WorldWideScience

Sample records for turbulent heat transport

  1. Poloidal profiles and transport during turbulent heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascheroni, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    The current penetration stage of a turbulently heated tokamak is modeled. The basic formulae are written in slab geometry since the dominant anomalous transport has a characteristic frequency much larger than the bounce frequency. Thus, the basic framework is provided by the Maxwell and fluid equations, with classical and anomalous transport. Quasi-neutrality is used. It is shown that the anomalous collision frequency dominates the anomalous viscosity and thermal conductivity, and that the convective wave transport can be neglected. For these numerical estimates, the leading term in the quasi-linear series is used. During the current penetration stage the distribution function for the particles will depart from a single Maxwellian type. Hence, the first objective was to numerically compare calculated poloidal magnetic field profiles with measured, published poloidal profiles. The poloidal magnetic field has been calculated using a code which handles the anomalous collision frequency self-consistently. The agreement is good, and it is concluded that the current penetration stage can be satisfactorily described by this model

  2. Turbulent transport regimes and the SOL heat flux width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the responsible mechanisms and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width is important for predicting viable operating regimes in future tokamaks, and for seeking possible mitigation schemes. Simulation and theory results using reduced edge/SOL turbulence models have produced SOL widths and scalings in reasonable accord with experiments in many cases. In this work, we attempt to qualitatively and conceptually understand various regimes of edge/SOL turbulence and the role of turbulent transport in establishing the SOL heat flux width. Relevant considerations include the type and spectral characteristics of underlying instabilities, the location of the gradient drive relative to the SOL, the nonlinear saturation mechanism, and the parallel heat transport regime. Recent SOLT turbulence code results are employed to understand the roles of these considerations and to develop analytical scalings. We find a heat flux width scaling with major radius R that is generally positive, consistent with older results reviewed in. The possible relationship of turbulence mechanisms to the heuristic drift mechanism is considered, together with implications for future experiments. Work supported by US DOE grant DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  3. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakkaraju, R.; Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Oresta, P.; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to

  4. Heat transport in bubbling turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakkaraju, Rajaram; Stevens, Richard J A M; Oresta, Paolo; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-06-04

    Boiling is an extremely effective way to promote heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid due to numerous mechanisms, many of which are not understood in quantitative detail. An important component of the overall process is that the buoyancy of the bubble compounds with that of the liquid to give rise to a much-enhanced natural convection. In this article, we focus specifically on this enhancement and present a numerical study of the resulting two-phase Rayleigh-Bénard convection process in a cylindrical cell with a diameter equal to its height. We make no attempt to model other aspects of the boiling process such as bubble nucleation and detachment. The cell base and top are held at temperatures above and below the boiling point of the liquid, respectively. By keeping this difference constant, we study the effect of the liquid superheat in a Rayleigh number range that, in the absence of boiling, would be between 2 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(9). We find a considerable enhancement of the heat transfer and study its dependence on the number of bubbles, the degree of superheat of the hot cell bottom, and the Rayleigh number. The increased buoyancy provided by the bubbles leads to more energetic hot plumes detaching from the cell bottom, and the strength of the circulation in the cell is significantly increased. Our results are in general agreement with recent experiments on boiling Rayleigh-Bénard convection.

  5. Heat Transport Enhancement of Turbulent Thermal Convection by Inserted Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ke-Qing; Zhang, Lu

    2017-11-01

    We report an experimental study on the heat transport properties of turbulent Rayleigh Benard Convection (RBC) in a rectangular cell with two types of 3D-printed structures inserted inside. The first one splits the original rectangular cell into 60 identical sub cells whose aspect ratio is 1:1:10 (length, width, height). The second one splits the cell into 30 sub cells, each with a 1:2:10 aspect ratio and a baffle in the center. We find that for large Rayleigh numbers (Ra), the Nusselt numbers (Nu) of both structures increase compared with that of the empty rectangular cell. An enhancement in Nu as much as 20% is found for the second type of insertion at Rayleigh number 2 ×109 . Moreover, the Nu-Ra scaling shows a transition with both geometries. The particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurement within a single sub unit indicates that the transition may be related to the laminar to turbulent transition in flow field. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) confirm the experimental results. Our results demonstrate the potential in using insertions to enhance passive heat transfer. This work was supported by the Research Grants Council (RGC) of HKSAR (Nos. CUHK404513 and CUHK14301115).

  6. Tokamak electron heat transport by direct numerical simulation of small scale turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labit, B.

    2002-10-01

    In a fusion machine, understanding plasma turbulence, which causes a degradation of the measured energy confinement time, would constitute a major progress in this field. In tokamaks, the measured ion and electron thermal conductivities are of comparable magnitude. The possible sources of turbulence are the temperature and density gradients occurring in a fusion plasma. Whereas the heat losses in the ion channel are reasonably well understood, the origin of the electron losses is more uncertain. In addition to the radial velocity associated to the fluctuations of the electric field, electrons are more affected than ions by the magnetic field fluctuations. In experiments, the confinement time can be conveniently expressed in terms of dimensionless parameters. Although still somewhat too imprecise, these scaling laws exhibit strong dependencies on the normalized pressure β or the normalized Larmor radius, ρ * . The present thesis assesses whether a tridimensional, electromagnetic, nonlinear fluid model of plasma turbulence driven by a specific instability can reproduce the dependence of the experimental electron heat losses on the dimensionless parameters β and ρ * . The investigated interchange instability is the Electron Temperature Gradient driven one (ETG). The model is built by using the set of Braginskii equations. The developed simulation code is global in the sense that a fixed heat flux is imposed at the inner boundary, leaving the gradients free to evolve. From the nonlinear simulations, we have put in light three characteristics for the ETG turbulence: the turbulent transport is essentially electrostatic; the potential and pressure fluctuations form radially elongated cells called streamers; the transport level is very low compared to the experimental values. The thermal transport dependence study has shown a very small role of the normalized pressure, which is in contradiction with the Ohkama's formula. On the other hand, the crucial role of the

  7. Measurements of the turbulent transport of heat and momentum in convexly curved boundary layers - Effects of curvature, recovery and free-stream turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Simon, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of streamwise convex curvature, recovery, and freestream turbulence intensity on the turbulent transport of heat and momentum in a mature boundary layer are studied using a specially designed three-wire hot-wire probe. Increased freestream turbulence is found to increase the profiles throughout the boundary layer on the flat developing wall. Curvature effects were found to dominate turbulence intensity effects for the present cases considered. For the higher TI (turbulence intensity) case, negative values of the turbulent Prandtl number are found in the outer half of the boundary layer, indicating a breakdown in Reynolds analogy.

  8. Turbulent transport regimes and the scrape-off layer heat flux width

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the responsible mechanisms and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width is important for predicting viable operating regimes in future tokamaks and for seeking possible mitigation schemes. In this paper, we present a qualitative and conceptual framework for understanding various regimes of edge/SOL turbulence and the role of turbulent transport as the mechanism for establishing the SOL heat flux width. Relevant considerations include the type and spectral characteristics of underlying instabilities, the location of the gradient drive relative to the SOL, the nonlinear saturation mechanism, and the parallel heat transport regime. We find a heat flux width scaling with major radius R that is generally positive, consistent with the previous findings [Connor et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 169 (1999)]. The possible relationship of turbulence mechanisms to the neoclassical orbit width or heuristic drift mechanism in core energy confinement regimes known as low (L) mode and high (H) mode is considered, together with implications for the future experiments.

  9. Turbulent transport regimes and the scrape-off layer heat flux width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myra, J. R.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Russell, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the responsible mechanisms and resulting scaling of the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width is important for predicting viable operating regimes in future tokamaks and for seeking possible mitigation schemes. In this paper, we present a qualitative and conceptual framework for understanding various regimes of edge/SOL turbulence and the role of turbulent transport as the mechanism for establishing the SOL heat flux width. Relevant considerations include the type and spectral characteristics of underlying instabilities, the location of the gradient drive relative to the SOL, the nonlinear saturation mechanism, and the parallel heat transport regime. We find a heat flux width scaling with major radius R that is generally positive, consistent with the previous findings [Connor et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 169 (1999)]. The possible relationship of turbulence mechanisms to the neoclassical orbit width or heuristic drift mechanism in core energy confinement regimes known as low (L) mode and high (H) mode is considered, together with implications for the future experiments

  10. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics, heat transport and thermal waves in laminar and turbulent superfluid helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongiovì, Maria Stella; Jou, David; Sciacca, Michele

    2018-01-01

    This review paper puts together some results concerning non equilibrium thermodynamics and heat transport properties of superfluid He II. A one-fluid extended model of superfluid helium, which considers heat flux as an additional independent variable, is presented, its microscopic bases are analyzed, and compared with the well known two-fluid model. In laminar situations, the fundamental fields are density, velocity, absolute temperature, and heat flux. Such a theory is able to describe the thermomechanical phenomena, the propagation of two sounds in liquid helium, and of fourth sound in superleak. It also leads in a natural way to a two-fluid model on purely macroscopical grounds and allows a small amount of entropy associated with the superfluid component. Other important features of liquid He II arise in rotating situations and in superfluid turbulence, both characterized by the presence of quantized vortices (thin vortex lines whose circulation is restricted by a quantum condition). Such vortices have a deep influence on the transport properties of superfluid helium, as they increase very much its thermal resistance. Thus, heat flux influences the vortices which, in turn, modify the heat flux. The dynamics of vortex lines is the central topic in turbulent superfluid helium. The model is generalized to take into account the vortices in different cases of physical interest: rotating superfluids, counterflow superfluid turbulence, combined counterflow and rotation, and mass flow in addition to heat flow. To do this, the averaged vortex line density per unit volume L, is introduced and its dynamical equations are considered. Linear and non-linear evolution equations for L are written for homogeneous and inhomogeneous, isotropic and anisotropic situations. Several physical experiments are analyzed and the influence of vortices on the effective thermal conductivity of turbulent superfluid helium is found. Transitions from laminar to turbulent flows, from diffusive to

  11. Low frequency turbulence, particle and heat transport in the Wisconsin levitated octupole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, H.R.

    1982-01-01

    Low frequency turbulence in the drift frequency range and its relation to the observed particle transport in the Wisconsin Levitated Octupole has been studied with a microwave scattering apparatus. The experimental parameters were T/sub e/ approx. T/sub i/ 13 cm -3 , 200 G < B/sub p-average/ < 1.25 kG. The effect of shear on the transport was studied by the addition of a small toroidal field. By matching experimentally measured density profiles to those given by numerical solutions of the transport equations, diffusion coefficients were obtained. Time dependent density fluctuation spectra were measured with an 8 mm microwave scattering diagnostic to correlate the drift wave portion of the spectrum with the observed diffusion. The density fluctuation spectrum of low frequency (1 kHz < ω < 6 MHz) turbulence was measured for several values of perpendicular wavenumber, k/sub perpendicular to/. Electron heat transport was studied by fitting experimentally measured electron temperature profiles to those predicted by numerical solutions of electron energy transport equation

  12. Controlling heat transport and flow structures in thermal turbulence using ratchet surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef

    2017-11-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchet-like roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the Large Scale Circulation Roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. This work is financially supported by the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11672156, the Dutch Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), the Dutch Technology Foundation (STW) and a VIDI Grant.

  13. Controlling Heat Transport and Flow Structures in Thermal Turbulence Using Ratchet Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hechuan; Zhu, Xiaojue; Mathai, Varghese; Verzicco, Roberto; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2018-01-01

    In this combined experimental and numerical study on thermally driven turbulence in a rectangular cell, the global heat transport and the coherent flow structures are controlled with an asymmetric ratchetlike roughness on the top and bottom plates. We show that, by means of symmetry breaking due to the presence of the ratchet structures on the conducting plates, the orientation of the large scale circulation roll (LSCR) can be locked to a preferred direction even when the cell is perfectly leveled out. By introducing a small tilt to the system, we show that the LSCR orientation can be tuned and controlled. The two different orientations of LSCR give two quite different heat transport efficiencies, indicating that heat transport is sensitive to the LSCR direction over the asymmetric roughness structure. Through a quantitative analysis of the dynamics of thermal plume emissions and the orientation of the LSCR over the asymmetric structure, we provide a physical explanation for these findings. The current work has important implications for passive and active flow control in engineering, biofluid dynamics, and geophysical flows.

  14. Turbulent energy losses during orchard heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    Two rapid-response drag anemometers and low time constant thermocouples, all at 4 m above a heated orchard floor, sampled wind component in the vertical direction and temperature at 30 Hz. The turbulent heat flux calculated revealed not more than 10% of the heat lost from the orchard was via turbulent transort. The observations failed to support previous estimates that at least a third of the energy applied was lost through turbulent transport. Underestimation of heat loss due to mean flow and a newly revealed flux due to spatial variations in the mean flow may explain the unaccounted for loss.

  15. A continuum self organized critically model of turbulent heat transport in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tangri, V; Das, A; Kaw, P; Singh, R [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2003-09-01

    Based on the now well known and experimentally observed critical gradient length (R/L{sub Te} = RT/{nabla}T) in tokamaks, we present a continuum one dimensional model for explaining self organized heat transport in tokamaks. Key parameters of this model include a novel hysteresis parameter which ensures that the switch of heat transport coefficient {chi} upwards and downwards takes place at two different values of R/L{sub Te}. Extensive numerical simulations of this model reproduce many features of present day tokamaks such as submarginal temperature profiles, intermittent transport events, 1/f scaling of the frequency spectra, propagating fronts, etc. This model utilises a minimal set of phenomenological parameters, which may be determined from experiments and/or simulations. Analytical and physical understanding of the observed features has also been attempted. (author)

  16. Turbulence and transport during electron cyclotron heating in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, T.L.; Peebles, W.A.; DeBoo, J.C.; Prater, R.; Kinsey, J.E.; de Grassie, J.S.; Bravenec, R.V.; Burrell, K.H.; Lohr, J.; Petty, C.C.; Nguyen, X.V.; Doyle, E.J.; Greenfield, C.M.; Zeng, L.; Zeeland, M.A.; Wang, G.; Makowski, M.A.; Staebler, G.M.; St John, H.E.; Solomon, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    The response of plasma parameters and broad wavenumber turbulence (1--40 cm -1 , kρ s = 0.1--8) to auxiliary electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is reported on. In these plasmas the electron temperature responds most strongly to the ECH while the electron density and ion temperature are kept approximately constant. Thermal fluxes and diffusivities increase appreciably with ECH for both electron and ion channels. Significant changes to the density fluctuations over the full range of measured wavenumbers are observed. This range of wavenumbers encompasses that typically associated with ion temperature gradient, trapped electron mode, and electron temperature gradient modes. Changes in linear growth rates calculated using a gyrokinetic code show consistency with observed fluctuation increases over the whole range of wavenumbers.

  17. Turbulent transport of energetic ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dannert, Tilman; Hauff, Thilo; Jenko, Frank; Guenter, Sibylle

    2006-01-01

    Approaching ITER operation, the issue of anomalous transport of fast particles becomes more and more important. This is partly because the ITER heating and current drive system relies heavily on neutral beam injection. Moreover burning plasmas are heated by fast fusion α particles.Fusion α particles are characterised by a fixed energy and an isotropic velocity distribution. Therefore they have gyroradii one magnitude larger than the thermal ions. The dependency of the particle diffusion of α test particles on the Kubo number K = VExBτc/λc (VExB mean E x B velocity, τc, λc correlation time and length of the turbulent potential) is presented. For different turbulent regimes, different dependency of the diffusion on the gyroradius is found. For large Kubo numbers, the transport is found to remain constant for gyroradii up to the correlation length of the potential, whereas it is drastically reduced in the small Kubo number regime.In the second part, a model for beam ions injected along the equilibrium magnetic field is described. The beam ions are treated gyrokinetically in a self-consistent way with the equilibrium distribution function taken as a shifted Maxwellian. The implications of such a model for the Vlasov equation, the field equations, and the calculation of moments and fluxes are discussed. Linear and nonlinear results, obtained with the gyrokinetic flux tube code GENE show the existence of a new instability driven by fast beam ions. The instability has a maximum growth rate at perpendicular wave numbers of kyρs ∼ 0.15 and depends mainly on the beam velocity and the density gradient of the beam ions. This instability leads to a replacement of bulk ion particle transport by fast ion particle transport, connected to a strongly enhanced heat flux. In the presence of this instability, the turbulent particle and heat transport is dominated by fast ions

  18. The relationship between turbulence measurements and transport in different heating regimes in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretz, N.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Paul, S.F.; Hammett, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    The scaling of broad band density fluctuations in the confinement zone of TFTR measured by microwave scattering, beam emission spectroscopy (BES), and reflectometry show a relationship between these fluctuations and energy transport measured from power balance calculations. In L-mode plasmas scattering and BES indicates that the density fluctuation level, δn 2 , in the confinement zone for 0.2 aux and I p in a way that is consistent with variations in energy transport. Fluctuation levels measured with all systems increase strongly toward the edge in all heating regimes following increases in energy transport coefficients. Measurements using BES have shown that poloidal and radial correlation lengths in the confinement zone of L-mode and supershot plasmas fall in the range of 1 to 2 cm. with a wave structure which has k max ∼ 1 cm -1 (k perpendicular ps ∼ 0.2) in the poloidal direction and k max approaching zero in the radial direction. A simple estimate of the diffusion coefficient based on a measured radial correlation length and correlation time indicates good agreement with power balance calculations. Similar estimates using reflectometry give radial coherence lengths at 10 to 20 kHz in low density ohmic and supershot plasmas of between I and 2 cm

  19. Energetics of turbulent transport processes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, F.A.; Thyagaraja, A.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of electromagnetic turbulence on electrons and ions under Tokamak conditions is considered using a kinetic description. Taking the magnetic fluctuation spectrum as given, the density fluctuation spectrum is self-consistently calculated taking account of quasi-neutrality. The calculation is valid for arbitrary collisionality and appropriate to low frequencies typical of experiment. In addition to the usual enhancement of the radial electron energy transport, it is found that the turbulent fluctuations can heat the plasma at rates comparable to ordinary ohmic heating under well-defined conditions. Interestingly, electromagnetic turbulence appears to imply only an insignificant correction to the toroidal resistance of the plasma as estimated from Spitzer resistivity. The scalings of anomalous transport, fluctuations and heating with temperature and plasma volume are investigated. The assumption that the magnetic fluctuation spectrum of the turbulence is invariant under a wide range of conditions is shown to result in interesting consequences for JET-like plasmas. (author)

  20. Tokamak electron heat transport by direct numerical simulation of small scale turbulence; Transport de chaleur electronique dans un tokamak par simulation numerique directe d'une turbulence de petite echelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labit, B

    2002-10-01

    In a fusion machine, understanding plasma turbulence, which causes a degradation of the measured energy confinement time, would constitute a major progress in this field. In tokamaks, the measured ion and electron thermal conductivities are of comparable magnitude. The possible sources of turbulence are the temperature and density gradients occurring in a fusion plasma. Whereas the heat losses in the ion channel are reasonably well understood, the origin of the electron losses is more uncertain. In addition to the radial velocity associated to the fluctuations of the electric field, electrons are more affected than ions by the magnetic field fluctuations. In experiments, the confinement time can be conveniently expressed in terms of dimensionless parameters. Although still somewhat too imprecise, these scaling laws exhibit strong dependencies on the normalized pressure {beta} or the normalized Larmor radius, {rho}{sub *}. The present thesis assesses whether a tridimensional, electromagnetic, nonlinear fluid model of plasma turbulence driven by a specific instability can reproduce the dependence of the experimental electron heat losses on the dimensionless parameters {beta} and {rho}{sub *}. The investigated interchange instability is the Electron Temperature Gradient driven one (ETG). The model is built by using the set of Braginskii equations. The developed simulation code is global in the sense that a fixed heat flux is imposed at the inner boundary, leaving the gradients free to evolve. From the nonlinear simulations, we have put in light three characteristics for the ETG turbulence: the turbulent transport is essentially electrostatic; the potential and pressure fluctuations form radially elongated cells called streamers; the transport level is very low compared to the experimental values. The thermal transport dependence study has shown a very small role of the normalized pressure, which is in contradiction with the Ohkama's formula. On the other hand

  1. Heated water jet in coflowing turbulent stream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirazi, M.A.; McQuivey, R.S.; Keefer, T.N.

    1974-01-01

    Effects of ambient turbulence on temperature and salinity distributions of heated water and neutrally buoyant saltwater jets were studied for a wide range of densimetric jet Froude numbers, jet discharge velocities, and ambient turbulence levels in a 4-ft-wide channel. Estimates of vertical and lateral diffusivity coefficients for heat and for salt were obtained from salinity and temperature distributions taken at several stations downstream of the injection point. Readily usable correlations are presented for plume center-line temperature, plume width, and trajectory. The ambient turbulence affects the gross behavior characteristics of the plume. The effects vary with the initial jet Froude number and the jet to ambient velocity ratio. Heat and salinity are transported similarly and the finite source dimensions and the initial jet characteristics alter the numerical value of the diffusivity

  2. TRIAM-1 turbulent heating experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Nagao, Akihiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1983-02-01

    The experimental studies on the containment of high temperature plasma and turbulent heating using the tokamak device with strong magnetic field (TRIAM-1) started in 1977 have achieved much results up to fiscal 1979, and the anticipated objectives were almost attained. The results of these studies were summarized in the ''Report of the results of strong magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1 experiment''. In this report, the results obtained by the second stage project of the TRIAM-1 project are summarized. The second stage was the two-year project for fiscal 1980 and 81. In the second stage project, by the complete preparation of measuring instrument and the improvement of the experimental setup, the carefully planned experiment on turbulent heating was performed, in particular, the clarification of the mechanism of turbulent heating was the central theme. As the important results obtained, the detection of ion sound waves at the time of turbulent heating, the formation of high energy ions by wave-particle interaction and the clarification of the process of their energy relaxation, and the verification of the effectiveness of double pulse turbulent heating are enumerated.

  3. TRIAM-1 turbulent heating experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Nagao, Akihiro

    1983-01-01

    The experimental studies on the containment of high temperature plasma and turbulent heating using the tokamak device with strong magnetic field (TRIAM-1) started in 1977 have achieved much results up to fiscal 1979, and the anticipated objectives were almost attained. The results of these studies were summarized in the ''Report of the results of strong magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1 experiment''. In this report, the results obtained by the second stage project of the TRIAM-1 project are summarized. The second stage was the two-year project for fiscal 1980 and 81. In the second stage project, by the complete preparation of measuring instrument and the improvement of the experimental setup, the carefully planned experiment on turbulent heating was performed, in particular, the clarification of the mechanism of turbulent heating was the central theme. As the important results obtained, the detection of ion sound waves at the time of turbulent heating, the formation of high energy ions by waveparticle interaction and the clarification of the process of their energy relaxation, and the verification of the effectiveness of double pulse turbulent heating are enumerated. (Kako, I.)

  4. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.; Pomphrey, N.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, the term 'transport-optimized' stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  5. The roles of turbulence on plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Takaichi; Kawabe, Takaya

    1976-01-01

    The relation between the heating rate of plasma particles and the thermalization frequency is established, and the important role of plasma turbulence in the fast thermalization process is underlined. This relation can be applied not only in the case of high current turbulent heating but also when turbulent phenomena occur with other heating means. The experimental results on ion and electron heating during the Mach II experiment are presented. The role of turbulence on particle losses accross the magnetic field is analyzed

  6. Heat flux driven ion turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    1998-01-01

    This work is an analysis of an ion turbulence in a tokamak in the case where the thermal flux is fixed and the temperature profile is allowed to fluctuate. The system exhibits some features of Self-Organized Critical systems. In particular, avalanches are observed. Also the frequency spectrum of the thermal flux exhibits a structure similar to the one of a sand pile automaton, including a 1/f behavior. However, the time average temperature profile is found to be supercritical, i.e. the temperature gradient stays above the critical value. Moreover, the heat diffusivity is lower for a turbulence calculated at fixed flux than a fixed temperature gradient, with the same time average temperature. This behavior is attributed to a stabilizing effect of avalanches. (author)

  7. Broad wavenumber turbulence and transport during Ohmic and electron cyclotron heating in the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, T L [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90025 (United States); Peebles, W A [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90025 (United States); DeBoo, J C [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Prater, R [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Kinsey, J E [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Staebler, G M [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Candy, J [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Austin, M E [University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Bravenec, R V [University of Texas-Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Burrell, K H [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); De Grassie, J S [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Doyle, E J [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90025 (United States); Gohil, P; Greenfield, C M; Groebner, R J; Lohr, J [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Makowski, M A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Nguyen, X V [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90025 (United States); Petty, C C [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Solomon, W M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543-0451 (United States); John, H E St; Zeeland, M A Van [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Wang, G.; Zeng, L [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90025 (United States)

    2007-12-15

    The response of plasma parameters and broad wavenumber turbulence (1-39 cm{sup -1}, k{rho}{sub s} = 0.1-10, relevant to ion temperature gradient, trapped electron mode and electron temperature gradient mode turbulence, here {rho}{sub s} = ion gyroradius) to auxiliary electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is reported on. One fluid thermal fluxes and diffusivities increase appreciably with ECH. Significant changes to the density fluctuations over the full range of measured wavenumbers are observed, with an increase for lower wavenumbers and a more spatially complicated response at high k. Spatially resolved high k measurements (k = 39 cm{sup -1}, k{rho}{sub s} = 4-10) show a varying response to ECH, with n-bar decreasing at r/a = 0.35 and increasing at r/a = 0.6 and 1. These variations were found to have a positive correlation with {nabla}T{sub e} evaluated at nearby locations, consistent with a {nabla}T{sub e} drive. Comparison of the changes in high k fluctuation levels with linear gyrokinetic growth rates show qualitative agreement at the innermost location, r/a = 0.35 and disagreement at r/a = 0.6.

  8. Broad wavenumber turbulence and transport during Ohmic and electron cyclotron heating in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, T L; Peebles, W A; DeBoo, J C; Prater, R; Kinsey, J E; Staebler, G M; Candy, J; Austin, M E; Bravenec, R V; Burrell, K H; De Grassie, J S; Doyle, E J; Gohil, P; Greenfield, C M; Groebner, R J; Lohr, J; Makowski, M A; Nguyen, X V; Petty, C C; Solomon, W M; John, H E St; Zeeland, M A Van; Wang, G.; Zeng, L

    2007-01-01

    The response of plasma parameters and broad wavenumber turbulence (1-39 cm -1 , kρ s = 0.1-10, relevant to ion temperature gradient, trapped electron mode and electron temperature gradient mode turbulence, here ρ s = ion gyroradius) to auxiliary electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is reported on. One fluid thermal fluxes and diffusivities increase appreciably with ECH. Significant changes to the density fluctuations over the full range of measured wavenumbers are observed, with an increase for lower wavenumbers and a more spatially complicated response at high k. Spatially resolved high k measurements (k = 39 cm -1 , kρ s = 4-10) show a varying response to ECH, with n-bar decreasing at r/a = 0.35 and increasing at r/a = 0.6 and 1. These variations were found to have a positive correlation with ∇T e evaluated at nearby locations, consistent with a ∇T e drive. Comparison of the changes in high k fluctuation levels with linear gyrokinetic growth rates show qualitative agreement at the innermost location, r/a = 0.35 and disagreement at r/a = 0.6

  9. Turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Horton, Wendell

    2012-01-01

    This book explains how magnetized plasmas self-organize in states of electromagnetic turbulence that transports particles and energy out of the core plasma faster than anticipated by the fusion scientists designing magnetic confinement systems in the 20th century. It describes theory, experiments and simulations in a unified and up-to-date presentation of the issues of achieving nuclear fusion power.

