WorldWideScience

Sample records for twaa learning training

  1. Learning without training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Christian; Dinse, Hubert R

    2013-06-03

    Achieving high-level skills is generally considered to require intense training, which is thought to optimally engage neuronal plasticity mechanisms. Recent work, however, suggests that intensive training may not be necessary for skill learning. Skills can be effectively acquired by a complementary approach in which the learning occurs in response to mere exposure to repetitive sensory stimulation. Such training-independent sensory learning induces lasting changes in perception and goal-directed behaviour in humans, without any explicit task training. We suggest that the effectiveness of this form of learning in different sensory domains stems from the fact that the stimulation protocols used are optimized to alter synaptic transmission and efficacy. While this approach directly links behavioural research in humans with studies on cellular plasticity, other approaches show that learning can occur even in the absence of an actual stimulus. These include learning through imagery or feedback-induced cortical activation, resulting in learning without task training. All these approaches challenge our understanding of the mechanisms that mediate learning. Apparently, humans can learn under conditions thought to be impossible a few years ago. Although the underlying mechanisms are far from being understood, training-independent sensory learning opens novel possibilities for applications aimed at augmenting human cognition.

  2. Training and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luntley, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Some philosophers of education think that there is a pedagogically informative concept of training that can be gleaned from Wittgenstein's later writings: training as initiation into a form of life. Stickney, in "Training and Mastery of Techniques in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy: A response to Michael Luntley" takes me to task for ignoring this…

  3. Training and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luntley, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Some philosophers of education think that there is a pedagogically informative concept of training that can be gleaned from Wittgenstein's later writings: training as initiation into a form of life. Stickney, in "Training and Mastery of Techniques in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy: A response to Michael Luntley" takes me to task for ignoring this…

  4. Learning Strategy Training in Foreign Language Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文梅

    2007-01-01

    A great many recent studies haye shown that making good use of learning strategies can contribute much to students'foreign language learning.This poper deals with some important issues about strategy training based on O'Malley and Chamot's theory,including the concept,value and goals of strategy training and approaches to such training

  5. Language Learning Strategies and Its Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes and reviews the literature regarding language learning strategies and it's training model, pointing out the significance of language learning strategies to EFL learners and an applicable and effective language learning strategies training model, which is beneficial both to EFL learners and instructors, is badly needed.

  6. Role of Learning Theories in Training While Training the Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Ahmad

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of training and cost of training are obvious. The question forcing the executives in organization is that how organization can make these training programs more effective. This paper discuss the role of learning theories in guiding and development of effective training programs, as organizational performance depends upon the employees’ skills, knowledge and experiences. It means that individual makes the organizational performance better by utilizing their knowledge and skills consequently organization offers training for development of its employee performance to achieve required goals. This study highlights the importance and applications of learning theories and how these theories could prove to be of most effective in trainings. As training are only effective if it promote learning.

  7. Improving Organizational Learning through Leadership Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Henna; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Holmstrom, Stefan; Karanika-Murray, Maria; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to evaluate whether training of managers at workplaces can improve organizational learning. Managers play a crucial role in providing opportunities to employees for learning. Although scholars have called for intervention research on the effects of leadership development on organizational learning, no such research is…

  8. Orienting attention during phonetic training facilitates learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Eric; Guion-Anderson, Susan

    2010-02-01

    The role of consciously directed attention toward speech input in learning has not yet been determined. Previous phonetic learning studies have manipulated acoustic signals and response feedback, but not conscious control over attentional orienting. This study tests whether directed attention facilitates learning of phonetic information. Two monolingual English-speaking groups were trained with feedback on the same auditory stimuli: Hindi words. One group was instructed to attend to the consonants and the other to the vowels. The consonant-oriented group, but not the vowel-oriented group, demonstrated post-training improvement in consonant perception, confirming a role for consciously directed attentional mechanisms during phonetic learning.

  9. Virtual Reality for Training and Lifelong Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mellet-d'Huart

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers the application of virtual reality (VR to training and lifelong learning. A number of considerations concerning the design of VR applications are included. The introduction is dedicated to the more general aspects of applying VR to training. From multiple perspectives, we will provide an overview of existing applications with their main purposes and go into more depth on certain learning areas. Recent developments of virtual environments for training and lifelong learning are analyzed, followed by an analytical viewpoint on design, advocating more explicit paradigmatic considerations and development of generic design methods. These approaches and proposals are aimed at better exploiting the uniqueness of VR and designing more effective virtual environments. Finally, a number of conclusions will be drawn for future technology-enhanced training and for lifelong learning using VR.

  10. Training on Call: The Open Learning Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garside, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Queensland (Australia) Open Learning Network delivered training to telephone industry workers using audiographic conferencing. Ways to overcome the lack of face-to-face interaction were devised, and the presenter used oral cues more extensively. (SK)

  11. Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Training Technologies and Learning Environments held at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, March 9-10, 1999. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees were from NASA, other government agencies, industry, and universities. The objective of the workshop was to assess the status and effectiveness of different advanced training technologies and learning environments.

  12. Virtual Reality for Training and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellet-d'Huart, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This article covers the application of virtual reality (VR) to training and lifelong learning. A number of considerations concerning the design of VR applications are included. The introduction is dedicated to the more general aspects of applying VR to training. From multiple perspectives, we will provide an overview of existing applications with…

  13. Blended learning tools for teaching and training

    CERN Document Server

    Allan, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Offers a holistic blended learning approach, combining the best of traditional approaches to learning and teaching to make best use of the advantages of each while minimizing the disadvantages. It provides information professionals with a practical guide to the design and delivery of such training programmes.

  14. Immersive Learning Simulations in Aircraft Maintenance Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-15

    You might just get a “serious game,” or “as proposed by the eLearning Guild, you could get an Immersive Learning Simulation.”3 Quoting the... eLearning Guild, Caspian Learning, in a report for the United Kingdom Ministry of Defense, defined an Immersive Learning Simulation (ILS) as “an optimized...their studies that “the savings are more likely to be achieved, and the improvements in training quality more easily justified, when technology is

  15. Learning Enhancement through Visual Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Donald J.

    1980-01-01

    A study involving 120 second-grade students with deficiencies in visual perceptual skills was designed to determine the effects of a vision training program on reading test performance. Students receiving vision training did significantly better in tests measuring reading comprehension and word recognition skills than did students who did not…

  16. Learning operational strategies in surgery training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paydar, Shahram; Ghahramani, Zahra; Bolandparvaz, Shahram; Khalili, Hosseinali; Abbasi, Hamid Reza

    2014-04-01

    Education and training in surgery is in the middle of apprenticeship style of learning especially in operating room with little importance of understanding on how trainees learn. This training is one of the most difficult types of training. Medical training and expertise are the specialty of this education system. We can name these complex fields as "Operational Strategies". The strategies are includes of "what to do", "what to think" and "what to create". These strategies are good to test and train higher functions in persons who have professional's positions. Most of educational fields are complex. It means that the training is not limited in an area and includes of theory fields, areas of decision making and areas of handy and practical skills. These fields are the most relevant skills or expertise which individual must be informed of the performance of maintenance and repair or upgrade and make a new system.   The operational strategy is a new training strategy for surgery students. It is useful to train surgery students to modify and improve their practices and doing surgeries and treating patients in best conditions.

  17. Neuroprosthetic Decoder Training as Imitation Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Merel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic brain-computer interfaces function via an algorithm which decodes neural activity of the user into movements of an end effector, such as a cursor or robotic arm. In practice, the decoder is often learned by updating its parameters while the user performs a task. When the user's intention is not directly observable, recent methods have demonstrated value in training the decoder against a surrogate for the user's intended movement. Here we show that training a decoder in this way is a novel variant of an imitation learning problem, where an oracle or expert is employed for supervised training in lieu of direct observations, which are not available. Specifically, we describe how a generic imitation learning meta-algorithm, dataset aggregation (DAgger, can be adapted to train a generic brain-computer interface. By deriving existing learning algorithms for brain-computer interfaces in this framework, we provide a novel analysis of regret (an important metric of learning efficacy for brain-computer interfaces. This analysis allows us to characterize the space of algorithmic variants and bounds on their regret rates. Existing approaches for decoder learning have been performed in the cursor control setting, but the available design principles for these decoders are such that it has been impossible to scale them to naturalistic settings. Leveraging our findings, we then offer an algorithm that combines imitation learning with optimal control, which should allow for training of arbitrary effectors for which optimal control can generate goal-oriented control. We demonstrate this novel and general BCI algorithm with simulated neuroprosthetic control of a 26 degree-of-freedom model of an arm, a sophisticated and realistic end effector.

  18. Effects of Teacher Training in Adult Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Lund; Wahlgren, Bjarne

    This paper tries to shed light over two questions raised in the workshop: ‘Effects of Teacher Training' at the ASEM conference June 2009 on Teachers and Trainers in Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Professional Development in Asia and Europe. At first it is asked what do we already know abou...... training? This will be illustrated by describing a research design in progress at the National Centre of  Competence Development, Denmark, regarding a program where teachers are taught teaching Cooperative Learning as a pedagogical and didactical method....

  19. Learning Emotional Intelligence: Training & Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, Allison

    2015-01-01

    This core assessment provides an overview and training of the use of Emotional Intelligence (EI) in the workplace. It includes a needs analysis for a local Chamber of Commerce, and outlines the importance of improving their organizational communication with the improvement of their EI. Behavioral objectives related to the skills needed are…

  20. Effects of Teacher Training in Adult Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lea Lund; Wahlgren, Bjarne

    This paper tries to shed light over two questions raised in the workshop: ‘Effects of Teacher Training' at the ASEM conference June 2009 on Teachers and Trainers in Adult Education and Lifelong Learning Professional Development in Asia and Europe. At first it is asked what do we already know about...... training? This will be illustrated by describing a research design in progress at the National Centre of  Competence Development, Denmark, regarding a program where teachers are taught teaching Cooperative Learning as a pedagogical and didactical method....... teacher training effects in relation to adult learners? This will be identified by a search for systematic reviews in the international clearinghouses and afterwards by a small scale mapping done in the pedagogic database ERIC. And second: which methods can be used to measure the effects of teacher...

  1. Facilitating vocabulary learning through metacognitive strategy training and learning journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Luz Trujillo Becerra

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a mixed- method action research study carried out with participants from three public high schools in different regions in Colombia: Bogotá, Orito and Tocaima.  The overall aim of this study was to analyze whether training in the use of metacognitive strategies (MS through learning journals could improve the participants’ vocabulary learning. The data, collected mainly through students’ learning journals, teachers’ field notes, questionnaires and mind maps, was analyzed following the principles of grounded theory. The results suggested that the training helped participants to develop metacognitive awareness of their vocabulary learning process and their lexical competence regarding daily routines.  Participants also displayed some improvements in critical thinking and self-directed attitudes that could likewise benefit their vocabulary learning. Finally, the study proposes that training in metacognitive and vocabulary strategies should be implemented in language classrooms to promote a higher degree of student control over learning and to facilitate the transference of these strategies to other areas of knowledge.

  2. Training Does Not Imply Learning: The Individual's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonacopoulou, Elena P.

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 78 bank managers in the United Kingdom showed that they perceive training and learning as closely connected. However, it does not necessarily follow that individuals learn from training. Significant numbers did not feel they could use on the job what they had learned through training. (SK)

  3. Rapid E-Learning Simulation Training and User Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackler, Angeline

    2011-01-01

    A new trend in e-learning development is to have subject matter experts use rapid development tools to create training simulations. This type of training is called rapid e-learning simulation training. Though companies are using rapid development tools to create training quickly and cost effectively, there is little empirical research to indicate…

  4. Rapid E-Learning Simulation Training and User Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackler, Angeline

    2011-01-01

    A new trend in e-learning development is to have subject matter experts use rapid development tools to create training simulations. This type of training is called rapid e-learning simulation training. Though companies are using rapid development tools to create training quickly and cost effectively, there is little empirical research to indicate…

  5. An Archival Research Comparing Learning Effectiveness and Training Transfer Perceptions between Classroom Technical Training and Synchronous Online Technical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Charles L.

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous online training has become one of the preferred training modes for organizations. Despite organizations increasing their use of online training, there is still little data to confirm that synchronous online technical training is as effective as classroom technical training for training transfer. Although learning effectiveness between…

  6. TRAINING OF LEARNING STRATEGIES IN WRITING ESSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Edi Winarto

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Writing essay is still considered difficult for English students to master. The students are expected to be able to express their ideas correctly without making any chance of messages to be misinterpreted by the readers; therefore, they have to know and use the best or the most appropriate ways to write. The purpose of writing this article is to introduce learning strategies and the possibility of training of learning strategies in writing essay to English students. The first strategy is integration of strategy with the process of writing essay: pre-writing, writing draft, and post-writing activities. The second is training learning strategies, such as memory, cognitive, compensation, metacognitive, affective, and social strategies to students to make writing essay easier, faster, more enjoyable, more effective, and more self-directed to achieve the desired result in their writing. To get better result of improvement, the model of training of learning strategies in writing essay should be applied and developed based on the appropriateness of teachers, learners, subjects, and situations.

  7. Training students to use syringe pumps: an experimental comparison of e-learning and classroom training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundgeiger, Tobias; Kolb, Lorenz; Korb, Maximilian O; Mengelkamp, Christoph; Held, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The inadequate use of syringe pumps can jeopardize patient safety, and syringe pump trainings are conducted to manage this risk. A critical step in this risk management process is the learning success of trainees. In the present paper, we compared an e-learning approach with standard classroom training in learning success effectives, trainees' opinion on the trainings, and investigated the relation between technological affinity and learning success. The results showed that e-learning was as effective as classroom training but nursing students' confidence in using the pump and satisfaction with the training was decreased for e-learning compared with classroom training. We discuss the results in context of the nursing e-learning literature. Finally, we discuss the literature for risk identification, risk analysis, risk treatment, and risk monitoring and control in the context of syringe pump training and add the lessons learned from the evaluated e-learning program.

  8. Interactive Multimedia Instruction for Training Self-Directed Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Self - Directed Learning Techniques Paul N...December 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Interactive Multimedia Instruction for Training Self - Directed Learning Techniques 5a. CONTRACT OR GRANT...train new NCOs on effective self - directed learning skills. Army NCOs must often learn new knowledge and skills on their own in the course of their

  9. Metacognitive Strategy Training and Vocabulary Learning of Chinese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na

    2009-01-01

    This paper attempts to tap the relationship between metacognitive strategy training and vocabulary learning of college students through a five week training program. It aims to answer the following question: Can metacognitive strategy training facilitate vocabulary learning of Chinese college students? Both questionnaire and tests were used in the…

  10. CSCL in Teacher Training: What Learning Tasks Lead to Collaboration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhorst, Ditte; Admiraal, Wilfried; Pilot, Albert

    2010-01-01

    Professional teacher communities appear to be positively related to student learning, teacher learning, teacher practice and school culture. Teacher collaboration is a significant element of these communities. In initial teacher training as well as in-service training and other initiatives for teacher learning, collaborative skills should be…

  11. Learning Technology Specification: Principles for Army Training Designers and Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    training: capitalizing on lessons learned. International Journal of Training and Development 14, 239-249. Bloom , B. S . (1984). Taxonomy of... educational objectives . Boston: Allyn and Bacon. Bower, M. (2008). Affordance analysis- matching learning tasks with learning technologies... Educational Media International, 45, 3-15. Bransford, J. D., Sherwood, R. D., Hasselbring, T. S ., Kinzer, C. K., and Williams, S . M. (1990). Anchored

  12. Specific learning processes and indigenous teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adir Casaro Nascimento

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Indigenous teacher formation and the issue of specific learning processes, as a right of the indigenous peoples derived from the 1988 Constitution, aim at the re-signification of pedagogical practices in specific socio-cultural contexts and at the visibility of indigenous education. Taking indigenous children as a reference, or rather, the agents that produce knowledge within the context of their particularities and territorialities, the essay points to the necessity of constructing new theoretical bases and a pedagogy that gives visibility to other local epistemic logics produced by “power coloniality”. They are different from the dominant Western logic in the process of training indigenous educators.

  13. Distance learning for training business game tutors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana de Toledo Marinho

    Full Text Available Abstract This work is the result of research that proposes the incorporation of Distance Learning into a Business Game as a strategy to enhance tutor training, considering entrepreneurship difficulties faced by public school teachers. Part of the problem could be attributed to subject type, because, in general, it is not common to find entrepreneurship on school curricula. The Distance Learning (DL activities were developed using the Moodle platform and structured by topic to increase educational flexibility and achieve a better balance between individual reflection and online discussion. It was developed in four steps: course content development; course evaluation by computer technicians; restructuring the course based on course evaluation done by computer technicians and course evaluation by teachers from the public school system. A preliminary test was performed with informatics technicians to technically evaluate the learning environment. Based on this, the course was restructured, applying corrections and adjustments to improve environment usability. After corrections, a final test was conducted with public school system teachers to analyze user perception, which gave a positive result. Virtual learning environment evaluation is complex and multidisciplinary, requiring the technical knowledge of internet programming and a conceptual knowledge of education, especially in the field of learning. When the evaluation done by teachers was examined, it was found that deficiencies pointed out by computer technicians had been resolved, giving a positive rating. This current research concludes that DL can improve the use of games, because it is possible to structure the content related to the learning gaps of specific groups of students. In this respect the use of games results can guide the development of content.

  14. CELSTEC Learning Labs: Mobile App Development for Education and Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Specht, M. (2011). CELSTEC Learning Labs: Mobile App Development for Education and Training. Presentation given in Workshop at CELSTEC Learning Lab for Bluetea. February, 21, 2011, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  15. [Mobile learning in nurse training institutes, infinite pedagogical possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Loïc

    Riding on the digital wave, the Rouen nurse training institute is developing mobile learning. Students and trainers are finding benefits in terms of learning methods and pedagogical innovations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. CELSTEC Learning Labs: Mobile App Development for Education and Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Specht, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Specht, M. (2011). CELSTEC Learning Labs: Mobile App Development for Education and Training. Presentation given in Workshop at CELSTEC Learning Lab for Bluetea. February, 21, 2011, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  17. Opportunity to learn first year mathematics in teacher training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Opportunity to learn first year mathematics in teacher training colleges in Ghana. ... Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ... Attempts should be made to integrate the discovery approach into teaching and learning difficult mathematics topics.

  18. Self-Directed Learning and the Millennial Athletic Training Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Brian J.; Berry, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Athletic training educators (ATEs) have a responsibility to remain aware of the current student population, particularly how they learn and give meaning to what they have learned. Just as clinical athletic trainers (ATs) must adapt to ever changing work schedules and demands, so too must athletic training educators. In addition to adapting to…

  19. Training Practices and Organisational Learning Capability: Relationship and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerez Gomez, Pilar; Cespedes Lorente, Jose J.; Valle Cabrera, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an in-depth study of the relationship between the company's training strategy and its learning capability. On a sample of 111 Spanish companies from the chemical industry, tests a set of hypotheses which link four different training strategies with the learning capability dimensions. The results obtained from the regression…

  20. Framework for compulsory teacher training in blended learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenalt, Maria Hvid; Nielsen, Tobias Alsted

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for approaching the design of compulsory teacher training in blended learning. Rather than being prescriptive with regards to blended learning usage and impact, the design is adjustable to various teacher approaches to teaching, resistance to change, teaching...... is used successfully in a one-year long teacher training programme in blended learning developed at Aarhus University in Denmark. Aarhus University (AU) adopted a 'Educational IT’ policy in 2011 with the purpose of strengthening teaching and learning through use of online interactions. The policy......, decided that a one-year long training programme focusing on blended learning should be mandatory for associate and full professors at Aarhus BSS. By now, approximately 100 teachers have completed the training programme. The framework applied in the specific training programme includes among others...

  1. Quality Training and Learning in Aviation: Problems of Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Phillip J.; Lehrer, Henry R.; Telfer, Ross A.

    2001-01-01

    The challenge of producing training programs that lead to quality learning outcomes is ever present in aviation, especially when economic and regulatory pressures are brought into the equation. Previous research by Telfer & Moore (1997) indicates the importance of appropriate alignment of beliefs about learning across all levels of an organization from the managerial level, through the instructor/check and training level, to the pilots and other crew. This paper argues for a central focus on approaches to learning and training that encourage understanding, problem solving and application. Recent research in the area is emphasized as are methods and techniques for enhancing deeper learning.

  2. Virtual reality training versus blended learning of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Brzoska, Julia Anja; Gondan, Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared virtual reality (VR) training with low cost blended learning (BL) in a structured training program. Background: Training of laparoscopic skills outside the operating room is mandatory to reduce operative times and risks. Methods: Laparoscopy-naïve medical students...

  3. Effectiveness of Dysphagia Training for Adult Learning Disabilities Support Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tredinnick, Gerlind; Cocks, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a 1-day dysphagia training package delivered to support workers who work with adults with a learning disability. Thirty-eight support staff took part in this study. Twenty-five support staff received training, and 13 did not receive training and therefore acted as a control group. Three questionnaires…

  4. Virtual reality training versus blended learning of laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Brzoska, Julia Anja; Gondan, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study compared virtual reality (VR) training with low cost blended learning (BL) in a structured training program. Background: Training of laparoscopic skills outside the operating room is mandatory to reduce operative times and risks. Methods: Laparoscopy-naïve medical students...

  5. Learning Styles and Teacher Training: Are We Perpetuating Neuromyths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lethaby, Carol; Harries, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that brain-based teaching, as exhibited in the idea of teaching to address perceptual learning styles, has no basis in what scientists are learning about the brain and how it works. This article questions whether training teachers to assess and accommodate learning styles is harmless or potentially poor educational…

  6. Learning Styles and Teacher Training: Are We Perpetuating Neuromyths?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lethaby, Carol; Harries, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that brain-based teaching, as exhibited in the idea of teaching to address perceptual learning styles, has no basis in what scientists are learning about the brain and how it works. This article questions whether training teachers to assess and accommodate learning styles is harmless or potentially poor educational…

  7. EduCamp Colombia: Social Networked Learning for Teacher Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Ernesto Leal Fonseca

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a learning experience called EduCamp, which was launched by the Ministry of Education of Colombia in 2007, based on emerging concepts such as e-Learning 2.0, connectivism, and personal learning environments. An EduCamp proposes an unstructured collective learning experience, which intends to make palpable the possibilities of social software tools in learning and interaction processes while demonstrating face-to-face organizational forms that reflect social networked learning ideas. The experience opens new perspectives for the design of technology training workshops and for the development of lifelong learning experiences.

  8. Cultivating Lifelong Learning Skills During Graduate Medical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rajiv; Badyal, Dinesh Kumar; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-09-08

    Lifelong learning is referred to as learning practiced by the individual for the whole life, is flexible, and is accessible at all times. Medical Council of India has included lifelong learning as a competency in its new regulations for graduate medical training. Acquisition of metacognitive skills, self-directed learning, self-monitoring, and reflective attitude are the main attributes of lifelong learning; and all of these can be inculcated in the students by using appropriate instructional methodologies. It is time to deliberate upon the instructional designs to foster the lifelong learning skills and behaviors in medical graduates. In this communication, we aim to debrief the concept of lifelong learning, particularly in context with medical training and detailing the process that can be explicitly used to cultivate the attitude of lifelong learning in medical graduates.

  9. Mobile Contextualized learning games for decision support training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland; Börner, Dirk; Suarez, Angel; Schneider, Jan; Antonaci, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    This interactive workshop session introduces mobile serious games as situated, contextualized learning games. Example cases for mobile serious games for decision support training are introduced and discussed. Participants will get to know contextualization techniques used in modern mobile devices

  10. Mobile Contextualized learning games for decision support training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klemke, Roland

    2014-01-01

    This interactive workshop session introduces mobile serious games as situated, contextualized learning games. Example cases for mobile serious games for decision support training are introduced and discussed. Participants will get to know contextualization techniques used in modern mobile devices a

  11. The application of learning theory in horse training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLean, Andrew N.; Christensen, Janne Winther

    2017-01-01

    on the correct application of learning theory, and safety and welfare benefits for people and horses would follow. Finally it is also proposed that the term ‘conflict theory’ be taken up in equitation science to facilitate diagnosis of training-related behaviour disorders and thus enable the emergence......The millennia-old practices of horse training markedly predate and thus were isolated from the mid-twentieth century revelation of animal learning processes. From this standpoint, the progress made in the application and understanding of learning theory in horse training is reviewed including...... a discussion of how learning processes are employed or otherwise under-utilised in training. This review describes the process of habituation and the most commonly applied desensitisation techniques (systematic desensitisation, counter-conditioning, overshadowing, response prevention) and propose two...

  12. Adult learning and naval leadership training

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Approved for public release, distribution is unlimited Adult learning embraces andragogy, constructivism, Transformative Learning Theory, praxis, and the understanding that not all adults are prepared initially for complete learning autonomy. The concept of andragogy can be traced to the Nineteenth Century, and the volume of follow-on research has reinforced the basic tenants of adult learning. It is, therefore, valid to expect that adherence to adult learning will indicate one measure of ...

  13. The potential of social learning in relation to leadership training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby-Jensen, Cecilie K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential of social learning in relation to leadership training courses, by presenting an empirical case study of the intended and unintended consequences of learning that occurred as a result of a specific leadership training course for public middle managers...... in the healthcare sector in Denmark. The findings presented in the paper are based on participant observations, interviews, surveys and documentary material collected from 12 managers and the 160 staff members they supervise. Analyses of the data lead to recommendations for further integration of social learning...... elements in leadership training courses in order to create opportunities for additional learning and changes in actual practice. Thus, this paper predominately contributes empirical knowledge concerning the type of learning stimulated at such courses, and the consequences of this for practice....

  14. Learning transfer in the context of professional advanced training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenberger, Nina; Kummer, Simon [AREVA NP GmbH, Offenbach (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Advanced vocational training measures aim to achieve a high level of job-oriented competence and qualifications. The aspired knowledge, skills and attitude of the trainee are usually not obtained through listening alone, it is more effective to recall training contents in individual working situations. The authors identify measures that encourage the transfer process during a training program and suggest how to bridge the so called gap in transfer after the training course. Transfer of learning should be a major concern to advanced vocational professionals. Before training takes place clear expectations must be defined as learning objectives by the trainee and his supervisor. After the training application opportunities should be provided, as well as feedback and reinforcement mechanisms that support immediate skill use.

  15. Service Learning in Schools: Training Counselors for Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornestad, Andrea; Mims, Grace Ann; Mims, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the experiences of counselors-in-training via student reflection journals as part of a service-learning project in a group counseling course. The counselors-in-training facilitated psychoeducational groups at an alternative high school. The Objective, Reflective, Interpretive, Decisional model was utilized…

  16. Effectiveness of Mobile Learning on Athletic Training Psychomotor Skill Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davie, Emily; Martin, Malissa; Cuppett, Micki; Lebsack, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Context: Instruction of psychomotor skills is an important component of athletic training education. Accommodating the varied learning abilities and preferences of athletic training students can be challenging for an instructor initiating skill acquisition in a traditional face-to-face (F2F) environment. Video instruction available on mobile…

  17. Initiating Training Stations As Clusters of Learning in Fashion Merchandising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Jayne

    1974-01-01

    A Chicago business school offers fashion merchandising as one of several business curriculums that combines on-the-job training and classroom instruction. Instruction is organized around the occupational cluster concept which requires training stations that provide a wide variety of learning experiences. (EA)

  18. Learning by Helping? Undergraduate Communication Outcomes Associated with Training or Service-Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jennifer; DuBois, Melinda; Wigderson, Sara

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated communication outcomes after training or applied service-learning experiences. Pre-practicum trainees learned active listening skills over 10 weeks. Practicum students were successful trainees who staffed a helpline. Community interns were trained and supervised at community agencies. Undergraduate students in psychology…

  19. What Millennial Preservice Teachers Want to Learn in Their Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah K.; Byrnes, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    As teacher educators, we implore teacher candidates to understand the cultures and experiences of their students to engage them in learning. Yet, preservice teachers are seldom asked what they hope to learn in their training to become teachers of young children. In this study, we examined the interests, resources, and expectations of millennial…

  20. What Millennial Preservice Teachers Want to Learn in Their Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Sarah K.; Byrnes, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    As teacher educators, we implore teacher candidates to understand the cultures and experiences of their students to engage them in learning. Yet, preservice teachers are seldom asked what they hope to learn in their training to become teachers of young children. In this study, we examined the interests, resources, and expectations of millennial…

  1. Do Training Institutions Learn from Experience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Claudio de Moura

    2011-01-01

    This essay is concerned with organisational learning and, in particular, policy learning. Sometimes, organisations learn; sometimes they do not. Sometimes they use their acquired knowledge, but this is, not always the case. Inside organisations, particular values, rules and incentive systems are developed. In addition, organisations need to…

  2. Pass-ball trainning based on genetic reinforcement learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a mixture genetic algorithm and reinforcement learning computation model used for inde pendent agent learning in continuous, distributive, open environment, which takes full advantage of the reactive and robust of reinforcement learning algorithm and the property that genetic algorithm is suitable to the problem with high dimension, large collectivity, complex environment, and concludes that through proper training, the result verifies that this method is available in the complex multi-agent environment.

  3. Perceptual learning of basic visual features remains task specific with Training-Plus-Exposure (TPE) training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Lin-Juan; Wang, Ru-Jie; Yu, Cong; Zhang, Jun-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning is known to be specific to the trained retinal location, feature, and task. However, location and feature specificity can be eliminated by double-training or TPE training protocols, in which observers receive additional exposure to the transfer location or feature dimension via an irrelevant task besides the primary learning task Here we tested whether these new training protocols could even make learning transfer across different tasks involving discrimination of basic visual features (e.g., orientation and contrast). Observers practiced a near-threshold orientation (or contrast) discrimination task. Following a TPE training protocol, they also received exposure to the transfer task via performing suprathreshold contrast (or orientation) discrimination in alternating blocks of trials in the same sessions. The results showed no evidence for significant learning transfer to the untrained near-threshold contrast (or orientation) discrimination task after discounting the pretest effects and the suprathreshold practice effects. These results thus do not support a hypothetical task-independent component in perceptual learning of basic visual features. They also set the boundary of the new training protocols in their capability to enable learning transfer.

  4. 2D3 Pilotstudy: Accelerated learning in anaesthetic training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Claus Hedebo; Holdgaard, Hans Ole; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck;

    2011-01-01

    Background: With the purpose to elucidate the possibility for accelerated learning, four residents, in their first year of anaesthetic training, followed a revised curriculum. Summary of work: The curriculum consisted of skills training for airway management, spinal anaesthesia and insertion...... increased confidence in relation to insertion of an epidural catheter. Conclusions: Accelerated training in basic anaesthetic procedures may be acquired through skills- and simulation based learning. Further randomised studies needs to be performed....... of an epidural catheter and simulation based training in general anaesthesia. The skill trained for each procedure was performed in 4 sessions on four consecutive days immediately before the beginning of clinical practice. The simulation based course in general anaesthesia was a 1-day course in week three...

  5. Training Lessons Learned from Peak Performance Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-01

    athletes’ activation levels through auto suggestion. ’-- These techniques (e.g., autogenic training, biofeedback , breathing exercises, progressive muscle...psychical self-regulation program developed in Russia. This program uses techniques from numerous training systems ( meditation , yoga, hypnosis, autogenic...and techniques for individual manipulation of psychological readiness (e.g., biofeedback for affecting arousal level), information processing (e.g

  6. Agriculture Cooperative Training--"Learning by Doing."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Lewis E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A vocational agriculture instructor describes the Agricultural Cooperative Training (ACT) program at Nottoway (Virginia) Senior High School for on-the-job training in agribusiness and agricultural production. Especially important are student and site selection, ACT guidelines, a parent-student-employer-school written agreement, and the student…

  7. Hybrid Learning: A Study of Training Environment and Training Transfer in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Karla

    2013-01-01

    Training transfer can be analyzed in the workplace by studying the results of a validated instrument like the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) developed by Holton and Bates (2011). This correlational study used the Spearman rho correlation coefficient to examine the relationship between transfer design and opportunity to use learning as…

  8. Computer-based Training in Medicine and Learning Theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Martin; Bauch, Matthias; Garde, Sebastian; Heid, Jörn; Weires, Thorsten; Leven, Franz-Josef

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based training (CBT) systems can efficiently support modern teaching and learning environments. In this paper, we demonstrate on the basis of the case-based CBT system CAMPUS that current learning theories and design principles (Bloom's Taxonomy and practice fields) are (i) relevant to CBT and (ii) are feasible to implement using computer-based training and adequate learning environments. Not all design principles can be fulfilled by the system alone, the integration of the system in adequate teaching and learning environments therefore is essential. Adequately integrated, CBT programs become valuable means to build or support practice fields for learners that build domain knowledge and problem-solving skills. Learning theories and their design principles can support in designing these systems as well as in assessing their value.

  9. Automated training for algorithms that learn from genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilingir, Gokcen; Broschat, Shira L

    2015-01-01

    Supervised machine learning algorithms are used by life scientists for a variety of objectives. Expert-curated public gene and protein databases are major resources for gathering data to train these algorithms. While these data resources are continuously updated, generally, these updates are not incorporated into published machine learning algorithms which thereby can become outdated soon after their introduction. In this paper, we propose a new model of operation for supervised machine learning algorithms that learn from genomic data. By defining these algorithms in a pipeline in which the training data gathering procedure and the learning process are automated, one can create a system that generates a classifier or predictor using information available from public resources. The proposed model is explained using three case studies on SignalP, MemLoci, and ApicoAP in which existing machine learning models are utilized in pipelines. Given that the vast majority of the procedures described for gathering training data can easily be automated, it is possible to transform valuable machine learning algorithms into self-evolving learners that benefit from the ever-changing data available for gene products and to develop new machine learning algorithms that are similarly capable.

  10. Digital control systems training on a distance learning platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan PIECHA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with new training technologies development based on approach to distance learning website, implemented in the laboratory of a Traffic Engineering study branch at Faculty of Transport. The discussed computing interface allows students complete knowledge of traffic controllers’ architecture and machine language programming fundamentals. These training facilities are available at home; at their remote terminal. The training resources consist of electronic / computer based training; guidebooks and software units. The laboratory provides the students with an interface entering into simulation packages and programming interfaces, supporting the web training facilities. The courseware complexity selection is one of the most difficult factors in intelligent training unit’s development. The dynamically configured application provides the user with his individually set structure of the training resources. The trainee controls the application structure and complexity, from the time he started. For simplifying the training process and studying activities, several unifications were provided. The introduced ideas need various standardisations, simplifying the e-learning units’ development and application control processes [8], [9]. Further training facilities development concerns virtual laboratory environment organisation in laboratories of Transport Faculty.

  11. Differential Training Facilitates Early Consolidation in Motor Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henz, Diana; Schöllhorn, Wolfgang I.

    2016-01-01

    Current research demonstrates increased learning rates in differential learning (DL) compared to repetitive training. To date, little is known on the underlying neurophysiological processes in DL that contribute to superior performance over repetitive practice. In the present study, we measured electroencephalographic (EEG) brain activation patterns after DL and repetitive badminton serve training. Twenty-four semi-professional badminton players performed badminton serves in a DL and repetitive training schedule in a within-subjects design. EEG activity was recorded from 19 electrodes according to the 10–20 system before and immediately after each 20-min exercise. Increased theta activity was obtained in contralateral parieto-occipital regions after DL. Further, increased posterior alpha activity was obtained in DL compared to repetitive training. Results indicate different underlying neuronal processes in DL and repetitive training with a higher involvement of parieto-occipital areas in DL. We argue that DL facilitates early consolidation in motor learning indicated by post-training increases in theta and alpha activity. Further, brain activation patterns indicate somatosensory working memory processes where attentional resources are allocated in processing of somatosensory information in DL. Reinforcing a somatosensory memory trace might explain increased motor learning rates in DL. Finally, this memory trace is more stable against interference from internal and external disturbances that afford executively controlled processing such as attentional processes.

  12. Perancangan Training dengan E-Learning pada Perusahaan Manufacture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Putranto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of information technology has been very widely in many fields including industry. Along with that, the need for a concept and mechanism of IT-based learning becomes inevitable. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the training process and identify any related problems occurred at PT.Suzuki Indomobil Motor. The problems are about the limited training time, lack of material distribution media and consultations out of training time. E-Learning is a concept of electronic application use to support learning using the internet and computer network. This concept influences the process of conventional education transformation to digital form, both in content and system. The learning system will be replaced with a web-based training media. The method used is the Object Oriented Analysis Design, which begins with a depiction of rich pictures to the Deployment diagram. This system is expected to meet the needs of employees while joining the training process, so that they will obtain excellent learning and achieve the company objectives. 

  13. Education and training column: the learning collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L; Nemec, Patricia B

    2015-03-01

    This column describes the key components of a learning collaborative, with examples from the experience of 1 organization. A learning collaborative is a method for management, learning, and improvement of products or processes, and is a useful approach to implementation of a new service design or approach. This description draws from published material on learning collaboratives and the authors' experiences. The learning collaborative approach offers an effective method to improve service provider skills, provide support, and structure environments to result in lasting change for people using behavioral health services. This approach is consistent with psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices, and serves to increase the overall capacity of the mental health system by structuring a process for discovering and sharing knowledge and expertise across provider agencies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. Training Procedures for Enhancing Reserve Component Learning, Retention, and Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Russian vocabulary. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory , 1, 126-133. Atkinson , R. C., & Shiffrin , R. M. (1968). Human memory ...interrepetition interval is too long, excessive forgetting occurs between repetitions and learning suffers ( Atkinson & Shiffrin , 1968). Unfortunately, the...the more stringent memory retrieval requirements of a recall test. 12. Questions should be asked within the context of the training materials to

  15. Learning and Training: Enhancing Small Business Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Crowley, Suzanne

    Owners or managers of 181 Australian businesses employing fewer than 20 people in the construction, manufacturing, property and business services, and retail industries in 3 metropolitan and 3 nonmetropolitan locations were interviewed by telephone to identify how they used training to enhance their small business's success. Of those surveyed,…

  16. Moving Beyond the Training Room: Fostering Workplace Learning through Online Journaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyboran, Vincent L.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of instructional methods have been shown to be effective in fostering employee learning in workplace training. These include problem-based learning, cooperative learning, and situated learning. Despite their success, however, there are at least two important reasons to actively foster learning beyond the training room: The transfer of…

  17. New Learning Methods for Marine Oil Spill Response Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justiina Halonen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In Finland the Regional Fire and Rescue Services (RFRS are responsible for near shore oil spill response and shoreline cleanup operations. In addition, they assist in other types of maritime incidents, such as search and rescue operations and fire-fighting on board. These statutory assignments require the RFRS to have capability to act both on land and at sea. As maritime incidents occur infrequently, little routine has been established. In order to improve their performance in maritime operations, the RFRS are participating in a new oil spill training programme to be launched by South-Eastern Finland University of Applied Sciences. This training programme aims to utilize new educational methods; e-learning and simulator based training. In addition to fully exploiting the existing navigational bridge simulator, radio communication simulator and crisis management simulator, an entirely new simulator is developed. This simulator is designed to model the oil recovery process; recovery method, rate and volume in various conditions with different oil types. New simulator enables creation of a comprehensive training programme covering training tasks from a distress call to the completion of an oil spill response operation. Structure of the training programme, as well as the training objectives, are based on the findings from competence and education surveys conducted in spring 2016. In these results, a need for vessel maneuvering and navigation exercises together with actual response measures training were emphasized. Also additional training for maritime radio communication, GMDSS-emergency protocols and collaboration with maritime authorities were seemed important. This paper describes new approach to the maritime operations training designed for rescue authorities, a way of learning by doing, without mobilising the vessels at sea.

  18. Virtual Reality Training Versus Blended Learning of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickel, Felix; Brzoska, Julia A.; Gondan, Matthias; Rangnick, Henriette M.; Chu, Jackson; Kenngott, Hannes G.; Linke, Georg R.; Kadmon, Martina; Fischer, Lars; Müller-Stich, Beat P.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study compared virtual reality (VR) training with low cost-blended learning (BL) in a structured training program. Training of laparoscopic skills outside the operating room is mandatory to reduce operative times and risks. Laparoscopy-naïve medical students were randomized in 2 groups stratified for sex. The BL group (n = 42) used E-learning for laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and practiced basic skills with box trainers. The VR group (n = 42) trained basic skills and LC on the LAP Mentor II (Simbionix, Cleveland, OH). Each group trained 3 × 4 hours followed by a knowledge test concerning LC. Blinded raters assessed the operative performance of cadaveric porcine LC using the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS). The LC was discontinued when it was not completed within 80 min. Students evaluated their training modality with questionnaires. The VR group completed the LC significantly faster and more often within 80 min than BL (45% v 21%, P = .02). The BL group scored higher than the VR group in the knowledge test (13.3 ± 1.3 vs 11.0 ± 1.7, P < 0.001). Both groups showed equal operative performance of LC in the OSATS score (49.4 ± 10.5 vs 49.7 ± 12.0, P = 0.90). Students generally liked training and felt well prepared for assisting in laparoscopic surgery. The efficiency of the training was judged higher by the VR group than by the BL group. VR and BL can both be applied for training the basics of LC. Multimodality training programs should be developed that combine the advantages of both approaches. PMID:25997044

  19. Adult Learning and Naval Leadership Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    the organization. 14 Praxis is a concept from Brazilian educator Paulo Freire : “…a continuous and...research found to be integral to adult learning. Praxis is an idea developed by Brazilian educator Paulo Freire in which the student practices a

  20. E-learning in surgical education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larvin, Mike

    2009-03-01

    For most surgeons and surgical educators, e-learning is relatively new and confusing. This article attempts to explain the key concepts behind e-learning, as well as its benefits and risks. E-learning has become a fixed feature within Higher and Professional Education and has been prioritized by Universities around the world, as well as all six Surgical Royal Colleges. Trainees have grown up with virtual learning environments and expect similar provision for their postgraduate studies, but have a greater need for basic science learning. Dispersal of trainees across duty rotas and geographically makes e-learning more attractive, but preserving peer and trainer communication is as important as content. Recent changes in surgical education and training have also made electronic and distance learning more attractive than previously. Initial work by the Colleges is now being evaluated and important lessons have emerged. The UK Department of Health has made medical e-learning a priority and it is now the largest e-learning provider in Europe. Changes in the World Wide Web, with a shift to more social-networking activity in education and to web-based delivery to small, ubiquitous portable devices will increase opportunities for surgical e-learning.

  1. Learning Precise Spike Train to Spike Train Transformations in Multilayer Feedforward Neuronal Networks

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We derive a synaptic weight update rule for learning temporally precise spike train to spike train transformations in multilayer feedforward networks of spiking neurons. The framework, aimed at seamlessly generalizing error backpropagation to the deterministic spiking neuron setting, is based strictly on spike timing and avoids invoking concepts pertaining to spike rates or probabilistic models of spiking. The derivation is founded on two innovations. First, an error functional is proposed th...

  2. Self-Trained LMT for Semisupervised Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos Fazakis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important asset of semisupervised classification methods is the use of available unlabeled data combined with a clearly smaller set of labeled examples, so as to increase the classification accuracy compared with the default procedure of supervised methods, which on the other hand use only the labeled data during the training phase. Both the absence of automated mechanisms that produce labeled data and the high cost of needed human effort for completing the procedure of labelization in several scientific domains rise the need for semisupervised methods which counterbalance this phenomenon. In this work, a self-trained Logistic Model Trees (LMT algorithm is presented, which combines the characteristics of Logistic Trees under the scenario of poor available labeled data. We performed an in depth comparison with other well-known semisupervised classification methods on standard benchmark datasets and we finally reached to the point that the presented technique had better accuracy in most cases.

  3. E-learning and learning-E: reflections on training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Panciroli

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The increase of the traditional limits of education towards dinamic teaching and learning enviroments, of a strongly constructive nature, is strictly related with an always increasing request of knowledge elements by a part of society who made the cognitive dimension one of the development challenge. Telematic technologies, in particular those of e-learning, represents one of the possible interpretation that in this paper are going to be analysed with a problematicistic approach.

  4. E-learning and learning-E: reflections on training

    OpenAIRE

    Chiara Panciroli

    2008-01-01

    The increase of the traditional limits of education towards dinamic teaching and learning enviroments, of a strongly constructive nature, is strictly related with an always increasing request of knowledge elements by a part of society who made the cognitive dimension one of the development challenge. Telematic technologies, in particular those of e-learning, represents one of the possible interpretation that in this paper are going to be analysed with a problematicistic approach.

