explore the perspectives of internal medicine residents toward conferences held in the lecture format. The investigators invited internal medicine residents (N  =  144) to participate in focus groups discussing their perspectives about noon conference lectures. The investigators used a semistructured guide to ask about motivations for attendance and effectiveness of noon conferences, transcribed the recordings, coded the discussions, and analyzed the results. Seven focus groups with a total of 41 residents were held. This identified 4 major domains: (1) motivations for attendance; (2) appropriate content; (3) effective teaching methods; and (4) perspectives on active participation. Residents' motivations were categorized into external factors, including desire for a break and balance to their workload, and intrinsic attributes, including the learning opportunity, topic, and speaker. Appropriate content was described as clinically relevant, practical, and presenting a balance of evidence. Identified effective teaching methods included shorter teaching sessions focused on high-yield learning points structured around cases and questions. While active participation increases residents' perceived level of stress, the benefits of this format include increased attention and learning. This study furthers our knowledge of the learning preferences of internal medicine residents within the changing environment of residency education and can be used in conjunction with principles of adult learning to reform how we deliver core medical knowledge.

  7. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gripaios, Ben

    2015-01-01

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  8. Lecture about crowdsourcing and social media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Hanze Honours Lecture, 19-12-12. Het lectoraat Regisseren van Ondernemende Netwerken richt zich op onderzoek naar het effect van regisserend leiderschap in een wereld waarin internet nieuwe verbindingen tussen mensen en organisaties creëert.

  9. Lectures on Physics Beyond the Standard Model

    OpenAIRE

    Gripaios, Ben

    2015-01-01

    These four lectures, given at the British Universities Summer School in Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics (BUSSTEPP), held in 2014 in Southampton, are a brief introduction to a selection of current topics in physics Beyond the Standard Model.

  10. Introductory Lectures on Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2014-01-01

    In these lectures we present a few topics in Quantum Field Theory in detail. Some of them are conceptual and some more practical. They have been selected because they appear frequently in current applications to Particle Physics and String Theory.

  11. Stream restoration hydraulic design course: lecture notes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newbury, R

    2002-01-01

    Steam restoration encompasses a broad range of activities and disciplines. This lecture series is designed for practitioners who must fit habitat improvement works in the hydraulics of degraded channels...

  12. Dynamica 3-A: Lecture Notes wb1303

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, P.

    1997-01-01

    Lecture Notes for course wb 1303 Dynamica 3-A, Faculty 3me/Mechanical Engineering, TU Delft. Contents: Continuous systems; Dynamics of a reciprocating engine; Non-linear systems; Kinematics and dynamics of multi-body systems; Exercises.

  13. Making lectures memorable: A cognitive perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Azam; Babar, Shazia

    2016-08-01

    Lectures have been a cornerstone of medical education since the introduction of a discipline based curricular model more than two hundred years ago. Recently this instructional strategy has come under criticism because of its reliance on passive learning. There are still many medical schools that cover content predominantly through lectures due to its feasibility. With the introduction of the flipped classrooms, lectures have been given a new lease of life. Improving cognitive imprinting during lectures would enhance retrieval and promote long term storage. Simplifying the content reduces the cognitive load of the information being received and makes it more meaningful hence more memorable. To make learning memorable, rehearsal should be built into the sessions. With the exponential increase in online learning, the need for online learning technologies will require a generation of a large amount of asynchronous video content which should ideally be truly meaningful and memorable, and inspirational to our students.

  14. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    J. Herr

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please enjoy the l...

  15. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Goldfarb, S.

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, WLAP, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. The current system, including future developments for the project and the field in general, was recently presented at the CHEP 2006 conference in Mumbai, India. The relevant presentations and papers can be found here: The Web Lecture Archive Project. A Web Lecture Capture System with Robotic Speaker Tracking This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser, either via streaming or local download (for limited bandwidth). Please e...

  16. Paul Dirac lectures at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    When a group of physicists entered the Main Auditorium, during the evening of 29 June, they felt they had opened a time portal.   Paul Dirac in front of a blackboard showing his formula. ©Sandra Hoogeboom An attentive audience, dressed in early 1900 costumes, were watching a lecture by the elusive Paul Dirac, presenting for the first time his famous formula on the blackboard. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (1902-1984) was a British mathematical physicist at Cambridge, and one of the "fathers" of quantum mechanics. When he first wrote it, in 1928, Dirac was not sure what his formula really meant. As demonstrated by Andersson four year later, what Dirac had written on the blackboard was the first definition of a positron, hence he is credited with having anticipated the existence of antimatter. The actor John Kohl performs as Paul Dirac. ©Sandra Hoogeboom What the group of puzzled physicists were really observing when they entered the CERN Auditorium was the shoo...

  17. Lectures on advances in combinatorics

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlswede, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    The main focus of these lectures is basis extremal problems and inequalities – two sides of the same coin. Additionally they prepare well for approaches and methods useful and applicable in a broader mathematical context. Highlights of the book include a solution to the famous 4m-conjecture of Erdös/Ko/Rado 1938, one of the oldest problems in combinatorial extremal theory, an answer to a question of Erdös (1962) in combinatorial number theory "What is the maximal cardinality of a set of numbers smaller than n with no k+1 of its members pair wise relatively prime?", and the discovery that the AD-inequality implies more general and sharper number theoretical inequalities than for instance Behrend's inequality. Several concepts and problems in the book arise in response to or by rephrasing questions from information theory, computer science, statistical physics. The interdisciplinary character creates an atmosphere rich of incentives for new discoveries and lends Ars Combinatoria a special status in mathemat...

  18. A peculiar lecture by Ettore Majorana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, S.

    2006-09-01

    We give, for the first time, the English translation of a manuscript by Ettore Majorana, which probably corresponds to the text for a seminar lecture delivered at the University of Naples in 1938, where he lectured on theoretical physics. Some passages reveal a physical interpretation of quantum mechanics which anticipates for several years the Feynman approach in terms of path integrals, independent of the underlying mathematical formulation.

  19. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models....

  20. Lectures on flips and minimal models

    OpenAIRE

    Corti, Alessio; Hacking, Paul; Kollár, János; Lazarsfeld, Robert; Mustaţă, Mircea

    2007-01-01

    This document contains notes from the lectures of Corti, Koll\\'ar, Lazarsfeld, and Musta\\c{t}\\u{a} at the workshop ``Minimal and canonical models in algebraic geometry" at MSRI, Berkeley, April 2007. The lectures give an overview of the recent advances on canonical and minimal models of algebraic varieties obtained by Hacon--McKernan and Birkar--Cascini--Hacon--McKernan.

  1. Lecture Notes in Statistics. 3rd Semester

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models.......The lecture note is prepared to meet the requirements for the 3rd semester course in statistics at the Aarhus School of Business. It focuses on multiple regression models, analysis of variance, and log-linear models....

  2. Flipped classroom or an active lecture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, James D; Roberts, David J H

    2017-08-31

    Recent changes in anatomy education have seen the introduction of flipped classrooms as a replacement to the traditional didactic lecture. This approach utilizes the increasing availability of digital technology to create learning resources that can be accessed prior to attending class, with face-to-face sessions then becoming more student-centered via discussion, collaborative learning, and problem-solving activities. Although this approach may appear intuitive, this viewpoint commentary presents a counter opinion and highlights a simple alternative that utilizes evidence-based active learning approaches as part of the traditional lecture. The active lecture takes the traditional lecture, and (1) ensures the lecture content is relevant and has clear objectives, (2) contains lecture material that is designed according to the latest evidence-base, (3) complements it with additional supplementary material, (4) creates space to check prior understanding and knowledge levels, and (5) utilizes suitable technology to facilitate continual engagement and interaction. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Indian dental students' preferences regarding lecture courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolia, Abhishek; Mohan, Mandakini; Kundabala, M; Shenoy, Ramya

    2012-03-01

    Teaching and learning activities in the dental clinic or hospital are a challenging area for students as well as teachers. With various teaching methodologies being used in dental schools around the world, gaining greater understanding of students' attitudes toward these methodologies would be useful for dental educators. The objective of this study was to explore the preferences of dental students in India about various aspects of lecture courses. A structured survey consisting of ten closed-ended questions was developed, and 2,680 undergraduate students from forty-three dental schools in India were approached via e-mail with a follow-up postal mailing. Of these, 1,980 students responded, for a response rate of 73.8 percent. Most of the students reported preferring lectures with the aid of PowerPoint and chalkboard. They preferred morning lectures from 8 am to 10 am for a maximum of thirty to forty minutes for each lecture, and they preferred to receive information about the lecture topic in advance. The students said that delivery of clinical demonstrations was beneficial after the lectures, and they preferred learning-based rather than exam-oriented education. The respondents also said that attendance should be made compulsory and that numerical marking of examinations should not be replaced by a grading system.

  4. Envisioning the Transformative Role of IT in Lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Zarraonandia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most widely used methods for teaching is the lecture. During the last few decades lecturers and students have taken advantage of the progressive introduction of new technology for supporting these lectures. As this trend is very likely to continue, in this paper we will try to anticipate some possible technology enriched future lecture scenarios. We also present ALFs, a system which aims to improve the communication between participants in a lecture making use of augmented reality techniques.

  5. Revitalizing the Live Lecture Class With Instructor-Created Videos

    OpenAIRE

    Frank Alpert

    2016-01-01

    Today, the lecture class as a format for higher education is under attack more than ever. This article addresses the research question of how lectures can be modernized and revitalized through new uses of digital technology—in particular, video. Critics of lecturing have for a long time observed that lecture classes can be weak on student engagement and motivation to attend class. This article introduces one way to help modernize and revitalize the live lecture class session, a new conceptual...

  6. Argonne lectures on particles accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devred, A

    1999-09-01

    The quest for elementary particles has promoted the development of particle accelerators producing beams of increasingly higher energies. In a synchrotron, the particle energy is directly proportional to the product of the machine's radius times the bending magnets' field strength. Present proton experiments at the TeV scale require facilities with circumferences ranging from a few to tens of kilometers and relying on a large number (several hundred to several thousand) high field dipole magnets and high field gradient quadrupole magnets. These electro-magnets use high-current-density, low-critical-temperature superconducting cables and are cooled down at liquid helium temperature. They are among the most costly and the most challenging components of the machine. After explaining what are the various types of accelerator magnets and why they are needed (lecture 1), we briefly recall the origins of superconductivity and we review the parameters of existing superconducting particle accelerators (lecture 2). Then, we review the superconducting materials that are available at industrial scale (chiefly, NbTi and Nb{sub 3}Sn) and we explain in details the manufacturing of NbTi wires and cables (lecture 3). We also present the difficulties of processing and insulating Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors, which so far have limited the use of this material in spite of its superior performances. We continue by discussing the two dimensional current distributions which are the most appropriate for generating pure dipole and quadrupole fields and we explain how these ideal distributions can be approximated by so called cos{theta} and cos 2{theta} coil designs (lecture 4). We also present a few alternative designs which are being investigated and we describe the difficulties of realizing coil ends. Next, we present the mechanical design concepts that are used in existing accelerator magnets (lecture 5) and we describe how the magnets are assembled (lecture 6). Some of the toughest

  7. Twelve tips for teaching medical students with dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Sebastian Charles Keith; Anderson, John Leeds

    2017-07-01

    Dyslexia is a common learning difficulty. As a result of SS' own experiences as a medical student with dyslexia, we have been researching and teaching on this topic for the past two years. Here, we present twelve tips for teaching medical students with dyslexia. These are gathered from our personal experiences and research, discussions with other educators, and wider literature on the topic. This article aims to shed some light on dyslexia, and also to make practical suggestions. Teaching students with dyslexia should not be a daunting experience. Small changes to existing methods, at minor effort, can make a difference - for example, adding pastel colors to slide backgrounds or avoiding Serif fonts. These tips can help educators gain more insight into dyslexia and incorporate small, beneficial adaptations into their teaching.

  8. Antibacterial activities of extracts from twelve Centaurea species from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tekeli Yener

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the genus Centaurea (Asteraceae have been used in traditional plant-based medicine. The methanol extracts of twelve Centaurea species, of which five are endemic to Turkey flora, were screened for antibacterial activity against four bacteria (Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus. The antibacterial activity was evaluated by the microdilution method and the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC of the extracts were determined. C. cariensis subsp. microlepis exhibited an antimicrobial effect on all tested microorganisms. The extracts from eight Centaurea species (C. balsamita, C. calolepis, C. cariensis subsp. maculiceps, C. cariensis subsp. microlepis, C. kotschyi var. kotschyi, C. solstitialis subsp. solstitialis, C. urvillei subsp. urvillei and C. virgata possessed antibacterial activity against several of the tested microorganisms.

  9. Twelve tips on how to compile a medical educator's portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Claudia Lucy; Wilson, Anthony; Agius, Steven

    2017-09-17

    Medical education is an expanding area of specialist interest for medical professionals. Whilst most doctors will be familiar with the compilation of clinical portfolios for scrutiny of their clinical practice and provision of public accountability, teaching portfolios used specifically to gather and demonstrate medical education activity remain uncommon in many non-academic settings. For aspiring and early career medical educators in particular, their value should not be underestimated. Such a medical educator's portfolio (MEP) is a unique compendium of evidence that is invaluable for appraisal, revalidation, and promotion. It can stimulate and provide direction for professional development, and is a rich source for personal reflection and learning. We recommend that all new and aspiring medical educators prepare an MEP, and suggest twelve tips on how to skillfully compile one.

  10. Spectroscopy of twelve Type Ia supernovae at intermediate redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Balland, C; Pain, R; Walton, N A; Amanullah, R; Astier, Pierre; Ellis, Richard S; Fabbro, S; Goobar, A; Hardin, D; Hook, I M; Irwin, M J; McMahon, R M; Mendez, J M; Ruiz-Lapuente, P; Sainton, G; Schahmaneche, K; Stanishev, V

    2005-01-01

    We present spectra of twelve Type Ia supernovae obtained in 1999 at the William Herschel Telescope and the Nordic Optical Telescope during a search for Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) at intermediate redshift. The spectra range from z=0.178 to z=0.493, including five high signal-to-noise ratio SN Ia spectra in the still largely unexplored range 0.15 < z < 0.3. Most of the spectra were obtained before or around restframe B-band maximum light. None of them shows the peculiar spectral features found in low-redshift over- or under-luminous SN Ia. Expansion velocities of characteristic spectral absorption features such as SiII at 6355 angs., SII at 5640 angs. and CaII at 3945 angs. are found consistent with their low-z SN Ia counterparts.

  11. Characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students and lecturers perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapsari, Trusti; Putri, Dian Permana; Raharjo, Jajo Firman

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to determine the characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students' and lecturers' perspectivesand compare the characteristics of good lecturers/ teachers which are in accordance with the findings of some previous studies and the theories. This study is survey study. The Data were collected through questionnaires and interview. The population consists of some mathematics students from the first level through the third level and some mathematics education lecturers of a private university in West Java. Qualitative analysis was undertaken to examine the results of questionnaires and interviews. The finding shows that the characteristic of good mathematics lecturers is inspiring. They can inspire other mathematics lecturers and educators in general. Based on the students and lecturers' perspective, some characteristics of good mathematics lecturers are mastering the materials well, being on time, being objective, understanding the students, presenting the materials with clearly, and being disciplined. Some other characteristic mentioned are: teaching eagerly, being unhurried, being friendly, giving exemplary and preparing the lesson well. These characteristics are not much different from the characteristics described by some previous researchers and some theories of experts, i.e. mastering the subject matters well, pedagogic, and work wholeheartedly.