  10. Magnetic turbulence and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Mourgues, F.; Samain, A.

    1990-01-01

    The self consistency conditions for magnetic turbulence are reviewed. The main features of magnetic topology involving stochastic flux lines are summarized. Two driving sources are considered: thermal effects which require large scale residual islands and electron diamagnetism which involves fluctuation scales smaller than the ion Larmor radius and a β p threshold of order one. Stability criteria and transport coefficients are given

  11. Impact of electro-magnetic stabilization, small- scale turbulence and multi-scale interactions on heat transport in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantica, Paola

    2016-10-01

    Heat transport experiments in JET, based on ICRH heat flux scans and temperature modulation, have confirmed the importance of two transport mechanisms that are often neglected in modeling experimental results, but are crucial to reach agreement between theory and experiment and may be significant in ITER. The first mechanism is the stabilizing effect of the total pressure gradient (including fast ions) on ITG driven ion heat transport. Such stabilization is found in non-linear gyro-kinetic electro-magnetic simulations using GENE and GYRO, and is the explanation for the observed loss of ion stiffness in the core of high NBI-power JET plasmas. The effect was recently observed also in JET plasmas with dominant ICRH heating and small rotation, due to ICRH fast ions, which is promising for ITER. Such mechanism dominates over ExB flow shear in the core and needs to be included in quasi-linear models to increase their ability to capture the relevant physics. The second mechanism is the capability of small- scale ETG instabilities to carry a significant fraction of electron heat. A decrease in Te peaking is observed when decreasing Zeff Te/Ti, which cannot be ascribed to TEMs but is in line with ETGs. Non-linear GENE single-scale simulations of ETGs and ITG/TEMs show that the ITG/TEM electron heat flux is not enough to match experiment. TEM stiffness is also much lower than measured. In the ETG single scale simulations the external flow shear is used to saturate the ETG streamers. Multi-scale simulations are ongoing, in which the ion zonal flows are the main saturating mechanism for ETGs. These costly simulations should provide the final answer on the importance of ETG-driven electron heat flux in JET. with JET contributors [F.Romanelli, Proc.25thIAEA FEC]. Supported by EUROfusion Grant 633053.

  12. The roles of turbulence on plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Takaichi; Kawabe, Takaya.

    1976-06-01

    In this paper, the characteristic features of the turbulent heating are reviewed, which is considered to be one of the strong candidates of the further heating method in fusion reactor systems, referring to the works in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Nagoya University. The roles of turbulence in plasma heating including toroidal plasma heating are discussed from several points of view. The relation between the heating rate of plasma particles and the thermalization (randomization) frequency is theoretically investigated and the role of plasma turbulence in the fast thermalization is shown. The experimental results on fluctuation and heating of electrons and ions in turbulently heated plasmas are presented. The influence of turbulence, which is responsible for the particle heating, on the diffusion across the confinement magnetic field is considered for the application in the toroidal plasmas. It is pointed out that the turbulent fields in the fast turbulent heating give only a minor effect to the loss of particles across the magnetic field. It can be said that the enhanced fluctuation in turbulent plasma gives its field energy to the plasma particles while it can play the role of the fast thermalization of the ordered motion of particles that is produced in the plasma by some acceleration process. (Kato, T.)

  13. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagesson, Torbern

    2012-04-01

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to ∼3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect of

  14. Turbulent transport in the atmospheric surface layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagesson, Torbern [Dept. of Physical Geography and Ecosystem Science, Lund Univ., Lund (Sweden)

    2012-04-15

    In the modelling of transport and accumulation of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 (C-14) in the case of a potential release from a future repository of radioactive waste, it is important to describe the transport of the isotope in the atmosphere. This report aims to describe the turbulent transport within the lower part of the atmosphere; the inertial surface layer and the roughness sublayer. Transport in the inertial surface layer is dependent on several factors, whereof some can be neglected under certain circumstances. Under steady state conditions, fully developed turbulent conditions, in flat and horizontal homogeneous areas, it is possible to apply an eddy diffusivity approach for estimating vertical transport of C. The eddy diffusivity model assumes that there is proportionality between the vertical gradient and the transport of C. The eddy diffusivity is depending on the atmospheric turbulence, which is affected by the interaction between mean wind and friction of the ground surface and of the sensible heat flux in the atmosphere. In this report, it is described how eddy diffusivity of the inertial surface layer can be estimated from 3-d wind measurements and measurements of sensible heat fluxes. It is also described how to estimate the eddy diffusivity in the inertial surface layer from profile measurements of temperature and wind speed. Close to the canopy, wind and C profiles are influenced by effects of the surface roughness; this section of the atmosphere is called the roughness sublayer. Its height is up to {approx}3 times the height of the plant canopy. When the mean wind interacts with the canopy, turbulence is not only produced by shear stress and buoyancy, it is additionally created by wakes, which are formed behind the plants. Turbulence is higher than it would be over a flat surface, and the turbulent transport is hereby more efficient. Above the plant canopy, but still within the roughness sublayer, a function that compensates for the effect

  15. ADIABATIC HEATING OF CONTRACTING TURBULENT FLUIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, Brant; Goldreich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence influences the behavior of many astrophysical systems, frequently by providing non-thermal pressure support through random bulk motions. Although turbulence is commonly studied in systems with constant volume and mean density, turbulent astrophysical gases often expand or contract under the influence of pressure or gravity. Here, we examine the behavior of turbulence in contracting volumes using idealized models of compressed gases. Employing numerical simulations and an analytical model, we identify a simple mechanism by which the turbulent motions of contracting gases 'adiabatically heat', experiencing an increase in their random bulk velocities until the largest eddies in the gas circulate over a Hubble time of the contraction. Adiabatic heating provides a mechanism for sustaining turbulence in gases where no large-scale driving exists. We describe this mechanism in detail and discuss some potential applications to turbulence in astrophysical settings.

  16. Suprathermal ion transport in turbulent magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bovet, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Suprathermal ions, which have an energy greater than the quasi-Maxwellian background plasma temperature, are present in many laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. In fusion devices, they are generated by the fusion reactions and auxiliary heating. Controlling their transport is essential for the success of future fusion devices that could provide a clean, safe and abundant source of electric power to our society. In space, suprathermal ions include energetic solar particles and cosmic rays. The understanding of the acceleration and transport mechanisms of these particles is still incomplete. Basic plasma devices allow detailed measurements that are not accessible in astrophysical and fusion plasmas, due to the difficulty to access the former and the high temperatures of the latter. The basic toroidal device TORPEX offers an easy access for diagnostics, well characterized plasma scenarios and validated numerical simulations of its turbulence dynamics, making it the ideal platform for the investigation of suprathermal ion transport. This Thesis presents three-dimensional measurements of a suprathermal ion beam injected in turbulent TORPEX plasmas. The combination of uniquely resolved measurements and first principle numerical simulations reveals the general non-diffusive nature of the suprathermal ion transport. A precise characterization of their transport regime shows that, depending on their energies, suprathermal ions can experience either a super diffusive transport or a subdiffusive transport in the same background turbulence. The transport character is determined by the interaction of the suprathermal ion orbits with the turbulent plasma structures, which in turn depends on the ratio between the ion energy and the background plasma temperature. Time-resolved measurements reveal a clear difference in the intermittency of suprathermal ions time-traces depending on the transport regime they experience. Conditionally averaged measurements uncover the influence of

  17. Laminar turbulent transition in heated free jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejci, L.; Marsik, F.; Nenicka, V.

    1998-01-01

    The evolution of heat and mass transfer in the initial region of a transitional plasma plume is investigated and discussed. The results show that these transport processes are controlled and limited by the plume shear layer instability. The process of laminar-turbulent transition is consecutively controlled by the plume core shear layer instability where interrelation of the effective thickness of the shear temperature and density layers play decisive role. When the absolute instability occurs the resonances in the jet and arc chamber must be taken into account. These processes are manifested in three events. Between the first and second phase, there is a maximum of arc heater exit average enthalpy. The other two thresholds occur at maximum and minimum stagnation heat flux from the plume core. It seems that these processes also influence the thermal energy production in the arc chamber cavity. (author)

  18. Turbulent Transport in a Three-dimensional Solar Wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiota, D. [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Telloni, D. [INAF—Astrophysical Observatory of Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Bruno, R., E-mail: shiota@isee.nagoya-u.ac.jp [INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2017-03-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind can play essential roles in the heating of coronal and solar wind plasma and the acceleration of the solar wind and energetic particles. Turbulence sources are not well understood and thought to be partly enhanced by interaction with the large-scale inhomogeneity of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field and/or transported from the solar corona. To investigate the interaction with background inhomogeneity and the turbulence sources, we have developed a new 3D MHD model that includes the transport and dissipation of turbulence using the theoretical model of Zank et al. We solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of three moments or variables, the energy in the forward and backward fluctuating modes and the residual energy and their three corresponding correlation lengths. The transport model is coupled to our 3D model of the inhomogeneous solar wind. We present results of the coupled solar wind-turbulence model assuming a simple tilted dipole magnetic configuration that mimics solar minimum conditions, together with several comparative intermediate cases. By considering eight possible solar wind and turbulence source configurations, we show that the large-scale solar wind and IMF inhomogeneity and the strength of the turbulence sources significantly affect the distribution of turbulence in the heliosphere within 6 au. We compare the predicted turbulence distribution results from a complete solar minimum model with in situ measurements made by the Helios and Ulysses spacecraft, finding that the synthetic profiles of the turbulence intensities show reasonable agreement with observations.

  19. Dynamic method to study turbulence and turbulence transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.; Kasuya, N.; Sasaki, M.; Fujisawa, A.; Ida, K.; Itoh, K.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tamura, N.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.; Tanaka, K.; Tsuchiya, H.; Nagayama, Y.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kosuga, Y.; Kamiya, Kensaku

    2014-10-01

    Here we developed research methods of plasma turbulence transport associated with the non-local features. The ECH modulation experiment and the higher harmonic analysis of the heat wave indicated: (1) propagation of the change of T e at the time of switch-off/on of ECH power is about 5 times faster than that of perturbation itself, (2) propagation of the higher (7th) harmonic of the T e perturbation is 5 times faster than prediction by the diffusive model. New bi-spectral analysis of fluctuations demonstrated a non-linear coupling of micro-fluctuations at different radial locations. These results are beneficial for control of plasma dynamics in future fusion reactors. (author)

  20. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Curved Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2013-11-01

    In the present investigation, turbulent heat transfer in fully-developed curved pipe flow with axially uniform wall heat flux has been numerically studied. The Reynolds numbers under consideration are Reτ = 210 (DNS) and 1,000 (LES) based on the mean friction velocity and the pipe radius, and the Prandtl number (Pr) is 0.71. For Reτ = 210 , the pipe curvature (κ) was fixed as 1/18.2, whereas three cases of κ (0.01, 0.05, 0.1) were computed in the case of Reτ = 1,000. The mean velocity, turbulent intensities and heat transfer rates obtained from the present calculations are in good agreement with the previous numerical and experimental results. To elucidate the secondary flow structures due to the pipe curvature, the mean quantities and rms fluctuations of the flow and temperature fields are presented on the pipe cross-sections, and compared with those of the straight pipe flow. To study turbulence structures and their influence on turbulent heat transfer, turbulence statistics including but not limited to skewness and flatness of velocity fluctuations, cross-correlation coefficients, an Octant analysis, and turbulence budgets are presented and discussed. Based on our results, we attempt to clarify the effects of Reynolds number and the pipe curvature on turbulent heat transfer. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2010-0008457).

  1. Momentum transport in gyrokinetic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, Rico

    2016-07-01

    In this thesis, the gyrokinetic-Vlasov code GKW is used to study turbulent transport, with a focus on radial transport of toroidal momentum. To support the studies on turbulent transport an eigenvalue solver has been implemented into GKW. This allows to find, not only the most unstable mode, but also subdominant modes. Furthermore it is possible to follow the modes in parameter scans. Furthermore, two fundamental mechanisms that can generate an intrinsic rotation have been investigated: profile shearing and the velocity nonlinearity. The study of toroidal momentum transport in a tokamak due to profile shearing reveals that the momentum flux can not be accurately described by the gradient in the turbulent intensity. Consequently, a description using the profile variation is used. A linear model has been developed that is able to reproduce the variations in the momentum flux as the profiles of density and temperature vary, reasonably well. It uses, not only the gradient length of density and temperature profile, but also their derivative, i.e. the second derivative of the logarithm of the temperature and the density profile. It is shown that both first as well as second derivatives contribute to the generation of a momentum flux. A difference between the linear and nonlinear simulations has been found with respect to the behaviour of the momentum flux. In linear simulations the momentum flux is independent of the normalized Larmor radius ρ{sub *}, whereas it is linear in ρ{sub *} for nonlinear simulations, provided ρ{sub *} is small enough (≤4.10{sup -3}). Nonlinear simulations reveal that the profile shearing can generate an intrinsic rotation comparable to that of current experiments. Under reactor conditions, however, the intrinsic rotation from the profile shearing is expected to be small due to the small normalized Larmor radius ρ{sub *}

  2. Heating of plasmas in tokamaks by current-driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluiver, H. de.

    1985-10-01

    Investigations of current-driven turbulence have shown the potential to heat plasmas to elevated temperatures in relatively small cross-section devices. The fundamental processes are rather well understood theoretically. Even as it is shown to be possible to relax the technical requirements on the necessary electric field and the pulse length to acceptable values, the effect of energy generation near the plasma edge, the energy transport, the impurity influx and the variation of the current profile are still unknown for present-day large-radius tokamaks. Heating of plasmas by quasi-stationary weakly turbulent states caused by moderate increases of the resistivity due to higher loop voltages could be envisaged. Power supplies able to furnish power levels 5-10 times higher than the usual values could be used for a demonstration of those regimes. At several institutes and university laboratories the study of turbulent heating in larger tokamaks and stellarators is pursued

  3. Effects of premixed flames on turbulence and turbulent scalar transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipatnikov, A.N.; Chomiak, J. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, 412 75 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Experimental data and results of direct numerical simulations are reviewed in order to show that premixed combustion can change the basic characteristics of a fluctuating velocity field (the so-called flame-generated turbulence) and the direction of scalar fluxes (the so-called countergradient or pressure-driven transport) in a turbulent flow. Various approaches to modeling these phenomena are discussed and the lack of a well-elaborated and widely validated predictive approach is emphasized. Relevant basic issues (the transition from gradient to countergradient scalar transport, the role played by flame-generated turbulence in the combustion rate, the characterization of turbulence in premixed flames, etc.) are critically considered and certain widely accepted concepts are disputed. Despite the substantial progress made in understanding the discussed effects over the past decades, these basic issues strongly need further research. (author)

  4. Turbulent transport in low-beta plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Pécseli, H.L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations are studied experimentally in a low-P plasma, with particular attention to their importance for the anomalous plasma transport across magnetic field lines. The presence of large coherent structures in a turbulent background at the edge of the plasma column...... is demonstrated by a statistical analysis. The importance of these structures for the turbulent transport is investigated. The study is extended by a multichannel conditional analysis to illustrate detailed properties and parameter dependences of the turbulent transport. (C) 1996 American Institute of Physics....

  5. Analysis of turbulent heat and momentum transfer in a transitionally rough turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doosttalab, Ali; Dharmarathne, Suranga; Tutkun, Murat; Adrian, Ronald; Castillo, Luciano

    2016-11-01

    A zero-pressure-gradient (ZPG) turbulent boundary layer over a transitionally rough surface is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The rough surface is modeled as 24-grit sandpaper which corresponds to k+ 11 , where k+ is roughness height. Reynolds number based on momentum thickness is approximately 2400. The walls are isothermal and turbulent flow Prandtl number is 0.71. We simulate temperature as passive scalar. We compute the inner product of net turbulent force (d (u1ui) / dxi) and net turbulent heat flux (d (ui θ / dxi)) in order to investigate (i) the correlation between these vectorial quantities, (II) size of the projection of these fields on each other and (IIi) alignment of momentum and hear flux. The inner product in rough case results in larger projection and better alignment. In addition, our study on the vortices shows that surface roughness promotes production of vortical structures which affects the thermal transport near the wall.

  6. Resistive drift wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatani, M.

    1986-01-01

    Our efforts for studying the properties of resistive drift wave turbulence by using model mode-coupling equations are shown. It may be related to the edge turbulence and the associated anomalous transport in tokamaks or in stellarator/heliotron. (author)

  7. Paleoclassical electron heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callen, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    Radial electron heat transport in low collisionality, magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas is shown to result from paleoclassical Coulomb collision processes (parallel electron heat conduction and magnetic field diffusion). In such plasmas the electron temperature equilibrates along magnetic field lines a long length L, which is the minimum of the electron collision length and a maximum effective half length of helical field lines. Thus, the diffusing field lines induce a radial electron heat diffusivity M ≅ L/(πR 0q ) ∼ 10 >> 1 times the magnetic field diffusivity η/μ 0 ≅ ν e (c/ω p ) 2 . The paleoclassical electron heat flux model provides interpretations for many features of 'anomalous' electron heat transport: magnitude and radial profile of electron heat diffusivity (in tokamaks, STs, and RFPs), Alcator scaling in high density plasmas, transport barriers around low order rational surfaces and near a separatrix, and a natural heat pinch (or minimum temperature gradient) heat flux form. (author)

  8. Theory of incremental turbulent transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similon, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this research is to understand how the various aspect of turbulent transport operate in tokamaks, in the presence of low frequency fluctuations such as drift waves or trapped electron modes

  9. Application of turbulence modeling to predict surface heat transfer in stagnation flow region of circular cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi R.; Yeh, Frederick C.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical analysis and numerical calculations for the turbulent flow field and for the effect of free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate of a stagnation flow are presented. The emphasis is on the modeling of turbulence and its augmentation of surface heat transfer rate. The flow field considered is the region near the forward stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a uniform turbulent mean flow. The free stream is steady and incompressible with a Reynolds number of the order of 10 to the 5th power and turbulence intensity of less than 5 percent. For this analysis, the flow field is divided into three regions: (1) a uniform free-stream region where the turbulence is homogeneous and isotropic; (2) an external viscid flow region where the turbulence is distorted by the variation of the mean flow velocity; and, (3) an anisotropic turbulent boundary layer region over the cylinder surface. The turbulence modeling techniques used are the kappa-epsilon two-equation model in the external flow region and the time-averaged turbulence transport equation in the boundary layer region. The turbulence double correlations, the mean velocity, and the mean temperature within the boundary layer are solved numerically from the transport equations. The surface heat transfer rate is calculated as functions of the free-stream turbulence longitudinal microlength scale, the turbulence intensity, and the Reynolds number.

  10. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, P.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  11. Turbulence and intermittent transport at the boundary of magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical fluid simulations of interchange turbulence for geometry and parameters relevant to the boundary region of magnetically confined plasmas are shown to result in intermittent transport qualitatively similar to recent experimental measurements. The two-dimensional simulation domain features...... a forcing region with spatially localized sources of particles and heat outside which losses due to the motion along open magnetic-field lines dominate, corresponding to the edge region and the scrape-off layer, respectively. Turbulent states reveal intermittent eruptions of hot plasma from the edge region...... fluctuation wave forms and transport statistics are also in a good agreement with those derived from the experiments. Associated with the turbulence bursts are relaxation oscillations in the particle and heat confinements as well as in the kinetic energy of the sheared poloidal flows. The formation of blob...

  12. Transport due to ion pressure gradient turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    Turbulent transport due to the ion pressure gradient (or temperature drift) instability is thought to be significant when etasub(i)=d(ln Tsub(i))/d(ln n)>1. The invariance properties of the governing equations under scale transformations are used to discuss the characteristics of this turbulence. This approach not only clarifies the relationships between earlier treatments but also, in certain limits, completely determines the scaling properties of the fluctuations and the consequent thermal transport. (author)

  13. On the relation between neoclassical transport and turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaing, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    It is demonstrated through the flux-force relationship in the neoclassical theory that when neoclassical transport fluxes are improved, the damping rate of the radial electric field of the zonal flow is reduced. This, in turn, leads to improved turbulent transport fluxes. Thus, two seemingly unrelated transport fluxes are intimately connected through the momentum equation, and the neoclassical flux-force relation. This also implies a method to improve turbulent transport by improving neoclassical fluxes

  14. Statistical description of turbulent transport for flux driven toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.; Imadera, K.; Kishimoto, Y.; Li, J. Q.; Nordman, H.

    2017-06-01

    A novel methodology to analyze non-Gaussian probability distribution functions (PDFs) of intermittent turbulent transport in global full-f gyrokinetic simulations is presented. In this work, the auto-regressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model is applied to time series data of intermittent turbulent heat transport to separate noise and oscillatory trends, allowing for the extraction of non-Gaussian features of the PDFs. It was shown that non-Gaussian tails of the PDFs from first principles based gyrokinetic simulations agree with an analytical estimation based on a two fluid model.

  15. Turbulent momentum transport due to neoclassical flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Barnes, Michael; Parra, Felix I; Belli, Emily; Candy, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic toroidal rotation in a tokamak can be driven by turbulent momentum transport due to neoclassical flow effects breaking a symmetry of turbulence. In this paper we categorize the contributions due to neoclassical effects to the turbulent momentum transport, and evaluate each contribution using gyrokinetic simulations. We find that the relative importance of each contribution changes with collisionality. For low collisionality, the dominant contributions come from neoclassical particle and parallel flows. For moderate collisionality, there are non-negligible contributions due to neoclassical poloidal electric field and poloidal gradients of density and temperature, which are not important for low collisionality. (paper)

  16. Large eddy simulations of turbulent flows with heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Alexandre

    2004-01-01

    LES of turbulent flows with heat transfer was used within the framework of conjugate heat transfer problems. The objective of this work lies not only in identifying the various elements likely to impair temperature fluctuations estimations at the fluid/solid interface but also to introduce adequate wall modeling. The choice of a proper convection scheme for the transport of passive scalars led to the adoption of a high order upwind scheme with slope limiter. The use of classical wall models having shown some weaknesses as for the estimation of parietal temperature fluctuations, two new approaches are proposed and tested. The first one relies on a complete resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations on a refined grid close to the wall making it possible to rebuild the temperature fluctuations near the wall. The second one relies on the simultaneous and one dimensional resolution of a turbulent boundary layer equation and a variance transport equation near the wall. (author) [fr

  17. Turbulent current heating of dense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suprunenko, V.A.; Sukhomlin, E.A.; Volkov, E.D.; Perepelkij, N.F.

    1976-01-01

    Based upon experimental results an attempt is made for systematizing and analysing conditions of experiments in anomalous resistance and turbulent heating of a plasma. The extensive program of such investigations aims at a direct practical study on quasistationary heating and plasma containment in magnetic traps. It has been shown that in real conditions turbulent heating turns out to be a far more complicated phenomenon than that described within the framework of theories developed so far. It has been established that the phenomenon alters in the transition through the critical values of electric and magnetic fields. This makes it possible to separate four characteristic experimental regimes. For all the regimes the stabilization of the electron current drift rate is typical. On the basis of the experimental results obtained an explanation is given of the sporadic character of the ultrathermal radiation in a quasistationary discharge

  18. Active transport and heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Peter W

    2011-07-01

    Increasing heat may impede peoples' ability to be active outdoors thus limiting active transport options. Co-benefits from mitigation of and adaptation to global warming should not be assumed but need to be actively designed into strategies.

  19. Heat transport and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despois, J.

    1977-01-01

    Recalling the close connections existing between heat transport and storage, some general considerations on the problem of heat distribution and transport are presented 'in order to set out the problem' of storage in concrete form. This problem is considered in its overall plane, then studied under the angle of the different technical choices it involves. The two alternatives currently in consideration are described i.e.: storage in a mined cavity and underground storage as captive sheet [fr

  20. Suppression of turbulent transport in NSTX internal transport barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Howard

    2008-11-01

    Electron transport will be important for ITER where fusion alphas and high-energy beam ions will primarily heat electrons. In the NSTX, internal transport barriers (ITBs) are observed in reversed (negative) shear discharges where diffusivities for electron and ion thermal channels and momentum are reduced. While neutral beam heating can produce ITBs in both electron and ion channels, High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating can produce electron thermal ITBs under reversed magnetic shear conditions without momentum input. Interestingly, the location of the electron ITB does not necessarily match that of the ion ITB: the electron ITB correlates well with the minimum in the magnetic shear determined by Motional Stark Effect (MSE) [1] constrained equilibria, whereas the ion ITB better correlates with the maximum ExB shearing rate. Measured electron temperature gradients can exceed critical linear thresholds for ETG instability calculated by linear gyrokinetic codes in the ITB confinement region. The high-k microwave scattering diagnostic [2] shows reduced local density fluctuations at wavenumbers characteristic of electron turbulence for discharges with strongly negative magnetic shear versus weakly negative or positive magnetic shear. Fluctuation reductions are found to be spatially and temporally correlated with the local magnetic shear. These results are consistent with non-linear gyrokinetic simulations predictions showing the reduction of electron transport in negative magnetic shear conditions despite being linearly unstable [3]. Electron transport improvement via negative magnetic shear rather than ExB shear highlights the importance of current profile control in ITER and future devices. [1] F.M. Levinton, H. Yuh et al., PoP 14, 056119 [2] D.R. Smith, E. Mazzucato et al., RSI 75, 3840 [3] Jenko, F. and Dorland, W., PRL 89 225001

  1. Introduction to turbulent transport in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    2006-01-01

    This introduction presents the main instabilities responsible for turbulence in tokamak plasmas, and the prominent features of the resulting transport. The usual techniques to construct reduced transport models are described. These models can be tested by analysing steady state and transient regimes. Another way to test the theory is to use a similarity principle, similar to the one used in fluid mechanics. Finally, the physics involved in the formation and sustainment of transport barriers is presented. (author)

  2. Electron thermal transport in tokamak: ETG or TEM turbulences?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z.; Chen, L.; Nishimura, Y.; Qu, H.; Hahm, T.S.; Lewandowski, J.; Rewoldt, G.; Wang, W.X.; Diamond, P.H.; Holland, C.; Zonca, F.; Li, Y.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports progress on numerical and theoretical studies of electron transport in tokamak including: (1) electron temperature gradient turbulence; (2) trapped electron mode turbulence; and (3) a new finite element solver for global electromagnetic simulation. In particular, global gyrokinetic particle simulation and nonlinear gyrokinetic theory find that electron temperature gradient (ETG) instability saturates via nonlinear toroidal couplings, which transfer energy successively from unstable modes to damped modes preferably with longer poloidal wavelengths. The electrostatic ETG turbulence is dominated by nonlinearly generated radial streamers. The length of streamers scales with the device size and is much longer than the distance between mode rational surfaces or electron radial excursions. Both fluctuation intensity and transport level are independent of the streamer size. These simulations with realistic plasma parameters find that the electron heat conductivity is much smaller than the experimental value and in contrast with recent findings of flux-tube simulations that ETG turbulence is responsible for the anomalous electron thermal transport in fusion plasmas. The nonlinear toroidal couplings represent a new paradigm for the spectral cascade in plasma turbulence. (author)

  3. Turbulent and neoclassical toroidal momentum transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abiteboul, J.

    2012-10-01

    The goal of magnetic confinement devices such as tokamaks is to produce energy from nuclear fusion reactions in plasmas at low densities and high temperatures. Experimentally, toroidal flows have been found to significantly improve the energy confinement, and therefore the performance of the machine. As extrinsic momentum sources will be limited in future fusion devices such as ITER, an understanding of the physics of toroidal momentum transport and the generation of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks would be an important step in order to predict the rotation profile in experiments. Among the mechanisms expected to contribute to the generation of toroidal rotation is the transport of momentum by electrostatic turbulence, which governs heat transport in tokamaks. Due to the low collisionality of the plasma, kinetic modeling is mandatory for the study of tokamak turbulence. In principle, this implies the modeling of a six-dimensional distribution function representing the density of particles in position and velocity phase-space, which can be reduced to five dimensions when considering only frequencies below the particle cyclotron frequency. This approximation, relevant for the study of turbulence in tokamaks, leads to the so-called gyrokinetic model and brings the computational cost of the model within the presently available numerical resources. In this work, we study the transport of toroidal momentum in tokamaks in the framework of the gyrokinetic model. First, we show that this reduced model is indeed capable of accurately modeling momentum transport by deriving a local conservation equation of toroidal momentum, and verifying it numerically with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Secondly, we show how electrostatic turbulence can break the axisymmetry and generate toroidal rotation, while a strong link between turbulent heat and momentum transport is identified, as both exhibit the same large-scale avalanche-like events. The dynamics of turbulent transport are

  4. Turbulent ion heating in TCV Tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlatter, Ch.

    2009-08-01

    charge exchange measurements, by doping the plasma with ion neutralisation targets injected with the diagnostic neutral beam (DNBI), were used to absolutely calibrate the NPA. Advanced modelling of the measured hydrogenic charge exchange spectra with the neutralisation and neutral transport codes KN1D and DOUBLE-TCV permitted a calculation of the absolute neutral density profiles of the plasma species.The energisation and the properties of fast ions were studied in dedicated, low density, cold ion, hot electron plasmas, resonantly heated at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. The ion acceleration occurs on a characteristic timescale in the sub-millisecond range and comprises up to 20 % of the plasma ions. The number of fast ions n i s and their effective temperature T i s are found to depend strongly on the bulk and suprathermal electron parameters, in particular T i s ≥ T e b (electron bulk) and n i s ∼ v de (toroidal electron drift speed). The suprathermal electrons, abundantly generated in plasmas subjected to ECCD, are diagnosed with perpendicular and oblique viewing electron cyclotron emission (ECE) antennas and the measured frequency spectra are reconstructed with the relativistic ECE radiation balance code NOTEC-TCV. With steady-state ECRH and ECCD, the fast ion population reaches an equilibrium state. The spatial fast ion temperature profile is broad, of similar shape compared to the bulk ion temperature profile. The hottest suprathermal temperature observed is T i s ≥ 6 keV. Various potential ion acceleration mechanisms were examined for relevance in the TCV parameter range. The simultaneous wave-electron and wave-ion resonances of ion acoustic turbulence (IAT) show the best correlation with the available experimental knowledge. Ion acoustic waves are emitted by the weakly relativistic circulating electrons and are mainly Landau damped onto the ions. Destabilisation of IAT is markedly facilitated by the important degree of

  5. Progress in understanding heat transport at JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Garbet, X.; Angioni, C.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports recent progress in understanding heat transport mechanisms either in conventional or advanced tokamak scenarios in JET. A key experimental tool has been the use of perturbative transport techniques, both by ICH power modulation and by edge cold pulses. The availability of such results has allowed careful comparison with theoretical modelling using 1D empirical or physics based transport models, 3D fluid turbulence simulations or gyrokinetic stability analysis. In conventional L- and H-mode plasmas the issue of temperature profile stiffness has been addressed. JET results are consistent with the concept of a critical inverse temperature gradient length above which transport is enhanced by the onset of turbulence. A threshold value R/L Te ∼5 has been found for the onset of stiff electron transport, while the level of electron stiffness appears to vary strongly with plasma parameters, in particular with the ratio of electron and ion heating: electrons become stiffer when ions are strongly heated, resulting in larger R/L Ti values. This behaviour has also been found theoretically, although quantitatively weaker than in experiments. In plasmas characterized by Internal Transport Barriers (ITB), the properties of heat transport inside the ITB layer and the ITB formation mechanisms have been investigated. The plasma current profile is found to play a major role in ITB formation. The effect of negative magnetic shear on electron and ion stabilization is demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically using turbulence codes. The role of rational magnetic surfaces in ITB triggering is well assessed experimentally, but still lacks a convincing theoretical explanation. Attempts to trigger an ITB by externally induced magnetic reconnection using saddle coils have shown that MHD islands in general do not produce a sufficient variation of ExB flow shear to lead to ITB formation. First results of perturbative transport in ITBs show that the ITB is a narrow

  6. Particle Acceleration and Heating by Turbulent Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (I.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  7. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND HEATING BY TURBULENT RECONNECTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker–Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  8. PARTICLE ACCELERATION AND HEATING BY TURBULENT RECONNECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Pisokas, Theophilos; Isliker, Heinz; Tsiolis, Vassilis [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-52124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Anastasiadis, Anastasios [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece)

    2016-08-10

    Turbulent flows in the solar wind, large-scale current sheets, multiple current sheets, and shock waves lead to the formation of environments in which a dense network of current sheets is established and sustains “turbulent reconnection.” We constructed a 2D grid on which a number of randomly chosen grid points are acting as scatterers (i.e., magnetic clouds or current sheets). Our goal is to examine how test particles respond inside this large-scale collection of scatterers. We study the energy gain of individual particles, the evolution of their energy distribution, and their escape time distribution. We have developed a new method to estimate the transport coefficients from the dynamics of the interaction of the particles with the scatterers. Replacing the “magnetic clouds” with current sheets, we have proven that the energization processes can be more efficient depending on the strength of the effective electric fields inside the current sheets and their statistical properties. Using the estimated transport coefficients and solving the Fokker–Planck (FP) equation, we can recover the energy distribution of the particles only for the stochastic Fermi process. We have shown that the evolution of the particles inside a turbulent reconnecting volume is not a solution of the FP equation, since the interaction of the particles with the current sheets is “anomalous,” in contrast to the case of the second-order Fermi process.