  5. Training and Learning Strategies of Family Businesses: An Irish Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdthistle, Naomi

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the training and learning strategies adopted by family businesses in Ireland. Design/methodology/approach: In order to implement the study a database of family businesses was compiled. A number of sources were used to compile the database. Primary data from a stratified random sample of independent…

  6. Real-time individualized training vectors for experiential learning.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, Matt; Tucker, Eilish Marie; Raybourn, Elaine Marie; Glickman, Matthew R.; Fabian, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Military training utilizing serious games or virtual worlds potentially generate data that can be mined to better understand how trainees learn in experiential exercises. Few data mining approaches for deployed military training games exist. Opportunities exist to collect and analyze these data, as well as to construct a full-history learner model. Outcomes discussed in the present document include results from a quasi-experimental research study on military game-based experiential learning, the deployment of an online game for training evidence collection, and results from a proof-of-concept pilot study on the development of individualized training vectors. This Lab Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project leveraged products within projects, such as Titan (Network Grand Challenge), Real-Time Feedback and Evaluation System, (America's Army Adaptive Thinking and Leadership, DARWARS Ambush! NK), and Dynamic Bayesian Networks to investigate whether machine learning capabilities could perform real-time, in-game similarity vectors of learner performance, toward adaptation of content delivery, and quantitative measurement of experiential learning.

  7. The TENOR Architecture for Advanced Distributed Learning and Intelligent Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    accomplishes its tasks by NOT using static web pages, but by storing training material in a database and creating customized web pages on the fly. As...The highlights of the system are one: that learning material is stored in a database, and NOT in static web pages; two, our intelligent engine

  8. Cognitive-Behavioral Training in Spelling for Learning Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Michael M.; Hall, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    Development of effective cognitive-behavioral training approaches for students with learning handicaps in academic domains, such as spelling, requires greater concern for teachers' knowledge of the academic domain, as well as their pedagogical expertise in finely and precisely adjusting their instructional use of language to communicate that…

  9. Learning styles and embedded training: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoddard, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe user behavior with fixed-format and context-sensitive help that has been implemented on a personnel information system at Los Alamos National Laboratory and to suggest that user learning style is a key determinant for the design of embedded training.

  10. Locomotion training of legged robots using hybrid machine learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, William E.; Doerschuk, Peggy I.; Zhang, Wen-Ran; Li, Andrew L.

    1995-01-01

    In this study artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic are used to control the jumping behavior of a three-link uniped robot. The biped locomotion control problem is an increment of the uniped locomotion control. Study of legged locomotion dynamics indicates that a hierarchical controller is required to control the behavior of a legged robot. A structured control strategy is suggested which includes navigator, motion planner, biped coordinator and uniped controllers. A three-link uniped robot simulation is developed to be used as the plant. Neurocontrollers were trained both online and offline. In the case of on-line training, a reinforcement learning technique was used to train the neurocontroller to make the robot jump to a specified height. After several hundred iterations of training, the plant output achieved an accuracy of 7.4%. However, when jump distance and body angular momentum were also included in the control objectives, training time became impractically long. In the case of off-line training, a three-layered backpropagation (BP) network was first used with three inputs, three outputs and 15 to 40 hidden nodes. Pre-generated data were presented to the network with a learning rate as low as 0.003 in order to reach convergence. The low learning rate required for convergence resulted in a very slow training process which took weeks to learn 460 examples. After training, performance of the neurocontroller was rather poor. Consequently, the BP network was replaced by a Cerebeller Model Articulation Controller (CMAC) network. Subsequent experiments described in this document show that the CMAC network is more suitable to the solution of uniped locomotion control problems in terms of both learning efficiency and performance. A new approach is introduced in this report, viz., a self-organizing multiagent cerebeller model for fuzzy-neural control of uniped locomotion is suggested to improve training efficiency. This is currently being evaluated for a possible

  11. What Do We Learn From Self-Evaluations of Training?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai

    Self-evaluations of program impact, notably subjective evaluations of the e¤ects of training, are wide-spread in both the public and the private sector . probably because self-evaluations o¤er an easy and low-cost alternative to rigorous experimental or econometric evaluations. In this paper, I...... analyze how subjective assessments of satisfaction with training compare to objective measures based on differences in test scores before and after training. I find a complete lack of correspondence between the objective measure of learning and 11 subjective measures of satisfaction with aspects...... of the courses. This finding suggests that either learning has no weight in the employees. subjective evaluations or subjective evaluations cannot be trusted. At this stage, we cannot fully ascertain whether subjective valuations can be used as a substitute for econometric or experimental program evaluations...

  12. New Blended Learning Strategy Based on Flipped-Learning for Vocational Work-Linked Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajji, Mohamed; El Bouzaidi, Rachid Drissi; Douzi, Hassan; Khouya, El Hassane

    2016-01-01

    In a changing Moroccan educational landscape, Addressing teaching development needs is becoming a major issue in vocational work-linked Training. In this context, this paper present a new blended learning strategy based on the flipped classroom, using a social learning platform as support. Through this strategy, we increased the time dedicated to…

  13. Implementation of emergency obstetric care training in Bangladesh: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Tajul; Haque, Yasmin Ali; Waxman, Rachel; Bhuiyan, Abdul Bayes

    2006-05-01

    The Women's Right to Life and Health project aimed to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh through provision of comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in the country's district and sub-district hospitals. Human resources development was one of the project's major activities. This paper describes the project in 2000-2004 and lessons learned. Project documents, the training database, reports and training protocols were reviewed. Medical officers, nurses, facility managers and laboratory technicians received training in the country's eight medical college hospitals, using nationally accepted curricula. A 17-week competency-based training course for teams of medical officers and nurses was introduced in 2003. At baseline in 1999, only three sub-district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC and 33 basic EmOC, mostly due to lack of trained staff and necessary equipment. In 2004, 105 of the 120 sub-district hospitals had become functional for EmOC, 70 with comprehensive EmOC and 35 with basic EmOC, while 53 of 59 of the district hospitals were providing comprehensive EmOC compared to 35 in 1999. The scaling up of competency-based training, innovative incentives to retain trained staff, evidence-based protocols to standardise practice and improve quality of care and the continuing involvement of key stakeholders, especially trainers, will all be needed to reach training targets in future.

  14. Blended learning: strengths, challenges, and lessons learned in an interprofessional training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotrecchiano, G R; McDonald, P L; Lyons, L; Long, T; Zajicek-Farber, M

    2013-11-01

    This field report outlines the goals of providing a blended learning model for an interdisciplinary training program for healthcare professionals who care for children with disabilities. The curriculum blended traditional face-to-face or on-site learning with integrated online interactive instruction. Credit earning and audited graduate level online coursework, community engagement experiences, and on-site training with maternal and child health community engagement opportunities were blended into a cohesive program. The training approach emphasized adult learning principles in different environmental contexts integrating multiple components of the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities Program. This paper describes the key principles adopted for this blended approach and the accomplishments, challenges, and lessons learned. The discussion offers examples from training content, material gathered through yearly program evaluation, as well as university course evaluations. The lessons learned consider the process and the implications for the role of blended learning in this type of training program with suggestions for future development and adoption by other programs.

  15. Cognitive training during infancy and adolescence accelerates adult associative learning: critical impact of age, stimulus contingency and training intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruss, Michael; Abraham, Andreas; Schäble, Sandra; Becker, Susann; Braun, Katharina

    2010-10-01

    A growing body of evidence supports the hypothesis that juvenile cognitive training shapes neural networks and behavior, and thereby determines the adult's capacity for learning and memory. In particular, we have shown that infant rats, even though they do not develop an active avoidance strategy in a two-way active avoidance task, show as adults accelerated learning in the same learning task. This indicates that a memory trace was formed in the infant rats, which most likely is recruited during adult training. To identify the learning conditions, which are essential prerequisites to form this memory trace in infancy or adolescence, we investigated the critical impact of: (i) age, (ii) CS-UCS contingency, and (iii) pre-training intensity on this facilitating effect. We observed: (i) an age-dependent improvement of avoidance learning, (ii) that the beneficial impact of infant or adolescent pre-training on adult learning increases with the age at pre-training, (iii) that CS-UCS contingency during infant pre-training was most efficient to accelerate adult learning, (iv) that pre-training intensity (i.e. number of pre-training trials) was positively correlated with the pre-training induced acceleration of adult learning, and (v) that infant rats, compared to adolescent rats, need a higher training intensity to show learning improvement as adults. These results indicate that infant rats develop a goal-oriented escape strategy, which during adult training is replaced by an avoidance strategy, facilitated by the recruitment of the CS-UCS association, which has been learned during infant training. Based on these results the future challenge will be to identify the specific contribution of prefronto-limbic circuits in infant and adult learning in relation to their functional maturation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Blogs, webinars and significant learning: A case report on a teacher training program for college teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Polanco-Bueno, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a teacher training experience for College professors in which participants were trained, taking advantage of technological tools, in two main teaching competences. First, professors were trained to use technology to enrich students’ learning outcomes. Second, they applied strategies of significant learning in the design of students’ learning experiences. The learning experience consisted in an International Certificate on Significant Learning integrated by six modules, 2...

  17. Participant Comfort with and Application of Inquiry-Based Learning: Results from 4-H Volunteer Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Heidi; Stevenson, Anne; Meyer, Rebecca L.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how a one-time training designed to support learning transfer affected 4-H volunteers' comfort levels with the training content and how comfort levels, in turn, affected the volunteers' application of tools and techniques learned during the training. Results of a follow-up survey suggest that the training participants…

  18. A Mixed Method Case Study on Learner Engagement in e-Learning Professional Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jane Yanfeng

    2014-01-01

    Previous research showed that learners' reluctance in participating in e-Learning training is a major obstacle in achieving training objectives. This study focused on learners' e-Learning engagement in professional training in the chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD). The participants were 21 chapter members.…

  19. A Mixed Method Case Study on Learner Engagement in e-Learning Professional Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jane Yanfeng

    2014-01-01

    Previous research showed that learners' reluctance in participating in e-Learning training is a major obstacle in achieving training objectives. This study focused on learners' e-Learning engagement in professional training in the chapter of the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD). The participants were 21 chapter members.…

  20. Group affective learning in training for psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, Jill Savege; Scharff, David E

    2017-03-04

    This paper describes The Group Affective Model, a method for teaching psychoanalytic concepts and their clinical application, using multi-channel teaching, process and review in group settings, and learning from experience in an open systems learning community for psychoanalysts and psychotherapists. This innovation arose in response to criticism of existing methods in psychoanalytic education that have subordinated the primary educational task to that of the training analysis. Noticing this split between education and training analysis, between cognition and affect, and between concepts of individual and group unconscious processes, we developed the Group Affective Model for teaching and learning psychoanalysis and psychotherapy in an open psychological space in which students and faculty experience individual and group processes of digestion, assimilation, and review, which demonstrate the concepts in action and make them available for internalization selectively. We discuss our philosophy and our educational stance. We describe our institution and our participants. We give examples of teaching situations that we have studied to provide some insight about assimilation and internalization of the concepts and clinical approaches being taught. We discuss the transferability of the Group Affective Model to other teaching settings and psychoanalytic training institutions and propose it as the fourth pillar of psychoanalytic training, next to analytic treatment, clinical supervision, and didactic seminars.

  1. ICT AND MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES: LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES AND TRAINING NEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Davies

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is divided into two main sections. The first section considers why technology has not lived up to its expectations in bringing about improvements in language learning. Many learning opportunities are offered by new technologies but they are not fully exploited, mainly owing to the lack of relevant training offered to teachers. In addition, with the advent of the Web, there is a disturbing trend towards removing the teacher from the learning process - which is simply not acceptable. The second section of the article looks at a website that offers a considerable volume of ICT training materials or language teachers, namely the ICT4LT website: http://www.ict4lt.org. The author examines the aims behind the site as a whole and the pattern of site visits, discussing the key issues and drawing conclusions based on an analysis of the pattern of visits to different modules of the site. Some important lessons have been learned regarding the type of training that teachers appear to need, for example: the continued interest in multimedia and the high demand for introductory courses. It is also evident that Web traffic is predominantly one-way and confined to certain sectors of the world, indicating that much more has to be done in order to stimulate discussion and to make the Web accessible to underserved regions of the world.

  2. Learning object for teacher training aimed to develop communication skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Esmeralda RODRÍGUEZ RAMÍREZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results and reflections obtained across a research aimed to analyze the quality criteria of an opened learning object oriented to develop communication skills in order to be able to report and validate it according to its content, pedagogic structure, technological structure, graphical and textual language and usability to teacher training, in order to base it theoretically, pedagogically and technologically. The research question was: Which are the quality criteria that a learning object aimed to develop communication skills must cover? Under a quantitative approach, there were electronic questionnaires applied to: 34 Technological University teachers, eight experts about of communicative competence, teaching, technology and graphic design. The results indicated that some of the quality criteria of learning object are: the effective managing of the learning content, the balanced composition of his pedagogic structure, the technological structure efficiency and the proper managing of graphical and textual language.

  3. A Context-Adaptive Teacher Training Model in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chiang, Feng Kuang; Jiang, Ya Na; Yu, Sheng Quan

    2017-01-01

    In view of the discrepancies in teacher training and teaching practice, this paper put forward a context-adaptive teacher training model in a ubiquitous learning (u-learning) environment. The innovative model provides teachers of different subjects with adaptive and personalized learning content in a u-learning environment, implements intra- and…

  4. A Context-Adaptive Teacher Training Model in a Ubiquitous Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Chiang, Feng Kuang; Jiang, Ya Na; Yu, Sheng Quan

    2017-01-01

    In view of the discrepancies in teacher training and teaching practice, this paper put forward a context-adaptive teacher training model in a ubiquitous learning (u-learning) environment. The innovative model provides teachers of different subjects with adaptive and personalized learning content in a u-learning environment, implements intra- and…

  5. M-LEARNING (MOBILE LEARNING IN PRACTICE: A TRAINING EXPERIENCE WITH IT PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarolinda Zanela Saccol

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a study that addresses the following question: what are the real possibilities of m-learning (mobile learning for the development of individual competences and also for collaboration in the organizational setting? The paper analyzes a real experience in m-learning for training IT professionals. For this purpose a mobile virtual learning environment called COMTEXT was developed and implemented, which was designed to support competence development for workers using PocketPCs. The participants of the training activity (13 professionals evaluated the m-learning experience via a structured questionnaire; all the content and interactions within COMTEXT were analyzed via content analysis. The results generated important insights into the ergonomic, technological and pedagogical possibilities and limitations of mobile and wireless technologies for corporate training and also on methodologies and learning tools that can be applied to m-learning. As an exploratory study, it also indicates issues for further research on m-learning in the organizational context.

  6. [Which learning methods are expected for ultrasound training? Blended learning on trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhrig, S; Hempel, D; Stenger, T; Armbruster, W; Seibel, A; Walcher, F; Breitkreutz, R

    2014-10-01

    Current teaching methods in graduate and postgraduate training often include frontal presentations. Especially in ultrasound education not only knowledge but also sensomotory and visual skills need to be taught. This requires new learning methods. This study examined which types of teaching methods are preferred by participants in ultrasound training courses before, during and after the course by analyzing a blended learning concept. It also investigated how much time trainees are willing to spend on such activities. A survey was conducted at the end of a certified ultrasound training course. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire based on a visual analogue scale (VAS) in which three categories were defined: category (1) vote for acceptance with a two thirds majority (VAS 67-100%), category (2) simple acceptance (50-67%) and category (3) rejection (learning program with interactive elements, short presentations (less than 20 min), incorporating interaction with the audience, hands-on sessions in small groups, an alternation between presentations and hands-on-sessions, live demonstrations and quizzes. For post-course learning, interactive and media-assisted approaches were preferred, such as e-learning, films of the presentations and the possibility to stay in contact with instructors in order to discuss the results. Participants also voted for maintaining a logbook for documentation of results. The results of this study indicate the need for interactive learning concepts and blended learning activities. Directors of ultrasound courses may consider these aspects and are encouraged to develop sustainable learning pathways.

  7. Training Self-Regulated Learning in the Classroom: Development and Evaluation of Learning Materials to Train Self-Regulated Learning during Regular Mathematics Lessons at Primary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Leidinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the intervention based on the self-regulation theory by Zimmerman (2000 was to promote a powerful learning environment for supporting self-regulated learning by using learning materials. In the study, primary school teachers were asked to implement specific learning materials into their regular mathematics lessons in grade four. These learning materials focused on particular (metacognitive and motivational components of self-regulated learning and were subdivided into six units, with which the students of the experimental group were asked to deal with on a weekly basis. The evaluation was based on a quasiexperimental pre-/postcontrol-group design combined with a time series design. Altogether, 135 fourth graders participated in the study. The intervention was evaluated by a self-regulated learning questionnaire, mathematics test, and process data gathered through structured learning diaries for a period of six weeks. The results revealed that students with the self-regulated learning training maintained their level of self-reported self-regulated learning activities from pre- to posttest, whereas a significant decline was observed for the control students. Regarding students’ mathematical achievement, a slightly greater improvement was found for the students with self-regulated learning training.

  8. The relationship between learning styles and motivation to transfer of learning in a vocational training programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Olivos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is ample research about Kolb's learning styles, few studies have examined their relationship with motivations to transfer, a concept used to assess whether the content and competencies learned through professional training activities are transferred to the workplace context. Ninety-six students (M = 24.58 years old; 99% males from three vocational training institutes participated in laboratory activities at the Renewable Energy Research Institute of the University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain. They completed a self-administered questionnaire that included the Kolb's Learning Styles Inventory; two scales adapted to measure student motivation to transfer their learning from training experiences; and a scale of satisfaction with the activities. A correlation analysis showed positive and moderately strong correlations (r = .708; p < .01 between motivations to transfer and “the relevance of the activities to academic performance”. A discriminant analysis between transfer and learning styles revealed that the “Student training motivation” item resulted in a distinct difference between assimilators and convergers, explaining 97.1% of the model variance (Wilks’ λ = .459; χ2 = 21.028; Sig. = .002 and classifying 56.4% of the cases. A discussion is presented as to the implications of these results for the theory of learning styles and the ways in which the design of the educational activities described in the study can be improved.

  9. Learning Precise Spike Train-to-Spike Train Transformations in Multilayer Feedforward Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arunava

    2016-05-01

    We derive a synaptic weight update rule for learning temporally precise spike train-to-spike train transformations in multilayer feedforward networks of spiking neurons. The framework, aimed at seamlessly generalizing error backpropagation to the deterministic spiking neuron setting, is based strictly on spike timing and avoids invoking concepts pertaining to spike rates or probabilistic models of spiking. The derivation is founded on two innovations. First, an error functional is proposed that compares the spike train emitted by the output neuron of the network to the desired spike train by way of their putative impact on a virtual postsynaptic neuron. This formulation sidesteps the need for spike alignment and leads to closed-form solutions for all quantities of interest. Second, virtual assignment of weights to spikes rather than synapses enables a perturbation analysis of individual spike times and synaptic weights of the output, as well as all intermediate neurons in the network, which yields the gradients of the error functional with respect to the said entities. Learning proceeds via a gradient descent mechanism that leverages these quantities. Simulation experiments demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed learning framework. The experiments also highlight asymmetries between synapses on excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

  10. Learning probabilistic models of connectivity from multiple spike train data

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal circuits or cell assemblies carry out brain function through complex coordinated firing patterns [1]. Inferring topology of neuronal circuits from simultaneously recorded spike train data is a challenging problem in neuroscience. In this work we present a new class of dynamic Bayesian networks to infer polysynaptic excitatory connectivity between spiking cortical neurons [2]. The emphasis on excitatory networks allows us to learn connectivity models by exploiting fast data mining alg...

  11. Understanding Frame-of-Reference Training Success: A Social Learning Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulsky, Lorne M.; Kline, Theresa J. B.

    2007-01-01

    Employing the social learning theory (SLT) perspective on training, we analysed the effects of alternative frame-of-reference (FOR) training protocols on various criteria of training effectiveness. Undergraduate participants (N = 65) were randomly assigned to one of four FOR training conditions and a control condition. Training effectiveness was…

  12. E-learning to train staff in Danish hospitals - three genres of e-learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygholm, Ann

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the use of e-learning in education and training of hospital staff in Denmark, in particular in relation with the implementation of electronic patient records (EPR). The study consists of a survey mapping the dissemination and main experience from using e-learning in Danish hospitals. The study shows a widespread use and a considerably agreement on the potentials of e-learning in education and training of hospital staff, but also problems and doubtfulness concerning the actual role of e-learning in the overall educational and organizational strategy for the hospital. The majority of hospitals use some sorts of computer-based training program to support the staff in acquiring necessary knowledge to operate the EPR. I argue that a more differentiated understanding is needed in order to realize the potentials and direct the use of e-learning in hospitals. Three genres of e-learning which differ in regards to qualification addressed are identified and I claim that a more explicit understanding of the differences between them is needed in order to guide the choice of e-learning of hospital staff.

  13. Incorporating prior knowledge into learning by dividing training data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baoliang LU; Xiaolin WANG; Masao UTIYAMA

    2009-01-01

    In most large-scale real-world pattern classification problems, there is always some explicit information besides given training data, namely prior knowledge, with which the training data are organized. In this paper, we proposed a framework for incorporating this kind of prior knowledge into the training of min-max modular (M3) classifier to improve learning performance. In order to evaluate the proposed method, we perform experiments on a large-scale Japanese patent classification problem and consider two kinds of prior knowledge included in patent documents: patent's publishing date and the hierarchical structure of patent classification system. In the experiments, traditional support vector machine (SVM) and Ma-SVM without prior knowledge are adopted as baseline classifiers. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is superior to the baseline classifiers in terms of training cost and generalization accuracy. Moreover, Ma-SVM with prior knowledge is found to be much more robust than traditional support vector machine to noisy dated patent samples, which is crucial for incremental learning.

  14. Fast Brain Plasticity during Word Learning in Musically-Trained Children

    OpenAIRE

    Dittinger, Eva,; Chobert, Julie; Ziegler, Johannes; Besson, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Children learn new words every day and this ability requires auditory perception, phoneme discrimination, attention, associative learning and semantic memory. Based on previous results showing that some of these functions are enhanced by music training, we investigated learning of novel words through picture-word associations in musically-trained and control children (8–12 year-old) to determine whether music training would positively influence word learning. Results s...

  15. Fast Brain Plasticity during Word Learning in Musically-Trained Children

    OpenAIRE

    Dittinger, Eva,; Chobert, Julie; Johannes C Ziegler; Besson, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    Children learn new words every day and this ability requires auditory perception, phoneme discrimination, attention, associative learning and semantic memory. Based on previous results showing that some of these functions are enhanced by music training, we investigated learning of novel words through picture-word associations in musically-trained and control children (8–12 year-old) to determine whether music training would positively influence word learning. Results showed that musically-tra...

  16. Assessment of Prior Learning in Adult Vocational Education and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibe Aarkrog

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals about the results of a study of school-based Assessment of Prior Learning of adults who have enrolled as students in a VET college in order to qualify for occupations as skilled workers. Based on examples of VET teachers’ methods for assessing the students’ prior learning in the programs for gastronomes, respectively child care assistants the article discusses two issues in relation to Assessment of Prior Learing: the encounter of practical experience and school-based knowledge and the validity and reliability of the assessment procedures. Through focusing on the students’ knowing that and knowing why the assessment is based on a scholastic perception of the students’ needs for training, reflecting one of the most important challenges in Assessment of Prior Learning: how can practical experience be transformed into credits for the knowledge parts of the programs? The study shows that by combining several Assessment of Prior Learning methods and comparing the teachers’ assessments the teachers respond to the issues of validity and reliability. However, validity and reliability might be even further strengthened, if the competencies are well defined, if the education system is aware of securing a reasonable balance between knowing how, knowing that, and knowing why, and if the teachers are adequately trained for the assessment procedures.

  17. Online Learning Community and its Application in the Occupational Training of College Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Xiu Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Object: The analysis of established online learning community, and its structural elements and creation strategies can shed light on the effect of the application of online learning community in the occupational training of college teachers. Methods: detailed analysis of the existing successful online Teacher learning communities like the Wired for Learning and the online learning community established by Beijing Normal University. Conclusion: Traditional learning community took place in a specific physical environment, whose members and resources are limited by the physical environment. Online learning community can help solve many of the existing problems in traditional training and opened new possibilities for occupational training

  18. [Training -- competency-based education -- learning theory and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Georg

    2013-11-01

    A lifelong learning process is necessarily the basis for the specialization and expertise in the field of anesthesiology. Thus competency as a physician is a complex, multidimensional construction of knowledge, skills and attitudes to be able to solve and persist the complex daily work challenges in a flexible and responsible way. Experts therefore showflexible and intuitive capabilities in pursuing their profession. Accordingly modern competency based learning objectives are very helpful. The DGAI Commission for “Further Education” already thought ahead in defining a competencybased curriculum for the specialization in the field of anesthesiology and could be integrated into the frameworks of the German Medical Association. In addition to the curricular framework elements of assessment are necessary. A single oral exam is consequently not representative for different levels of competencies. However, there is beside the responsibility of the learners for their learning processalso a high obligation of the clinical teachers to attend the learning process and to ensure a positive learning atmosphere with scope for feedback. Some competencies potentially could be better learned in a “sheltered” room based on simulation outside the OR, for example to train rare incidents or emergency procedures. In general there should be ongoing effort to enhance the process of expertise development, also in context of patient safety and quality management.

  19. Supervisor’s Role as an Antecedent of Training Transfer and Motivation to Learn in Training Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriawati Sabhi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Training and development program literature highlights two major characteristics of supervisor’s role: support and communication. The ability of supervisors to provide adequate support and practice good communication style in relation to training programs may lead to increased training transfer and motivation to learn. Though the nature of this relationship is significant, little is known about the predictive properties of supervisor’s roles in training program literatures. Therefore, this study was conducted to measure the effect of supervisor’s role on training transfer and motivation to learn using 110 usable questionnaires gathered from employees who have attended training programs in a state public work agency in East Malaysia, Malaysia. The results of exploratory factor analysis confirmed that the measurement scales used in this study satisfactorily met the acceptable standards of validity and reliability analyses. Further, the outcomes of stepwise regression analysis showed four important findings: first, support insignificantly correlated with motivation to learn. Second, communication significantly correlated with motivation to learn. Third, support significantly correlated with transfer of training. Finally, communication significantly correlated with transfer of learning. Statistically, this result confirms that support is an important antecedent of motivation to learn and communication is an important antecedent of motivation to learn. Conversely, support and communication are important antecedents of training transfer in the studied organization. In addition, discussion, implications and conclusion are elaborated.

  20. Robust spike-train learning in spike-event based weight update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sumit Bam; Song, Qing

    2017-09-12

    Supervised learning algorithms in a spiking neural network either learn a spike-train pattern for a single neuron receiving input spike-train from multiple input synapses or learn to output the first spike time in a feedforward network setting. In this paper, we build upon spike-event based weight update strategy to learn continuous spike-train in a spiking neural network with a hidden layer using a dead zone on-off based adaptive learning rate rule which ensures convergence of the learning process in the sense of weight convergence and robustness of the learning process to external disturbances. Based on different benchmark problems, we compare this new method with other relevant spike-train learning algorithms. The results show that the speed of learning is much improved and the rate of successful learning is also greatly improved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Efficient generation of image chips for training deep learning algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sanghui; Fafard, Alex; Kerekes, John; Gartley, Michael; Ientilucci, Emmett; Savakis, Andreas; Law, Charles; Parhan, Jason; Turek, Matt; Fieldhouse, Keith; Rovito, Todd

    2017-05-01

    Training deep convolutional networks for satellite or aerial image analysis often requires a large amount of training data. For a more robust algorithm, training data need to have variations not only in the background and target, but also radiometric variations in the image such as shadowing, illumination changes, atmospheric conditions, and imaging platforms with different collection geometry. Data augmentation is a commonly used approach to generating additional training data. However, this approach is often insufficient in accounting for real world changes in lighting, location or viewpoint outside of the collection geometry. Alternatively, image simulation can be an efficient way to augment training data that incorporates all these variations, such as changing backgrounds, that may be encountered in real data. The Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Image Generation (DIRSIG) model is a tool that produces synthetic imagery using a suite of physics-based radiation propagation modules. DIRSIG can simulate images taken from different sensors with variation in collection geometry, spectral response, solar elevation and angle, atmospheric models, target, and background. Simulation of Urban Mobility (SUMO) is a multi-modal traffic simulation tool that explicitly models vehicles that move through a given road network. The output of the SUMO model was incorporated into DIRSIG to generate scenes with moving vehicles. The same approach was used when using helicopters as targets, but with slight modifications. Using the combination of DIRSIG and SUMO, we quickly generated many small images, with the target at the center with different backgrounds. The simulations generated images with vehicles and helicopters as targets, and corresponding images without targets. Using parallel computing, 120,000 training images were generated in about an hour. Some preliminary results show an improvement in the deep learning algorithm when real image training data are augmented with

  2. Multisensory Training can Promote or Impede Visual Perceptual Learning of Speech Stimuli: Visual-Tactile versus Visual-Auditory Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio P Eberhardt

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In a series of studies we have been investigating how multisensory training affects unisensory perceptual learning with speech stimuli. Previously, we reported that Aaudiovisual training with speech stimuli can promote auditory-only perceptual learning in normal-hearing adults but can impede learning in congenitally deaf adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training. In Experiment 1, visual-only (VO training on paired associations between CVCVC nonsense word videos and nonsense pictures demonstrated that VO words could be learned to a high level of accuracy even by poor lipreaders. In Experiment 2, visual-auditory (VA training in the same paradigm but with the addition of synchronous vocoded acoustic speech impeded VO learning of the stimuli in the paired-associates paradigm. In Experiment 3, the vocoded auditory-only (AO stimuli were shown to be less informative than the VO speech. Experiment 4 combined vibrotactile speech stimuli with the visual stimuli during training. Vibrotactile stimuli were shown to promote visual perceptual learning in participants whose training scores were similar. In Experiment 5, no-training controls were used to show that training with visual speech carried over to consonant identification of untrained CVCVC stimuli but not to lipreading words in sentences. Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training. Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1 Stimuli presented to the trainee’s primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2 Stimuli presented to the trainee’s lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway. The mechanisms supporting these principles are discussed in light of multisensory reverse hierarchy theory.

  3. Complexity, Training Paradigm Design, and the Contribution of Memory Subsystems to Grammar Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, Mark; Ettlinger, Marc; Wong, Patrick C M

    2016-01-01

    Although there is variability in nonnative grammar learning outcomes, the contributions of training paradigm design and memory subsystems are not well understood. To examine this, we presented learners with an artificial grammar that formed words via simple and complex morphophonological rules. Across three experiments, we manipulated training paradigm design and measured subjects' declarative, procedural, and working memory subsystems. Experiment 1 demonstrated that passive, exposure-based training boosted learning of both simple and complex grammatical rules, relative to no training. Additionally, procedural memory correlated with simple rule learning, whereas declarative memory correlated with complex rule learning. Experiment 2 showed that presenting corrective feedback during the test phase did not improve learning. Experiment 3 revealed that structuring the order of training so that subjects are first exposed to the simple rule and then the complex improved learning. The cumulative findings shed light on the contributions of grammatical complexity, training paradigm design, and domain-general memory subsystems in determining grammar learning success.

  4. Blogs, Webinars and Significant Learning: A Case Report on a Teacher Training Program for College Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco-Bueno, Rodrigo

    2013-01-01

    This case study reports on a teacher training experience for college professors in which participants were trained, taking advantage of technological tools, in two main teaching competences. First, professors were trained to use technology to enrich students' learning outcomes. Second, they applied strategies of significant learning in the design…

  5. Supervisor’s Role as an Antecedent of Training Transfer and Motivation to Learn in Training Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Suriawati Sabhi; Ahmad Zaidi Sulaiman; Hasan Al Banna Mohamed; Azman Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Training and development program literature highlights two major characteristics of supervisor’s role: support and communication. The ability of supervisors to provide adequate support and practice good communication style in relation to training programs may lead to increased training transfer and motivation to learn. Though the nature of this relationship is significant, little is known about the predictive properties of supervisor’s roles in training program literatures. Therefore, this st...

  6. A reinforcement learning approach to gait training improves retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Christopher J; Manczurowsky, Julia; Yen, Sheng-Che

    2015-01-01

    Many gait training programs are based on supervised learning principles: an individual is guided towards a desired gait pattern with directional error feedback. While this results in rapid adaptation, improvements quickly disappear. This study tested the hypothesis that a reinforcement learning approach improves retention and transfer of a new gait pattern. The results of a pilot study and larger experiment are presented. Healthy subjects were randomly assigned to either a supervised group, who received explicit instructions and directional error feedback while they learned a new gait pattern on a treadmill, or a reinforcement group, who was only shown whether they were close to or far from the desired gait. Subjects practiced for 10 min, followed by immediate and overnight retention and over-ground transfer tests. The pilot study showed that subjects could learn a new gait pattern under a reinforcement learning paradigm. The larger experiment, which had twice as many subjects (16 in each group) showed that the reinforcement group had better overnight retention than the supervised group (a 32% vs. 120% error increase, respectively), but there were no differences for over-ground transfer. These results suggest that encouraging participants to find rewarding actions through self-guided exploration is beneficial for retention.

  7. Earth Observation Training and Education with ESA LearnEO!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, Valborg; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Dobson, Malcolm; Rosmorduc, Vinca; Del Frate, Fabio; Banks, Chris; Picchiani, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    For society to benefit fully from its investment in Earth observation, EO data must be accessible and familiar to a global community of users who have the skills, knowledge and understanding to use the observations appropriately in their work. Achieving this requires considerable education effort. LearnEO! (www.learn-eo.org) is a new ESA education project that contributes towards making this a reality. LearnEO! has two main aims: to develop new training resources that use data from sensors on ESA satellites to explore a variety of environmental topics, and to stimulate and support members of the EO and education communities who may be willing to develop and share new education resources in the future. The project builds on the UNESCO Bilko project, which currently supplies free software, tutorials, and example data to users in 175 countries. Most of these users are in academic education or research, but the training resources are also of interest to a growing number of professionals in government, NGOs and private enterprise. Typical users are not remote sensing experts, but see satellite data as one of many observational tools. They want an easy, low-cost means to process, display and analyse data from different satellite sensors as part of their work in environmental research, monitoring and policy development. Many of the software improvements and training materials developed in LearnEO! are in response to requests from this user community. The LearnEO! tutorial and peer-reviewed lessons are designed to teach satellite data processing and analysis skills at different levels, from beginner to advanced - where advanced lessons requires some previous experience with Earth observation techniques. The materials are aimed at students and professionals in various branches of Earth sciences who have not yet specialised in specific EO technologies. The lessons are suitable for self-study, university courses at undergraduate to MSc level, or for continued professional

  8. Preferred Learning Styles of Professional Undergraduate and Graduate Athletic Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Sarah; Hansen, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recognizing the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students will equip educators to more effectively improve their teaching methods and optimize student learning. Objective: To determine the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students…

  9. Preferred Learning Styles of Professional Undergraduate and Graduate Athletic Training Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Sarah; Hansen, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Context: Recognizing the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students will equip educators to more effectively improve their teaching methods and optimize student learning. Objective: To determine the preferred learning style of professional undergraduate and graduate athletic training students…

  10. Multisensory training can promote or impede visual perceptual learning of speech stimuli: visual-tactile vs. visual-auditory training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Silvio P; Auer, Edward T; Bernstein, Lynne E

    2014-01-01

    In a series of studies we have been investigating how multisensory training affects unisensory perceptual learning with speech stimuli. Previously, we reported that audiovisual (AV) training with speech stimuli can promote auditory-only (AO) perceptual learning in normal-hearing adults but can impede learning in congenitally deaf adults with late-acquired cochlear implants. Here, impeder and promoter effects were sought in normal-hearing adults who participated in lipreading training. In Experiment 1, visual-only (VO) training on paired associations between CVCVC nonsense word videos and nonsense pictures demonstrated that VO words could be learned to a high level of accuracy even by poor lipreaders. In Experiment 2, visual-auditory (VA) training in the same paradigm but with the addition of synchronous vocoded acoustic speech impeded VO learning of the stimuli in the paired-associates paradigm. In Experiment 3, the vocoded AO stimuli were shown to be less informative than the VO speech. Experiment 4 combined vibrotactile speech stimuli with the visual stimuli during training. Vibrotactile stimuli were shown to promote visual perceptual learning. In Experiment 5, no-training controls were used to show that training with visual speech carried over to consonant identification of untrained CVCVC stimuli but not to lipreading words in sentences. Across this and previous studies, multisensory training effects depended on the functional relationship between pathways engaged during training. Two principles are proposed to account for stimulus effects: (1) Stimuli presented to the trainee's primary perceptual pathway will impede learning by a lower-rank pathway. (2) Stimuli presented to the trainee's lower rank perceptual pathway will promote learning by a higher-rank pathway. The mechanisms supporting these principles are discussed in light of multisensory reverse hierarchy theory (RHT).

  11. 'Real life' clinical learning on an interprofessional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeth, D; Reeves, S; Goreham, C; Parker, P; Haynes, S; Pearson, S

    2001-07-01

    This paper describes the multi-method evaluation of an interprofessional training ward placement for medical, nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students. Unique in the UK, and an extension of pioneering work in Sweden (Wahlström et al. 1997, Wahlstroöm & Sandén 1998), this interprofessional clinical placement allowed senior pre-qualifying students, under the supervision of practitioners, to plan and deliver interprofessional care for a group of orthopaedic and rheumatology patients. This responsibility enabled students to develop both their profession-specific skills in a real-world setting and the quality of their interprofessional teamwork. Student teams were supported by facilitators who led reflective sessions and acted as a resource for the students' problem-based learning. The training ward was evaluated by a multi-method approach, incorporating interviews, observations and questionnaires with students, patients and clinical staff. The evaluation findings have been grouped into a number of themes which offer an insight into the varying perspectives of training ward students, patients and staff. This paper pays particular attention to the nursing perspective of the interprofessional training ward pilot.

  12. Enhanced learning of proportional math through music training and spatial-temporal training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, A B; Peterson, M; Shaw, G L

    1999-03-01

    It was predicted, based on a mathematical model of the cortex, that early music training would enhance spatial-temporal reasoning. We have demonstrated that preschool children given six months of piano keyboard lessons improved dramatically on spatial-temporal reasoning while children in appropriate control groups did not improve. It was then predicted that the enhanced spatial-temporal reasoning from piano keyboard training could lead to enhanced learning of specific math concepts, in particular proportional math, which is notoriously difficult to teach using the usual language-analytic methods. We report here the development of Spatial-Temporal Math Video Game software designed to teach fractions and proportional math, and its strikingly successful use in a study involving 237 second-grade children (age range six years eight months-eight years five months). Furthermore, as predicted, children given piano keyboard training along with the Math Video Game training scored significantly higher on proportional math and fractions than children given a control training along with the Math Video Game. These results were readily measured using the companion Math Video Game Evaluation Program. The training time necessary for children on the Math Video Game is very short, and they rapidly reach a high level of performance. This suggests that, as predicted, we are tapping into fundamental cortical processes of spatial-temporal reasoning. This spatial-temporal approach is easily generalized to teach other math and science concepts in a complementary manner to traditional language-analytic methods, and at a younger age. The neural mechanisms involved in thinking through fractions and proportional math during training with the Math Video Game might be investigated in EEG coherence studies along with priming by specific music.

  13. Designing Empathetic Animated Agents for a B-Learning Training Environment within the Electrical Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Yasmin; Pérez-Ramírez, Miguel; Zatarain-Cabada, Ramon; Barrón-Estrada, Lucia; Alor-Hernández, Giner

    2016-01-01

    Electrical tests involve high risk; therefore utility companies require highly qualified electricians and efficient training. Recently, training for electrical tests has been supported by virtual reality systems; nonetheless, these training systems are not yet adaptive. We propose a b-learning model to support adaptive and distance training. The…

  14. How Organisations Are Using Blended E-Learning to Deliver More Flexible Approaches to Trade Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Victor James; Johnston, Margaret Alison; Poulsen, Alison Louise

    2015-01-01

    Training organisations are being asked to respond to the growing levels of diversity around the contexts for training and to examine a wider range of training solutions than in the past. This research investigates how training organisations in Australia are using blended forms of e-learning to provide more responsive, flexible and innovative…

  15. One step at a time: how to toilet train children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, June

    Toilet training children with learning disabilities can present challenges and requires careful assessmentand management. This article examines strategies for toilet training using a five step approach bladder and bowel control.

  16. Attitudes to Formal Business Training and Learning amongst Entrepreneurs in the Cultural Industries: Situated Business Learning through "Doing with Others."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffo, Carlo; O'Connor, Justin; Lovatt, Andy; Banks, Mark

    2000-01-01

    Presents arguments supporting a social model of learning linked to situated learning and cultural capital. Critiques training methods used in cultural industries (arts, publishing, broadcasting, design, fashion, restaurants). Uses case study evidence to demonstrates inadequacies of formal training in this sector. (Contains 49 references.) (SK)

  17. Learning Microsoft Excel 2011 for Mac video training DVD

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Guy

    2011-01-01

    In this video tutorial for Microsoft Excel 2011 For Mac, expert author Guy Vaccaro teaches you to effectively utilize the features and functions of Excel through project based learning. You will complete various projects, and along they way learn to leverage the power of the most important features Excel 2011 has to offer the Mac user. Starting your training course with the creation of a spreadsheet to record and monitor sales data, you will learn the basics of what you can do with a spreadsheet. You will then move on to creating a Profit and Loss report, learning formulas along the way. Moving to score sheets for a sports day, you will discover conditional based formatting, lookups, and more. You then create a functional expense claim form, advancing your Excel expertise. Moving on to a sales contact management sheet, you will discover how you can manipulate text, and even create mail merges from Excel. Finally, you will utilize all your knowledge thus far to create a sales report, including charts, pivot ta...

  18. Institutionalizing Blended Learning into Joint Training: A Case Study and Ten Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    mail.mil pbockelman@mesh.dsci.com ABSTRACT In 2011, the Joint Staff J7 (Joint Training) directorate initiated the Continuum of eLearning project in...Orlando, FL. 14. ABSTRACT In 2011, the Joint Staff J7 (Joint Training) directorate initiated the Continuum of eLearning project in order to integrate...dispersed organizations still poses significant challenges. The Joint Staff J7, Deputy Director for Joint Training initiated the Continuum of eLearning

  19. Collaborative Learning Processes in Teacher Training: Benefits and Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Aschermann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current pedagogical discussion emphasizes self-determined and cooperative forms of learning. The theoretical background stems from constructivist theories of learning, which interpret social exchange and reflecting on one’s learning pathway as crucial points for construction processes. Consequently, self-regulation turns into a central condition for scholarly learning. This includes setting goals, planning and conducting the learning process as well as the evaluation of results. This paper focusses on the processes secondary school teachers use to implement newly acquired knowledge on self-regulated learning in their lessons. By means of qualitative research methodology, we wanted to explore how experienced teachers develop their own abilities for self-determined learning while teaching their own pupils to do so. Method: In a transdisciplinary research-project between a secondary school and a university, a group of mathematic teachers participated in a two-day training course on self-regulated learning during which they discussed and developed ways to enhance self-regulation of learners. They were then tasked with implementing their newly acquired knowledge during their maths lessons (number of pupils = 270, 4 – 5 lessons per week with eighth graders in the course of a twelve week teaching period. Two separate groups of teachers were asked to put their newly acquired skills into practice. The first group (N = 6 used a collaborative setting in which tasks, teaching activities and performance reviews had been clarified and discussed within the group. The second group (N = 4 fulfilled these tasks individually without seeking assistance. The teaching strategies were assessed by means of multiple semi-structured interviews and observations of classroom activities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the teachers prior to the training and after 12 and 32 weeks respectively to explore their understanding of self-regulated learning

  20. Learning to rank image tags with limited training examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songhe Feng; Zheyun Feng; Rong Jin

    2015-04-01

    With an increasing number of images that are available in social media, image annotation has emerged as an important research topic due to its application in image matching and retrieval. Most studies cast image annotation into a multilabel classification problem. The main shortcoming of this approach is that it requires a large number of training images with clean and complete annotations in order to learn a reliable model for tag prediction. We address this limitation by developing a novel approach that combines the strength of tag ranking with the power of matrix recovery. Instead of having to make a binary decision for each tag, our approach ranks tags in the descending order of their relevance to the given image, significantly simplifying the problem. In addition, the proposed method aggregates the prediction models for different tags into a matrix, and casts tag ranking into a matrix recovery problem. It introduces the matrix trace norm to explicitly control the model complexity, so that a reliable prediction model can be learned for tag ranking even when the tag space is large and the number of training images is limited. Experiments on multiple well-known image data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework for tag ranking compared with the state-of-the-art approaches for image annotation and tag ranking.

  1. Development of a virtual learning environment for cardiorespiratory arrest training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anazilda Carvalho da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To develop a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE aiming at the training of nursing team workers and emergency vehicle drivers in Basic Life Support (BLS to attend Cardiorespiratory arrest, and to evaluate the quality of its contents among specialists in the area of Emergency and Urgent care. METHOD Applied research of technological development. The methodology used was based on the Instructional Design Model (ADDIE, which structures the teaching-learning planning in different stages (analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. The VLE was composed of texts elaborated from bibliographic research, links, edited video from a simulation scenario in the laboratory and questions to evaluate the fixation of the content, organized in modules. RESULTS After its development, it was evaluated as adequate to satisfy the needs of the target public, by eight expert judges, which was made available for electronic access. CONCLUSION The VLE has potential as a tool for training and qualification in BLS, as it can be easily integrated with other pedagogical approaches and strategies with active methodologies.