  12. Reaction Lecture : Text Messaging to Increase Student Engagement in Large-Scale Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnips, Koos; Heutink, Joost; Beldhuis, Hans; Greener, S; Rospigliosi, A

    2011-01-01

    By helping to be active during large scale lectures, students remember better what is presented, and can better connect new knowledge to entry knowledge. In large scale lectures with more than 150 students, it is nearly impossible to manage personal, face-to-face discussions and interaction. Based u

  13. Reaction Lecture : Text Messaging to Increase Student Engagement in Large-Scale Lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnips, Koos; Heutink, Joost; Beldhuis, Hans; Greener, S; Rospigliosi, A

    2011-01-01

    By helping to be active during large scale lectures, students remember better what is presented, and can better connect new knowledge to entry knowledge. In large scale lectures with more than 150 students, it is nearly impossible to manage personal, face-to-face discussions and interaction. Based

  14. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lost Art of Lecturing: Cultivating Student Listening and Notetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kevin R.; Hunt, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    As this forum's call for papers notes, lecture represents one of the more "controversial forms of instructional communication," yet remains a predominant instructional method in academia. Ironically, instructors face increasing pressure to abandon lecture at a time when these classes are popular and students readily enroll in lecture…

  15. Modeling of the time sharing for lecturers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Shakhova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of modernization of the Russian system of higher education, it is necessary to analyze the working time of the university lecturers, taking into account both basic job functions as the university lecturer, and others.The mathematical problem is presented for the optimal working time planning for the university lecturers. The review of the documents, native and foreign works on the study is made. Simulation conditions, based on analysis of the subject area, are defined. Models of optimal working time sharing of the university lecturers («the second half of the day» are developed and implemented in the system MathCAD. Optimal solutions have been obtained.Three problems have been solved:1 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» in a certain position of the university lecturer;2 to find the optimal time sharing for «the second half of the day» for all positions of the university lecturers in view of the established model of the academic load differentiation;3 to find the volume value of the non-standardized part of time work in the department for the academic year, taking into account: the established model of an academic load differentiation, distribution of the Faculty number for the positions and the optimal time sharing «the second half of the day» for the university lecturers of the department.Examples are given of the analysis results. The practical application of the research: the developed models can be used when planning the working time of an individual professor in the preparation of the work plan of the university department for the academic year, as well as to conduct a comprehensive analysis of the administrative decisions in the development of local university regulations.

  16. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed

  17. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, Paul M; Palmer, Edward; Devitt, Peter

    2007-07-27

    Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8-12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p higher-order lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably disposed to continue with

  18. The Web-Lecture - a viable alternative to the traditional lecture format?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meibom, S.

    2004-12-01

    Educational research shows that students learn best in an environment with emphasis on teamwork, problem-solving, and hands-on experience. Still professors spend the majority of their time with students in the traditional lecture-hall setting where the combination of large classes and limited time prevents sufficient student-teacher interaction to foster an active learning environment. Can modern computer technology be used to provide "lecture-type" information to students via the World Wide Web? If so, will that help professors make better and/or different use of their scheduled time with the students? Answering these questions was the main motivation for the Extra-Solar Planet Project. The Extra-Solar Planet Project was designed to test the effectiveness of a lecture available to the student on the World Wide Web (Web-Lecture) and to engage the students in an active learning environment were their use the information presented in the Web-Lecture. The topic of the Web-Lecture was detection of extra-solar planets and the project was implemented into an introductory astronomy course at University of Wisconsin Madison in the spring of 2004. The Web-Lecture was designed to give an interactive presentation of synchronized video, audio and lecture notes. It was created using the eTEACH software developed at the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Engineering. In my talk, I will describe the project, show excerpts of the Web-Lecture, and present assessments of student learning and results of student evaluations of the web-lecture format.

  19. Vocal intensity in lecturers: Results of measurements conducted during lecture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Mikulski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occupational voice users (inter alia: lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Speakers adjust this intensity knowingly (e.g. to underline the importance of fragments of the speech or unknowingly. The unknown adjustment of voice intensity occurs e.g. in the presence of high acoustic background noise (so-called Lombard effect, but it also results from many other factors: hearing loss, construction of the vocal tract, habits and others. The aim of the article is to confirm the thesis that in similar conditions of acoustic properties of the room different lecturers speak with different levels of vocal intensity. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in a group of 10 lecturers in the same conference room. A-weighted sound pressure level determined at 1 m from the lecturer's mouth was adopted as a parameter defining the intensity of the lecturer's voice. The levels of all lecturers' voice intensity were compared and evaluated according to the criteria defined in EN ISO 9921. Results: Nine in ten lecturers were speaking with normal voice intensity (60-65 dB and only one full-time university lecturer was speaking with raised voice (66-71 dB. Conclusions: It was found that in the room of the same acoustic conditions the lecturers spoke with different intensities of voice. Some lecturers occasionally, and one all the time spoke with the voice intensity specified by PN-EN ISO 9921 as a raised voice. The results of the preliminary study warrant further studies in a larger group of teachers. Med Pr 2013;64(6:797–804

  20. Explicit constructivism: a missing link in ineffective lectures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, E S

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my university was randomized to two groups to receive one of two types of lectures, "typical" lectures (n = 28, 18 women and 10 men) or "constructivist" lectures (n = 26, 19 women and 7 men), on the same topic: the regulation of respiration. Student pretest scores in the two groups were comparable (P > 0.1). Students that received the constructivist lectures did much better in the posttest conducted immediately after the lectures (6.8 +/- 3.4 for constructivist lectures vs. 4.2 +/- 2.3 for typical lectures, means +/- SD, P = 0.004). Although both types of lectures were well received, students that received the constructivist lectures appeared to have been more satisfied with their learning experience. However, on a posttest conducted 4 mo later, scores obtained by students in the two groups were not any different (6.9 +/- 3 for constructivist lectures vs. 6.9 +/- 3.7 for typical lectures, P = 0.94). This study adds to the increasing body of evidence that there is a case for the use of interactive lectures that make the construction of knowledge and understanding explicit, easy, and enjoyable to learners.

  1. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  2. Do prerecorded lecture VODcasts affect lecture attendance of first-yearpre-clinical Graduate Entry to Medicine students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Mark G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2017-03-01

    There is increasing concern amongst educators that the provision of recorded lectures may reduce student attendance of live lectures. We therefore sought to determine if the provision of prerecorded lecture video podcasts (VODcasts) to first-year Graduate Entry to Medicine (GEM) students, affected attendance at 21 Physiology lectures within three separate pre-clinical modules. Data on lecture attendance, utilization of VODcasts, and whether VODcasts should replace live lectures were drawn from three surveys conducted in academic years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 on all first-year GEM students in two first-year pre-clinical modules where prerecorded Physiology VODcasts were available for viewing or downloading prior to scheduled live lectures. A total of 191/214 (89%) students responded to the three surveys, with 84.3% of students attending all 21 lectures in the study. Only 4% of students missed more than one lecture in each of the three lecture series, with 79% indicating that VODcasts should not replace lectures. Therefore, we conclude that the attendance of pre-clinical GEM students at live lectures is not significantly impacted upon by the provision of lecture VODcasts, with most students viewing them as useful revision tools rather than as a replacement for live lectures.

  3. Lecture Notes on Network Information Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gamal, Abbas El

    2010-01-01

    Network information theory deals with the fundamental limits on information flow in networks and optimal coding techniques and protocols that achieve these limits. It extends Shannon's point-to-point information theory and the Ford--Fulkerson max-flow min-cut theorem to networks with multiple sources and destinations, broadcasting, interference, relaying, distributed compression and computing. Although a complete theory is yet to be developed, several beautiful results and techniques have been developed over the past forty years with potential applications in wireless communication, the Internet, and other networked systems. This set of lecture notes, which is a much expanded version of lecture notes used in graduate courses over the past eight years at Stanford, UCSD, CUHK, UC Berkeley, and EPFL, aims to provide a broad coverage of key results, techniques, and open problems in network information theory. The lectures are organized in a "top-down" manner into four parts: background, single-hop networks, multi...

  4. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES QUESTIONNAIRE: SUGGEST AND WIN!

    CERN Multimedia

    Academic Training; Tel. 73127

    2001-01-01

    Time to plan for the 2001-02 lecture series. From today until April 9 you have the chance to give your contribution to improved planning for next year's Academic Training Lectures Series. At the web site: http://wwwinfo/support/survey/academic-training/ you will find questionnaires concerning the following different categories: high energy physics, applied physics, science and society and post-graduate students lectures. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at CERN bookshop.

  5. Professional development of international classroom lecturers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    With a rapidly growing number of students learning and lecturers teaching through a language other than their own first language, there is equally a growing need to consider how lecturers are trained to teach in the international classroom where students have a range of different linguistic...... to planning and managing multilingual and multicultural learning environments (best practice) and (ii) to suggest possible formats of suitable training sessions for university lecturers. Based on a comprehensive literature review, the study comprises cases of professional development programmes offered...... and weaknesses) and discuss their applicability in a wider context. Key words: Professional development; International classroom; English Medium Instruction, Opportunities and challenges Simon, Eszter & Gabriela Pleschová (eds).2013. Teacher Development in Higher Education. Existing Programs, Program Impact...

  6. Lectures on formal and rigid geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    A first version of this work appeared in 2005 as a Preprint of the Collaborative Research Center "Geometrical Structures in Mathematics" at the University of Münster. Its aim was to offer a concise and self-contained 'lecture-style' introduction to the theory of classical rigid geometry established by John Tate, together with the formal algebraic geometry approach launched by Michel Raynaud. These Lectures are now viewed commonly as an ideal means of learning advanced rigid geometry, regardless of the reader's level of background. Despite its parsimonious style, the presentation illustrates a number of key facts even more extensively than any other previous work. This Lecture Notes Volume is a revised and slightly expanded version of the original preprint and has been published at the suggestion of several experts in the field.

  7. Lectures in the history of mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Bos, Henk J M

    1993-01-01

    "[These lectures] are about themes of the history of mathematics which, for various reasons, are dear to me. The early differential and integral calculus, the work of Christiaan Huygens, and the concept of construction in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century mathematics are the three themes around which much of my research has concentrated and which continue to fascinate me by the insights they offer in the development of that special human activity called mathematics." -from the Introduction This volume contains eleven lectures ranging over a variety of topics in the history of mathematics. The lectures, presented between 1970 and 1987, were delivered in a variety of venues and appeared only in less accessible publications. Those who teach mathematics, as well as mathematics historians, will appreciate this insightful, wide-ranging book.

  8. On performing concepts during science lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzer-Ardenghi, Lilian; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    When lecturing, teachers make use of both verbal and nonverbal communication. What is called teaching, therefore, involves not only the words and sentences a teacher utters and writes on the board during a lesson, but also all the hands/arms gestures, body movements, and facial expressions a teacher performs in the classroom. All of these communicative modalities constitute resources that are made available to students for making sense of and learning from lectures. Yet in the literature on teaching science, these other means of communication are little investigated and understood - and, correspondingly, they are undertheorized. The purpose of this position paper is to argue for a different view of concepts in lectures: they are performed simultaneously drawing on and producing multiple resources that are different expressions of the same holistic meaning unit. To support our point, we provide examples from a database of 26 lectures in a 12th-grade biology class, where the human body was the main topic of study. We analyze how different types of resources - including verbal and nonverbal discourse and various material artifacts - interact during lectures. We provide evidence for the unified production of these various sense-making resources during teaching to constitute a meaning unit, and we emphasize particularly the use of gestures and body orientations inside this meaning unit. We suggest that proper analyses of meaning units need to take into account not only language and diagrams but also a lecturer's pointing and depicting gestures, body positions, and the relationships between these different modalities. Scientific knowledge (conceptions) exists in the concurrent display of all sense-making resources, which we, following Vygotsky, understand as forming a unit (identity) of nonidentical entities.

  9. Lecture notes for Advanced Time Series Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Holst, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A first version of this notes was used at the lectures in Grenoble, and they are now extended and improved (together with Jan Holst), and used in Ph.D. courses on Advanced Time Series Analysis at IMM and at the Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Lund, 1994, 1997, ......A first version of this notes was used at the lectures in Grenoble, and they are now extended and improved (together with Jan Holst), and used in Ph.D. courses on Advanced Time Series Analysis at IMM and at the Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Lund, 1994, 1997, ...

  10. Rawls on Dewey before the Dewey Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    This article sheds light on John Rawls's views on John Dewey's philosophical temperament by investigating unpublished papers and lectures that Rawls wrote and delivered across the late 1940s, the 1950s, the 1960s, and the early 1970s. Moreover, the article shows that Rawls's rejection of Kant's dualisms predates by at least three decades the "Dewey Lectures" (1980) and that Dewey's notion of deliberation as "dramatic rehearsal in imagination" might have had an impact on Rawls's development of the notion of "reflective equilibrium" as a state of affairs that we strive to reach in ethical reflection.

  11. Five Lectures on Radial Basis Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Powell, Mike J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM.......Professor Mike J. D. Powell spent three weeks at IMM in November - December 2004. During the visit he gave five lectures on radial basis functions. These notes are a TeXified version of his hand-outs, made by Hans Bruun Nielsen, IMM....

  12. 67 INVITED Personalized surgical treatment for early breast cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rutgers, E

    2007-01-01

    ... belongtothemodernsurgicalapproachinthebattleagainstlocalisedand locallyadvancedprostatecancer. 67 INVITED Personalized surgical treatment for early breast cancer E.Rutgers. The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department...

  13. Twelve novel Atm mutations identified in Chinese ataxia telangiectasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Yang, Lu; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Fan; Xiao, Ying; Xia, Rongjun; Yuan, Xianhou; Yan, Mingshan

    2013-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized mainly by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, and immunodeficiency. This disease is caused by mutations of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene. More than 500 Atm mutations that are responsible for A-T have been identified so far. However, there have been very few A-T cases reported in China, and only two Chinese A-T patients have undergone Atm gene analysis. In order to systemically investigate A-T in China and map their Atm mutation spectrum, we recruited eight Chinese A-T patients from six unrelated families nationwide. Using direct sequencing of genomic DNA and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we identified twelve pathogenic Atm mutations, including one missense, four nonsense, five frameshift, one splicing, and one large genomic deletion. All the Atm mutations we identified were novel, and no homozygous mutation and founder-effect mutation were found. These results suggest that Atm mutations in Chinese populations are diverse and distinct largely from those in other ethnic areas.