  9. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Candy, J.; Kaye, S.M.; Nevins, W.M.; Wang, E.; Bell, R.E.; Hammett, G.W.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Yuh, H.

    2011-01-01

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  10. Pressure gradient turbulent transport and collisionless reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    The scale invariance technique is employed to discuss pressure gradient driven turbulent transport when an Ohm's law with electron inertia, rather than resistivity, is relevant. An expression for thermal diffusivity which has many features appropriate to L-mode transport in tokamaks, is seen to have greater generality than indicated by their particular calculation. The results of applying the technique to a more appropriate collisionless Ohm's law are discussed. (Author)

  11. Ion turbulence and thermal transport in laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, H.C.; Boyd, T.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In the interaction of high-intensity lasers with target plasmas the transport of thermal energy from the region in which the radiation is absorbed, to the cold dense plasma in the interior of the target, is an issue of central importance. The role of ion turbulence as a flux limiter is addressed with particular regard to recent experiments in which target plasmas were irradiated by 1.06 μm neodymium laser light at irradiances of 10 15 W cm - 2 and greater. Saturation levels of the ion-acoustic turbulence driven by a combination of a suprathermal electron current and a heat flux are calculated on the basis of perturbed orbit theory. The levels of turbulence are found to be markedly lower than those commonly estimated from simple trapping arguments and too low to explain the thermal flux inhibition observed in the experiments used as a basis for the model. (author)

  12. Diagnosis of Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufor, Mikal T.; Jemiolo, Andrew J.; Keesee, Amy; Cassak, Paul; Tu, Weichao; Scime, Earl E.

    2017-10-01

    The DARTH (Diagnosis of Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Heating) experiment is an intermediate-scale, experimental facility designed to study magnetic reconnection at and below the kinetic scale of ions and electrons. The experiment will have non-perturbative diagnostics with high temporal and three-dimensional spatial resolution, giving it the capability to investigate kinetic-scale physics. Of specific scientific interest are particle acceleration, plasma heating, turbulence and energy dissipation during reconnection. Here we will describe the magnetic field system and the two plasma guns used to create flux ropes that then merge through magnetic reconnection. We will also describe the key diagnostic systems: laser induced fluorescence (LIF) for ion vdf measurements, a 300 GHz microwave scattering system for sub-mm wavelength fluctuation measurements and a Thomson scattering laser for electron vdf measurements. The vacuum chamber is designed to provide unparalleled access for these particle diagnostics. The scientific goals of DARTH are to examine particle acceleration and heating during, the role of three-dimensional instabilities during reconnection, how reconnection ceases, and the role of impurities and asymmetries in reconnection. This work was supported by the by the O'Brien Energy Research Fund.

  13. Anisotropy and buoyancy in nuclear turbulent heat transfer - critical assessment and needs for modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groetzbach, G.

    2007-12-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) programs have a wide application field in reactor technique, like to diverse flow types which have to be considered in Accelerator Driven nuclear reactor Systems (ADS). This requires turbulence models for the momentum and heat transfer with very different capabilities. The physical demands on the models are elaborated for selected transport mechanisms, the status quo of the modelling is discussed, and it is investigated which capabilities are offered by the market dominating commercial CFD codes. One topic of the discussion is on the already earlier achieved knowledge on the distinct anisotropy of the turbulent momentum and heat transport near walls. It is shown that this is relevant in channel flows with inhomogeneous wall conditions. The related consequences for the turbulence modelling are discussed. The second topic is the turbulent heat transport in buoyancy influenced flows. The only turbulence model for heat transfer which is available in the large commercial CFD-codes is based on the Reynolds analogy. This means, it is required to prescribe suitable turbulent Prandtl number distributions. There exist many correlations for channel flows, but they are seldom used in practical applications. Here, a correlation is deduced for the local turbulent Prandtl number which accounts for many parameters, like wall distance, molecular Prandtl number of the fluid, wall roughness and local shear stress, thermal wall condition, etc. so that it can be applied to most ADS typical heat transporting channel flows. The spatial dependence is discussed. It is shown that it is essential for reliable temperature calculations to get accurate turbulent Prandtl numbers especially near walls. If thermal wall functions are applied, then the correlation for the turbulent Prandtl number has to be consistent with the wall functions to avoid unphysical discretisation dependences. In using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) data for horizontal fluid layers it

  14. Turbulent circulation above the surface heat source in stably stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2016-10-01

    The 3-level RANS approach for simulating a turbulent circulation over the heat island in a stably stratified environment under nearly calm conditions is formulated. The turbulent kinetic energy its spectral consumption (dissipation) and the dispersion of turbulent fluctuations of temperature are found from differential equations, thus the correct modeling of transport processes in the interface layer with the counter-gradient heat flux is assured. The three-parameter turbulence RANS approach minimizes difficulties in simulating the turbulent transport in a stably stratified environment and reduces efforts needed for the numerical implementation of the 3-level RANS approach. Numerical simulation of the turbulent structure of the penetrative convection over the heat island under conditions of stably stratified atmosphere demonstrates that the three-equation model is able to predict the thermal circulation induced by the heat island. The temperature distribution, root-mean-square fluctuations of the turbulent velocity and temperature fields and spectral turbulent kinetic energy flux are in good agreement with the experimental data. The model describes such thin physical effects, as a crossing of vertical profiles of temperature of a thermal plume with the formation of the negative buoyancy area testifying to development of the dome-shaped form at the top part of a plume in the form of "hat".

  15. Coarse Grained Transport Model for Neutrals in Turbulent SOL Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marandet, Y.; Mekkaoui, A.; Genesio, P.; Rosato, J.; Capes, H.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Stamm, R., E-mail: yannick.marandet@univ-amu.fr [PIIM, CNRS/Aix-Marseille University, Marseille (France); Reiter, D.; Boerner, P. [IEK4, FZJ, Juelich (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: Edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices exhibit strong intermittent turbulence, which governs perpendicular transport of particles and heat. Turbulent fluxes result from the coarse graining procedure used to derive the transport equation, which entails time averaging of the underlying equations governing the turbulent evolution of the electron and ion fluids. In previous works, we have pointed out that this averaging is not carried out on the Boltzmann equation that describes the transport of neutral particles (atoms, molecules) in current edge code suites (such as SOLPS). Since fluctuations in the far SOL are of order unity, calculating the transport of neutral particles, hence the source terms in plasma fluid equations, in the average plasma background might lead to misleading results. In particular, retaining the effects of fluctuations could affect the estimation of the importance of main chamber recycling, hence first wall sputtering by charge exchange atoms, as well as main chamber impurity contamination and transport. In this contribution, we obtain an exact coarse-grained equation for the average neutral density, assuming that density fluctuations are described by multivariate Gamma statistics. This equation is a scattering free Boltzmann equation, where the ionization rate has been renormalized to account for fluctuations. The coarse grained transport model for neutrals has been implemented in the EIRENE code, and applications in 2D geometry with ITER relevant plasma parameters are presented. Our results open the way for the implementation of the effects of turbulent fluctuations on the transport of neutral particles in coupled plasma/neutral edge codes like B2-EIRENE. (author)

  16. Transport barrier fluctuations governed by SOL turbulence spreading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Sarazin, Y.; Ciraolo, G.; Darmet, G.; Garbet, X.; Grangirard, V.; Tamain, P.; Benkadda, S.; Beyer, P.

    2007-01-01

    Turbulence spreading, namely turbulent transport extending into a stable region is reported both for the flat density profiles in the far SOL and into a modeled H-mode barrier. It is shown that due to turbulence penetration, the pedestal width fluctuates and that its effective width is a factor 2 smaller than the linear predicted width. Turbulence overshooting throughout the pedestal leads to a non-vanishing turbulent transport within the barrier and provides a coupling of core and SOL turbulence despite the transport barrier

  17. Turbulence and anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordman, H

    1990-12-31

    In present-day Tokamak fusion machines, instabilities and turbulence driven by temperature gradients can have a considerable impact on the confinement qualities. This thesis is mainly devoted to analyzing the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities and the associated turbulent transport. A combined analytical and numerical study of the ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is presented. An analytical expression for the ion thermal conductivity is derived and found to be in good agreement with the simulation results. The scaling properties of chi{sub i} are investigated and compared with experimental results. The transport due to the simultaneous presence of a trapped electron mode and an ion temperature gradient mode is analysed. It is found that the coupling of the modes can give rise to inward diffusive fluxes of both particles and energy. The tendency of the system to equilibrate density and temperature scale lengths is compared with recent experimental trends. The nonlinear behaviour of the instabilities is also studied in the context of low dimensional dynamical systems. Here, the relation between the fully nonlinear fluid models and the low dimensional models is discussed. The influence of a high frequency RF-field on the ion temperature gradient driven mode is investigated analytically. The consequences for mode stability and transport are considered. 23 refs.

  18. Turbulence and anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordman, H.

    1989-01-01

    In present-day Tokamak fusion machines, instabilities and turbulence driven by temperature gradients can have a considerable impact on the confinement qualities. This thesis is mainly devoted to analyzing the nonlinear evolution of these instabilities and the associated turbulent transport. A combined analytical and numerical study of the ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is presented. An analytical expression for the ion thermal conductivity is derived and found to be in good agreement with the simulation results. The scaling properties of chi i are investigated and compared with experimental results. The transport due to the simultaneous presence of a trapped electron mode and an ion temperature gradient mode is analysed. It is found that the coupling of the modes can give rise to inward diffusive fluxes of both particles and energy. The tendency of the system to equilibrate density and temperature scale lengths is compared with recent experimental trends. The nonlinear behaviour of the instabilities is also studied in the context of low dimensional dynamical systems. Here, the relation between the fully nonlinear fluid models and the low dimensional models is discussed. The influence of a high frequency RF-field on the ion temperature gradient driven mode is investigated analytically. The consequences for mode stability and transport are considered. 23 refs

  19. Transport due to ion temperature gradient mode vortex turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, V.P.; Weiland, J.

    1991-01-01

    The ion energy transport due to an ensemble of nonlinear vortices is calculated in the test particle approximation for a strongly turbulent plasma. A diffusion coefficient proportional to the root of the stationary turbulence level is obtained. (au)

  20. Turbulent transport across invariant canonical flux surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, J.B.; Callen, J.D.

    1994-07-01

    Net transport due to a combination of Coulomb collisions and turbulence effects in a plasma is investigated using a fluid moment description that allows for kinetic and nonlinear effects via closure relations. The model considered allows for ''ideal'' turbulent fluctuations that distort but preserve the topology of species-dependent canonical flux surfaces ψ number-sign,s triple-bond ∫ dF · B number-sign,s triple-bond ∇ x [A + (m s /q s )u s ] in which u s is the flow velocity of the fluid species. Equations for the net transport relative to these surfaces due to ''nonideal'' dissipative processes are found for the total number of particles and total entropy enclosed by a moving canonical flux surface. The corresponding particle transport flux is calculated using a toroidal axisymmetry approximation of the ideal surfaces. The resulting Lagrangian transport flux includes classical, neoclassical-like, and anomalous contributions and shows for the first time how these various contributions should be summed to obtain the total particle transport flux

  1. Characterisation of temperature gradient driven turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    We report on extensive numerical studies aimed at characterising various aspects of temperature gradient driven turbulence. We specifically discuss results from 3D fluid models of ETG and of ITG turbulence, and results from a 2D+2D gyrokinetic model of trapped ion turbulence. Global transport exhibits gyro-Bohm scaling in both the ETG and the ITG model. The conductivity of the ETG model decreases weakly with beta. The heat transport is due to the EXB advection, the effect of the magnetic flutter is negligible. However the transport level is much lower than experimentally observed. In both 3D models the correlation lengths scale with the gyroradius, but they are typically a factor 10 larger. Vortices are elongated but their aspect ratio is independent of the gyroradius. Their radial size is limited by LD. The trapped ion model gives larger vortices due to the absence of LD from passing ions. Avalanches are observed in all the models, the weakest occurring in the ITG system. Their range increases with gyroradius, but more weakly than linearly. Finally, ZFs can limit the range of the avalanches, which explains why avalanches are weaker in the ITG model which is more sensitive to ZFs. (author)

  2. Heat transport system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    A heat transport system of small size which can be operated in any orientation consists of a coolant loop containing a vaporizable liquid as working fluid and includes in series a vaporizer, a condenser and two one-way valves and a pressurizer connected to the loop between the two valves. The pressurizer may be divided into two chambers by a flexible diaphragm, an inert gas in one chamber acts as a pneumatic spring for the system. This system is suitable for use in a nuclear-powered artificial heart

  3. A reduced model for ion temperature gradient turbulent transport in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunami, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.

    2013-07-01

    A novel reduced model for ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulent transport in helical plasmas is presented. The model enables one to predict nonlinear gyrokinetic simulation results from linear gyrokinetic analyses. It is shown from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of the ITG turbulence in helical plasmas that the transport coefficient can be expressed as a function of the turbulent fluctuation level and the averaged zonal flow amplitude. Then, the reduced model for the turbulent ion heat diffusivity is derived by representing the nonlinear turbulent fluctuations and zonal flow amplitude in terms of the linear growth rate of the ITG instability and the linear response of the zonal flow potentials. It is confirmed that the reduced transport model results are in good agreement with those from nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations for high ion temperature plasmas in the Large Helical Device. (author)

  4. Turbulence spectra, transport, and E × B flows in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M.; Sugama, H.; Satake, S.; Matsuoka, S.; Ishizawa, A.; Tanaka, K.; Maeyama, Shinya

    2012-11-01

    Gyrokinetic simulation of ion temperature gradient turbulence and zonal flows for helical plasmas has been validated against the Large Helical Device experiments with high ion temperature, where a reduced modeling of ion heat transport is also considered. It is confirmed by the entropy transfer analysis that the turbulence spectrum elongated in the radial wavenumber space is associated with successive interactions with zonal flows. A novel multi-scale simulation for turbulence and zonal flows in poloidally-rotating helical plasmas has demonstrated strong zonal flow generation by turbulence, which implies that turbulent transport processes in non-axisymmetric systems are coupled to neoclassical transport through the macroscopic E × B flows determined by the ambipolarty condition for neoclassical particle fluxes. (author)

  5. Fractional Transport in Strongly Turbulent Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isliker, Heinz; Vlahos, Loukas; Constantinescu, Dana

    2017-07-01

    We analyze statistically the energization of particles in a large scale environment of strong turbulence that is fragmented into a large number of distributed current filaments. The turbulent environment is generated through strongly perturbed, 3D, resistive magnetohydrodynamics simulations, and it emerges naturally from the nonlinear evolution, without a specific reconnection geometry being set up. Based on test-particle simulations, we estimate the transport coefficients in energy space for use in the classical Fokker-Planck (FP) equation, and we show that the latter fails to reproduce the simulation results. The reason is that transport in energy space is highly anomalous (strange), the particles perform Levy flights, and the energy distributions show extended power-law tails. Newly then, we motivate the use and derive the specific form of a fractional transport equation (FTE), we determine its parameters and the order of the fractional derivatives from the simulation data, and we show that the FTE is able to reproduce the high energy part of the simulation data very well. The procedure for determining the FTE parameters also makes clear that it is the analysis of the simulation data that allows us to make the decision whether a classical FP equation or a FTE is appropriate.

  6. Ion transport in turbulent edge plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helander, P.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA; Hazeltine, R.D.; Catto, P.J.

    1996-02-01

    Edge plasmas, such as the tokamak scrape-off layer, exist as a consequence of a balance between cross-field diffusion and parallel losses. The former is usually anomalous, and is widely thought to be driven by strong electrostatic turbulence. It is shown that the anomalous diffusion affects the parallel ion transport by giving rise to a new type of thermal force between different ion species. This force is parallel to the magnetic field, but arises entirely because of perpendicular gradients, and could be important for impurity retention in the tokamak divertor. (author)

  7. Turbulent transport of impurities in a magnetized plasma; Transport turbulent d'impuretes dans un plasma magnetise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubuit, N

    2006-10-15

    This work deals with the transport of impurities in magnetically confined thermonuclear plasmas. The accumulation of impurities in the core of the plasma would imply dramatic losses of energy that may lead to the extinction of the plasma. On the opposite, the injection of impurities in the plasma edge is considered as an efficient means to extract heat without damaging the first wall. The balance between these 2 contradictory constraints requires an accurate knowledge of the impurity transport inside the plasma. The effect of turbulence, the main transport mechanism for impurities is therefore a major issue. In this work, the complete formula of a turbulent flow of impurities for a given fluctuation spectrum has been inferred. The origin and features of the main accumulation processes have been identified. The main effect comes from the compressibility of the electrical shift speed in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. This compressibility appears to be linked to the curvature of the magnetic field. A less important effect is a thermal-diffusion process that is inversely proportional to the number of charges and then disappears for most type of impurities except the lightest. This effect implies an impurity flux proportional to the temperature gradient and its direction can change according to the average speed of fluctuations. A new version of the turbulence code TRB has been developed. This new version allows the constraints of the turbulence not by the gradients but by the flux which is more realistic. The importance of the processes described above has been confirmed by a comparison between calculation and experimental data from Tore-supra and the Jet tokamak. The prevailing role of the curvature of the magnetic field in the transport impurity is highlighted. (A.C.)

  8. On the correlation of heat transfer in turbulent boundary layers subjected to free-stream turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, M.J.; Hollingsworth, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    The turbulent flow of a fluid bounded by a heated surface is a wonderfully complex yet derisively mundane phenomenon. Despite its commonness in natural and man-made environments, the authors struggle to accurately predict its behavior in many simple situations. A complexity encountered in a number of flows is the presence of free-stream turbulence. A turbulent free-stream typically yields increased surface friction and heat transfer. Turbulent boundary layers with turbulent free-streams are encountered in gas-turbine engines, rocket nozzles, electronic-cooling passages, geophysical flows, and numerous other dynamic systems. Here, turbulent boundary layers were subjected to grid-generated free-stream turbulence to study the effects of length scale and intensity on heat transfer. The research focused on correlating heat transfer without the use of conventional boundary-layer Reynolds numbers. The boundary-layers studied ranged from 400 to 2,700 in momentum-thickness Reynolds number and from 450 to 1,900 in enthalpy-thickness Reynolds number. Free-stream turbulence intensities varied from 0.1 to 8.0%. The turbulent-to-viscous length-scale ratios presented are the smallest found in the heat-transfer literature; the ratios spanned from 100 to 1000. The turbulent-to-thermal ratios (using enthalpy thickness as the thermal scale) are also the smallest reported; the ratios ranged from 3.2 to 12.3. A length-scale dependence was identified in a Stanton number based on a near-wall streamwise velocity fluctuation. A new near-wall Stanton number was introduced; this parameter was regarded as a constant in a two-region boundary-layer model. The new model correlated heat-transfer to within 7%.

  9. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent pipe flow with nonuniform surface heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Shin-ichi; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    1998-01-01

    Turbulent transport computations of a scalar quantity for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow were carried out by means of a direct numerical simulation (DNS) procedure. In this paper, three wall-heating boundary conditions were considered as follows: Case-1) a uniform heat-flux condition along the wall, Case-2) a nonuniform wall-heating condition, that is, a cosine heat-flux distribution along the wall and Case-3) a nonuniform wall-heating condition with a constant temperature over a half of the pipe wall. The number of computational grids used in this paper is 256 x 128 x 128. Prandtl number of the working fluid is 0.71. The Nusselt number in case of Case-1 is in good agreement with the empirical correlation. In case of Case-3, the distributions of the turbulent quantity and the Nusselt number seem to be reasonable. However, as for Case-2, the distributions of the turbulent quantity and the Nusselt number seem to be unrealistic. Two numerical treatments of thermal boundary condition on the wall were applied and their results were discussed from the viewpoint of the turbulent transport feature. (author)

  10. Influence of fluid-property variation on turbulent convective heat transfer in vertical annular CHANNEL FLOWS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joong Hun Bae; Jung Yul Yoo; Haecheon Choi

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The influence of variable fluid property on turbulent convective heat transfer is investigated using direct numerical simulations. We consider thermally-developing flows of air and supercritical-pressure CO 2 in a vertical annular channel where the inner wall is heated with a constant heat flux and the outer wall is insulated. Turbulence statistics show that the heat and momentum transport characteristics of variable-property flows are significantly different from those of constant-property flows. The difference is mainly caused by the spatial and temporal variations of fluid density. The non-uniform density distribution causes fluid particles to be accelerated either by expansion or buoyancy force, while the temporal density fluctuations change the heat and momentum transfer via transport of turbulent mass flux, ρ'u' i . Both effects of the spatial and temporal variations of density are shown to be important in the analysis of turbulent convective heat transfer for supercritical-pressure fluids. For variable-property heated air flows, however, the effect of temporal density fluctuations can be neglected at low Mach number, which is in good accordance with the Morkovin's hypothesis. (authors)

  11. Direct numerical simulation and modeling of turbulent natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudjemadi, R.

    1996-03-01

    The main objectives of this thesis are the direct numerical simulation of natural convection in a vertical differentially heated slot and the improvements of second-order turbulence modelling. A three-dimensional direct numerical simulation code has been developed in order to gain a better understanding of turbulence properties in natural convection flows. This code has been validated in several physical configurations: non-stratified natural convection flows (conduction solution), stratified natural convection flows (double boundary layer solution), transitional and turbulent Poiseuille flows. For the conduction solution, the turbulent regime was reached at a Rayleigh number of 1*10 5 and 5.4*10 5 . A detailed analysis of these results has revealed the principal qualities of the available models but has also pointed our their shortcomings. This data base has been used in order to improve the triple correlations transport models and to select the turbulent time scales suitable for such flows. (author). 122 refs., figs., tabs., 4 appends

  12. Statistical analysis of anomalous transport in resistive interchange turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugama, Hideo; Wakatani, Masahiro.

    1992-01-01

    A new anomalous transport model for resistive interchange turbulence is derived from statistical analysis applying two-scale direct-interaction approximation to resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations with a gravity term. Our model is similar to the K-ε model for eddy viscosity of turbulent shear flows in that anomalous transport coefficients are expressed in terms of by the turbulent kinetic energy K and its dissipation rate ε while K and ε are determined by transport equations. This anomalous transport model can describe some nonlocal effects such as those from boundary conditions which cannot be treated by conventional models based on the transport coefficients represented by locally determined plasma parameters. (author)

  13. Fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Wang, W. X.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Ethier, S.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Lee, K. C. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    In this letter, we report the first observation of the fast response of electron-scale turbulence to auxiliary heating cessation in National Spherical Torus eXperiment [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The observation was made in a set of RF-heated L-mode plasmas with toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T and plasma current of 300 kA. It is observed that electron-scale turbulence spectral power (measured with a high-k collective microwave scattering system) decreases significantly following fast cessation of RF heating that occurs in less than 200 μs. The large drop in the turbulence spectral power has a short time delay of about 1–2 ms relative to the RF cessation and happens on a time scale of 0.5–1 ms, much smaller than the energy confinement time of about 10 ms. Power balance analysis shows a factor of about 2 decrease in electron thermal diffusivity after the sudden drop of turbulence spectral power. Measured small changes in equilibrium profiles across the RF cessation are unlikely able to explain this sudden reduction in the measured turbulence and decrease in electron thermal transport, supported by local linear stability analysis and both local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The observations imply that nonlocal flux-driven mechanism may be important for the observed turbulence and electron thermal transport.

  14. Radiative heat transfer in turbulent combustion systems theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Modest, Michael F

    2016-01-01

    This introduction reviews why combustion and radiation are important, as well as the technical challenges posed by radiation. Emphasis is on interactions among turbulence, chemistry and radiation (turbulence-chemistry-radiation interactions – TCRI) in Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulations. Subsequent chapters cover: chemically reacting turbulent flows; radiation properties, Reynolds transport equation (RTE) solution methods, and TCRI; radiation effects in laminar flames; TCRI in turbulent flames; and high-pressure combustion systems. This Brief presents integrated approach that includes radiation at the outset, rather than as an afterthought. It stands as the most recent developments in physical modeling, numerical algorithms, and applications collected in one monograph.

  15. Heat-flux enhancement by vapour-bubble nucleation in Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narezo Guzman, Daniela; Xie, Yanbo; Chen, S.; Fernandez Rivas, David; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Ahlers, Günter

    2016-01-01

    We report on the enhancement of turbulent convective heat transport due to vapour-bubble nucleation at the bottom plate of a cylindrical Rayleigh–Bénard sample (aspect ratio 1.00, diameter 8.8 cm) filled with liquid. Microcavities acted as nucleation sites, allowing for well-controlled bubble

  16. Influence of turbulence on bed load sediment transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumer, B. Mutlu; Chua, L.; Cheng, N. S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an experimental study on the influence of an external turbulence field on the bedload sediment transport in an open channel. The external turbulence was generated by: (1) with a horizontal pipe placed halfway through the depth, h; (2) with a series of grids......-bed experiments and the ripple-covered-bed experiments. In the former case, the flow in the presence of the turbulence generator was adjusted so that the mean bed shear stress was the same as in the case without the turbulence generator in order to single out the effect of the external turbulence on the sediment...... correlated with the sediment transport rate. The sediment transport increases markedly with increasing turbulence level....