  2. Self-regulatory Behaviors and Approaches to Learning of Arts Students: A Comparison Between Professional Training and English Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Min-Chen; Chen, Chia-Cheng

    2016-11-17

    This study investigated the self-regulatory behaviors of arts students, namely memory strategy, goal-setting, self-evaluation, seeking assistance, environmental structuring, learning responsibility, and planning and organizing. We also explored approaches to learning, including deep approach (DA) and surface approach (SA), in a comparison between students' professional training and English learning. The participants consisted of 344 arts majors. The Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire and the Revised Learning Process Questionnaire were adopted to examine students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. The results show that a positive and significant correlation was found in students' self-regulatory behaviors between professional training and English learning. The results indicated that increases in using self-regulatory behaviors in professional training were associated with increases in applying self-regulatory behaviors in learning English. Seeking assistance, self-evaluation, and planning and organizing were significant predictors for learning English. In addition, arts students used the deep approach more often than the surface approach in both their professional training and English learning. A positive correlation was found in DA, whereas a negative correlation was shown in SA between students' self-regulatory behaviors and their approaches to learning. Students with high self-regulation adopted a deep approach, and they applied the surface approach less in professional training and English learning. In addition, a SEM model confirmed that DA had a positive influence; however, SA had a negative influence on self-regulatory behaviors.

  3. Dynamical and stationary properties of on-line learning from finite training sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peixun; Michael Wong, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The dynamical and stationary properties of on-line learning from finite training sets are analyzed by using the cavity method. For large input dimensions, we derive equations for the macroscopic parameters, namely, the student-teacher correlation, the student-student autocorrelation and the learning force fluctuation. This enables us to provide analytical solutions to Adaline learning as a benchmark. Theoretical predictions of training errors in transient and stationary states are obtained by a Monte Carlo sampling procedure. Generalization and training errors are found to agree with simulations. The physical origin of the critical learning rate is presented. Comparison with batch learning is discussed throughout the paper.

  4. Effective e-Training: Using a Course Management System and e-Learning Tools to Train Library Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Andrew; Teetor, Travis Stephen

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the University of Arizona Libraries implemented an online training program to effectively train Access Services staff and student employees at a large academic research library. This article discusses the program, which was built using a course management system (D2L) and various e-Learning software applications (Articulate…

  5. Understanding the Construction of Personal Learning Networks to Support Non-Formal Workplace Learning of Training Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Christin

    2013-01-01

    Workers in the 21st century workplace are faced with rapid and constant developments that place a heavy demand on them to continually learn beyond what the Human Resources and Training groups can meet. As a consequence, professionals must rely on non-formal learning approaches through the development of a personal learning network to keep…

  6. Effects of Learning Style and Training Method on Computer Attitude and Performance in World Wide Web Page Design Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Huey-Wen; Wang, Yu-Fang

    1999-01-01

    Compares the effects of two training methods on computer attitude and performance in a World Wide Web page design program in a field experiment with high school students in Taiwan. Discusses individual differences, Kolb's Experiential Learning Theory and Learning Style Inventory, Computer Attitude Scale, and results of statistical analyses.…

  7. Comparative Effect of Memory and Cognitive Strategies Training on EFL Intermediate Learners' Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banisaeid, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the effect of memory and cognitive strategies training on vocabulary learning of intermediate proficiency group of Iranian learners of English as a foreign language. It is to check how memory and cognitive strategies training affect word learning of EFL intermediate learners (N = 60) who were homogenized…

  8. Effects of Social Metacognitive Training for Enhancing Overt Behavior in Learning Disabled and Low Achieving Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Katherine A.; Gerber, Michael M.

    1987-01-01

    Learning disabled (n=34) and low-achieving (n=34) incarcerated delinquents (16-19 years) were assigned to social metacognitive training, attention control, or test-only control groups. Those given metacognitive training improved in rehabilitation achievement and other areas of social adjustment, with a greater proportion of the learning disabled…

  9. Online Problem-Based and Enquiry-Based Learning in the Training of Educational Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Nick; Williams, Huw

    2011-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, problem-based learning (PBL) and enquiry-based learning (EBL) approaches have been used in a variety of professional training courses. More recently online versions of these pedagogies have been developed. This paper explains how online PBL and EBL activities have been incorporated into the professional training of…

  10. Auditory Perceptual Learning for Speech Perception Can be Enhanced by Audiovisual Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Lynne E.; Auer, Edward T.; Eberhardt, Silvio P.; Jiang, Jintao

    2013-01-01

    Speech perception under audiovisual (AV) conditions is well known to confer benefits to perception such as increased speed and accuracy. Here, we investigated how AV training might benefit or impede auditory perceptual learning of speech degraded by vocoding. In Experiments 1 and 3, participants learned paired associations between vocoded spoken nonsense words and nonsense pictures. In Experiment 1, paired-associates (PA) AV training of one group of participants was compared with audio-only (AO) training of another group. When tested under AO conditions, the AV-trained group was significantly more accurate than the AO-trained group. In addition, pre- and post-training AO forced-choice consonant identification with untrained nonsense words showed that AV-trained participants had learned significantly more than AO participants. The pattern of results pointed to their having learned at the level of the auditory phonetic features of the vocoded stimuli. Experiment 2, a no-training control with testing and re-testing on the AO consonant identification, showed that the controls were as accurate as the AO-trained participants in Experiment 1 but less accurate than the AV-trained participants. In Experiment 3, PA training alternated AV and AO conditions on a list-by-list basis within participants, and training was to criterion (92% correct). PA training with AO stimuli was reliably more effective than training with AV stimuli. We explain these discrepant results in terms of the so-called “reverse hierarchy theory” of perceptual learning and in terms of the diverse multisensory and unisensory processing resources available to speech perception. We propose that early AV speech integration can potentially impede auditory perceptual learning; but visual top-down access to relevant auditory features can promote auditory perceptual learning. PMID:23515520

  11. Problem-based learning and teacher training in mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Cazzola, Marina

    2008-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a constructivist learner-centered instructional approach based on the analysis, resolution and discussion of a given problem. It can be applied to any subject, indeed it is especially useful for the teaching of mathematics. When compared to ``traditional'' teaching, the PBL approach requires increased responsibility for the teachers (in addition to the presentation of mathematical knowledge, they need to engage students in gathering information and using their knowledge to solve given problems). It thus become crucial that the future teachers become aware of its effectiveness. One of the main obstacle to this awareness lies usually on the fact that future teachers did not find this methodology in their own pre-service training. In this paper we will describe the attempt to introduce PBL in University courses so to have future maths teacher ``experience mathematics'' themselves.

  12. Supervisor's role in training programs as a manager of learning program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the training literature, a supervisor's role in training programs has two major elements: supervisor support and supervisor communication. The ability of supervisors to play effective roles in training programs may increase employees' motivation to learn. The nature of this relationship is interesting, but the role of supervisor's role as a predicting variable is less emphasized in a training program models. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the effect of supervisor's role in training programs on motivation to learn using 152 usable questionnaires gathered from non-academic employees who have worked in a technological based public university, Malaysia. The outcomes of stepwise regression analysis showed that the supervisor support and supervisor communication significantly associated with motivation to learn. Statistically, this result demonstrates that supervisor's role in training programs does act as an important predictor of motivation to learn in the organizational sample. In addition, discussion, implication and conclusion are elaborated.

  13. Fast Brain Plasticity during Word Learning in Musically-Trained Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittinger, Eva; Chobert, Julie; Ziegler, Johannes C; Besson, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    Children learn new words every day and this ability requires auditory perception, phoneme discrimination, attention, associative learning and semantic memory. Based on previous results showing that some of these functions are enhanced by music training, we investigated learning of novel words through picture-word associations in musically-trained and control children (8-12 year-old) to determine whether music training would positively influence word learning. Results showed that musically-trained children outperformed controls in a learning paradigm that included picture-sound matching and semantic associations. Moreover, the differences between unexpected and expected learned words, as reflected by the N200 and N400 effects, were larger in children with music training compared to controls after only 3 min of learning the meaning of novel words. In line with previous results in adults, these findings clearly demonstrate a correlation between music training and better word learning. It is argued that these benefits reflect both bottom-up and top-down influences. The present learning paradigm might provide a useful dynamic diagnostic tool to determine which perceptive and cognitive functions are impaired in children with learning difficulties.

  14. Fast Brain Plasticity during Word Learning in Musically-Trained Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Dittinger

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Children learn new words every day and this ability requires auditory perception, phoneme discrimination, attention, associative learning and semantic memory. Based on previous results showing that some of these functions are enhanced by music training, we investigated learning of novel words through picture-word associations in musically-trained and control children (8–12 year-old to determine whether music training would positively influence word learning. Results showed that musically-trained children outperformed controls in a learning paradigm that included picture-sound matching and semantic associations. Moreover, the differences between unexpected and expected learned words, as reflected by the N200 and N400 effects, were larger in children with music training compared to controls after only 3 min of learning the meaning of novel words. In line with previous results in adults, these findings clearly demonstrate a correlation between music training and better word learning. It is argued that these benefits reflect both bottom-up and top-down influences. The present learning paradigm might provide a useful dynamic diagnostic tool to determine which perceptive and cognitive functions are impaired in children with learning difficulties.

  15. Fast Brain Plasticity during Word Learning in Musically-Trained Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittinger, Eva; Chobert, Julie; Ziegler, Johannes C.; Besson, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    Children learn new words every day and this ability requires auditory perception, phoneme discrimination, attention, associative learning and semantic memory. Based on previous results showing that some of these functions are enhanced by music training, we investigated learning of novel words through picture-word associations in musically-trained and control children (8–12 year-old) to determine whether music training would positively influence word learning. Results showed that musically-trained children outperformed controls in a learning paradigm that included picture-sound matching and semantic associations. Moreover, the differences between unexpected and expected learned words, as reflected by the N200 and N400 effects, were larger in children with music training compared to controls after only 3 min of learning the meaning of novel words. In line with previous results in adults, these findings clearly demonstrate a correlation between music training and better word learning. It is argued that these benefits reflect both bottom-up and top-down influences. The present learning paradigm might provide a useful dynamic diagnostic tool to determine which perceptive and cognitive functions are impaired in children with learning difficulties. PMID:28553213

  16. Incremental concept learning with few training examples and hierarchical classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Henri; Eendebak, Pieter T.; Schutte, Klamer; Azzopardi, George; Burghouts, Gertjan J.

    2015-10-01

    Object recognition and localization are important to automatically interpret video and allow better querying on its content. We propose a method for object localization that learns incrementally and addresses four key aspects. Firstly, we show that for certain applications, recognition is feasible with only a few training samples. Secondly, we show that novel objects can be added incrementally without retraining existing objects, which is important for fast interaction. Thirdly, we show that an unbalanced number of positive training samples leads to biased classifier scores that can be corrected by modifying weights. Fourthly, we show that the detector performance can deteriorate due to hard-negative mining for similar or closely related classes (e.g., for Barbie and dress, because the doll is wearing a dress). This can be solved by our hierarchical classification. We introduce a new dataset, which we call TOSO, and use it to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method for the localization and recognition of multiple objects in images.

  17. The Effects of EEG Biofeedback Training on Hyperactive and/or Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, Steve

    The literature review presents an explanation of biofeedback and a critical evaluation of the research pertaining to electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback training for the hyperactive and/or learning disabled child. Three hypotheses are examined: whether EEG biofeedback training is efficacious; whether EEG biofeedback training is more…

  18. The Effects of EEG Biofeedback Training on Hyperactive and/or Learning Disabled Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassel, Steve

    The literature review presents an explanation of biofeedback and a critical evaluation of the research pertaining to electroencephalographic (EEG) biofeedback training for the hyperactive and/or learning disabled child. Three hypotheses are examined: whether EEG biofeedback training is efficacious; whether EEG biofeedback training is more…

  19. Generalist Turned Trainer: Using Adult Learning Techniques for Top Ten Training Sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Kathleen

    1994-01-01

    Human resource professionals who find themselves charged with selecting and conducting employee training are advised to use adult learning theory to develop effective programs. Tips for facilitating adult training sessions, questions to address before designing a training program, and pointers for successful flip chart use are offered. (MSE)

  20. Learning, Behaviour and Reaction Framework: A Model for Training Raters to Improve Assessment Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chung-Yang; Chang, Huiju; Hsu, Wen-Chin; Sheen, Gwo-Ji

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a training model for raters, with the goal to improve the intra- and inter-consistency of evaluation quality for higher education curricula. The model, termed the learning, behaviour and reaction (LBR) circular training model, is an interdisciplinary application from the business and organisational training domain. The…

  1. Calibrating Building Energy Models Using Supercomputer Trained Machine Learning Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Edwards, Richard [ORNL; Parker, Lynne Edwards [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrofit purposes. EnergyPlus is the flagship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for different types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manually by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building energy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the Autotune research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the different kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of EnergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-effective calibration of building models.

  2. Science teacher's perception about science learning experiences as a foundation for teacher training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilouw, Marisa Christina; Firman, Harry; Redjeki, Sri; Chandra, Didi Teguh

    2017-05-01

    Teacher training is one form of continuous professional development. Before organizing teacher training (material, time frame), a survey about teacher's need has to be done. Science teacher's perception about science learning in the classroom, the most difficult learning model, difficulties of lesson plan would be a good input for teacher training program. This survey conducted in June 2016. About 23 science teacher filled in the questionnaire. The core of questions are training participation, the most difficult science subject matter, the most difficult learning model, the difficulties of making lesson plan, knowledge of integrated science and problem based learning. Mostly, experienced teacher participated training once a year. Science training is very important to enhance professional competency and to improve the way of teaching. The difficulties of subject matter depend on teacher's education background. The physics subject matter in class VIII and IX are difficult to teach for most respondent because of many formulas and abstract. Respondents found difficulties in making lesson plan, in term of choosing the right learning model for some subject matter. Based on the result, inquiry, cooperative, practice are frequently used in science class. Integrated science is understood as a mix between Biology, Physics and Chemistry concepts. On the other hand, respondents argue that problem based learning was difficult especially in finding contextual problem. All the questionnaire result can be used as an input for teacher training program in order to enhanced teacher's competency. Difficult concepts, integrated science, teaching plan, problem based learning can be shared in teacher training.

  3. E-learning on the job : training taking a more virtual approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, R.

    2008-07-15

    A growing number of companies are using web-based e-learning systems to train employees. The activities of 3 E-learning companies were described in this article, notably dominKnow Learning Systems, NGRAIN Corporation and Blatant Media. One of the greatest challenges facing the oilsands industry is to build a skilled labour force to operate massive upgraders. The benefit of the e-learning approach is that consistent information can be delivered to learners, with no variation in information. The training takes on many forms, either through online simulations or simply placing a manual online. In addition to saving time, e-learning familiarizes workers with specific pieces of equipment that would be much too expensive to purchase. Three-dimensional equipment simulations are also made available for training purposes. This article presented an online e-learning approach that has been used effectively for safety training and corporate governance. E-learning simplified the process compared to actual classroom training. It allowed staff to combine training time with regular work schedules. The online e-learning approach was shown to save companies many of hours in training time. 2 figs.

  4. The role of training structure in perceptual learning of accented speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Christina Y; Alexander, Jessica E D; Sidaras, Sabrina K; Nygaard, Lynne C

    2016-11-01

    Foreign-accented speech contains multiple sources of variation that listeners learn to accommodate. Extending previous findings showing that exposure to high-variation training facilitates perceptual learning of accented speech, the current study examines to what extent the structure of training materials affects learning. During training, native adult speakers of American English transcribed sentences spoken in English by native Spanish-speaking adults. In Experiment 1, training stimuli were blocked by speaker, sentence, or randomized with respect to speaker and sentence (Variable training). At test, listeners transcribed novel English sentences produced by unfamiliar Spanish-accented speakers. Listeners' transcription accuracy was highest in the Variable condition, suggesting that varying both speaker identity and sentence across training trials enabled listeners to generalize their learning to novel speakers and linguistic content. Experiment 2 assessed the extent to which ordering of training tokens by a single factor, speaker intelligibility, would facilitate speaker-independent accent learning, finding that listeners' test performance did not reliably differ from that in the no-training control condition. Overall, these results suggest that the structure of training exposure, specifically trial-to-trial variation on both speaker's voice and linguistic content, facilitates learning of the systematic properties of accented speech. The current findings suggest a crucial role of training structure in optimizing perceptual learning. Beyond characterizing the types of variation listeners encode in their representations of spoken utterances, theories of spoken language processing should incorporate the role of training structure in learning lawful variation in speech. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Training of Teachers in Strategies that Develop Independent Learning Skills in Their Pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, L; Perlberg, A.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of independent learning are explored in an attempt to identify some salient components of independent learning. Training teachers in this strategy should facilitate a favorable pupil attitude toward learning and thought processes such as fluency, divergency, analysis, synthesis, etc., which are considered important educational…

  6. Integrating Web 2.0-Based Informal Learning with Workplace Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Kemp, Linzi J.

    2012-01-01

    Informal learning takes place in the workplace through connection and collaboration mediated by Web 2.0 applications. However, little research has yet been published that explores informal learning and how to integrate it with workplace training. We aim to address this research gap by developing a conceptual Web 2.0-based workplace learning and…

  7. Does a Strategy Training Foster Students' Ability to Learn from Multimedia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiter, Katharina; Schubert, Carina; Gerjets, Peter; Stalbovs, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Despite the general effectiveness of multimedia instruction, students do not always benefit from it. This study examined whether students' learning from multimedia can be improved by teaching them relevant learning strategies. On the basis of current theories and research on multimedia learning, the authors developed a strategy training for…

  8. Training in the laboratory animal science community: strategies to support adult learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Jackie; Stevens, James; Medina, Leticia V

    2007-01-01

    The essence of learning is change; learning is the process by which learners customize new information to make it personally meaningful and relevant. Training is the process of helping students make those changes. Research indicates that adults learn differently than children or adolescents and that adults consistently use the following six learning strategies: prior experiences; conversations; metacognition; reflection; authentic experiences; and images, pictures, or other types of visuals. Each of these learning strategies can be combined with the other strategies and often build upon each other. A recent study on how health care professionals learn indicated that the learning strategy they used most often was reflection, which supports learning before, during, and after training. Numerous examples are provided in this article describing how to integrate each of the six adult learning strategies into laboratory animal science training. While lectures and other types of direct instruction are appropriate, they are inadequate and ineffective unless they are integrated with and support adult learning strategies. Both the US Department of Agriculture regulations and the Public Health Service Policy mandate that research institutions must ensure that all personnel involved in animal care, treatment, or use are qualified to perform their duties. Applying adult learning strategies to training for the laboratory animal science community will enhance learning and improve both the science and the humane care of the animals, which is a goal our community must continuously strive to achieve.

  9. Integrating Web 2.0-Based Informal Learning with Workplace Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fang; Kemp, Linzi J.

    2012-01-01

    Informal learning takes place in the workplace through connection and collaboration mediated by Web 2.0 applications. However, little research has yet been published that explores informal learning and how to integrate it with workplace training. We aim to address this research gap by developing a conceptual Web 2.0-based workplace learning and…

  10. The Distance Learning Mode of Training Teachers in Kenya: Challenges, Prospects, and Suggested Policy Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritim, Ezra K.

    2009-01-01

    Globally, distance learning has gained legitimacy as an effective mode for learning and training. This legitimacy has occurred as a result of, "inter alia", its flexibility with respect to time, pace and entry requirements, affordability, cost-effectiveness, and reputation for high quality. In Kenya, distance learning--although…

  11. Adoption of Learning Designs in Teacher Training and Medical Education: Templates versus Embedded Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, James; Dalziel, Bronwen

    2012-01-01

    One of the ongoing challenges in the field of Learning Design is how to most effectively support educators in the development of innovative e-learning through the adoption and adaptation of learning design templates. This paper reflects on experiences from two recent higher education projects in teacher training and medical education, and…

  12. Effects of a Word-Learning Training on Children With Cochlear Implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children with hearing loss who use cochlear implants demonstrate vocabulary delays when compared to their peers without hearing loss. These delays may be a result of deficient word-learning abilities; children with cochlear implants perform more poorly on rapid word-learning tasks than children with normal hearing. This study explored the malleability of rapid word learning of preschoolers with cochlear implants by evaluating the effects of a word-learning training on rapid word learning. A single-subject, multiple probe design across participants measured the impact of the training on children’s rapid word-learning performance. Participants included 5 preschool children with cochlear implants who had an expressive lexicon of less than 150 words. An investigator guided children to identify, repeat, and learn about unknown sets of words in 2-weekly sessions across 10 weeks. The probe measure, a rapid word-learning task with a different set of words than those taught during training, was collected in the baseline, training, and maintenance conditions. All participants improved their receptive rapid word-learning performance in the training condition. The functional relation indicates that the receptive rapid word-learning performance of children with cochlear implants is malleable. PMID:23981321

  13. An E-Learning Module for Clinical Skills Training In Undergraduate Medical Education

    OpenAIRE

    Gürpınar, Erol; Alimoğlu, M. Kemal; KULAÇ, Esin; Nacar, Melis; Budakoğlu, Işıl İrem; KARAOĞLU, Nazan; Yılmaz, Nilüfer Demiral; Öncü, Selcen; Taşkıran, Cahit; Çalışkan, Ayhan; GÖNÜLLÜ, İpek; Onan, Arif; Mamaklı, Sümer

    2012-01-01

    Eighty three medical education programs are offered in our country. Department of Medical Education exists in 33 medical schools. Forty-seven medical schools have Clinical Skills Training Laboratory. Mastery learning is targeted in Clinical Skills Training Laboratory which means that each student achieve required mastery level at completion of training. However students may loose their competence in time if they do not re-study or apply the skill immediately after training. The aim ...

  14. Effect of behavior training on learning and memory of young rats with fetal growth restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Xuelan; Gou Wenli; Huang Pu; Li Chunfang; Sun Yunping

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of behavior training on the learning and memory of young rats with fetal growth restriction (FGR). Methods: The model of FGR was established by passive smoking method to pregnant rats.The new-born rats were divided into FGR group and normal group, and then randomly subdivided into trained and untrained group respectively. Morris water maze behavior training was performed on postnatal months 2 and 4, then learning and memory abilities of young rats were measured by dark-avoidance testing and step-down testing. Results: In the dark-avoidance and step-down testing, the young rats' performance of FGR group was worse than that of control group, and the trained group was better than the untrained group significantly. Conclusion: FGR young rats have descended learning and memory abilities. Behavior training could improve the young rats' learning and memory abilities, especially for the FGR young rats.

  15. Improving workplace safety training using a self-directed CPR-AED learning program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Mary E; Cazzell, Mary; Kardong-Edgren, Suzan; Cason, Carolyn L

    2009-04-01

    Adequate training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and use of an automated external defibrillator (AED) is an important component of a workplace safety training program. Barriers to traditional in-classroom CPR-AED training programs include time away from work to complete training, logistics, learner discomfort over being in a classroom setting, and instructors who include information irrelevant to CPR. This study evaluated differences in CPR skills performance between employees who learned CPR using a self-directed learning (SDL) kit and employees who attended a traditional instructor-led course. The results suggest that the SDL kit yields learning outcomes comparable to those obtained with traditional instructor-led courses and is a more time-efficient tool for CPR-AED training. Furthermore, the SDL kit overcomes many of the barriers that keep individuals from learning CPR and appears to contribute to bystanders' confidently attempting resuscitation.

  16. Statistical learning and auditory processing in children with music training: An ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandikal Vasuki, Pragati Rao; Sharma, Mridula; Ibrahim, Ronny; Arciuli, Joanne

    2017-07-01

    The question whether musical training is associated with enhanced auditory and cognitive abilities in children is of considerable interest. In the present study, we compared children with music training versus those without music training across a range of auditory and cognitive measures, including the ability to detect implicitly statistical regularities in input (statistical learning). Statistical learning of regularities embedded in auditory and visual stimuli was measured in musically trained and age-matched untrained children between the ages of 9-11years. In addition to collecting behavioural measures, we recorded electrophysiological measures to obtain an online measure of segmentation during the statistical learning tasks. Musically trained children showed better performance on melody discrimination, rhythm discrimination, frequency discrimination, and auditory statistical learning. Furthermore, grand-averaged ERPs showed that triplet onset (initial stimulus) elicited larger responses in the musically trained children during both auditory and visual statistical learning tasks. In addition, children's music skills were associated with performance on auditory and visual behavioural statistical learning tasks. Our data suggests that individual differences in musical skills are associated with children's ability to detect regularities. The ERP data suggest that musical training is associated with better encoding of both auditory and visual stimuli. Although causality must be explored in further research, these results may have implications for developing music-based remediation strategies for children with learning impairments. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Supervised Learning of Logical Operations in Layered Spiking Neural Networks with Spike Train Encoding

    CERN Document Server

    Grüning, André

    2011-01-01

    Few algorithms for supervised training of spiking neural networks exist that can deal with patterns of multiple spikes, and their computational properties are largely unexplored. We demonstrate in a set of simulations that the ReSuMe learning algorithm can be successfully applied to layered neural networks. Input and output patterns are encoded as spike trains of multiple precisely timed spikes, and the network learns to transform the input trains into target output trains. This is done by combining the ReSuMe learning algorithm with multiplicative scaling of the connections of downstream neurons. We show in particular that layered networks with one hidden layer can learn the basic logical operations, including Exclusive-Or, while networks without hidden layer cannot, mirroring an analogous result for layered networks of rate neurons. While supervised learning in spiking neural networks is not yet fit for technical purposes, exploring computational properties of spiking neural networks advances our understand...

  18. Training versus Education: eLearning, Hybrid, and Face-to-Face Modalities - a Participatory Debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Blair

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Is training education or is education training? Universities and organizations treat training and education synonymously, but it is worth exploring the differences. Universities are scrambling to standardize a preferred delivery method of education and training. With the blended modalities of eLearning, face-to-face, and hybrid learning, the educational delivery seems to be equalizing. The disruptive shift with technology in education or training is complicated by the expectations of our millennial, Gen Y, and Gen Z students. As an added pressure at the university level, even more importantly, the expectation of the administration and the accrediting bodies keep changing the 'play book' on requirements. Given the ever changing complexities of today's paradigm-shift in education and learning, we explored the complexities of navigating the delivery methods to achieve educational goals in higher education or training goals in corporate America.

  19. Vernier perceptual learning transfers to completely untrained retinal locations after double training: a "piggybacking" effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Jun-Yun; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M; Yu, Cong

    2014-11-14

    Perceptual learning, a process in which training improves visual discrimination, is often specific to the trained retinal location, and this location specificity is frequently regarded as an indication of neural plasticity in the retinotopic visual cortex. However, our previous studies have shown that "double training" enables location-specific perceptual learning, such as Vernier learning, to completely transfer to a new location where an irrelevant task is practiced. Here we show that Vernier learning can be actuated by less location-specific orientation or motion-direction learning to transfer to completely untrained retinal locations. This "piggybacking" effect occurs even if both tasks are trained at the same retinal location. However, piggybacking does not occur when the Vernier task is paired with a more location-specific contrast-discrimination task. This previously unknown complexity challenges the current understanding of perceptual learning and its specificity/transfer. Orientation and motion-direction learning, but not contrast and Vernier learning, appears to activate a global process that allows learning transfer to untrained locations. Moreover, when paired with orientation or motion-direction learning, Vernier learning may be "piggybacked" by the activated global process to transfer to other untrained retinal locations. How this task-specific global activation process is achieved is as yet unknown.

  20. Development of a virtual learning environment for cardiorespiratory arrest training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Anazilda Carvalho da; Bernardes, Andrea; Évora, Yolanda Dora Martinez; Dalri, Maria Célia Barcellos; Silva, Alexandre Ribeiro da; Sampaio, Camila Santana Justo Cintra

    2016-01-01

    To develop a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) aiming at the training of nursing team workers and emergency vehicle drivers in Basic Life Support (BLS) to attend Cardiorespiratory arrest, and to evaluate the quality of its contents among specialists in the area of Emergency and Urgent care. Applied research of technological development. The methodology used was based on the Instructional Design Model (ADDIE), which structures the teaching-learning planning in different stages (analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation). The VLE was composed of texts elaborated from bibliographic research, links, edited video from a simulation scenario in the laboratory and questions to evaluate the fixation of the content, organized in modules. After its development, it was evaluated as adequate to satisfy the needs of the target public, by eight expert judges, which was made available for electronic access. The VLE has potential as a tool for training and qualification in BLS, as it can be easily integrated with other pedagogical approaches and strategies with active methodologies. Desenvolver um Ambiente Virtual de Aprendizagem (AVA) visando à capacitação de trabalhadores da equipe de enfermagem e condutores de veículo de emergência em Suporte Básico de Vida (SBV) no atendimento à Parada Cardiorrespiratória, e avaliar a qualidade do seu conteúdo junto a especialistas na área de Urgência e Emergência. Pesquisa aplicada, de produção tecnológica. A metodologia utilizada foi baseada no Modelo de Design Instrucional (ADDIE), que estrutura o planejamento de ensino-aprendizagem em estágios distintos (analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation). O AVA foi composto por textos elaborados a partir de pesquisa bibliográfica, links, vídeo construído a partir de um cenário de simulação em laboratório e questões para avaliar a fixação do conteúdo, organizados em módulos. Após a sua construção, foi avaliado como adequado para

  1. Learning game for training child bicyclists' situation awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Esko; Sahlberg, Heidi; Rovamo, Emilia; Summala, Heikki

    2017-08-01

    Encouraging more children to bicycle would produce both environmental and health benefits, but bicycling accidents are a major source of injuries and fatalities among children. One reason for this may be children's less developed hazard perception skills. We assume that children's situation awareness could be trained with a computer based learning game, which should also improve their hazard perception skills. In this paper, we present a prototype for such a game and pilot it with 8-9year old children. The game consisted of videos filmed from a bicyclist's perspective. Using a touchscreen, the player's task was to point out targets early enough to gain points. The targets were either overt (other visible road users on a potentially conflicting course) or covert (occlusions, i.e. locations where other road users could suddenly emerge). If a target was missed or identified too late, the video was paused and feedback was given. The game was tested with 49 children from the 2nd grade of primary school (aged 8-9). 31 young adults (aged 22-34) played the game for comparison. The effect of the game on situation awareness was assessed with situation awareness tests in a crossover design. Similar videos were used in the tests as in the game, but instead of pointing out the targets while watching, the video was suddenly masked and participants were asked to locate all targets which had been present just before the masking, choosing among several possible locations. Their performance was analyzed using Signal Detection Theory and answer latencies. The game decreased answer latency and marginally changed response bias in a less conservative direction for both children and adults, but it did not significantly increase sensitivity for targets. Adults performed better in the tests and in the game, and it was possible to satisfactorily predict group membership based on the scores. Children found it especially difficult to find covert targets. Overall, the described version of the

  2. Learning to prescribe – pharmacists' experiences of supplementary prescribing training in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hutchinson Allen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of non-medical prescribing for professions such as pharmacy and nursing in recent years offers additional responsibilities and opportunities but attendant training issues. In the UK and in contrast to some international models, becoming a non-medical prescriber involves the completion of an accredited training course offered by many higher education institutions, where the skills and knowledge necessary for prescribing are learnt. Aims: to explore pharmacists' perceptions and experiences of learning to prescribe on supplementary prescribing (SP courses, particularly in relation to inter-professional learning, course content and subsequent use of prescribing in practice. Methods A postal questionnaire survey was sent to all 808 SP registered pharmacists in England in April 2007, exploring demographic, training, prescribing, safety culture and general perceptions of SP. Results After one follow-up, 411 (51% of pharmacists responded. 82% agreed SP training was useful, 58% agreed courses provided appropriate knowledge and 62% agreed that the necessary prescribing skills were gained. Clinical examination, consultation skills training and practical experience with doctors were valued highly; pharmacology training and some aspects of course delivery were criticised. Mixed views on inter-professional learning were reported – insights into other professions being valued but knowledge and skills differences considered problematic. 67% believed SP and recent independent prescribing (IP should be taught together, with more diagnostic training wanted; few pharmacists trained in IP, but many were training or intending to train. There was no association between pharmacists' attitudes towards prescribing training and when they undertook training between 2004 and 2007 but earlier cohorts were more likely to be using supplementary prescribing in practice. Conclusion Pharmacists appeared to value their SP training and

  3. The Influence of Autonomous Learning Training on College Students ’ Listening Proficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun

    2014-01-01

    Recently it is a focus to orientate students towards effective autonomous learning within the field of foreign language education at home and abroad. It aims to prove the effectiveness of autonomous learning training in stimulating students ’aware-ness of autonomous learning and improving the application of learning strategies, so as to promote their listening proficiency. Along with a training, a questionnaire, listening proficiency tests, through analyzing the data collected from the questionnaires and the tests, it reveals the experimental class’s listening proficiency is apparently better than that of the control class. 80% stu-dents with different listening levels from the experimental class achieve progress to some degree. Autonomous learning training enables students to promote their listening proficiency as well as the awareness of autonomous learning.

  4. Assessing 3D Virtual World Disaster Training Through Adult Learning Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Taylor-Nelms

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As role-play, virtual reality, and simulated environments gain popularity through virtual worlds such as Second Life, the importance of identifying best practices for education and emergency management training becomes necessary. Using a formal needs assessment approach, we examined the extent to which 3D virtual tornado simulation trainings follow the principles of adult learning theory employed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA National Training and Education Division. Through a three-fold methodology of observation, interviews, and reflection on action, 3D virtual world tornado trainings were analyzed for congruence to adult learning theory.

  5. CERN Technical Training 2008: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    FLUKA Workshop 2008: 23-27 June 2008 http://www.cern.ch/Fluka2008 FLUKA is a fully integrated particle physics Monte-Carlo simulation package. It has many applications in high energy experimental physics and engineering, shielding, detector and telescope design, cosmic ray studies, dosimetry, medical physics and radio-biology. More information, as well as related publications can be found on the FLUKA official website (www.fluka.org). This year, the CERN FLUKA Team, in collaboration with INFN and SC/RP, is organizing a FLUKA beginner’s course, held at CERN for the first time. Previous one-week courses were given in Frascati (Italy), twice in Houston (Texas, US), Pavia (Italy), as well as in Legnaro (Italy). At CERN, continuous lectures are provided in the framework of locally scheduled ‘FLUKA User Meetings’ (http://www.cern.ch/info-fluka-discussion). This new dedicated one-week CERN training course will be an opportunity for new users to learn the basics about FLUKA, as well as offer the possibility to...

  6. CERN Technical Training 2008: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    FLUKA Workshop 2008: 23-27 June 2008 http://www.cern.ch/Fluka2008 FLUKA is a fully integrated particle physics Monte-Carlo simulation package. It has many applications in high energy experimental physics and engineering, shielding, detector and telescope design, cosmic ray studies, dosimetry, medical physics and radio-biology. More information, as well as related publications can be found on the FLUKA official website (www.fluka.org). This year, the CERN FLUKA Team, in collaboration with INFN and SC/RP, is organizing a FLUKA beginner’s course, held at CERN for the first time. Previous one-week courses were given in Frascati (Italy), twice in Houston (Texas, US), Pavia (Italy), as well as in Legnaro (Italy). At CERN, continuous lectures are provided in the framework of locally scheduled ‘FLUKA User Meetings’ (http://www.cern.ch/info-fluka-discussion). This new dedicated one-week CERN training course will be an opportunity for new users to learn the basics about FLUKA, as well as offer the possibility to...

  7. Learning a novel phonological contrast depends on interactions between individual differences and training paradigm design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrachione, Tyler K; Lee, Jiyeon; Ha, Louisa Y Y; Wong, Patrick C M

    2011-07-01

    Studies evaluating phonological contrast learning typically investigate either the predictiveness of specific pretraining aptitude measures or the efficacy of different instructional paradigms. However, little research considers how these factors interact--whether different students learn better from different types of instruction--and what the psychological basis for any interaction might be. The present study demonstrates that successfully learning a foreign-language phonological contrast for pitch depends on an interaction between individual differences in perceptual abilities and the design of the training paradigm. Training from stimuli with high acoustic-phonetic variability is generally thought to improve learning; however, we found high-variability training enhanced learning only for individuals with strong perceptual abilities. Learners with weaker perceptual abilities were actually impaired by high-variability training relative to a low-variability condition. A second experiment assessing variations on the high-variability training design determined that the property of this learning environment most detrimental to perceptually weak learners is the amount of trial-by-trial variability. Learners' perceptual limitations can thus override the benefits of high-variability training where trial-by-trial variability in other irrelevant acoustic-phonetic features obfuscates access to the target feature. These results demonstrate the importance of considering individual differences in pretraining aptitudes when evaluating the efficacy of any speech training paradigm. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  8. A blended design in acute care training: similar learning results, less training costs compared with a traditional format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankbaar, Mary E W; Storm, Diana J; Teeuwen, Irene C; Schuit, Stephanie C E

    2014-09-01

    Introduction There is a demand for more attractive and efficient training programmes in postgraduate health care training. This retrospective study aims to show the effectiveness of a blended versus traditional face-to-face training design. For nurses in postgraduate Acute and Intensive Care training, the effectiveness of a blended course design was compared with a traditional design. Methods In a first pilot study 57 students took a traditional course (2-h lecture and 2-h workshop) and 46 students took a blended course (2-h lecture and 2-h online self-study material). Test results were compared for both groups. After positive results in the pilot study, the design was replicated for the complete programme in Acute and Intensive Care. Now 16 students followed the traditional programme (11 days face-to-face education) and 31 students did the blended programme (7 days face-to-face and 40 h online self-study). An evaluation was done after the pilot and course costs were calculated. Results Results show that the traditional and blended groups were similar regarding the main characteristics and did not differ in learning results for both the pilot and the complete programme. Student evaluations of both designs were positive; however, the blended group were more confident that they had achieved the learning objectives. Training costs were reduced substantially. Conclusion The blended training design offers an effective and attractive training solution, leading to a significant reduction in costs.

  9. Cost Comparison Model: Blended eLearning versus traditional training of community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sissine, Mysha; Segan, Robert; Taylor, Mathew; Jefferson, Bobby; Borrelli, Alice; Koehler, Mohandas; Chelvayohan, Meena

    2014-01-01

    Another one million community healthcare workers are needed to address the growing global population and increasing demand of health care services. This paper describes a cost comparison between two training approaches to better understand costs implications of training community health workers (CHWs) in Sub-Saharan Africa. Our team created a prospective model to forecast and compare the costs of two training methods as described in the Dalburge Report - (1) a traditional didactic training approach ("baseline") and (2) a blended eLearning training approach ("blended"). After running the model for training 100,000 CHWs, we compared the results and scaled up those results to one million CHWs. A substantial difference exists in total costs between the baseline and blended training programs. RESULTS indicate that using a blended eLearning approach for training community health care workers could provide a total cost savings of 42%. Scaling the model to one million CHWs, the blended eLearning training approach reduces total costs by 25%. The blended eLearning savings are a result of decreased classroom time, thereby reducing the costs associated with travel, trainers and classroom costs; and using a tablet with WiFi plus a feature phone rather than a smartphone with data plan. The results of this cost analysis indicate significant savings through using a blended eLearning approach in comparison to a traditional didactic method for CHW training by as much as 67%. These results correspond to the Dalberg publication which indicates that using a blended eLearning approach is an opportunity for closing the gap in training community health care workers.

  10. [Effects of practical training to increase motivation for learning and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takumi; Akiyama, Shinji; Sagara, Hidenori; Tanaka, Akihiro; Miyauchi, Yoshirou; Araki, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Izushi, Fumio; Namba, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Under the six-year pharmaceutical education system that was initiated in April 2006, students who had completed the course in March 2012 became the first graduates. The six-year system encourages students to develop a well-rounded personality, a deep sense of ethics, knowledge required for health care professionals, abilities to identify and solve problems, and practical skills required in clinical settings, as well as basic knowledge and skills. Under the new education system based on the "pharmaceutical education model core curriculums" and "practical training model core curriculums", general pharmaceutical education is implemented in each college, and five-month practical training is conducted in clinical settings. Clinical tasks experienced by students for the first time are expected to significantly influence their motivation to learn and future prospects. In the present survey research, students who had completed practical training evaluated the training program, and correspondence and logistic regression analyses of the results were conducted to examine the future effects and influences of the training on the students. The results suggest that the students viewed the practical training program positively. In addition, clinical experience during the training sessions not only influenced their decisions on future careers, but also significantly increased their motivation to learn. Furthermore, their motivation for learning was increased most by the enthusiasm of pharmacists who advised them in clinical settings, rather than the training program itself. To improve pharmaceutical clinical learning, it is important to develop teaching and working environments for pharmacists in charge of advising students in clinical training.

  11. EduCamp Colombia: Social Networked Learning for Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Diego Ernesto Leal

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a learning experience called EduCamp, which was launched by the Ministry of Education of Colombia in 2007, based on emerging concepts such as e-Learning 2.0, connectivism, and personal learning environments. An EduCamp proposes an unstructured collective learning experience, which intends to make palpable the possibilities of…

  12. What a Story! Sharing Stories for Effective Learning and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Luis A.

    2008-01-01

    Adult learning theory and practice supports the common sense approach that lasting learning takes place when the learners have both a cognitive and emotional experience with the topic at hand. While learning is a complex individual process, it needs to be meaningful, familiar, and challenging in order for each person to learn. Story telling on…

  13. External validity of individual differences in multiple cue probability learning: The case of pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Matton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals differ in their ability to deal with unpredictable environments. Could impaired performances on learning an unpredictable cue-criteria relationship in a laboratory task be associated with impaired learning of complex skills in a natural setting? We focused on a multiple-cue probability learning (MCPL laboratory task and on the natural setting of pilot training. We used data from three selection sessions and from the three corresponding selected pilot student classes of a national airline pilot selection and training system. First, applicants took an MCPL task at the selection stage (N=556; N=701; N=412. Then, pilot trainees selected from the applicant pools (N=44; N=60; N=28 followed the training for 2.5 to 3 yrs. Differences in final MCPL performance were associated with pilot training difficulties. Indeed, poor MCPL performers experienced almost twice as many pilot training difficulties as better MCPL performers (44.0% and 25.0%, respectively.

  14. A Framework of Multimedia E-Learning Design for Engineering Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissova, Daniela; Mustakerov, Ivan

    The paper presents a new framework approach for design and development of an interactive multimedia e-learning system for engineering training. The main goal of the paper is to encourage low cost developing of effective and customized e-learning systems for engineering training by using popular and inexpensive software tools. The proposed framework is a generalization of the authors’ experience gained in developing of a pneumoautomatics e-training system. It can be used for developing of Web-based on-line or off-line e-learning systems for students or specialists customized training. The proposed framework is illustrated by some screen snapshots and descriptions of operational algorithms. The software realization of the pneumoautomatics example is done by means of HTML and JavaScript languages and was tested and used for students training.

  15. SyntaxTrain: Relieving the pain of learning syntax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moth, Andreas Leon Aagaard; Villadsen, Jørgen; Ben-Ari, Mordechai

    2011-01-01

    SyntaxTrain parses a Java program and displays the syntax diagrams associated with a syntax error.......SyntaxTrain parses a Java program and displays the syntax diagrams associated with a syntax error....