  14. Oral papillary squamous cell carcinoma in twelve dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, A; Murphy, B G; Jordan, R C; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2014-01-01

    Papillary squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is a distinct histological subtype of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), described in both dogs and man. In dogs, PSCC has long been considered a malignant oral tumour of very young animals, but it has recently been reported to occur in adult dogs as well. The aim of this study was to describe the major clinicopathological characteristics of canine oral PSCC (COPSCC). Twelve dogs diagnosed with COPSCC were included in this retrospective study (1990-2012). The majority (75%) of the dogs were >6 years of age (median age 9 years). All tumours were derived from the gingiva of dentate jaws, with 66.7% affecting the rostral aspects of the jaws. The gross appearance of the lesions varied, with one having an intraosseous component only. The majority (91.7%) of the tumours were advanced lesions (T2 and T3), but no local or distant metastases were noted. Microscopically, two patterns were seen: (1) invasion of bone forming a cup-shaped indentation in the bone or a deeply cavitating cyst within the bone (cavitating pattern), (2) histologically malignant growth, but lack of apparent bone invasion (non-cavitating pattern). The microscopical appearance corresponded to imaging findings in a majority of cases, with cavitating forms presenting with a cyst-like pattern of bone loss or an expansile mass on imaging and non-cavitating forms showing an infiltrative pattern of bone destruction on imaging. These features suggest two distinct biological behaviours of COPSCC.

  15. Sensitivity and growth of twelve Elatior begonia cultivars to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinert, R.A.; Nelson, P.V.

    1979-12-01

    Twelve cultivars of Elatior begonia (Begonia X hiemalis Fotsch.) were exposed to O/sub 3/ at 25 and 50 pphM. The 'Schwabenland' group, 'Whisper 'O' Pink', and 'Improved Krefeld Orange' were the most sensitive, whereas 'Ballerina', 'Mikkell Limelight', and 'Turo' were the least sensitive. 'Rennaisance', 'Heirloom' 'Nixe', and 'Fantasy' were intermediate in sensitivity. The dry weight of foliage (stems plus leaves) of 9 cultivars exposed to O/sub 3/ was significantly less than that of control plants. Ozone at 25 and 50 pphM inhibited flower growth (including peduncles) and development in 4 and 8 of the 12 cultivars, respectively. Differences in flower weight ranged from 43 to 105% of the control at 25 pphM and from 25 to 98% of the control at 50 pphM, depending on cultivar. 1 table.

  16. Twelve tips for designing and running longitudinal integrated clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel; Graves, Lisa; Berry, Sue; Myhre, Doug; Cummings, Beth-Ann; Konkin, Jill

    2013-12-01

    Longitudinal integrated clerkships (LICs) involve learners spending an extended time in a clinical setting (or a variety of interlinked clinical settings) where their clinical learning opportunities are interwoven through continuities of patient contact and care, continuities of assessment and supervision, and continuities of clinical and cultural learning. Our twelve tips are grounded in the lived experiences of designing, implementing, maintaining, and evaluating LICs, and in the extant literature on LICs. We consider: general issues (anticipated benefits and challenges associated with starting and running an LIC); logistical issues (how long each longitudinal experience should last, where it will take place, the number of learners who can be accommodated); and integration issues (how the LIC interfaces with the rest of the program, and the need for evaluation that aligns with the dynamics of the LIC model). Although this paper is primarily aimed at those who are considering setting up an LIC in their own institutions or who are already running an LIC we also offer our recommendations as a reflection on the broader dynamics of medical education and on the priorities and issues we all face in designing and running educational programs.

  17. Commercializing Government-sponsored Innovations: Twelve Successful Buildings Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M. A.; Berry, L. G.; Goel, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies.

  18. The strong coupling regime of twelve flavors QCD

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Tiago Nunes

    2012-01-01

    We summarize the results recently reported in Ref.[1] [A. Deuzeman, M.P. Lombardo, T. Nunes da Silva and E. Pallante,"The bulk transition of QCD with twelve flavors and the role of improvement"] for the SU(3) gauge theory with Nf=12 fundamental flavors, and we add some numerical evidence and theoretical discussion. In particular, we study the nature of the bulk transition that separates a chirally broken phase at strong coupling from a chirally restored phase at weak coupling. When a non-improved action is used, a rapid crossover is observed at small bare quark masses. Our results confirm a first order nature for this transition, in agreement with previous results we obtained using an improved action. As shown in Ref.[1], when improvement of the action is used, the transition is preceded by a second rapid crossover at weaker coupling and an exotic phase emerges, where chiral symmetry is not yet broken. This can be explained [1] by the non hermiticity of the improved lattice Transfer matrix, arising from the c...

  19. Impact of invitation schemes on screening coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Katja Kemp; von Euler Chelpin, My; Vejborg, Ilse

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The porpuse of mammography screening is to decrease breast cancer mortality. To achieve this a high coverage by examination is needed. Within an organized screening programme, we examined the impact of changes in the invitation schedule on the interplay between coverage and participat...

  20. Mapping Invitations to Participate: An Investigation in Museum Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, Elsa Lenz

    2016-01-01

    This a/r/tographic inquiry delves into questions about participatory art museum practice, specifically seeking to understand the nature of invitations to participate. Utilising drawings, writing and mapping of embodied participation, questions of how individuals are invited to participate in various locations and how these invitations inform the…

  1. Twelve years of cooperation in the field of radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grapengiesser, Sten; Bennerstedt, Torkel

    2005-06-01

    SSI has pursued an international cooperation program since 1992 within the field of radiation protection and emergency preparedness for radiation accidents with the three Baltic countries as main beneficiaries. As the Baltic countries are members of the EU since May 2004, this bilateral support will now be phased out and replaced with other forms of cooperation. During the years passed, a large number of activities have been launched with a total budget of some 14 million ECU. The Baltic radiation protection authorities have played a big role in the cooperation and Baltic ministries, universities, nuclear technology installations and other industries using radiation have also been engaged in the projects. SKI, SKB, Studsvik and the Swedish nuclear power plants should be mentioned as major cooperation partners on the Swedish side. During autumn 2004 when such a large coordinated work program was coming to an end, SSI decided to hold a seminar with the purpose to follow up experiences from the work and discuss coming forms of cooperation. The seminar took place on the 18 of November 2004 and gathered some 80 participants, 29 of which from the Baltic countries. It was opened by Lars-Erik Holm, the SSI Director General, and the three Baltic countries then presented their views and impressions from the passed years of cooperation. The seminar was concluded with a panel discussion on 'How to proceed from today's situation'. The result was that SSI invited to a new coordination meeting during autumn 2005 to follow up and discuss coordination of radiation protection around the Baltic Sea together with the other Nordic radiation protection authorities.

  2. Maintaining Students’ Involvement in a Math Lecture Using Countdown Timers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ann Krizzel A. Aban; Lauro L. Fontanil

    2015-01-01

    ...), to deliver their lectures. The non-stop use of these softwares, however, seems to have negative effects on the students when it comes to maintaining their involvement in a lecture discussion for they tend to be more passive spectators...

  3. Instructional Uses of Instant Messaging (IM) During Classroom Lectures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mable B Kinzie; Stephen D Whitaker; Mark J Hofer

    2005-01-01

    ...) discussions during undergraduate university lectures. Over the course of three weeks, students practiced with and then employed hand-held computers for brief, synchronous class discussions in response to assigned questions related to the lectures...

  4. Viewpoints of Seven Fields Medalists : Lectures given at the Institut d'Estudis Catalans

    CERN Document Server

    Castellet, Manuel

    1992-01-01

    The Symposium on the Current State and Prospects of Mathematics was held in Barcelona from June 13 to June 18, 1991. Seven invited Fields medalists gavetalks on the development of their respective research fields. The contents of all lectures were collected in the volume, together witha transcription of a round table discussion held during the Symposium. All papers are expository. Some parts include precise technical statements of recent results, but the greater part consists of narrative text addressed to a very broad mathematical public. CONTENTS: R. Thom: Leaving Mathematics for Philosophy.- S. Novikov: Role of Integrable Models in the Development of Mathematics.- S.-T. Yau: The Current State and Prospects of Geometry and Nonlinear Differential Equations.- A. Connes: Noncommutative Geometry.- S. Smale: Theory of Computation.- V. Jones: Knots in Mathematics and Physics.- G. Faltings: Recent Progress in Diophantine Geometry.

  5. Goals and design of public physics lectures: perspectives of high-school students, physics teachers and lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-09-01

    Many large scientific projects and scientific centres incorporate some kind of outreach programme. Almost all of these outreach programmes include public scientific lectures delivered by practising scientists. In this article, we examine such lectures from the perspectives of: (i) lecturers (7) who are practising scientists acknowledged to be good public lecturers and (ii) audiences composed of high-school students (169) and high-school physics teachers (80) who attended these lectures. We identify and discuss the main goals as expressed by the lecturers and the audiences, and the correspondence between these goals. We also discuss how the lecturers' goals impact on the design of their lectures and examine how the lecture affects audiences with different attitudes towards (and interests in) physics. Our findings suggest that the goals of the participating lecturers and the expectations of their audiences were highly congruent. Both believe that a good public scientific lecture must successfully communicate state-of-the-art scientific knowledge to the public, while inspiring interest in and appreciation of science. Our findings also suggest that exemplary public scientific lectures incorporate content, structure and explanatory means that explicitly adhere to the lecturers' goals. We identify and list several design principles.

  6. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  7. Lecture Notes on Software Process Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    13 Introduction bo Software Verification and Validation EM-8 Lecture Notes on Software Process Improvement CM-14 Intelectual Property Protection for...Talented people are important in any software organization. Nevertheless, people need to be supported by a good working environment. Software

  8. Lecture notes for Advanced Time Series Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henrik; Holst, Jan

    1997-01-01

    A first version of this notes was used at the lectures in Grenoble, and they are now extended and improved (together with Jan Holst), and used in Ph.D. courses on Advanced Time Series Analysis at IMM and at the Department of Mathematical Statistics, University of Lund, 1994, 1997, ...

  9. College Students' Preference for Compressed Speech Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primrose, Robert A.

    To test student reactions to compressed-speech lectures, tapes for a general education course in oral communication were compressed to 49 to 77 percent of original time. Students were permitted to check them out via a dial access retrieval system. Checkouts and use of tapes were compared with student grades at semester's end. No significant…

  10. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 26 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (7/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (1/4) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 27 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. Pich (IFIC) The Standard Model (8/8) 10:15 - 11:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (2/3) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) A. Pich (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 28 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (2/4) 10:15 - 11:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic Colliders (3/4) 11:15 - 12:00 R. Rattazzi (CERN) Beyond the Standard Model (3/3) 14:00 - 15:00 R. Assmann (CERN) The CLIC project DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 29 July 09:15 - 10:00 K. Jacobs (Universität Freiburg) Physics in Hadronic ...

  11. Lectures on quantization of gauge systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reshetikhin, N.; Booß-Bavnbek, B.; Esposito, G.; Lesch, M.

    2010-01-01

    A gauge system is a classical field theory where among the fields there are connections in a principal G-bundle over the space - time manifold and the classical action is either invariant or transforms appropriately with respect to the action of the gauge group. The lectures are focused on the path

  12. Lectures on Flavor Physics and CP Violation

    OpenAIRE

    Grinstein, B.

    2017-01-01

    Two short introductory lectures on Flavor Physics delivered at CLASHEP 2015. Among included topics: The KM matrix and the KM model of CP-violation, Determination of KM Elements, FCNC and GIM, New Physics and Flavor, Neutral Meson Mixing and CP Asymmetries. Many problems for the student, and solutions to selected problems, included.

  13. Lecturers' Views on Ghana's Undergraduate Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assuah, Charles; Ayebo, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    This paper synthesizes the views of 6 university lecturers on Ghana's undergraduate mathematics education. These views were expressed during a mathematics workshop sensitization program on the "contribution of undergraduate mathematics education to the Ghanaian economy." The data consisting of open-ended questions followed by…

  14. KAWA lecture notes on complex hyperbolic geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Erwan

    2016-01-01

    These lecture notes are based on a mini-course given at the fifth KAWA Winter School on March 24-29, 2014 at CIRM, Marseille. They provide an introduction to hyperbolicity of complex algebraic varieties namely the geometry of entire curves, and a description of some recent developments.

  15. Movement and Character. Lecture, London, 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesorri, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Montessori's words from the 1946 London Lectures describe principles of intelligence and character, the work of the hand, and movement with a purpose as being integral to self-construction. The perfection of movement is spiritual, says Dr. Montessori. Repetition of practical life exercises are exercises in movement with the dignity of human…

  16. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 19 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (1/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (3/5) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 20 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (2/8) 10:15 - 11:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (4/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) A. PICH (IFIC) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 21 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (3/8) 10:15 - 11:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (4/8) 11:15 - 12:00 O. ULLALAND (CERN) Detectors (5/5) 14:00 - 15:00 R. BRUN (CERN) ROOT: Introduction and Demonstration DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Thursday 22 July 09:15 - 10:00 A. PICH (IFIC) The Standard Model (5/8) 10:15 - 11:00 C. De La Taille (Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire) Introduction to Electronics (1/3) 11:15 - 12:00 A. PICH (IFIC) C. De La Taille (Laboratoi...

  17. Music during Lectures: Will Students Learn Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosseville, Fabrice; Laborde, Sylvain; Scelles, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the influence of music during learning on the academic performance of undergraduate students, and more particularly the influence of affects induced by music. Altogether 249 students were involved in the study, divided into a control group and an experimental group. Both groups attended the same videotaped lecture, with the…

  18. Engineering Lecturers' Views on CLIL and EMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The present study aims to shed some light on how engineering lecturers teaching in English at a Spanish university view their work (teaching goals) within the current European internationalisation trend of offering courses and master programmes in English. A questionnaire where content and language integrated learning (CLIL) and English-medium…

  19. Creativity and the Curriculum. Inaugural Professorial Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is regarded by many as a vital aspect of the human world, and creative endeavours are seen as a central element of society. Hence student creativity is regarded as a desirable outcome of education. This inaugural professorial lecture examines the place of creativity in education and in national curricula. Beginning with examples of…

  20. Knowledge, Power, and Freud's Clark Conference Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Martha; Makay, John J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines Freud's Clark Conference Lectures in which he offers a case in point of the intersection among knowledge, power, and discourse. Argues that Freud's rhetorical action constituted the "new" knowledge of psychoanalysis, while simultaneously forging relationships between the scientific and medical communities that endowed the…

  1. Creativity and the Curriculum. Inaugural Professorial Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Creativity is regarded by many as a vital aspect of the human world, and creative endeavours are seen as a central element of society. Hence student creativity is regarded as a desirable outcome of education. This inaugural professorial lecture examines the place of creativity in education and in national curricula. Beginning with examples of…

  2. Movement and Learning in Lecture Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michala Paige

    2011-01-01

    This mixed methods research utilized Action Based Learning Theory on a population of undergraduate college-aged students to determine if movement breaks in a predominately lecture-style college class affected a student's ability to demonstrate learning. Four professors from various disciplines, each teaching two sections of the same…

  3. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennifer Lynn McLean; Erica L. Suchman

    2016-01-01

    .... Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due...