  17. Turbulence and abnormal transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    1988-09-01

    Microinstabilities in linear and nonlinear tokamak plasmas were studied. A variational method based on the existence of a system of angular variables and action for the charged particles in the magnetic configuration of a tokamak is described. The corresponding functional, extremal in relation to the fluctuating electromagnetic field, is calculated analytically, taking into account the effects of the toroidal geometry. A numerical code, TORRID, was derived from these principles and the main instabilities, especially ion instabilities and microtearing, were studied linearly. Nonlinear methods were also applied to microtearing. Quasi-linear transport coefficients are derived from a principle of minimum entropy production. Thermal ionic conductivity and viscosity are calculated for an ionic turbulence [fr

  18. Turbulence and abnormal transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    1988-06-01

    The objective of this thesis is the study of plasma microinstabilities in linear and nonlinear tokamak regime. After a brief review of experimental results the theoretical tools used in this study are presented. A variational method founded on the existence of angular variables system and on action for charged particles in tokamak configurations is detailed. The correspondent functional extreme with regard to fluctuating electromagnetic field, is calculated analytically with taking into account the toroidal geometry. A numerical code, TORRID, has been constructed on this principle and the main instabilities, particularly ionic instabilities and microtearing, has been linearly studied. The most simple non linear methods are rewieved and applied at the microtearing instabilities. The quasilinear transport coefficients are deducted of an entropy minimum production principle. The ionic thermic conductivity and the viscosity are calculated for an ionic turbulence [fr

  19. Application of two-equation turbulence models to turbulent gas flow heated by a high heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    Heat transfer in heated turbulent gas flow is analyzed using two-equation turbulence models. Four kinds of two-equation models are examined; that is, k-epsilon model by Jones-Launder, k-w model by Wilcox-Traci, k-kL model by Rotta, k-ω model by Saffman-Wilcox. The results are compared with more than ten experiments by seven authors. The k-kL model proposed originally by Rotta and modified by the present author is found to give relatively the best results. It well predicts the decrease in the heat transfer coefficient found in the heated turbulent gas flow; however, it fails to predict the laminarization due to a strong heating. (author)

  20. An experimental investigation of turbulent flow heat transfer through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the turbulent flow heat transfer and to determine the pressure drop characteristics of air, flowing through a tube with insert. An insert of special geometry is used inside the tube. The test section is electrically heated, and air is allowed to flow as the working fluid ...

  1. Self-regulation of turbulence bursts and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriani, E; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Sarazin, Y; Lima, R

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between turbulent bursts and transport barriers is analyzed with a simplified model of interchange turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. The turbulent bursts spread into the transport barriers and, depending on the competing magnitude of the burst and stopping capability of the barrier, can burn through. Simulations of two models of transport barriers are presented: a hard barrier where interchange turbulence modes are stable in a prescribed region and a soft barrier with external plasma biasing. The response of the transport barriers to the non-linear perturbations of the turbulent bursts, addressed in a predator–prey approach, indicates that the barriers monitor an amplification factor of the turbulent bursts, with amplification smaller than one for most bursts and, in some cases, amplification factors that can significantly exceed unity. The weak barriers in corrugated profiles and magnetic structures, as well as the standard barriers, are characterized by these transmission properties, which then regulate the turbulent burst transport properties. The interplays of barriers and turbulent bursts are modeled as competing stochastic processes. For different classes of the probability density function (PDF) of these processes, one can predict the heavy tail properties of the bursts downstream from the barrier, either exponential for a leaky barrier, or with power laws for a tight barrier. The intrinsic probing of the transport barriers by the turbulent bursts thus gives access to the properties of the barriers. The main stochastic variables are the barrier width and the spreading distance of the turbulent bursts within the barrier, together with their level of correlation. One finds that in the case of a barrier with volumetric losses, such as radiation or particle losses as addressed in our present simulations, the stochastic model predicts a leaky behavior with an exponential PDF of escaping turbulent bursts in agreement with the simulation

  2. Prediction of turbulent heat transfer with surface blowing using a non-linear algebraic heat flux model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bataille, F.; Younis, B.A.; Bellettre, J.; Lallemand, A.

    2003-01-01

    The paper reports on the prediction of the effects of blowing on the evolution of the thermal and velocity fields in a flat-plate turbulent boundary layer developing over a porous surface. Closure of the time-averaged equations governing the transport of momentum and thermal energy is achieved using a complete Reynolds-stress transport model for the turbulent stresses and a non-linear, algebraic and explicit model for the turbulent heat fluxes. The latter model accounts explicitly for the dependence of the turbulent heat fluxes on the gradients of mean velocity. Results are reported for the case of a heated boundary layer which is first developed into equilibrium over a smooth impervious wall before encountering a porous section through which cooler fluid is continuously injected. Comparisons are made with LDA measurements for an injection rate of 1%. The reduction of the wall shear stress with increase in injection rate is obtained in the calculations, and the computed rates of heat transfer between the hot flow and the wall are found to agree well with the published data

  3. Intermittent heating of the solar corona by MHD turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    É. Buchlin

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available As the dissipation mechanisms considered for the heating of the solar corona would be sufficiently efficient only in the presence of small scales, turbulence is thought to be a key player in the coronal heating processes: it allows indeed to transfer energy from the large scales to these small scales. While Direct numerical simulations which have been performed to investigate the properties of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the corona have provided interesting results, they are limited to small Reynolds numbers. We present here a model of coronal loop turbulence involving shell-models and Alfvén waves propagation, allowing the much faster computation of spectra and turbulence statistics at higher Reynolds numbers. We also present first results of the forward-modelling of spectroscopic observables in the UV.

  4. Turbulent heavy liquid metal heat transfer along a heated rod in an annular cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefhalm, C.-H.; Tak, N.-I.; Piecha, H.; Stieglitz, R.

    2004-01-01

    Heavy liquid metals (HLM) are considered as coolant and spallation material in accelerator driven systems (ADS), because of their good molecular heat conductivity. This property leads to a separation of the spatial extension of thermal and viscous boundary layers. Commercially available computational fluid dynamic codes (CFD) assume an analogy of momentum and energy transfer, which is problematic for liquid metals flow. Therefore, benchmark experiments are required, in order to validate codes or modify existing models used therein. Within this article an experimental and numerical study of a thermally developing turbulent lead bismuth (PbBi) flow along a uniformly heated rod in a circular tube is presented. Local temperatures and velocity distributions are measured using thermocouples and Pitot tubes. The data are compared to simulation results computed with the CFX code package. The measured velocity profiles coincide nearly perfect with the simulation results. However, discrepancies up to 7% between the measured and computed temperatures appear. A minor part of the deviations can be explained by the imperfect experimental set-up. But, the measured shape of the thermal boundary is different to the calculated one, indicating the inadequateness of the presently used models describing the turbulent heat transport within the thermal boundary layer

  5. Reducing Turbulent Transport in Toroidal Configurations via Shaping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynick, H.E.; Pomphrey, N.; Xanthopoulos, P.

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in reducing turbulent transport in stellarators and tokamaks by 3D shaping using a stellarator optimization code in conjunction with a gyrokinetic code is presented. The original applications of the method focussed on ion temperature gradient transport in a quasi-axisymmetric stellarator design. Here, an examination of both other turbulence channels and other starting configurations is initiated. It is found that the designs evolved for transport from ion temperature gradient turbulence also display reduced transport from other transport channels whose modes are also stabilized by improved curvature, such as electron temperature gradient and ballooning modes. The optimizer is also applied to evolving from a tokamak, finding appreciable turbulence reduction for these devices as well. From these studies, improved understanding is obtained of why the deformations found by the optimizer are beneficial, and these deformations are related to earlier theoretical work in both stellarators and tokamaks.

  6. Acoustically enhanced heat transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ang, Kar M.; Hung, Yew Mun; Tan, Ming K., E-mail: tan.ming.kwang@monash.edu [School of Engineering, Monash University Malaysia, 47500 Bandar Sunway, Selangor (Malaysia); Yeo, Leslie Y. [Micro/Nanophysics Research Laboratory, RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC 3001 (Australia); Friend, James R. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We investigate the enhancement of heat transfer in the nucleate boiling regime by inducing high frequency acoustic waves (f ∼ 10{sup 6} Hz) on the heated surface. In the experiments, liquid droplets (deionized water) are dispensed directly onto a heated, vibrating substrate. At lower vibration amplitudes (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −9} m), the improved heat transfer is mainly due to the detachment of vapor bubbles from the heated surface and the induced thermal mixing. Upon increasing the vibration amplitude (ξ{sub s} ∼ 10{sup −8} m), the heat transfer becomes more substantial due to the rapid bursting of vapor bubbles happening at the liquid-air interface as a consequence of capillary waves travelling in the thin liquid film between the vapor bubble and the air. Further increases then lead to rapid atomization that continues to enhance the heat transfer. An acoustic wave displacement amplitude on the order of 10{sup −8} m with 10{sup 6} Hz order frequencies is observed to produce an improvement of up to 50% reduction in the surface temperature over the case without acoustic excitation.

  7. Momentum and scalar transport at the turbulent/non-turbulent interface of a jet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerweel, J.; Fukushima, C.; Pedersen, Jakob Martin

    2009-01-01

    and well-defined bounding interface between the turbulent and non-turbulent regions of flow. The jet carries a fluorescent dye measured with planar laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and the surface discontinuity in the scalar concentration is identified as the fluctuating turbulent jet interface. Thence...... velocity and mean scalar and a tendency towards a singularity in mean vorticity. These actual or asymptotic discontinuities are consistent with the conditional mean momentum and scalar transport equations integrated across the interface. Measurements of the fluxes of turbulent kinetic energy and enstrophy...

  8. Turbulence and transport in a magnetized argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pots, B.F.M.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study on turbulence and transport in the highly ionized argon plasma of a hollow cathode discharge is described. In order to determine the plasma parameters three standard diagnostics have been used, whilst two diagnostics have been developed to study the plasma turbulence. (Auth.)

  9. Density based topology optimization of turbulent flow heat transfer systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilgen, Sümer Bartug; Dilgen, Cetin Batur; Fuhrman, David R.

    2018-01-01

    The focus of this article is on topology optimization of heat sinks with turbulent forced convection. The goal is to demonstrate the extendibility, and the scalability of a previously developed fluid solver to coupled multi-physics and large 3D problems. The gradients of the objective and the con...... in the optimization process, while also demonstrating extension of the methodology to include coupling of heat transfer with turbulent flows.......The focus of this article is on topology optimization of heat sinks with turbulent forced convection. The goal is to demonstrate the extendibility, and the scalability of a previously developed fluid solver to coupled multi-physics and large 3D problems. The gradients of the objective...

  10. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Turbulent Flows by Blocked Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur YEMENİCİ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the heat transfer analyses over flat and blocked surfaces were carried out in turbulent flow under the influence of the block height. A constant-temperature hot wire anemometer was used to the velocity and turbulent intensity measurements, while temperature values were measured by copper-constantan thermocouples. The average Stanton numbers for block heights of 15 and 25 mm were higher than those of flat surface by %38 and %84, respectively. The results showed that the presence of the blocks increased the heat transfer and the enhancement rose with block heights

  11. Numerical prediction of flow, heat transfer, turbulence and combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Spalding, D Brian; Pollard, Andrew; Singhal, Ashok K

    1983-01-01

    Numerical Prediction of Flow, Heat Transfer, Turbulence and Combustion: Selected Works of Professor D. Brian Spalding focuses on the many contributions of Professor Spalding on thermodynamics. This compilation of his works is done to honor the professor on the occasion of his 60th birthday. Relatively, the works contained in this book are selected to highlight the genius of Professor Spalding in this field of interest. The book presents various research on combustion, heat transfer, turbulence, and flows. His thinking on separated flows paved the way for the multi-dimensional modeling of turbu

  12. Instabilities, turbulence and transport in a magnetized plasma; Instabilites, turbulence et transport dans un plasma magnetise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce the main processes that occur in a magnetized plasma. During the last 2 decades, the understanding of turbulence has made great progress but analytical formulas and simulations are far to produce reliable predictions. The values of transport coefficients in a tokamak plasma exceed by far those predicted by the theory of collisional transport. This phenomenon is called abnormal transport and might be due to plasma fluctuations. An estimation of turbulent fluxes derived from the levels of fluctuations, is proposed. A flow description of plasma allows the understanding of most micro-instabilities. The ballooning representation deals with instabilities in a toric geometry. 3 factors play an important role to stabilize plasmas: density pinch, magnetic shear and speed shear. The flow model of plasma gives an erroneous value for the stability threshold, this is due to a bad description of the resonant interaction between wave and particle. As for dynamics, flow models can be improved by adding dissipative terms so that the linear response nears the kinetic response. The kinetic approach is more accurate but is complex because of the great number of dimensions involved. (A.C.)

  13. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  14. Statistical properties of transport in plasma turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Garcia, O.E.; Nielsen, A.H.

    2004-01-01

    The statistical properties of the particle flux in different types of plasma turbulence models are numerically investigated using probability distribution functions (PDFs). The physics included in the models range from two-dimensional drift wave turbulence to three-dimensional MHD dynamics...

  15. Experimental investigation of turbulent mixed convection in the wake of a heated sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suckow, D.

    1993-11-01

    The axisymmetric wake of a heated sphere under conditions of turbulent mixed convection is investigated in the water test section FLUTMIK. The sphere is located in a vertical channel with forced convective upward flow. The influence of buoyancy forces to the flow field is studied by comparison with the unheated wake. The theoretical fundamentals describing turbulent flows and different versions of the k-ε turbulence model extended by buoyancy terms are described in detail. The quantities to be determined experimentally are derived. The temperature and the components of the velocity vector in axial and radial directions are measured simultaneously by means of a thermocouple probe and a two component, two color laser Doppler anemometer. The flow quantities are determined at axial distances between 5 and 106 sphere diameters. The functional principle and the basis of the laser Doppler anemometer are explained. The mean velocity, the mean temperature, the intensities of their fluctuations and the turbulent exchange quantities of momentum and heat transport are calculated. The decay laws of the quantities along the axis of the channel and the radial profiles are indicated and discussed. The applicability of the experimental results of the axisymmetric buoyancy influenced turbulent wake with respect to the turbulence models presented are shown. (orig.) [de

  16. Progress towards modeling tokamak boundary plasma turbulence and understanding its role in setting divertor heat flux widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Xu, X. Q.; Xia, T. Y.; Li, N. M.; Porkolab, M.; Edlund, E.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J.; Hughes, J. W.; Ye, M. Y.; Wan, Y. X.

    2018-05-01

    The heat flux distributions on divertor targets in H-mode plasmas are serious concerns for future devices. We seek to simulate the tokamak boundary plasma turbulence and heat transport in the edge localized mode-suppressed regimes. The improved BOUT++ model shows that not only Ip but also the radial electric field Er plays an important role on the turbulence behavior and sets the heat flux width. Instead of calculating Er from the pressure gradient term (diamagnetic Er), it is calculated from the plasma transport equations with the sheath potential in the scrape-off layer and the plasma density and temperature profiles inside the separatrix from the experiment. The simulation results with the new Er model have better agreement with the experiment than using the diamagnetic Er model: (1) The electromagnetic turbulence in enhanced Dα H-mode shows the characteristics of quasi-coherent modes (QCMs) and broadband turbulence. The mode spectra are in agreement with the phase contrast imaging data and almost has no change in comparison to the cases which use the diamagnetic Er model; (2) the self-consistent boundary Er is needed for the turbulence simulations to get the consistent heat flux width with the experiment; (3) the frequencies of the QCMs are proportional to Er, while the divertor heat flux widths are inversely proportional to Er; and (4) the BOUT++ turbulence simulations yield a similar heat flux width to the experimental Eich scaling law and the prediction from the Goldston heuristic drift model.

  17. Fast Propagation in Fluid Transport Models with Evolution of Turbulence Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2012-07-01

    This report compiles and extends two works on models that reproduce the experimental facts of non local transport and pulse propagation in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The works are based on fluid transport models, originally designed to explain the formation of edge or internal transport barriers, that include fast evolution equations for the particle and heat fluxes. The heating of the plasma core in response to a sudden edge cooling or the propagation of turbulent fronts around transport barriers are a consequence of the competing roles of linear drive and non-linear reduction of the turbulent fluxes. Possibilities to use the models to interpret TJ-II plasmas are discussed. (Author) 62 refs.

  18. Fast Propagation in Fluid Transport Models with Evolution of Turbulence Saturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Bruna, D.

    2012-01-01

    This report compiles and extends two works on models that reproduce the experimental facts of non local transport and pulse propagation in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The works are based on fluid transport models, originally designed to explain the formation of edge or internal transport barriers, that include fast evolution equations for the particle and heat fluxes. The heating of the plasma core in response to a sudden edge cooling or the propagation of turbulent fronts around transport barriers are a consequence of the competing roles of linear drive and non-linear reduction of the turbulent fluxes. Possibilities to use the models to interpret TJ-II plasmas are discussed. (Author) 62 refs.

  19. Fast Heat Pulse Propagation by Turbulence Spreading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Mantica, Paola

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of a cold pulse initiated by edge cooling in JET is compared to propagation of the heat wave originating from a modulation of the heating source roughly at mid radius. It is found that the propagation of the cold pulse is by far faster than what could be predicted on the basis of ...

  20. Impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Grandgirard, V [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Dif-Pradalier, G [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Fleurence, E [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bertrand, P [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Besse, N [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Crouseilles, N [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Sonnendruecker, E [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Latu, G [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France); Violard, E [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2006-12-15

    The impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas is explored by means of various kinetic models. Zonal flows are found to lead to a non-linear upshift of turbulent transport in a 3D kinetic model for interchange turbulence. Such a transition is absent from fluid simulations, performed with the same numerical tool, which also predict a much larger transport. The discrepancy cannot be explained by zonal flows only, despite they being overdamped in fluids. Indeed, some difference remains, although reduced, when they are artificially suppressed. Zonal flows are also reported to trigger transport barriers in a 4D drift-kinetic model for slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence. The density gradient acts as a source drive for zonal flows, while their curvature back stabilizes the turbulence. Finally, 5D simulations of toroidal ITG modes with the global and full-f GYSELA code require the equilibrium density function to depend on the motion invariants only. If not, the generated strong mean flows can completely quench turbulent transport.

  1. Impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarazin, Y; Grandgirard, V; Dif-Pradalier, G; Fleurence, E; Garbet, X; Ghendrih, Ph; Bertrand, P; Besse, N; Crouseilles, N; Sonnendruecker, E; Latu, G; Violard, E

    2006-01-01

    The impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas is explored by means of various kinetic models. Zonal flows are found to lead to a non-linear upshift of turbulent transport in a 3D kinetic model for interchange turbulence. Such a transition is absent from fluid simulations, performed with the same numerical tool, which also predict a much larger transport. The discrepancy cannot be explained by zonal flows only, despite they being overdamped in fluids. Indeed, some difference remains, although reduced, when they are artificially suppressed. Zonal flows are also reported to trigger transport barriers in a 4D drift-kinetic model for slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence. The density gradient acts as a source drive for zonal flows, while their curvature back stabilizes the turbulence. Finally, 5D simulations of toroidal ITG modes with the global and full-f GYSELA code require the equilibrium density function to depend on the motion invariants only. If not, the generated strong mean flows can completely quench turbulent transport

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of heat transfer in a turbulent flume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergant, R.; Tiselj, I.

    2001-01-01

    Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) can be used for the description of turbulent heat transfer in the fluid at low Reynolds numbers. DNS means precise solving of Navier-Stoke's equations without any extra turbulent models. DNS should be able to describe all relevant length scales and time scales in observed turbulent flow. The largest length scale is actually dimension of system and the smallest length and time scale is equal to Kolmogorov scale. In the present work simulations of fully developed turbulent velocity and temperature fields were performed in a turbulent flume (open channel) with pseudo-spectral approach at Reynolds number 2670 (friction Reynolds number 171) and constant Prandtl number 5.4, considering the fluid temperature as a passive scalar. Two ideal thermal boundary conditions were taken into account on the heated wall. The first one was an ideal isothermal boundary condition and the second one an ideal isoflux boundary condition. We observed different parameters like mean temperature and velocity, fluctuations of temperature and velocity, and auto-correlation functions.(author)

  3. Zonal flow dynamics and control of turbulent transport in stellarators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, P; Mischchenko, A; Helander, P; Sugama, H; Watanabe, T-H

    2011-12-09

    The relation between magnetic geometry and the level of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven turbulence in stellarators is explored through gyrokinetic theory and direct linear and nonlinear simulations. It is found that the ITG radial heat flux is sensitive to details of the magnetic configuration that can be understood in terms of the linear behavior of zonal flows. The results throw light on the question of how the optimization of neoclassical confinement is related to the reduction of turbulence.

  4. The influence of streamwise vortices on turbulent heat transfer in rectangular ducts with various aspect ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hang Seok; Park, Tae Seon

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► With changing aspect ratio, the effect of secondary flows on the turbulent heat transfer is scrutinized by a LES. ► The conditional sampling technique of instantaneous near-wall streamwise vortices is developed. ► Clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating streamwise vortices are sampled and discussed with the wall heat transfer. ► The hot-sweep motions of CW and CCW vortices clearly appear with increasing aspect ratio. -- Abstract: The effect of aspect ratio of rectangular duct on the turbulent flow and heat transfer is very important for its engineering applications. But the turbulent thermal fields have not been fundamentally scrutinized in spite of its engineering significance especially for cooling device. Hence, in the present study, large eddy simulation is applied to the turbulent flow and heat transfer in rectangular ducts with varying aspect ratio. The turbulent statistics of the flow and thermal quantities are calculated and the characteristics of wall Nusselt number are investigated for each rectangular duct. Especially, to scrutinize near-wall streamwise vortices, a conditional sampling technique is developed and adopted. Clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating streamwise vortices are sampled and the probability density function of the vortex circulation Reynolds number and wall Nusselt number are calculated. From the results, the time-averaged secondary flow caused by instantaneous vortical motions has a great effect on the heat and momentum transport of the flow in the rectangular ducts. Hence, the wall Nusselt number is enhanced near the downwash flow region of the secondary flow. However, with increasing the aspect ratio, the effects of the hot-sweep flow of the clockwise and counter-clockwise rotating vortices become equally dominant near the wall normal bisector of the ducts. During time averaging process, these two counter-rotating vortices are canceled out each other diminishing a secondary flow but they still enhance the

  5. Effect of turbulence models on predicting convective heat transfer to hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A variety of turbulence models were used to perform numerical simulations of heat transfer for hydrocarbon fuel flowing upward and downward through uniformly heated vertical pipes at supercritical pressure. Inlet temperatures varied from 373 K to 663 K, with heat flux ranging from 300 kW/m2 to 550 kW/m2. Comparative analyses between predicted and experimental results were used to evaluate the ability of turbulence models to respond to variable thermophysical properties of hydrocarbon fuel at supercritical pressure. It was found that the prediction performance of turbulence models is mainly determined by the damping function, which enables them to respond differently to local flow conditions. Although prediction accuracy for experimental results varied from condition to condition, the shear stress transport (SST and launder and sharma models performed better than all other models used in the study. For very small buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration due to variations in density lead to the impairment of heat transfer occurring in the vicinity of pseudo-critical points, and heat transfer was enhanced at higher temperatures through the combined action of four thermophysical properties: density, viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat. For very large buoyancy-influenced runs, the thermal-induced acceleration effect was over predicted by the LS and AB models.

  6. Validating modeled turbulent heat fluxes across large freshwater surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofgren, B. M.; Fujisaki-Manome, A.; Gronewold, A.; Anderson, E. J.; Fitzpatrick, L.; Blanken, P.; Spence, C.; Lenters, J. D.; Xiao, C.; Charusambot, U.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulent fluxes of latent and sensible heat are important physical processes that influence the energy and water budgets of the Great Lakes. Validation and improvement of bulk flux algorithms to simulate these turbulent heat fluxes are critical for accurate prediction of hydrodynamics, water levels, weather, and climate over the region. Here we consider five heat flux algorithms from several model systems; the Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model, the Weather Research and Forecasting model, and the Large Lake Thermodynamics Model, which are used in research and operational environments and concentrate on different aspects of the Great Lakes' physical system, but interface at the lake surface. The heat flux algorithms were isolated from each model and driven by meteorological data from over-lake stations in the Great Lakes Evaporation Network. The simulation results were compared with eddy covariance flux measurements at the same stations. All models show the capacity to the seasonal cycle of the turbulent heat fluxes. Overall, the Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment algorithm in FVCOM has the best agreement with eddy covariance measurements. Simulations with the other four algorithms are overall improved by updating the parameterization of roughness length scales of temperature and humidity. Agreement between modelled and observed fluxes notably varied with geographical locations of the stations. For example, at the Long Point station in Lake Erie, observed fluxes are likely influenced by the upwind land surface while the simulations do not take account of the land surface influence, and therefore the agreement is worse in general.

  7. Computation of turbulent flow and heat transfer in subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slagter, W.

    1979-01-01

    This research is carried out in order to provide information on the thermohydraulic behaviour of fast reactor subassemblies. The research work involves the development of versatile computation methods and the evaluation of combined theoretical and experimental work on fluid flow and heat transfer in fuel rod bundles. The computation method described here rests on the application of the distributed parameter approach. The conditions considered cover steady, turbulent flow and heat transfer of incompressible fluids in bundles of bare rods. Throughout 1978 main efforts were given to the development of the VITESSE program and to the validation of the hydrodynamic part of the code. In its present version the VITESSE program is applicable to predict the fully developed turbulent flow and heat transfer in the subchannels of a bundle with bare rods. In this paper the main features of the code are described as well as the present status of development

  8. Radiative heat transfer in a heat generating and turbulently convecting fluid layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Chan, S.H.; Chawla, T.C.; Cho, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The coupled problem of radiative transport and turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated, horizontal gray fluid medium, bounded from above by a rigid, isothermal wall and below by a rigid, adiabatic wall, is investigated analytically. An approximate method based upon the boundary layer approach is employed to obtain the dependence of heat transfer at the upper wall on the principal parameters of the problem, which, for moderate Prandtl number, are the Rayleigh number, Ra, the optical thickness, KL, and the conduction-radiation coupling parameter, N. Also obtained in this study is the behaviour of the thermal boundary layer at the upper wall. At large kL, the contribution of thermal radiation to heat transfer in the layer is found to be negligible for N > 10, moderate for N approximately 1, and overwhelming for N < 0.1. However, at small kL, thermal radiation is found to be important only for N < 0.01. While a higher level of turbulence results in a thinner boundary layer, a larger effect of radiation is found to result in a thicker one. Thus, in the presence of strong thermal radiation, a much larger value of Ra is required for the boundary layer approach to remain valid. Under severe radiation conditions, no boundary layer flow regime is found to exist even at very high Rayleigh numbers. Accordingly, the ranges of applicability of the present results are determined and the approximate method justified. In particular, the validity of the present analysis is tested in three limiting cases, ie those of kL → infinity, N → infinity, and Ra → infinity, and is further confirmed by comparison with the numerical solution (author)

  9. Performance evaluation of RANS-based turbulence models in simulating a honeycomb heat sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasi, Abdussamet; Ozsipahi, Mustafa; Sahin, Bayram; Gunes, Hasan

    2017-07-01

    As well-known, there is not a universal turbulence model that can be used to model all engineering problems. There are specific applications for each turbulence model that make it appropriate to use, and it is vital to select an appropriate model and wall function combination that matches the physics of the problem considered. Therefore, in this study, performance of six well-known Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes ( RANS) based turbulence models which are the Standard k {{-}} ɛ, the Renormalized Group k- ɛ, the Realizable k- ɛ, the Reynolds Stress Model, the k- ω and the Shear Stress Transport k- ω and accompanying wall functions which are the standard, the non-equilibrium and the enhanced are evaluated via 3D simulation of a honeycomb heat sink. The CutCell method is used to generate grid for the part including heat sink called test section while a hexahedral mesh is employed to discretize to inlet and outlet sections. A grid convergence study is conducted for verification process while experimental data and well-known correlations are used to validate the numerical results. Prediction of pressure drop along the test section, mean base plate temperature of the heat sink and temperature at the test section outlet are regarded as a measure of the performance of employed models and wall functions. The results indicate that selection of turbulence models and wall functions has a great influence on the results and, therefore, need to be selected carefully. Hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the honeycomb heat sink can be determined in a reasonable accuracy using RANS- based turbulence models provided that a suitable turbulence model and wall function combination is selected.