  16. Primary care emergency team training in situ means learning in real context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstorp, Helen; Halvorsen, Peder A.; Sterud, Birgitte; Haugland, Bjørgun; Kirkengen, Anna Luise

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of our study was to explore the local learning processes and to improve in situ team training in the primary care emergency teams with a focus on interaction. Design, setting and subjects As participating observers, we investigated locally organised trainings of teams constituted ad hoc, involving nurses, paramedics and general practitioners, in rural Norway. Subsequently, we facilitated focus discussions with local participants. We investigated what kinds of issues the participants chose to elaborate in these learning situations, why they did so, and whether and how local conditions improved during the course of three and a half years. In addition, we applied learning theories to explore and challenge our own and the local participants’ understanding of team training. Results In situ team training was experienced as challenging, engaging, and enabling. In the training sessions and later focus groups, the participants discussed a wide range of topics constitutive for learning in a sociocultural perspective, and topics constitutive for patient safety culture. The participants expanded the types of training sites, themes and the structures for participation, improved their understanding of communication and developed local procedures. The flexible structure of the model mirrors the complexity of medicine and provides space for the participants’ own sense of responsibility. Conclusion Challenging, monthly in situ team trainings organised by local health personnel facilitate many types of learning. The flexible training model provides space for the participants’ own sense of responsibility and priorities. Outcomes involve social and structural improvements, including a sustainable culture of patient safety. Key Points Challenging, monthly in situ team trainings, organised by local health personnel, facilitate many types of learning.The flexible structure of the training model mirrors the complexity of medicine and the realism of the

  17. From Training to Learning in Enterprise Resource Planning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Don; Murray, Peter A.; Burgess, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The information systems' literature outlines how training is a critical factor to successful Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) implementations. Yet, types of training are not discussed in the literature and there is little indication if existing training is effective and whether relevant contextual factors have been considered. Without…

  18. Selective transfer of visual working memory training on Chinese character learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, Bertram; Schneiders, Julia A; Krick, Christoph M; Mecklinger, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown a systematic relationship between phonological working memory capacity and second language proficiency for alphabetic languages. However, little is known about the impact of working memory processes on second language learning in a non-alphabetic language such as Mandarin Chinese. Due to the greater complexity of the Chinese writing system we expect that visual working memory rather than phonological working memory exerts a unique influence on learning Chinese characters. This issue was explored in the present experiment by comparing visual working memory training with an active (auditory working memory training) control condition and a passive, no training control condition. Training induced modulations in language-related brain networks were additionally examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a pretest-training-posttest design. As revealed by pre- to posttest comparisons and analyses of individual differences in working memory training gains, visual working memory training led to positive transfer effects on visual Chinese vocabulary learning compared to both control conditions. In addition, we found sustained activation after visual working memory training in the (predominantly visual) left infero-temporal cortex that was associated with behavioral transfer. In the control conditions, activation either increased (active control condition) or decreased (passive control condition) without reliable behavioral transfer effects. This suggests that visual working memory training leads to more efficient processing and more refined responses in brain regions involved in visual processing. Furthermore, visual working memory training boosted additional activation in the precuneus, presumably reflecting mental image generation of the learned characters. We, therefore, suggest that the conjoint activity of the mid-fusiform gyrus and the precuneus after visual working memory training reflects an interaction of working memory and

  19. Learning Together; part 2: training costs and health gain - a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Katherine; Riches, Wendy; Macaulay, Chloe; Spicer, John

    2017-01-01

    Learning Together is a complex educational intervention aimed at improving health outcomes for children and young people. There is an additional cost as two doctors are seeing patients together for a longer appointment than a standard general practice (GP) appointment. Our approach combines the impact of the training clinics on activity in South London in 2014-15 with health gain, using NICE guidance and standards to allow comparison of training options. Activity data was collected from Training Practices hosting Learning Together. A computer based model was developed to analyse the costs of the Learning Together intervention compared to usual training in a partial economic evaluation. The results of the model were used to value the health gain required to make the intervention cost effective. Data were returned for 363 patients booked into 61 clinics across 16 Training Practices. Learning Together clinics resulted in an increase in costs of £37 per clinic. Threshold analysis illustrated one child with a common illness like constipation needs to be well for two weeks, in one Practice hosting four training clinics for the clinics to be considered cost effective. Learning Together is of minimal training cost. Our threshold analysis produced a rubric that can be used locally to test cost effectiveness at a Practice or Programme level.

  20. E-learning : a high-tech solution to industry training challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, G.

    2007-09-15

    A web-based e-learning system used to train oilsands upgrading employees was discussed in this article. While the majority of the upgrader's staff had previously worked in the oil and gas industry, many did not have adequate control system training. Use of the system avoided the need for upgrader downtime due to staff shortages during training periods, and avoided the need for on-site instructor-led classes. Savings of over $90,000 were made on a single training course by using the web-based system. A learning content management system (LCMS) was used to develop and customize learning modules so that the software could be customized for use at different facilities. Use of the e-learning system allows staff to mesh training time with regular work schedules and can save companies thousands of hours in training time. Information on the training modules is referenced in a database so that staff members can address new or additional systems, equipment, or technologies. It was concluded that a growing number of companies are using web-based learning systems. 2 figs.

  1. Untutored discrimination training on paired cell images influences visual learning in cytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evered, Andrew; Walker, Darren; Watt, Andrew A; Perham, Nick

    2014-03-01

    Cytologists must learn how to discriminate cells that might be visually very similar but have different neoplastic potential. The mechanism by which trainees learn this task is poorly researched and is the focus of the current investigation. Cognitive science offers a theoretical platform from which to design meaningful experiments that could lead to novel training strategies. The interpretation of a cell image is a category-discrimination task, and the process by which discrimination improves with practice is called perceptual learning. The study authors operationalized this concept by training 150 naive observers on paired cell images without providing explicit tuition, employing cervical cytology as a model system. Six strategies were tested, which differed according to the diagnostic category and level of interpretive difficulty of each image. Participants were tested before and after training to determine the extent to which visual learning had occurred. Diagnostic accuracy improved for participants who were trained on normal/abnormal image pairs in which at least one member of the pair was "easy" to interpret (P image pairs were drawn from the same diagnostic category or when both members of the pair were "difficult" to interpret (P > .05). Training on paired cell images without explicit tuition can be an efficient and effective means of visual learning in cytopathology, but only if care is taken to avoid image pairs from category boundaries. Training on same-category image pairs is ineffective. This study is a step toward the development of perceptual learning modules for cytopathology. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  2. A Novel Semi-Supervised Electronic Nose Learning Technique: M-Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Jia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available When an electronic nose (E-nose is used to distinguish different kinds of gases, the label information of the target gas could be lost due to some fault of the operators or some other reason, although this is not expected. Another fact is that the cost of getting the labeled samples is usually higher than for unlabeled ones. In most cases, the classification accuracy of an E-nose trained using labeled samples is higher than that of the E-nose trained by unlabeled ones, so gases without label information should not be used to train an E-nose, however, this wastes resources and can even delay the progress of research. In this work a novel multi-class semi-supervised learning technique called M-training is proposed to train E-noses with both labeled and unlabeled samples. We employ M-training to train the E-nose which is used to distinguish three indoor pollutant gases (benzene, toluene and formaldehyde. Data processing results prove that the classification accuracy of E-nose trained by semi-supervised techniques (tri-training and M-training is higher than that of an E-nose trained only with labeled samples, and the performance of M-training is better than that of tri-training because more base classifiers can be employed by M-training.

  3. Learning and Training for Work in the Knowledge Society. Report IV (1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).

    This report from the 91st session of the International Labor Organization (ILO) conference examines recent legislation, policies, and practices reflecting new approaches to learning and training. The document was intended to foster discussion regarding a revision of the ILO standard on human resources training and development. Chapter I examines…

  4. Analysis of learning curves in the on-the-job training of air traffic controllers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oprins, E.A.P.B.; Bruggraaff, E.; Roe, R.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a competence-based assessment system, called CBAS, for air traffic control (ATC) simulator and on-the-job training (OJT), developed at Air Traffic Control The Netherlands (LVNL). In contrast with simulator training, learning processes in OJT are difficult to assess, because th

  5. Living at Sea: Learning from Communal Life Aboard Sail Training Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Ken

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers features of domestic and social life aboard sail training vessels, exploring the particular character of life at sea, and how these features contribute to the distinctive character of sail training experience as a context for learning. Methodologically, the study lies in the sociological tradition of ethnography, focusing on…

  6. Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Tutor Training for Problem Based Learning in Undergraduate Psychology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühlfelder, Manfred; Konermann, Tobias; Borchard, Linda-Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe a "Train the Tutor" programme (TtT) for developing the metacognitive skills, facilitator skills, and tutor skills of students in a problem based learning (PBL) context. The purpose of the programme was to train 2nd and 3rd year undergraduate students in psychology to become effective PBL tutors for…

  7. Study on Innovation of Teacher Training Model in Basic Education from the Perspective of "Blended Learning"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Huabai; Bu, Shizhen

    2012-01-01

    Gradual integration of synergetic technology, P2P technology and online learning community furnishes a new research field for innovation of teacher training model in a knowledge economy era. This article proposes the innovative model of "whole of three lines" in teacher training in basic education from the perspective of "blended…

  8. Group Creativity Training for Children: Lessons Learned from Two Award-Winning Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Namin; Jang, Yeon-Ju

    2017-01-01

    The development of group creativity can be challenging for both young students and their teachers. This study examined the processes and learning outcomes of group creativity training from the perspectives of elementary school students and teachers while identifying critical factors that contributed to the success of the training. Data were…

  9. Improving the Efficiency of Virtual Reality Training by Integrating Partly Observational Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuviler-Gavish, Nirit; Rodríguez, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Teresa; Sánchez, Emilio; Casado, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The current study hypothesized that integrating partly observational learning into virtual reality training systems (VRTS) can enhance training efficiency for procedural tasks. A common approach in designing VRTS is the enactive approach, which stresses the importance of physical actions within the environment to enhance perception and improve…

  10. Working Memory Capacity and Reading Skill Moderate the Effectiveness of Strategy Training in Learning from Hypertext

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Johannes; Richter, Tobias; Christmann, Ursula; Groeben, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Cognitive and metacognitive strategies are particularly important for learning with hypertext. The effectiveness of strategy training, however, depends on available working memory resources. Thus, especially learners high on working memory capacity can profit from strategy training, while learners low on working memory capacity might easily be…

  11. The Dread Factor: How Hazards and Safety Training Influence Learning and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J.; Salvador, Rommel O.; Smith-Crowe, Kristin; Chan-Serafin, Suzanne; Smith, Alexis; Sonesh, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of hypotheses derived from social and experiential learning theories, we meta-analytically investigated how safety training and workplace hazards impact the development of safety knowledge and safety performance. The results were consistent with an expected interaction between the level of engagement of safety training and hazardous…

  12. Leadership Training in an MBA Program Using Peer-Led Team Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Gregory; Frye, Robin; Mantena, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Leadership training is an important part of any MBA program, but is often difficult to provide in an effective way. Over the last three years, we implemented a program of Peer-Led Team Learning in two core courses of our MBA curriculum, which we believe provides a good solution. The program combines leadership training with practical hands-on…

  13. The use of information technology in trainning human resources: an e-learning case study

    OpenAIRE

    Gascó Gascó, José Luis; Llopis Taverner, Juan; González Ramírez, María Reyes

    2004-01-01

    This paper addresses the influence of information technology in human resources management (HRM) and specifically on training policy through the experience of a Spanish telecommunications firm, Telefonica. The characteristics of the training model designed by this firm to face new environments is considered and the technologies used, the key actions, the disadvantages and success factors are detected in trying to grow an E-learning company. Success factors in training policy are identified. T...

  14. Employee Perceptions of an Organization's Learning Climate: Effects of Employee Orientation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdere, Mesut; Schmidt, Steven W.

    2008-01-01

    The most important goal of any given training effort is to achieve learning at the individual, group/team, and organizational levels. This study used a repeated measures design to measure the change in employee perception of an organization's learning environment tin a large U.S. manufacturing company. The time period examined included an employee…

  15. The Effects of Cooperative Training and Ability Grouping on Microcomputer Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Lois J.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a study of fifth and sixth graders that investigated the effects of cooperative training and ability grouping on microcomputer learning. Results on four measures of achievement did not support the use of cooperative learning or ability grouping to enhance achievement in computer-assisted instruction. (Author/LRW)

  16. Transfer in Rule-Based Category Learning Depends on the Training Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattner, Florian; Cox, Christopher R; Green, C Shawn

    2016-01-01

    While learning is often highly specific to the exact stimuli and tasks used during training, there are cases where training results in learning that generalizes more broadly. It has been previously argued that the degree of specificity can be predicted based upon the learning solution(s) dictated by the particular demands of the training task. Here we applied this logic in the domain of rule-based categorization learning. Participants were presented with stimuli corresponding to four different categories and were asked to perform either a category discrimination task (which permits learning specific rule to discriminate two categories) or a category identification task (which does not permit learning a specific discrimination rule). In a subsequent transfer stage, all participants were asked to discriminate stimuli belonging to two of the categories which they had seen, but had never directly discriminated before (i.e., this particular discrimination was omitted from training). As predicted, learning in the category-discrimination tasks tended to be specific, while the category-identification task produced learning that transferred to the transfer discrimination task. These results suggest that the discrimination and identification tasks fostered the acquisition of different category representations which were more or less generalizable.

  17. Increasing Metacomprehension in Learning Disabled and Normally Achieving Students through Self-Questioning Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Bernice Y. L.; Jones, Wayne

    1982-01-01

    Training to self-monitor reading comprehension was undertaken with 120 learning disabled eighth and ninth graders and normally achieving sixth graders. It was hypothesized that insufficient metacomprehension is one possible cause underlying learning disabled adolescents' comprehension problems. (Author/SEW)

  18. Integrating Training Simulations and e-Learning Systems: The SimSCORM platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, L. de; Boot, E.W; Kappé, B.

    2008-01-01

    From a technological, pedagogical, and commercial perspective, the world of training simulators has always been separate from the world of e-learning. There is a need, however, to merge both worlds. This would allow the pedagogical capabilities of the e-learning community to be combined with the ope

  19. Instituting Learning-By-Doing Practices in Training Programs for Technical Writers, Usability Testers, and Translators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Isohella, Suvi; Mara, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract - This workshop focuses on how to implement and grow highly successful and realistic learning-by-doing approaches to teaching and training professional communicators by connecting students from across the globe and across academic language programs. Workshop participants learn the methods...

  20. E-Business and Online Learning: Connections and Opportunities for Vocational Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John

    Australian vocational education and training (VET) providers show increasing interest in using electronic technology to provide online learning, student services, and business functions, according to a study that included a literature review, Internet search, interviews with organizations that use e-business models for online learning, analysis of…

  1. An Analysis Of Personalized Learning Systems For Navy Training And Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    virtually all of its schoolhouses and learning environments. This “one size fits all” system is dated and inefficient, and the Navy could potentially...BLANK v ABSTRACT The U.S. Navy employs a single approach to education and training in virtually all of its schoolhouses and learning...Management Systems..................................................29 6. Digital Teaching Platform

  2. E-Business and Online Learning: Connections and Opportunities for Vocational Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John

    Australian vocational education and training (VET) providers show increasing interest in using electronic technology to provide online learning, student services, and business functions, according to a study that included a literature review, Internet search, interviews with organizations that use e-business models for online learning, analysis of…

  3. Strategies for Overcoming Barriers to Training and Education for Canadians with Disabilities. Lessons in Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Council on Learning, 2009

    2009-01-01

    If stronger skills and more education are key to greater labour force participation, then it is important to identify critical barriers to education and training for Canadians with disabilities. In 2008, the Canadian Council on Learning's Adult Learning Knowledge Centre funded a "Community Outreach Initiative for Learner's with…

  4. The Conundrum of Training and Capacity Building for People with Learning Disabilities Doing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nind, Melanie; Chapman, Rohhss; Seale, Jane; Tilley, Liz

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study explores the training involved when people with learning disabilities take their place in the community as researchers. This was a theme in a recent UK seminar series where a network of researchers explored pushing the boundaries of participatory research. Method: Academics, researchers with learning disabilities, supporters…

  5. Factors Associated with Transfer of Training in Workplace E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji-Hye; Wentling, Tim

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of factors associated with e-learning, particularly computer attitudes and usability, on transfer of training in workplace e-learning courses. Design/methodology/approach--This study relied on quantitative data obtained from four online survey questionnaires. The sample of this study…

  6. Collaborative learning: A next step in the training of peer support providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronise, Rita

    2016-09-01

    This column explores how peer support provider training is enhanced through collaborative learning. Collaborative learning is an approach that draws upon the "real life" experiences of individual learners and encompasses opportunities to explore varying perspectives and collectively construct solutions that enrich the practice of all participants. This description draws upon published articles and examples of collaborative learning in training and communities of practice of peer support providers. Similar to person-centered practices that enhance the recovery experience of individuals receiving services, collaborative learning enhances the experience of peer support providers as they explore relevant "real world" issues, offer unique contributions, and work together toward improving practice. Three examples of collaborative learning approaches are provided that have resulted in successful collaborative learning opportunities for peer support providers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. From Teaching Assistant (TA) Training to Workplace Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpan, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I propose a renewed look at how teaching assistants (TAs) are being prepared to fulfill their duties in higher education. I argue that the apprenticeship model of learning that is currently in use be replaced by the more holistic workplace learning approach. Workplace learning theories take into consideration the complexity of the…

  8. Challenges for the work-based learning in vocational education and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    Dual systems of vocational education and training that build on the tradition of apprenticeship, have many attractive qualities, seen from a political perspective. VET systems that comprise a significant amount of work-based training, provide a valuable alternative for young people who chose...... not to pursue an academic career. Countries with strong apprenticeship systems tend to have less youth unemployment and a smoother transition to the labour market than others. Furthermore, from a learning perspective, the out-comes of work-based training and informal learning are enhanced when they are combined...

  9. Challenges for work-based learning in vocational education and training in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms

    2015-01-01

    Dual systems of vocational education and training that build on the tradition of apprenticeship, have many attractive qualities, seen from a political perspective. VET systems that comprise a significant amount of work-based training, provide a valuable alternative for young people who chose...... not to pursue an academic career. Countries with strong apprenticeship systems tend to have less youth unemployment and a smoother transition to the labour market than others. Furthermore, from a learning perspective, the outcomes of work-based training and informal learning are enhanced when they are combined...

  10. The influence of tutor training for peer tutors in the dissection course on the learning behavior of students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, T; Hirt, B; Lammerding-Koeppel, M

    2016-11-01

    Student tutors in the dissection course are expected to meet high demands in their job, to fulfill these expectations they receive training. Combined tutor training is well accepted by tutors and tutees, however, it is not known how tutor training influences student learning. Deduced from the learning goals of the tutor training, a randomized, controlled, single-blinded study was set up with a quantitative cross-sectional analysis to compare student learning behavior. A total of 197 medical students, coached either by ten trained or ten untrained tutors, were enlisted in the study. To assess the students' learning behavior we employed the LIST questionnaire. A common factor analysis was calculated to extract dimensions. Factor scores of the extracted dimensions were calculated for both groups to estimate differences in learning behavior. Factor analysis of the LIST questionnaire revealed eight factors explaining 47.57% of the overall variance. The eight factors comprise: deep learning, attention, learning organization, cooperative learning, time management, learning effort, superficial learning and learning environment. Comparing the factor scores of the extracted dimensions, students coached by trained tutors learned significantly more with their fellow students (factor score in cooperative learning 0.194 vs. -0.205, ptrained by untrained tutors. Students coached by trained tutors also tend to be better organized in their learning (factor score in learning organization 0.115 vs. -0.122, p=0.16). The learning behavior of students coached by trained tutors differs from the learning behavior of students coached by untrained tutors. Students coached by trained tutors learn significantly more often in teams than their colleagues and are better organized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. An Alternative Approach to Preservice Police Training: Combining Training and Education Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Many states offer police and corrections officer certification through state approved police basic training, either after hire (in-service) or before hire (preservice). Only large agencies conduct their own basic training academies after being hired. The trend is to save money through preservice training offered by colleges. This especially…

  12. AN EVALUATION OF LEARNING OUTCOMES OF WORKPLACE TRAINING OF STUDENTS IN VOCATIONAL COLLEGES

    OpenAIRE

    Adigüzel, Oktay Cem

    2009-01-01

    In our education life, most of us do not question sufficiently what, how much, and how we learn and what we need to learn. Education life in schools might be limited to certificates received without answering these questions fully. It seems difficult to expect success without answering these question in practical training at industrial institutions which are important for vocational education,. In vocational and technical education,it is important to reach an overlap between the learning ou...

  13. High-Fidelity e-Learning: SEI’s Virtual Training Environment (VTE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    percentages in the grid represent the por- tions ofthe overall professional training market served by each type. Another factor that varies by type of...and graphics in e-learning materials [Clark & Mayer 2003]. Reseach and cognitive learning theory indicate that people learn more deeply from words...video as the player, because it is operating system agnostic and enjoys a very high market penetration among web users. As a result, a student is

  14. Designing learning activities for interpreter trainers: a socio-constructivist approach to training

    OpenAIRE

    Class, Barbara; Moser-Mercer, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    The context of this paper is the post-graduate Certificate course for interpreter trainers, offered by the School of Translation and Interpretation at the University of Geneva. Great care must be taken in designing learning activities in the field of teacher training because the medium is also the message. To help us design socio-constructivist learning activities in a blended student centered learning environment, we used the Tutoring Support Structure engineering tool, paying particular att...

  15. The elaboration group training of the Laboratorio di Gruppoanalisi: From teaching to learning community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Materdomini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the transformative factors of a group experiential training. It is argued that the evolution of the group and its participants is inscribed within a shared dimension generating a real learning process based on direct experience, characterized by cognitive and emotional sharing of individual experiences, which become key points for each member.Keywords: Learning group; Learning community; Transformative function

  16. Self-Paced E-Training in E-Learning for University Teaching Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norah Ahmed Al-Malki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The shift towards adopting e-training methods and practices in the workplace to equip staff with soft and hard skills have become an essential component of training in many Higher Education institutions. The aim of this paper is to advocate such a shift in Saudi universities through presenting the preliminary outcomes of a short-scale pilot study conducted by the Deanship of E-learning and Distance Education (DELDE during August 2014. Basically, the paper introduces the results of a first run of a self-paced e-training program focusing on introducing topics related to e-learning development and instruction. The paper 1 explores the pedagogical motivation for adopting the self-paced learning model, 2 outlines the elements of the developed course, and 3 discusses the results of the first run of the e-training program.

  17. Innovating Training through Immersive Environments: Generation Y, Exploratory Learning, and Serious Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Over the next decade, those entering Service and Joint Staff positions within the military will come from a different generation than the current leadership. They will come from Generation Y and have differing preferences for learning. Immersive learning environments like serious games and virtual world initiatives can complement traditional training methods to provide a better overall training program for staffs. Generation Y members desire learning methods which are relevant and interactive, regardless of whether they are delivered over the internet or in person. This paper focuses on a project undertaken to assess alternative training methods to teach special operations staffs. It provides a summary of the needs analysis used to consider alternatives and to better posture the Department of Defense for future training development.

  18. How did we learn best? A retrospective survey of clinical psychology training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, Pieter W; Pezzolesi, Cinzia; Stott, Dave J

    2012-09-01

    This U.K.-based study aimed to investigate qualified clinical psychologists' perceptions of the value and usefulness of the learning activities experienced during their training in clinical psychology. Members (N = 357) of the Division of Clinical Psychology of the British Psychological Society (BPS) completed a self-report questionnaire about their training as clinical psychologists. The results indicate that most clinical psychologists believe that they learnt mainly through doing and by observing others' clinical practice. They also highlight the importance of the learning relationship and the value of personal therapy for learning. The findings point to the need for more training of trainers, especially clinical supervisors. They also draw attention to the need for more research to establish which learning activities contribute most / least to trainees' developing competence. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Efficacy of the LiSN & Learn Auditory Training Software: randomized blinded controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Children with a spatial processing disorder (SPD require a more favorable signal-to-noise ratio in the classroom because they have difficulty perceiving sound source location cues. Previous research has shown that a novel training program - LiSN & Learn - employing spatialized sound, overcomes this deficit. Here we investigate whether improvements in spatial processing ability are specific to the LiSN & Learn training program. Materials and methods: Participants were ten children (aged between 6;0 [years;months] and 9;9 with normal peripheral hearing who were diagnosed as having SPD using the Listening in Spatialized Noise – Sentences Test (LISN-S. In a blinded controlled study, the participants were randomly allocated to train with either the LiSN & Learn or another auditory training program – Earobics - for approximately 15 minutes per day for twelve weeks. Results: There was a significant improvement post-training on the conditions of the LiSN-S that evaluate spatial processing ability for the LiSN & Learn group (p=0.03 to 0.0008, η2=0.75 to 0.95, n=5, but not for the Earobics group (p=0.5 to 0.7, η2=0.1 to 0.04, n=5. Results from questionnaires completed by the participants and their parents and teachers revealed improvements in real-world listening performance post-training were greater in the LiSN & Learn group than the Earobics group. Conclusions: LiSN & Learn training improved binaural processing ability in children with SPD, enhancing their ability to understand speech in noise. Exposure to non-spatialized auditory training does not produce similar outcomes, emphasizing the importance of deficit-specific remediation.

  20. Efficacy of the LiSN & Learn auditory training software: randomized blinded controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Cameron

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Children with a spatial processing disorder (SPD require a more favorable signal-to-noise ratio in the classroom because they have difficulty perceiving sound source location cues. Previous research has shown that a novel training program - LiSN & Learn - employing spatialized sound, overcomes this deficit. Here we investigate whether improvements in spatial processing ability are specific to the LiSN & Learn training program. Participants were ten children (aged between 6;0 [years;months] and 9;9 with normal peripheral hearing who were diagnosed as having SPD using the Listening in Spatialized Noise - Sentences test (LiSN-S. In a blinded controlled study, the participants were randomly allocated to train with either the LiSN & Learn or another auditory training program - Earobics - for approximately 15 min per day for twelve weeks. There was a significant improvement post-training on the conditions of the LiSN-S that evaluate spatial processing ability for the LiSN & Learn group (P=0.03 to 0.0008, η 2=0.75 to 0.95, n=5, but not for the Earobics group (P=0.5 to 0.7, η 2=0.1 to 0.04, n=5. Results from questionnaires completed by the participants and their parents and teachers revealed improvements in real-world listening performance post-training were greater in the LiSN & Learn group than the Earobics group. LiSN & Learn training improved binaural processing ability in children with SPD, enhancing their ability to understand speech in noise. Exposure to non-spatialized auditory training does not produce similar outcomes, emphasizing the importance of deficit-specific remediation.

  1. Analysis of Perceptions of Conventional and E-Learning Education in Corporate Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conkova Monika

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of today concerning the need to optimize the learning process has led to the development of e-learning. Organizations gradually incorporate e-learning into their educational activities. However, blended learning, which combines online components with the conventional face-to-face components, has emerged as an alternative way of teaching and learning. The paper presents selected research results that compare the perceived attributes of e-learning and conventional business training in an organization operating in the Slovak market. The purpose of the analysis was to determine, which style of learning is preferred, subjectively more beneficial and better evaluated by employees of the company for the purpose of supporting decision-making in company’s business education strategy development. Two thrifty summated scales, both of four original items rating the properties of two types of business training were compiled with acceptable reliability assessed by internal consistency coefficient and validity established by factor analysis. The results showed comparable perceived quality, effectiveness, efficiency, and knowledge applicability of two types of business training in the company, balanced preferences and thus vindication of both styles of training in business education program. Regarding practical implications, this study proposes the concept of thrifty multidimensional learners’ evaluation, which can be used in organizations providing different styles of business training for quantitative evaluating and monitoring the perceived trainings’ quality attributes, their benefit, effectiveness and efficiency for quick inspection of relevant differences between the two styles of training in company. Realizing the existence of deficiencies in the training can support corrective actions starting toward training’s quality and effectiveness and efficiency optimization.

  2. Learning curves and long-term outcome of simulation-based thoracentesis training for medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Kezhong

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulation-based medical education has been widely used in medical skills training; however, the effectiveness and long-term outcome of simulation-based training in thoracentesis requires further investigation. The purpose of this study was to assess the learning curve of simulation-based thoracentesis training, study skills retention and transfer of knowledge to a clinical setting following simulation-based education intervention in thoracentesis procedures. Methods Fifty-two medical students were enrolled in this study. Each participant performed five supervised trials on the simulator. Participant's performance was assessed by performance score (PS, procedure time (PT, and participant's confidence (PC. Learning curves for each variable were generated. Long-term outcome of the training was measured by the retesting and clinical performance evaluation 6 months and 1 year, respectively, after initial training on the simulator. Results Significant improvements in PS, PT, and PC were noted among the first 3 to 4 test trials (p 0.05. Clinical competency in thoracentesis was improved in participants who received simulation training relative to that of first year medical residents without such experience (p Conclusions This study demonstrates that simulation-based thoracentesis training can significantly improve an individual's performance. The saturation of learning from the simulator can be achieved after four practice sessions. Simulation-based training can assist in long-term retention of skills and can be partially transferred to clinical practice.

  3. Integrating Creativity Training into Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) Curriculum in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang

    2012-01-01

    In order to foster creative engineers, a creativity training programme was carried out in medialogy education in a Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) environment at Aalborg University, Denmark. This paper focuses on the question of how engineering students perceive the strategy of integrating...... creativity training into a PBL curriculum. A total of 20 medialogy students in the training programme were interviewed. The data shows that the training programme was thought useful and students get benefits such as gaining project work skills, creative concepts and confidence of being creative. However......, limitations of the programme show that only five days of training did not fit the requirements of learning skills in PBL. So the supervisors are suggested to offer more creativity techniques and process engagement to move projects forward....

  4. Training Facilitators for Face-to-Face Electronic Meetings: An Experiential Learning Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak Yoong

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for effective facilitation in Group Support Systems (GSS environments is well documented. Results from recent studies of facilitation in face-to-face electronic meetings have demonstrated that more and different research is required before we have a clearer picture of GSS facilitation. The training of GSS facilitators has been acknowledged as an important issue in GSS research but, up to now, has received little research attention. This paper describes an experiential learning approach to the training of facilitators for face-to-face electronic meetings. It begins with a description of the nature of GSS facilitation training. The experiential learning method of training is then explained. Finally, the GSS facilitation training program is described.

  5. SKYNET: an efficient and robust neural network training tool for machine learning in astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Graff, Philip; Hobson, Michael P; Lasenby, Anthony N

    2013-01-01

    We present the first public release of our generic neural network training algorithm, called SKYNET. This efficient and robust machine-learning tool is able to train large and deep feed-forward neural networks, including autoencoders, for use in a wide range of supervised and unsupervised learning applications, such as regression, classification, density estimation, clustering and dimensionality reduction. SKYNET uses a powerful 'pre-training' method, to obtain a set of network parameters close to the true global maximum of the training objective function, followed by further optimisation using an automatically-regularised variant of Newton's method; the latter uses second-order derivative information to improve convergence, but without the need to evaluate or store the full Hessian matrix, by using a fast approximate method to calculate Hessian-vector products. This combination of methods allows for the training of complicated networks that are difficult to optimise using standard backpropagation techniques....

  6. Genetic optimization of training sets for improved machine learning models of molecular properties

    CERN Document Server

    Browning, Nicholas J; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole; Röthlisberger, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The training of molecular models of quantum mechanical properties based on statistical machine learning requires large datasets which exemplify the map from chemical structure to molecular property. Intelligent a priori selection of training examples is often difficult or impossible to achieve as prior knowledge may be sparse or unavailable. Ordinarily representative selection of training molecules from such datasets is achieved through random sampling. We use genetic algorithms for the optimization of training set composition consisting of tens of thousands of small organic molecules. The resulting machine learning models are considerably more accurate with respect to small randomly selected training sets: mean absolute errors for out-of-sample predictions are reduced to ~25% for enthalpies, free energies, and zero-point vibrational energy, to ~50% for heat-capacity, electron-spread, and polarizability, and by more than ~20% for electronic properties such as frontier orbital eigenvalues or dipole-moments. We...

  7. END-USER TRAINING ON DIGITAL TEACHING TOOLS: REACTION, LEARNING, BEHAVIOR, RESULTS, AND MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave E. Marcial

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed digital teaching tools, namely mobile class record application and portable learning management system were launched and distributed. This paper measures the evaluation rating of the region-wide end-user training on the classroom use and integration of the two digital teaching tools. A total of 74 trainees in Central Visayas, Philippines were trained. Using the New World Kirkpatrick Model, the trainees evaluated the training regarding reaction, learning, behavior, results, and management. The data show that the trainees rated the training with an overall mean of 3.70 described as “strongly agree.” The result implies that the end-user training on digital teaching tools is very successful and excellent.

  8. Effect of coping with stress training on the social adjustment of students with learning disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifolah Khodadadi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Learning disability includes wide range of educational problems which treating these problems need child's social, emotional and behavior treatment. As prevalence of learning disabilities among children and their difficulties, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of coping with stress training on social adjustment of students with learning disabilities. The statistical population consists of all boy student with learning disabilities in learning disabilities center, in which 34 students were selected by convenience sampling. The social adjustment questionnaire was used. The experimental group had coping strategies training in 9 sessions for 90 minutes every week. Covariance analysis was used to compare the scores. The results showed that there was significant difference in pretest and posttest of experimental group. The findings also indicated that coping strategies training increased social adjustment, affective and educational adjustments of experimental group in comparison of control group. Appropriate strategies can be used for dealing with stress in students with learning disabilities. Coping training can be used as supplemental program in schools and centers of learning disabilities to improve the adjustment problems of these students.

  9. Using Problem-Based Learning to Train Evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Janet; Wallace, Tanner LeBaron; Alkin, Marvin

    2007-01-01

    As the evaluation profession has continued to grow and develop, there has been a corresponding concern about how to properly train future evaluation practitioners. Those who teach evaluation strive to develop training opportunities that create the appropriate balance of the practical, how-to knowledge of evaluation with the burgeoning theoretical…

  10. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In collaboration with AS and AC divisions, the Technical Training Programme is launching EVM Hands-on Tutorials specifically designed for those people involved in the current EVM for LHC exercise. The goal of the EVM Hands-on Training Sessions is to provide insight in Earned Value Management as implemented at CERN. Following this course will enable you to understand the EVM methodology, the tools used at CERN, the procedures used for the data-collection and data-reporting and assist you in analysing cost & schedule variances. The course is an intensive 2-hour 'hands-on' training session. If you are interested in this course, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training web pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/

  11. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC !

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    In collaboration with AS and AC divisions, the Technical Training Programme is launching EVM Hands-on Tutorials specifically designed for those people involved in the current EVM for LHC exercise. The goal of the EVM Hands-on Training Sessions is to provide insight in Earned Value Management as implemented at CERN. Following this course will enable you to understand the EVM methodology, the tools used at CERN, the procedures used for the data-collection and data-reporting and assist you in analysing cost & schedule variances. The course is an intensive 2-hour 'hands-on' training session. If you are interested in this course, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training web pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/

  12. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program: impact and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, John; Boninger, Michael; Helkowski, Wendy; Braddom-Ritzler, Carolyn

    2009-03-01

    Physician scientists are seen as important in healthcare research. However, the number of physician scientists and their success in obtaining National Institutes of Health funding have been declining for many years. The shortage of physician scientists in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is particularly severe and can be attributed to many of the same factors that affect physician scientists in general, as well as to the lack of well-developed models for research training. In 1995, the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program was funded by a K12 grant from the National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research, as one strategy for increasing the number of research-productive physiatrists. The Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program's structure was revised in 2001 to improve the level of preparation of incoming trainees and to provide a stronger central mentorship support network. We describe the original and revised structure of the Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program and review subjective and objective data on the productivity of the trainees who have completed the program. These data suggest that Rehabilitation Medicine Scientist Training Program trainees are, in general, successful in obtaining and maintaining academic faculty positions and that the productivity of the cohort trained after the revision, in particular, shows impressive growth after about 3 yrs of training.

  13. A Framework for Designing Training Programs to Foster Self-Regulated Learning and Text Analysis Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Wagner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study’s aim was to develop an intervention program and to evaluate its contribution to students’ self-regulated learning (SRL and text analysis skills. In a student-focused training approach, the students themselves acquired the training strategies, whereas in the teacher-focused training, the teachers were enabled to explicitly impart these strategies to their students. In order to investigate the effectiveness of the intervention in terms of transfer benefits on SRL and text analysis skills, 274 lower secondary students were examined in a pretest-training-posttest design. Based on two different training approaches, a distinction was made between four groups: student training (singleST, teacher training (singleTT, combination of student and teacher training (ComT, and control group (CG. Substantially more transfer was revealed in all training conditions as compared to the control group. Specifically, the singleST group showed the highest learning gains for all variables. Conversely, a combination of both approaches (ComT did not result in synergetic effects, but rather in reciprocal interferences.

  14. Virtual learning : oil and gas training in the virtual world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macedo, R.

    2006-07-15

    New software technologies may help to meet increased training demands in the booming oil and gas industry. Although not intended to take the place of hands-on training, a new 3-D simulation program designed by Terris Hill may help new employees demonstrate initial competency. The program outlines the basic training requirements of working on a service rig and was designed to look like many of today's video games. The software was patterned after one cycle of work on a particular job on a service rig. Workers navigate through the 3-D program, which was was built by animators and graphic artists and then tested by experts in the industry. Calgary-based 3D Internet is also developing technology to create training programs for workers in the oil and gas industry. In addition to interactive training programs, the company has constructed simulations, and has recently completed a project for a massive water treatment plant in Saudi Arabia. The company has also created a substation training program that includes voice-overs from actual field employees, as well as interactive knobs and gauges. Simulation training may benefit both employers and employees, as trainees can review procedures repeatedly without the dangers of personal injury or equipment failure. Entry modules can include helpful hints and guidelines while certification modules will grade for behaviour and quality of work performed without system help. However, although simulation technology may help the safety level and proficiency of workers, it represents only a fraction of what workers will need to know before working on an actual service rig. It was concluded that any move to incorporate new simulation training programs within current interactive training programs will need to be driven by industry. 4 figs.

  15. Training models in laparoscopy: a systematic review comparing their effectiveness in learning surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willaert, W; Van De Putte, D; Van Renterghem, K; Van Nieuwenhove, Y; Ceelen, W; Pattyn, P

    2013-01-01

    Surgery has traditionally been learned on patients in the operating room, which is time-consuming, can have an impact on the patient outcomes, and is of variable effectiveness. As a result, surgical training models have been developed, which are compared in this systematic review. We searched Pubmed, CENTRAL, and Science Citation index expanded for randomised clinical trials and randomised cross-over studies comparing laparoscopic training models. Studies comparing one model with no training were also included. The reference list of identified trials was searched for further relevant studies. Fifty-eight trials evaluating several training forms and involving 1591 participants were included (four studies with a low risk of bias). Training (virtual reality (VR) or video trainer (VT)) versus no training improves surgical skills in the majority of trials. Both VR and VT are as effective in most studies. VR training is superior to traditional laparoscopic training in the operating room. Outcome results for VR robotic simulations versus robot training show no clear difference in effectiveness for either model. Only one trial included human cadavers and observed better results versus VR for one out of four scores. Contrasting results are observed when robotic technology is compared with manual laparoscopy. VR training and VT training are valid teaching models. Practicing on these models similarly improves surgical skills. A combination of both methods is recommended in a surgical curriculum. VR training is superior to unstructured traditional training in the operating room. The reciprocal effectiveness of the other models to learn surgical skills has not yet been established.

  16. [E-learning in the education and training of physicians. Methods, results, evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeker, M; Klar, R

    2006-05-01

    E-learning has been established in the education and training of physicians in various types: linear sequential and hyper-textual forms of multimedia presentations and texts, tutorial systems and simulations. Case-based e-learning systems are of special importance in medicine because they allow for mediation of process and practical knowledge by presentation of authentic medical cases in a simulated environment. The integration into the medical education and advanced professional training is crucial for the long-term success of e-learning; in case-based systems this can be accomplished by blended learning approaches which combine elements of traditional teaching with e-learning. Learning management systems (LMS) support integration of traditional teaching and e-learning by serving as an organizational platform for content of teaching. Further, they provide means of communication for trainers and trainees, authoring tools, interactive components, course management and role-based sharing concept. The dissemination of e-learning can be fostered by attention to requirements and user analysis, early adoption to organizational structures, curricular integration and continuous cooperation with students. Summarized, didactic and organizational aspects determine the success of our own e-learning offers as well as they influence the general further development of e-learning more than technical features.

  17. A Corrective Training Algorithm for Adaptive Learning in Bag Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, H H; Chen, Hsin-Hsi; Lee, Yue-Shi

    1994-01-01

    The sampling problem in training corpus is one of the major sources of errors in corpus-based applications. This paper proposes a corrective training algorithm to best-fit the run-time context domain in the application of bag generation. It shows which objects to be adjusted and how to adjust their probabilities. The resulting techniques are greatly simplified and the experimental results demonstrate the promising effects of the training algorithm from generic domain to specific domain. In general, these techniques can be easily extended to various language models and corpus-based applications.

  18. Advancing MCH Interdisciplinary/Interprofessional Leadership Training and Practice Through a Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Meaghan C; Margolis, Lewis H; Rosenberg, Angela; Humphreys, Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Purpose The Interdisciplinary Leadership Learning Collaborative (ILLC), under the sponsorship of AUCD and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, brought together six teams, composed of 14 MCHB and UCEDD training programs to enhance their leadership training. Description Using adult learning principles, interactive training methods, and skill-focused learning, the ILLC built upon the evidence-based Interdisciplinary Leadership Development Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The program began with a 4-day on-site intensive and then continued through monthly conference calls, a mid-term on-site workshop, and a summary virtual workshop to present programmatic accomplishments and share plans for sustainability. Coaching/consultation for the teams around particular challenges was also part of the program. Assessment All teams reported enhancements in intentional leadership training, threading of leadership concepts across clinical, didactic, and workshop settings, and new collaborative partnerships for leadership training. Teams also identified a number of strategies to increase sustainability of their intentional leadership training efforts. Conclusion for Practice The learning collaborative is a productive model to address the growing need for interdisciplinary MCH leaders.

  19. Evaluation of Web-Based Training Courses by Means of Criteria on Learning Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisser, R.; Keefer, F.; Schoenfelder, C.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, due to the widespread use of digital media and the internet, more and more traditional education and training measures have been replaced or enhanced by elearning. In the context of the nuclear industry, however, with its stringent demand for well qualified and motivated human resources, it is very important to know to what extent these new learning formats will contribute to effective education and training. In cooperation with AREVA and within the scope of a master thesis, it was first investigated as to which factors greatly support the effectiveness of learning by using digital media, from a learner’s point of view in particular. Then, several criteria were developed that could be used to evaluate web based training courses. Next, these criteria were applied to three courses that have already been implemented at AREVA for different target groups and training objectives. The investigation has shown that factors which support the effectiveness of learning are not well known and not systematically applied in the training development process. Consequently, the success of training implementation depends to a great extent on the competence of external suppliers for e-learning programming. (Author)

  20. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Gonzaga, Mubuuke A., E-mail: gmubuuke@gmail.co [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  1. Training of tonal similarity ratings in non-musicians: a "rapid learning" approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oechslin, Mathias S; Läge, Damian; Vitouch, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Although cognitive music psychology has a long tradition of expert-novice comparisons, experimental training studies are rare. Studies on the learning progress of trained novices in hearing harmonic relationships are still largely lacking. This paper presents a simple training concept using the example of tone/triad similarity ratings, demonstrating the gradual progress of non-musicians compared to musical experts: In a feedback-based "rapid learning" paradigm, participants had to decide for single tones and chords whether paired sounds matched each other well. Before and after the training sessions, they provided similarity judgments for a complete set of sound pairs. From these similarity matrices, individual relational sound maps, intended to display mental representations, were calculated by means of non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS), and were compared to an expert model through procrustean transformation. Approximately half of the novices showed substantial learning success, with some participants even reaching the level of professional musicians. Results speak for a fundamental ability to quickly train an understanding of harmony, show inter-individual differences in learning success, and demonstrate the suitability of the scaling method used for learning research in music and other domains. Results are discussed in the context of the "giftedness" debate.

  2. Individual Differences and Learning Performance in Computer-based Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Navigation in hypermedia learning systems: experts vs. novices. Computers in Human Behavior , 22, 251–266. Chi, M. T. H., Glaser, R., & Rees, E...communication technologies on performance in a Web-based learning program. Computers in Human Behavior , 22(6), 962-970. Shivpuri, S., Schmitt, N., Oswald

  3. Knowledgeable Learning and Conceptual Change: Value Adding to Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeigh, Tony

    2013-01-01

    This report concerns the use of pre and post responses to an online questionnaire as evidence of knowledgeable learning by education students at a regional Australian university. Factor analysis was used to reveal conceptual changes in the students' thinking about classroom management across a unit of learning they had undertaken. These changes…

  4. Adult Learning Strategies in an Onsite Training Program in Tunisia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayachi, Zeineb

    2015-01-01

    The new market place has dictated on adults the use of English as it is the first international language used in business. However, learning a foreign language becomes more and more complicated as the learner gets older, is in a mature command of L1 and L2, and does not have enough time to learn due to professional responsibilities. Contrary to…

  5. Evidence-based Frameworks for Teaching and Learning in Classical Singing Training: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocco, Laura; Madill, Catherine J; McCabe, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The study systematically reviews evidence-based frameworks for teaching and learning of classical singing training. This is a systematic review. A systematic literature search of 15 electronic databases following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. Eligibility criteria included type of publication, participant characteristics, intervention, and report of outcomes. Quality rating scales were applied to support assessment of the included literature. Data analysis was conducted using meta-aggregation. Nine papers met the inclusion criteria. No complete evidence-based teaching and learning framework was found. Thematic content analysis showed that studies either (1) identified teaching practices in one-to-one lessons, (2) identified student learning strategies in one-to-one lessons or personal practice sessions, and (3) implemented a tool to enhance one specific area of teaching and learning in lessons. The included studies showed that research in music education is not always specific to musical genre or instrumental group, with four of the nine studies including participant teachers and students of classical voice training only. The overall methodological quality ratings were low. Research in classical singing training has not yet developed an evidence-based framework for classical singing training. This review has found that introductory information on teaching and learning practices has been provided, and tools have been suggested for use in the evaluation of the teaching-learning process. High-quality methodological research designs are needed. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-Lasting Perceptual Learning Occurs Not during but after Active Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Ding

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous behavioral studies have shown that human perceptual learning (PL occurs not only within active training sessions but also between sessions when no actual training is conducted. Once acquired, the learning effect can last for a long term, from months to even years, without further training (Karni et al, Nature, 1993. It's not clear, however, whether fast (within-session and slow (between-session visual PL involves different neural mechanisms, and whether both contribute to the long-term preservation. Recently, by observing the time course of learning-associated ERP changes over a period of six months, we found that fast and slow learning involved distinct ERP changes, which played different role on the preservation of PL: while the ERP changes associated with fast learning can only last for a short term (several days, those associated with slow learning can be retained for a long-term (several months after training has been stopped. We have observed these findings in two distinct visual tasks: line orientation detection (Qu et al., Neuropsychologia, 2010 and vernier tasks (Ding et al., in preparation so far. A general model of PL was proposed based on our findings and literatures.