  4. Engagement of Students with Lectures in Biochemistry and Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth Ann; Hodgson, Yvonne; Macaulay, Janet Olwyn

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff at universities have become concerned about the decrease in student attendance at lectures and the implication of this on student achievement and learning. Few studies have measured actual lecture attendance in a coherent or comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to measure actual lecture attendance of students over two year…

  5. Lecturers' Experience of Using Social Media in Higher Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seechaliao, Thapanee

    2015-01-01

    This research paper presents lecturers' experience of using social media in higher education courses. The research methodology used a survey approach. The research instrument was a questionnaire about lecturers' experience of using social media in higher education courses. Thirty-one lecturers completed the questionnaire. The data were scored by…

  6. Does Instructor's Image Size in Video Lectures Affect Learning Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pi, Z.; Hong, J.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most commonly used forms of video lectures is a combination of an instructor's image and accompanying lecture slides as a picture-in-picture. As the image size of the instructor varies significantly across video lectures, and so do the learning outcomes associated with this technology, the influence of the instructor's image size should…

  7. The Effect of Instant Messaging on Lecture Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVaugh, Nathan Kant

    2012-01-01

    The impact of instant message interruptions via computer on immediate lecture retention for college students was examined. While watching a 24-minute video of a classroom lecture, students received various numbers of related-to-lecture ("Is consistent use of the eye contact method necessary for success?") versus not-related-to lecture…

  8. University Lecturer Publication Output: Qualifications, Time and Confidence Count

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmings, Brian; Kay, Russell

    2010-01-01

    An investigation of factors which differentiate between university lecturers in relation to publication output is reported. The study drew on data from lecturers working full-time at two large Australian universities. Measures of research publication output were used to select two groups of lecturers (N[subscript 1] = 119; N[subscript 2] = 119);…

  9. Student Use of Mobile Devices in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Neil; Rees, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly used by students in university lectures. This has resulted in controversy and the banning of mobile devices in some lectures. Although there has been some research into how students use laptop computers in lectures, there has been little investigation into the wider use of mobile devices. This study was designed to…

  10. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive…

  11. Methodological triangulation of the students' use of recorded lectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Bruggen, Jan van; Jochems, Wim

    2013-01-01

    A lot of research into the use of recorded lectures has been done by using surveys or interviews. We will show that triangulation of multiple data sources is needed. We will discuss how students use recorded lectures according to their self-report and what actual usage of the recorded lectures can b

  12. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive…

  13. Mathematics Lectures as Narratives: Insights from Network Graph Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Aaron; Wiesner, Emilie; Fukawa-Connelly, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Although lecture is the traditional method of university mathematics instruction, there has been little empirical research that describes the general structure of lectures. In this paper, we adapt ideas from narrative analysis and apply them to an upper-level mathematics lecture. We develop a framework that enables us to conceptualize the lecture…

  14. Student Preferences for Online Lecture Formats: Does Prior Experience Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Michelle; Hile, Rachel E.; Vartanian, Lesa R.; Webb, Janae

    2013-01-01

    We examined undergraduate students' quality ratings of and preferences for different types of online lecture formats. Students preferred richer online lecture formats that included both audio and visual components; however, there were no significant differences between students' ratings of PowerPoint lectures with "audio" of the…

  15. The Effects of Lecture Diversity on Germane Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costley, Jamie; Lange, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    An important aspect of MOOCs is the way students interact with video lectures. Instruction provided through video lectures should focus on ways to increase germane cognitive load, which directly contributes to learning. One approach that may lead to an increase of germane load may be to use video lectures with diverse forms of media, including…

  16. Taxonomy of Lecture Note-Taking Skills and Subskills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musalli, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Note taking (NT) in lectures is as active a skill as listening, which stimulates it, and as challenging as writing, which is the end product. Literature on lecture NT misses an integration of the processes involved in listening with those in NT. In this article, a taxonomy is proposed of lecture NT skills and subskills based on a similar list…

  17. 45 CFR 73.735-706 - Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) Teaching, lecturing, or writing may not be for the purpose of the special preparation of a person or class... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. 73.735-706... OF CONDUCT Outside Activities § 73.735-706 Teaching, lecturing, and speechmaking. (a) Employees...

  18. Engagement of Students with Lectures in Biochemistry and Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Elizabeth Ann; Hodgson, Yvonne; Macaulay, Janet Olwyn

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff at universities have become concerned about the decrease in student attendance at lectures and the implication of this on student achievement and learning. Few studies have measured actual lecture attendance in a coherent or comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to measure actual lecture attendance of students over two year…

  19. Lecture on Female Masturbation Harassed Him, Male Student Says.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    1995-01-01

    A male student in a California State University-Sacramento psychology lecture on female masturbation has filed a sexual harassment complaint, claiming the lecture violated institutional policy by creating an intimidating, hostile, and offensive learning environment. He felt the lecture was inappropriately graphic and political in intent. (MSE)

  20. Annual Advances in Cancer Prevention Lecture | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016 Keynote Lecture Polyvalent Vaccines Targeting Oncogenic Driver Pathways A special keynote lecture became part of the NCI Summer Curriculum in Cancer Prevention in 2000. This lecture will be held on Thursday, July 21, 2016 at 1:30pm at Masur Auditorium, Building 10, NIH Main Campus, Bethesda, MD. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Mary L. (Nora) Disis, MD. |

  1. Taxonomy of Lecture Note-Taking Skills and Subskills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musalli, Alaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Note taking (NT) in lectures is as active a skill as listening, which stimulates it, and as challenging as writing, which is the end product. Literature on lecture NT misses an integration of the processes involved in listening with those in NT. In this article, a taxonomy is proposed of lecture NT skills and subskills based on a similar list…

  2. How Much Do They Understand? Lectures, Students and Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Denise; Kirkpatrick, Andy

    2000-01-01

    Studied the nature and extent of problems in comprehension of lectures experienced by 198 college students from non-English speaking backgrounds at a British university. Slightly fewer than 1 in 10 was able to understand the content and intent of lectures very well, and almost 25% had not understood the lectures at all. (SLD)

  3. The Synthesis and Antitumor Activity of Twelve Galloyl Glucosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve galloyl glucosides 1–12, showing diverse substitution patterns with two or three galloyl groups, were synthesized using commercially available, low-cost D-glucose and gallic acid as starting materials. Among them, three compounds, methyl 3,6-di-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (9, ethyl 2,3-di-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (11 and ethyl 2,3-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (12, are new compounds and other six, 1,6-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (1, 1,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (2, 1,2-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (3, 1,3-di-O-galloyl-β-D-glucopyranose (4, 1,2,3-tri-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranose (6 and methyl 3,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (10, were synthesized for the first time in the present study. In in vitro MTT assay, 1–12 inhibited human cancer K562, HL-60 and HeLa cells with inhibition rates ranging from 64.2% to 92.9% at 100 μg/mL, and their IC50 values were determined to be varied in 17.2–124.7 μM on the tested three human cancer cell lines. In addition, compounds 1–12 inhibited murine sarcoma S180 cells with inhibition rates ranging from 38.7% to 52.8% at 100 μg/mL in the in vitro MTT assay, and in vivo antitumor activity of 1 and 2 was also detected in murine sarcoma S180 tumor-bearing Kunming mice using taxol as positive control.

  4. [Twelve years of working of Brazzaville cancer registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsondé Malanda, Judith; Nkoua Mbon, Jean Bernard; Bambara, Augustin Tozoula; Ibara, Gérard; Minga, Benoît; Nkoua Epala, Brice; Gombé Mbalawa, Charles

    2013-02-01

    The Brazzaville cancer registry was created in 1996 with the support of the International Agency Research against Cancer (IARC) which is located in Lyon, France. The Brazzaville cancer registry is a registry which is based on population which records new cancer cases occurring in Brazzaville by using Canreg 4.0 Software. Its aim is to supply useful information to fight against cancer to physicians and to decision makers. We conducted this study whose target was to determine the incidence of cancer in Brazzaville during twelve years, from January 1st, 1998 to December 31, 2009. During that period 6,048 new cancer cases were recorded: 3,377 women (55.8%), 2,384 men (39.4%), and 287 children (4.8%) from 0 to 14 years old with an annual average of 504 cases. Middle age to the patient's diagnosis was 49.5 years in female sex and 505.5 years old for male sex. The incidence rate of cancers in Brazzaville was 39.8 or 100.000 inhabitants per year and by sex we observed 49 to female sex and 35.2 for male sex. The first cancers localizations observed to women were in order of frequency: breast, cervix uterine, liver ovaries, hematopoietic system, to men : liver, prostate, hematopoietic system, colon and stomach; to children : retina, kidney, hematopoietic system, liver and bones. These rates are the basis to know the burden of cancer among all pathologies of Brazzaville and the achievement of a national cancer control program.

  5. Hyperinsulinism and hyperammonemia syndrome: report of twelve unrelated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lonlay, P; Benelli, C; Fouque, F; Ganguly, A; Aral, B; Dionisi-Vici, C; Touati, G; Heinrichs, C; Rabier, D; Kamoun, P; Robert, J J; Stanley, C; Saudubray, J M

    2001-09-01

    Hyperinsulinism and hyperammonemia syndrome has been reported as a cause of moderately severe hyperinsulinism with diffuse involvement of the pancreas. The disorder is caused by gain of function mutations in the GLUD1 gene, resulting in a decreased inhibitory effect of guanosine triphosphate on the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzyme. Twelve unrelated patients (six males, six females) with hyperinsulinism and hyperammonemia syndrome have been investigated. The phenotypes were clinically heterogeneous, with neonatal and infancy-onset hypoglycemia and variable responsiveness to medical (diazoxide) and dietary (leucine-restricted diet) treatment. Hyperammonemia (90-200 micromol/L, normal carbamylglutamate administration. The patients had mean basal GDH activity (18.3 +/- 0.9 nmol/min/mg protein) not different from controls (17.9 +/- 1.8 nmol/min/mg protein) in cultured lymphoblasts. The sensitivity of GDH activity to inhibition by guanosine triphosphate was reduced in all patient lymphoblast cultures (IC(50), or concentrations required for 50% inhibition of GDH activity, ranging from 140 to 580 nM, compared with control IC(50) value of 83 +/- 1.0 nmol/L). The allosteric effect of ADP was within the normal range. The activating effect of leucine on GDH activity varied among the patients, with a significant decrease of sensitivity that was correlated with the negative clinical response to a leucine-restricted diet in plasma glucose levels in four patients. Molecular studies were performed in 11 patients. Heterozygous mutations were localized in the antenna region (four patients in exon 11, two patients in exon 12) as well as in the guanosine triphosphate binding site (two patients in exon 6, two patients in exon 7) of the GLUD1 gene. No mutation has been found in one patient after sequencing the exons 5-13 of the gene.

  6. Commercializing government-sponsored innovations: Twelve successful buildings case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.; Berry, L.G.; Goel, R.K.

    1989-01-01

    This report examines the commercialization and use of R and D results funded by DOE's Office of Buildings and Community Systems (OBCS), an office that is dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of the nation's buildings. Three goals guided the research described in this report: to improve understanding of the factors that hinder or facilitate the transfer of OBCS R and D results, to determine which technology transfer strategies are most effective and under what circumstances each is appropriate, and to document the market penetration and energy savings achieved by successfully-commercialized innovations that have received OBCS support. Twelve successfully-commercialized innovations are discussed here. The methodology employed involved a review of the literature, interviews with innovation program managers and industry personnel, and data collection from secondary sources. Six generic technology transfer strategies are also described. Of these, contracting R and D to industrial partners is found to be the most commonly used strategy in our case studies. The market penetration achieved to date by the innovations studied ranges from less than 1% to 100%. For the three innovations with the highest predicted levels of energy savings (i.e., the flame retention head oil burner, low-E windows, and solid-state ballasts), combined cumulative savings by the year 2000 are likely to approach 2 quads. To date the energy savings for these three innovations have been about 0.2 quads. Our case studies illustrate the important role federal agencies can play in commercializing new technologies. 27 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Lecturer practitioners in six professions: combining cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Pat; Mathers, Nigel J

    2004-07-01

    Whilst research has been undertaken in relation to the lecturer practitioner role in nursing, there have been no cross-professional studies. There is an explicit political agenda in the United Kingdom on interprofessional education and enhancing the status of those who provide practice-based teaching. This paper reports a study to investigate the commonalities and differences between lecturer practitioners across professions and to generate hypotheses about the role, which follows different models of practice in the different professions. An exploratory research design was adopted, using semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of lecturer practitioners from six professions (architecture, clinical psychology, law, medicine, nursing and social work). A grounded theory approach was used. All lecturer practitioners perceived a clear dichotomy between their professional practice role and their university role. All used similar strategies to adapt to and deal with combining two very differently perceived cultures. There were striking similarities in response to the consequences of serving "two masters" in the areas of time management and role identity/definition. The role not only bridges theory and practice, but has to operate within very different organizational cultures. Further research is needed to test the generalizability of the findings. Relevance to clinical practice. This investigation aims to inform higher education and health service policy on lecturer practitioners, and also provide support for those undertaking this challenging role. The study poses challenging questions for policymakers in the current climate of interprofessional learning, which need to be addressed if future initiatives in this area are to be successful.

  8. An Inverse MOOC Model: Small Virtual Field Geology Classes with Many Teachers (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bentley, C.

    2013-12-01

    In the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) mode of instruction, one or a small group of collaborating instructors lecture online to a large (often extremely large) number of students. We are experimenting with an inverse concept: an online classroom in which a small group of collaborating students are taught by dozens of collaborating instructors. This experiment is part of a new NSF TUES Type 3 project titled 'Google Earth for Onsite and Distance Education (GEODE).' Among the goals of the project are the development of an online course called the 'Grand Tour.' We are inviting dozens of colleagues to record virtual field trips (VFTs) and upload them to Google Earth. Students enrolled in the course will be assigned to a small group and tasked with a research project--for example to write a report on foreland thrust belts. They will select a small subset of available VFTs to follow and will be scaffolded by virtual specimens, emergent cross sections, analytical simulations (virtual tricorders), and a game style environment. Instant feedback based on auto-logging will enable adaptive learning. The design is suited to both onsite and distance education and will facilitate access to iconic geologic sites around the world to persons with mobility constraints. We invite input from the community to help guide the design phase of this project. Prototypes of the above-listed learning resources have already been developed and are freely available at http://www.DigitalPlanet.org.

  9. Goals and Design of Public Physics Lectures: Perspectives of High-School Students, Physics Teachers and Lecturers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-01-01

    Many large scientific projects and scientific centres incorporate some kind of outreach programme. Almost all of these outreach programmes include public scientific lectures delivered by practising scientists. In this article, we examine such lectures from the perspectives of: (i) lecturers (7) who are practising scientists acknowledged to be good…

  10. BOOK REVIEW: Feynman Lectures on Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feynman, Richard P.; Morinigo, Fernando B.; Wagner, William G.