  10. Magnetic turbulent electron transport in a reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenberg, K.; Moses, R.

    1990-01-01

    A model of magnetic turbulent electron transport is presented. The model, based on the thermal conduction theory of Rechester and Rosenbluth, entails a Boltzmann description of electron dynamics in the long mean-free-path limit and quantitatively describes the salient features of superthermal electron measurements in the RFP edge plasma. Included are predictions of the mean superthermal electron energy, current density, and power flux asymmetry. A discussion of the transport model, the assumptions implicit in the model, and the relevance of this work to more general issue of magnetic turbulent transport in toroidal systems is presented. 32 refs., 3 figs

  11. Compressibility and rotation effects on transport suppression in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizawa, A.

    1996-01-01

    Compressibility and rotation effects on turbulent transports in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows under arbitrary mean field are investigated using a Markovianized two-scale statistical approach. Some new aspects of MHD turbulence are pointed out in close relation to plasma compressibility. Special attention is paid to the turbulent electromotive force, which plays a central role in the generation of magnetic and velocity fluctuations. In addition to plasma rotation, the interaction between compressibility and magnetic fields is shown to bring a few factors suppressing MHD fluctuations and, eventually, density and temperature transports, even in the presence of steep mean density and temperature gradients. This finding is discussed in the context of the turbulence-suppression mechanism in the tokamak close-quote s high-confinement modes. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  12. Evidence for strange kinetics in Hasegawa-Mima turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annibaldi, S.V.; Drury, L.O'C.; Manfredi, G.; Dendy, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the transport of test particle ensembles moving in turbulent electrostatic fields governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) equation. As a result of the interplay of the linear dispersive term and the nonlinear term in the HM equation, 'strange kinetics' emerge: the poloidal particle transport undergoes a qualitative transition from diffusive, through supradiffusive, to ballistic. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  13. Plasma Turbulence Suppression and Transport Barrier Formation by Externally Driven RF Waves in Spherical Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.C.; Komoshvili, K.

    2002-01-01

    Turbulent transport of heat and particles is the principle obstacle confronting controlled fusion today. Thus, we investigate quantitatively the suppression of turbulence and formation of transport barriers in spherical tokamaks by sheared electric fields generated by externally driven radio-frequency (RF) waves, in the frequency range o)A n o] < o)ci (e)A and o)ci are the Alfven and ion cyclotron frequencies). This investigation consists of the solution of the full-wave equation for a spherical tokamak in the presence of externally driven fast waves and the evaluation of the power dissipation by the mode-converted Alfven waves. This in turn, provides a radial flow shear responsible for the suppression of plasma turbulence. Thus, a strongly non-linear equation for the radial sheared electric field is solved, the turbulent transport suppression rate is evaluated and compared with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability increment. For illustration, the case of START-like device (Sykes 2000) is treated. Thus, (i) the exact D-shape cross-section is considered; (ii) additional kinetic (including Landau damping) and particle trapping effects are added to the resistive two-fluid dielectric tensor operator; (iii) a finite extension antenna located on the low-field-side of the plasma is considered; (iv) a rigorous 2.5 finite elements numerical code (Sewell 1993) is used; and (v) the turbulence and transport barrier generated as a result of wave-plasma interaction is evaluated

  14. Turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Noda, Nobuaki

    2008-01-01

    The turbulent heat transfer coefficients for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 21 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.5 to 353.4 K), the inlet pressures (P in =810 to 1014 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), τ=10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured by an experimental water loop. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3, 6 and 9 mm), heated lengths (L=32.7 to 100 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=5.51 to 33.3) and wall thickness (δ=0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mm) with surface roughness (Ra=0.40 to 0.78 μm) are used in this work. The turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by other workers' correlations for the turbulent heat transfer. The influence of Reynolds number (Re), Prandtl number (Pr), Dynamic viscosity (μ) and L/d on the turbulent heat transfer is investigated into details and, the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data. The correlation can describe the turbulent heat transfer coefficients obtained in this work for the wide range of the temperature difference between heater inner surface temperature and average bulk liquid temperature (ΔT L =5 to 140 K) with d=3, 6 and 9 mm, L=32.7 to 100 mm and u=4.0 to 21 m/s within ±15%, difference. (author)

  15. Turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Noda, Nobuaki

    2007-01-01

    The turbulent heat transfer coefficients for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 21 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.5 to 353.4 K), the inlet pressures (P in =810 to 1014 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), τ=10, 20 and 33.3 s) are systematically measured by the experimental water loop. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3, 6 and 9 mm), heated lengths (L=32.7 to 100 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=5.51 to 33.3) and wall thicknesses (δ=0.3, 0.4 and 0.5 mm) with surface roughness (Ra=0.40 to 0.78 μm) are used in this work. The turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by other workers' correlations for the turbulent heat transfer. The influences of Reynolds number (Re), Prandtl number (Pr), Dynamic viscosity (μ) and L/d on the turbulent heat transfer are investigated into details and, the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data. The correlation can describe the turbulent heat transfer coefficients obtained in this work for wide range of the temperature difference between heater inner surface temperature and average bulk liquid temperature (ΔT L =5 to 140 K) with d=3, 6 and 9 mm, L=32.7 to 100 mm and u=4.0 to 21 m/s within ±15% difference. (author)

  16. A turbulent transport network model in MULTIFLUX coupled with TOUGH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danko, G.; Bahrami, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-01-01

    A new numerical method is described for the fully iterated, conjugate solution of two discrete submodels, involving (a) a transport network model for heat, moisture, and airflows in a high-permeability, air-filled cavity; and (b) a variably saturated fractured porous medium. The transport network submodel is an integrated-parameter, computational fluid dynamics solver, describing the thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the flow channel system of the cavity with laminar or turbulent flow and convective heat and mass transport, using MULTIFLUX. The porous medium submodel, using TOUGH2, is a solver for the heat and mass transport in the fractured rock mass. The new model solution extends the application fields of TOUGH2 by integrating it with turbulent flow and transport in a discrete flow network system. We present demonstrational results for a nuclear waste repository application at Yucca Mountain with the most realistic model assumptions and input parameters including the geometrical layout of the nuclear spent fuel and waste with variable heat load for the individual containers. The MULTIFLUX and TOUGH2 model elements are fully iterated, applying a programmed reprocessing of the Numerical Transport Code Functionalization model-element in an automated Outside Balance Iteration loop. The natural, convective airflow field and the heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during postclosure are explicitly solved in the new model. The results demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the air circulation patterns and all transport modes are strongly affected by the heat and moisture transport processes in the surrounding rock, justifying the need for a coupled, fully iterated model solution such as the one presented in the paper.

  17. Computational simulation of turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated square cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Camila Braga; Su, Jian; Niceno, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to analyze the turbulent natural convection in a volumetrically heated fluid with similar characteristics of an oxide layer of a molten core in the lower head of the pressure vessel. The simulations were carried out in a square cavity with isothermal walls, for Rayleigh numbers (Ra) ranging from 10 9 to 10 11 . Different turbulence models based on Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied, such as the standard k - ε, low-Reynolds-k - ε, and Shear Stress Transport (SST), using the open-source Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code - Open FOAM (Open Field Operation and Manipulation). The results of the three turbulence models were compared versus the results of experimental correlations and other authors’ simulations, and the conclusion was that the most promising model proves to be the SST, due to its accuracy and robustness. (author)

  18. Transitional and turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2010-08-01

    We report on our direct numerical simulation of an incompressible, nominally zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layer from momentum thickness Reynolds number 80-1950. Heat transfer between the constant-temperature solid surface and the free-stream is also simulated with molecular Prandtl number Pr=1. Skin-friction coefficient and other boundary layer parameters follow the Blasius solutions prior to the onset of turbulent spots. Throughout the entire flat-plate, the ratio of Stanton number and skin-friction St/Cf deviates from the exact Reynolds analogy value of 0.5 by less than 1.5%. Mean velocity and Reynolds stresses agree with experimental data over an extended turbulent region downstream of transition. Normalized rms wall-pressure fluctuation increases gradually with the streamwise growth of the turbulent boundary layer. Wall shear stress fluctuation, τw,rms'+, on the other hand, remains constant at approximately 0.44 over the range, 800spots are tightly packed with numerous hairpin vortices. With the advection and merging of turbulent spots, these young isolated hairpin forests develop into the downstream turbulent region. Isosurfaces of temperature up to Reθ=1900 are found to display well-resolved signatures of hairpin vortices, which indicates the persistence of the hairpin forests.

  19. Turbulent heat transfer studies in annulus with inner cylinder rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzay, T.M.; Scott, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental investigations of turbulent heat transfer are made in a large-gap annulus with both rotating and nonrotating inner cylinder. The vertical annular channel has an electrically heated outer wall; the inner wall i thermally and electrically insulated. The axial air flow is allowed to develop before rotation and heating are imparted. The resulting temperature fields are investigated using thermocouple probes located near the channel exit. The wall heat flux, wall axial temperature development, and radial temperature profiles are measured. For each axial Reynolds number, three heat flux rates are used. Excellent correlation is established between rotational and nonrotational Nusselt number. The proper correlation parameter is a physical quantity characterizing the flow helix. This parameter is the inverse of the ratio of axial travel of the flow helix in terms of hydraulic diameter, per half revolution of the spinning wall

  20. Turbulence model for melt pool natural convection heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, K.M.; Patankar, S.V.

    1994-01-01

    Under severe reactor accident scenarios, pools of molten core material may form in the reactor core or in the hemispherically shaped lower plenum of the reactor vessel. Such molten pools are internally heated due to the radioactive decay heat that gives rise to buoyant flows in the molten pool. The flow in such pools is strongly influenced by the turbulent mixing because the expected Rayleigh numbers under accidents scenarios are very high. The variation of the local heat flux over the boundaries of the molten pools are important in determining the subsequent melt progression behavior. This study reports results of an ongoing effort towards providing a well validated mathematical model for the prediction of buoyant flow and heat transfer in internally heated pool under conditions expected in severe accident scenarios

  1. CLOSED-FIELD CORONAL HEATING DRIVEN BY WAVE TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, Cooper; Lionello, Roberto; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A [Predictive Science Incorporated, 9990 Mesa Rim Rd. Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Velli, Marco, E-mail: cdowns@predsci.com [EPSS, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    To simulate the energy balance of coronal plasmas on macroscopic scales, we often require the specification of the coronal heating mechanism in some functional form. To go beyond empirical formulations and to build a more physically motivated heating function, we investigate the wave-turbulence-driven (WTD) phenomenology for the heating of closed coronal loops. Our implementation is designed to capture the large-scale propagation, reflection, and dissipation of wave turbulence along a loop. The parameter space of this model is explored by solving the coupled WTD and hydrodynamic evolution in 1D for an idealized loop. The relevance to a range of solar conditions is also established by computing solutions for over one hundred loops extracted from a realistic 3D coronal field. Due to the implicit dependence of the WTD heating model on loop geometry and plasma properties along the loop and at the footpoints, we find that this model can significantly reduce the number of free parameters when compared to traditional empirical heating models, and still robustly describe a broad range of quiet-Sun and active region conditions. The importance of the self-reflection term in producing relatively short heating scale heights and thermal nonequilibrium cycles is also discussed.

  2. Turbulence Spreading into Linearly Stable Zone and Transport Scaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, T.S.; Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2003-01-01

    We study the simplest problem of turbulence spreading corresponding to the spatio-temporal propagation of a patch of turbulence from a region where it is locally excited to a region of weaker excitation, or even local damping. A single model equation for the local turbulence intensity I(x, t) includes the effects of local linear growth and damping, spatially local nonlinear coupling to dissipation and spatial scattering of turbulence energy induced by nonlinear coupling. In the absence of dissipation, the front propagation into the linearly stable zone occurs with the property of rapid progression at small t, followed by slower subdiffusive progression at late times. The turbulence radial spreading into the linearly stable zone reduces the turbulent intensity in the linearly unstable zone, and introduces an additional dependence on the rho* is always equal to rho i/a to the turbulent intensity and the transport scaling. These are in broad, semi-quantitative agreements with a number of global gyrokinetic simulation results with zonal flows and without zonal flows. The front propagation stops when the radial flux of fluctuation energy from the linearly unstable region is balanced by local dissipation in the linearly stable region

  3. Turbulent transport in 2D collisionless guide field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, P. A.; Büchner, J.; Kilian, P.

    2017-02-01

    Transport in hot and dilute, i.e., collisionless, astrophysical and space, plasmas is called "anomalous." This transport is due to the interaction between the particles and the self-generated turbulence by their collective interactions. The anomalous transport has very different and not well known properties compared to the transport due to binary collisions, dominant in colder and denser plasmas. Because of its relevance for astrophysical and space plasmas, we explore the excitation of turbulence in current sheets prone to component- or guide-field reconnection, a process not well understood yet. This configuration is typical for stellar coronae, and it is created in the laboratory for which a 2.5D geometry applies. In our analysis, in addition to the immediate vicinity of the X-line, we also include regions outside and near the separatrices. We analyze the anomalous transport properties by using 2.5D Particle-in-Cell code simulations. We split off the mean slow variation (in contrast to the fast turbulent fluctuations) of the macroscopic observables and determine the main transport terms of the generalized Ohm's law. We verify our findings by comparing with the independently determined slowing-down rate of the macroscopic currents (due to a net momentum transfer from particles to waves) and with the transport terms obtained by the first order correlations of the turbulent fluctuations. We find that the turbulence is most intense in the "low density" separatrix region of guide-field reconnection. It is excited by streaming instabilities, is mainly electrostatic and "patchy" in space, and so is the associated anomalous transport. Parts of the energy exchange between turbulence and particles are reversible and quasi-periodic. The remaining irreversible anomalous resistivity can be parametrized by an effective collision rate ranging from the local ion-cyclotron to the lower-hybrid frequency. The contributions to the parallel and the perpendicular (to the magnetic

  4. Turbulence Modeling and Computation of Turbine Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Luo, J.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to develop improved turbulence models for the computation of complex flows through turbomachinery passages, including the effects of streamline curvature, heat transfer and secondary flows. Advanced turbulence models are crucial for accurate prediction of rocket engine flows, due to existance of very large extra strain rates, such as strong streamline curvature. Numerical simulation of the turbulent flows in strongly curved ducts, including two 180-deg ducts, one 90-deg duct and a strongly concave curved turbulent boundary layer have been carried out with Reynolds stress models (RSM) and algebraic Reynolds stress models (ARSM). An improved near-wall pressure-strain correlation has been developed for capturing the anisotropy of turbulence in the concave region. A comparative study of two modes of transition in gas turbine, the by-pass transition and the separation-induced transition, has been carried out with several representative low-Reynolds number (LRN) k-epsilon models. Effects of blade surface pressure gradient, freestream turbulence and Reynolds number on the blade boundary layer development, and particularly the inception of transition are examined in detail. The present study indicates that the turbine blade transition, in the presence of high freestream turbulence, is predicted well with LRN k-epsilon models employed. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes procedure developed by the present authors has been used to compute the three-dimensional viscous flow through the turbine nozzle passage of a single stage turbine. A low Reynolds number k-epsilon model and a zonal k-epsilon/ARSM (algebraic Reynolds stress model) are utilized for turbulence closure. An assessment of the performance of the turbulence models has been carried out. The two models are found to provide similar predictions for the mean flow parameters, although slight improvement in the prediction of some secondary flow quantities has been obtained by the

  5. Transported PDF Modeling of Nonpremixed Turbulent CO/H-2/N-2 Jet Flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, xinyu; Haworth, D. C.; Huckaby, E. David

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (“syngas”) flames are simulated using a transported composition probability density function (PDF) method. A consistent hybrid Lagrangian particle/Eulerian mesh algorithm is used to solve the modeled PDF transport equation. The model includes standard k–ϵ turbulence, gradient transport for scalars, and Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST) mixing. Sensitivities of model results to variations in the turbulence model, the treatment of radiation heat transfer, the choice of chemical mechanism, and the PDF mixing model are explored. A baseline model reproduces the measured mean and rms temperature, major species, and minor species profiles reasonably well, and captures the scaling that is observed in the experiments. Both our results and the literature suggest that further improvements can be realized with adjustments in the turbulence model, the radiation heat transfer model, and the chemical mechanism. Although radiation effects are relatively small in these flames, consideration of radiation is important for accurate NO prediction. Chemical mechanisms that have been developed specifically for fuels with high concentrations of CO and H{sub 2} perform better than a methane mechanism that was not designed for this purpose. It is important to account explicitly for turbulence–chemistry interactions, although the details of the mixing model do not make a large difference in the results, within reasonable limits.

  6. Interaction between sheared flows and turbulent transport in magnetized fusion-grade plasmas; Interaction entre ecoulements cisailles et transport turbulent dans les plasmas de fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leconte, M.

    2008-11-15

    The H confinement regime is set when the heating power reaches a threshold value P{sub c} and is linked to the formation of a transport barrier in the edge region of the plasma. Such a barrier is characterized by a high pressure gradient and is submitted to ELM (edge localized mode) instabilities. ELM instabilities trigger violent quasi-periodical ejections of matter and heat that induce quasi-periodical relaxations of the transport barrier called relaxation oscillations. In this work we studied the interaction between sheared flows and turbulence in fusion plasmas. In particular, we studied the complex dynamics of a transport barrier and we show through a simulation that resonant magnetic perturbations could control relaxation oscillations without a significant loss of confinement

  7. Turbulence modeling and surface heat transfer in a stagnation flow region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Yeh, F. C.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis for the turbulent flow field and the effect of freestream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate of a stagnation flow is presented. The emphasis is on modeling and its augmentation of surface heat transfer rate. The flow field considered is the region near the forward stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a uniform turbulent mean flow.

  8. Heat transport the cold way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A novel system for long-distance heat transport is being born in the 'Kernforschungsanlage Juelich' with the project being called 'Nukleare Fernenergie' (nuclear district energy). The project is also known as 'EVA/ADAM' [EVA = Einzelrohr-Versuchs-Anlage (single tube test facility); ADAM = Anlage mit Drei Adiabaten Methanisierungsreaktoren (plant provided with three adiabate methanising reactors)] and is based in principle on transport of energy in chemical bond within a closed loop. In the 60ies already this development was discussed both in the 'Kernforschungsanlage Juelich' and in the 'Rheinische Braunkohlenwerke' independent of each other. In 1975 these two organizations concluded a co-operation contract. (orig.) [de

  9. Turbulent transport in the MST reversed-field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempel, T.D.; Almagri, A.F.; Assadi, S.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Hokin, S.A.; Prager, S.C.; Sarff, J.S.; Shen, W.; Sidikman, K.L.; Spragins, C.W.; Sprott, J.C.; Stoneking, M.R.; Zita, E.J.

    1991-11-01

    Measurements of edge turbulence and the associated transport are ongoing in the Madison Symmetric Torus (R = 1.5 m, a = 0.52 m) reversed-field pinch using magnetic and electrostatic probes. Magnetic fluctuations are dominated by m = 1 and n ∼ 2R/a tearing modes. Particle losses induced by magnetic field fluctuations have been found to be ambipolar ( parallel B r > = O). Electrostatic fluctuations are broadband and turbulent, with mode widths δm ∼ 3--7 and δn ∼70--150. Particle, parallel current, and energy transport arising from coherent motion with the fluctuating ExB drift has been measured. Particle transport via this channel is comparable to the total particle loss from MST. Energy transport (from phi >/B o ) due to electrostatic fluctuations is relatively small, and parallel current transport (from parallel E chi >/B o ) may be small as well

  10. Electron heat transport studies using transient phenomena in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacchia, A.; Angioni, C.; Manini, A.; Ryter, F.; Apostoliceanu, M.; Conway, G.; Fahrbach, H.-U.; Kirov, K.K.; Leuterer, F.; Reich, M.; Sutttrop, W.; Cirant, S.; Mantica, P.; De Luca, F.; Weiland, J.

    2005-01-01

    Experiments in tokamaks suggest that a critical gradient length may cause the resilient behavior of T e profiles, in the absence of ITBs. This agrees in general with ITG/TEM turbulence physics. Experiments in ASDEX Upgrade using modulation techniques with ECH and/or cold pulses demonstrate the existence of a threshold in R/L Te when T e >T i and T e ≤T i . For T e >T i linear stability analyses indicate that electron heat transport is dominated by TEM modes. They agree in the value of the threshold (both T e and n e ) and for the electron heat transport increase above the threshold. The stabilization of TEM modes by collisions yielded by gyro-kinetic calculations, which suggests a transition from TEM to ITG dominated transport at high collisionality, is experimentally demonstrated by comparing heat pulse and steady-state diffusivities. For the T e ∼T i discharges above the threshold the resilience, normalized by T e 3/2 , is similar to that of the TEM dominated cases, despite very different conditions. The heat pinch predicted by fluid modeling of ITG/TEM turbulence is investigated by perturbative transport in off-axis ECH-heated discharges. (author)

  11. BROWNIAN HEAT TRANSFER ENHANCEMENT IN THE TURBULENT REGIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Chandrasekhar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents convection heat transfer of a turbulent flow Al2O3/water nanofluid in a circular duct. The duct is a under constant and uniform heat flux. The paper computationally investigates the system’s thermal behavior in a wide range of Reynolds number and also volume concentration up to 6%. To obtain the nanofluid thermophysical properties, the Hamilton-Crosser model along with the Brownian motion effect are utilized. Then the thermal performance of the system with the nanofluid is compared to the conventional systems which use water as the working fluid. The results indicate that the use of nanofluid of 6% improves the heat transfer rate up to 36.8% with respect to pure water. Therefore, using the Al2O3/water nanofluid instead of water can be a great choice when better heat transfer is needed.

  12. Summary of experimental core turbulence characteristics in ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges in T-10 tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vershkov, V.A.; Shelukhin, D.A.; Soldatov, S.V.; Urazbaev, A.O.; Grashin, S.A.; Eliseev, L.G.; Melnikov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of experimental turbulence investigations carried out at T-10 for more than 10 years. The turbulence characteristics were investigated using correlation reflectometry, multipin Langmuir probe (MLP) and heavy ion beam probe diagnostics. The reflectometry capabilities were analysed using 2D full-wave simulations and verified by direct comparison using a MLP. The ohmic and electron cyclotron resonance heated discharges show the distinct transition from the core turbulence, having complex spectral structure, to the unstructured one in the scrape-off layer. The core turbulence includes 'broad band, quasi-coherent' features, arising due to the excitation of rational surfaces with high poloidal m-numbers, with a low frequency near zero and specific oscillations at 15-30 kHz. All experimentally measured properties of low frequency and high frequency quasi-coherent oscillations are in good agreement with predictions of linear theory for the ion temperature gradient/dissipative trapped electron mode instabilities. Significant local changes in the turbulence characteristics were observed at the edge velocity shear layer and in the core near q = 1 radius after switching off the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH). The local decrease in the electron heat conductivity and decrease in the turbulence level could be evidence of the formation of an electron internal transport barrier. The dynamic behaviour of the core turbulence was also investigated for the case of fast edge cooling and the beginning phase of ECRH

  13. Evaluation of turbulent transport and flame surface dissipation using direct numerical simulation of turbulent combustion; Evaluation des termes de transport et de dissipation de surface de flamme par simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughanem, H.

    1998-03-24

    The assumption of gradient transport for the mean reaction progress variable has a limited domain of validity in premixed turbulent combustion. The existence of two turbulent transport regimes, gradient and counter-gradient, is demonstrated in the present work using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) of plane flame configurations. The DNS data base describes the influence of the heat release factor, of the turbulence-to-flame velocity ratio, and of an external pressure gradient. The simulations reveal a strong correlation between the regime of turbulent transport and the turbulent flame speed and turbulent flame thickness. These effects re not well described by current turbulent combustion models. A conditional approach `fresh gases / burnt gases` is proposed to overcome these difficulties. Furthermore, he development of flame instabilities in turbulent configurations is also observed in the simulations. A criterion is derived that determines the domain of occurrence of these instabilities (Darrieus- Landau instabilities, Rayleigh- Taylor instabilities, thermo-diffusive instabilities). This criterion suggests that the domain of occurrence of flame instabilities is not limited to small Reynolds numbers. (author) 98 refs.

  14. SIMULATION OF TURBULENT FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER OVER A BACKWARD -FACING STEP WITH RIBS TURBULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khudheyer S Mushatet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is presented for a backward facing step flow and heat transfer inside a channel with ribs turbulators. The problem was investigated for Reynolds numbers up to 32000. The effect of a step height, the number of ribs and the rib thickness on the flow and thermal field were investigated. The computed results are presented as streamlines counters, velocity vectors and graphs of Nusselt number and turbulent kinetic energy variation. A control volume method employing a staggered grid techniques was imposed to discretize the governing continuity, full Navier Stockes and energy equations. A computer program using a SIMPLE algorithm was developed to handle the considered problem. The effect of turbulence was modeled by using a k-є model with its wall function formulas. The obtained results show that the strength and size of the re-circulation zones behind the step are increased with the increase of contraction ratio(i.e. with the increase of a step height. The size of recirculation regions and the reattachment length after the ribs are decreased with increasing of the contraction ratio. Also the results show that the Reynolds number and contraction ratio have a significant effect on the variation of turbulent kinetic energy and Nusselt number

  15. A new turbulence-based model for sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayaud, Jerome; Wiggs, Giles; Bailey, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the changing rate of sediment flux in space and time is essential for quantifying surface erosion and deposition in desert landscapes. While many aeolian studies have relied on time-averaged parameters such as wind velocity (U) and wind shear velocity (u*) to determine sediment flux, there is increasing evidence that high-frequency turbulence is an important driving force behind the entrainment and transport of sand. However, turbulence has yet to be incorporated into a functional sand transport model that can be used for predictive purposes. In this study we present a new transport model (the 'turbulence model') that accounts for high-frequency variations in the horizontal (u) and vertical (w) components of wind flow. The turbulence model is fitted to wind velocity and sediment transport data from a field experiment undertaken in Namibia's Skeleton Coast National Park, and its performance at three temporal resolutions (10 Hz, 1 Hz, 1 min) is compared to two existing models that rely on time-averaged wind velocity data (Radok, 1977; Dong et al., 2003). The validity of the three models is analysed under a variety of saltation conditions, using a 2-hour (1 Hz measurement resolution) dataset from the Skeleton Coast and a 5-hour (1 min measurement resolution) dataset from the southwestern Kalahari Desert. The turbulence model is shown to outperform the Radok and Dong models when predicting total saltation count over the three experimental periods. For all temporal resolutions presented in this study (10 Hz-10 min), the turbulence model predicted total saltation count to within at least 0.34%, whereas the Radok and Dong models over- or underestimated total count by up to 5.50% and 20.53% respectively. The strong performance of the turbulence model can be attributed to a lag in mass flux response built into its formulation, which can be adapted depending on the temporal resolution of investigation. This accounts for the inherent lag within the physical

  16. Thermal Transport and Entropy Production Mechanisms in a Turbulent Round Jet at Supercritical Thermodynamic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ries

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, thermal transport and entropy production mechanisms in a turbulent round jet of compressed nitrogen at supercritical thermodynamic conditions are investigated using a direct numerical simulation. First, thermal transport and its contribution to the mixture formation along with the anisotropy of heat fluxes and temperature scales are examined. Secondly, the entropy production rates during thermofluid processes evolving in the supercritical flow are investigated in order to identify the causes of irreversibilities and to display advantageous locations of handling along with the process regimes favorable to mixing. Thereby, it turned out that (1 the jet disintegration process consists of four main stages under supercritical conditions (potential core, separation, pseudo-boiling, turbulent mixing, (2 causes of irreversibilities are primarily due to heat transport and thermodynamic effects rather than turbulence dynamics and (3 heat fluxes and temperature scales appear anisotropic even at the smallest scales, which implies that anisotropic thermal diffusivity models might be appropriate in the context of both Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS and large eddy simulation (LES approaches while numerically modeling supercritical fluid flows.