  7. Perceptual learning and generalization resulting from training on an auditory amplitude-modulation detection task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Matthew B; Wright, Beverly A

    2011-02-01

    Fluctuations in sound amplitude provide important cues to the identity of many sounds including speech. Of interest here was whether the ability to detect these fluctuations can be improved with practice, and if so whether this learning generalizes to untrained cases. To address these issues, normal-hearing adults (n = 9) were trained to detect sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM; 80-Hz rate, 3-4 kHz bandpass carrier) 720 trials/day for 6-7 days and were tested before and after training on related SAM-detection and SAM-rate-discrimination conditions. Controls (n = 9) only participated in the pre- and post-tests. The trained listeners improved more than the controls on the trained condition between the pre- and post-tests, but different subgroups of trained listeners required different amounts of practice to reach asymptotic performance, ranging from 1 (n = 6) to 4-6 (n = 3) sessions. This training-induced learning did not generalize to detection with two untrained carrier spectra (5 kHz low-pass and 0.5-1.5 kHz bandpass) or to rate discrimination with the trained rate and carrier spectrum, but there was some indication that it generalized to detection with two untrained rates (30 and 150 Hz). Thus, practice improved the ability to detect amplitude modulation, but the generalization of this learning to untrained cases was somewhat limited.

  8. Promoting Cooperative Learning in the Classroom: Comparing Explicit and Implicit Training Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Elliott

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated whether providing 4th and 5th-grade students with explicit instruction in prerequisite cooperative-learning skills and techniques would enhance their academic performance and promote in them positive attitudes towards cooperative learning. Overall, students who received explicit training outperformed their peers on both the unit project and test and presented more favourable attitudes towards cooperative learning. The findings of this study support the use of explicitly instructing students about the components of cooperative learning prior to engaging in collaborative activities. Implications for teacher-education are discussed.

  9. The Education and Training of Learning Technologists: A Competences Approach (Report to IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technologies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Roger; Kinshuk; Koper, Rob; Okamoto, Toshio; Spector, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The educational and training requirements of Advanced Learning Technology (ALT) need to engage with curricula that reflect the varied requirements of the workplace and of society. Students have a range of interests and ambitions in ALT which the instructional process has to accommodate and support. With these considerations in mind the IEEE…

  10. E-Learning in small and medium sized enterprises across Europe: attitudes towards technology, learning and training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, W.; Lockhorst, D.

    2009-01-01

    There is little doubt that e-learning has had a major impact in large companies, both in allowing the extension of training provision and in facilitating professional development activities. However, the picture is far less clear when it comes to Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). Technology and a

  11. The Education and Training of Learning Technologists: A Competences Approach (Report to IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technologies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Roger; Kinshuk; Koper, Rob; Okamoto, Toshio; Spector, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The educational and training requirements of Advanced Learning Technology (ALT) need to engage with curricula that reflect the varied requirements of the workplace and of society. Students have a range of interests and ambitions in ALT which the instructional process has to accommodate and support. With these considerations in mind the IEEE…

  12. Electric utility pole yard training facility: Designing an effective learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Robert P.

    The primary responsibility of electric utilities is to supply consistent, dependable, and affordable energy to private customers, businesses, and industries. As with many businesses, electric utilities are experiencing the effects of an aging workforce and expending considerable resources to train their current and replacement workers. Community colleges can partner with electric utilities to provide effective learning environments for these workers, and gain access to new sources of revenue and community support for the colleges. The purpose of this study was to describe the functions, features, and major design issues of an effective learning environment for training electric utility industry workers, the electric utility line-worker pole yard. Case studies of three "state of the art" line-worker pole yard training environments provide the basis for the study's findings and implications. The study was guided by the following research questions: (1) What is the function of a line-worker pole yard in supporting effective training? (2) What are the features of present day ("state of the art") line-worker pole yard learning environments? and (3) What are the major issues that need to be addressed in designing a line-worker pole yard learning environment for the future? The study participants included industry representatives, training coordinators, instructors, and students from the three selected "state of the art" line-worker pole yard sites. The overall findings from the study resulted in composites of the desired features of learning outcomes, learning process, and learning environment for a line-worker pole yard training program and major issues that are affecting the future design of these training programs. Composite findings of a pole-yard training environment included unique features associated with: (a) outdoor, (b) indoor, (c) underground, (d) classroom, (e) gathering places, and (f) work-based learning components. Composite findings with regard to major

  13. The Applicati on of E-learning and Distance Learning Technologies to Crew Education and Training in the Russian Federaiton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Gorobtsov; N.Kovalnogova; S.Kurguzov; V.Marich; S.Sokolov

    2016-01-01

    The article examines the world experience of e-learning as well as distance education technologies within the edu-cation process organization on higher and post-higher education programs .There have been listed the results of the most popular e-learning platforms analysis .Furthermore, there have been looked through the core legislative background of the development of the mentioned technologies in Russia and worldwide among the universities , specialized in seafarers training .There have been al-so drawn up the points of the Admiral Makarov State University of Maritime and Inland Shipping ( Admiral Makarov SUMIS ) de-sign of the distance education system LMS “FARWATER” in compliance with the International Convention on Standards of Train -ing,Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers (STCW Convention).The practical application of distance education system to the advanced professional training has been discussed in the article .

  14. Evaluating the Viability of Mobile Learning to Enhance Management Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Macdonald

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative research project was conducted to test the viability of augmenting an e-learning program for workplace learners using mobile content delivered through smart phones. Ten learners taking a six week web-based e-learning course were given smart phones which enabled them to access approximately 70% of the course content, in addition to having access to the full course via a standard e-learning website. Mobile content was provided in a variety of forms, including text, audio and video files, a mobile multiple-choice quiz website, and links to streaming videos. Study participants who were regular users of mobile phones found the mobile learning materials to be user-friendly, offering increased convenience and flexibility. Use of the mobile content tended to increase as learners spent more time in their day away from locations where Internet-linked computers could be found. Video was found to be the most effective means of presenting content, followed by audio and text. The most promising role of mobile learning appears to be to augment rather than replace e-learning or blended learning.

  15. Motor learning without doing: trial-by-trial improvement in motor performance during mental training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentili, Rodolphe; Han, Cheol E; Schweighofer, Nicolas; Papaxanthis, Charalambos

    2010-08-01

    Although there is converging experimental and clinical evidences suggesting that mental training with motor imagery can improve motor performance, it is unclear how humans can learn movements through mental training despite the lack of sensory feedback from the body and the environment. In a first experiment, we measured the trial-by-trial decrease in durations of executed movements (physical training group) and mentally simulated movements (motor-imagery training group), by means of training on a multiple-target arm-pointing task requiring high accuracy and speed. Movement durations were significantly lower in posttest compared with pretest after both physical and motor-imagery training. Although both the posttraining performance and the rate of learning were smaller in motor-imagery training group than in physical training group, the change in movement duration and the asymptotic movement duration after a hypothetical large number of trials were identical. The two control groups (eye-movement training and rest groups) did not show change in movement duration. In the second experiment, additional kinematic analyses revealed that arm movements were straighter and faster both immediately and 24 h after physical and motor-imagery training. No such improvements were observed in the eye-movement training group. Our results suggest that the brain uses state estimation, provided by internal forward model predictions, to improve motor performance during mental training. Furthermore, our results suggest that mental practice can, at least in young healthy subjects and if given after a short bout of physical practice, be successfully substituted to physical practice to improve motor performance.

  16. Imperfect practice makes perfect: error management training improves transfer of learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyre, Liv; Tabor, Ann; Ringsted, Charlotte; Tolsgaard, Martin G

    2017-02-01

    Traditionally, trainees are instructed to practise with as few errors as possible during simulation-based training. However, transfer of learning may improve if trainees are encouraged to commit errors. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of error management instructions compared with error avoidance instructions during simulation-based ultrasound training. Medical students (n = 60) with no prior ultrasound experience were randomised to error management training (EMT) (n = 32) or error avoidance training (EAT) (n = 28). The EMT group was instructed to deliberately make errors during training. The EAT group was instructed to follow the simulator instructions and to commit as few errors as possible. Training consisted of 3 hours of simulation-based ultrasound training focusing on fetal weight estimation. Simulation-based tests were administered before and after training. Transfer tests were performed on real patients 7-10 days after the completion of training. Primary outcomes were transfer test performance scores and diagnostic accuracy. Secondary outcomes included performance scores and diagnostic accuracy during the simulation-based pre- and post-tests. A total of 56 participants completed the study. On the transfer test, EMT group participants attained higher performance scores (mean score: 67.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 62.4-72.9%) than EAT group members (mean score: 51.7%, 95% CI: 45.8-57.6%) (p training improves the transfer of learning to the clinical setting compared with error avoidance instructions. Rather than teaching to avoid errors, the use of errors for learning should be explored further in medical education theory and practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  17. The Future of Learning and Training in Augmented Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangdon Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Students acquire knowledge and skills through different modes of instruction that include classroom lectures with textbooks, computers, and the like. The availability and choice of learning innovation depends on the individual’s access to technologies and on the infrastructure environment of the surrounding community. In this rapidly changing society, information needs to be adopted and applied at the right time and right place to maintain efficiency in all settings. Augmented reality is one technology that dramatically shifts the timing and location of learning. This paper describes augmented reality, how it applies to learning, and its potential impact on future education.

  18. The Effect of Inquiry Training Learning Model Based on Just in Time Teaching for Problem Solving Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnip, Betty; Wahyuni, Ida; Tanjung, Yul Ifda

    2016-01-01

    One of the factors that can support successful learning activity is the use of learning models according to the objectives to be achieved. This study aimed to analyze the differences in problem-solving ability Physics student learning model Inquiry Training based on Just In Time Teaching [JITT] and conventional learning taught by cooperative model…

  19. Experience-dependent learning of auditory temporal resolution: evidence from Carnatic-trained musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srikanta K; Panda, Manasa R

    2014-01-22

    Musical training and experience greatly enhance the cortical and subcortical processing of sounds, which may translate to superior auditory perceptual acuity. Auditory temporal resolution is a fundamental perceptual aspect that is critical for speech understanding in noise in listeners with normal hearing, auditory disorders, cochlear implants, and language disorders, yet very few studies have focused on music-induced learning of temporal resolution. This report demonstrates that Carnatic musical training and experience have a significant impact on temporal resolution assayed by gap detection thresholds. This experience-dependent learning in Carnatic-trained musicians exhibits the universal aspects of human perception and plasticity. The present work adds the perceptual component to a growing body of neurophysiological and imaging studies that suggest plasticity of the peripheral auditory system at the level of the brainstem. The present work may be intriguing to researchers and clinicians alike interested in devising cross-cultural training regimens to alleviate listening-in-noise difficulties.

  20. Training and Support of Sessional Staff to Improve Quality of Teaching and Learning at Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Gillian; Crane, Linda; Heslop, Ian; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-06-25

    Sessional staff is increasingly involved in teaching at universities, playing a pivotal role in bridging the gap between theory and practice for students, especially in the health professions, including pharmacy. Although sessional staff numbers have increased substantially in recent years, limited attention has been paid to the quality of teaching and learning provided by this group. This review will discuss the training and support of sessional staff, with a focus on Australian universities, including the reasons for and potential benefits of training, and structure and content of training programs. Although sessional staff views these programs as valuable, there is a lack of in-depth evaluations of the outcomes of the programs for sessional staff, students and the university. Quality assurance of such programs is only guaranteed, however, if these evaluations extend to the impact of this training and support on student learning.

  1. Assessment of prior learning in vocational education and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Aarkrog, Vibe

    The article deals about the results of a study of the assessment of prior learning among adult workers who want to obtain formal qualifications as skilled workers. The study contributes to developing methods for assessing prior learning including both the teachers’ ways of eliciting the students......’ knowledge, skills and competences during the students’ performances and the methods that the teachers apply in order to assess the students’ prior learning in relation to the regulations of the current VET-program. In particular the study focuses on how to assess not only the students’ explicated knowledge...... and skills but also their competences, i.e. the way the students use their skills and knowledge to perform in practice. Based on a description of the assessment procedures the article discusses central issues in relation to the assessment of prior learning. The empirical data have been obtained in the VET...

  2. Physical Training, Fitness, and Injuries: Lessons Learned From Military Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bruce H; Hauschild, Veronique D

    2015-11-01

    Injuries are the leading cause of medical encounters across the U.S. military services resulting in more than 2.0 million clinic visits per year. Almost 50% of military service members experience an injury each year and half of those injuries are caused by physical training (PT), exercise, or sports. To prevent a problem as large and complex as injuries in the military requires a systematic approach. Several key questions must be answered to effectively address a problem such as injuries: (1) how big is the problem? (2) what are the causes and risk factors for the problem? (3) do modifiable risk factors for the problem exist? and (4) what works to prevent the problem? The article discusses leading causes of injuries for U.S. Army populations. It then explores key risk factors for exercise and training-related injuries: (1) the amounts of training, (2) types of training activities, (3) participants level of fitness, and (4) personal health risk behaviors. The article concludes with a review of prevention strategies illustrating interventions that have been shown to be effective, and others that are not effective. The data presented suggest that PT and exercise cause injuries and that modifications of training are most likely to prevent the problem.

  3. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC !

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom CLEAN-2002 is a free of charge, half-day seminar in the context of Technical Training for the LHC. The course is designed for personnel working or managing activities in an assembly cleanroom, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory. CLEAN-2002 is aimed at raising awareness about good working practices in a cleanroom, and at providing practical examples, analysis tools, and documentation. Specific problems put forward beforehand by attendees will also be addressed. If you are interested in CLEAN-2002, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/ The next session, in English, will be on Friday, 11 April 2003 (afternoon). Organiser: Davide Vitè / HR-TD / 75141 Davide.Vite@cern.ch

  4. CERN Technical Training Programme: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    CLEAN-2002: Working in a Cleanroom CLEAN-2002 is a free of charge, half-day seminar in the context of Technical Training for the LHC. The course is designed for personnel working or managing activities in an assembly cleanroom, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory. CLEAN-2002 is aimed at raising awareness about good working practices in a cleanroom, and at providing practical examples, analysis tools, and documentation. Specific problems put forward beforehand by attendees will also be addressed. If you are interested in CLEAN-2002, please discuss with your supervisor or your DTO. More information and online registration by EDH are available from the Technical Training pages: http://www.cern.ch/TechnicalTraining/ The next session in French will be on Thursday, 4 September 2003 (afternoon), and in English on Thursday, 23 October 2003 (afternoon). Organiser: Davide Vitè / HR-TD / 75141 Davide.Vite@cern.ch

  5. CERN TECHNICAL TRAINING 2002: LEARNING FOR THE LHC !

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2002-01-01

    - FEED-2002 - Analogue and Digital Techniques in Closed Loop Regulation Applications   FEED-2002 is a two-term course, given by CERN engineers in a new format within the framework of the Technical Training Programme. The course will review the techniques dealing with closed loop systems, focussing on time-invariant linear systems. FEED-2002 is composed of two terms, and of an open Introductory Lecture. Attendance to the Introductory Lecture is a prerequisite to the participation to both terms. All sessions will take place on Tuesdays afternoons in the Training Centre Auditorium, from 14h30 to 17h00. The course will be in English, with questions and answers also in French.   Introductory Lecture: AD/DA Conversion Techniques - An Overview Technical Training Seminar, 17 September 2002 (free attendance, no registration required) Lecturer: John Pett, SL-PO Programme: The modern Analogue to Digital (AD) and Digital to Analogue (DA) conversion methods. Digital representations of time-varying, rea...

  6. CERN TECHNICAL TRAINING 2002: LEARNING FOR THE LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    Davide Vitè

    2002-01-01

    - FEED-2002 - Analogue and Digital Techniques in Closed Loop Regulation Applications   FEED-2002 is a two-term course, given by CERN engineers in a new format within the framework of the Technical Training Programme. The course will review the techniques dealing with closed loop systems, focussing on time-invariant linear systems. FEED-2002 is composed of two terms, and of an open Introductory Lecture. Attendance to the Introductory Lecture is a prerequisite to the participation to both terms. All sessions will take place on Tuesdays afternoons in the Training Centre Auditorium, from 14h30 to 17h00. The course will be in English, with questions and answers also in French.   Introductory Lecture: AD/DA Conversion Techniques - An Overview Technical Training Seminar, 17 September 2002 (free attendance, no registration required) Lecturer: John Pett, SL-PO Programme: The modern Analogue to Digital (AD) and Digital to Analogue (DA) conversion methods. Digital representations of time-varyi...

  7. Training of tonal similarity ratings in non-musicians: a rapid learning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias S Oechslin

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Although music psychology has a long tradition of expert-novice comparisons, experimental training studies are rare. Studies on the learning progress of trained novices in hearing harmonic relationships are still largely lacking. This paper presents a simple training concept using the example of tone/triad similarity ratings, demonstrating the gradual progress of non-musicians compared to musical experts: In a feedback-based rapid learning paradigm, participants had to decide for single tones and chords whether paired sounds matched each other well. Before and after the training sessions, they provided similarity judgments for a complete set of sound pairs. From these similarity matrices, individual relational sound maps, aiming to map the mental representations, were calculated by means of non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS, which were compared to an expert model through procrustean transformation. Approximately half of the novices showed substantial learning success, with some participants even reaching the level of professional musicians. Results speak for a fundamental ability to quickly train an understanding of harmony, show inter-individual differences in learning success, and demonstrate the suitability of the scaling method used for music psychological research. Results are discussed in the context of the giftedness debate.

  8. Web 2.0 in Corporate Training: New Possibilities for Implementing e-learning within Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Antoni Martinez-Aceituno

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Web 2.0 tools offer both corporate training and online education in general the possibility of developing and applying new educational approaches. Its eminently social and participative orientation favors networking and aids the establishment of informal teaching-learning processes. This way of working and of learning can be channeled in organizations through 2.0 corporate training systems. In this paper, we set out a participative intervention method geared towards each organization defining, developing and applying its own model, while at the same time acquiring the necessary skills to consolidate it and allow it to evolve.

  9. Learning and Motivation to Transfer after an E-Learning Programme: Impact of Trainees' Motivation to Train, Personal Interaction and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Stephanie; Barbier, Marie; Faulx, Daniel; Hansez, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    While e-learning appears to be increasingly present in training and education, the systematic evaluation of its effectiveness remains understudied. In this paper, we determine the mediating role of satisfaction between motivation to train and personal interaction, on the one hand, and learning and motivation to transfer, on the other hand. A…

  10. A Model for an Open and Flexible E-Training Platform To Encourage Companies' Learning Culture and Meet Employees' Learning Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnasco, Andrea; Chirico, Marco; Parodi, Giancarlo; Scapolla, A. Marina

    2003-01-01

    Distance education is an answer to the demand for flexibility in training. The aim is to build a virtual learning community on the basis of a knowledge model that meets different learning needs. This article analyzes possible innovations in corporate training, and proposes a framework that integrates all information sources and offers practice…

  11. Predicting Motivation To Learn and Motivation To Transfer Learning Back to the Job in a Service Organization--A New Systemic Model for Training Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoghiorghes, Constantine

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of human resource development (HRD) focuses on an exploratory study that attempted to identify key predictors of motivation to learn during training and motivation to transfer learning back to the workplace, as well as examine the relationship between the two variables. Presents conceptual frameworks for training transfer. (Author/LRW)

  12. Network traffic classification based on ensemble learning and co-training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE HaiTao; LUO XiaoNan; MA FeiTeng; CHE ChunHui; WANG JianMin

    2009-01-01

    Classification of network traffic Is the essential step for many network researches. However, with the rapid evolution of Internet applications the effectiveness of the port-based or payload-based identifi-cation approaches has been greatly diminished In recent years. And many researchers begin to turn their attentions to an alternative machine learning based method. This paper presents a novel machine learning-based classification model, which combines ensemble learning paradigm with co-training tech-niques. Compared to previous approaches, most of which only employed single classifier, multiple clas-sifiers and semi-supervised learning are applied in our method and it mainly helps to overcome three shortcomings: limited flow accuracy rate, weak adaptability and huge demand of labeled training set. In this paper, statistical characteristics of IP flows are extracted from the packet level traces to establish the feature set, then the classification model is created and tested and the empirical results prove its feasibility and effectiveness.

  13. Training in Metacognitive Strategies for Students’ Vocabulary Improvement by Using Learning Journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itala Diaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the effects of metacognitive strategies to help beginning young learners with difficulties increasing and retaining vocabulary. This was a qualitative study in which participants first went through metacognitive strategy instruction to provide awareness of learning strategies. Following this instruction, students underwent a set of five interventions based on the cognitive academic language learning approach instructional model. These interventions, together with journaling progress, were used to train them in the use of the metacognitive strategies planning, monitoring, and evaluating. The findings showed that metacognitive strategy training has positively contributed to vocabulary acquisition skills, as participants were able to raise consciousness about some learning strategies and the use of metacognitive strategies to increase their vocabulary learning.

  14. Assessment of prior learning in adult vocational education and training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aarkrog, Vibe; Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    the assessment is based on a scholastic perception of the students’ needs for training, reflecting one of the most important challenges in APL: how can practical experience be transformed into credits for the knowledge parts of the programs? The study shows that by combining several APL methods and comparing...... the teachers’ assessments the teachers respond to the issues of validity and reliability. However, validity and reliability might be even further strengthened, if the competencies are well defined, if the education system is aware ofsecuring a reasonable balance between knowing how, knowing that, and knowing...... why, and if the teachers are adequately trained for the assessment procedures....

  15. Integrating dynamic stopping, transfer learning and language models in an adaptive zero-training ERP speller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Tangermann, Michael; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Objective. Most BCIs have to undergo a calibration session in which data is recorded to train decoders with machine learning. Only recently zero-training methods have become a subject of study. This work proposes a probabilistic framework for BCI applications which exploit event-related potentials (ERPs). For the example of a visual P300 speller we show how the framework harvests the structure suitable to solve the decoding task by (a) transfer learning, (b) unsupervised adaptation, (c) language model and (d) dynamic stopping. Approach. A simulation study compares the proposed probabilistic zero framework (using transfer learning and task structure) to a state-of-the-art supervised model on n = 22 subjects. The individual influence of the involved components (a)-(d) are investigated. Main results. Without any need for a calibration session, the probabilistic zero-training framework with inter-subject transfer learning shows excellent performance—competitive to a state-of-the-art supervised method using calibration. Its decoding quality is carried mainly by the effect of transfer learning in combination with continuous unsupervised adaptation. Significance. A high-performing zero-training BCI is within reach for one of the most popular BCI paradigms: ERP spelling. Recording calibration data for a supervised BCI would require valuable time which is lost for spelling. The time spent on calibration would allow a novel user to spell 29 symbols with our unsupervised approach. It could be of use for various clinical and non-clinical ERP-applications of BCI.

  16. Integrating dynamic stopping, transfer learning and language models in an adaptive zero-training ERP speller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindermans, Pieter-Jan; Tangermann, Michael; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2014-06-01

    Most BCIs have to undergo a calibration session in which data is recorded to train decoders with machine learning. Only recently zero-training methods have become a subject of study. This work proposes a probabilistic framework for BCI applications which exploit event-related potentials (ERPs). For the example of a visual P300 speller we show how the framework harvests the structure suitable to solve the decoding task by (a) transfer learning, (b) unsupervised adaptation, (c) language model and (d) dynamic stopping. A simulation study compares the proposed probabilistic zero framework (using transfer learning and task structure) to a state-of-the-art supervised model on n = 22 subjects. The individual influence of the involved components (a)-(d) are investigated. Without any need for a calibration session, the probabilistic zero-training framework with inter-subject transfer learning shows excellent performance--competitive to a state-of-the-art supervised method using calibration. Its decoding quality is carried mainly by the effect of transfer learning in combination with continuous unsupervised adaptation. A high-performing zero-training BCI is within reach for one of the most popular BCI paradigms: ERP spelling. Recording calibration data for a supervised BCI would require valuable time which is lost for spelling. The time spent on calibration would allow a novel user to spell 29 symbols with our unsupervised approach. It could be of use for various clinical and non-clinical ERP-applications of BCI.

  17. Manpower allocation in a cellular manufacturing system considering the impact of learning, training and combination of learning and training in operator skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a manpower allocation and cell loading problem is studied, where demand is sto-chastic. The inter-cell and intra-cell movements are considered and attention is focused on as-signing operators with different skill levels to operations, because cell performance in addition to load cell is dependent on manpower. The purpose of this article is manpower allocation in cellu-lar manufacturing with consideration to learning and training policies. The manpower skill levels are determined in order to enhance production rate. The main contribution of this approach is the scenarios of training and learning in addition to the combination of training and learning being simulated. By using these three scenarios, the skill level of workers increase which reduces the processing time. In this regard cell layout is static where processing times and customer demand follow a normal distribution. As one of the significant costs of industrial unit is related to pro-duction cost, this study has attempted to reduce these costs by increasing the skill level of opera-tor which causes to reduce the processing time. Scenarios are evaluated by using a simulation method that finally attained results indicate this simulation provides better manpower assign-ments.

  18. Learning Together 1: an educational model for training GPs, paediatricians: initial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaulay, Chloe; Spicer, John; Riches, Wendy; Lakhanpaul, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Learning Together is primarily an educational intervention, where paediatric registrars [SpRs] and General Practice (GP) registrars [GPSTs] see children together in a primary care setting. Over a six month period in 2013/2014, 44 learning pairs were set up mainly in North East and Central London. Proof of concept for the model at scale was achieved. Reported learning demonstrated: clinical learning themes of new knowledge, skill and communication skills; and collaborative themes of ongoing collaboration, satisfaction with team working and change in attitudes. These themes were identified in both sets of trainees. The self-reported learning is backed up by the results of a retrospective notes review of four common conditions based on NICE guidelines; constipation, asthma, feverish illness and eczema (CAFE). Guidance adherence improved from 57% before the intervention in solo GP training consultations to 72% during the joint clinic intervention (p Learning Together in its South London extension.

  19. The Effect of In-Service Teacher Training on Student Learning of English as a Second Language

    OpenAIRE

    Bando Grana, Rosangela; Xia LI

    2014-01-01

    In-service teacher training aims to improve the supply of public education. A randomized experiment was conducted in Mexico to test whether teacher training could increase teacher efficiency in public secondary schools. After seven and a half months of exposure to a trained teacher, students improved their English. This paper explores two mechanisms through which training can affect student learning. First, trained teachers improved their English by 0.35 standard deviations in the short run. ...

  20. E-learning in orthopedic surgery training: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Burton, Denver A

    2016-12-01

    E-learning is the use of internet-based resources in education. In the field of surgical education, this definition includes the use of virtual patient cases, digital modeling, online tutorials, as well as video recordings of surgical procedures and lectures. In recent years, e-learning has increasingly been considered a viable alternative to traditional teaching within a number of surgical fields. Here we present (1) a systematic review of literature assessing the efficacy of e-learning modules for orthopedic education and (2) a discussion of their relevance. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA). The search yielded a total of 255 non-duplicate citations that were screened using predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of 9 full text articles met inclusion criteria, which included the use of an objective outcome measure to evaluate an orthopedic e-learning module. Six studies assessed knowledge using a multiple-choice test and 4 assessed skills using a clinical exam. All studies showed positive score improvement pre- to post-intervention, and a majority showed greater score improvement than standard teaching methods in both knowledge (4/6 studies) and clinical skills (3/4 studies). E-learning represents an effective supplement or even alternative to standard teaching techniques within orthopedic education for both medical students and residents. Future work should focus on validating specific e-learning programs using standardized outcome measures and assessing long-term knowledge retention using e-learning platforms.

  1. Teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mena, Alodio

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a system of teaching and learning strategies for pedagogical training of non-educational students. The modeling of teaching and learning strategies presented is the result of a research project carried out at the University of Camagüey; its results are being employed successfully. A full description of research methods, rationale, and each of the suggested strategies is provided.

  2. Influence of aerobic exercise training on the neural correlates of motor learning in Parkinson's disease individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Duchesne, MA

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Our results reveal, for the first time, that exercise training produces functional changes in known motor learning related brain structures that are consistent with improved behavioural performance observed in PD patients. As such, AET can be a valuable non-pharmacological intervention to promote, not only physical fitness in early PD, but also better motor learning capacity useful in day-to-day activities through increased plasticity in motor related structures.

  3. Effects of Higher-order Cognitive Strategy Training on Gist Reasoning and Fact Learning in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn F Gamino

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving the reasoning skills of adolescents across the United States has become a major concern for educators and scientists who are dedicated to identifying evidence-based protocols to improve student outcome. This small sample randomized, control pilot study sought to determine the efficacy of higher-order cognitive training on gist-reasoning and fact-learning in an inner-city public middle school. The study compared gist-reasoning and fact-learning performances after training in a smaller sample when tested in Spanish, many of the students’ native language, versus English. The 54 eighth grade students who participated in this pilot study were enrolled in an urban middle school, predominantly from lower socio-economic status families, and were primarily of minority descent. The students were randomized into one of three groups, one that learned cognitive strategies promoting abstraction of meaning, a group that learned rote memory strategies, or a control group to ascertain the impact of each program on gist-reasoning and fact-learning from text-based information. We found that the students who had cognitive strategy instruction that entailed abstraction of meaning significantly improved their gist-reasoning and fact-learning ability. The students who learned rote memory strategies significantly improved their fact-learning scores from a text but not gist-reasoning ability. The control group showed no significant change in either gist-reasoning or fact-learning ability. A trend toward significant improvement in overall reading scores for the group that learned to abstract meaning as well as a significant correlation between gist-reasoning ability and the critical thinking on a state-mandated standardized reading test was also found. There were no significant differences between English and Spanish performance of gist reasoning and fact learning. Our findings suggest that teaching higher-order cognitive strategies facilitates gist

  4. School Learning and Adjustment: Interdisciplinary Training for Pediatricians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockowitz, Ruth J.; Stebbins, Winifred

    1975-01-01

    Describes and evaluates the School Health Programs of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry's pediatric training: first-year lectures, second-year electives, clinical consultation for house officers, and a year-long experience as a local school consulting pediatrician for associate residents and fellows. (JT)

  5. Employment and Training Schemes for Rural Youth: Learning from Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan-Thuy, N.

    1985-01-01

    Over the past two decades a number of African and Asian governments have experimented with various types of youth mobilization or employment and training schemes in trying to cope with rural youth unemployment. A critical appraisal is made of some of these in an attempt to establish criteria that productive employment programs for rural youth…

  6. Training the Trainers: Learning to Be a Principal Supervisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltzman, Amy

    2017-01-01

    While most principal supervisors are former principals themselves, few come to the role with specific training in how to do the job effectively. For this reason, both the Washington, D.C., and Tulsa, Oklahoma, principal supervisor programs include a strong professional development component. In this article, the author takes a look inside these…

  7. Training needs assessment of andalusian teachers in educational digital resources authoring for virtual learning environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Javier Romero Díaz de la Guardia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This research work has been conducted within the teacher training plan known as “Escuela TIC 2.0”, implemented by the Spanish Junta de Andalucía. The main aim is to obtain objective data regarding training needs for teachers in the autonomous region of Andalusia in terms of educational digital content authoring. To that end, we carried out a descriptive survey study on Andalusian teachers participating in teacher training courses on e-learning strategies that took place during the 2011- 2012 academic year.

  8. [E-learning and safety training: a precision teaching case study in AgustaWestland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguini, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    The complexity of the instrumentation installed on the last version of AgustaWestland helicopters requires the pilots to have a higher level of skills and abilities gained through a training more and more focused and effective. On the basis of these considerations the THSS (Training and Helicopter Support Systems) department of AW has experienced a non-conventional instructional methodology based on the Behavior Analysis, in particular a form of training called "Precision Teaching" This methodology is characterized by the fact that takes into account the SPEED not only the ACCURACY of learning.

  9. Team Work and Democratic Learning in Projectmanagement Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidon, Ivan; Rebollar, Ruben; Qvist, Palle

    of Zaragoza, which makes it possible to detect problems of teamwork functioning in groups while they develop their projects, in order to prevent possible failure once projects are completed. The Democratic Learning Questionnaire developed at Aalborg University, which studies the decision-making process within...... project groups in order to obtain an indication of the degree of student participation in a democratic learning system. The results obtained have confirmed the validity of the first questionnaire for the early detection of teamwork functioning problems in groups. The second questionnaire has made....... The functioning of a team will be characterized, among other things, by the way it is organized and the way decisions are reached within it. A new term has appeared lately to refer to this concept: Democratic Learning. This paper shows the results obtained in an experiment carried out at the Universities...

  10. Code Carnivals: resuscitating Code Blue training with accelerated learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, Vicky A; Malone, Peggy; Brim, Carla; Schoonover, Heather; Nordstrom, Cindy; Selzler, Melissa

    2009-12-01

    Nurses in the hospital setting must be knowledgeable about resuscitation procedures and proficient in the delivery of care during an emergency. They must be ready to implement their knowledge and skills at a moment's notice. A common dilemma for many nurses is that cardiopulmonary emergencies (Code Blues) are infrequent occurrences. Therefore, how do nurses remain competent and confident in their implementation of emergency skills while having limited exposure to the equipment and minimal experience in emergency situations? A team of nurse educators at a regional medical center in Washington State applied adult learning theory and accelerated learning techniques to develop and present a series of learning activities to enhance the staff's familiarity with emergency equipment and procedures. The series began with a carnival venue that provided hands-on practice and review of emergency skills and was reinforced with subsequent random unannounced code drills led by both educators and charge nurses. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Training shortest-path tractography: Automatic learning of spatial priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasenburg, Niklas; Liptrot, Matthew George; Reislev, Nina Linde;

    2016-01-01

    knowledge. Here we demonstrate how such prior knowledge, or indeed any prior spatial information, can be automatically incorporated into a shortest-path tractography approach to produce more robust results. We describe how such a prior can be automatically generated (learned) from a population, and we...... demonstrate that our framework also retains support for conventional interactive constraints such as waypoint regions. We apply our approach to the open access, high quality Human Connectome Project data, as well as a dataset acquired on a typical clinical scanner. Our results show that the use of a learned...... prior substantially increases the overlap of tractography outputwith a reference atlas on both populations, and this is confirmed by visual inspection. Furthermore, we demonstrate how a prior learned on the high quality dataset significantly increases the overlap with the reference for the more typical...

  12. The dread factor: how hazards and safety training influence learning and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael J; Salvador, Rommel O; Smith-Crowe, Kristin; Chan-Serafin, Suzanne; Smith, Alexis; Sonesh, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of hypotheses derived from social and experiential learning theories, we meta-analytically investigated how safety training and workplace hazards impact the development of safety knowledge and safety performance. The results were consistent with an expected interaction between the level of engagement of safety training and hazardous event/exposure severity in the promotion of safety knowledge and performance. For safety knowledge and safety performance, highly engaging training was considerably more effective than less engaging training when hazardous event/exposure severity was high, whereas highly and less engaging training had comparable levels of effectiveness when hazardous event/exposure severity was low. Implications of these findings for theory testing and incorporating information on objective risk into workplace safety research and practice are discussed.

  13. Towards developing high-fidelity simulated learning environment training modules in audiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzulkarnain, A A; Rahmat, S; Mohd Puzi, N A F; Badzis, M

    2017-02-01

    This discussion paper reviews and synthesises the literature on simulated learning environment (SLE) from allied health sciences, medical and nursing in general and audiology specifically. The focus of the paper is on discussing the use of high-fidelity (HF) SLE and describing the challenges for developing a HF SLE for clinical audiology training. Through the review of the literature, this paper discusses seven questions, (i) What is SLE? (ii) What are the types of SLEs? (iii) How is SLE classified? (iv) What is HF SLE? (v) What types of SLEs are available in audiology and their level of fidelity? (vi) What are the components needed for developing HF SLE? (vii) What are the possible types of HF SLEs that are suitable for audiology training? Publications were identified by structured searches from three major databases PubMed, Web of Knowledge and PsychInfo and from the reference lists of relevant articles. The authors discussed and mapped the levels of fidelity of SLE audiology training modules from the literature and the learning domains involved in the clinical audiology courses. The discussion paper has highlighted that most of the existing SLE audiology training modules consist of either low- or medium-fidelity types of simulators. Those components needed to achieve a HF SLE for audiology training are also highlighted. Overall, this review recommends that the combined approach of different levels and types of SLE could be used to obtain a HF SLE training module in audiology training.

  14. Varied Practice in Laparoscopy Training: Beneficial Learning Stimulation or Cognitive Overload?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward N. eSpruit

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractDetermining the optimal design for surgical skills training is an ongoing research endeavor. In education literature, varied practice is listed as a positive intervention to improve acquisition of knowledge and motor skills. In the current study we tested the effectiveness of a varied practice intervention during laparoscopy training. 24 trainees (control group without prior experience received a three week laparoscopic skills training utilizing four basic and one advanced training task. 28 trainees (experimental group received the same training with a random training task schedule, more frequent task switching and inverted viewing conditions on the four basic training tasks, but not the advanced task. Results showed inferior performance of the experimental group on the four basic laparoscopy tasks during training, at the end of training and at a two month retention session. We assume the inverted viewing conditions have led to the deterioration of learning in the experimental group because no significant differences were found between groups on the only task that had not been practiced under inverted viewing conditions; the advanced laparoscopic task. Potential moderating effects of inter-task similarity, task complexity and trainee characteristics are discussed.

  15. Teacher Training in a Synchronous Cyber Face-to-Face Classroom: Characterizing and Supporting the Online Teachers' Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuping; Chen, Nian-Shing; Levy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the learning process undertaken by language teachers in a cyber face-to-face teacher training program. Eight tertiary Chinese language teachers attended a 12-week training program conducted in an online synchronous learning environment characterized by multimedia-based, oral and visual interaction. The term "cyber…

  16. Integrating Faculty Led Service Learning Training to Quantify Height of Natural Resources from a Spatial Science Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Daniel R.; Kulhavy, David L.; Busch-Petersen, Kai; Hung, I.-Kuai

    2016-01-01

    Arthur Temple College of Forestry and Agriculture (ATCOFA) faculty members were trained how to integrate service learning activities within senior level classes at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFASU) in Nacogdoches, Texas. The service learning training, taught under the acronym Mentored Undergraduate Scholarship (MUGS), involved meeting…

  17. Enhancing Learners' Self-Directed Use of Technology for Language Learning: The Effectiveness of an Online Training Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chun; Shum, Mark; Tian, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Enhancing self-directed use of technology for language learning is essential for maximizing the potential of technology for language learning. Understanding how to construct learner training to promote this critical competency is of great significance. This study examined the effectiveness of an online training platform aimed at enhancing the…

  18. Training Self-Regulated Learning in the Classroom: Development and Evaluation of Learning Materials to Train Self-Regulated Learning during Regular Mathematics Lessons at Primary School

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the intervention based on the self-regulation theory by Zimmerman (2000) was to promote a powerful learning environment for supporting self-regulated learning by using learning materials. In the study, primary school teachers were asked to implement specific learning materials into their regular mathematics lessons in grade four. These learning materials focused on particular (meta)cognitive and motivational components of self-regulated learning and were subdivided into six units, ...

  19. Free-access open-source e-learning in comprehensive neurosurgery skills training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Jotwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since the end of last century, technology has taken a front seat in dispersion of medical education. Advancements of technology in neurosurgery and traditional training methods are now being challenged by legal and ethical concerns of patient safety, resident work-hour restriction and cost of operating-room time. To supplement the existing neurosurgery education pattern, various e-learning platforms are introduced as structured, interactive learning system. Materials and Methods: This study focuses on the concept, formulation, development and impact of web based learning platforms dedicated to neurosurgery discipline to disseminate education, supplement surgical knowledge and improve skills of neurosurgeons. ′Neurosurgery Education and Training School (NETS, e-learning platform′ has integration of web-based technologies like ′Content Management System′ for organizing the education material and ′Learning Management System′ for updating neurosurgeons. NETS discussion forum networks neurosurgeons, neuroscientists and neuro-technologists across the globe facilitating collaborative translational research. Results: Multi-authored neurosurgical e-learning material supplements the deficiencies of regular time-bound education. Interactive open-source, global, free-access e-learning platform of NETS has around 1 425 visitors/month from 73 countries; ratio of new visitors to returning visitors 42.3; 57.7 (2; 64,380 views from 190 subscribers for surgical videos, 3-D animation, graphics based training modules (3; average 402 views per post. Conclusion: The e-Learning platforms provide updated educational content that make them "quick, surf, find and extract" resources. e-Learning tools like web-based education, social interactive platform and question-answer forum will save unnecessary expenditure of time and travel of neurosurgeons seeking knowledge. The need for free access platforms is more pronounced for the neurosurgeons and

  20. Investigating a model for lecturer training that enables lecturers to plan and carry out meaningful e-learning activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Christopher; Hansen, Pernille Stenkil; Christensen, Inger-Marie F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of a lecturer training model in the shape of an e-learning project based on research on adult and work-based learning. A survey was conducted to explore participants’ learning experiences. Findings show high overall satisfaction, motivation and engagement. Suggest......This paper reports on the effect of a lecturer training model in the shape of an e-learning project based on research on adult and work-based learning. A survey was conducted to explore participants’ learning experiences. Findings show high overall satisfaction, motivation and engagement....... Suggestions for improvement include better integration of the e-learning project with other lecturer training components, supporting participants in formulating the e-learning project and providing additional opportunities for reflection and feedback....

  1. The Future of Learning and Training in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kangdon

    2012-01-01

    Students acquire knowledge and skills through different modes of instruction that include classroom lectures with textbooks, computers, and the like. The availability and choice of learning innovation depends on the individual's access to technologies and on the infrastructure environment of the surrounding community. In this rapidly changing…

  2. How Learning Theory Creates a Foundation for SI Leader Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Glen; Hurley, Maureen; Unite, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    The exploration of alternative teaching and learning strategies such as those utilised in Supplemental Instruction (SI) is becoming increasingly important as students arrive at university less prepared for the rigors of higher education. Keeping these changes in mind, it is necessary to review the theories that inform our approach to ensure the…

  3. Training Lp norm multiple kernel learning in the primal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhizheng; Xia, Shixiong; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Lei

    2013-10-01

    Some multiple kernel learning (MKL) models are usually solved by utilizing the alternating optimization method where one alternately solves SVMs in the dual and updates kernel weights. Since the dual and primal optimization can achieve the same aim, it is valuable in exploring how to perform Lp norm MKL in the primal. In this paper, we propose an Lp norm multiple kernel learning algorithm in the primal where we resort to the alternating optimization method: one cycle for solving SVMs in the primal by using the preconditioned conjugate gradient method and other cycle for learning the kernel weights. It is interesting to note that the kernel weights in our method can obtain analytical solutions. Most importantly, the proposed method is well suited for the manifold regularization framework in the primal since solving LapSVMs in the primal is much more effective than solving LapSVMs in the dual. In addition, we also carry out theoretical analysis for multiple kernel learning in the primal in terms of the empirical Rademacher complexity. It is found that optimizing the empirical Rademacher complexity may obtain a type of kernel weights. The experiments on some datasets are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Computer-supported inquiry learning: effects of training and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beishuizen, Jos; Wilhelm, Pascal; Schimmel, Marieke

    2004-01-01

    Inquiry learning requires the ability to understand that theory and evidence have to be distinguished and co-ordinated. Moreover, learners have to be able to control two or more independent variables when formulating hypotheses, designing experiments and interpreting outcomes. Can sixth-grade (9–10

  5. Incremental concept learning with few training examples and hierarchical classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Eendebak, P.T.; Schutte, K.; Azzopardi, G.; Burghouts, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Object recognition and localization are important to automatically interpret video and allow better querying on its content. We propose a method for object localization that learns incrementally and addresses four key aspects. Firstly, we show that for certain applications, recognition is feasible

  6. Incremental concept learning with few training examples and hierarchical classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Eendebak, P.T.; Schutte, K.; Azzopardi, G.; Burghouts, G.J.