    2003-05-01

    In the early 1960s Feynman lectured to physics undergraduates and, with the assistance of his colleagues Leighton and Sands, produced the three-volume classic Feynman Lectures in Physics. These lectures were delivered in the mornings. In the afternoons Feynman was giving postgraduate lectures on gravitation. This book is based on notes compiled by two students on that course: Morinigo and Wagner. Their notes were checked and approved by Feynman and were available at Caltech. They have now been edited by Brian Hatfield and made more widely available. The book has a substantial preface by John Preskill and Kip Thorne, and an introduction entitled 'Quantum Gravity' by Brian Hatfield. You should read these before going on to the lectures themselves. Preskill and Thorne identify three categories of potential readers of this book. 1. Those with a postgraduate training in theoretical physics. 2. 'Readers with a solid undergraduate training in physics'. 3. 'Admirers of Feynman who do not have a strong physics background'. The title of the book is perhaps misleading: readers in category 2 who think that this book is an extension of the Feynman Lectures in Physics may be disappointed. It is not: it is a book aimed mainly at those in category 1. If you want to get to grips with gravitation (and general relativity) then you need to read an introductory text first e.g. General Relativity by I R Kenyon (Oxford: Oxford University Press) or A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics by Ian D Lawrie (Bristol: IoP). But there is no Royal Road. As pointed out in the preface and in the introduction, the book represents Feynman's thinking about gravitation some 40 years ago: the lecture course was part of his attempts to understand the subject himself, and for readers in all three categories it is this that makes the book one of interest: the opportunity to observe how a great physicist attempts to tackle some of the hardest challenges of physics. However, the book was written 40

  11. Lectures on Higher Structures in M-Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Saemann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    These are notes for four lectures on higher structures in M-theory as presented at workshops at the Erwin Schroedinger Institute and Tohoku University. The first lecture gives an overview of systems of multiple M5-branes and introduces the relevant mathematical structures underlying a local description of higher gauge theory. In the second lecture, we develop the corresponding global picture. A construction of non-abelian superconformal gauge theories in six dimensions using twistor spaces is discussed in the third lecture. The last lecture deals with the problem of higher quantization and its relation to loop space. An appendix summarizes the relation between 3-Lie algebras and Lie 2-algebras.

  12. Berger Peter L., Invitation à la sociologie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Marquis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available L’invitation à la sociologie de Peter Berger est la réédition d’un ouvrage initiale­ment paru en 1963. Né en 1929, P. Berger est un des grands noms de la sociologie amé­ricaine actuelle, notamment connu chez nous pour un ouvrage coécrit avec Th. Luck­­mann et paru trois ans après la première édition de Invitation à la sociologie : The Social Construction of Reality, qui constitue une étape importante dans l’approche dite du constructivisme social en réactivant la tradition phénoménologique en...

  13. Lectures on Dark Energy and Cosmic Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.

    2008-09-01

    The discovery ten years ago that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating put in place the present cosmological model, in which the Universe is composed of 4% baryons, 20% dark matter, and 76% dark energy. Yet the underlying cause of cosmic acceleration remains a mystery: it could arise from the repulsive gravity of dark energy-for example, the quantum energy of the vacuum-or it may signal that General Relativity breaks down on cosmological scales and must be replaced. In these lectures, I present the observational evidence for cosmic acceleration and what it has revealed about dark energy, discuss a few of the theoretical ideas that have been proposed to explain acceleration, and describe the key observational probes that we hope will shed light on this enigma in the coming years. Based on five lectures given at the XII Ciclo de Cursos Especiais at the Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1-5 October 2007.

  14. Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme: Cloud Computing

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Cloud Computing (1/2), by Belmiro Rodrigues Moreira (LIP Laboratorio de Instrumentacao e Fisica Experimental de Part).   Wednesday, May 30, 2012 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 500-1-001 - Main Auditorium ) Cloud computing, the recent years buzzword for distributed computing, continues to attract and keep the interest of both the computing and business world. These lectures aim at explaining "What is Cloud Computing?" identifying and analyzing it's characteristics, models, and applications. The lectures will explore different "Cloud definitions" given by different authors and use them to introduce the particular concepts. The main cloud models (SaaS, PaaS, IaaS), cloud types (public, private, hybrid), cloud standards and security concerns will be presented. The borders between Cloud Computing and Grid Computing, Server Virtualization, Utility Computing will be discussed and analyzed.

  15. Lectures on Flavor Physics and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Grinstein, B

    2016-01-01

    These lectures on flavor physics are an introduction to the subject. First lec- ture: We discuss the meaning of flavor and the importance of flavor physics in restricting extensions of the Standard Model (SM) of Electroweak interactions. We explain the origin of the KM matrix and how its elements are determined. We discuss FCNC and the GIM mechanism, followed by how a principle of Minimal Flavor Violation leads to SM extensions that are safe as far as FCNC are concerned even if the new physics comes in at low, TeVish scales. This is illustrated by the example of B radiative decays ( b → sγ ). Second lecture: We then turn our attention to CP-violation. We start by presenting neutral meson mixing. Then we consider various CP-asymmetries, culminating in the theoretically clean interference between mixing and decay into CP eigenstates.

  16. Academic Training: Academic Training Lectures-Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  17. Lecture Notes on Topics in Accelerator Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alex W.

    2002-11-15

    These are lecture notes that cover a selection of topics, some of them under current research, in accelerator physics. I try to derive the results from first principles, although the students are assumed to have an introductory knowledge of the basics. The topics covered are: (1) Panofsky-Wenzel and Planar Wake Theorems; (2) Echo Effect; (3) Crystalline Beam; (4) Fast Ion Instability; (5) Lawson-Woodward Theorem and Laser Acceleration in Free Space; (6) Spin Dynamics and Siberian Snakes; (7) Symplectic Approximation of Maps; (8) Truncated Power Series Algebra; and (9) Lie Algebra Technique for nonlinear Dynamics. The purpose of these lectures is not to elaborate, but to prepare the students so that they can do their own research. Each topic can be read independently of the others.

  18. Lecture Notes on Topics in Accelerator Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chao, A W

    2002-01-01

    These are lecture notes that cover a selection of topics, some of them under current research, in accelerator physics. I try to derive the results from first principles, although the students are assumed to have an introductory knowledge of the basics. The topics covered are: (1) Panofsky-Wenzel and Planar Wake Theorems; (2) Echo Effect; (3) Crystalline Beam; (4) Fast Ion Instability; (5) Lawson-Woodward Theorem and Laser Acceleration in Free Space; (6) Spin Dynamics and Siberian Snakes; (7) Symplectic Approximation of Maps; (8) Truncated Power Series Algebra; and (9) Lie Algebra Technique for nonlinear Dynamics. The purpose of these lectures is not to elaborate, but to prepare the students so that they can do their own research. Each topic can be read independently of the others.

  19. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  20. An Experiment in Humanistic Management within Community College District Twelve, Centralia/Olympia, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Dale A.; Hurley, John A.

    Community College District Twelve, a multi-college district serving a two-county area in southwestern Washington, has attempted to incorporate at administrative levels many of the humanistic, process-oriented principles of management discussed by Maslow and Maccoby. A concept of the ideal leadership style for District Twelve guides the selection…

  1. Academic Training Lecture: Jets at Hadron Colliders

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Regular Programme 30, 31 March and 1 April  2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  Bldg. 40-S2-A01 - Salle Andersson Jets at Hadron Colliders by Gavin Salam These three lectures will discuss how jets are defined at hadron colliders, the physics that is responsible for the internal structure of jets and the ways in which an understanding of jets may help in searches for new particles at the LHC.

  2. Three lectures on topological phases of matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, E.

    2016-07-01

    These notes are based on lectures at the PSSCMP/PiTP summer school that was held at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study in July, 2015. They are devoted largely to topological phases of matter that can be understood in terms of free fermions and band theory. They also contain an introduction to the fractional quantum Hall effect from the point of view of effective field theory.

  3. Virginia Tech Distinguished Lecture Series: Eric Lyon

    OpenAIRE

    Lyon, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Associate Professor - Music Technology, Composition Eric Lyon is a composer and computer music researcher. Major areas of focus include computer chamber music, spatial orchestration, and articulated noise composition. Recent compositions include "Spirits", a 43-channel electroacoustic piano composition for the ZKM Kubus,"Noise Variations" for ensemble mise-en, and “The Book of Strange Positions” for the violin duo String Noise. Subject: Distinguished Lecture Series

  4. TASI 2008 Lectures on Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.

    2009-01-01

    Based on lectures given at the 2008 Theoretical Advanced Study Institute (TASI), I review here some aspects of the phenomenology of particle dark matter, including the process of thermal freeze-out in the early universe, and the direct and indirect detection of WIMPs. I also describe some of the most popular particle candidates for dark matter and summarize the current status of the quest to discover dark matter's particle identity.

  5. Academic Training: Summer Student Lecture Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Monday 12 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (1/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (1/5) 11:15 - 12:00 L. Di Lella (CERN) Introduction to Particle Physics (4/4) DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Tuesday 13 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (2/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (2/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. Bruening (CERN) G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Discussion Session DATE TIME LECTURER TITLE Wednesday 14 July 09:15 - 10:00 G. Ross (The Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics & CERN) Fundamental Concepts of Particle Physics (3/6) 10:15 - 11:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (3/5) 11:15 - 12:00 O. Bruening (CERN) Accelerators (4/5) 14:00 - ...

  6. Nursing students' attitudes to biomedical science lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Modhefer, A K; Roe, S

    To explore what first-year nursing students believe to be the preferred characteristics of common foundation programme biomedical science lecturers, and to investigate whether students prefer active or passive learning. Survey and interview methodologies were used to explore the attitudes of a cohort of first-year nursing students at Queen's University Belfast. Questionnaires were distributed among 300 students. Individuals were asked to select five of a list of 14 criteria that they believed characterised the qualities of an effective lecturer. Informal interviews were carried out with five participants who were randomly selected from the sample to investigate which teaching methods were most beneficial in assisting their learning. Nursing students favoured didactic teaching and found interactivity in lectures intimidating. Students preferred to learn biomedical science passively and depended heavily on their instructors. In response to the survey, the authors propose a set of recommendations to enhance the learning process in large classes. This guidance includes giving clear objectives and requirements to students, encouraging active participation, and sustaining student interest through the use of improved teaching aids and innovative techniques.

  7. Lecture programme The reality of science today

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    What are the new challenges and realities facing scientific research? What is its place in society today? To answer these questions, the History and Philosophy of Sciences Unit of Geneva University, in collaboration with ASPERA, the European network for astroparticle physics research, has organised a programme of lectures entitled La réalité de la science d’aujourd’hui, enjeux et défis de la diversité. This series of lectures will provide researchers and members of the public with a snapshot of the state of science today from the perspective of laboratories and institutes, and on subjects such as funding policy and technological and legal impact. The first lecture will be given by science historian Dominique Pestre (EHESS & Centre Koyré, Paris), renowned for his contributions to the analysis of science past and present, and notably one of the authors of the work "History of CERN". He will discuss the modern methods of producing scientific knowledge which have been develop...

  8. Lecture Script: Introduction to Computational Quantum Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Schmied, Roman

    2014-01-01

    This document is the lecture script of a one-semester course taught at the University of Basel in the Fall semesters of 2012 and 2013. It is aimed at advanced students of physics who are familiar with the concepts and notations of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics lectures can often be separated into two classes. In the first class you get to know Schroedinger's equation and find the form and dynamics of simple physical systems (square well, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom); most calculations are analytic and inspired by calculations originally done in the 1920s and 1930s. In the second class you learn about large systems such as molecular structures, crystalline solids, or lattice models; these calculations are usually so complicated that it is difficult for the student to understand them in all detail. This lecture tries to bridge the gap between simple analytic calculations and complicated large-scale computations. We will revisit most of the problems encountered in introductory quantum mechanics, fo...

  9. Recently Published Lectures and Tutorials for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Herr, J.

    2006-01-01

    As reported in the September 2004 ATLAS eNews, the Web Lecture Archive Project, WLAP, a collaboration between the University of Michigan and CERN, has developed a synchronized system for recording and publishing educational multimedia presentations, using the Web as medium. This year, the University of Michigan team has been asked to record and publish all ATLAS Plenary sessions, as well as a large number of Physics and Computing tutorials. A significant amount of this material has already been published and can be accessed via the links below. The WLAP model is spreading. This summer, the CERN's High School Teachers program has used WLAP's system to record several physics lectures directed toward a broad audience. And a new project called MScribe, which is essentially the WLAP system coupled with an infrared tracking camera, is being used by the University of Michigan to record several University courses this academic year. All lectures can be viewed on any major platform with any common internet browser...

  10. "A COMPARISON OF ""TRADITIONAL LECTURE"" AND ""LECTURE ALONG WITH FILMSTRIP PROJECTION"""

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Tahvildari

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, for the first time in Iran, the application and effectiveness of two educational methods of" traditional lecture" and " lecture along with filmstrip projection", on the level of personal health knowledge of students studying at third grade of girls guidance school in the 7th educational district of Tehran was compared. The "Experimental design" was chosen for conducting this research in order to have a more suitable ground for understanding causal relationships. In order to consider both, the effects of the primary measurement and also the effects of the simultaneous factors, the experimental design was applied. A control group was also included in the experiment. The results of this study showed that the "lecture along with filmstrip projection" was significantly better and more effective that "traditional lecture" method of education in increasing student's health knowledge in relation to personal health contents. It was also concluded that the "traditional lecture" method of education has had significantly more effects on increasing student's health knowledge as compared to control group (without receiving health education in relation to personal health.

  11. Video Lecture Capture Technology Helps Students Study without Affecting Attendance in Large Microbiology Lecture Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynn McLean

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recording lectures using video lecture capture software and making them available for students to watch anytime, from anywhere, has become a common practice in many universities across many disciplines. The software has become increasingly easy to use and is commonly provided and maintained by higher education institutions. Several studies have reported that students use lecture capture to enhance their learning and study for assessments, as well as to catch up on material they miss when they cannot attend class due to extenuating circumstances. Furthermore, students with disabilities and students from non-English Speaking Backgrounds (NESB may benefit from being able to watch the video lecture captures at their own pace. Yet, the effect of this technology on class attendance remains a controversial topic and largely unexplored in undergraduate microbiology education. Here, we show that when video lecture captures were available in our large enrollment general microbiology courses, attendance did not decrease. In fact, the majority of students reported that having the videos available did not encourage them to skip class, but rather they used them as a study tool. When we surveyed NESB students and nontraditional students about their attitudes toward this technology, they found it helpful for their learning and for keeping up with the material.

  12. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785. The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p Conclusion In this setting, EVS technology used in large group lectures did not offer significant advantages over the more traditional lecture format.

  13. The Trieste Lecture of John Stewart Bell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassi, Angelo; Carlo Ghirardi, Gian

    2007-03-01

    Delivered at Trieste on the occasion of the 25th Anniversary of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, 2 November 1989 The video of this lecture is available here. Please see the PDF for the transcript of the lecture. General remarks by Angelo Bassi and GianCarlo Ghirardi During the autumn of 1989 the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, celebrated the 25th anniversary of its creation. Among the many prestigious speakers, who delivered extremely interesting lectures on that occasion, was the late John Stewart Bell. All lectures have been recorded on tape. We succeeded in getting a copy of John's lecture. In the lecture, many of the arguments that John had lucidly stressed in his writings appear once more, but there are also extremely interesting new remarks which, to our knowledge, have not been presented elsewhere. In particular he decided, as pointed out by the very choice of the title of his lecture, to call attention to the fact that the theory presents two types of difficulties, which Dirac classified as first and second class. The former are those connected with the so-called macro-objectification problem, the latter with the divergences characterizing relativistic quantum field theories. Bell describes the precise position of Dirac on these problems and he stresses appropriately how, contrary to Dirac's hopes, the steps which have led to a partial overcoming of the second class difficulties have not helped in any way whatsoever to overcome those of the first class. He then proceeds to analyse the origin and development of the Dynamical Reduction Program and draws attention to the problems that still affect it, in particular that of a consistent relativistic generalization. When the two meetings Are there quantum jumps? and On the present status of Quantum Mechanics were organized in Trieste and Losinj (Croatia), on 5 10 September 2005, it occurred to us that this lecture, which has never been published, might represent an

  14. Le temps passe,la lecture reste%Le temps passe, la lecture reste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓霖

    2011-01-01

    Il y a plus de deux mille ans,Confucius insistait déjà sur l'importance de la lecture.En effet,depuis deux mille ans,la lecture est une tradition,qui influence beaucoup les Chinois.De m(e)me,en Occident,l'Eglise chrétienne a demandé très t(o)t à ses fidèles de lire la Bible,car sa lecture était le moyen d'entrer en communication avec Dieu.Selon la tradition juda(i)que,la mère mettait un peu de miel sur la Bible,et laissait ses enfants l'embrasser,ceci dans le but de leur faire comprendre que le Livre est d'une douceur merveilleuse.