  17. Statistical theory of resistive drift-wave turbulence and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, G.; Krommes, J.A.; Bowman, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    Resistive drift-wave turbulence in a slab geometry is studied by statistical closure methods and direct numerical simulations. The two-field Hasegawa endash Wakatani (HW) fluid model, which evolves the electrostatic potential and plasma density self-consistently, is a paradigm for understanding the generic nonlinear behavior of multiple-field plasma turbulence. A gyrokinetic derivation of the HW model is sketched. The recently developed Realizable Markovian Closure (RMC) is applied to the HW model; spectral properties, nonlinear energy transfers, and turbulent transport calculations are discussed. The closure results are also compared to direct numerical simulation results; excellent agreement is found. The transport scaling with the adiabaticity parameter, which measures the strength of the parallel electron resistivity, is analytically derived and understood through weak- and strong-turbulence analyses. No evidence is found to support previous suggestions that coherent structures cause a large depression of saturated transport from its quasilinear value in the hydrodynamic regime of the HW model. Instead, the depression of transport is well explained by the spectral balance equation of the (second-order) statistical closure when account is taken of incoherent noise. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  18. CFD Study of Deteriorated Turbulent Heat Transfer in Upward Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nietiadi, Yohanes Setiawan; Lee, Jeong Ik; Addad, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    DTHT regime can be induced by two effects: buoyancy and acceleration. Apart from these two deteriorating effects, another unique behavior of fluid in the DTHT regime is that the convective heat transfer rate will continue to deteriorate until it reaches certain point. The downstream of this point, is known as the recovery region, where the convective heat transfer rate returns back to the high values by recovering turbulence. We called this phenomena as re-turbulization.. The map of the DTHT regime can be seen from fig. 2, where the x-axis is the buoyancy parameter and y-axis is the acceleration parameter which is the agreed governing non-dimensional numbers among the researchers to illustrate the phenomena. The Buoyancy parameter is defind in Eq. (1) and the acceleration parameter is defined in Eq. (2), respectively. The threshold value for both effects to move from the forced turbulent heat transfer to the DTHT regime are found to be Bo* ≥ 2x10 -6 and Kv ≥ 2.5x10 -6 in the previous works. Bo * =Gr q /Re 3 '. 425 Pr 0 '. 8 (1). K v =4q + /Re (2). Many experiments and simulation have been done to investigate this phenomenon and the boundary of the regime. However, very limited number of experiment was conducted in the regime where buoyancy effect and acceleration effect are in the same order of magnitude and high enough to cause DTHT (mixed DTHT). Some important experimental researches that have been done in the gas DTHT regime is Lee et al. who investigated the heat transfer of gas flow in the range of buoyancy parameter from 3x10 -9 to 10 -5 and acceleration parameter span from 6x10 -8 to 5x10 -6 and presented the behavior of Nusselt number ratio from the experiment as fig. 3 and fig. 4. This paper will discuss a Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis on DTHT by assuming hypothetical boundary conditions especially on the mixed DTHT regime. It has been found that a gas cooled fast reactor has a tendency to operate in the Deteriorated Turbulent Heat

  19. Gyrokinetic simulations of turbulent transport: size scaling and chaotic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villard, L; Brunner, S; Casati, A; Aghdam, S Khosh; Lapillonne, X; McMillan, B F; Bottino, A; Dannert, T; Goerler, T; Hatzky, R; Jenko, F; Merz, F; Chowdhury, J; Ganesh, R; Garbet, X; Grandgirard, V; Latu, G; Sarazin, Y; Idomura, Y; Jolliet, S

    2010-01-01

    Important steps towards the understanding of turbulent transport have been made with the development of the gyrokinetic framework for describing turbulence and with the emergence of numerical codes able to solve the set of gyrokinetic equations. This paper presents some of the main recent advances in gyrokinetic theory and computing of turbulence. Solving 5D gyrokinetic equations for each species requires state-of-the-art high performance computing techniques involving massively parallel computers and parallel scalable algorithms. The various numerical schemes that have been explored until now, Lagrangian, Eulerian and semi-Lagrangian, each have their advantages and drawbacks. A past controversy regarding the finite size effect (finite ρ * ) in ITG turbulence has now been resolved. It has triggered an intensive benchmarking effort and careful examination of the convergence properties of the different numerical approaches. Now, both Eulerian and Lagrangian global codes are shown to agree and to converge to the flux-tube result in the ρ * → 0 limit. It is found, however, that an appropriate treatment of geometrical terms is necessary: inconsistent approximations that are sometimes used can lead to important discrepancies. Turbulent processes are characterized by a chaotic behaviour, often accompanied by bursts and avalanches. Performing ensemble averages of statistically independent simulations, starting from different initial conditions, is presented as a way to assess the intrinsic variability of turbulent fluxes and obtain reliable estimates of the standard deviation. Further developments concerning non-adiabatic electron dynamics around mode-rational surfaces and electromagnetic effects are discussed.

  20. Theory and Transport of Nearly Incompressible Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zank, G. P.; Adhikari, L.; Hunana, P. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Shiota, D. [Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Bruno, R. [INAF-IAPS Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Telloni, D. [INAF—Astrophysical Observatory of Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

    2017-02-01

    The theory of nearly incompressible magnetohydrodynamics (NI MHD) was developed largely in the early 1990s, together with an important extension to inhomogeneous flows in 2010. Much of the focus in the earlier work was to understand the apparent incompressibility of the solar wind and other plasma environments, and the relationship of density fluctuations to apparently incompressible manifestations of turbulence in the solar wind and interstellar medium. Further important predictions about the “dimensionality” of solar wind turbulence and its relationship to the plasma beta were made and subsequently confirmed observationally. However, despite the initial success of NI MHD in describing fluctuations in the solar wind, a detailed application to solar wind turbulence has not been undertaken. Here, we use the equations of NI MHD to describe solar wind turbulence, rewriting the NI MHD system in terms of Elsässer variables. Distinct descriptions of 2D and slab turbulence emerge naturally from the Elsässer formulation, as do the nonlinear couplings between 2D and slab components. For plasma beta order 1 or less regions, predictions for 2D and slab spectra result from the NI MHD description, and predictions for the spectral characteristics of density fluctuations can be made. We conclude by presenting a NI MHD formulation describing the transport of majority 2D and minority slab turbulence throughout the solar wind. A preliminary comparison of theory and observations is presented.

  1. Parallel Transport with Sheath and Collisional Effects in Global Electrostatic Turbulent Transport in FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jian; Lau, Calvin; Kuley, Animesh; Lin, Zhihong; Fulton, Daniel; Tajima, Toshiki; Tri Alpha Energy, Inc. Team

    2017-10-01

    Collisional and turbulent transport in a field reversed configuration (FRC) is studied in global particle simulation by using GTC (gyrokinetic toroidal code). The global FRC geometry is incorporated in GTC by using a field-aligned mesh in cylindrical coordinates, which enables global simulation coupling core and scrape-off layer (SOL) across the separatrix. Furthermore, fully kinetic ions are implemented in GTC to treat magnetic-null point in FRC core. Both global simulation coupling core and SOL regions and independent SOL region simulation have been carried out to study turbulence. In this work, the ``logical sheath boundary condition'' is implemented to study parallel transport in the SOL. This method helps to relax time and spatial steps without resolving electron plasma frequency and Debye length, which enables turbulent transports simulation with sheath effects. We will study collisional and turbulent SOL parallel transport with mirror geometry and sheath boundary condition in C2-W divertor.

  2. Impurity and trace tritium transport in tokamak edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent transport of impurity or minority species, as for example tritium, is investigated in drift-Alfven edge turbulence. The full effects of perpendicular and parallel convection are kept for the impurity species. The impurity density develops a granular structure with steep gradients...... and locally exceeds its initial values due to the compressibility of the flow. An approximate decomposition of the impurity flux into a diffusive part and an effective convective part (characterized by a pinch velocity) is performed and a net inward pinch effect is recovered. The pinch velocity is explained...

  3. Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent flows with heat transfer; Simulation des grandes echelles d'ecoulements turbulents avec transferts de chaleur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, A.

    2004-09-15

    LES of turbulent flows with heat transfer was used within the framework of conjugate heat transfer problems. The objective of this work lies not only in identifying the various elements likely to impair temperature fluctuations estimations at the fluid/solid interface but also to introduce adequate wall modeling. The choice of a proper convection scheme for the transport of passive scalars led to the adoption of a high order upwind scheme with slope limiter. The use of classical wall models having shown some weaknesses as for the estimation of parietal temperature fluctuations, two new approaches are proposed and tested. The first one relies on a complete resolution of the Navier-Stokes equations on a refined grid close to the wall making it possible to rebuild the temperature fluctuations near the wall. The second one relies on the simultaneous and one dimensional resolution of a turbulent boundary layer equation and a variance transport equation near the wall. (author)

  4. Transport of solar electrons in the turbulent interplanetary magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ablaßmayer, J.; Tautz, R. C., E-mail: robert.c.tautz@gmail.com [Zentrum für Astronomie und Astrophysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Dresing, N., E-mail: dresing@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Leibnizstraße 11, D-24118 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The turbulent transport of solar energetic electrons in the interplanetary magnetic field is investigated by means of a test-particle Monte-Carlo simulation. The magnetic fields are modeled as a combination of the Parker field and a turbulent component. In combination with the direct calculation of diffusion coefficients via the mean-square displacements, this approach allows one to analyze the effect of the initial ballistic transport phase. In that sense, the model complements the main other approach in which a transport equation is solved. The major advancement is that, by recording the flux of particles arriving at virtual detectors, intensity and anisotropy-time profiles can be obtained. Observational indications for a longitudinal asymmetry can thus be explained by tracing the diffusive spread of the particle distribution. The approach may be of future help for the systematic interpretation of observations for instance by the solar terrestrial relations observatory (STEREO) and advanced composition explorer (ACE) spacecrafts.

  5. Turbulent heating in galaxy clusters brightest in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Arévalo, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2014-11-01

    The hot (107 to 108 kelvin), X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales much shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating for these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies, through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM remains open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep X-ray data and a new data analysis method that enable us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate from the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset radiative cooling and indeed appears to balance it locally at each radius--it may therefore be the key element in resolving the gas cooling problem in cluster cores and, more universally, in the atmospheres of X-ray-emitting, gas-rich systems on scales from galaxy clusters to groups and elliptical galaxies.

  6. Direct numerical simulation of MHD heat transfer in high Reynolds number turbulent channel flows for Prandtl number of 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, the MHD heat transfer DNS database corresponding to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design using molten salt, were established. • MHD heat transfer correlation was proposed and about 20% of the heat transfer degradation was evaluated under the design conditions. • The contribution of the turbulent diffusion to heat transfer is increased drastically with increasing Hartmann number. - Abstract: The high-Prandtl number passive scalar transport of the turbulent channel flow imposed a wall-normal magnetic field is investigated through the large-scale direct numerical simulation (DNS). All essential turbulence scales of velocities and temperature are resolved by using 2048 × 870 × 1024 computational grid points in stream, vertical, and spanwise directions. The heat transfer phenomena for a Prandtl number of 25 were observed under the following flow conditions: the bulk Reynolds number of 14,000 and Hartman number of up to 28. These values were equivalent to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design proposed by Wong et al. As a result, a high-accuracy DNS database for the verification of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent heat transfer models was established for the first time, and it was confirmed that the heat transfer correlation for a Prandtl number of 5.25 proposed by Yamamoto and Kunugi was applicable to the Prandtl number of 25 used in this study

  7. Direct numerical simulation of MHD heat transfer in high Reynolds number turbulent channel flows for Prandtl number of 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Yoshinobu, E-mail: yamamotoy@yamanashi.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Kunugi, Tomoaki [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University Yoshida, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • For the first time, the MHD heat transfer DNS database corresponding to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design using molten salt, were established. • MHD heat transfer correlation was proposed and about 20% of the heat transfer degradation was evaluated under the design conditions. • The contribution of the turbulent diffusion to heat transfer is increased drastically with increasing Hartmann number. - Abstract: The high-Prandtl number passive scalar transport of the turbulent channel flow imposed a wall-normal magnetic field is investigated through the large-scale direct numerical simulation (DNS). All essential turbulence scales of velocities and temperature are resolved by using 2048 × 870 × 1024 computational grid points in stream, vertical, and spanwise directions. The heat transfer phenomena for a Prandtl number of 25 were observed under the following flow conditions: the bulk Reynolds number of 14,000 and Hartman number of up to 28. These values were equivalent to the typical nondimensional parameters of the fusion blanket design proposed by Wong et al. As a result, a high-accuracy DNS database for the verification of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent heat transfer models was established for the first time, and it was confirmed that the heat transfer correlation for a Prandtl number of 5.25 proposed by Yamamoto and Kunugi was applicable to the Prandtl number of 25 used in this study.

  8. Effects of polymer stresses on analogy between momentum and heat transfer in drag-reduced turbulent channel flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoungyoun; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2018-03-01

    The effects of polymer stresses on the analogy between momentum and heat transfer are examined by using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of viscoelastic turbulent channel flows using a constant heat flux boundary condition. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and channel half height is 125, and the Prandtl number is 5. The polymer stress is modeled using the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic-Peterlin constitutive model, and low (15%), intermediate (34%), and high drag reduction (DR) (52%) cases are examined. The Colburn analogy is found to be inapplicable for viscoelastic turbulent flows, suggesting dissimilarity between the momentum and heat transfer at the macroscopic coefficient level. The mean temperature profile also shows behaviour different from the mean velocity profile in drag-reduced flows. In contrast to the dissimilarity in the mean profiles, the turbulent Prandtl number Prt predicted by the DNS is near unity. This implies that turbulent heat transfer is still analogous to turbulent momentum transfer in drag-reduced flows, as in Newtonian flow. An increase in DR is accompanied by an increase in the correlation coefficient ρuθ between the instantaneous fluctuations in the streamwise velocity u and temperature θ. The correlation coefficient between u' and wall-normal velocity fluctuations v', ρ-u v, exhibits a profile similar to that of ρ-θ v in drag-reduced and Newtonian flows. Finally, the budget analysis of the transport equations of turbulent heat flux shows a strong similarity between the turbulent momentum and heat transfer, which is consistent with the predictions of Prt near unity.

  9. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Turbulent Gas Flow in Microtube with Constant Heat Flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Chungpyo; Matsushita, Shinichi; Ueno, Ichiro; Asako, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Local friction factors for turbulent gas flows in circular microtubes with constant wall heat flux were obtained numerically. The numerical methodology is based on arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian method to solve two-dimensional compressible momentum and energy equations. The Lam-Bremhorst's Low-Reynolds number turbulence model was employed to calculate eddy viscosity coefficient and turbulence energy. The simulations were performed for a wide flow range of Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers with different constant wall heat fluxes. The stagnation pressure was chosen in such a way that the outlet Mach number ranged from 0.07 to 1.0. Both Darcy friction factor and Fanning friction factor were locally obtained. The result shows that the obtained both friction factors were evaluated as a function of Reynolds number on the Moody chart. The values of Darcy friction factor differ from Blasius correlation due to the compressibility effects but the values of Fanning friction factor almost coincide with Blasius correlation. The wall heat flux varied from 100 to 10000 W/m 2 . The wall and bulk temperatures with positive heat flux are compared with those of incompressible flow. The result shows that the Nusselt number of turbulent gas flow is different from that of incompressible flow.

  10. Numerical study of turbulent heat transfer along a heated rod in an annular cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batta, A.; Class, A.; Daubner, M.; Gnieser, S.; Stieglitz, R.

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental knowledge on the turbulent convective heat transfer from a rod into liquid metal is of crucial importance for the design of advanced liquid metal operated nuclear systems since a single rod is the basic element of a fuel rod assembly. Therefore, a numerical investigation of the heated rod experiment at KALLA (KArlsruhe Liquid metal LAboratory) has been performed. This experiment investigates the turbulent heat transfer from a heated rod placed concentrically within in a cylindrical tube in a developing flow of a heavy liquid metal (HLM, here Pb 45 Bi 55 Eutectic) at reactor typical power levels and dimensions. It is set up with thermocouples (TCs), a traversable Pitot tube and three thermocouple rakes consisting of numerous thermocouples (TCs). The concentricity is ensured by means of mechanical spacers placed axially equidistant. This article concentrates on the numerical investigation of the impact of the experimental instrumentation on the developing flow pattern and temperature field. In particular, the influence of spacers which distort the velocity profile as well of a potential contact of the spacer with the heated rod changing the heat conduction regime are considered numerically in this paper using the STAR-CD code. The turbulent flow simulation assumes axis-symmetry and uses the SST turbulence model. The simulation results exhibit a flow pattern that is substantially altered by spacers. Hence, the flow can not be considered to be axis-symmetric. This in turn yields that the convective heat transfer from the heated rod towards the spacer region is reduced leading to a temperature rise in spacer region, which represents the maximum value in this domain. As a consequence the entire three-dimensional test section must be modelled in order to correctly represent the physics and to allow an adequate interpretation of the experimental data. (orig.)

  11. Turbulence and sediment transport over sand dunes and ripples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennis, A.; Le Bot, S.; lafite, R.; Bonneton, P.; Ardhuin, F.

    2013-12-01

    Several bedforms are present near to the surfzone of natural beaches. Dunes and ripples are frequently observed. Understanding the turbulence over these forms is essential for the sediment transport. The turbulent flow and the suspended sand particles interact with each other. At the moment, the modelling strategy for turbulence is still a challenge. According to the spatial scales, some different methods to model the turbulence are employed, in particular the RANS (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) and the LES (Large Eddy Simulation). A hybrid method combining both RANS and LES is set up here. We have adapted this method, initially developed for atmospheric flow, to the oceanic flow. This new method is implemented inside the 3D hydrodynamic model, MARS 3D, which is forced by waves. LES is currently the best way to simulate turbulent flow but its higher cost prevents it from being used for large scale applications. So, here we use RANS near the bottom while LES is set elsewhere. It allows us minimize the computational cost and ensure a better accuracy of the results than with a fully RANS model. In the case of megaripples, the validation step was performed with two sets of field data (Sandy Duck'97 and Forsoms'13) but also with the data from Dune2D model which uses only RANS for turbulence. The main findings are: a) the vertical profiles of the velocity are similar throughout the data b) the turbulent kinetic energy, which was underestimated by Dune2D, is in line with the observations c) the concentration of the suspended sediment is simulated with a better accuracy than with Dune2D but this remains lower than the observations.

  12. Studies of heat transport to forced-flow He II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Kashani, A.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    1985-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of heat transport to forced-flow He II are reported. The work is pertinent to the transfer of He II in space. An analytical model has been developed that establishes a condition for two-phase flow to occur in the transfer line. This condition sets an allowable limit to the heat leak into the transfer line. Experimental measurements of pressure drop and flow meter performances indicate that turbulent He II can be analyzed in terms of classical pressure drop correlations

  13. Transport by negative eddy viscosity in soliton turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The forced Schrodinger equation is used to describe the microhydrodynamical state of strong soliton turbulence. The Schrodinger equation is transformed into a master equation and is decomposed into a macrogroup, a microgroup, and a submicrogroup, representative of the three transport processes of spectral evolution, transport property, and relaxation. The kinetic equation for the macrodistribution is derived and reverted to the continuum by the method of moments in order to find the equation of spectral evolution. The spectral flow is found to be governed by three types of transport, which are discussed.

  14. DNS of fully developed turbulent heat transfer of a viscoelastic drag-reducing flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Bo [Department of Oil and Gas Storage and Transportation Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Kawaguchi, Yasuo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2005-10-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow with a Giesekus model was carried out to investigate turbulent heat transfer mechanism of a viscoelastic drag-reducing flow by additives. The configuration was a fully-developed turbulent channel flow with uniform heat flux imposed on both the walls. The temperature was considered as a passive scalar with the effect of buoyancy force neglected. The Reynolds number based on the friction velocity and half the channel height was 150. Statistical quantities such as root-mean-square temperature fluctuations, turbulent heat fluxes and turbulent Prandtl number were obtained and compared with those of a Newtonian fluid flow. Budget terms of the temperature variance and turbulent heat fluxes were also presented. (author)

  15. Turbulence convective heat transfer for cooling the photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arianmehr, Iman

    Solar PV (photovoltaic) is a rapidly advancing renewable energy technology which converts sunlight directly into electricity. One of the outstanding challenges of the current PV technology is the reduction in its conversion efficiency with increasing PV panel temperature, which is closely associated with the increase in solar intensity and the ambient temperature surrounding the PV panels. To more effectively capture the available energy when the sun is most intense, significant efforts have been invested in active and passive cooling research over the last few years. While integrated cooling systems can lead to the highest total efficiencies, they are usually neither the most feasible nor the most cost effective solutions. This work examines some simple passive means of manipulating the prevailing wind turbulence to enhance convective heat transfer over a heated plate in a wind tunnel.

  16. Turbulent circulation above the surface heat source in a stably stratified environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the numerical modeling of turbulent structure of the penetrating convection above the urban heat island with a small aspect ratio in a stably stratified medium at rest are presented. The gradient diffusion representations for turbulent momentum and heat fluxes are used, which depend on three parameters — the turbulence kinetic energy, the velocity of its spectral expenditure, and the dispersion of temperature fluctuations. These parameters are found from the closed differential equations of balance in the RANS approach of turbulence description. The distributions of averaged velocity and temperature fields as well as turbulent characteristics agree well with measurement data.

  17. Stochastic models of edge turbulent transport in the thermonuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volchenkov, Dima

    2005-01-01

    Two-dimensional stochastic model of turbulent transport in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of thermonuclear reactors is considered. Convective instability arisen in the system with respect to perturbations reveals itself in the strong outward bursts of particle density propagating ballistically across the SOL. The criterion of stability for the fluctuations of particle density is formulated. A possibility to stabilize the system depends upon the certain type of plasma waves interactions and the certain scenario of turbulence. A bias of limiter surface would provide a fairly good insulation of chamber walls excepting for the resonant cases. Pdf of the particle flux for the large magnitudes of flux events is modeled with a simple discrete time toy model of I-dimensional random walks concluding at the boundary. The spectra of wandering times feature the pdf of particle flux in the model and qualitatively reproduce the experimental statistics of transport events

  18. Numerical assessment of the ion turbulent thermal transport scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Manfredi, G.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical simulations of ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence were carried out to investigate the parametric dependence of the ion thermal transport on the reduced gyroradius and on the local safety factor. Whereas the simulations show a clear proportionality of the conductivity to the gyroradius, the dependence on the safety factor cannot be represented as a simple power law like the one exhibited by the empirical scaling laws. (author)

  19. Turbulent transport modeling in the edge plasma of tokamaks: verification, validation, simulation and synthetic diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Bellot, Clothilde

    2015-01-01

    The possibility to produce power by using magnetically confined fusion is a scientific and technological challenge. The perspective of ITER conveys strong signals to intensify modeling effort on magnetized fusion plasmas. The success of the fusion operation is conditioned by the quality of plasma confinement in the core of the reactor and by the control of plasma exhaust on the wall. Both phenomena are related to turbulent cross-field transport that is at the heart of the notion of magnetic confinement studies, particle and heat losses. The study of edge phenomena is therefore complicated by a particularly complex magnetic geometry.This calls for an improvement of our capacity to develop numerical tools able to reproduce turbulent transport properties reliable to predict particle and energy fluxes on the plasma facing components. This thesis introduces the TOKAM3X fluid model to simulate edge plasma turbulence. A special focus is made on the code Verification and the Validation. It is a necessary step before using a code as a predictive tool. Then new insights on physical properties of the edge plasma turbulence are explored. In particular, the poloidal asymmetries induced by turbulence and observed experimentally in the Low-Field-Side of the devices are investigated in details. Great care is dedicated to the reproduction of the MISTRAL base case which consists in changing the magnetic configuration and observing the impact on parallel flows in the poloidal plane. The simulations recover experimental measurements and provide new insights on the effect of the plasma-wall contact position location on the turbulent features, which were not accessible in experiments. (author) [fr

  20. Transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Kai, Naoto; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Masuzaki, Suguru

    2011-01-01

    The transient turbulent heat transfer coefficients in a short vertical Platinum test tube were systematically measured for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.6 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.93 to 304.81 K), the inlet pressures (P in =794.39 to 858.27 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), exponential periods, τ, of 18.6 ms to 25.7 s) by an experimental water loop comprised of a multistage canned-type circulation pump with high pump head. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3 and 6 mm), heated lengths (L=66.5 and 69.6 mm), effective lengths (L eff =56.7 and 59.2 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=22.16 and 11.6), ratios of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d=18.9 and 9.87) and wall thickness (δ=0.5 and 0.4 mm) with average surface roughness (Ra=0.40 and 0.45 μm) were used in this work. The surface heat fluxes between the two potential taps were given the difference between the heat generation rate per unit surface area and the rate of change of energy storage in the test tube obtained from the faired average temperature versus time curve. The heater inner surface temperature between the two potential taps was also obtained by solving the unsteady heat conduction equation in the test tube under the conditions of measured average temperature and heat generation rate per unit surface area of the test tube. The transient turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by authors' correlation for the steady state turbulent heat transfer. The influence of inner diameter (d), ratio of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d), flow velocity (u) and exponential period (τ) on the transient turbulent heat transfer is investigated into details and the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data and authors' studies for the

  1. Transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hata, Koichi; Kai, Naoto; Shirai, Yasuyuki; Masuzaki, Suguru

    2011-01-01

    The transient turbulent heat transfer coefficients in a short vertical Platinum test tube were systematically measured for the flow velocities (u=4.0 to 13.6 m/s), the inlet liquid temperatures (T in =296.93 to 304.81 K), the inlet pressures (P in =794.39 to 858.27 kPa) and the increasing heat inputs (Q 0 exp(t/τ), exponential periods, τ, of 18.6 ms to 25.7 s) by an experimental water loop comprised of a multistage canned-type circulation pump with high pump head. The Platinum test tubes of test tube inner diameters (d=3 and 6 mm), heated lengths (L=66.5 and 69.6 mm), effective lengths (L eff =56.7 and 59.2 mm), ratios of heated length to inner diameter (L/d=22.16 and 11.6), ratios of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d=18.9 and 9.87) and wall thickness (δ=0.5 and 0.4 mm) with average surface roughness (Ra=0.40 and 0.45 μm) were used in this work. The surface heat fluxes between the two potential taps were given the difference between the heat generation rate per unit surface area and the rate of change of energy storage in the test tube obtained from the faired average temperature versus time curve. The heater inner surface temperature between the two potential taps was also obtained by solving the unsteady heat conduction equation in the test tube under the conditions of measured average temperature and heat generation rate per unit surface area of the test tube. The transient turbulent heat transfer data for Platinum test tubes were compared with the values calculated by authors' correlation for the steady state turbulent heat transfer. The influence of inner diameter (d), ratio of effective length to inner diameter (L eff /d), flow velocity (u) and exponential period (τ) on the transient turbulent heat transfer is investigated into details and the widely and precisely predictable correlation of the transient turbulent heat transfer for heating of water in a short vertical tube is given based on the experimental data and authors' studies for the

  2. Flowing and heat transfer characteristics of turbulent flow in typical rod bundles at rolling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Binghuo; Yu Lei; Gu Hanyang

    2011-01-01

    The influence mechanism of rolling motion on the flowing and heat transfer characteristics of turbulent flow in typical four rod bundles was investigated with Fluent code. The flowing and heat transfer characteristics of turbulent flow in rod bundles can be affected by rolling motion. But the flowing similarity of turbulent flow in adiabatic and non-adiabatic can not be affected. If the rolling period is small, the radial additional force can make the parameter profiles, the turbulent flowing and heat transfer change greatly. At rolling motion, as the pitch to diameter ratio decreases, especially if it is less than 1.1, the flowing and heat transfer of turbulent flow at rolling motion change significantly. The variation of pitch to diameter ratio can change the profiles of secondary flow and turbulent kinetic energy in cross-section greatly. (authors)

  3. Universal Probability Distribution Function for Bursty Transport in Plasma Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, I.; Benkadda, S.; Garbet, X.; Ropokis, G.; Hizanidis, K.; Castillo-Negrete, D. del

    2009-01-01

    Bursty transport phenomena associated with convective motion present universal statistical characteristics among different physical systems. In this Letter, a stochastic univariate model and the associated probability distribution function for the description of bursty transport in plasma turbulence is presented. The proposed stochastic process recovers the universal distribution of density fluctuations observed in plasma edge of several magnetic confinement devices and the remarkable scaling between their skewness S and kurtosis K. Similar statistical characteristics of variabilities have been also observed in other physical systems that are characterized by convection such as the x-ray fluctuations emitted by the Cygnus X-1 accretion disc plasmas and the sea surface temperature fluctuations.

  4. Sand Transport under Highly Turbulent Airflow on a Beach Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baas, A. C. W.; Jackson, D. W. T.; Cooper, J. A. G.; Lynch, K.; Delgado-Fernandez, I.; Beyers, J. H. M.