    2015-01-01

    Object recognition and localization are important to automatically interpret video and allow better querying on its content. We propose a method for object localization that learns incrementally and addresses four key aspects. Firstly, we show that for certain applications, recognition is feasible w

  7. Online Distance Learning and Music Training: Benefits, Drawbacks and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoupidou, Theano

    2014-01-01

    This study examines online distance learning (ODL) as applied in music and music education programmes at different educational levels with a special focus on the digital tools employed in such programmes. It aims to provide an up-to-date snapshot of the current online courses focusing on the potential benefits and drawbacks of ODL from the…

  8. Business Meeting Training on Its Head: Inverted and Embedded Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praet, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the value of using embedding to extend the notion of first exposure learning in flipped classroom practices. It describes a preclass assignment for a meeting and negotiation skills course, in which students are instructed to observe an authentic business meeting, interview participants of the meeting, photograph the…

  9. Web-Based Learning and Training for Virtual Metrology Lab

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Zahrani, Fahad

    2010-01-01

    The use of World Web Wide for distance education has received increasing attention over the past decades. The real challenge of adapting this technology for engineering education and training is to facilitate the laboratory experiments via Internet. In the sciences, measurement plays an important role. The accuracy of the measurement, as well as the units, help scientists to better understand phenomena occurring in nature. This paper introduces Metrology educators to the use and adoption of Java-applets in order to create virtual, online Metrology laboratories for students. These techniques have been used to successfully form a laboratory course which augments the more conventional lectures in concepts of Metrology course at Faculty of Engineering, Albaha University, KSA. Improvements of the package are still undergoing to incorporate Web-based technologies (Internet home page, HTML, Java programming etc...). This Web-based education and training has been successfully class-tested within an undergraduate prel...

  10. Extended apprenticeship learning in doctoral training and supervision - moving beyond 'cookbook recipes'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanggaard, Lene; Wegener, Charlotte

    An apprenticeship perspective on learning in academia sheds light on the potential for mutual learning and production, and also reveals the diverse range of learning resources beyond the formal novice-–expert relationship. Although apprenticeship is a well-known concept in educational research......, in this case apprenticeship offers an innovative perspective on future practice and research in academia allowing more students access to high high-quality research training and giving supervisors a chance to combine their own research with their supervision obligations....

  11. Learning by doing. Training health care professionals to become facilitator of moral case deliberation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, Margreet; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy

    2015-03-01

    Moral case deliberation (MCD) is a dialogue among health care professionals about moral issues in practice. A trained facilitator moderates the dialogue, using a conversation method. Often, the facilitator is an ethicist. However, because of the growing interest in MCD and the need to connect MCD to practice, healthcare professionals should also become facilitators themselves. In order to transfer the facilitating expertise to health care professionals, a training program has been developed. This program enables professionals in health care institutions to acquire expertise in dealing with moral questions independent of the expertise of an (external) ethicist. Over the past 10 years, we developed a training program with a specific mix of theory and practice, aiming to foster the right attitude, skills and knowledge of the trainee. The content and the didactics of the training developed in line with the philosophy of MCD: pragmatic hermeneutics, dialogical ethics and Socratic epistemology. Central principles are: 'learning by doing', 'reflection instead of ready made knowledge', and 'dialogue on dialogue'. This paper describes the theoretical background and the didactic content of the current training. Furthermore, we present didactic tools which we developed for stimulating active learning. We also go into lessons we learned in developing the training. Next, we provide some preliminary data from evaluation research of the training program by participants. The discussion highlights crucial aspects of educating professionals to become facilitators of MCD. The paper ends with concluding remarks and a plea for more evaluative evidence of the effectiveness and meaning of this training program for doing MCD in institutions.

  12. The Effect of Context on Training: Is Learning Situated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-13

    identical to those previous, despite a complete change in the motor movements necessary for output. Case 3: Logan and Klapp (1992) had subjects solve...retrieval of an item used previously in training. This explains why so little transfer was obtained in the Logan and Klapp experiment described above, when...Logan & Klapp , 1992). In contrast, Smith, Branscombe and Bormann (1988) had people make judgments of the form, Is behavior X trait Y? (e.g.., Is hitting

  13. Effects of training on learning non-native speech contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Joan M.

    2002-05-01

    An animal psychoacoustic procedure was used to train human listeners to categorize two non-native phonemic distinctions. In Exp 1, Japanese perception of the English liquid contrast /r-l/ was examined. In Exp 2, American-English perception of the Hindi dental-retroflex contrast /d-D/was examined. The training methods were identical in the two studies. The stimuli consisted of 64 CVs produced by four different native talkers (two male, two female) using four different vowels. The procedure involved manually moving a lever to make either a ``go-left'' or ``go-right'' response to categorize the stimuli. Feedback was given for correct and incorrect responses after each trial. After 32 training sessions, lasting about 8 weeks, performance was analyzed using both percent correct and response time as measures. Results showed that the Japanese listeners, as a group, were statistically similar to a group of native listeners in categorizing the liquid contrast. In contrast, the Amercan-English listeners were not nativelike in categorizing the dental-retroflex contrast. Hypotheses for the different results in the two experiments are discussed, including possible subject-related variables. In addition, the use of an animal model is proposed to objectively ``calibrate'' the psychoacoustic salience of various phoneme contrasts used in human speech.

  14. CERN Technical Training 2004: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Document Server

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    If you wish to participate in one of the following courses, please discuss with your supervisor and apply electronically directly from the course description pages that can be found on the Web at: http://www.cern.ch/Training/ or fill in an 'application for training' form available from your Divisional Secretariat or from your DTO (Divisional Training Officer). Applications will be accepted in the order of their receipt. Programmation Unity-Pro pour utilisateurs de Schneider PL7-Pro Annonce de nouveau cours pour l'environnement d'automatisme Schneider. Un nouveau cours sur les environnements d'automatisme Premium et Quantum de Schneider est maintenant offert dans le cadre de l'Enseignement technique du CERN, afin de découvrir le nouvel outil de programmation Unity. Cette formation, mise en place par le GUAPI (Groupe des utilisateurs d'automates programmable industriels du CERN), sera essentiellement technique et pratique, destinée aux automaticiens concepteurs, metteurs en œu...

  15. Evaluation Framework EFI for Measuring the Impact of Learning, Education and Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the Evaluation Framework EFI for the Impact Measurement of learning, education and training: The Evaluation Framework for Impact Measurement was developed for specifying the evaluation phase and its objectives and tasks within the IDEAL Reference Model for the introduction an

  16. Learning To Compete: Education, Training & Enterprise in Ghana, Kenya & South Africa. Education Research Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afenyadu, Dela; King, Kenneth; McGrath, Simon; Oketch, Henry; Rogerson, Christian; Visser, Kobus

    A multinational, multidisciplinary team examined the impact of globalization on education, training, and small and medium sized enterprise development in Ghana, Kenya, and South Africa. The study focused on the following issues: developing a learner-led competitiveness approach; building learning enterprises; education for microenterprises and…

  17. Commitment to an Entrepreneurship Training Programme for Self-Employed Entrepreneurs, and Learning from Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Lenita; Hytti, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how self-employed entrepreneurs commit themselves to an entrepreneurship training programme and how such commitment relates to their perceptions of learning. Design/methodology/approach: The data were collected through qualitative, inductive methods by interviewing and observing six entrepreneurs…

  18. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Exploring Primary Health Care Nurses' Training and Counselling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Lena Lindhe; Nilsen, Per; Kristensson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the training and counselling experiences of 20 nurses, aiming to identify key elements in the process of learning and applying motivational interviewing (MI) counselling skills with adherence to protocols. Setting/method: The nurses were recruited from 10 primary health care units in Ostergotland, Sweden. The study…

  19. Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training--Supporting Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter; Dalton, Jennifer; Henry, John

    2005-01-01

    This document was produced by the author(s) based on their research for the Australian report, "Accommodating Learning Styles: Relevance and Good Practice in Vocational Education and Training," and contains three parts. Part 1, Research Methodology and Findings (Peter Smith and Jennifer Dalton), contains: (1) Research Questions; (2)…

  20. EA Training 2.0 Newsletter #3 - EA Active, Problem Based Learning Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Lillian; Ryberg, Thomas; Sroga, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    The main products of the project are innovative, active problem-based learning methodology for EA education and training, EA courses for university students and private and public sector employees, and an Enterprise Architecture competence ontology including a complete specification of skills...

  1. Learning Control: Sense-Making, CNC Machines, and Changes in Vocational Training for Industrial Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Boel

    2009-01-01

    The paper explores how novices in school-based vocational training make sense of computerized numerical control (CNC) machines. Based on two ethnographic studies in Swedish schools, one from the early 1980s and one from 2006, it analyses change and continuity in the cognitive, social, and emotional processes of learning how to become a machine…

  2. Teacher Change and Development during Training in Social and Emotional Learning Programs in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimber, Birgitta; Skoog, Therése; Sandell, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results from a thematic analysis of the process diaries of teachers involved in teacher training in social and emotional learning (SEL) in Sweden. Twenty-nine out of the 122 diaries available were analyzed until saturation was reached. The following themes and sub-themes were extracted: development (professional and…

  3. Learning Style Preferences of Undergraduate Dietetics, Athletic Training, and Exercise Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Meredith G.; Hansen, Pamela; Rhee, Yeong; Brundt, Ardith; Terbizan, Donna; Christensen, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    The study assessed the preferred learning style (LS) of college students and compared LS preferences among students majoring in Dietetics, Exercise Science, and Athletic Training. LS questionnaires were distributed to students (N = 693, mean age 20.5 ± 1.7) enrolled in health science courses at three Midwestern universities. Most students…

  4. A Learning Evaluation for an Immersive Virtual Laboratory for Technical Training Applied into a Welding Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Francisco; Neira Tovar, Leticia A.; del Rio, Marta Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the results of welding virtual training performance, designed using a learning model based on cognitive and usability techniques, applying an immersive concept focused on person attention. Moreover, it also intended to demonstrate that exits a moderating effect of performance improvement when the user experience is taken…

  5. Evaluation Framework EFI for Measuring the Impact of Learning, Education and Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the Evaluation Framework EFI for the Impact Measurement of learning, education and training: The Evaluation Framework for Impact Measurement was developed for specifying the evaluation phase and its objectives and tasks within the IDEAL Reference Model for the introduction an

  6. How Identification Facilitates Effective Learning: The Evaluation of Generic versus Localized Professionalization Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Kirstien; Haslam, S. Alexander; Morton, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, organizations are keen to ensure that they achieve a performance return from the large investment they make in employee training. This study examines the way in which workgroup identification facilitates trainees' motivation to transfer learning into workplace performance. A 2 × 2 longitudinal study evaluated the effects of a new…

  7. Adult Learning and Vocational Training in the Informal Sector in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakke-Seeck, Sigvor; And Others

    Because a growing proportion of the world's working population is in the informal sector (in work areas generally outside the sphere of state protection), planners of vocational training for adults must pay closer attention to those concepts of teaching and learning that have relevance for the informal sector, and they must develop strategies for…

  8. A Comparison of Approaches to Learning Task Selection in the Training of Complex Cognitive Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salden, Ron; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Salden, R.J.C.M., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J.J.G. (2006). A comparison of approaches to learning task selection in the training of complex cognitive skills. Computers in Human Behavior, 22 , 321-333

  9. Generational Learning Style Preferences Based on Computer-Based Healthcare Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michaelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to determine the degree of perceived differences for auditory, visual and kinesthetic learning styles of Traditionalist, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Millennial generational healthcare workers participating in technology-assisted healthcare training. Methodology. This mixed-method research…

  10. Using E-Learning to Train Youth Workers: The Bell Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquart, Matthea; Rizzi, Zora Jones; Parikh, Amita Desai

    2010-01-01

    A national provider of afterschool and summer programming plans to expand quickly into new regions, bringing its successful model of out-of-school learning to more children in disadvantaged schools and neighborhoods. A large number of staff members must be trained in the provider's program model in a short window of time. The organization needs to…

  11. A Learning Evaluation for an Immersive Virtual Laboratory for Technical Training Applied into a Welding Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Francisco; Neira Tovar, Leticia A.; del Rio, Marta Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to explore the results of welding virtual training performance, designed using a learning model based on cognitive and usability techniques, applying an immersive concept focused on person attention. Moreover, it also intended to demonstrate that exits a moderating effect of performance improvement when the user experience is taken…

  12. Enhancing Soldier-Centered Learning with Emerging Training Technologies and Integrated Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    learn, the desire to practice, and other training related outcomes (Mautone, Spiker, Karp , & Conkey, 2010; Topolski, Leibrecht, Cooley, Rossi, Lampton...the Simulation Interoperability Workshop. Mautone, T., Spiker, A., Karp , M. R., & Conkey, C. (2010). Using games to accelerate aircrew cognitive

  13. Learning Control: Sense-Making, CNC Machines, and Changes in Vocational Training for Industrial Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Boel

    2009-01-01

    The paper explores how novices in school-based vocational training make sense of computerized numerical control (CNC) machines. Based on two ethnographic studies in Swedish schools, one from the early 1980s and one from 2006, it analyses change and continuity in the cognitive, social, and emotional processes of learning how to become a machine…

  14. Exploring the Acceptability of Online Learning for Continuous Professional Development at Kenya Medical Training Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyalo, Isaac William; Hopkins, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the acceptance of online learning (OL) for continuous professional development among lecturers at Kenya Medical Training College in 2009. The large and multi-campus College faces logistical and cost challenges in ensuring that its 700 lecturing staff have access to continuous professional development. Online learning…

  15. Evaluation Framework EFI for Measuring the Impact of Learning, Education and Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stracke, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    This article introduces the Evaluation Framework EFI for the Impact Measurement of learning, education and training: The Evaluation Framework for Impact Measurement was developed for specifying the evaluation phase and its objectives and tasks within the IDEAL Reference Model for the introduction

  16. Open and Distance Learning for Health: Supporting Health Workers through Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Tony

    2011-01-01

    This case study surveys the growing use of open and distance learning approaches to the provision of support, education and training to health workers over the past few decades. It classifies such uses under four headings, providing brief descriptions from the literature of a few examples of each group. In conclusion, it identifies key lessons…

  17. Self-directed learning skills in air-traffic control training; An eye-tracking approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meeuwen, Ludo; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen; Bock, Jeano; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Van Meeuwen, L. W., Brand-Gruwel, S., De Bock, J. J. P. R., Kirschner, P. A., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010, September). Self-directed Learning Skills in Air-traffic Control Training; An Eye-tracking Approach. Paper presented at the European Association for Aviation Psychology, Budapest.

  18. University Teacher Competencies in a Virtual Teaching/Learning Environment: Analysis of a Teacher Training Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasch, Teresa; Alvarez, Ibis; Espasa, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This paper attempts to shed light on the competencies a university teacher must have in order to teach in virtual learning environments. A teacher training experience was designed by taking into account the methodological criteria established in line with previous theoretical principles. The main objective of our analysis was to identify the…

  19. Work Organisation, Forms of Employee Learning and National Systems of Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Edward; Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Kraemer-Mbula, Erika; Rasmussen, Palle

    2016-01-01

    This article uses a multi-level framework to investigate for 17 European nations the links between forms of work organisation and style of employee learning at the workplace on the one hand, and the characteristics of national educational and training systems on the other. The analysis shows that forms of work organisation characterised by…

  20. Executive Function, Self-Regulated Learning, and Reading Comprehension: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirino, Paul T.; Miciak, Jeremy; Gerst, Elyssa; Barnes, Marcia A.; Vaughn, Sharon; Child, Amanda; Huston-Warren, Emily

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the extent to which training that emphasizes the process of executive function (EF) and self-regulated learning (SRL) would result in increased reading comprehension; we also evaluated interrelationships of EF, SRL, and reading. We report an experiment (N = 75 fourth graders) that contrasted two…

  1. How Identification Facilitates Effective Learning: The Evaluation of Generic versus Localized Professionalization Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Kirstien; Haslam, S. Alexander; Morton, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, organizations are keen to ensure that they achieve a performance return from the large investment they make in employee training. This study examines the way in which workgroup identification facilitates trainees' motivation to transfer learning into workplace performance. A 2 × 2 longitudinal study evaluated the effects of a new…

  2. Learning Motivational Interviewing: Exploring Primary Health Care Nurses' Training and Counselling Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Lena Lindhe; Nilsen, Per; Kristensson, Margareta

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores the training and counselling experiences of 20 nurses, aiming to identify key elements in the process of learning and applying motivational interviewing (MI) counselling skills with adherence to protocols. Setting/method: The nurses were recruited from 10 primary health care units in Ostergotland, Sweden. The study…

  3. Empowering the Language Learner: Language Learning Strategy Training and Self-Regulation in an EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how an understanding of the Good Language Learner models described in the SLA literature can be used to tailor and implement a program of learning strategy training and self-regulatory practices in the classroom to empower L2 learners in an EFL context. The paper begins by reviewing the various…

  4. Auditory Training for Experienced and Inexperienced Second-Language Learners: Native French Speakers Learning English Vowels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Paul; Pinet, Melanie; Evans, Bronwen G.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined whether high-variability auditory training on natural speech can benefit experienced second-language English speakers who already are exposed to natural variability in their daily use of English. The subjects were native French speakers who had learned English in school; experienced listeners were tested in England and the less…

  5. A Context-Aware Mobile Learning System for Supporting Cognitive Apprenticeships in Nursing Skills Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-Han; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Su, Liang-Hao; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2012-01-01

    The aim of nursing education is to foster in students the competence of applying integrated knowledge with clinical skills to the application domains. In the traditional approach, in-class knowledge learning and clinical skills training are usually conducted separately, such that the students might not be able to integrate the knowledge and the…

  6. Work Organisation, Forms of Employee Learning and National Systems of Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Edward; Lundvall, Bengt-Åke; Kraemer-Mbula, Erika; Rasmussen, Palle

    2016-01-01

    This article uses a multi-level framework to investigate for 17 European nations the links between forms of work organisation and style of employee learning at the workplace on the one hand, and the characteristics of national educational and training systems on the other. The analysis shows that forms of work organisation characterised by…

  7. Turning Experience into Learning: Educational Contributions of Collaborative Peer Songwriting during Music Therapy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Felicity; Krout, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of 21 Australian and United States (US) tertiary/university students involved in training to become professional music therapists. The study aimed to identify the learning outcomes--musical, professional, and personal--that occurred when students participated in collaborative peer songwriting experiences. Student…

  8. Turning Experience into Learning: Educational Contributions of Collaborative Peer Songwriting during Music Therapy Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Felicity; Krout, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a study of 21 Australian and United States (US) tertiary/university students involved in training to become professional music therapists. The study aimed to identify the learning outcomes--musical, professional, and personal--that occurred when students participated in collaborative peer songwriting experiences. Student…

  9. E-learning-based speech therapy: a web application for speech training.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijer, L.J.; Rietveld, T.C.; Beers, M.M. van; Slangen, R.M.; Heuvel, H. van den; Swart, B.J.M. de; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract In The Netherlands, a web application for speech training, E-learning-based speech therapy (EST), has been developed for patients with dysarthria, a speech disorder resulting from acquired neurological impairments such as stroke or Parkinson's disease. In this report, the EST infrastructure

  10. A Competency-Based Technical Training Model That Embraces Learning Flexibility and Rewards Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasinski, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Today's adult learners are continuously searching for successful programs with added learner flexibility, a positive learning experience, and the best education for their investment. Red Deer College's unique competency based welder apprenticeship training model fulfills this desire for many adult learners.

  11. Generational Learning Style Preferences Based on Computer-Based Healthcare Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Michaelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to determine the degree of perceived differences for auditory, visual and kinesthetic learning styles of Traditionalist, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Millennial generational healthcare workers participating in technology-assisted healthcare training. Methodology. This mixed-method research…

  12. Application of ICT-based Learning Resources for University Inorganic Chemistry Course Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana M. Derkach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article studies expediency and efficiency of various ICT-based learning resources use in university inorganic chemistry course training, detects difference of attitudes toward electronic resources between students and faculty members, which create the background for their efficiency loss

  13. Visual-Motor Learning Using Haptic Devices: How Best to Train Surgeons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Giles

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Laparoscopic surgery has revolutionised medicine but requires surgeons to learn new visual-motor mappings. The optimal method for training surgeons is unknown. For instance, it may be easier to learn planar movements when training is constrained to a plane, since this forces the surgeon to develop an appropriate perceptual-motor map. In contrast, allowing the surgeon to move without constraints could improve performance because this provides greater experience of the control dynamics of the device. In order to test between these alternatives, we created an experimental tool that connected a commercially available robotic arm with specialised software that presents visual stimuli and objectively records kinematics. Participants were given the task of generating a series of aiming movements to move a visual cursor to a series of targets. The actions required movement along a horizontal plane, whereas the visual display was a screen positioned perpendicular to this plane (ie, vertically. One group (n=8 received training where the force field constrained their movement to the correct plane of action, whilst a second group (n=8 trained without constraints. On test trials (after training the unconstrained group showed better performance, as indexed by reduced movement duration and reduced path length. These results show that participants who explored the entire action space had an advantage, which highlights the importance of experiencing the full dynamics of a control device and the action space when learning a new visual-motor mapping.

  14. Training Japanese listeners to identify English /r/ and /l/: IV. Some effects of perceptual learning on speech production

    OpenAIRE

    Bradlow, Ann R.; Pisoni, David B.; Akahane-Yamada, Reiko; Tohkura, Yoh’ichi

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of training in /r/–/l/ perceptual identification on /r/–/l/ production by adult Japanese speakers. Subjects were recorded producing English words that contrast /r/ and /l/ before and after participating in an extended period of /r/–/l/ identification training using a high-variability presentation format. All subjects showed significant perceptual learning as a result of the training program, and this perceptual learning generalized to novel items spoken by ...

  15. Effectiveness Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model: Research Outline by Joan H Johnston, Greg...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effectiveness Evaluation Tools and Methods for Adaptive Training and Education in Support of the US Army Learning Model...provide affordable, tailored SRL training and educational capabilities for the US Army, the US Army Research Laboratory is investigating and developing

  16. Education and training for learning disability practice: key messages from contemporary literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmore, Debbie; Wray, Jane

    2009-12-01

    Over the last quarter of a century, much attention has justifiably been given to the closure of long-stay hospitals and the subsequent community-based experiences of people with learning disabilities. This has inevitably led to debate regarding how best they might continue to be supported, and by whom. Having identified a range of accredited provision currently available to prepare or develop staff working with adults with learning disabilities in the United Kingdom, this article reviews a range of contemporary literature relating to education in learning disability health and social care that is typically produced and viewed in isolation. Four themes are identified: training social carers, user involvement, (inter)professional practice and work-based learning. Key messages emerge from these themes to form recommendations for the future education of learning disability practitioners across the workforce.

  17. Team Work and Democratic Learning in Projectmanagement Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidon, Ivan; Rebollar, Ruben; Qvist, Palle

    of Zaragoza, which makes it possible to detect problems of teamwork functioning in groups while they develop their projects, in order to prevent possible failure once projects are completed. The Democratic Learning Questionnaire developed at Aalborg University, which studies the decision-making process within...... it possible to establish a correlation between a group's decision making process and the quality of its functioning as a team........ The functioning of a team will be characterized, among other things, by the way it is organized and the way decisions are reached within it. A new term has appeared lately to refer to this concept: Democratic Learning. This paper shows the results obtained in an experiment carried out at the Universities...

  18. A perceptual learning deficit in Chinese developmental dyslexia as revealed by visual texture discrimination training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengke; Cheng-Lai, Alice; Song, Yan; Cutting, Laurie; Jiang, Yuzheng; Lin, Ou; Meng, Xiangzhi; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2014-08-01

    Learning to read involves discriminating between different written forms and establishing connections with phonology and semantics. This process may be partially built upon visual perceptual learning, during which the ability to process the attributes of visual stimuli progressively improves with practice. The present study investigated to what extent Chinese children with developmental dyslexia have deficits in perceptual learning by using a texture discrimination task, in which participants were asked to discriminate the orientation of target bars. Experiment l demonstrated that, when all of the participants started with the same initial stimulus-to-mask onset asynchrony (SOA) at 300 ms, the threshold SOA, adjusted according to response accuracy for reaching 80% accuracy, did not show a decrement over 5 days of training for children with dyslexia, whereas this threshold SOA steadily decreased over the training for the control group. Experiment 2 used an adaptive procedure to determine the threshold SOA for each participant during training. Results showed that both the group of dyslexia and the control group attained perceptual learning over the sessions in 5 days, although the threshold SOAs were significantly higher for the group of dyslexia than for the control group; moreover, over individual participants, the threshold SOA negatively correlated with their performance in Chinese character recognition. These findings suggest that deficits in visual perceptual processing and learning might, in part, underpin difficulty in reading Chinese.

  19. E-Learning and the Changing Face of Corporate Training and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Zornada

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Internet technologies and the advent of e-learning applications inmany organisations have made a fundamental difference to the way organisations deliver training and development content, activities and experiences to their employees. Some of the organisations at the forefront of deploying e-learning technologies have been global corporations and/or transaction processing intensive organisations, who typically have difficulties assembling their staff for traditional classroom based training activities, either due to logistical difficulties or because of the impact this would have on work flows and business continuity. Such organisations have developed approaches to e-learning and competency development that overcome the logistical problems of conventional training by making innovative use of e-learning. This paper examines the approaches used by several leading global, Australian and Asian organisations, including Cisco Systems, Motorola, Qantas and several others by drawing on a field study conducted by the writer during 2003–2004. It attempts to identify some key emerging trends and practices in the field, and lessons that can be learnt from the experiences of organisations reviewed, for the successful deployment of e-learning strategies.

  20. eLearning: Is There a Place in Athletic Training Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth E; Stewart, Jeffrey; Wright, Vivian H; Barker, Scott

    2002-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an overview of current issue and research literature that discusses the use of eLearning in an academic curriculum. We address several components to be examined before eLearning is incorporated into athletic training education. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE and Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) from 2000 through 2002 using the key words distance education, online learning, and the individual research studies referenced in this article. DATA SYNTHESIS: Educational research studies have confirmed that multiple methods in instruction delivery exist. Within the changing culture of higher education, the use of effective communication tools has been shown to increase student knowledge and skills. Through eLearning, methods of instruction design are designed to be student centered and allow the educator to become a facilitator. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Even though the use of eLearning faces many challenges in athletic training education, the research literature does support this method of instructional delivery in selected courses in athletic training education.

  1. Can memory training positively affect the skills of learning a foreign language and support learning English by older students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Kozak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment covered in this paper was conducted from November 2011 until February 2012 in the University of Third Age at the University of Wrocław in Poland as a part of the Third Age and New Technologies (TANT project which was realised as a Grundtvig partnership programme. The aim of the experiment was to determine whether memory training can positively affect learning a foreign language (English by senior students.

  2. Experiential and reflective learning approaches for the train-the-trainers program of Project P.A.T.H.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching Man

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the successful application of experiential and reflective learning approaches to promote personal and professional growth of social workers and teachers in the train-the-trainer program of Project P.A.T.H.S. Qualitative data revealed that program participants benefited from their learning experiences. The paper inquires into the dilemma of experiential and reflective learning. Recommendations are presented for those interested in using experiential and reflective approaches for training programs.

  3. THE EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING LEARNING MODEL AND CRITICAL THINGKING ABILITY TOWARD SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS OF SMA

    OpenAIRE

    Ferawati Hutapea; Motlan .

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of research are 1). To know are differences in science process skills of students with the applied of inquiry training learning model and direct instruction learning models, 2). To know are differences in science process skills of students who has high critical thinking ability and the  critically low ability, 3). To know the interaction inquiry training learning model and critical thinking ability toward students science process skills. The samples in this research conducted by c...

  4. Learning foreign sounds in an alien world: videogame training improves non-native speech categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sung-joo; Holt, Lori L

    2011-01-01

    Although speech categories are defined by multiple acoustic dimensions, some are perceptually weighted more than others and there are residual effects of native-language weightings in non-native speech perception. Recent research on nonlinguistic sound category learning suggests that the distribution characteristics of experienced sounds influence perceptual cue weights: Increasing variability across a dimension leads listeners to rely upon it less in subsequent category learning (Holt & Lotto, 2006). The present experiment investigated the implications of this among native Japanese learning English /r/-/l/ categories. Training was accomplished using a videogame paradigm that emphasizes associations among sound categories, visual information, and players' responses to videogame characters rather than overt categorization or explicit feedback. Subjects who played the game for 2.5h across 5 days exhibited improvements in /r/-/l/ perception on par with 2-4 weeks of explicit categorization training in previous research and exhibited a shift toward more native-like perceptual cue weights.

  5. Development and training of a learning expert system in an autonomous mobile robot via simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spelt, P.F.; Lyness, E.; DeSaussure, G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA). Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research)

    1989-11-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research (CESAR) conducts basic research in the area of intelligent machines. Recently at CESAR a learning expert system was created to operate on board an autonomous robot working at a process control panel. The authors discuss two-computer simulation system used to create, evaluate and train this learning system. The simulation system has a graphics display of the current status of the process being simulated, and the same program which does the simulating also drives the actual control panel. Simulation results were validated on the actual robot. The speed and safety values of using a computerized simulator to train a learning computer, and future uses of the simulation system, are discussed.

  6. Enhancing visuospatial performance through video game training to increase learning in visuospatial science domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Christopher A

    2012-02-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated that performance on visuospatial assessments can be enhanced through relevant experience, an unaddressed question is whether such experience also produces a similar increase in target domains (such as science learning) where visuospatial abilities are directly relevant for performance. In the present study, participants completed either spatial or nonspatial training via interaction with video games and were then asked to read and learn about the geologic topic of plate tectonics. Results replicate the benefit of playing appropriate video games in enhancing visuospatial performance and demonstrate that this facilitation also manifests itself in learning science topics that are visuospatial in nature. This novel result suggests that visuospatial training not only can impact performance on measures of spatial functioning, but also can affect performance in content areas in which these abilities are utilized.

  7. Protocol for a realist review of workplace learning in postgraduate medical education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Anel; Kilty, Caroline; Bergin, Colm; Flood, Patrick; Fu, Na; Horgan, Mary; Higgins, Agnes; Maher, Bridget; O'Kane, Grainne; Prihodova, Lucia; Slattery, Dubhfeasa; Bennett, Deirdre

    2017-01-19

    Postgraduate medical education and training (PGMET) is a complex social process which happens predominantly during the delivery of patient care. The clinical learning environment (CLE), the context for PGMET, shapes the development of the doctors who learn and work within it, ultimately impacting the quality and safety of patient care. Clinical workplaces are complex, dynamic systems in which learning emerges from non-linear interactions within a network of related factors and activities. Those tasked with the design and delivery of postgraduate medical education and training need to understand the relationship between the processes of medical workplace learning and these contextual elements in order to optimise conditions for learning. We propose to conduct a realist synthesis of the literature to address the overarching questions; how, why and in what circumstances do doctors learn in clinical environments? This review is part of a funded projected with the overall aim of producing guidelines and recommendations for the design of high quality clinical learning environments for postgraduate medical education and training. We have chosen realist synthesis as a methodology because of its suitability for researching complexity and producing answers useful to policymakers and practitioners. This realist synthesis will follow the steps and procedures outlined by Wong et al. in the RAMESES Publication Standards for Realist Synthesis and the Realist Synthesis RAMESES Training Materials. The core research team is a multi-disciplinary group of researchers, clinicians and health professions educators. The wider research group includes experts in organisational behaviour and human resources management as well as the key stakeholders; doctors in training, patient representatives and providers of PGMET. This study will draw from the published literature and programme, and substantive, theories of workplace learning, to describe context, mechanism and outcome configurations for

  8. Role of Adult Learning Theories in the Development of Corporate Training in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Lytovchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of the role of adult learning theories in the development of corporate training in the USA. Considering that corporate education is part of the adult education system in this country, the author examines theories of organizational learning in the context of adult learning. The results of the study have revealed that adult education in the US is based on dif erent learning theories which should be viewed from the perspective of several main orientations: behaviorism, cognitivism, humanism, developmental theories, social learning, constructivism, which have dif erent philosophical background and, accordingly, different understanding of the nature and methodology of adult learning. Based on the results of the study it has been concluded that theories of organizational learning which explain motivation of students, their needs and goals, cognitive processes and other aspects of the learning in organizations and have had the main influence on the development of corporate education in the United States should be viewed in the context of the above-mentioned basic orientations to learning, too. From the methodological perspective, the research was based on interdisciplinary and systemic approaches. Thus, we used a set of interrelated research methods: comparative, structural, systemic-functional analyses, comparison and synthesis.

  9. CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    AXEL-2003 - Introduction to Particle Accelerators AXEL-2003 is a course given at CERN within the framework of the Technical Training Programme. The course will present an introduction to particle accelerators. Known in the past as the PS Complex Operation Course (or the "PS Shutdown Course"), and organised by the ex-PS division until last year, it is now organised as a joint venture between the AB division and Technical Training, and open to a wider CERN community. The AXEL-2003 course series is designed for technicians who are operating an accelerator, or whose work is closely linked to accelerators, but it is open to all people (technicians, engineers, physicists) interested in this field. The course does not require any prior knowledge on accelerators. However, some basic knowledge on trigonometry, matrices and differential equations, and some basic notions of magnetism would be an advantage. The course and the course supports will be in English, with questions and answers also in French. Lectures wil...

  10. CERN Technical Training 2003: Learning for the LHC!

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    AXEL-2003  -  Introduction to Particle Accelerators   AXEL-2003 is a course given at CERN within the framework of the Technical Training Programme. The course will present an introduction to particle accelerators. Known in the past as the PS Complex Operation Course (or the "PS Shutdown Course"), and organised by the ex-PS division until last year, it is now organised as a joint venture between the AB division and Technical Training, and open to a wider CERN community. The AXEL-2003 course series is designed for technicians who are operating an accelerator, or whose work is closely linked to accelerators, but it is open to all people (technicians, engineers, physicists) interested in this field. The course does not require any prior knowledge on accelerators. However, some basic knowledge on trigonometry, matrices and differential equations, and some basic notions of magnetism would be an advantage. The course and the course supports will be in English, with questions and answers also in French. Lectur...

  11. GOBLET: The Global Organisation for Bioinformatics Learning, Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Teresa K.; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Brazas, Michelle E.; Corpas, Manuel; Gaudet, Pascale; Lewitter, Fran; Mulder, Nicola; Palagi, Patricia M.; Schneider, Maria Victoria; van Gelder, Celia W. G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high-throughput technologies have brought big data to the life sciences. The march of progress has been rapid, leaving in its wake a demand for courses in data analysis, data stewardship, computing fundamentals, etc., a need that universities have not yet been able to satisfy—paradoxically, many are actually closing “niche” bioinformatics courses at a time of critical need. The impact of this is being felt across continents, as many students and early-stage researchers are being left without appropriate skills to manage, analyse, and interpret their data with confidence. This situation has galvanised a group of scientists to address the problems on an international scale. For the first time, bioinformatics educators and trainers across the globe have come together to address common needs, rising above institutional and international boundaries to cooperate in sharing bioinformatics training expertise, experience, and resources, aiming to put ad hoc training practices on a more professional footing for the benefit of all. PMID:25856076

  12. Investigating a model for lecturer training that enables lecturers to plan and carry out meaningful e-learning activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Christopher; Hansen, Pernille Stenkil; Christensen, Inger-Marie F.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the effect of a lecturer training model in the shape of an e-learning project based on research on adult and work-based learning. A survey was conducted to explore participants’ learning experiences. Findings show high overall satisfaction, motivation and engagement. Suggest...

  13. How Adults Learn from Self-Paced, Technology-Based Corporate Training: New Focus for Learners, New Focus for Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrovolny, Jackie

    2006-01-01

    "How" do adults learn from self-paced, technology-based corporate training, which they select based on its relevance to their current employment responsibilities? Specifically, "how" do adults use the following learning strategies: prior experience, reflection, metacognition, conversations, generative learning strategies, and authentic…

  14. Learning Strategy Training and the Shift in Learners’ Beliefs About Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mohammadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the impact of teaching learning strategies on learners’ beliefs about language learning and reading comprehension ability. Participants were 78 university freshmen studying English language teaching, translation, and literature. They were divided into two groups. The experimental group received a number of learning strategies adopted and adapted by the researchers, including concept-mapping, vocabulary notebook, passage restatement, dictionary use, summary writing, and guessing. The treatment was carried out 4 hr a week for 15 consecutive weeks. The Language Learners’ Beliefs Scale, developed and validated by Birjandi and Mohammadi, and the reading comprehension section of Cambridge Preliminary English Test (PET were administered before and after the treatment to identify the students’ shifts in beliefs about language learning and to measure reading comprehension ability, respectively. The results of independent t test indicated that the instruction of learning strategies changed the university students’ beliefs about language learning. Furthermore, learning strategy instruction could boost their reading comprehension ability.

  15. The Training of Learning Strategy in Fast Reading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何秀娟

    2016-01-01

    Fast reading plays an important role in one's Eng-lish learning. It can help these learners improve their reading speed and make them read fast and efficiently. It can help learners pass these examinations and get high marks. Fast reading can im-prove reading comprehension ability. There are certain reading skills and strategies that we all must be familiar with in our study. It helps to further the efficiency of fast reading and take in infor-mation much better than what we would otherwise be able to do.

  16. Service learning at university: a strategy in training critical citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Francisco Amat

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Service Learning (SL is a proposal which emerges from the volunteer service to the community and from skills acquisition, combining them in a single articulated project. The goal of this article is to discuss an SL innovation experience which took place in the academic year 2009–2010 at the Universitat Jaume I in Castelló de la Plana (Spain. This initiative was implemented by an interdisciplinary teaching team formed by the academic staff in the Teaching Education, Psychopedagogy and Audiovisual Communication degrees. It aims to awaken critical awareness and promote citizen participation among all university members.

  17. Exploring the Relationship Between Distributed Training, Integrated Learning Environments, and Immersive Training Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    interactivity have been the focus of attention for several decades now (Conn, Lanier, Minsky , Fisher, & Druin, 1989; Macredie, Taylor, Yu & Keeble, 1996...was compared with verbal rehearsal with a computer model . Transfer to an actual building was better for those who trained in a virtual environment...communicate both verbally and non-verbally. It would have to include a background tutoring system that models ideal behavior and can provide corrective

  18. Surgical training and the European Working Time Directive: The role of informal workplace learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, James A

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of European Working Time Directive, limiting doctors' working hours to 48 per week, has caused recent controversy within the profession. The Royal College of Surgeons of England in particular has been one of the loudest critics of the legislation. One of the main concerns is regarding the negative impact on training hours for those embarking on surgical careers. Simulation technology has been suggested as a method to overcome this reduction in hospital training hours, and research suggests that this is a good substitute for operative training in a theatre. However, modern educational theory emphasises the power of informal workplace learning in postgraduate education, and the essential role of experience in training future surgeons.

  19. [Simulation-based anaesthesia crisis resource management training. Results of a survey on learning success].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, T; von Heymann, C H; Ortwein, H; Rau, J; Wernecke, K D; Spies, C

    2009-10-01

    Up to as many as 38,000 people die in German hospitals each year as a result of preventable medical errors. Anesthetic procedures are generally safer than internal medical procedures and the mortality associated with anesthesia is estimated to be 3.3-5 cases per million. However, this is still 10 times higher than the risk associated with civilian aviation for example. Up to 80% of mistakes are attributable to inadequate execution of non-technical skills (NTS) such as communication, teamwork and organization of the working environment. Training in non-technical skills through Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) is an integral part of the Berlin Simulation Training (BeST) curriculum. The aim of this study was to describe the subjective evaluation of change in routine clinical behavior as a result of simulator training using latent outcome variables such as "subjective evaluation of learning outcome", with special emphasis on communication. In total 235 doctors with varying levels of professional experience received BeST training between 2001 and 2004. An anonymous postal questionnaire was sent to 228 of these participants and the response rate was 64% The questionnaire contained 13 questions covering evaluation of the workshop and learning outcome with respect to communication in the operating room (OR), teamwork in the OR and medical knowledge. Following factor analysis 3 latent outcome variables (subjective evaluation of the learning outcome, workshop-related change in perception of the value of communication and general value and relevance) were generated. Logistic regression was used to determine whether there was any relationship between the latent outcome variables and a number of independent factors. It was not possible to demonstrate any relationship between the level of professional training, age or date of the workshop and the variables selected to describe subjective evaluation of behavioral change as a result of the workshop. How realistic the

  20. Evaluation of simulation-based training for aircraft carrier marshalling with learning cubic and Kirkpatrick’s models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Yongliang; Liu Hu; Yin Jiao; Luo Mingqiang; Wu Guanghui

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based training is a promising way to train a carrier flight deck crew because of the complex and dangerous working environment. Quantitative evaluation of simulation-based training quality is vital to make simulation-based training practical for aircraft carrier marshalling. This paper develops a personal computer-based aircraft carrier marshalling simulation system and a cave automatic virtual environment (CAVE)-based immersive environment. In order to compare the training effectiveness of simulation-based training and paper-based training, a learning cubic model is proposed and a contrast experiment is carried out as well. The experimental data is ana-lyzed based on a simplified Kirkpatrick’s model. The results show that simulation-based training is better than paper-based training by 26.80%after three rounds of testing, which prove the effective-ness of simulation-based aircraft carrier marshalling training.

  1. Education and Training of Emergency Medical Teams: Recommendations for a Global Operational Learning Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat Camacho, Nieves; Hughes, Amy; Burkle, Frederick M; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Ragazzoni, Luca; Redmond, Anthony; Norton, Ian; von Schreeb, Johan

    2016-10-21

    An increasing number of international emergency medical teams are deployed to assist disaster-affected populations worldwide. Since Haiti earthquake those teams have been criticised for ill adapted care, lack of preparedness in addition to not coordinating with the affected country healthcare system. The Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs) initiative, as part of the Word Health Organization's Global Health Emergency Workforce program, aims to address these shortcomings by improved EMT coordination, and mechanisms to ensure quality and accountability of national and international EMTs. An essential component to reach this goal is appropriate education and training. Multiple disaster education and training programs are available. However, most are centred on individuals' professional development rather than on the EMTs operational performance. Moreover, no common overarching or standardised training frameworks exist. In this report, an expert panel review and discuss the current approaches to disaster education and training and propose a three-step operational learning framework that could be used for EMTs globally. The proposed framework includes the following steps: 1) ensure professional competence and license to practice, 2) support adaptation of technical and non-technical professional capacities into the low-resource and emergency context and 3) prepare for an effective team performance in the field. A combination of training methodologies is also recommended, including individual theory based education, immersive simulations and team training. Agreed curriculum and open access training materials for EMTs need to be further developed, ideally through collaborative efforts between WHO, operational EMT organizations, universities, professional bodies and training agencies.  Keywords: disasters; education; emergencies; global health; learning.

  2. Learning a job: the workshop training with group of postgraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Pontalti

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work is faced the problem of the professional competence of the young students during their specialization in psychotherapy. Experience is described top work with them in small group, for three years, to fortnightly frequency. The clinical situations of the students are discusses with continuity, from the moment of the formulation of the project of care up to its conclusion. The sustained thesis is that the acquisition of competence stirs on two ways: a procedural competence (strategies and tactics of intervention and relational competence (co-transferal dynamics. Necessity is sustained that the teacher has a complete professional in comparison to the characteristics of the situation to transimit a work, almost artistic. The exploration of the relational dynamics it become important in once following, with objective to harmonize procedural competence and relational competence in a mature professional competence. Brief clinical illustrations are introduced.Keywords: training, procedural competence, relational competence, work group versus work community.

  3. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Shigeo; Takehira, Rieko

    2017-01-01

    To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students' learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training), 5th (before practical training at clinical sites), and 6th (after all practical training) years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation), and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of 'self-determination' in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen's d= 0.43). Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on 'self-determination' among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  4. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students’ learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. Methods The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training), 5th (before practical training at clinical sites), and 6th (after all practical training) years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. Results A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation), and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of ‘self-determination’ in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen’s d= 0.43). Conclusion Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on ‘self-determination’ among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation. PMID:28167812

  5. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeo Yamamura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students’ learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. Methods The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training, 5th (before practical training at clinical sites, and 6th (after all practical training years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. Results A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation, and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of ‘self-determination’ in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen’s d= 0.43. Conclusion Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on ‘self-determination’ among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  6. Designing and Evaluating a Scientific Training Program and Virtual Learning Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raalte, Lisa; Boulay, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The University of Hawaii's John A. Burns School of Medicine developed a professional development program and virtual learning materials to assist high school science teachers become familiar with laboratory techniques prior to engaging in authentic molecular biology research. The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluative overview of the program with emphasis on the virtual materials that were designed to employ a blended learning approach to augment offline classroom learning. The virtual learning materials provide a unique sphere for scientific learning in which skills can be reproduced in an offline environment. Twelve high school science teachers participated in the training program and were given full access to the online materials. After participation in the program, teachers filled out a final survey and completed a final written reflective statement as a form of evaluating the program and online materials. Thematic analysis was used to code participants' responses. Results showed that teachers recounted meeting the scientists as a valuable experience, teachers were grateful to learn real-world application of current research, and teachers described the importance of learning skills to prepare students to succeed in higher education. Additionally, results showed teacher's intent to use the virtual learning materials as homework tools and in classroom lessons.