  15.   Personal invitations for population-based breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalasti-Koskinen, Ulla; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Saarenmaa, Irma;

    2010-01-01

    , leaflets) the units sent to women was collected. Results from 2005 were sent as feedback to the units. Data were analyzed descriptively, and results from the 2 years were compared. RESULTS: Screening units sent personal invitation letters usually providing fixed appointment times. Most units informed about......RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Women who are invited for breast cancer screening should get enough information about the benefits and harms of screening to make an informed decision on participation. Personal invitations are an important source of information, because all invited women receive them...

  16. The Basic Tenets of Invitational Theory and Practice: An Invitational Glossary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel E.; Siegel, Betty L.; Schoenlein, Allyson

    2013-01-01

    A review of the literature which concentrates on Invitational Theory and Practice (ITP) has revealed an inconsistent and oft times confusing or contradictory use of named concepts, labels, phrases, wordings, definitions, and other such titles of major ITP principles (Shaw and Siegel, 2010). Presented in a glossary type format, the purpose of this…

  17. Assessing the learning potential of an interactive digital game versus an interactive-style didactic lecture: the continued importance of didactic teaching in medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtier, Jesse; Webb, Emily M; Phelps, Andrew S; Naeger, David M

    2016-12-01

    Games with educational intent offer a possible advantage of being more interactive and increasing learner satisfaction. We conducted a two-armed experiment to evaluate student satisfaction and content mastery for an introductory pediatric radiology topic, taught by either an interactive digital game or with a traditional didactic lecture. Medical students participating in a fourth-year radiology elective were invited to participate. Student cohorts were alternatively given a faculty-supervised 1h session playing a simple interactive digital Tic-tac-toe quiz module on pediatric gastrointestinal radiology or a 1h didactic introductory lecture on the same topic. Survey questions assessed the learners' perceived ability to recall the material as well as their satisfaction with the educational experience. Results of an end-of-rotation exam were reviewed to evaluate a quantitative measure of learning between groups. Survey responses were analyzed with a chi-squared test. Exam results for both groups were analyzed with a paired Student's t-test. Students in the lecture group had higher test scores compared to students in the game group (4.0/5 versus 3.6/5, P = 0.045). Students in the lecture group reported greater understanding and recall of the material than students in the game group (P lecture group perceived the lecture to be more enjoyable and a better use of their time compared to those in the game group (P = 0.04 and P lecture and game group in ability to maintain interest (P = 0.187). In comparison to pre-survey results, there was a statistically significant decrease in interest for further digital interactive materials reported by students in the game group (P = 0.146). Our experience supported the use of a traditional lecture over a digital game module. While these results might be affected by the specific lecture and digital content in any given comparison, a digital module is not always the superior option.

  18. The Interactive Lecture: Teaching and Learning Technologies for Large Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Conventional lectures in large classrooms are connected to fundamental didactic problems due to a lack of interactivity and feedback opportunities. In an interactive lecture each student is equipped with a light-weight, mobile device that can be used to interact with the lecturer during the lesson, thus creating an additional channel of communication. These devices support new teaching and learning paradigms such as participatory simulations. In this paper, we present our experiences with the...

  19. Blended versus lecture learning: outcomes for staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Heidi; Comer, Linda; Putnam, Lorene; Freeman, Helen

    2012-07-01

    Critical care pharmacology education is crucial to safe patient care for nurses orienting to specialized areas. Although traditionally taught as a classroom lecture, it is important to consider effectiveness of alternative methods for education. This study provided experimentally derived evidence regarding effectiveness of blended versus traditional lecture for critical care pharmacology education. Regardless of learner demographics, the findings determined no significant differences in cognitive learning outcomes or learner satisfaction between blended versus lecture formats.

  20. The impact of alcoholics anonymous on other substance abuse-related twelve-step programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre B

    2008-01-01

    This chapter explores the influence of the AA model on self-help fellowships addressing problems of drug dependence. Fellowships that have adapted the twelve-step recovery model to other substances of abuse are reviewed; next similarities and differences between AA and drug-recovery twelve-step organizations are examined; finally, we present empirical findings on patterns of attendance and perceptions of AA and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) among polydrug-dependent populations, many of whom are cross-addicted to alcohol. Future directions in twelve-step research are noted in closing.

  1. MHD Dynamo phenomenon in our lab (Petrus Peregrinus Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailitis, Agris

    2016-04-01

    Celestial objects generate magnetic field very like technical dynamo do. Field induces current in a moving electroconductor. The induced current amplifies magnetic field. At large enough product conductivity time's velocity time's size amplification exceeds losses and situation without magnetic field is impossible. Such scenario is obvious for technical dynamo made from insolated wire but not so for uniform conductor as in celestial bodies. Development of the idea took literally the entire 20th century. Discovery of sunspot magnetic fields at the century rise and laboratory verification at the very fall. At thirties Cowling noticed that geometrically simple shaped (axially symmetrical) field can't sustain itself. Process must be more complex, somehow spatially fragmented. At the middle of century Parker and Steenbeck saw such fragmentation in a turbulent structure of hydrodynamic flow. Shortly after his α-effect approach was made ready Steenbeck invited us to think on molten Na experiments for theory verification. The first idea was to push the Na flow through the hand-blown pipe maze. Similar industrial scale experiment after years and regardless of us was realized in Karlsruhe. Seeking for something cheaper we stopped at Ponomarenko idea - axially symmetric helical flow can't generate axi-simmetric field but it can generate azimuthally structured one. The mathematical model was modified to experimental conditions and numerically optimized. The Dynamo stand was built and it works. Even after optimization Dynamo stand exceeds usual size of hydraulic experiments. 2m3 of molten Na circulate there by means of propeller powered from 200kW motor. When circulation exceeds 0.6 m3/s (at 120°C) seemingly from nowhere appears magnetic field. Twisted field pattern slowly (about 1.5Hz) rotates round flow axis. Up to 0.1T field stay as long as stay circulation and temperature. When sodium is heated up or slowed down the field is slowly dying out. Phenomenon is much richer

  2. Using lecture capture: a qualitative study of nursing faculty's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Patricia E; Bertram, Julie E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

    2014-04-01

    As lecture capture technology becomes widely available in schools of nursing, faculty will need to master new technological skills and make decisions about recording their classroom lectures or other activities. This study sought to understand faculty's experience of using a new lecture capture system. This qualitative study used Kruger's systematic approach to explore undergraduate nursing faculty's first-time experience using a lecture capture system purchased by the university. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of fourteen undergraduate faculty using lecture capture for the first-time. The interviews were recorded and transcribed and then analyzed by the researchers. Four themes were identified from the faculty interviews. Two of the themes expressed faculty's concerns about the teaching role, and two themes expressed the faculty's concerns about student learning. Participants experienced stress when learning to use the new lecture capture technology and struggled to resolve it with their own beliefs and teaching values. The impact of lecture capture on student learning, impact on class attendance, and the promotion of a culture of lecturing were revealed as important issues to consider when lecture capture becomes available. © 2013.

  3. Lecture Evaluations by Medical Students: Concepts That Correlate With Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Aaron; Webb, Emily M; Ahearn, Bren; Naeger, David M

    2016-01-01

    The didactic lecture remains one of the most popular teaching formats in medical education; yet, factors that most influence lecturing success in radiology education are unknown. The purpose of this study is to identify patterns of narrative student feedback that are associated with relatively higher and lower evaluation scores. All student evaluations from our core radiology elective during 1 year were compiled. All evaluation comments were tagged, to identify discrete descriptive concepts. Correlation coefficients were calculated, for each tag with mean evaluation scores. Tags that were the most strongly associated with the highest- versus lowest-rated (> or lectures were identified. A total of 3,262 comments, on 273 lectures, rated by 77 senior medical students, were analyzed. The mean lecture score was 8.96 ± 0.62. Three tags were significantly positively correlated with lecture score: "interactive"; "fun/engaging"; and "practical/important content" (r = 0.39, r = 0.34, and r = 0.32, respectively; all P lectures yielded similar results. Several factors were identified that were strongly associated with lecture score. Among the actionable characteristics, interactive lectures with appropriately targeted content (ie, practical/useful) were the most highly rated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The work of lecturing in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, SungWon; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2013-09-01

    Lecturing is an important aspect of the culture of science education. Perhaps because of the negative associations constructivist educators make with lecturing, little research has been done concerning the generally invisible aspects of the (embodied, lived) work that is required. Traditional research on science lectures focuses on ideas and (mental) concepts that somehow are "gotten across"; and it is interested in identifying verbal content and visual representations science teachers provide. The purpose of this study is to explicitly describe and theorize the living work of lecturing that produces in a societal arena everything from which students can learn. We use two case studies from the chemistry lectures in a tenth-grade Singapore classroom to exemplify the central role of the performative aspects of lecturing. We articulate and exemplify assertions that (a) corporeal performances differentiate and coordinate the contents of lecturing with its pitch, rhythm, and speech volume, and thereby orient students to specific discourse features of chemistry; and (b) corporeal performances differentiate and coordinate layers of talk with prosody, gestures, and body orientation, and thereby make analogies available to students. We conclude that what is visible in lectures (e.g., scientific discourse, analogies) is always the outcome of the (generally unattended to) corporeal labor including gestures, body orientation, and prosodic features (e.g., shifts in pitch) and that this outcome | labor pair constitutes an appropriate unit of understanding lecturing as societal phenomenon.

  5. Explaining the Unexplainable: Translated Scientific Explanations (TSE) in Public Physics Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapon, Shulamit; Ganiel, Uri; Eylon, Bat Sheva

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the features and design of explanations in public physics lectures. It presents the findings from a comparative study of three exemplary public physics lectures, given by practicing physicists who are acknowledged as excellent public lecturers. The study uses three different perspectives: the lecture, the lecturer, and the…

  6. Media Richness and Social Norms in the Choice to Attend Lectures or to Watch Them Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassili, John N.

    2008-01-01

    Lectures in a large psychology course were taped and posted online where they could be viewed by streaming video. All students in the course had the option to attend lectures or watch them online, a choice that could be exercised on a lecture-by-lecture basis. The proportion of lectures watched online revealed that students chose between…

  7. Automatic Camera Control System for a Distant Lecture with Videoing a Normal Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Akira; Nishigori, Shuichiro

    The growth of a communication network technology enables students to take part in a distant lecture. Although many lectures are conducted in universities by using Web contents, normal lectures using a blackboard are still held. The latter style lecture is good for a teacher's dynamic explanation. A way to modify it for a distant lecture is to…

  8. Lectures on Hamiltonian Dynamics : Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Benettin, Giancarlo; Kuksin, Sergei

    2005-01-01

    This volume collects three series of lectures on applications of the theory of Hamiltonian systems, contributed by some of the specialists in the field. The aim is to describe the state of the art for some interesting problems, such as the Hamiltonian theory for infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems, including KAM theory, the recent extensions of the theory of adiabatic invariants and the phenomena related to stability over exponentially long times of Nekhoroshev's theory. The books may serve as an excellent basis for young researchers, who will find here a complete and accurate exposition of recent original results and many hints for further investigation.

  9. Erice Lectures on Black Holes and Attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrara, Sergio; Marrani, A

    2008-01-01

    These lectures give an elementary introduction to the subject of four dimensional black holes (BHs) in supergravity and the Attractor Mechanism in the extremal case. Some thermodynamical properties are discussed and some relevant formulae for the critical points of the BH effective potential are given. The case of Maxwell-Einstein-axion-dilaton (super)gravity is discussed in detail. Analogies among BH entropy and multipartite entanglement of qubits in quantum information theory, as well moduli spaces of extremal BH attractors, are also discussed.

  10. Protein physics a course of lectures

    CERN Document Server

    Finkelstein, Alexei V

    2002-01-01

    Protein Physics is a lively presentation of the most general problems of protein structure, folding and function from the physics and chemistry perspective, based on lectures given by the authors. It deals with fibrous, membrane and, most of all, with the best studied water-soluble globular proteins, in both their native and denatured states. The major aspects of protein physics are covered systematically, physico-chemical properties of polypeptide chains; their secondary structures; tertiary structures of proteins and their classification; conformational transitions in protein molecules and t

  11. Banting lecture 2011: hyperinsulinemia: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkey, Barbara E

    2012-01-01

    The Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement Award is the American Diabetes Association's highest scientific award and honors an individual who has made significant, long-term contributions to the understanding of diabetes, its treatment, and/or prevention. The award is named after Nobel Prize winner Sir Frederick Banting, who codiscovered insulin treatment for diabetes. Dr. Barbara E. Corkey received the American Diabetes Association's Banting Medal for Scientific Achievement at the Association's 71st Scientific Sessions, 24-28 June 2011, San Diego, California. She presented the Banting Lecture, "Hyperinsulinemia: Cause or Consequence?" on Sunday, 26 June 2011.

  12. Elements of Linear Algebra. Lecture Notes

    CERN Document Server

    Cotaescu, Ion I

    2016-01-01

    These pedagogical lecture notes address to the students in theoretical physics for helping them to understand the mechanisms of the linear operators defined on finite-dimensional vector spaces equipped with definite or indefinite inner products. The importance of the Dirac conjugation is pointed out presenting its general theory and a version of the Riesz theorem for the indefinite inner product spaces, based on the Dirac-Riesz map that combines the action of the Riesz map with that of the metric operator. The matrix representations of the linear operators on vector spaces with definite or indefinite inner products is also presented.

  13. Lectures on N_X(p)

    CERN Document Server

    Serre, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Lectures on NX(p) deals with the question on how NX(p), the number of solutions of mod p congruences, varies with p when the family (X) of polynomial equations is fixed. While such a general question cannot have a complete answer, it offers a good occasion for reviewing various techniques in l-adic cohomology and group representations, presented in a context that is appealing to specialists in number theory and algebraic geometry. Along with covering open problems, the text examines the size and congruence properties of NX(p) and describes the ways in which it is computed, by closed formulae a

  14. Paris-Princeton Lectures on Mathematical Finance

    CERN Document Server

    Carmona, René A; Kohatsu-Higa, Arturo; Lasry, Jean-Michel; Lions, Pierre-Louis; Pham, Huyên; Taflin, Erik

    2007-01-01

    The Paris-Princeton Lectures in Financial Mathematics, of which this is the third volume, will, on an annual basis, publish cutting-edge research in self-contained, expository articles from outstanding - established or upcoming! - specialists. The aim is to produce a series of articles that can serve as an introductory reference for research in the field. It arises as a result of frequent exchanges between the finance and financial mathematics groups in Paris and Princeton. The present volume sets standards with articles by René Carmona, Ivar Ekeland/Erik Taflin, Arturo Kohatsu-Higa, Pierre-Louis Lions/Jean-Michel Lasry, and Hyuên Pham.