    2012-04-01

    The past decade has seen a growing body of research on the relation between turbulence in the wind and the resultant transport of sediment over active sand surfaces. Widespread use of sonic anemometry and high-frequency sand transport sensors and traps have facilitated recent field studies over dunes and beach surfaces, to move beyond monitoring of mean wind speed and bulk transport to more detailed measurements at much higher spatio-temporal resolutions. In this paper we present results of a field study conducted in the recirculation flow and re-attachment zone on a beach behind a foredune at Magilligan Strand, Northern Ireland. The offshore winds over the foredune at this site are associated with flow separation and reversal located over the beach surface in the lee of the dune row, often strong enough to induce sand transport toward the toe of the foredune ('against' the overall offshore flow). The re-attachment and recirculation zone are associated with strongly turbulent fluid flow and complex streamlines that do not follow the underlying topography. High frequency (25 Hz) wind and sand transport data were collected at a grid of point locations distributed over the beach surface between 35 m to 55 m distance from the 10 m high dune crest, using ultrasonic anemometers at 0.5 m height and co-located load cell traps and Safires at the bed surface. The wind data are used to investigate the role of Reynolds shear stresses and quadrant analysis techniques for identifying burst-sweep events in relation to sand transport events. This includes an assessment of the issues involved with data rotations for yaw, pitch, and roll corrections relative to complex flow streamlines, and the subsequently derived turbulence parameters based on fluctuating vector components (u', v', w'). Results illustrate how transport may exist under threshold mean velocities because of the role played by coherent flow structures, and the findings corroborate previous findings that shear velocity

  5. Edge turbulence and transport: Text and ATF modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, C.P.; Rhodes, T.L.; Lin, H.; Rowan, W.L.; Bengtson, R.; Wootton, A.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Ware, A.S.; Thayer, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    We present experimental results on edge turbulence and transport from the tokamak TEXT and the torsatron ATF. The measured electrostatic fluctuations can explain the edge transport of particles and energy. Certain drive (radiation) and stabilizing (velocity shear) terms are suggested by the results. The experimental fluctuation levels and spectral widths can be reproduced by considering the nonlinear evolution of the reduced MHD equations, incorporating a thermal drive from line radiation. In the tokamak limit (with toroidal electric field) the model corresponds to the resistivity gradient mode, while in the currentless torsatron or stellarator limit it corresponds to a thermally driven drift wave

  6. Turbulent heat/mass transfer at oceanic interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enstad, Lars Inge

    2005-07-01

    The thesis studies heat/mass transfer and uses various simulation techniques. A numerical method has been developed. 4 papers which describes the work, are included. In the first paper we look at such flow configuration where the flow is driven by a constant pressure gradient and the interface is cooled from above. Papers 2 and 3. 2: The effect of stable density stratification on turbulent vortical structures near an atmosphere-ocean interface driven by low wind shear. 3: Low shear turbulence structures beneath a gas-liquid interface under neutral and stable stratified conditions. A well known feature of the upper layer of the ocean is the presence of counter-rotating streamwise vorticity, so called Langmuir circulation. Earlier numerical investigations show that similar vortex structures appear on small scale induced by shear instability only. Short wave solar radiation may create a stable situation which affects the turbulence near the interface. In these papers we investigate such a flow situation by employing a uniform and constant shear stress at the interface together with a similar heat flux into the interface. In both articles we also use a two-point correlation to give a statistical representation of the streamwise vorticity. The spatial extent and intensity are decreased by stable stratification. In addition, in article 3, we find that the Reynolds stress is damped by stable stratification. This leads to an increased mean velocity since decreased Reynolds stress is compensated by a larger mean velocity gradient. The cospectra of the Reynolds stress in the spanwise direction show that the production of Reynolds stress is decreased at lower wave numbers and thus shifted to higher wave numbers in the presence of stable stratification. The streak structure created by the streamwise vorticity is disorganized by stable stratification. Article 4: A numerical study of a density interface using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) coupled with a Navier Stokes

  7. Ion and impurity transport in turbulent, anisotropic magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrea, M; Petrisor, I; Isliker, H; Vogiannou, A; Vlahos, L; Weyssow, B

    2011-01-01

    We investigate ion and impurity transport in turbulent, possibly anisotropic, magnetic fields. The turbulent magnetic field is modeled as a correlated stochastic field, with Gaussian distribution function and prescribed spatial auto-correlation function, superimposed onto a strong background field. The (running) diffusion coefficients of ions are determined in the three-dimensional environment, using two alternative methods, the semi-analytical decorrelation trajectory (DCT) method, and test-particle simulations. In a first step, the results of the test-particle simulations are compared with and used to validate the results obtained from the DCT method. For this purpose, a drift approximation was made in slab geometry, and relatively good qualitative agreement between the DCT method and the test-particle simulations was found. In a second step, the ion species He, Be, Ne and W, all assumed to be fully ionized, are considered under ITER-like conditions, and the scaling of their diffusivities is determined with respect to varying levels of turbulence (varying Kubo number), varying degrees of anisotropy of the turbulent structures and atomic number. In a third step, the test-particle simulations are repeated without drift approximation, directly using the Lorentz force, first in slab geometry, in order to assess the finite Larmor radius effects, and second in toroidal geometry, to account for the geometric effects. It is found that both effects are important, most prominently the effects due to toroidal geometry and the diffusivities are overestimated in slab geometry by an order of magnitude.

  8. Ion and impurity transport in turbulent, anisotropic magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrea, M; Petrisor, I [Department of Physics, Association Euratom-MEdC, Romania, University of Craiova, A.I. Cuza str. 13, Craiova (Romania); Isliker, H; Vogiannou, A; Vlahos, L [Section of Astrophysics, Astronomy and Mechanics, Department of Physics, University of Thessaloniki, Association Euratom-Hellenic Republic, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece); Weyssow, B [Physique Statistique-Plasmas, Association Euratom-Etat Belge, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Bd. du Triomphe, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    We investigate ion and impurity transport in turbulent, possibly anisotropic, magnetic fields. The turbulent magnetic field is modeled as a correlated stochastic field, with Gaussian distribution function and prescribed spatial auto-correlation function, superimposed onto a strong background field. The (running) diffusion coefficients of ions are determined in the three-dimensional environment, using two alternative methods, the semi-analytical decorrelation trajectory (DCT) method, and test-particle simulations. In a first step, the results of the test-particle simulations are compared with and used to validate the results obtained from the DCT method. For this purpose, a drift approximation was made in slab geometry, and relatively good qualitative agreement between the DCT method and the test-particle simulations was found. In a second step, the ion species He, Be, Ne and W, all assumed to be fully ionized, are considered under ITER-like conditions, and the scaling of their diffusivities is determined with respect to varying levels of turbulence (varying Kubo number), varying degrees of anisotropy of the turbulent structures and atomic number. In a third step, the test-particle simulations are repeated without drift approximation, directly using the Lorentz force, first in slab geometry, in order to assess the finite Larmor radius effects, and second in toroidal geometry, to account for the geometric effects. It is found that both effects are important, most prominently the effects due to toroidal geometry and the diffusivities are overestimated in slab geometry by an order of magnitude.

  9. Ion and impurity transport in turbulent, anisotropic magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrea, M.; Petrisor, I.; Isliker, H.; Vogiannou, A.; Vlahos, L.; Weyssow, B.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate ion and impurity transport in turbulent, possibly anisotropic, magnetic fields. The turbulent magnetic field is modeled as a correlated stochastic field, with Gaussian distribution function and prescribed spatial auto-correlation function, superimposed onto a strong background field. The (running) diffusion coefficients of ions are determined in the three-dimensional environment, using two alternative methods, the semi-analytical decorrelation trajectory (DCT) method, and test-particle simulations. In a first step, the results of the test-particle simulations are compared with and used to validate the results obtained from the DCT method. For this purpose, a drift approximation was made in slab geometry, and relatively good qualitative agreement between the DCT method and the test-particle simulations was found. In a second step, the ion species He, Be, Ne and W, all assumed to be fully ionized, are considered under ITER-like conditions, and the scaling of their diffusivities is determined with respect to varying levels of turbulence (varying Kubo number), varying degrees of anisotropy of the turbulent structures and atomic number. In a third step, the test-particle simulations are repeated without drift approximation, directly using the Lorentz force, first in slab geometry, in order to assess the finite Larmor radius effects, and second in toroidal geometry, to account for the geometric effects. It is found that both effects are important, most prominently the effects due to toroidal geometry and the diffusivities are overestimated in slab geometry by an order of magnitude.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of the turbulent transport of airborne contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.W.; Barr, S.

    1975-09-01

    A generalized, three-dimensional Monte Carlo model and computer code (SPOOR) are described for simulating atmospheric transport and dispersal of small pollutant clouds. A cloud is represented by a large number of particles that we track by statistically sampling simulated wind and turbulence fields. These fields are based on generalized wind data for large-scale flow and turbulent energy spectra for the micro- and mesoscales. The large-scale field can be input from a climatological data base, or by means of real-time analyses, or from a separate, subjectively defined data base. We introduce the micro- and mesoscale wind fluctuations through a power spectral density, to include effects from a broad spectrum of turbulent-energy scales. The role of turbulence is simulated in both meander and dispersal. Complex flow fields and time-dependent diffusion rates are accounted for naturally, and shear effects are simulated automatically in the ensemble of particle trajectories. An important adjunct has been the development of computer-graphics displays. These include two- and three-dimensional (perspective) snapshots and color motion pictures of particle ensembles, plus running displays of differential and integral cloud characteristics. The model's versatility makes it a valuable atmospheric research tool that we can adapt easily into broader, multicomponent systems-analysis codes. Removal, transformation, dry or wet deposition, and resuspension of contaminant particles can be readily included

  11. Turbulence, transport and confinement: from tokamaks to star magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugarek, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is part of the general study of self-organization in hot and magnetized plasmas. We focus our work on two specific objects: stars and tokamaks. We use first principle numerical simulations to study turbulence, transport and confinement in these plasmas. The first part of this thesis introduces the main characteristics of stellar and tokamak plasmas. The reasons for studying them together are properly detailed. The second part is focused on stellar aspects. We study the interactions between the 3D turbulent motions in the solar convection zone with an internal magnetic field in the tachocline (the transition region between the instable and stable zones in the Sun). The tachocline is a very thin layer (less than five percent of the solar radius) that acts as a transport barrier of angular momentum. We show that such an internal magnetic field is not likely to explain the observed thickness of the tachocline and we give some insights on how to find alternative mechanisms to constrain it. We also explore the effect of the environment of star on its structure. We develop a methodology to study the influence of stellar wind and of the magnetic coupling of a star with its orbiting planets. We use the same methodology to analyse the magnetic interaction between a stellar wind and a planetary magnetosphere that acts as a transport barrier of matter. Then, the third part is dedicated to fusion oriented research. We present a numerical investigation on the experimental mechanisms that lead to the development of transport barriers in the plasma. These barriers are particularly important for the design of high performance fusion devices. The creation of transport barriers is obtained in turbulent first principle simulations for the very first time. The collaboration between the two scientific teams lead to the results presented in the fourth part of this thesis. An original spectral method is developed to analyse the saturation of stellar convective dynamos and of

  12. Turbulent transport of large particles in the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D. H.; Chamecki, M.

    2017-12-01

    To describe the transport of heavy dust particles in the atmosphere, assumptions must typically be made in order to connect the micro-scale emission processes with the larger-scale atmospheric motions. In the context of numerical models, this can be thought of as the transport process which occurs between the domain bottom and the first vertical grid point. For example, in the limit of small particles (both low inertia and low settling velocity), theory built upon Monin-Obukhov similarity has proven effective in relating mean dust concentration profiles to surface emission fluxes. For increasing particle mass, however, it becomes more difficult to represent dust transport as a simple extension of the transport of a passive scalar due to issues such as the crossing trajectories effect. This study focuses specifically on the problem of large particle transport and dispersion in the turbulent boundary layer by utilizing direct numerical simulations with Lagrangian point-particle tracking to determine under what, if any, conditions the large dust particles (larger than 10 micron in diameter) can be accurately described in a simplified Eulerian framework. In particular, results will be presented detailing the independent contributions of both particle inertia and particle settling velocity relative to the strength of the surrounding turbulent flow, and consequences of overestimating surface fluxes via traditional parameterizations will be demonstrated.

  13. Turbulent heat transfer to longitudinal flow through a triangular array of circular rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfann, J.

    1975-01-01

    Temperature distribution and heat transfer to longitudinal turbulent, fully developed flow through triangular arrays of smooth circular rods are analysed for liquids with Prandtl number approximately 1 and << 1. Nusselt number is plotted versus pitch and turbulence for constant heat flow and for constant temperature on the rod surface, and the optimum pitch is determined. The influence of Prandtl number is analysed. (Auth.)

  14. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1982-07-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time).

  15. Small particle transport across turbulent nonisothermal boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, D. E.; Fernandez De La Mora, J.

    1982-01-01

    The interaction between turbulent diffusion, Brownian diffusion, and particle thermophoresis in the limit of vanishing particle inertial effects is quantitatively modeled for applications in gas turbines. The model is initiated with consideration of the particle phase mass conservation equation for a two-dimensional boundary layer, including the thermophoretic flux term directed toward the cold wall. A formalism of a turbulent flow near a flat plate in a heat transfer problem is adopted, and variable property effects are neglected. Attention is given to the limit of very large Schmidt numbers and the particle concentration depletion outside of the Brownian sublayer. It is concluded that, in the parameter range of interest, thermophoresis augments the high Schmidt number mass-transfer coefficient by a factor equal to the product of the outer sink and the thermophoretic suction.

  16. Sandpile dynamics as a paradigm for turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Diamond, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    To shed some light on the apparent discrepancies between most theoretical models of turbulent transport and experimental observations of the transport in magnetically confined plasmas, a model for transport has been developed based on the concept of self-organized criticality (SOC). This model seeks to describe the dynamics of the transport without relying on the underlying local fluctuation mechanisms. Computations based on a cellular automata model have found that SOC systems maintain average profiles that are linearly stable (submarginal) and yet are able to sustain active transport dynamics in contrast to naive marginal stability arguments. It is also found that the dominant scales in the transport dynamics in the absence of sheared flow are system scales rather than the underlying local fluctuation scales. However, the addition of sheared flow into the dynamics leads to a large reduction of the system-scale transport events and a commensurate increase in the fluctuation-scale transport events needed to maintain the constant flux. The dynamics of these models and the potential ramifications for transport studies are discussed

  17. Integrated heat transport simulation of high ion temperature plasma of LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Sakai, A.

    2014-10-01

    A first dynamical simulation of high ion temperature plasma with carbon pellet injection of LHD is performed by the integrated simulation GNET-TD + TASK3D. NBI heating deposition of time evolving plasma is evaluated by the 5D drift kinetic equation solver, GNET-TD and the heat transport of multi-ion species plasma (e, H, He, C) is studied by the integrated transport simulation code, TASK3D. Achievement of high ion temperature plasma is attributed to the 1) increase of heating power per ion due to the temporal increase of effective charge, 2) reduction of effective neoclassical transport with impurities, 3) reduction of turbulence transport. The reduction of turbulence transport is most significant contribution to achieve the high ion temperature and the reduction of the turbulent transport from the L-mode plasma (normal hydrogen plasma) is evaluated to be a factor about five by using integrated heat transport simulation code. Applying the Z effective dependent turbulent reduction model we obtain a similar time behavior of ion temperature after the C pellet injection with the experimental results. (author)

  18. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-15

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  19. Coherent structures and transport in drift wave plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang Korsholm, S.

    2011-12-01

    Fusion energy research aims at developing fusion power plants providing safe and clean energy with abundant fuels. Plasma turbulence induced transport of energy and particles is a performance limiting factor for fusion devices. Hence the understanding of plasma turbulence is important for optimization. The present work is a part of the puzzle to understand the basic physics of transport induced by drift wave turbulence in the edge region of a plasma. The basis for the study is the Hasegawa-Wakatani model. Simulation results for 3D periodic and nonperiodic geometries are presented. The Hasegawa-Wakatani model is further expanded to include ion temperature effects. Another expansion of the model is derived from the Braginskii electron temperature equation. The result is a self-consistent set of equations describing the dynamical evolution of the drift wave fluctuations of the electron density, electron temperature and the potential in the presence of density and temperature gradients. 3D simulation results of the models are presented. Finally, the construction and first results from the MAST fluctuation reflectometer is described. The results demonstrate how L- to H-mode transitions as well as edge-localized-modes can be detected by the relatively simple diagnostic system. The present Risoe report is a slightly updated version of my original PhD report which was submitted in April 2002 and defended in August 2002. (Author)

  20. Explaining Cold-Pulse Dynamics in Tokamak Plasmas Using Local Turbulent Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, P.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Grierson, B. A.; Staebler, G. M.; Rice, J. E.; Yuan, X.; Cao, N. M.; Creely, A. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J. H.; Sciortino, F.

    2018-02-01

    A long-standing enigma in plasma transport has been resolved by modeling of cold-pulse experiments conducted on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Controlled edge cooling of fusion plasmas triggers core electron heating on time scales faster than an energy confinement time, which has long been interpreted as strong evidence of nonlocal transport. This Letter shows that the steady-state profiles, the cold-pulse rise time, and disappearance at higher density as measured in these experiments are successfully captured by a recent local quasilinear turbulent transport model, demonstrating that the existence of nonlocal transport phenomena is not necessary for explaining the behavior and time scales of cold-pulse experiments in tokamak plasmas.

  1. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carriington, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  2. Transport and turbulence in TORE SUPRA ohmic discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.; Payan, J.; Laviron, C.; Devynck, P.; Saha, S.K.; Capes, H.; Chen, X.P.; Coulon, J.P.; Gil, C.; Harris, G.; Hutter, T.; Pecquet, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the energy confinement behaviour in ohmic tokamak discharges are not yet understood. It is well known that the confinement time increases with the average density and saturates above a critical value of the density, but several explanations exist for this saturation. The present study is an analysis of a set of ohmic discharges in Tore Supra with I p =1.6 MA, B=4 T, R=2.35 m and a=0.78 m, where the average density was increased from 0.9 to 4.2 10 19 m -3 . For these plasma parameters, the energy confinement time given by magnetic measurements saturates for e > ≥ 2.5 10 19 m -3 . It is emphasized here that the onset of ionic turbulence is unlikely in Tore Supra. This conclusion relies on a transport analysis and turbulence measurements by CO 2 laser scattering, whose results are presented in this paper

  3. Time dependent plasma viscosity and relation between neoclassical transport and turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaing, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    Time dependent plasma viscosities for asymmetric toroidal plasmas in various collisionality regimes are calculated. It is known that in the symmetric limit the time dependent plasma viscosities accurately describe plasma flow damping rate. Thus, time dependent plasma viscosities are important in modeling the radial electric field of the zonal flow. From the momentum balance equation, it is shown that, at the steady state, the balance of the viscosity force and the momentum source determines the radial electric field of the zonal flow. Thus, for a fixed source, the smaller the viscous force is, the larger the value of the radial electric field is, which in turn suppresses the turbulence fluctuations more and improves turbulence transport. However, the smaller the viscous force also implies the smaller the neoclassical transport fluxes based on the neoclassical flux-force relationship. We thus show that when neoclassical transport fluxes are improved so are the turbulent fluxes in toroidal plasmas. (author)

  4. Sensible Heat Flux Related to Variations in Atmospheric Turbulence Kinetic Energy on a Sandy Beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    production, turbulent transport by pressure fluctuations, dissipation and flux divergence . The TKE budget as explained by Srivastava and Sarthi (2002...generation of turbulence. Term 3 is flux divergence , which describes the differential transport of TKE by turbulent eddies. Term 4, dissipation, is a sink...the time series data to align all signals to the same time base. Winds were rotated into a shore-normal frame of reference. All data outside of T

  5. CFD SIMULATION OF THE HEAT TRANSFER PROCESS IN A CHEVRON PLATE HEAT EXCHANGER USING THE SST TURBULENCE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Skočilas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation of the heat transfer process during turbulent hot water flow between two chevron plates in a plate heat exchanger. A three-dimensional model with the simplified geometry of two cross-corrugated channels provided by chevron plates, taking into account the inlet and outlet ports, has been designed for the numerical study. The numerical model was based on the shear-stress transport (SST k-! model. The basic characteristics of the heat exchanger, as values of heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop, have been investigated. A comparative analysis of analytical calculation results, based on experimental data obtained from literature, and of the results obtained by numerical simulation, has been carried out. The coefficients and the exponents in the design equations for the considered plates have been arranged by using simulation results. The influence on the main flow parameters of the corrugation inclination angle relative to the flow direction has been taken into account. An analysis of the temperature distribution across the plates has been carried out, and it has shown the presence of zones with higher heat losses and low fluid flow intensity.

  6. Towards CFD modeling of turbulent pipeline material transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahirpour, Amir; Herzog, Nicoleta; Egbers, Cristoph

    2013-04-01

    Safe and financially efficient pipeline transportation of carbon dioxide is a critical issue in the developing field of the CCS Technology. In this part of the process, carbon dioxide is transported via pipes with diameter of 1.5 m and entry pressure of 150 bar, with Reynolds number of 107 and viscosity of 8×10(-5) Pa.s as dense fluid [1]. Presence of large and small scale structures in the pipeline, high Reynolds numbers at which CO2 should be transferred, and 3 dimensional turbulence caused by local geometrical modifications, increase the importance of simulation of turbulent material transport through the individual components of the CO2 chain process. In this study, incompressible turbulent channel flow and pipe flow have been modeled using OpenFoam, an open source CFD software. In the first step, simulation of a turbulent channel flow has been considered using LES for shear Reynolds number of 395. A simple geometry has been chosen with cyclic fluid inlet and outlet boundary conditions to simulate a fully developed flow. The mesh is gradually refined towards the wall to provide values close enough to the wall for the wall coordinate (y+). Grid resolution study has been conducted for One-Equation model. The accuracy of the results is analyzed with respect to the grid smoothness in order to reach an optimized resolution for carrying out the next simulations. Furthermore, three LES models, One-Equation, Smagorinsky and Dynamic Smagorinsky are applied for the grid resolution of (60 × 100 × 80) in (x, y, z) directions. The results are then validated with reference to the DNS carried out by Moser et al.[2] for the similar geometry using logarithmic velocity profile (U+) and Reynolds stress tensor components. In the second step the similar flow is modeled using Reynolds averaged method. Several RANS models, like K-epsilon and Launder-Reece-Rodi are applied and validated against DNS and LES results in a similar fashion. In the most recent step, it has been intended

  7. Confinement of ohmically heated plasmas and turbulent heating in high-magnetic field tokamak TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Itoh, S; Kawai, Y; Toi, K; Nakamura, K [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1979-12-01

    TRIAM-1, the tokamak device with high toroidal magnetic field, has been constructed to establish the scaling laws of advanced tokamak devices such as Alcator, and to study the possibility of the turbulent heating as a further economical heating method of the fusion oriented plasmas. The plasma parameters obtained by ohmic heating alone are as follows; central electron temperature T sub(e0) = 640 eV, central ion temperature T sub(i0) = 280 eV and line-average electron density n average sub(e) = 2.2 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/. The empirical scaling laws are investigated concerning T sub(e0), T sub(i0) and n average sub(e). The turbulent heating has been carried out by applying the high electric field in the toroidal direction to the typical tokamak discharge with T sub(i0) asymptotically equals 200 eV. The efficient ion heating is observed and T sub(i0) attains to about 600 eV.

  8. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A.

    2013-01-01

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  9. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-09-21

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  10. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Wang, W.; Horton, W.; Klasky, S.; Decyk, V.; Ma, K.-L.; Chames, J.; Adams, M.

    2011-01-01

    The three-year project GPS-TTBP resulted in over 152 publications and 135 presentations. This summary focuses on the scientific progress made by the project team. A major focus of the project was on the physics intrinsic rotation in tokamaks. Progress included the first ever flux driven study of net intrinsic spin-up, mediated by boundary effects (in collaboration with CPES), detailed studies of the microphysics origins of the Rice scaling, comparative studies of symmetry breaking mechanisms, a pioneering study of intrinsic torque driven by trapped electron modes, and studies of intrinsic rotation generation as a thermodynamic engine. Validation studies were performed with C-Mod, DIII-D and CSDX. This work resulted in very successful completion of the FY2010 Theory Milestone Activity for OFES, and several prominent papers of the 2008 and 2010 IAEA Conferences. A second major focus was on the relation between zonal flow formation and transport non-locality. This culminated in the discovery of the ExB staircase - a conceptually new phenomenon. This also makes useful interdisciplinary contact with the physics of the PV staircase, well-known in oceans and atmospheres. A third topic where progress was made was in the simulation and theory of turbulence spreading. This work, now well cited, is important for understanding the dynamics of non-locality in turbulent transport. Progress was made in studies of conjectured non-diffusive transport in trapped electron turbulence. Pioneering studies of ITB formation, coupling to intrinsic rotation and hysteresis were completed. These results may be especially significant for future ITER operation. All told, the physics per dollar performance of this project was quite good. The intense focus was beneficial and SciDAC resources were essential to its success.

  11. Instabilities, turbulence and transport in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garbet, X.

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this work is to introduce the main processes that occur in a magnetized plasma. During the last 2 decades, the understanding of turbulence has made great progress but analytical formulas and simulations are far to produce reliable predictions. The values of transport coefficients in a tokamak plasma exceed by far those predicted by the theory of collisional transport. This phenomenon is called abnormal transport and might be due to plasma fluctuations. An estimation of turbulent fluxes derived from the levels of fluctuations, is proposed. A flow description of plasma allows the understanding of most micro-instabilities. The ballooning representation deals with instabilities in a toric geometry. 3 factors play an important role to stabilize plasmas: density pinch, magnetic shear and speed shear. The flow model of plasma gives an erroneous value for the stability threshold, this is due to a bad description of the resonant interaction between wave and particle. As for dynamics, flow models can be improved by adding dissipative terms so that the linear response nears the kinetic response. The kinetic approach is more accurate but is complex because of the great number of dimensions involved. (A.C.)

  12. Self-consistency constraints on turbulent magnetic transport and relaxation in collisionless plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Diamond, P.H.; Hahm, T.S.

    1985-10-01

    Novel constraints on collisionless relaxation and transport in drift-Alfven turbulence are reported. These constraints arise due to the consideration of mode coupling and incoherent fluctuations and the proper application of self-consistency conditions. The result that electrostatic fluctuations alone regulate transport in drift-Alfven turbulence follows directly. Quasilinear transport predictions are discussed in light of these constraints

  13. Stochastic transport models for mixing in variable-density turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakosi, J.; Ristorcelli, J. R.

    2011-11-01

    In variable-density (VD) turbulent mixing, where very-different- density materials coexist, the density fluctuations can be an order of magnitude larger than their mean. Density fluctuations are non-negligible in the inertia terms of the Navier-Stokes equation which has both quadratic and cubic nonlinearities. Very different mixing rates of different materials give rise to large differential accelerations and some fundamentally new physics that is not seen in constant-density turbulence. In VD flows material mixing is active in a sense far stronger than that applied in the Boussinesq approximation of buoyantly-driven flows: the mass fraction fluctuations are coupled to each other and to the fluid momentum. Statistical modeling of VD mixing requires accounting for basic constraints that are not important in the small-density-fluctuation passive-scalar-mixing approximation: the unit-sum of mass fractions, bounded sample space, and the highly skewed nature of the probability densities become essential. We derive a transport equation for the joint probability of mass fractions, equivalent to a system of stochastic differential equations, that is consistent with VD mixing in multi-component turbulence and consistently reduces to passive scalar mixing in constant-density flows.