  7. Impact of Training Deep Vocabulary Learning Strategies on Vocabulary Retention of Iranian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Es-hagi Sardroud

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the overall tendency of foreign language learners to use mechanical strategies of rote rehearsal in vocabulary learning and their resistance towards use of 'deep' vocabulary learning strategies, namely contextual guessing, Keyword Method, metacognitive strategy, and semantic mapping, this study intended (a to explore what impact the instruction of these deep strategies, on vocabulary retention of 32 post-intermediate adult EFL Iranian learners, (b to determine how the variable of gender influences the vocabulary retention of students after receiving training in these strategies. To this end, on the basis of a strategy-based model of instruction–CALLA (Chamot & O'Malley, 1994, the experimental group received training in using 'deep' vocabulary learning strategies while the control group received only the common method of vocabulary teaching. After the treatment, following factorial design, the performance of the participants in the teacher-made vocabulary test as posttest was analyzed statistically.  The results indicated higher vocabulary retention for the experimental group, and it was revealed that female students were more receptive to strategy training. This study provides evidence for confirmation of 'depth of processing' hypothesis and the emerging theory about the impact of gender on effective strategy teaching and use, and it recommends incorporation of teaching these 'deep' strategies of vocabulary learning into EFL classrooms.

  8. Evaluative research of a learning experience within the Secondary Education Teachers’ Training Master

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente CARRASCO EMBUENA

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes the results of the evaluative research of a didactic experience contextualized within the Master on Secondary education Teachers’ Training, developed at the University of Alicante during the 2009-2010 year and related to the subject Curricular Design and Adaptation, which belongs to the general module. An active learning methodological proposal has been offered to guarantee the students’ motivation, to train them in competences and to help their learning process. what has been researched is the incidence these methodologies have on learning, from a subjective perception, through the analysis of the results of a questionnaire offered to two different groups of students, which gave their opinion about the class development and about what it has contributed to their own training. On the other hand, the students’ level of achievement has been objectively analyzed. In both cases, the results show important percentages of achievement success and a high degree of satisfaction towards the class activities and the learning carried out. In addition, some suggestions to improve this curricular proposal are also set out.

  9. Emergency management: e-learning as an immediate response to veterinary training needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Alessandrini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary training plays a crucial role in increasing effectiveness of veterinary response to epidemic and non-epidemic emergencies. Being able to assess learning needs and to deliver training is acknowledged as a strategic priority in veterinary public health activities. The validation of an e-learning system that is able to respond to the urgent needs of veterinary professionals to ensure the despatch of rapid teaching methods on emerging and re-emerging animal diseases and zoonoses was the core of a research project developed in the Mediterranean Basin between 2005 and 2009. The project validated a new transferable, sustainable and repeatable learning model, the main components of which are described. The model is applied to an emergency situation that occurred in Italy in 2008, when West Nile disease outbreaks were reported in northern Italy. Approximately 450 official veterinarians were trained, using an e-learning system that showed adaptability and effectiveness in transferring knowledge, skills and competence to face the situation. The case was used to validate the effectiveness of the model and proved that it can be applied in any emergency situation, i.e. every time that rapid dissemination of knowledge and skills is required.

  10. Introducing active learning pedagogy into a technical and vocational education and training academy in Kurdistan, Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Martina; Ladefoged, Svend Erik

    2017-08-01

    This article focuses on a teaching methodology project which investigated issues of teaching quality at a technical and vocational education and training (TVET) academy in Kurdistan, Northern Iraq. The academy was established in 2012 to provide unemployed youth with TVET, particularly workplace-relevant training. A needs analysis showed that the academy's teachers were mainly skilled in technical content areas rather than in pedagogy. Perhaps as a result, predominantly teacher-centred approaches to teaching were observed. However, teaching and learning in TVET, by its very definition, must consider active learning and practical training as core to its vocational purpose. Moreover, technical and pedagogical skills are intrinsically linked, since a teacher cannot effectively pass on technical skills without the necessary pedagogical skills to do so. It is on this premise that the authors of this article based their project, which was designed for the purpose of upgrading the teachers' pedagogical skills to incorporate more active learning strategies and practical work. Comparison of observation logs and feedback sessions at the conclusion of their project provided evidence that whilst some of the teachers' pedagogical skills had shifted towards using more dynamic teaching strategies, interviews strongly indicated that there was also some reluctance to incorporate active learning. In their conclusion, the authors suggest that the insights gained from this project could be further empirically examined in a larger, multi-institutional study.

  11. Transcranial direct current stimulation modulates neuronal activity and learning in pilot training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehoon eChoe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Skill acquisition requires distributed learning both within (online and across (offline days to consolidate experiences into newly learned abilities. In particular, piloting an aircraft requires skills developed from extensive training and practice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS can modulate neuronal function to improve skill learning and performance during flight simulator training of aircraft landing procedures. Thirty-two right-handed participants consented to participate in four consecutive daily sessions of flight simulation training and received sham or anodal high-definition-tDCS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or left motor cortex (M1 in a randomized, double-blind experiment. Continuous electroencephalography (EEG and functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS were collected during flight simulation, n-back working memory, and resting-state assessments. tDCS of the right DLPFC increased midline-frontal theta-band activity in flight and n-back working memory training, confirming tDCS-related modulation of brain processes involved in executive function. This modulation corresponded to a significantly different online and offline learning rates for working memory accuracy and decreased inter-subject behavioral variability in flight and n-back tasks in the DLPFC stimulation group. Additionally, tDCS of left M1 increased parietal alpha power during flight tasks and tDCS to the right DLPFC increased midline frontal theta-band power during n-back and flight tasks. These results demonstrate a modulation of group variance in skill acquisition through an increasing in learned skill consistency in cognitive and real-world tasks with tDCS. Further, tDCS performance improvements corresponded to changes in electrophysiological and blood-oxygenation activity of the DLPFC and motor cortices, providing a stronger link between modulated neuronal function and behavior.

  12. Project-based learning with international collaboration for training biomedical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Training biomedical engineers while effectively keeping up with the fast paced scientific breakthroughs and the growth in technical innovations poses arduous challenges for educators. Traditional pedagogical methods are employed for coping with the increasing demands in biomedical engineering (BME) training and continuous improvements have been attempted with some success. Project-based learning (PBL) is an academic effort that challenges students by making them carry out interdisciplinary projects aimed at accomplishing a wide range of student learning outcomes. PBL has been shown to be effective in the medical field and has been adopted by other fields including engineering. The impact of globalization in healthcare appears to be steadily increasing which necessitates the inclusion of awareness of relevant international activities in the curriculum. Numerous difficulties are encountered when the formation of a collaborative team is tried, and additional difficulties occur as the collaboration team is extended to international partners. Understanding and agreement of responsibilities becomes somewhat complex and hence the collaborative project has to be planned and executed with clear understanding by all partners and participants. A model for training BME students by adopting PBL with international collaboration is proposed. The results of previous BME project work with international collaboration fit partially into the model. There were many logistic issues and constraints; however, the collaborative projects themselves greatly enhanced the student learning outcomes. This PBL type of learning experience tends to promote long term retention of multidisciplinary material and foster high-order cognitive activities such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. In addition to introducing the students to experiences encountered in the real-life workforce, the proposed approach enhances developing professional contracts and global networking. In conclusion, despite

  13. Learning through projects in the training of biomedical engineers: an application experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambi, José Antonio Li; Peme, Carmen

    2011-09-01

    Learning through Projects in the curriculum consists of both the identification and analysis of a problem, and the design of solution, execution and evaluation strategies, with teams of students. The project is conceived as the creation of a set of strategies articulated and developed during a certain amount of time to solve a problem contextualized in situations continually changing, where the constant evaluation provides feedback to make adjustments. In 2009, Learning through Projects was applied on the subject Hospital Facilities and three intervention projects were developed in health centers. This first stage is restricted to the analysis of the aspects that are considered to be basic to the professional training: a) Context knowledge: The future biomedical engineers must be familiarized with the complex health system where they will develop their profession; b) Team work: This is one of the essential skills in the training of students, since Biomedical Engineering connects the knowledge of sciences of life with the knowledge of exact sciences and technology; c) Regulations: The activities related to the profession require the implementation of regulations; therefore, to be aware of and to apply these regulations is a fundamental aspect to be analyzed in this stage; d) Project evaluation: It refers to the elaboration and studying of co-evaluation reports, which helps to find out if Learning through Projects contributes to the training. This new line of investigation has the purpose of discovering if the application of this learning strategy makes changes in the training of students in relation to their future professional career. The findings of this ongoing investigation will allow for the analysis of the possibility of extending its application. Key words: engineering, biomedical, learning, projects, strategies.

  14. [ACCOMPANY THE LEARNING OF INTERPROFESSIONAL COLLABORATION: A REQUIRED REFLEXIVE GOVERNANCE OF THE TRAINING PROJECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiguier, Grégory; Poirette, Sabine; Pélissier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive care for patients in hospital requires a collective practice of care. Interprofessional collaboration becomes a major issue for organizations of care but also for health schools. This text questions the pedagogical practices that promote an effective interprofessional collaboration of actors in caregiving situation. Theoretical reflection will lead to consider interprofessionality education as a collective learning process actors and organizations. Therefore, this learning must necessarily supported by an inter-institutional project (the care and training institutions) making this a common learning problems and requiring a reflective governance. The presentation of an inter-institutional learning project currently experienced and dedicated to interprofessional collaboration in the geriatric field will illustrate the point. It will present the activities of educational intervention and research-intervention performed by a group of actors (caregivers, health trainers and researchers in health ethics and pedagogy) responsible for ensuring the reflective control.

  15. Improving learning disabled students' skills at composing essays: self-instructional strategy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, S; Harris, K R

    1989-11-01

    This study was conducted to determine if self-instructional strategy training would improve learning disabled students' writing. Students were taught a strategy designed to facilitate the generation, framing, and planning of argumentative essays. Training effects were investigated using a multiple-baseline across-subjects design, with multiple probes in baseline. Strategy instruction had a positive effect on students' writing performance and self-efficacy. Effects were maintained over time and transferred to a new setting and teacher. Evidence for generalization to a second genre, story writing, was also obtained. The students and their special education teacher recommended the use of the strategy with other students.

  16. Development and evaluation of the e-learning teaching materials for surgical nursing training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshimi; Takeuchi, Tomiko; Takahashi, Yukiko; Ozawa, Kazuhiro; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Terauti, Hidemasa

    2006-01-01

    We investigated e-learning teaching materials with a questionnaire for 55 nursing students. Students thought the materials easy to use. In addition, the teaching materials which we developed gave them the confidence of thinking, "I can do it". We affect training by imaging a nursing procedure and think anxiety to training to be be relieved. However, load of PC became high in these teaching materials to display of two motion pictures simultaneously in one screen, so it would be necessary to produce the teaching materials considered transmission rate.

  17. Evaluation of Learning Strategies Training Program 94B10 Fort Lee, Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-11-30

    baking powder , baking soda, IAU4) .u. tidltud cocoa , & 4 *Iota lizer bowl. 2 +U 2 3 SuCj.A. 6 3/4, oz . " ’ ’ ............. pinch .714 BL4 kaiJ I...of learning strate- gies-based training. To do so would require additional data from a cost- benefit perspective--the costs of training instructors and...InU.,h psn. Follow Steps 4 through 6. ;a $tep?, add 2 tbp arry powder . Omit Slt. hi tn Stup 9. poui 2 qt sauce 6ver vegetables In eaCh pos. follow

  18. Mobile learning for HIV/AIDS healthcare worker training in resource-limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolfo Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an innovative approach to healthcare worker (HCW training using mobile phones as a personal learning environment. Twenty physicians used individual Smartphones (Nokia N95 and iPhone, each equipped with a portable solar charger. Doctors worked in urban and peri-urban HIV/AIDS clinics in Peru, where almost 70% of the nation's HIV patients in need are on treatment. A set of 3D learning scenarios simulating interactive clinical cases was developed and adapted to the Smartphones for a continuing medical education program lasting 3 months. A mobile educational platform supporting learning events tracked participant learning progress. A discussion forum accessible via mobile connected participants to a group of HIV specialists available for back-up of the medical information. Learning outcomes were verified through mobile quizzes using multiple choice questions at the end of each module. Methods In December 2009, a mid-term evaluation was conducted, targeting both technical feasibility and user satisfaction. It also highlighted user perception of the program and the technical challenges encountered using mobile devices for lifelong learning. Results With a response rate of 90% (18/20 questionnaires returned, the overall satisfaction of using mobile tools was generally greater for the iPhone. Access to Skype and Facebook, screen/keyboard size, and image quality were cited as more troublesome for the Nokia N95 compared to the iPhone. Conclusions Training, supervision and clinical mentoring of health workers are the cornerstone of the scaling up process of HIV/AIDS care in resource-limited settings (RLSs. Educational modules on mobile phones can give flexibility to HCWs for accessing learning content anywhere. However lack of softwares interoperability and the high investment cost for the Smartphones' purchase could represent a limitation to the wide spread use of such kind mLearning programs in RLSs.

  19. Mobile learning for HIV/AIDS healthcare worker training in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfo, Maria; Iglesias, David; Kiyan, Carlos; Echevarria, Juan; Fucay, Luis; Llacsahuanga, Ellar; de Waard, Inge; Suàrez, Victor; Llaque, Walter Castillo; Lynen, Lutgarde

    2010-09-08

    We present an innovative approach to healthcare worker (HCW) training using mobile phones as a personal learning environment.Twenty physicians used individual Smartphones (Nokia N95 and iPhone), each equipped with a portable solar charger. Doctors worked in urban and peri-urban HIV/AIDS clinics in Peru, where almost 70% of the nation's HIV patients in need are on treatment. A set of 3D learning scenarios simulating interactive clinical cases was developed and adapted to the Smartphones for a continuing medical education program lasting 3 months. A mobile educational platform supporting learning events tracked participant learning progress. A discussion forum accessible via mobile connected participants to a group of HIV specialists available for back-up of the medical information. Learning outcomes were verified through mobile quizzes using multiple choice questions at the end of each module. In December 2009, a mid-term evaluation was conducted, targeting both technical feasibility and user satisfaction. It also highlighted user perception of the program and the technical challenges encountered using mobile devices for lifelong learning. With a response rate of 90% (18/20 questionnaires returned), the overall satisfaction of using mobile tools was generally greater for the iPhone. Access to Skype and Facebook, screen/keyboard size, and image quality were cited as more troublesome for the Nokia N95 compared to the iPhone. Training, supervision and clinical mentoring of health workers are the cornerstone of the scaling up process of HIV/AIDS care in resource-limited settings (RLSs). Educational modules on mobile phones can give flexibility to HCWs for accessing learning content anywhere. However lack of softwares interoperability and the high investment cost for the Smartphones' purchase could represent a limitation to the wide spread use of such kind mLearning programs in RLSs.

  20. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  1. Learning through Play for School Readiness: A Training Program for Parents and Other Caregivers of Preschool Children. Learning Games To Strengthen Children's School Readiness Skills. [Videotape with Facilitator's Manual].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jerome; Singer, Dorothy

    This video-based program trains parents and other child caregivers to engage 3- to 5-year-olds in simple, motivating learning games to strengthen cognitive, social, and motor school-readiness skills. The training materials consist of a manual for training facilitators and a training video demonstrating how to play each learning game with preschool…

  2. eLearning in education and advanced training in neuroradiology: introduction of a web-based teaching and learning application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajaczek, J.E.W. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology (OE 8210), Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Department of Medical Informatics, Hannover (Germany); Goetz, F.; Haubitz, B.; Donnerstag, F.; Becker, H. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neuroradiology (OE 8210), Hannover (Germany); Kupka, T.; Behrends, M.; Matthies, H.K. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Medical Informatics, Hannover (Germany); Rodt, T. [Hannover Medical School, Department of Neurosurgery, Hannover (Germany); Walter, G.F. [Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    New information technologies offer the possibility of major improvements in the professional education and advanced training of physicians. The web-based, multimedia teaching and learning application Schoolbook has been created and utilized for neuroradiology. Schoolbook is technically based as a content management system and is realized in a LAMP environment. The content is generated with the help of the developed system and stored in a database. The layout is defined by a PHP application, and the webpages are generated from the system. Schoolbook is realized as an authoring tool so that it can be integrated into daily practice. This enables the teacher to autonomously process the content into the web-based application which is used for lectures, seminars and self-study. A multimedia case library is the central building block of Schoolbook for neuroradiology, whereby the learner is provided with original diagnostic and therapeutic data from numerous individual cases. The user can put individual emphasis on key learning points as there are various ways to work with the case histories. Besides the case-based way of teaching and learning, a systematically structured way of dealing with the content is available. eLearning offers various opportunities for teaching and learning in academic and scientific as well as in economic contexts. Web-based applications such as Schoolbook may be beneficial not only for basic university education but also for the realization of international educational programmes such as the European Master of Medical Science with a major in neuroradiology. (orig.)

  3. Respect for the complexity of human learning: a proposal for a new model of teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori R. Muskat

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available "Inclusion" is hard to implement worldwide. In the U.S.A. and Canada, one obstacle is the division between "general" and "special" education. To facilitate inclusion of exceptional students, a new model of teacher training is needed. This piece introduces the System for Understanding Individual Learning Performance (S.U.I.L.P.. Derived from neuropsychology, cross-cultural psychology, education, and sociology, the S.U.I.L.P. provides a holistic framework and common vocabulary for understanding learning performance in all learners--across development and different contexts. It also establishes avenues for collaboration and eventual merging of general and special education.

  4. Broad-based visual benefits from training with an integrated perceptual-learning video game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Jenni; Lovcik, Gary; Seitz, Aaron R.

    2014-01-01

    Perception is the window through which we understand all information about our environment, and therefore deficits in perception due to disease, injury, stroke or aging can have significant negative impacts on individuals’ lives. Research in the field of perceptual learning has demonstrated that vision can be improved in both normally seeing and visually impaired individuals, however, a limitation of most perceptual learning approaches is their emphasis on isolating particular mechanisms. In the current study, we adopted an integrative approach where the goal is not to achieve highly specific learning but instead to achieve general improvements to vision. We combined multiple perceptual learning approaches that have individually contributed to increasing the speed, magnitude and generality of learning into a perceptual-learning based video-game. Our results demonstrate broad-based benefits of vision in a healthy adult population. Transfer from the game includes; improvements in acuity (measured with self-paced standard eye-charts), improvement along the full contrast sensitivity function, and improvements in peripheral acuity and contrast thresholds. The use of this type of this custom video game framework built up from psychophysical approaches takes advantage of the benefits found from video game training while maintaining a tight link to psychophysical designs that enable understanding of mechanisms of perceptual learning and has great potential both as a scientific tool and as therapy to help improve vision. PMID:24406157

  5. Intention to Use and Satisfaction of e-Learning for Training in the Corporate Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine P Esterhuyse

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Together, the fields of education and information technology have identified the need for an online solution to training. The introduction of e-learning has optimised the learning process, allowing organisations to realise the many advantages that e-learning offers. The importance of user involvement in the success of e-learning makes it imperative that the forces driving intention to use e-learning and satisfaction thereof be determined. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationships between the metrics influencing intention to use and the satisfaction of using e-learning in companies. The results of a survey distributed amongst a South African software development company’s customer base revealed that the 94 respondents have positive enjoyment and self-efficacy levels, and low computer anxiety levels. Correlation analysis revealed significant relationships between enjoyment and self-efficacy and between enjoyment and satisfaction. Companies should therefore ensure that users enjoy using e-learning as it can directly influence satisfaction and self-efficacy.

  6. Broad-based visual benefits from training with an integrated perceptual-learning video game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Jenni; Lovcik, Gary; Seitz, Aaron R

    2014-06-01

    Perception is the window through which we understand all information about our environment, and therefore deficits in perception due to disease, injury, stroke or aging can have significant negative impacts on individuals' lives. Research in the field of perceptual learning has demonstrated that vision can be improved in both normally seeing and visually impaired individuals, however, a limitation of most perceptual learning approaches is their emphasis on isolating particular mechanisms. In the current study, we adopted an integrative approach where the goal is not to achieve highly specific learning but instead to achieve general improvements to vision. We combined multiple perceptual learning approaches that have individually contributed to increasing the speed, magnitude and generality of learning into a perceptual-learning based video-game. Our results demonstrate broad-based benefits of vision in a healthy adult population. Transfer from the game includes; improvements in acuity (measured with self-paced standard eye-charts), improvement along the full contrast sensitivity function, and improvements in peripheral acuity and contrast thresholds. The use of this type of this custom video game framework built up from psychophysical approaches takes advantage of the benefits found from video game training while maintaining a tight link to psychophysical designs that enable understanding of mechanisms of perceptual learning and has great potential both as a scientific tool and as therapy to help improve vision. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitamura Kazuya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments. Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1 circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2 approach to starting the program; 3 how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4 future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1 few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2 developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3 start with undergraduates; 4 emphasize clinical skills; and 5 train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  8. A Training Strategy for Learning Pattern Recognition Control for Myoelectric Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Michael A; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition-based control of myoelectric prostheses offers amputees a natural, intuitive way of controlling the increasing functionality of modern myoelectric prostheses. While this approach to prosthesis control is certainly attractive, it is a significant departure from existing control methods. The transition from the more traditional methods of direct or proportional control to pattern recognition-based control presents a training challenge that will be unique to each amputee. In this paper we describe specific ways that a transradial amputee, prosthetist, and occupational therapist team can overcome these challenges by developing consistent and distinguishable muscle patterns. A central part of this process is the employment of a computer-based pattern recognition training system with which an amputee can learn and improve pattern recognition skills throughout the process of prosthesis fitting and testing. We describe in detail the manner in which four transradial amputees trained to improve their pattern recognition-based control of a virtual prosthesis by focusing on building consistent, distinguishable muscle patterns. We also describe a three-phase framework for instruction and training: 1) initial demonstration and conceptual instruction, 2) in-clinic testing and initial training, and 3) at-home training.

  9. Linking supervisor’s role in training programs to motivation to learn as an antecedent of job performance Linking supervisor’s role in training programs to motivation to learn as an antecedent of job performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian K. Francis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available According to the literature pertaining to human resource development (HRD, a supervisor’s role in training programs has two major characteristics: support and communication. The ability of supervisors to play effective roles in training programs may increase employees’ job performance. More importantly, extant research in this field reveals that the effect of the supervisor’s role in training programs on job performance is indirectly affected by the motivation to learn. The nature of this relationship is less emphasized in training management literature. Therefore, this study was conducted to measure the effect of the supervisor’s role in training programs and the motivation to learn on job performance using 91 usable questionnaires gathered from employees who have worked in a state library in East Malaysia, Malaysia. The outcomes of stepwise regression analysis displayed that the inclusion of motivation to learn in the analysis had increased the effects of the two supervisor’s role elements of support and communication on job performance. This result demonstrates that the motivation to learn acts as a mediating variable in the training model of the organizational sample. The implications of this study to the theory and practice of training programs, methodological and conceptual limitations as well as future directions are elaborated.According to the literature pertaining to human resource development (HRD, a supervisor’s role in training programs has two major characteristics: support and communication. The ability of supervisors to play effective roles in training programs may increase employees’ job performance. More importantly, extant research in this field reveals that the effect of the supervisor’s role in training programs on job performance is indirectly affected by the motivation to learn. The nature of this relationship is less emphasized in training management literature. Therefore, this study was conducted to

  10. Are two heads better than one? Comparing dyad and self-regulated learning in simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, David; Brydges, Ryan; den Brok, Wendie; Nair, Parvathy; Hatala, Rose

    2013-12-01

    The optimal learner to simulator ratio for procedural skills training is not known. Research in motor learning suggests observational training in pairs, termed 'dyad training', may be as effective as directed self-regulated learning (DSRL). This study was conducted to compare the relative effectiveness and efficiency of dyad versus DSRL training of simulation-based lumbar puncture (LP). We conducted a two-group randomised equivalence trial. First-year internal medicine residents (n = 50) were randomly assigned to learn LP either in dyads or as individual learners on a simulator, using a directed self-regulated approach (i.e. the learning sequence was defined for them, but they defined the pace of learning). Participants were videotaped performing a simulated LP on a pre-test, an immediate post-test, and a 6-week delayed retention test. In duplicate, blinded raters independently evaluated all trainee performances using a previously validated 5-point global rating scale (GRS) and 35-item checklist. Our analyses showed no significant differences (p = 0.69) on pre-test, post-test or retention test GRS scores between the dyad (mean ± standard deviation [SD] scores by test: 2.39 ± 0.57, 3.48 ± 0.62, 3.12 ± 0.85, respectively) and DSRL (mean ± SD scores by test: 2.67 ± 0.50, 3.34 ± 0.77, 3.21 ± 0.79, respectively) groups. Both groups improved significantly from pre-test to post-test (p groups (20.94 minutes for individuals and 24.20 minutes for dyads; p = 0.175). Our results indicate that learning in pairs is as effective as independent DSRL. Dyad training permits the more efficient use of simulators as two learners use the same resources as an individual. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Effect of portfolio assessment on student learning in prenatal training for midwives

    OpenAIRE

    Nourossadat Kariman; Farnoosh Moafi

    2011-01-01

    The tendency to use portfolios for evaluation has been developed with the aim of optimizing the culture of assessment. The present study was carried out to determine the effect of using portfolios as an evaluation method on midwifery students??learning and satisfaction in prenatal practical training. In this prospective cohort study, all midwifery students in semester four (n=40), were randomly allocated to portfolio and routine evaluation groups. Based on their educational goals, the portfol...

  12. Acquisition versus consolidation of auditory perceptual learning using mixed-training regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidment, David W; Kang, HiJee; Gill, Emma C; Amitay, Sygal

    2015-01-01

    Learning is considered to consist of two distinct phases-acquisition and consolidation. Acquisition can be disrupted when short periods of training on more than one task are interleaved, whereas consolidation can be disrupted when a second task is trained after the first has been initiated. Here we investigated the conditions governing the disruption to acquisition and consolidation during mixed-training regimens in which primary and secondary amplitude modulation tasks were either interleaved or presented consecutively. The secondary task differed from the primary task in either task-irrelevant (carrier frequency) or task-relevant (modulation rate) stimulus features while requiring the same perceptual judgment (amplitude modulation depth discrimination), or shared both irrelevant and relevant features but required a different judgment (amplitude modulation rate discrimination). Based on previous literature we predicted that acquisition would be disrupted by varying the task-relevant stimulus feature during training (stimulus interference), and that consolidation would be disrupted by varying the perceptual judgment required (task interference). We found that varying the task-relevant or -irrelevant stimulus features failed to disrupt acquisition but did disrupt consolidation, whereas mixing two tasks requiring a different perceptual judgment but sharing the same stimulus features disrupted both acquisition and consolidation. Thus, a distinction between acquisition and consolidation phases of perceptual learning cannot simply be attributed to (task-relevant) stimulus versus task interference. We propose instead that disruption occurs during acquisition when mixing two tasks requiring a perceptual judgment based on different cues, whereas consolidation is always disrupted regardless of whether different stimulus features or tasks are mixed. The current study not only provides a novel insight into the underlying mechanisms of perceptual learning, but also has

  13. Learning new vocabulary during childhood: effects of semantic training on lexical consolidation and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lisa; Weighall, Anna; Gaskell, Gareth

    2013-11-01

    Research suggests that word learning is an extended process, with offline consolidation crucial for the strengthening of new lexical representations and their integration with existing lexical knowledge (as measured by engagement in lexical competition). This supports a dual memory systems account, in which new information is initially sparsely encoded separately from existing knowledge and integrated with long-term memory over time. However, previous studies of this type exploited unnatural learning contexts, involving fictitious words in the absence of word meaning. In this study, 5- to 9-year-old children learned real science words (e.g., hippocampus) with or without semantic information. Children in both groups were slower to detect pauses in familiar competitor words (e.g., hippopotamus) relative to control words 24h after training but not immediately, confirming that offline consolidation is required before new words are integrated with the lexicon and engage in lexical competition. Children recalled more new words 24h after training than immediately (with similar improvements shown for the recall and recognition of new word meanings); however, children who were exposed to the meanings during training showed further improvements in recall after 1 week and outperformed children who were not exposed to meanings. These findings support the dual memory systems account of vocabulary acquisition and suggest that the association of a new phonological form with semantic information is critical for the development of stable lexical representations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A dual-learning paradigm can simultaneously train multiple characteristics of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statton, Matthew A; Toliver, Alexis; Bastian, Amy J

    2016-05-01

    Impairments in human motor patterns are complex: what is often observed as a single global deficit (e.g., limping when walking) is actually the sum of several distinct abnormalities. Motor adaptation can be useful to teach patients more normal motor patterns, yet conventional training paradigms focus on individual features of a movement, leaving others unaddressed. It is known that under certain conditions, distinct movement components can be simultaneously adapted without interference. These previous "dual-learning" studies focused solely on short, planar reaching movements, yet it is unknown whether these findings can generalize to a more complex behavior like walking. Here we asked whether a dual-learning paradigm, incorporating two distinct motor adaptation tasks, can be used to simultaneously train multiple components of the walking pattern. We developed a joint-angle learning task that provided biased visual feedback of sagittal joint angles to increase peak knee or hip flexion during the swing phase of walking. Healthy, young participants performed this task independently or concurrently with another locomotor adaptation task, split-belt treadmill adaptation, where subjects adapted their step length symmetry. We found that participants were able to successfully adapt both components of the walking pattern simultaneously, without interference, and at the same rate as adapting either component independently. This leads us to the interesting possibility that combining rehabilitation modalities within a single training session could be used to help alleviate multiple deficits at once in patients with complex gait impairments.

  15. Blended Learning and Innovative Technologies in Training of Future Specialists in Foreign Higher Education Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurevych Roman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article characterizes one of the most promising models of blended learning in higher education institutions. The article describes the peculiarities of improving the education process, the formation of motivational and professional competency of future specialists as well as the usage of one of the models of blended learning – “flipped learning”, within which the personal-oriented approach is implemented and the interaction between teacher and student significantly increases. On the basis of the analysis of specialists’ training in higher education institutions in the USA, Germany, Austria, South Korea by means of the blended model with the usage of the “flipped” and ubiquitous learning, it has been found out that specialists’ training using these technologies will facilitate the absorption of significant amounts of information, the realization of individual and cooperative activities of students, teaching by project technologies that enables to develop communicative skills of students. All this makes it possible to train future specialists to work in the informational society in accordance with the requirements of labour market.

  16. Recommendations for Improving the Way University of Jeddah Handles Learning and Training Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhazemi A. Abdulrahman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This Paper analyses the training and learning practices at University of Jeddah and to make recommendations on the basis of good practice in training and learning, as identified through a review of related academic literature. This paper is complemented with the presentation of the summary of responses received from the respondents for the interview questions and analysis of the secondary data to find points in support of the observations made in the primary research. Interviews conducted as part of the data collection process in this research included several questions, which were repeated to each one of the interviewees, and their responses were recorded in a text format in the notebook. It is concluded on the basis of the literature review and primary research at UJ that the leadership style followed by the university management and the lack of coordination between management and administration are major deviations from the best practice framework developed in this research. Primary research and the knowledge acquired through service in the university show that the university uses traditional forms of training and that the dictatorial style of leadership practiced by the management does not create a favorable climate for the staff to learn.

  17. THE CHALLENGE OF LEARNING TO LEARN IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES TEACHERS PRE SERVICE TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Crestian CUNHA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This text, aiming at filling a gap in recent learning strategies related studies, reports a study conducted to measure if and to what extent strategies practiced by undergraduates majoring in French and English were incorporated in their study routines. A questionnaire provided data for quantitative analysis and language learning histories contributed with qualitative information on the process. Both were produced after three to five semesters of its first instruction in a discipline called Learning to Learn Foreign Languages. Results show that a great deal of strategies, beforehand unknown to the students, were incorporated in their routines. A special role was given to the metacognitive strategies, which focus on reflection skills. Results also stress that the challenges enhanced by a reflective posture in the Brazilian context, demand, on the one hand, the benefits of a strategic teaching integrated to language teaching and, on the other hand, an early insertion in teaching practicum.

  18. Managing simulation-based training: A framework for optimizing learning, cost, and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Noah Joseph

    This study provides a management framework for optimizing training programs for learning, cost, and time when using simulation based training (SBT) and reality based training (RBT) as resources. Simulation is shown to be an effective means for implementing activity substitution as a way to reduce risk. The risk profile of 22 US Air Force vehicles are calculated, and the potential risk reduction is calculated under the assumption of perfect substitutability of RBT and SBT. Methods are subsequently developed to relax the assumption of perfect substitutability. The transfer effectiveness ratio (TER) concept is defined and modeled as a function of the quality of the simulator used, and the requirements of the activity trained. The Navy F/A-18 is then analyzed in a case study illustrating how learning can be maximized subject to constraints in cost and time, and also subject to the decision maker's preferences for the proportional and absolute use of simulation. Solution methods for optimizing multiple activities across shared resources are next provided. Finally, a simulation strategy including an operations planning program (OPP), an implementation program (IP), an acquisition program (AP), and a pedagogical research program (PRP) is detailed. The study provides the theoretical tools to understand how to leverage SBT, a case study demonstrating these tools' efficacy, and a set of policy recommendations to enable the US military to better utilize SBT in the future.

  19. SKYNET: an efficient and robust neural network training tool for machine learning in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Philip; Feroz, Farhan; Hobson, Michael P.; Lasenby, Anthony

    2014-06-01

    We present the first public release of our generic neural network training algorithm, called SKYNET. This efficient and robust machine learning tool is able to train large and deep feed-forward neural networks, including autoencoders, for use in a wide range of supervised and unsupervised learning applications, such as regression, classification, density estimation, clustering and dimensionality reduction. SKYNET uses a `pre-training' method to obtain a set of network parameters that has empirically been shown to be close to a good solution, followed by further optimization using a regularized variant of Newton's method, where the level of regularization is determined and adjusted automatically; the latter uses second-order derivative information to improve convergence, but without the need to evaluate or store the full Hessian matrix, by using a fast approximate method to calculate Hessian-vector products. This combination of methods allows for the training of complicated networks that are difficult to optimize using standard backpropagation techniques. SKYNET employs convergence criteria that naturally prevent overfitting, and also includes a fast algorithm for estimating the accuracy of network outputs. The utility and flexibility of SKYNET are demonstrated by application to a number of toy problems, and to astronomical problems focusing on the recovery of structure from blurred and noisy images, the identification of gamma-ray bursters, and the compression and denoising of galaxy images. The SKYNET software, which is implemented in standard ANSI C and fully parallelized using MPI, is available at http://www.mrao.cam.ac.uk/software/skynet/.

  20. FACTORS EXERTING IMPACT ON LEARNING EFFICIENCY, AND TRAINING PERFORMANCE’ EVALUATION TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Vladimirovich Fedosyuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper generally focused on the learning efficiency aspects at the training carried out with the purpose of improving practical efficiency of business team’ performance. While shortage of ideas the personnel should have produced, some training shall be particularly urgent, provided that the sessions to be aimed at contributing to practical merits of every employee, and at reducing numerous barriers the employees face while solving problems at work, rather than improving interpersonal relations and enhancing the cognitive tuning of the team. The author specified the criteria of performance’ efficiency, and measurement procedures in their evaluation, and has brought to light significance of some individual components as the coach, or the client or the participants. Their active involvement or inertness shall directly impact on the learning outcomes and, accordingly, the score of that training. Having made a review of the papers by the Russian and foreign writers, the study has sorted out two key issues (to solve prior to starting the training, and then used the ROI model by Phillips as the principal procedure of efficiency’ evaluation. In conclusion, the paper defined the main stages of assessment, jointly with some refinements.

  1. Detection and Labeling of Vertebrae in MR Images Using Deep Learning with Clinical Annotations as Training Data

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forsberg, Daniel; Sjöblom, Erik; Sunshine, Jeffrey L

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of using clinically provided spine label annotations stored in a single institution image archive as training data for deep learning-based...

  2. Trainers' perception of the learning environment and student competency : A qualitative investigation of midwifery and anesthesia training programs in Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kibwana, Sharon; Haws, Rachel; Kols, Adrienne; Ayalew, Firew; Kim, Young-Mi; van Roosmalen, Jos; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ethiopia has successfully expanded training for midwives and anesthetists in public institutions. This study explored the perceptions of trainers (instructors, clinical lab assistants and preceptors) towards the adequacy of students' learning experience and implications for achieving

  3. Computer-based auditory training (CBAT): benefits for children with language- and reading-related learning difficulties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loo, Jenny Hooi Yin; Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Campbell, Nicci; Luxon, Linda M

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the evidence for computer-based auditory training (CBAT) in children with language, reading, and related learning difficulties, and evaluates the extent it can benefit children with auditory processing disorder (APD...

  4. Brain Plasticity in Speech Training in Native English Speakers Learning Mandarin Tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzen, Christina Carolyn

    The current study employed behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measures to investigate brain plasticity associated with second-language (L2) phonetic learning based on an adaptive computer training program. The program utilized the acoustic characteristics of Infant-Directed Speech (IDS) to train monolingual American English-speaking listeners to perceive Mandarin lexical tones. Behavioral identification and discrimination tasks were conducted using naturally recorded speech, carefully controlled synthetic speech, and non-speech control stimuli. The ERP experiments were conducted with selected synthetic speech stimuli in a passive listening oddball paradigm. Identical pre- and post- tests were administered on nine adult listeners, who completed two-to-three hours of perceptual training. The perceptual training sessions used pair-wise lexical tone identification, and progressed through seven levels of difficulty for each tone pair. The levels of difficulty included progression in speaker variability from one to four speakers and progression through four levels of acoustic exaggeration of duration, pitch range, and pitch contour. Behavioral results for the natural speech stimuli revealed significant training-induced improvement in identification of Tones 1, 3, and 4. Improvements in identification of Tone 4 generalized to novel stimuli as well. Additionally, comparison between discrimination of across-category and within-category stimulus pairs taken from a synthetic continuum revealed a training-induced shift toward more native-like categorical perception of the Mandarin lexical tones. Analysis of the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) responses in the ERP data revealed increased amplitude and decreased latency for pre-attentive processing of across-category discrimination as a result of training. There were also laterality changes in the MMN responses to the non-speech control stimuli, which could reflect reallocation of brain resources in processing pitch patterns

  5. Sex-specific positive and negative consequences of avoidance training during childhood on adult active avoidance learning in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spröwitz, Almuth; Bock, Jörg; Braun, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    In humans and animals cognitive training during childhood plays an important role in shaping neural circuits and thereby determines learning capacity later in life. Using a negative feedback learning paradigm, the two-way active avoidance (TWA) learning, we aimed to investigate in mice (i) the age-dependency of TWA learning, (ii) the consequences of pretraining in childhood on adult learning capacity and (iii) the impact of sex on the learning paradigm in mice. Taken together, we show here for the first time that the beneficial or detrimental outcome of pretraining in childhood depends on the age during which TWA training is encountered, indicating that different, age-dependent long-term “memory traces” might be formed, which are recruited during adult TWA training and thereby either facilitate or impair adult TWA learning. While pretraining during infancy results in learning impairment in adulthood, pretraining in late adolescence improved avoidance learning. The experiments revealed a clear sex difference in the group of late-adolescent mice: female mice showed better avoidance learning during late adolescence compared to males, and the beneficial impact of late-adolescent pretraining on adult learning was more pronounced in females compared to males. PMID:24137115

  6. Sex-specific positive and negative consequences of avoidance training during childhood on adult active avoidance learning in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almuth eSpröwitz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In humans and animals cognitive training during childhood plays an important role in shaping neural circuits and thereby determines learning capacity later in life. Using a negative feedback learning paradigm, the two-way active avoidance (TWA learning, we aimed to investigate in mice (i the age-dependency of TWA learning, (ii the consequences of pretraining in childhood on adult learning capacity and (iii the impact of sex on the learning paradigm in mice. Taken together, we show here for the first time that the beneficial or detrimental outcome of pretraining in childhood depends on the age during which TWA training is encountered, indicating that different, age-dependent long-term memory traces might be formed, which are recruited during adult TWA training and thereby either facilitate or impair adult TWA learning. While pretraining during infancy results in learning impairment in adulthood, pretraining in late adolescence improved avoidance learning.The experiments revealed a clear sex difference in the group of late-adolescent mice: female mice showed better avoidance learning during late adolescence compared to males, and the beneficial impact of late-adolescent pretraining on adult learning was more pronounced in females compared to males.

  7. Blended Learning in the Vocational Education and Training System in Tanzania: Understanding Vocational Educators’ Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruni J. Machumu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In a constructivist world of teaching and learning, opportunities to acquire and develop the knowledge and practical skills necessary to design, establish, and deploy blended learning in vocational education and training (VET programs delivery is a labour-market-driven. The paper examines VET educator’s pleas about the need for the design, adoption and deployment of blended learning in VET programs delivery in Tanzania. A single case study design with an in-depth interview and focus group discussion was conducted with 15 VET educators in three VET colleges in both Morogoro and Dar es Salaam regions. Snowball and purposive sampling were used to obtain sample respondents. For the data analysis, content analysis was employed to condense data obtained from interviews and focus group discussion. It was found that continuous professional development, institutional arrangements, and support should be provided online to facilitate the design, adoption and use of blended learning in VET. We recommend that locally designed blended learning should be relevant to the environment of both students and teachers. In reality, the interplay between blended learning, imparting knowledge and practical skills remain the key focus of future research.

  8. Comparisons of different methods to train a young zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) to learn a song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derégnaucourt, Sébastien; Poirier, Colline; Kant, Anne Van der; Linden, Annemie Van der; Gahr, Manfred

    2013-06-01

    Like humans, oscine songbirds exhibit vocal learning. They learn their song by imitating conspecifics, mainly adults. Among them, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) has been widely used as a model species to study the behavioral, cellular and molecular substrates of vocal learning. Various methods using taped song playback have been used in the laboratory to train young male finches to learn a song. Since different protocols have been applied by different research groups, the efficiency of the studies cannot be directly compared. The purpose of our study was to address this problem. Young finches were raised by their mother alone from day post hatching (dph) 10 and singly isolated from dph 35. One week later, exposure to a song model began, either using a live tutor or taped playback (passive or self-elicited). At dph 100, the birds were transferred to a common aviary. We observed that one-to-one live tutoring is the best method to get a fairly complete imitation. Using self-elicited playback we observed high inter-individual variability; while some finches learned well (including good copying of the song model), others exhibited poor copying. Passive playback resulted in poor imitation of the model. We also observed that finches exhibited vocal changes after dph 100 and that the range of these changes was negatively related to their imitation of the song model. Taken together, these results suggest that social aspects are predominant in the success outcome of song learning in the zebra finch.

  9. A safe place with space for learning: Experiences from an interprofessional training ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Karin; Kiessling, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional learning in a real ward context effectively increases collaborative and professional competence among students. However, less is known on the processes behind this. The aim of this study was to explore medical, nurse, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy students' perspectives on the process of their own learning at an interprofessional training ward (IPTW). We performed a qualitative content analysis on free-text answers of 333 student questionnaires from the years 2004 to 2011. Two main themes emerged: first, students found that the IPTW provided an enriching learning environment--a safe place with space. It included authentic and relevant patients, well-composed and functioning student teams, competent and supportive supervisors, and adjusted ward structures to support learning. Second, they developed an awareness of their own development with faith in the future--from chaos to clarity. It included personal, professional, and interprofessional development towards a comprehensive view of practice and a faith in their ability to work as professionals in the future. Our findings are discussed with a social constructivist perspective. This study suggests that when an IPTW provides a supportive and permissive learning environment with possibilities to interact with one another--a safe place with space--it enables students to move from insecurity to faith in their abilities--from chaos to clarity. However, if the learning environment is impaired, the students' development could be halted.

  10. A Simulation Learning Approach to Training First Responders for Radiological Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, Robert Lon [ORNL; Rhodes, Graham S. [Applied Research Associates, Inc.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the application of simulation learning technology, popularized by the emerging serious games industry, for training first responders to properly act in the event of a radiological emergency. Using state-of-the-art video game production tools and runtime engines as an enabling technology, simulation learning combines interactive virtual worlds based on validated engineering models with engaging storylines and scenarios that invoke the emotional response-and the corresponding human stress level-that first responders would encounter during a real-world emergency. For the application discussed here, in addition to providing engaging instruction about the fundamentals of radiological environments and the proper usage of radiological equipment, simulation learning prepares first responders to perform effectively under high stress and enables them to practice in teams.