  15. Lectures on the Quantum Hall Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures is to describe the basic theoretical structures underlying the rich and beautiful physics of the quantum Hall effect. The focus is on the interplay between microscopic wavefunctions, long-distance effective Chern-Simons theories, and the modes which live on the boundary. The notes are aimed at graduate students in any discipline where $\\hbar=1$. A working knowledge of quantum field theory is assumed. Contents: 1. The Basics (Landau levels and Berry phase). 2. The Integer Quantum Hall Effect. 3. The Fractional Quantum Hall Effect. 4. Non-Abelian Quantum Hall States. 5. Chern-Simons Theories. 6. Edge Modes.

  16. Panels and Lectures Address China Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Video Resources

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Editors note: Over the past several months, colleagues have brought to our attention three public panel discussions and lectures that address contemporary controversies in Chinese studies. These discussions have been video-recorded and are available to view on the internet. These presentations may be useful either for scholarly pursuits or may be excerpted for classroom viewing. We wish to thank those who contacted us about these resources, and we encourage readers who know of other such video resources to let us know about them so that we can inform our ASIANetwork colleagues of their existence and availability.

  17. Weak interactions at high energies. [Lectures, review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, J.

    1978-08-01

    Review lectures are presented on the phenomenological implications of the modern spontaneously broken gauge theories of the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and some observations are made about which high energy experiments probe what aspects of gauge theories. Basic quantum chromodynamics phenomenology is covered including momentum dependent effective quark distributions, the transverse momentum cutoff, search for gluons as sources of hadron jets, the status and prospects for the spectroscopy of fundamental fermions and how fermions may be used to probe aspects of the weak and electromagnetic gauge theory, studies of intermediate vector bosons, and miscellaneous possibilities suggested by gauge theories from the Higgs bosons to speculations about proton decay. 187 references. (JFP)

  18. Lecture Phonologique De L’image Publicitaire

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZATEŞ, Öğr.Gör. Mediha

    2013-01-01

    Introduction En partant des points de vue de B Grunig nous allons essayer d’analyser l’image publicitaire sur le plan phonologique afin de faciliter la tâche du lecteur du texte publicitaire pour en assurer une interprétation correcte Qu’est ce que la lecture? «Rien n’est aussi clair qu’un texte clos » dit Umberto Eco 1991: 10 qui est le créateur de Lecteur modèle Lettore Modello dont le rôle est très grand envers le texte En comparant le texte à une machine paresseuse il dit que...

  19. Student Theological Research as an Invitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Badke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seminary students, despite having graduated from bachelors programs, struggle to make sense of the goals, processes, skills, and resources of research as graduate students. Beyond brief introductions to research, a scattered number of seminaries have developed either a separate theological information literacy course or have taken a through-the-curriculum approach to enhancing the information abilities of students. The former, however, separates information literacy from the curriculum, while the latter is difficult to implement and maintain. Living in a world of information glut, seminary professors are finding that traditional information dissemination models of education are becoming less viable. What is more, such models tend to teach students about a discipline rather than inviting them into it. These problems present a unique opportunity to place the teaching of information literacy at the foundation of theological education. With such an approach, students may be invited into the disciplines of their professors and enabled to practice these disciplines, thus becoming equipped to turn knowledge into praxis.

  20. Do Language Proficiency and Lecture Comprehension Matter? OpenCourseWare Lectures for Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Chih; Yang, Hui-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Open source lectures not only provide knowledge-seekers with convenient ways to obtain knowledge and information, they also serve as potential language learning resources that provide extensive language input and repeated exposure to vocabulary within specific topics or disciplines. This current study aims to examine the relationship between…

  1. LECTURES ON ACUPUNCTURE:Part Ⅰ Clinical Acupuncture Lecture Twenty-one MELANCHOLY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚秀葵; 付娟; 董红英

    2001-01-01

    Melancholy is a general term for diseases resulting from emotional depressign and stagnation of qi. Disorder of qi-circulation can disturb functional activity of the blood system and result in many pathological changes. In this section, only hysteria is discussed. If you want to treat headache, insomnia, palpitation, seminal emission and globus hystericus, the relative sections in other lectures can be referred to.

  2. Podcasting in the STEM disciplines: the implications of supplementary lecture recording and 'lecture flipping'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjianastasis, Marios; Nightingale, Karl P

    2016-02-01

    Lecture capture or 'podcasting' technology offers a new and engaging format of learning materials that can be used to increase the flexibility and interactivity of learning and teaching environments. Here we discuss different ways that these recordings can be incorporated into STEM discipline teaching, and the impact this can have on students' learning.

  3. Do Language Proficiency and Lecture Comprehension Matter? OpenCourseWare Lectures for Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu-Chih; Yang, Hui-Chi

    2012-01-01

    Open source lectures not only provide knowledge-seekers with convenient ways to obtain knowledge and information, they also serve as potential language learning resources that provide extensive language input and repeated exposure to vocabulary within specific topics or disciplines. This current study aims to examine the relationship between…

  4. LECTURE CANCELLED - Academic Training Lecture: Implications of LHC Data to New Physics (1/3)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS LECTURE IS CANCELLED by Alex Pomarol Clotet (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain). Monday, March 18, 2013 from 11:00 to 12:00 (Europe/Zurich) at CERN ( 4-3-006 - TH Conference Room ) More information here.

  5. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lecture and the Learning Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The essays in this forum demonstrate how the shift from an instructional to a learning paradigm is in full motion and is happening in scholarly conversations about communication and instruction. When asked about the role of the lecture in today's educational context, responses varied from some form of "none at all" to "the lecture…

  6. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF “TWELVE WELL-POINTS” IN EMERGENCY TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段功保

    2000-01-01

    In many years' clinical practice, I used blood-letting method of “Twelve Well-points” to treat emergencies as coma, syncope, acute infantile convulsion, wind-stroke syndrome, hysteria, epilepsy, etc. and have achieved immediate results.

  7. Inviting Policy Development: From Public Relations to Public Creations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Sheila J.; Novak, John M.

    Inviting policy development is an attempt to cordially summon those who are involved and affected by rules, codes, and procedures to understand and participate in the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of policies. This paper first presents criteria for an invitational framework for policy development and then goes on to discuss the…

  8. Lecture capturing assisted teaching and learning experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li

    2015-03-01

    When it comes to learning, a deep understanding of the material and a broadband of knowledge are equally important. However, provided limited amount of semester time, instructors often find themselves struggling to reach both aspects at the same time and are often forced to make a choice between the two. On one hand, we would like to spend much time to train our students, with demonstrations, step by step guidance and practice, to develop strong critical thinking skills and problem-solving skills. On the other hand, we also would like to cover a wide range of content topics to broaden our students' understanding. In this presentation, we propose a working scheme that may assist to achieve these two goals at the same time without sacrificing either one. With the help of recorded and pre-recorded lectures and other class materials, it allows instructors to spend more class time to focus on developing critical thinking skills and problem-solving skills, and to apply and connect principle knowledge with real life phenomena. It also allows our students to digest the material at a pace they are comfortable with by watching the recorded lectures over and over. Students now have something as a backup to refer to when they have random mistakes and/or missing spots on their notes, and hence take more ownership of their learning. Advanced technology have offered flexibility of how/when the content can be delivered, and have been assisting towards better teaching and learning strategies.

  9. Nobel lectures in physics 2006-2010

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This volume is a collection of the Nobel lectures delivered by the prizewinners, together with their biographies and the presentation speeches by Nobel Committee members for the period 2006-2010. The criterion for the Physics award is to the discoverer of a physical phenomenon that changed our views, or to the inventor of a new physical process that gave enormous benefits to either science at large or to the public. The biographies are remarkably interesting to read and the Nobel lectures provide detailed explanations of the phenomena for which the Laureates were awarded the Nobel Prize. Aspiring young scientists as well as more experienced ones, but also the interested public will learn a lot from and appreciate the geniuses of these narrations. List of prizewinners and their discoveries: (2006) to John C Mather and George F Smoot "for their discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation" The very detailed observations that the Laureates have carried out from the ...

  10. Introductory lecture: basic quantities in model biomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, John F

    2013-01-01

    One of the many aspects of membrane biophysics dealt with in this Faraday Discussion regards the material moduli that describe energies at a supramolecular level. This introductory lecture first critically reviews differences in reported numerical values of the bending modulus K(C), which is a central property for the biologically important flexibility of membranes. It is speculated that there may be a reason that the shape analysis method tends to give larger values of K(C) than the micromechanical manipulation method or the more recent X-ray method that agree very well with each other. Another theme of membrane biophysics is the use of simulations to provide exquisite detail of structures and processes. This lecture critically reviews the application of atomic level simulations to the quantitative structure of simple single component lipid bilayers and diagnostics are introduced to evaluate simulations. Another theme of this Faraday Discussion was lateral heterogeneity in biomembranes with many different lipids. Coarse grained simulations and analytical theories promise to synergistically enhance experimental studies when their interaction parameters are tuned to agree with experimental data, such as the slopes of experimental tie lines in ternary phase diagrams. Finally, attention is called to contributions that add relevant biological molecules to bilayers and to contributions that study the exciting shape changes and different non-bilayer structures with different lipids.

  11. Academic Training Lectures - QCD for Postgraduates

    CERN Multimedia

    Maureen Prola-Tessaur

    2010-01-01

    by Giulia Zanderighi (University of Oxford) Monday 12 to Friday 16 April 2010 From 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500-1-001 Monday 12 - Modern QCD - Lecture 1 Starting from the QCD Lagrangian we will revisit some basic QCD concepts and derive fundamental properties like gauge invariance and isospin symmetry and will discuss the Feynman rules of the theory. We will then focus on the gauge group of QCD and derive the Casimirs CF and CA and some useful color identities. Tuesday 13 - Modern QCD - Lecture 2 We will start discussing the matter content of the theory and revisit the experimental measurements that led to the discovery of quarks. We will then consider a classic QCD observable, the R-ratio, and use it to illustrate the appearance of UV divergences and the need to renormalize the coupling constant of QCD. We will then discuss asymptotic freedom and confinement. Finally, we will examine a case where soft and collinear infrared divergences appear, will discuss the soft approximation in QCD ...

  12. Book Review: Invitation to Topological Robotics by Michael Farber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Book Review: Invitaton to Topological Robotics by Michael Farber. Zurich Lectures in Advanced Mathematics, European Mathematical Society (2008), ISBN 978-3-03719-054-8......Book Review: Invitaton to Topological Robotics by Michael Farber. Zurich Lectures in Advanced Mathematics, European Mathematical Society (2008), ISBN 978-3-03719-054-8...

  13. Level of Perceived Stress Among Lectures in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofoegbu, Felicia; Nwadiani, Mon

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide empirical evidence on the level of stress among lecturers in Nigerian universities. On the whole eight universities were used for the study. A sample of 228 (123 male and 105 female) lecturers was selected according to the variables of age, sex, marital status, experience, domicile, areas of specialization,…

  14. Lecture versus DVD and Attitude Change toward Female Masturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Megan; Lee, Zoey; Knox, David; Wilson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Four-hundred and ninety eight female undergraduate students at a large southeastern university participated in a study to assess how lecture versus DVD format affected attitude change towards female masturbation. All groups were given a pre and post test to assess masturbatory attitudes. Group 1 experienced a masturbation lecture. Group 2…

  15. Doing Business: Knowledges in the Internationalised Business Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Catherine Ann

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the oracy (listening/speaking) genres enacted in an undergraduate entry point unit in the internationalised university and the kind of knowledges these genres elicit and perform. Focusing on a series of lectures in a business studies unit, it explores how anecdotal knowledge from both the lecturer's and the students' lived…

  16. The Anatomy Lecture Then and Now: A Foucauldian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many points of continuity, there are also a number of changes in the pedagogical form of the anatomy lecture over the longue durée, over centuries of epistemic change, rather than over years or decades. The article begins with an analysis of the physical and technical arrangements of the early modern anatomy lecture, showing how…

  17. Level of Perceived Stress Among Lectures in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofoegbu, Felicia; Nwadiani, Mon

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to provide empirical evidence on the level of stress among lecturers in Nigerian universities. On the whole eight universities were used for the study. A sample of 228 (123 male and 105 female) lecturers was selected according to the variables of age, sex, marital status, experience, domicile, areas of specialization,…

  18. How to move beyond lecture capture: Pedagogy guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, S.; Young, C.

    2014-01-01

    This guide gives you an introduction to the phenomenon of lecture capture, the impact it can have, student and teacher attitudes towards this technology in past years, and it also discusses questions like "What is the effect on attendance of students and on the lecture itself?". The guide explains

  19. The Anatomy Lecture Then and Now: A Foucauldian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Norm; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many points of continuity, there are also a number of changes in the pedagogical form of the anatomy lecture over the longue durée, over centuries of epistemic change, rather than over years or decades. The article begins with an analysis of the physical and technical arrangements of the early modern anatomy lecture, showing how…

  20. Public lecture | "Science and society" by Bob Jones | 22 May

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Public lecture: "Science and society: the impact of computing at CERN on society" by Bob Jones 22 May at 7.30 p.m. Globe of Science and Innovation Lecture in English, translated in French. Entrance free. Limited number of seats. Reservation essential: +41 22 767 76 76 or cern.reception@cern.ch

  1. Strategies for the Management of Lecturer Stress in Feedback Tutorials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartney, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The process of providing students with individual feedback on assessed work was identified as a source of lecturer stress (Stough and Emmer, 1998). An action research approach was used to address the following research question. What approaches to providing students with feedback minimize lecturer stress? Data were collected using written feedback…

  2. Role of Physics Lecture Demonstrations in Conceptual Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly; Lasry, Nathaniel; Chu, Kelvin; Mazur, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that students; prior knowledge can interfere with how they observe and remember lecture demonstrations. We measured students' prior knowledge in introductory mechanics and electricity and magnetism at two large universities. Students were then asked to predict the outcome of lecture demonstrations. We compare…

  3. The (Embodied) Performance of Physics Concepts in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, SungWon; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2011-01-01

    Lectures are often thought of in terms of information transfer: students (do not) "get" or "construct meaning of" what physics professors (lecturers) say and the notes they put on the chalkboard (overhead). But this information transfer view does not explain, for example, why students have a clear sense of understanding while they sit in a lecture…

  4. An Audio-Visual Lecture Course in Russian Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, Lauren G.

    1977-01-01

    An audio-visual course in Russian culture is given at Northern Illinois University. A collection of 4-5,000 color slides is the basis for the course, with lectures focussed on literature, philosophy, religion, politics, art and crafts. Acquisition, classification, storage and presentation of slides, and organization of lectures are discussed. (CHK)

  5. Lecture versus DVD and Attitude Change toward Female Masturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keels, Megan; Lee, Zoey; Knox, David; Wilson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Four-hundred and ninety eight female undergraduate students at a large southeastern university participated in a study to assess how lecture versus DVD format affected attitude change towards female masturbation. All groups were given a pre and post test to assess masturbatory attitudes. Group 1 experienced a masturbation lecture. Group 2…

  6. Voices, grins and laughter in the lecture room

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bannink, A.; Van Dam, J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the listening behaviors of students in a university lecture hall for cues of ‘active listening’ and/or cognitive/emotional engagement. Claims that the lecture format intrinsically lacks opportunities for learning since there is no (verbal) student response are examined on the

  7. Principles of Successful Implementation of Lecture Recordings in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollermann, Frank; Rolf, Rüdiger; Greweling, Christian; Klaßen, André

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to describe the principles underlying the successful implementation of a lecture recording service in higher education. Design/methodology/approach: The paper qualitatively reviews the practices and experiences of several years of automated lecture recording at a medium-sized university in Germany. Findings: The paper…

  8. Students Approach to Learning and Their Use of Lecture Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajoczki, Susan; Watt, Susan; Marquis, Nick; Liao, Rose; Vine, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    This study examined lecture capture as a way of enhancing university education, and explored how students with different learning approaches used lecture capturing (i.e., podcasts and vodcasts). Results indicate that both deep and surface learners report increased course satisfaction and better retention of knowledge in courses with traditional…

  9. Man: Planetary Disease. The 1971 B. Y. Morrison Memorial Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHarg, Ian L.