  11. E-LEARNING AS AN INSTRUMENT FOR CHANGE: THE PEDAGOGICAL DESIGN OF A TRAINING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Lucer Fustes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development and a summary of the results of a Training Experience implemented in the University of Extremadura. This experience is the innovative design of an online Postgraduate Course for Secondary School Teachers. The research team, which has been committed to online teaching for longer than a decade, began an innovative experience to test their singular conception of e-learning. So, a continuous process of group-negotiation began in order to design a course where the educational method should be the main part of the course. The design is innovative because of the tutorial approach and the learning evaluation process (as the quality of the evaluation is expected to be high although this is just implemented online. At present the results of the experience are being studied, however some strong and weak points have been already found out, so they might guide our teaching methods in order to get good practices for online learning.

  12. Collecting Validity Evidence for the Assessment of Mastery Learning in Simulation-Based Ultrasound Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyre, L; Nørgaard, L N; Tabor, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To collect validity evidence for the assessment of mastery learning on a virtual reality transabdominal ultrasound simulator. Materials and Methods: We assessed the validity evidence using Messick's framework for validity. The study included 20 novices and 9 ultrasound experts who all...... completed 10 obstetric training modules on a transabdominal ultrasound simulator that provided automated measures of performance for each completed module (i. e., simulator metrics). Differences in the performance of the two groups were used to identify simulator metrics with validity evidence...... for the assessment of mastery learning. The novices continued to practice until they had attained mastery learning level. Results: One-third of the simulator metrics discriminated between the two groups. The median simulator scores from a maximum of 40 metrics were 17.5 percent (range 0 - 45.0 percent) for novices...

  13. STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL MODEL OF CLOUD ORIENTED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FOR BACHELORS OF INFORMATICS TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana A. Vakaliuk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes the essence of the category "model". There are presented the main types of models used in educational research: structural, functional, structural and functional model as well as basic requirements for building these types of models. The national experience in building models and designing cloud-based learning environment of educational institutions (both higher and secondary is analyzed. It is presented structural and functional model of cloud-based learning environment for Bachelor of Informatics. Also we describe each component of cloud-based learning environment model for bachelors of informatics training: target, managerial, organizational, content and methodical, communication, technological and productive. It is summarized, that COLE should solve all major tasks that relate to higher education institutions.

  14. Association of Learning Styles with Research Self‐Efficacy: Study of Short‐Term Research Training Program for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A.; Winegarden, Babbi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Purpose With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short‐term research training programs, were associated with research self‐efficacy, a potential predictor of research career success. Method Seventy‐five first‐year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH‐supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self‐efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual‐verbal, sequential‐global, sensing‐intuitive, and active‐reflective) with students’ gender, ranking of medical school, and research self‐efficacy. Results Research self‐efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self‐efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self‐efficacy from baseline to posttraining. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students’ gender or ranking of their medical school. Conclusions Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician‐scientists. PMID:25079678

  15. Association of learning styles with research self-efficacy: study of short-term research training program for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A; Winegarden, Babbi; Jeste, Dilip V

    2014-12-01

    With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short-term research training programs, were associated with research self-efficacy, a potential predictor of research career success. Seventy-five first-year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH-supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self-efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual-verbal, sequential-global, sensing-intuitive, and active-reflective) with students' gender, ranking of medical school, and research self-efficacy. Research self-efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self-efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self-efficacy from baseline to posttraining. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students' gender or ranking of their medical school. Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician-scientists. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Experiential Learning Approach for Training Pre-Service Teachers in Environmental Science Using Mobile Apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, D. C.; Nair, U. S.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of complex environmental problems, it is desirable to enhance public awareness of environmental issues. In response to this challenge, environmental education is an integral part of curriculum at all levels of education, including teacher education. However, it is often criticized for being reductionist and empirical and thus not optimal for training next generation of students who are expected to formulate solutions to complex, interdisciplinary environmental issues. Experiential learning is better suited for such training. It create a connection between the learner and the content by involving the students in reflection on their experiences. It is very appropriate in teacher education where students carry their own unique experiences into the learning environment. This study will report on the use of mobile application, based on the Open Data Kit (ODK), along with the Google Earth Engine (GEE) to implement experiential learning approach for teacher education in Kerala, India. The specific topic considered is land use and land cover change due to human activity. The approach will involve students using Android mobile application to collect a sample of geo-locations for different land cover types. This data will be used to classify satellite imagery and understand how their neighborhoods have changed over the years. The present study will also report on evaluation of effectiveness of the developed Mobile Application as a tool for experiential learning of Environmental Education. The study uses an experimental method with mixed methods-one group Pretest-Posttest design. The sample for the study consists of 300 Pre-service teachers of Kerala, India. The data collected is analyzed using paired t tests. Qualitative feedback about the Mobile Application through focus group interviews is also collected. Implementation of the experiential learning algorithm and analysis of data collected for evaluation of the learning approach will also be presented.

  17. Implementing Transfer of Learning in Training and Professional Development in a US Public Child Welfare Agency: What Works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Virginia; Bosco-Ruggiero, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    In-service training in public child welfare agencies in the United States has long been viewed as an important vehicle for the improvement of job satisfaction and organizational commitment, and therefore as important to retention in child welfare. This article examines the critical role of transfer of learning strategies in such training and…

  18. Effect of Instructional Media in the Learning of English Grammar on the Achievement of Teacher Training Students at Namakkal District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulselvi, Evangelin

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at finding the effect of Instructional software program in the learning of grammar on the achievement of teacher training students of Namakkal District. Parallel group experimental method was adopted in this study. A sample of 80 students studying in the teacher training college were selected on the basis of their…

  19. Improvement of nursing students' learning outcomes through scenario-based skills training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: this study analyzed the influence of scenario-based skills training on students' learning skills. Method: the author evaluated the nursing skills laboratory exam papers of 605 sophomores in nursing programs for seven years. The study determined the common mistakes of students and the laboratory work was designed in a scenario-based format. The effectiveness of this method was evaluated by assessing the number of errors the students committed and their achievement scores in laboratory examinations. This study presents the students' common mistakes in intramuscular and subcutaneous injection and their development of intravenous access skills, included in the nursing skills laboratory examination. Results: an analysis of the students' most common mistakes revealed that the most common was not following the principles of asepsis for all three skills (intramuscular, subcutaneous injection, intravenous access) in the first year of the scenario-based training. The students' exam achievement scores increased gradually, except in the fall semester of the academic year 2009-2010. The study found that the scenario-based skills training reduced students' common mistakes in examinations and enhanced their performance on exams. Conclusion: this method received a positive response from both students and instructors. The scenario-based training is available for use in addition to other skills training methods. PMID:27508922

  20. Improvement of nursing students' learning outcomes through scenario-based skills training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Uysal

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: this study analyzed the influence of scenario-based skills training on students' learning skills. Method: the author evaluated the nursing skills laboratory exam papers of 605 sophomores in nursing programs for seven years. The study determined the common mistakes of students and the laboratory work was designed in a scenario-based format. The effectiveness of this method was evaluated by assessing the number of errors the students committed and their achievement scores in laboratory examinations. This study presents the students' common mistakes in intramuscular and subcutaneous injection and their development of intravenous access skills, included in the nursing skills laboratory examination. Results: an analysis of the students' most common mistakes revealed that the most common was not following the principles of asepsis for all three skills (intramuscular, subcutaneous injection, intravenous access in the first year of the scenario-based training. The students' exam achievement scores increased gradually, except in the fall semester of the academic year 2009-2010. The study found that the scenario-based skills training reduced students' common mistakes in examinations and enhanced their performance on exams. Conclusion: this method received a positive response from both students and instructors. The scenario-based training is available for use in addition to other skills training methods.

  1. Training the public health workforce from Albany to Zambia: technology lessons learned along the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltz, Edward C; Maniccia, Dayna M; Bryde, Regina L; Murphy, Kristin; Harris, Brett R; Waldenmaier, Mark N

    2010-01-01

    This article describes lessons learned by the University at Albany Center for Public Health Preparedness (UA-CPHP) in using three technologies to deliver preparedness training for public health professionals in New York State. These three technologies are: 1. Audience response system (ARS, or the "clicker" system)--Purchased to improve engagement of all participants in heterogeneous training audiences, it also markedly reduces staff time while improving training evaluation (cost: $4,500). 2. Satellite broadcast programs--UA-CPHP produced more than 50 broadcasts, which remain available as videostreams and/or podcasts. Viewership of archived programs sometimes surpasses that of the live event (cost estimate: $23,000 to $39,000). 3. Interactive online courses--Seventeen courses have registered more than 44,000 learners worldwide. The Pandemic Influenza course alone has reached more than 16,000 registrants from all 50 U.S. states and at least 56 other countries (cost estimate: $30,000 to $65,000). UA-CPHP's experience as a preparedness training center has confirmed that contemporary technology can be employed to improve and increase the reach of these training efforts. An additional finding was that, quite unintentionally, the intensive use of distance-based educational modalities designed to reach public health practitioners in New York State has afforded UA-CPHP a substantial national and international audience as well, and at no additional cost.

  2. Radiation therapy students' perceptions of their learning from participation in communication skills training: An innovative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungey, Gay M; Neser, Hazel A

    2017-06-01

    Communication skills training has been progressively integrated into the Bachelor of Radiation Therapy programme in New Zealand throughout the last 3 years. This innovative study aimed to explore students' perceptions of their learning from participation in communication skills workshops. The purpose was to expose students to a variety of common clinical situations that they could encounter as a student radiation therapist. Common scenarios from the radiation therapy setting were developed, using trained actors as a standardised patient, staff member or member of the public. Students were briefed on their scenario and then required to manage their interactions appropriate to its context. A staff member and peers observed each student's interaction via a digital screen and assessed the student's performance in six key skills. Each student was video recorded so that they could review their own interaction. Verbal and written feedback was given to each student. Students evaluated their experience using a 5-point Likert scale. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from 116 of 150 students who consented to participate. Three main themes emerged from the data: the value of learning from peers; preparation for the clinical environment; and the ability to self-reflect. The quantitative data indicated that students' perceptions of the tool are positive and an effective learning experience. Students' perceptions of participation in the communication skills workshops, with the integration of trained actors, are positive and students perceive the scenarios to be helpful for their learning. Opportunities are indicated to further develop of students' ability to self-reflect. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australian Society of Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy and New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology.

  3. Training of English Learning Strategy:Discussions Based on a Plan of Strategy Teaching in the Classroom of Senior School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Yun; CHEN Yong-lin

    2013-01-01

      Training of English learning strategy has become an important part in English teaching, but in the practice of the educ⁃tional activities, it does not be treated seriously. This paper tries to design a teaching plan to instruct some strategies and discuss the practical functions and meanings of learning strategy in English teaching by analyzing them.

  4. Face-to-Face or Distance Training? Two Different Approaches To Motivate SMEs To Learn--An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, John; O'Dwyer, Michele; Ryan, Eamon; Lawless, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Two projects attempted to assess and meet small and medium-sized enterprises' training needs. Britain's Learning support for Small Businesses delivery methods included paper, CD-ROM, and the Internet. The University of Limerick, Ireland, offered face-to-face learning for microenterprises. (SK)

  5. Training self-assessment and task-selection skills: A cognitive approach to improving self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostons, Danny; Van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Kostons, D., Van Gog, T., & Paas, F. (2012). Training self-assessment and task-selection skills: A cognitive approach to improving self-regulated learning. Learning and Instruction, 22(2), 121-132. doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2011.08.004

  6. Fostering pupils’ lifelong learning competencies in the classroom : evaluation of a training programme using a multivariate multilevel growth curve approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüftenegger, Marko; Finsterwald, Monika; Klug, Julia; Bergsmann, Evelyn; van de Schoot, Rens; Schober, Barbara; Wagner, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based interventions to promote lifelong learning are needed not only in continuing education but also in schools, which lay important cornerstones for lifelong learning. The present article reports evaluation results about the effectiveness of one such training programme (TALK). TALK aims

  7. Training self-assessment and task-selection skills: A cognitive approach to improving self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kostons, Danny; Van Gog, Tamara; Paas, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Kostons, D., Van Gog, T., & Paas, F. (2012). Training self-assessment and task-selection skills: A cognitive approach to improving self-regulated learning. Learning and Instruction, 22(2), 121-132. doi:10.1016/j.learninstruc.2011.08.004

  8. Face-to-Face or Distance Training? Two Different Approaches To Motivate SMEs To Learn--An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, John; O'Dwyer, Michele; Ryan, Eamon; Lawless, Naomi

    2001-01-01

    Two projects attempted to assess and meet small and medium-sized enterprises' training needs. Britain's Learning support for Small Businesses delivery methods included paper, CD-ROM, and the Internet. The University of Limerick, Ireland, offered face-to-face learning for microenterprises. (SK)

  9. How to Integrate Cooperative Skills Training into Learning Tasks: An Illustration with Young Pupils' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehraus, Katia

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how to integrate cooperative skills training into learning tasks in the area of writing. Cooperative learning sessions, aimed at developing both cooperative and cognitive skills, were created and conducted in two elementary school classes (Grade 2, age 7-8). Pupils' teamwork interactions were videotaped and analysed.…

  10. The Comparison of Rapid E-Learning Approach and Traditional E-Learning in Staff In-Service Training in Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyd-Shohre Alavi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As there are few studies that compare rapid e-learning with traditional e-learning this study was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Science in 1387 in order to compare learning rate trainees satisfaction and the time consumed to develop training courses in these two approaches. Methods: In this interventional study 100 employees were assessed in two 50- staff groups by blocking randomization one group learned through traditional e-learning and the other by rapid e-learning. The traditional e-learning content development was based on waterfall instructional design by Macromedia flash software. The rapid e-learning content development was based on parallel process of three stages of analysis design and development by Adobe Presenter software. The data were collected by pre test post test final examination; self- report questionnaire of learning and questionnaire of trainees satisfaction. Results: There was no significant difference between pre test post test final examination scores and self report of learning of the two groups nor was there significant difference between satisfaction of content delivery method e-learning program and overall satisfaction in the two groups. The consumed time for developing the course in traditional and rapid e-learning approaches was 141 working days and 24 working days respectively. Conclusion: The staff learning and satisfaction were not different in these two e-learning approaches but the time needed for content development in rapid e-learning approach was much less compared to the other approach. Therefore it is recommended that rapid e-learning be used in electronic staff in-service training in universities.

  11. 学困生语言学习策略培训探讨%On Language Learning Strategies Training for Learners with Learning Difficulties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈霞

    2012-01-01

    加强大学英语分级教学中学困生语言学习策略培训,提高学困生大学英语自主学习能力是大学英语教学改革关注的热点,也是实施素质教育的一个重要内容,更是全面提高大学英语教学质量的根本途径。本文结合语言学习策略培训的理论基础,重点阐述了学困生语言学习一策略培训的必要性,提出了加强学困生语言学习策略培训的有效方法。%Strengthening language learning strategies training for learners, especially for those with learning difficulties is an effective way to improve their autonymous learning ability, which is one of the hot topics in the process of English teaching reform. Cultivating students'autonymous learning ability is not only an important part of quality - oriented education, but also the essential way to improve college English teaching. In this article, on the ground of the theory of language learning strategies training, the writer mainly emphasizes the significance of language learning strategies training for the learners with learning difficulties and suggests some effective training methods.

  12. ANALYZE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND SCIENTIFIC ATTITUDE IN PHYSICS LEARNING USED INQUIRY TRAINING AND DIRECT INSTRUCTION LEARNING MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Parsaoran Damanik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the differences: (1 the difference of critical thinking skills of students' that using Inquiry Training and Direct Instruction. (2 The difference of critical thinking skills among students who at high scientific attitude and students who at low scientific attitude. (3 To see if there is interaction between inquiry learning model of the scientific attitude students' to increase the ability to critical thinking. This is a quasi experimental research. Which students of private junior high school Two Raya Kahean District Simalungun. Population choose random sample of each class. Instrument used consisted of: (1 test the scientific attitude of students through a questionnaire with 25 statements questionnaire number (2 test the critical thinking skills in the form of descriptions by 9 questions. The data were analyzed according to ANAVA. It showed that: (1 There are differences in students' critical thinking of skills achievement Inquiry Training model and Direct Instruction model, (2 there was a difference of students' critical thinking in scientific attitude at high is better than who thought there is a difference of students' critical thinking in scientific attitude at low. (3 There was no interaction between Inquiry Training model and Direct Instruction with the scientific attitude students' to increase student’s critical thinking of skills.

  13. Development of a prototype interactive learning system using multi-media technology for mission independent training program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Jack E.

    1992-01-01

    The Spacelab Mission Independent Training Program provides an overview of payload operations. Most of the training material is currently presented in workbook form with some lecture sessions to supplement selected topics. The goal of this project was to develop a prototype interactive learning system for one of the Mission Independent Training topics to demonstrate how the learning process can be improved by incorporating multi-media technology into an interactive system. This report documents the development process and some of the problems encountered during the analysis, design, and production phases of this system.

  14. Wearable Sensors for eLearning of Manual Tasks: Using Forearm EMG in Hand Hygiene Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutafina, Ekaterina; Laukamp, David; Bettermann, Ralf; Schroeder, Ulrik; Jonas, Stephan M

    2016-08-03

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to eLearning that makes use of smart wearable sensors. Traditional eLearning supports the remote and mobile learning of mostly theoretical knowledge. Here we discuss the possibilities of eLearning to support the training of manual skills. We employ forearm armbands with inertial measurement units and surface electromyography sensors to detect and analyse the user's hand motions and evaluate their performance. Hand hygiene is chosen as the example activity, as it is a highly standardized manual task that is often not properly executed. The World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene are taken as a model of the optimal hygiene procedure, due to their algorithmic structure. Gesture recognition procedures based on artificial neural networks and hidden Markov modeling were developed, achieving recognition rates of 98 . 30 % ( ± 1 . 26 % ) for individual gestures. Our approach is shown to be promising for further research and application in the mobile eLearning of manual skills.

  15. Wearable Sensors for eLearning of Manual Tasks: Using Forearm EMG in Hand Hygiene Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kutafina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel approach to eLearning that makes use of smart wearable sensors. Traditional eLearning supports the remote and mobile learning of mostly theoretical knowledge. Here we discuss the possibilities of eLearning to support the training of manual skills. We employ forearm armbands with inertial measurement units and surface electromyography sensors to detect and analyse the user’s hand motions and evaluate their performance. Hand hygiene is chosen as the example activity, as it is a highly standardized manual task that is often not properly executed. The World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene are taken as a model of the optimal hygiene procedure, due to their algorithmic structure. Gesture recognition procedures based on artificial neural networks and hidden Markov modeling were developed, achieving recognition rates of 98 . 30 % ( ± 1 . 26 % for individual gestures. Our approach is shown to be promising for further research and application in the mobile eLearning of manual skills.

  16. Wearable Sensors for eLearning of Manual Tasks: Using Forearm EMG in Hand Hygiene Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutafina, Ekaterina; Laukamp, David; Bettermann, Ralf; Schroeder, Ulrik; Jonas, Stephan M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach to eLearning that makes use of smart wearable sensors. Traditional eLearning supports the remote and mobile learning of mostly theoretical knowledge. Here we discuss the possibilities of eLearning to support the training of manual skills. We employ forearm armbands with inertial measurement units and surface electromyography sensors to detect and analyse the user’s hand motions and evaluate their performance. Hand hygiene is chosen as the example activity, as it is a highly standardized manual task that is often not properly executed. The World Health Organization guidelines on hand hygiene are taken as a model of the optimal hygiene procedure, due to their algorithmic structure. Gesture recognition procedures based on artificial neural networks and hidden Markov modeling were developed, achieving recognition rates of 98.30% (±1.26%) for individual gestures. Our approach is shown to be promising for further research and application in the mobile eLearning of manual skills. PMID:27527167

  17. The Relationship Between Fidelity and Learning in Aviation Training and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Cliff

    2002-01-01

    Flight simulators can be designed to train pilots or assess their flight performance. Low-Fidelity simulators maximize the initial learning rate of novice pilots and minimize initial costs; whereas, expensive, high-fidelity simulators predict the realworld in-flight performance of expert pilots (Fink & Shriver, 1978 Hays & Singer 1989; Kinkade & Wheaton. 1972). Although intuitively appealing and intellectually convenient to generalize concepts of learning and assessment, what holds true for the role of fidelity in assessment may not always hold true for learning, and vice versa. To bring clarity to this issue, the author distinguishes the role of fidelity in learning from its role in assessment as a function of skill level by applying the hypothesis of Alessi (1988) and reviewing the Laughery, Ditzian, and Houtman (1982) study on simulator validity. Alessi hypothesized that there is it point beyond which one additional unit of flight-simulator fidelity results in a diminished rate of learning. The author of this current paper also suggests the existence of an optimal point beyond which one additional unit of flight-simulator fidelity results in a diminished rate of practical assessment of nonexpert pilot performance.

  18. Neuroprotective effects of behavioural training and nicotine on age-related deficits in spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Carmen; Vicens, Paloma; Redolat, Rosa

    2006-09-01

    Studies in humans and animals show a clear decline in spatial memory with age and several approaches have been adopted to alleviate this impairment. The purpose of our review is to assess the studies that have suggested the possible neuroprotective actions of behavioural training and nicotine-applied both independently and in conjunction-on age-related deficits in spatial learning. Both spatial pretraining and nonspatial experiences influence an animal's performance in spatial tasks. In aged rats, the experience of training in the water maze task increases the number of newly generated neurons in the hippocampus. The neuroprotective effects of nicotine have been demonstrated in both in-vitro and in-vivo models, although the molecular mechanisms underlying these actions are not yet fully understood. It had been concluded in different studies that nicotine can improve, impair or have no effect on performance in the water maze. Neurobiological data also suggest an interaction between nicotine and prior experience in complex tasks, although few studies have raised the question of whether nicotine treatment and training in spatial tasks may contribute in an interactive manner to alleviate spatial cognition impairment associated with the ageing process. Different findings suggest that past experience could be a confounding variable in longitudinal studies that aim to evaluate the neuroprotective effects of nicotine on age-related deficits in spatial learning.

  19. Increase in c-Fos and Arc protein in retrosplenial cortex after memory-improving lateral hypothalamic electrical stimulation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádár, Elisabeth; Vico-Varela, Eva; Aldavert-Vera, Laura; Huguet, Gemma; Morgado-Bernal, Ignacio; Segura-Torres, Pilar

    2016-02-01

    Post-training Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) of the lateral hypothalamus (LH), a kind of rewarding deep-brain stimulation, potentiates learning and memory and increases c-Fos protein expression in specific memory-related brain regions. In a previous study, Aldavert-Vera et al. (2013) reported that post-acquisition LH-ICSS improved 48 h retention of a delay two-way active avoidance conditioning (TWAA) and induced c-Fos expression increase in CA3 at 90 min after administration. Nevertheless, this c-Fos induction was only observed after the acquisition session and not after the retention test at 48 h, when the ICSS improving effect was observed on memory. This current study aims to examine the hypothesis that post-training ICSS treatment may stimulate c-Fos expression at the time of the TWAA retention test in retrosplenial cortex (RSC), a hippocampus-related brain region more closely related with long-lasting memory storage. Effects of ICSS on Arc protein, a marker of memory-associated synaptic plasticity, were also measured by immunohistochemistry in granular and agranular RSC. The most innovative results are that the ICSS treatment potentiates the c-Fos induction across TWAA conditions (no conditioning, acquisition and retention), specifically in layer V of the granular RSC, along with increases of Arc protein levels in the granular but not in agranular areas of RSC ipsilaterally few hours after ICSS. This leads us to suggest that plasticity-related protein activation in the granular RSC could be involved in the positive modulatory effects of ICSS on TWAA memory consolidation, opening a new approach for future research in ICSS memory facilitation.

  20. Design, Explanation, and Evaluation of Training Model Structures Based on Learning Organization--In the Cement Industry with a Nominal Production Capacity of Ten Thousand Tons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Hamid; Kazemi, Mojtaba; Abbspour, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the effectiveness of training based on learning organization in the staff of cement industry with production capacity over ten thousand tons. The purpose of this study is to propose a training model based on learning organization. For this purpose, the factors of organizational learning were introduced by…

  1. Does reflective web-based discussion strengthen nursing students' learning experiences during clinical training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettiäinen, Sari; Vähämaa, Kristiina

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this research was to study how a web-based discussion forum can be used as a supervision tool during nursing students' clinical training. The study emphasises peer support and its importance for the students. The empirical research was carried out at a Finnish university of applied sciences. 25 nursing students took part in web-based discussion during their eight-week clinical training period. All in all, 395 comments were submitted. The material was analysed by using categorisation and a thematic analysis process. Finally, the results were reported using a modified Salmon's (2002) 5-stage model of Teaching and Learning On-line and Mezirow's (1981) levels of reflection. The students motivated each other by sharing their feelings and experiences. They noticed the value of peer support and started to learn from each other as well. By reflecting on their experiences, the students progressed in their learning process and at the same time advanced their reflective thinking process. This combination of theoretical knowledge and practice, based on the students' needs and interests, could lead to a deeper understanding which could also result in better clinical skills. This method offers the lecturers the possibility to support and follow the professional growth process in a new evidence-based manner.

  2. Learning from feedback training data at a self-paced brain-computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haihong; Liyanage, Sidath Ravindra; Wang, Chuanchu; Guan, Cuntai

    2011-08-01

    Inherent changes that appear in brain signals when transferring from calibration to feedback sessions are a challenging but critical issue in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications. While previous studies have mostly focused on the adaptation of classifiers, in this paper we study the feasibility and the importance of the adaptation of feature extraction in a self-paced BCI paradigm. First, we conduct calibration and feedback training on able-bodied naïve subjects using a new self-paced motor imagery BCI including the idle state. The online results suggest that the feature space constructed from calibration data may become ineffective during feedback sessions. Hence, we propose a new supervised method that learns from a feedback session to construct a more appropriate feature space, on the basis of the maximum mutual information principle between feedback signal, target signal and EEG. Specifically, we formulate the learning objective as maximizing a kernel-based mutual information estimate with respect to the spatial-spectral filtering parameters. We then derive a gradient-based optimization algorithm for the learning task. An experimental study is conducted using offline simulation. The results show that the proposed method is able to construct effective feature spaces to capture the discriminative information in feedback training data and, consequently, the prediction error can be significantly reduced using the new features.

  3. Situated learning in translation research training: academic research as a reflection of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risku, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Situated learning has become a dominant goal in the translation classroom: translation didactics is being developed in a learner-, situation- and experience-based direction, following constructivist and participatory teaching philosophies. However, the explicit use of situated approaches has, so far, not been the centre of attention in translation theory teaching and research training. As a consequence, translation theory often remains unconnected to the skills learned and topics tackled in language-specific translation teaching and the challenges experienced in real-life translation practice. This article reports on the results of an exploratory action research project into the teaching of academic research skills in translation studies at Master’s level. The goal of the project is to develop and test possibilities for employing situated learning in translation research training. The situatedness perspective has a double relevance for the teaching project: the students are involved in an authentic, ongoing research project, and the object of the research project itself deals with authentic translation processes at the workplace. Thus, the project has the potential to improve the expertise of the students as both researchers and reflective practitioners. PMID:27499805

  4. Situated learning in translation research training: academic research as a reflection of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risku, Hanna

    2016-01-02

    Situated learning has become a dominant goal in the translation classroom: translation didactics is being developed in a learner-, situation- and experience-based direction, following constructivist and participatory teaching philosophies. However, the explicit use of situated approaches has, so far, not been the centre of attention in translation theory teaching and research training. As a consequence, translation theory often remains unconnected to the skills learned and topics tackled in language-specific translation teaching and the challenges experienced in real-life translation practice. This article reports on the results of an exploratory action research project into the teaching of academic research skills in translation studies at Master's level. The goal of the project is to develop and test possibilities for employing situated learning in translation research training. The situatedness perspective has a double relevance for the teaching project: the students are involved in an authentic, ongoing research project, and the object of the research project itself deals with authentic translation processes at the workplace. Thus, the project has the potential to improve the expertise of the students as both researchers and reflective practitioners.

  5. Do organizations spend wisely on employees? Effects of training and development investments on learning and innovation in organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Sun Young; Choi, Jin Nam

    2014-04-01

    The present study examines the effects of training and development on organizational innovation. We specifically suggest that the training and development investments of an organization affect its innovative performance by promoting various learning practices. We empirically tested our hypothesis by using time-lagged, multi-source data collected from 260 Korean companies that represent diverse industries. Our analysis showed that corporate expenditure for internal training predicts interpersonal and organizational learning practices, which, in turn, increase innovative performance. The data also revealed that the positive relationship between interpersonal and organizational learning practices and innovative performance is stronger within organizations that have stronger innovative climates. By contrast, investment in employee development through financial support for education outside an organization poses a significant negative effect on its innovative performance and no significant effect on learning practices. The present study provides a plausible explanation for a mechanism through which the investment of an organization in employees enhances its innovative performance. Copyright © 2013 The Authors.

  6. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jianwei; Nakajima, Akira; Janssen, William G M; Bindokas, Vytautas P; Xiong, Xiaoli; Morrison, John H; Brorson, James R; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2008-02-27

    It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI) plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s) that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  7. Expression of NR2B in cerebellar granule cells specifically facilitates effect of motor training on motor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianwei Jiao

    Full Text Available It is believed that gene/environment interaction (GEI plays a pivotal role in the development of motor skills, which are acquired via practicing or motor training. However, the underlying molecular/neuronal mechanisms are still unclear. Here, we reported that the expression of NR2B, a subunit of NMDA receptors, in cerebellar granule cells specifically enhanced the effect of voluntary motor training on motor learning in the mouse. Moreover, this effect was characterized as motor learning-specific and developmental stage-dependent, because neither emotional/spatial memory was affected nor was the enhanced motor learning observed when the motor training was conducted starting at the age of 3 months old in these transgenic mice. These results indicate that changes in the expression of gene(s that are involved in regulating synaptic plasticity in cerebellar granule cells may constitute a molecular basis for the cerebellum to be involved in the GEI by facilitating motor skill learning.

  8. Cognitive Training and Work Therapy for the Treatment of Verbal Learning and Memory Deficits in Veterans With Alcohol Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Morris D; Vissicchio, Nicholas A; Weinstein, Andrea J

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the efficacy of cognitive training for verbal learning and memory deficits in a population of older veterans with alcohol use disorders. Veterans with alcohol use disorders, who were in outpatient treatment at VA facilities and in early-phase recovery (N = 31), were randomized to receive a three-month trial of daily cognitive training plus work therapy (n = 15) or work therapy alone (n = 16), along with treatment as usual. Participants completed assessments at baseline and at three- and six-month follow-ups; the Hopkins Verbal Learning Task (HVLT) was the primary outcome measure. Participants were primarily male (97%) and in their mid-50s (M = 55.16, SD = 5.16) and had been sober for 1.64 (SD = 2.81) months. Study retention was excellent (91% at three-month follow-up) and adherence to treatment in both conditions was very good. On average, participants in the cognitive training condition had more than 41 hours of cognitive training, and both conditions had more than 230 hours of productive activity. HVLT results at three-month follow-up revealed significant condition effects favoring cognitive training for verbal learning (HVLT Trial-3 T-score, p learning compared with a premorbid estimate of verbal IQ. At three-month follow-up there was a significant reduction in the number of participants in the cognitive training condition with clinically significant verbal memory deficits (p learning deficits, which was not sustained at six-month follow-up. This National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded pilot study demonstrates that cognitive training within the context of another activating intervention (work therapy) may have efficacy in remediating verbal learning and memory deficits in patients with alcohol use disorder. Findings indicate a large effect for cognitive training in this pilot study, which suggests that further research is warranted. This study is registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT 01410110).

  9. When Less Is More: Reduced Usefulness Training for the Learning of Anticipation Skill in Tennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeeton, Nicholas J.; Huys, Raoul; Jacobs, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Participants in this study practiced with feedback to anticipate the left-right direction of forehand tennis shots played by stick-figure players. A technique based on principal component analysis was used to remove dynamical differences that are associated with shots to different directions. Different body regions of the stick-figure players were neutralized with this procedure in the pretests and posttests, and in the practice phases. Experiment 1 showed that training is effective if during practice information is consistently present in the whole body of the player, but not if the information is neutralized in the whole body in half of the practice trials. Experiment 2 showed that training is effective if the variance associated with the direction of the shots is consistently present in one body region but neutralized in others, and that transfer occurs from practice with information in one body region to performance in conditions with information preserved only in other regions. Experiment 3 showed that occlusion has a much larger detrimental effect on learning than the applied neutralization technique, and that transfer between body regions occurs also with occlusion. Discussed are theoretical implications for understanding how biological motion is perceived and possible applications in a type of training referred to as reduced usefulness training. PMID:24244564

  10. E-learning-based speech therapy: a web application for speech training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijer, Lilian J; Rietveld, Toni C M; van Beers, Marijn M A; Slangen, Robert M L; van den Heuvel, Henk; de Swart, Bert J M; Geurts, Alexander C H

    2010-03-01

    Abstract In The Netherlands, a web application for speech training, E-learning-based speech therapy (EST), has been developed for patients with dysarthria, a speech disorder resulting from acquired neurological impairments such as stroke or Parkinson's disease. In this report, the EST infrastructure and its potentials for both therapists and patients are elucidated. EST provides patients with dysarthria the opportunity to engage in intensive speech training in their own environment, in addition to undergoing the traditional face-to-face therapy. Moreover, patients with chronic dysarthria can use EST to independently maintain the quality of their speech once the face-to-face sessions with their speech therapist have been completed. This telerehabilitation application allows therapists to remotely compose speech training programs tailored to suit each individual patient. Moreover, therapists can remotely monitor and evaluate changes in the patient's speech. In addition to its value as a device for composing, monitoring, and carrying out web-based speech training, the EST system compiles a database of dysarthric speech. This database is vital for further scientific research in this area.

  11. Adopting E-training and Living Labs for Collaborative Learning for Rural Public Agencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ntaliani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rural Small and Medium Enterprises devote significant resources exclusively for finding information so as to perform public services. The current period of information technology achievements but also financial crisis necessitates a different approach by local agencies and regional public authorities so as to provide information to rural businesses. In this paper , a European project entitled “Rural Inclusion” aiming at making the life of civil servants and rural entrepreneurs easier through innovative e-government services, training tools and methods is presented. In particular, this project offers collaborative learning for public authorities on providing information and adopting and deploying innovative e-government services, aiming at reducing the administrative burdens of rural businesses. In this light, this paper presents a framework for public authorities’ training so as to model and provide information and e-government services.

  12. Endoscopic tympanoplasty: learning curve for a surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Sedat; Bayraktar, Cem

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the learning curve of endoscopic tympanoplasty for a surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty. We analyzed the clinical records of 81 patients who underwent transcanal endoscopic type 1 tympanoplasty and 30 control patients who underwent microscopic tympanoplasty between 2013 and 2015 in a tertiary hospital. All operations were performed by a single surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty. Patients were divided into four groups according to the date of surgery chronologically (group 1 early stage, group 2 intermediate stage, group 3 advanced stage and group 4 control). We evaluated the four groups according to surgery duration, audiometric results, and graft intake success. The operation duration shortened in accordance with the surgeon's experience and there were two subsequent steps during the learning curve: first, after 30 procedures; and second, after 60 procedures. The mean operation duration was 88.60 ± 21.10 min in group 1, and 62.00 ± 12.48 min in group 2. After 60 procedures, the mean operation duration was 43.81 ± 8.34 min in group 3. In the control group, the microscopic tympanoplasty duration was 69.93 ± 12.56 min. When we compared audiologic results (air conduction, bone conduction, and air-bone gap) and graft intake success rates, there were no significant differences between groups. Endoscopic tympanoplasty is a minimally invasive and effective technique. Mastering endoscopic tympanoplasty takes approximately 60 operations for a surgeon already trained in microscopic tympanoplasty. Graft intake success rates and hearing results are stable during the learning curve.

  13. Evaluation of Virtual Learning Environment for the Professional Training in Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia Natascia Sannia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe a framework for the evaluation of a virtual learning environment in the Public Administration context. We describe the question of e-learning education of the Italian Public Administration employees and we analyse the characteristics of these learners [11, 13, 9]. These adults do not belong to the Internet Generation but they have to use the new educational tools, with the problems that this implies [9, 10, 15]. Citizens expect transparency and services personalization, efficiency and quality by the Public Administration. The Public Administration began this modernization process aimed at the improvement of the administrative action. The aim is to meet the needs of citizens that live in a complex society. This entails a re-examination of the role and the logic of work that find in the employees a master key for their success [6]. Therefore the most important element for this modernization process and for the reformation of the administrative action is the education of the employees [12, 14]. The European Council invited the member States to adopt the methodologies of e-learning for the education of their staff [4, 5]. In the last years a large number of employees have received training with the methodologies and the instruments of on-line education. The European Public Administrations had adopted on a large scale the e-learning for the education of their employees because this is a modality of in service-training that removes space and time bonds. Moreover this allows the utilisation of new educational techniques. The learning policies adopted by the governments highlight the importance of education in adulthood to be competitive in the knowledge society [4]. This type of education is oriented to provide and to develop the ability that can be utilised in a professional field, not to make up for knowledge opportunities missed at the time of compulsory school education. It is essential to provide the employees-learners a

  14. Does medical training promote or deter self-directed learning? A longitudinal mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Kalyani; Pahwa, Punam; Banerjee, Ankona; Baptiste, Kellen; Bhatt, Hitesh; Lim, Hyun J

    2013-11-01

    The School of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan curriculum promotes self-direction as one of its learning philosophies. The authors sought to identify changes in self-directed learning (SDL) readiness during training. Guglielmino's SDL Readiness Scale (SDLRS) was administered to five student cohorts (N = 375) at admission and the end of every year of training, 2006 to 2010. Scores were analyzed using repeated-measurement analysis. A focus group and interviews captured students' and instructors' perceptions of self-direction. Overall, the mean SDLRS score was 230.6; men (n = 168) 229.5; women (n = 197) 232.3, higher than in the average adult population. However, the authors were able to follow only 275 students through later years of medical education. There were no significant effects of gender, years of premedical training, and Medical College Admission Test scores on SDLRS scores. Older students were more self-directed. There was a significant drop in scores at the end of year one for each of the cohorts (P < .001), and no significant change to these SDLRS scores as students progressed through medical school. Students and faculty defined SDL narrowly and had similar perceptions of curricular factors affecting SDL. The initial scores indicate high self-direction. The drop in scores one year after admission, and the lack of change with increased training, show that the current educational interventions may require reexamination and alteration to ones that promote SDL. Comparison with schools using a different curricular approach may bring to light the impact of curriculum on SDL.

  15. Microblogging for Language Learning: Using Twitter to Train Communicative and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borau, Kerstin; Ullrich, Carsten; Feng, Jinjin; Shen, Ruimin

    Our work analyzes the usefulness of microblogging in second language learning using the example of the social network Twitter. Most learners of English do not require even more passive input in form of texts, lectures or videos, etc. This input is readily available in numerous forms on the Internet. What learners of English need is the chance to actively produce language and the chance to use English as tool of communication. This calls for instructional methods and tools promoting ‘active’ learning that present opportunities for students to express themselves and interact in the target language. In this paper we describe how we used Twitter with students of English at the Distant College of Shanghai Jiao Tong University. We analyze the students’ messages and show how the usage of Twitter trained communicative and cultural competence.

  16. Designing a clinical skills training laboratory with focus on video for better learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Toftgård, Rie Castella; Nørgaard, Cita

    Objective The principles of apprenticeship in clinical skills training are increasingly being challenged. First, most students are proficient in learning from visual multimedia and will expect this to be part of a modern university education. Second, students will often find visual teaching...... resources of varying quality on the internet if this is not made available during teaching. The objective of this project was to design a new clinical skills laboratory with IT and video facilities to support learning processes. Methods Teaching principles were described before decisions on the design......, (b) FAIR principle, (c) description of before-under-after procedures, and (d) requirements specifications. IT-companies were invited to provide technological solutions and make bids. Results Four teaching principles were developed with specific IT requirements specifications. The meeting process...

  17. Conversation as Academic Practice: Tutors' Strategies in Integrating Student Learning in a Professional Training Degree Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Bowden

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tutors are generally considered to be an additional resource in teaching and learning, as a means of augmenting that of the lecturer. This article explores tutors as academic staff with responsibilities for developing practice competencies and integrating student learning in a social care professional training degree programme. The research is small-scale, based upon data from a purposive sample of five interviews; and upon insider-participant observation notes and reflections in one single setting. The author deployed a situated ethnographic methodology alongside a frame analytic approach. The research found that in their academic practice, tutors reveal how their student contact is oriented to developing a reflective practitioner and they discuss how programme inputs impact on the student’s professional self. Simultaneously, tutors seek to create cross programme integration through finding overlaps with academic programme strands.

  18. Learning, neural plasticity and sensitive periods: implications for language acquisition, music training and transfer across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Erin J; Hutka, Stefanie A; Williams, Lynne J; Moreno, Sylvain

    2013-11-20

    Sensitive periods in human development have often been proposed to explain age-related differences in the attainment of a number of skills, such as a second language (L2) and musical expertise. It is difficult to reconcile the negative consequence this traditional view entails for learning after a sensitive period with our current understanding of the brain's ability for experience-dependent plasticity across the lifespan. What is needed is a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying auditory learning and plasticity at different points in development. Drawing on research in language development and music training, this review examines not only what we learn and when we learn it, but also how learning occurs at different ages. First, we discuss differences in the mechanism of learning and plasticity during and after a sensitive period by examining how language exposure versus training forms language-specific phonetic representations in infants and adult L2 learners, respectively. Second, we examine the impact of musical training that begins at different ages on behavioral and neural indices of auditory and motor processing as well as sensorimotor integration. Third, we examine the extent to which childhood training in one auditory domain can enhance processing in another domain via the transfer of learning between shared neuro-cognitive systems. Specifically, we review evidence for a potential bi-directional transfer of skills between music and language by examining how speaking a tonal language may enhance music processing and, conversely, how early music training can enhance language processing. We conclude with a discussion of the role of attention in auditory learning for learning during and after sensitive periods and outline avenues of future research.

  19. Learning, neural plasticity and sensitive periods: implications for language acquisition, music training and transfer across the lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Jacquelyn White

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensitive periods in human development have often been proposed to explain age-related differences in the attainment of a number of skills, such as a second language and musical expertise. It is difficult to reconcile the negative consequence this traditional view entails for learning after a sensitive period with our current understanding of the brain’s ability for experience-dependent plasticity across the lifespan. What is needed is a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying auditory learning and plasticity at different points in development. Drawing on research in language development and music training, this review examines not only what we learn and when we learn it, but also how learning occurs at different ages. First, we discuss differences in the mechanism of learning and plasticity during and after a sensitive period by examining how language exposure versus training forms language-specific phonetic representations in infants and adult second language learners, respectively. Second, we examine the impact of musical training that begins at different ages on behavioural and neural indices of auditory and motor processing as well as sensorimotor integration. Third, we examine the extent to which childhood training in one auditory domain can enhance processing in another domain via the transfer of learning between shared neuro-cognitive systems. Specifically, we review evidence for a potential bi-directional transfer of skills between music and language by examining how speaking a tonal language may enhance music processing and, conversely, how early music training can enhance language processing. We conclude with a discussion of the role of attention in auditory learning for learning during and after sensitive periods and outline avenues of future research.

  20. Learning, neural plasticity and sensitive periods: implications for language acquisition, music training and transfer across the lifespan

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Erin J.; Hutka, Stefanie A.; Williams, Lynne J.; Moreno, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    Sensitive periods in human development have often been proposed to explain age-related differences in the attainment of a number of skills, such as a second language (L2) and musical expertise. It is difficult to reconcile the negative consequence this traditional view entails for learning after a sensitive period with our current understanding of the brain’s ability for experience-dependent plasticity across the lifespan. What is needed is a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying auditory learning and plasticity at different points in development. Drawing on research in language development and music training, this review examines not only what we learn and when we learn it, but also how learning occurs at different ages. First, we discuss differences in the mechanism of learning and plasticity during and after a sensitive period by examining how language exposure versus training forms language-specific phonetic representations in infants and adult L2 learners, respectively. Second, we examine the impact of musical training that begins at different ages on behavioral and neural indices of auditory and motor processing as well as sensorimotor integration. Third, we examine the extent to which childhood training in one auditory domain can enhance processing in another domain via the transfer of learning between shared neuro-cognitive systems. Specifically, we review evidence for a potential bi-directional transfer of skills between music and language by examining how speaking a tonal language may enhance music processing and, conversely, how early music training can enhance language processing. We conclude with a discussion of the role of attention in auditory learning for learning during and after sensitive periods and outline avenues of future research. PMID:24312022