    The 1971 B.Y. Morrison Memorial Lecture by Ian L. McHarg, noted landscape architect, planner, and lecturer, is presented in this pamphlet. His expose is two-fold. "Man is an epidemic, multiplying at a superexponential rate, destroying the environment upon which he depends, and threatening his own extinction. He treats the world as a storehouse…

  10. Changing the Nature of Lectures Using a Personal Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masikunis, George; Panayiotidis, Andreas; Burke, Linda

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the use of an Electronic Voting System (EVS) in large group lectures within a business and management undergraduate degree programme, in an attempt to make them more interactive. The intention was to ensure that the introduction of the EVS-style lecture was educationally driven, linked to interactive learning activities in…

  11. Expectancies and Motivations to Attend an Informal Science Lecture Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbiGhannam, Niveen; Kahlor, LeeAnn; Dudo, Anthony; Liang, Ming-Ching; Rosenthal, Sonny; Banner, Jay L.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the expectancies and motivations that prompt audiences to attend a university science lecture series. The series features talks by science experts from the host campus and around the USA. Each lecture typically attracts between 300 and 600 attendees, including middle and high school student groups, university students, and…

  12. Erice lectures on "The status of local supersymmetry"

    OpenAIRE

    Duff, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    In the first lecture we review the current status of local supersymmetry. In the second lecture we focus on D=11 supergravity as the low-energy limit of M-theory and pose the questions: (1) What are the D=11 symmetries? (2) How many supersymmetries can M-theory vacua preserve?

  13. Is Attending Lectures Still Relevant in Engineering Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, J.; Cronin, K.; Byrne, E.

    2011-01-01

    A case study was conducted on a group of undergraduate chemical engineering students to assess the relevance of attending lectures from a student perspective and to understand why these students attend and do not attend lectures with a view to developing approaches to teaching, which are of greater interest and benefit to student learning. The…

  14. On the Language Arts of Tao Xingzhi's Lectures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Tao Xingzhi is a famous educator as well as a good public speaker. His lectures are perfect in style anddistinctive in language use. The paper discusses the language features of Tao's lectures : popular and easy to understand; precise and appropriate; humorous and lively; rich in paralanguage and with insightful metaphors and thorugh reasoning.

  15. Universal Design for Learning in Teaching Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Tereza; Lee-Post, Anita; Hapke, Holly

    2017-01-01

    To augment traditional lecture with instructional tools that provide options for content representation, learner engagement, and learning expression, we followed the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles to design and implement a learning environment for teaching and learning in large lecture classes. To this end, we incorporated four…

  16. Learning and Celebrating: The Glamour of Design Lecture Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Lubomir

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to highlight the celebratory aspect of the Design Lecture Series, a tradition in architecture schools and interior design programs, its meaning for all constituent parties, and its contributions to creating professional identity and community. The Design Lecture Series is a public event popular in design programs,…

  17. Lecture Recording: Structural and Symbolic Information vs. Flexibility of Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Daniel; Pforte, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    Rapid eLearning is an ongoing trend which enables flexible and cost-effective creation of learning materials. Especially, lecture recording has turned out to be a lightweight method particularly suited for existing lectures and blended learning strategies. In order to not only sequentially play back but offer full fledged navigation, search and…

  18. Topical Articles: Attention during Lectures--Beyond Ten Minutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karen; Korn, James H.

    2007-01-01

    Many authors claim that students' attention declines approximately 10 to 15 min into lectures. To evaluate this claim, we reviewed several types of studies including studies of student note taking, observations of students during lectures, and self-reports of student attention, as well as studies using physiological measures of attention. We found…

  19. Implementing Small-Group Activities in Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazedjian, Ani; Kolkhorst, Brittany Boyle

    2007-01-01

    This study examines student perceptions regarding the effectiveness of small-group work in a large lecture class. The article considers and illustrates from students' perspectives the ways in which small-group activities could enhance comprehension of course material, reduce anonymity associated with large lecture classes, and promote student…

  20. "Just Remember This": Lexicogrammatical Relevance Markers in Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deroey, Katrien L. B.; Taverniers, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive overview of lexicogrammatical devices which highlight important or relevant points in lectures. Despite the established usefulness of discourse organizational cues for lecture comprehension and note-taking, very little is known about the marking of relevance in this genre. The current overview of…

  1. Some Abnormal Psychical Conditions in Children: Excerpts from Three Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, George F.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents excerpts of the three lectures delivered by George F. Still on March 4, 1902, March 6, 1902, and March 11, 1902. In the first lecture, Still discussed several points in the psychology and development of social control in the normal child and considered the occurrence of defective moral control in in association with general…

  2. Information Retention from PowerPoint[TM] and Traditional Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, April; Proctor, Robert W.; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2009-01-01

    The benefit of PowerPoint[TM] is continuously debated, but both supporters and detractors have insufficient empirical evidence. Its use in university lectures has influenced investigations of PowerPoint's effects on student performance (e.g., overall quiz/exam scores) in comparison to lectures based on overhead projectors, traditional lectures…

  3. Lecture Videos in Online Courses: A Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Heather K.; Cordova, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    In a recent study regarding online lecture videos, Evans (2014) shows that lecture videos are not superior to still slides. Using two Introduction to American Government courses, taught in a 4-week summer session, she shows that students in a non-video course had higher satisfaction with the course and instructor and performed better on exams than…

  4. Lecturer and Student Perceptions on CLIL at a Spanish University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Marta; Rodriguez, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on a pilot implementation of Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) at a Spanish university. In order to find out how both lecturers and students perceived their experience, several interviews and meetings took place with lecturers, and an open-ended questionnaire was passed to students. The meetings and interviews with…

  5. New Wine in Old Bottles: Revitalizing the Traditional History Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackey, Robert

    1997-01-01

    Maintains that the lecture method in history can still function as an effective means of instruction if approached with a critical perspective. Outlines creative and engaging approaches for the history lecture and specific suggestions for organization, delivery, and content coverage. (MJP)

  6. College Students' Perceptions of the Traditional Lecture Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covill, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Fifty-one college students responded to survey questions regarding their perceptions of the traditional lecture method of instruction that they received in a 200-level psychology course. At a time when many professors are being encouraged to use active learning methods instead of lectures, it is important to consider the students' perspective. Do…

  7. Student Perception of Topic Difficulty: Lecture Capture in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCunn, Patrick; Newton, Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    Perception of topic difficulty is a likely predictor of lecture capture video use, as student perception of difficulty has been shown to affect a variety of outcomes in academic settings. This study measured the relationship between perceived difficulty and the use of lecture capture technology in a second year biochemistry course while…

  8. Literary Lectures Presented at the Library of Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

    This book contains 37 out-of-print lectures on American, English, and world literature that have been presented at the Library of Congress over the past 30 years. Lectures by Thomas Mann, T. S. Eliot, R. P. Blackmur, Archibald Henderson, Irving Stone, John O'Hara, MacKinlay Kantor, John Crowe Ransom, Delmore Schwartz, John Hall Wheelock, Robert…

  9. Tagging and Linking Lecture Audio Recordings: Goals and Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Gray, Norman; Honeychurch, Sarah; Draper, Steve; Barr, Niall

    2013-01-01

    Making and distributing audio recordings of lectures is cheap and technically straightforward, and these recordings represent an underexploited teaching resource. We explore the reasons why such recordings are not more used; we believe the barriers inhibiting such use should be easily overcome. Students can listen to a lecture they missed, or re-listen to a lecture at revision time, but their interaction is limited by the affordances of the replaying technology. Listening to lecture audio is generally solitary, linear, and disjoint from other available media. In this paper, we describe a tool we are developing at the University of Glasgow, which enriches students' interactions with lecture audio. We describe our experiments with this tool in session 2012--13. Fewer students used the tool than we expected would naturally do so, and we discuss some possible explanations for this.

  10. Effect Of Accounting Lecturer Lecturer Commitment To The Development Of Professional Accounting Empirical Study Lecturer Accounting Faculty Of Economics University Of Muhammadiyah Tangerang 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endraria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of the study in which the researcher is interested in conducting research by taking the title The Effect of Commitment Against Lecturer - Lecturer in Accounting Accounting Profession Development Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013 . This research was conducted at the Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang is located at Independence Pioneer Road I No.33 Cikokol Tangerang City. The experiment was conducted at the research site easily accessible for the author. The method used in this research is descriptive quantitative methods which aim to describe the descriptive method of data distribution of each variable.There are significant accounting lecturers commitment to the development of the accounting profession Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013 this is evidenced by the results of hypothesis testing that has been done obtained tcount ttable value 5.7193 and with a significance level of 5 and df n - 2 40-2 38 is equal to 1.686 with the statement concluded that t count t table. Thus Ha Ho accepted and rejected. The conclusion was that there are significant accounting lecturers commitment to the development of the accounting profession Empirical Study of Accounting Lecturer Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang in 2013. As for advice to be conveyed in this study is the government as a regulator should be able to evaluate the development of the accounting profession especially in Indonesia with the influence of commitment accounting lecturers are expected to improve and develop the accounting profession especially in the Faculty of Economics University of Muhammadiyah Tangerang.

  11. Lectures on Innovation in Building Technology: Lecture Articles for Students of Architecture Delft 1992-2015 / Nottingham 2005-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhout, A.J.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    This book is a collection of articles written in recent years and used in lectures for students at the Faculty of Architecture at Delft and at Nottingham University. The lectures and articles are based on a mixture of innovations in academia and industry. They elucidate the relationship between arch

  12. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. Sound Decision Making about the Lecture's Role in the College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldeck, Jennifer H.; Weimer, Maryellen

    2017-01-01

    College instructors use lecture and its current counterpoint--active learning--widely and often rely on both strategies, but the question of which best promotes student learning has become a debate that ignores the fact that learning can result from both. Students still listen to and learn from lectures. They pass exams, obtain degrees, and…

  13. Lectures on Innovation in Building Technology: Lecture Articles for Students of Architecture Delft 1992-2015 / Nottingham 2005-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekhout, A.J.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    This book is a collection of articles written in recent years and used in lectures for students at the Faculty of Architecture at Delft and at Nottingham University. The lectures and articles are based on a mixture of innovations in academia and industry. They elucidate the relationship between

  14. The Challenges of Listening to Academic Lectures for EAP Learners and the Impact of Metacognition on Academic Lecture Listening Comprehension

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Rahimirad; Mohammad Raouf Moini

    2015-01-01

    Academic listening skill is an indispensable necessity for English for academic purposes (EAP) students in English-medium universities and also critical for their future success in comprehending conference lectures. But due to the specific nature of such academic lectures, nonnative students all too often face challenges in getting a full command of this task. This study investigates the challenges of listening to acad...

  15. "But They Won't Come to Lectures..." The Impact of Audio Recorded Lectures on Student Experience and Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    The move to increasingly flexible platforms for student learning and experience through provision of online lecture recordings is often interpreted by educators as students viewing attendance at lectures as optional. The trend toward the use of this technology is often met with resistance from some academic staff who argue that student attendance…

  16. Lectures on S-matrices and Integrability

    CERN Document Server

    Bombardelli, Diego

    2016-01-01

    In these notes we review the S-matrix theory in (1+1)-dimensional integrable models, focusing mainly on the relativistic case. Once the main definitions and physical properties are introduced, we discuss the factorization of scattering processes due to integrability. We then focus on the analytic properties of the 2-particle scattering amplitude and illustrate the derivation of the S-matrices for all the possible bound states using the so-called bootstrap principle. General algebraic structures underlying the S-matrix theory and its relation with the form factors axioms are briefly mentioned. Finally, we discuss the S-matrices of sine-Gordon and SU(2), SU(3) chiral Gross-Neveu models. This is part of a collection of lecture notes for the Young Researchers Integrability School, organised by the GATIS network at Durham University on 6-10 July 2015.

  17. Lectures on Dark Energy and Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Frieman, Joshua A

    2009-01-01

    The discovery ten years ago that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating put in place the present cosmological model, in which the Universe is composed of 4% baryons, 20% dark matter, and 76% dark energy. Yet the underlying cause of cosmic acceleration remains a mystery: it could arise from the repulsive gravity of dark energy -- for example, the quantum energy of the vacuum -- or it may signal that General Relativity breaks down on cosmological scales and must be replaced. In these lectures, I present the observational evidence for cosmic acceleration and what it has revealed about dark energy, discuss a few of the theoretical ideas that have been proposed to explain acceleration, and describe the key observational probes that we hope will shed light on this enigma in the coming years.

  18. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the initial data'' for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models.

  19. Academic training: Advanced lectures on multiprocessor programming

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Department

    2011-01-01

    Academic Training Lecture - Regular Programme 31 October 1, 2 November 2011 from 11:00 to 12:00 -  IT Auditorium, Bldg. 31   Three classes (60 mins) on Multiprocessor Programming Prof. Dr. Christoph von Praun Georg-Simon-Ohm University of Applied Sciences Nuremberg, Germany This is an advanced class on multiprocessor programming. The class gives an introduction to principles of concurrent objects and the notion of different progress guarantees that concurrent computations can have. The focus of this class is on non-blocking computations, i.e. concurrent programs that do not make use of locks. We discuss the implementation of practical non-blocking data structures in detail. 1st class: Introduction to concurrent objects 2nd class: Principles of non-blocking synchronization 3rd class: Concurrent queues Brief Bio of Christoph von Praun Christoph worked on a variety of analysis techniques and runtime platforms for parallel programs. Hist most recent research studies programming models an...

  20. Paris-Princeton Lectures on Mathematical Finance

    CERN Document Server

    Çinlar, Erhan; Ekeland, Ivar; Jouini, Elyes; Scheinkman, José; Touzi, Nizar

    2004-01-01

    The Paris-Princeton Lectures in Financial Mathematics, of which this is the second volume, will, on an annual basis, publish cutting-edge research in self-contained, expository articles from outstanding - established or upcoming! - specialists. The aim is to produce a series of articles that can serve as an introductory reference for research in the field. It arises as a result of frequent exchanges between the finance and financial mathematics groups in Paris and Princeton. This volume presents the following articles: "Hedging of Defaultable Claims" by T. Bielecki, M. Jeanblanc, and M. Rutkowski; "On the Geometry of Interest Rate Models" by T. Björk; "Heterogeneous Beliefs, Speculation and Trading in Financial Markets" by J.A. Scheinkman, and W. Xiong.