  14. Microinstabilities and turbulent transport in the reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmody, Daniel Richard

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with addressing the nature of drift wave microturbulence in the reversed field pinch (RFP). Microturbulence is an important phenomenon and contributor to heat and particle transport in tokamaks, where it has been studied for several decades, but its role in the RFP is a rather new topic of study. As such, the nature of RFP drift waves and their relationship to their tokamak counterparts is still developing, and many of the results in this work are focused on addressing this challenge. Fundamental advances in microturbulence research have been made in recent decades through two parallel developments: the theoretical framework encompassed in the gyrokinetic model, and the computational power offered by massively-parallel, high-performance computing systems. Gyrokinetics is a formulation of kinetic theory in such a way that the fast timescale gyromotion of particles around magnetic field lines is averaged out. The implementation and use of RFP equilibrium models in gyrokinetic codes constitutes the bulk of this thesis. A simplified analytic equilibrium, the toroidal Bessel function model (TBFM), is used in the gyrokinetic code GYRO to explore the fundamental scaling properties of drift waves in the RFP geometry. Two drift wave instabilities, the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode and the microtearing mode (MTM) are found to occur, and the relationship of their critical threshold in driving gradients and plasma beta is explored. The critical values in these parameters are found to be above those of similar tokamak cases by roughly a factor of the flux surface aspect ratio. The MTM is found to be stabilized by increasing the RFP pinch parameter theta, making it unlikely for it to unstable in the high-theta improved confinement pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) discharges. Efforts are also made to address microinstabilities in specific experimental discharges of the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST). A semi

  15. Turbulent transport stabilization by ICRH minority fast ions in low rotating JET ILW L-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanomi, N.; Mantica, P.; Di Siena, A.; Delabie, E.; Giroud, C.; Johnson, T.; Lerche, E.; Menmuir, S.; Tsalas, M.; Van Eester, D.; Contributors, JET

    2018-05-01

    The first experimental demonstration that fast ion induced stabilization of thermal turbulent transport takes place also at low values of plasma toroidal rotation has been obtained in JET ILW (ITER-like wall) L-mode plasmas with high (3He)-D ICRH (ion cyclotron resonance heating) power. A reduction of the gyro-Bohm normalized ion heat flux and higher values of the normalized ion temperature gradient have been observed at high ICRH power and low NBI (neutral beam injection) power and plasma rotation. Gyrokinetic simulations indicate that ITG (ion temperature gradient) turbulence stabilization induced by the presence of high-energetic 3He ions is the key mechanism in order to explain the experimental observations. Two main mechanisms have been identified to be responsible for the turbulence stabilization: a linear electrostatic wave-fast particle resonance mechanism and a nonlinear electromagnetic mechanism. The dependence of the stabilization on the 3He distribution function has also been studied.

  16. On the dynamics of turbulent transport near marginal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, P.H.; Hahm, T.S.

    1995-03-01

    A general methodology for describing the dynamics of transport near marginal stability is formulated. Marginal stability is a special case of the more general phenomenon of self-organized criticality. Simple, one field models of the dynamics of tokamak plasma self-organized criticality have been constructed, and include relevant features such as sheared mean flow and transport bifurcations. In such models, slow mode (i.e. large scale, low frequency transport events) correlation times determine the behavior of transport dynamics near marginal stability. To illustrate this, impulse response scaling exponents (z) and turbulent diffusivities (D) have been calculated for the minimal (Burgers) and sheared flow models. For the minimal model, z = 1 (indicating ballastic propagation) and D ∼(S 0 2 ) 1/3 , where S 0 2 is the noise strength. With an identically structured noise spectrum and flow with shearing rate exceeding the ambient decorrelation rate for the largest scale transport events, diffusion is recovered with z = 2 and D ∼ (S 0 2 ) 3/5 . This indicates a qualitative change in the dynamics, as well as a reduction in losses. These results are consistent with recent findings from ρ scaling scans. Several tokamak transport experiments are suggested

  17. β-distribution for Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux in relaxation turbulent boundary layer of compression ramp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, YanChao; Bi, WeiTao; Li, ShiYao; She, ZhenSu

    2017-12-01

    A challenge in the study of turbulent boundary layers (TBLs) is to understand the non-equilibrium relaxation process after sep-aration and reattachment due to shock-wave/boundary-layer interaction. The classical boundary layer theory cannot deal with the strong adverse pressure gradient, and hence, the computational modeling of this process remains inaccurate. Here, we report the direct numerical simulation results of the relaxation TBL behind a compression ramp, which reveal the presence of intense large-scale eddies, with significantly enhanced Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux. A crucial finding is that the wall-normal profiles of the excess Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux obey a β-distribution, which is a product of two power laws with respect to the wall-normal distances from the wall and from the boundary layer edge. In addition, the streamwise decays of the excess Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux also exhibit power laws with respect to the streamwise distance from the corner of the compression ramp. These results suggest that the relaxation TBL obeys the dilation symmetry, which is a specific form of self-organization in this complex non-equilibrium flow. The β-distribution yields important hints for the development of a turbulence model.

  18. Momentum and scalar transport in a localised synthetic turbulence in a channel flow with a short contraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefeuvre, N; Djenidi, L [University of Newcastle, NSW Australia (Australia); Tardu, S, E-mail: nathan.lefeuvre@uon.edu.au [Laboratoire des Ecoulements Geophysiques et Industriels (LEGI), Grenoble (France)

    2011-12-22

    A numerical simulation is undertaken to investigate the transport of momentum and a passive scalar in a localised turbulence in a channel with a contraction. The simulation is carried out using a hybrid method which combines the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM, for the velocity field) and the energy equation (for the temperature field). The localised turbulence is generated through pulsed jets issued in the Poiseuille flow developing in the channel at a Reynolds number of about 1000. The aim of the study is twofold : i) determine effect of the contraction on the localised turbulence, and ii) study how the passive scalar behaves in such contracted localised turbulence. The contraction increase the averaged vorticity in the channel flow, which is accompanied by an increase in the averaged kinetic energy. The contraction also tends to reduce the Reynolds stresses. These results are similar those obtained in turbulent pipe flow with an axisymmetric contraction and in a turbulent boundary layer subjected to a favourable pressure gradient. However, it is found that the heat transport in the normal to the wall direction is more dramatically affected (reduced) than that in the direction of the flow.

  19. Two-dimensional numerical modeling and solution of convection heat transfer in turbulent He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Burt X.; Karr, Gerald R.

    1991-01-01

    Numerical schemes are employed to investigate heat transfer in the turbulent flow of He II. FEM is used to solve a set of equations governing the heat transfer and hydrodynamics of He II in the turbulent regime. Numerical results are compared with available experimental data and interpreted in terms of conventional heat transfer parameters such as the Prandtl number, the Peclet number, and the Nusselt number. Within the prescribed Reynolds number domain, the Gorter-Mellink thermal counterflow mechanism becomes less significant, and He II acts like an ordinary fluid. The convection heat transfer characteristics of He II in the highly turbulent regime can be successfully described by using the conventional turbulence and heat transfer theories.

  20. The Influence of Turbulent Coherent Structure on Suspended Sediment Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S. H.; Tsai, C.

    2017-12-01

    The anomalous diffusion of turbulent sedimentation has received more and more attention in recent years. With the advent of new instruments and technologies, researchers have found that sediment behavior may deviate from Fickian assumptions when particles are heavier. In particle-laden flow, bursting phenomena affects instantaneous local concentrations, and seems to carry suspended particles for a longer distance. Instead of the pure diffusion process in an analogy to Brownian motion, Levy flight which allows particles to move in response to bursting phenomena is suspected to be more suitable for describing particle movement in turbulence. And the fractional differential equation is a potential candidate to improve the concentration profile. However, stochastic modeling (the Differential Chapmen-Kolmogorov Equation) also provides an alternative mathematical framework to describe system transits between different states through diffusion/the jump processes. Within this framework, the stochastic particle tracking model linked with advection diffusion equation is a powerful tool to simulate particle locations in the flow field. By including the jump process to this model, a more comprehensive description for suspended sediment transport can be provided with a better physical insight. This study also shows the adaptability and expandability of the stochastic particle tracking model for suspended sediment transport modeling.

  1. Time-dependent Perpendicular Transport of Energetic Particles for Different Turbulence Configurations and Parallel Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasuik, J.; Shalchi, A., E-mail: andreasm4@yahoo.com [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2017-09-20

    Recently, a new theory for the transport of energetic particles across a mean magnetic field was presented. Compared to other nonlinear theories the new approach has the advantage that it provides a full time-dependent description of the transport. Furthermore, a diffusion approximation is no longer part of that theory. The purpose of this paper is to combine this new approach with a time-dependent model for parallel transport and different turbulence configurations in order to explore the parameter regimes for which we get ballistic transport, compound subdiffusion, and normal Markovian diffusion.

  2. Scalar and joint velocity-scalar PDF modelling of near-wall turbulent heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozorski, Jacek; Waclawczyk, Marta; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The temperature field in a heated turbulent flow is considered as a dynamically passive scalar. The probability density function (PDF) method with down to the wall integration is explored and new modelling proposals are put forward, including the explicit account for the molecular transport terms. Two variants of the approach are considered: first, the scalar PDF method with the use of externally-provided turbulence statistics; and second, the joint (stand-alone) velocity-scalar PDF method where a near-wall model for dynamical variables is coupled with a model for temperature. The closure proposals are formulated in the Lagrangian setting and resulting stochastic evolution equations are solved with a Monte Carlo method. The near-wall region of a heated channel flow is taken as a validation case; the second-order thermal statistics are of a particular interest. The PDF computation results agree reasonably with available DNS data. The sensitivity of results to the molecular Prandtl number and to the thermal wall boundary condition is accounted for

  3. Turbulent diffusion downstream of a linear heat source installed in a turbulent boundary layer; Diffusion turbulente en aval d`une source lineaire de chaleur placee dans une couche limite turbulente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kabiri, M.; Paranthoen, P.; Rosset, L.; Lecordier, J.C. [Rouen Univ., 76 - Mont-Saint-Aignan (France)

    1997-12-31

    An experimental study of heat transport downstream of a linear source installed in a turbulent boundary layer is performed. Second and third order momenta of velocity and temperature fields are presented and compared to gradient-type modeling. (J.S.) 7 refs.

  4. Particle and heat transport in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelier, M.

    1984-01-01

    A limitation to performances of tokamaks is heat transport through magnetic surfaces. Principles of ''classical'' or ''neoclassical'' transport -i.e. transport due to particle and heat fluxes due to Coulomb scattering of charged particle in a magnetic field- are exposed. It is shown that beside this classical effect, ''anomalous'' transport occurs; it is associated to the existence of fluctuating electric or magnetic fields which can appear in the plasma as a result of charge and current perturbations. Tearing modes and drift wave instabilities are taken as typical examples. Experimental features are presented which show that ions behave approximately in a classical way whereas electrons are strongly anomalous [fr

  5. DNS of Turbulent Flow and Heat Transfer in a Channel with Surface Mounted Cubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Velde, R.M. van der; Veldman, A.E.P.

    2000-01-01

    The turbulent flow and heat transfer in a channel with surface mounted cubical obstacles forms a generic example of a problem that occurs in many engineering applications, for instance in the design of cooling devices. We have performed a numerical simulation of it without using any turbulence

  6. DNS of turbulent flow and heat transfer in a channel with surface mounted cubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstappen, R.W.C.P.; Velde, R.M. van der; Veldman, A.E.P.

    2000-01-01

    The turbulent flow and heat transfer in a channel with surface mounted cubical obstacles forms a generic example of a problem that occurs in many engineering applications, for instance in the design of cooling devices. We have performed a numerical simulation of it without using any turbulence

  7. Modelling the turbulent transport of angular momentum in tokamak plasmas - A quasi-linear gyrokinetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottier, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic confinement in tokamaks is for now the most advanced way towards energy production by nuclear fusion. Both theoretical and experimental studies showed that rotation generation can increase its performance by reducing the turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas. The rotation influence on the heat and particle fluxes is studied along with the angular momentum transport with the quasi-linear gyro-kinetic eigenvalue code QuaLiKiz. For this purpose, the QuaLiKiz code is modified in order to take the plasma rotation into account and compute the angular momentum flux. It is shown that QuaLiKiz framework is able to correctly predict the angular momentum flux including the E*B shear induced residual stress as well as the influence of rotation on the heat and particle fluxes. The major approximations of QuaLiKiz formalisms are reviewed, in particular the ballooning representation at its lowest order and the eigenfunctions calculated in the hydrodynamic limit. The construction of the quasi-linear fluxes is also reviewed in details and the quasi-linear angular momentum flux is derived. The different contributions to the turbulent momentum flux are studied and successfully compared both against non-linear gyro-kinetic simulations and experimental data. (author) [fr

  8. Effects of radiative heat transfer on the turbulence structure in inert and reacting mixing layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Somnath; Friedrich, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    We use large-eddy simulation to study the interaction between turbulence and radiative heat transfer in low-speed inert and reacting plane temporal mixing layers. An explicit filtering scheme based on approximate deconvolution is applied to treat the closure problem arising from quadratic nonlinearities of the filtered transport equations. In the reacting case, the working fluid is a mixture of ideal gases where the low-speed stream consists of hydrogen and nitrogen and the high-speed stream consists of oxygen and nitrogen. Both streams are premixed in a way that the free-stream densities are the same and the stoichiometric mixture fraction is 0.3. The filtered heat release term is modelled using equilibrium chemistry. In the inert case, the low-speed stream consists of nitrogen at a temperature of 1000 K and the highspeed stream is pure water vapour of 2000 K, when radiation is turned off. Simulations assuming the gas mixtures as gray gases with artificially increased Planck mean absorption coefficients are performed in which the large-eddy simulation code and the radiation code PRISSMA are fully coupled. In both cases, radiative heat transfer is found to clearly affect fluctuations of thermodynamic variables, Reynolds stresses, and Reynolds stress budget terms like pressure-strain correlations. Source terms in the transport equation for the variance of temperature are used to explain the decrease of this variance in the reacting case and its increase in the inert case

  9. Numerical Investigation of Turbulent Natural Convection Heat Transfer in an Internally-Heated Melt Pool and Metallic Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourgaliev, R.R.; Dinh, A.T.; Dinh, T.N.; Sehgal, B.R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents results of numerical investigation of turbulent natural convection in an internally-heated oxidic pool, and in a metallic layer heated from below and cooled from top and sidewalls. Emphasis is placed upon applicability of the existing heat transfer correlations (obtained from simulant-material experiments) in assessments of a prototypic severe reactor accident. The objectives of this study are (i) to improve the current understanding of the physics of unstably stratified flows, and (ii) to reduce uncertainties associated with modeling and assessment of natural convection heat transfer in the above configuration. Prediction capabilities of different turbulence modeling approaches are first examined and discussed, based on extensive results of numerical investigations performed by present authors. Findings from numerical modeling of turbulent natural convection flow and heat transfer in melt pools and metallic layers are then described. (authors)

  10. Semi-empirical model for heat transfer coefficient in liquid metal turbulent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1982-01-01

    The heat transfer by forced convection in a metal liquid turbulent flow for circular ducts is analyzed. An analogy between the momentum and heat in the wall surface, is determined, aiming to determine an expression for heat transfer coefficient in function of the friction coefficient. (E.G.) [pt

  11. Characteristics of turbulent heat transfer in an annulus at supercritical pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, J.W.R.; Pecnik, R.; Rohde, M.; van der Hagen, T.H.J.J.; Boersma, B.J.

    2017-01-01

    Heat transfer to fluids at supercritical pressure is different from heat transfer at lower pressures due to strong variations of the thermophysical properties with the temperature. We present and analyze results of direct numerical simulations of heat transfer to turbulent CO2 at 8 MPa in an

  12. Characteristics of turbulent velocity and temperature in a wall channel of a heated rod bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, T.; Meyer, L. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1995-09-01

    Turbulent air flow in a wall sub-channel of a heated 37-rod bundle (P/D = 1.12, W/D = 1.06) was investigated. measurements were performed with hot-wire probe with X-wires and a temperature wire. The mean velocity, the mean fluid temperature, the wall shear stress and wall temperature, the turbulent quantities such as the turbulent kinetic energy, the Reynolds-stresses and the turbulent heat fluxes were measured and are discussed with respect to data from isothermal flow in a wall channel and heated flow in a central channel of the same rod bundle. Also, data on the power spectral densities of the velocity and temperature fluctuations are presented. These data show the existence of large scale periodic fluctuations are responsible for the high intersubchannel heat and momentum exchange.

  13. Ion heat transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantica, P; Angioni, C; Baiocchi, B

    2011-01-01

    Detailed experimental studies of ion heat transport have been carried out in JET exploiting the upgrade of active charge exchange spectroscopy and the availability of multi-frequency ion cyclotron resonance heating with 3He minority. The determination of ion temperature gradient (ITG) threshold a...

  14. Particle Acceleration and Fractional Transport in Turbulent Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isliker, Heinz; Pisokas, Theophilos; Vlahos, Loukas; Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    2017-11-01

    We consider a large-scale environment of turbulent reconnection that is fragmented into a number of randomly distributed unstable current sheets (UCSs), and we statistically analyze the acceleration of particles within this environment. We address two important cases of acceleration mechanisms when particles interact with the UCS: (a) electric field acceleration and (b) acceleration by reflection at contracting islands. Electrons and ions are accelerated very efficiently, attaining an energy distribution of power-law shape with an index 1-2, depending on the acceleration mechanism. The transport coefficients in energy space are estimated from test-particle simulation data, and we show that the classical Fokker-Planck (FP) equation fails to reproduce the simulation results when the transport coefficients are inserted into it and it is solved numerically. The cause for this failure is that the particles perform Levy flights in energy space, while the distributions of the energy increments exhibit power-law tails. We then use the fractional transport equation (FTE) derived by Isliker et al., whose parameters and the order of the fractional derivatives are inferred from the simulation data, and solving the FTE numerically, we show that the FTE successfully reproduces the kinetic energy distribution of the test particles. We discuss in detail the analysis of the simulation data and the criteria that allow one to judge the appropriateness of either an FTE or a classical FP equation as a transport model.

  15. Particle Acceleration and Fractional Transport in Turbulent Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isliker, Heinz; Pisokas, Theophilos; Vlahos, Loukas [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-52124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Anastasiadis, Anastasios [Institute for Astronomy, Astrophysics, Space Applications and Remote Sensing, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece)

    2017-11-01

    We consider a large-scale environment of turbulent reconnection that is fragmented into a number of randomly distributed unstable current sheets (UCSs), and we statistically analyze the acceleration of particles within this environment. We address two important cases of acceleration mechanisms when particles interact with the UCS: (a) electric field acceleration and (b) acceleration by reflection at contracting islands. Electrons and ions are accelerated very efficiently, attaining an energy distribution of power-law shape with an index 1–2, depending on the acceleration mechanism. The transport coefficients in energy space are estimated from test-particle simulation data, and we show that the classical Fokker–Planck (FP) equation fails to reproduce the simulation results when the transport coefficients are inserted into it and it is solved numerically. The cause for this failure is that the particles perform Levy flights in energy space, while the distributions of the energy increments exhibit power-law tails. We then use the fractional transport equation (FTE) derived by Isliker et al., whose parameters and the order of the fractional derivatives are inferred from the simulation data, and solving the FTE numerically, we show that the FTE successfully reproduces the kinetic energy distribution of the test particles. We discuss in detail the analysis of the simulation data and the criteria that allow one to judge the appropriateness of either an FTE or a classical FP equation as a transport model.

  16. Transition to ballistic regime for heat transport in helium II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciacca, Michele, E-mail: michele.sciacca@unipa.it [Dipartimento Scienze Agrarie e Forestali, Università degli studi di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Sellitto, Antonio, E-mail: ant.sellitto@gmail.com [Dipartimento di Matematica, Informatica ed Economia, Università della Basilicata, Campus Macchia Romana, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Jou, David, E-mail: david.jou@uab.cat [Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Institut d' Estudis Catalans, Carme 47, 08001 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-07-04

    The size-dependent and flux-dependent effective thermal conductivity of narrow capillaries filled with superfluid helium is analyzed from a thermodynamic continuum perspective. The classical Landau evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of quiescent superfluid, or the Gorter–Mellinck regime of turbulent superfluids, is extended to describe the transition to ballistic regime in narrow channels wherein the radius R is comparable to (or smaller than) the phonon mean-free path ℓ in superfluid helium. To do so, we start from an extended equation for the heat flux incorporating non-local terms, and take into consideration a heat slip flow along the walls of the tube. This leads from an effective thermal conductivity proportional to R{sup 2} (Landau regime) to another one proportional to Rℓ (ballistic regime). We consider two kinds of flows: along cylindrical pipes and along two infinite parallel plates. - Highlights: • Heat transport in counterflow helium in the ballistic regime. • The one-fluid model based on the Extended Thermodynamics is used. • The transition from the Landau regime to the ballistic regime. • The transition from quantum turbulence to ballistic regime.

  17. THE MECHANICAL GREENHOUSE: BURIAL OF HEAT BY TURBULENCE IN HOT JUPITER ATMOSPHERES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Mitchell, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    The intense irradiation received by hot Jupiters suppresses convection in the outer layers of their atmospheres and lowers their cooling rates. 'Inflated' hot Jupiters, i.e., those with anomalously large transit radii, require additional sources of heat or suppressed cooling. We consider the effect of forced turbulent mixing in the radiative layer, which could be driven by atmospheric circulation or by another mechanism. Due to stable stratification in the atmosphere, forced turbulence drives a downward flux of heat. Weak turbulent mixing slows the cooling rate by this process, as if the planet were irradiated more intensely. Stronger turbulent mixing buries heat into the convective interior, provided the turbulence extends to the radiative-convective boundary. This inflates the planet until a balance is reached between the heat buried into and radiated from the interior. We also include the direct injection of heat due to the dissipation of turbulence or other effects. Such heating is already known to slow planetary cooling. We find that dissipation also enhances heat burial from mixing by lowering the threshold for turbulent mixing to drive heat into the interior. Strong turbulent mixing of heavy molecular species such as TiO may be necessary to explain stratospheric thermal inversions. We show that the amount of mixing required to loft TiO may overinflate the planet by our mechanism. This possible refutation of the TiO hypothesis deserves further study. Our inflation mechanism requires a deep stratified layer that only exists when the absorbed stellar flux greatly exceeds the intrinsic emitted flux. Thus, it would be less effective for more luminous brown dwarfs and for longer period gas giants, including Jupiter and Saturn.

  18. Distributed Roughness Effects on Blunt-Body Transition and Turbulent Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to obtain data on the effects of surface roughness on blunt bodies at laminar, transitional, and turbulent conditions. Wind tunnel models with distributed surface roughness heights from 0.06 mm to 1.75 mm were tested and heating data were obtained using global surface thermography. Heating rates of up to 85% higher than predicted, smooth-surface turbulent levels were measured.

  19. Relaxation of ion energy spectrum just after turbulent heating pulse in TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Hiraki, Naoji; Nakamura, Yukio; Itoh, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    The temporal evolution and spatial profile of the ion energy spectrum just after the application of a toroidal current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in the TRIAM-1 tokamak and also numerically using the Fokker-Planck equation. The two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to a single one within tausub(i) (the ion collision time). (author)

  20. Tokamak fluidlike equations, with applications to turbulence and transport in H mode discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y.B.; Biglari, H.; Carreras, B.A.; Diamond, P.H.; Groebner, R.J.; Kwon, O.J.; Spong, D.A.; Callen, J.D.; Chang, Z.; Hollenberg, J.B.; Sundaram, A.K.; Terry, P.W.; Wang, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in developing tokamak fluidlike equations which are valid in all collisionality regimes in toroidal devices, and their applications to turbulence and transport in tokamaks. The areas highlighted in this paper include: the rigorous derivation of tokamak fluidlike equations via a generalized Chapman-Enskog procedure in various collisionality regimes and on various time scales; their application to collisionless and collisional drift wave models in a sheared slab geometry; applications to neoclassical drift wave turbulence; i.e. neoclassical ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence and neoclassical electron-drift-wave turbulence; applications to neoclassical bootstrap-current-driven turbulence; numerical simulation of nonlinear bootstrap-current-driven turbulence and tearing mode turbulence; transport in Hot-Ion H mode discharges. 20 refs., 3 figs

  1. Modeling 3D conjugate heat and mass transfer for turbulent air drying of Chilean papaya in a direct contact dryer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus-Mondaca, Roberto A.; Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Zambra, Carlos E.; Moraga, Nelson O.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D model considering heat and mass transfer for food dehydration inside a direct contact dryer is studied. The k- ɛ model is used to describe turbulent air flow. The samples thermophysical properties as density, specific heat, and thermal conductivity are assumed to vary non-linearly with temperature. FVM, SIMPLE algorithm based on a FORTRAN code are used. Results unsteady velocity, temperature, moisture, kinetic energy and dissipation rate for the air flow are presented, whilst temperature and moisture values for the food also are presented. The validation procedure includes a comparison with experimental and numerical temperature and moisture content results obtained from experimental data, reaching a deviation 7-10 %. In addition, this turbulent k- ɛ model provided a better understanding of the transport phenomenon inside the dryer and sample.

  2. Assessment of CFD Hypersonic Turbulent Heating Rates for Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William A.; Oliver, A. Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Turbulent CFD codes are assessed for the prediction of convective heat transfer rates at turbulent, hypersonic conditions. Algebraic turbulence models are used within the DPLR and LAURA CFD codes. The benchmark heat transfer rates are derived from thermocouple measurements of the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery windward tiles during the STS-119 and STS-128 entries. The thermocouples were located underneath the reaction-cured glass coating on the thermal protection tiles. Boundary layer transition flight experiments conducted during both of those entries promoted turbulent flow at unusually high Mach numbers, with the present analysis considering Mach 10{15. Similar prior comparisons of CFD predictions directly to the flight temperature measurements were unsatisfactory, showing diverging trends between prediction and measurement for Mach numbers greater than 11. In the prior work, surface temperatures and convective heat transfer rates had been assumed to be in radiative equilibrium. The present work employs a one-dimensional time-accurate conduction analysis to relate measured temperatures to surface heat transfer rates, removing heat soak lag from the flight data, in order to better assess the predictive accuracy of the numerical models. The turbulent CFD shows good agreement for turbulent fuselage flow up to Mach 13. But on the wing in the wake of the boundary layer trip, the inclusion of tile conduction effects does not explain the prior observed discrepancy in trends between simulation and experiment; the flight heat transfer measurements are roughly constant over Mach 11-15, versus an increasing trend with Mach number from the CFD.

  3. Self-consistent viscous heating of rapidly compressed turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alejandro; Morgan, Brandon

    2017-11-01

    Given turbulence subjected to infinitely rapid deformations, linear terms representing interactions between the mean flow and the turbulence dictate the evolution of the flow, whereas non-linear terms corresponding to turbulence-turbulence interactions are safely ignored. For rapidly deformed flows where the turbulence Reynolds number is not sufficiently large, viscous effects can't be neglected and tend to play a prominent role, as shown in the study of Davidovits & Fisch (2016). For such a case, the rapid increase of viscosity in a plasma-as compared to the weaker scaling of viscosity in a fluid-leads to the sudden viscous dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy. As shown in Davidovits & Fisch, increases in temperature caused by the direct compression of the plasma drive sufficiently large values of viscosity. We report on numerical simulations of turbulence where the increase in temperature is the result of both the direct compression (an inviscid mechanism) and the self-consistent viscous transfer of energy from the turbulent scales towards the thermal energy. A comparison between implicit large-eddy simulations against well-resolved direct numerical simulations is included to asses the effect of the numerical and subgrid-scale dissipation on the self-consistent viscous This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Turbulence Heating ObserveR - satellite mission proposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaivads, A.; Retinò, A.; J. Soucek; Yu.V. Khotyaintsev; F. Valentini (Francesco); C.P. Escoubet; O. Alexandrova; M. André; S.D. Bale; M. Balikhin; D. Burgess; E. Camporeale (Enrico); D. Caprioli; C.H.K. Chen; E. Clacey; C.M. Cully; J. De Keyser; J.P. Eastwood; A.N. Fazakerley; S. Eriksson; M.L. Goldstein; D.B. Graham; S. Haaland; M. Hoshino; H. Ji; H. Karimabadi; H. Kucharek; B. Lavraud; F. Marcucci; W.H. Matthaeus; T.E. Moore; R. Nakamura; Y. Narita; Z. Nemecek; C. Norgren; H. Opgenoorth; M. Palmroth; D. Perrone; J.-L. Pinçon; P. Rathsman; H. Rothkaehl; F. Sahraoui; S. Servidio; L. Sorriso-Valvo; R. Vainio; Z. Vörös; R.F. Wimmer-Schweingruber

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe Universe is permeated by hot, turbulent, magnetized plasmas. Turbulent plasma is a major constituent of active galactic nuclei, supernova remnants, the intergalactic and interstellar medium, the solar corona, the solar wind and the Earth’s magnetosphere, just to mention a few

  5. Theory of ion heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gott, Y.V.; Yurchenko, E.I.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments which have been carried out in several tokamaks to determine the ion thermal conductivity show that it is several times the value predicted by the neoclassical theory. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is proposed. When the finite width of a banana is taken into account, there are substantial increases in the heat fluxes which stem from the important contribution of superthermal ions to the transport. If the electron diffusive flux is zero, a systematic account of the ions with E>T leads to an ion heat flux with a finite banana width which is two to four times the neoclassical prediction. The effect of the anomalous nature of the electron flux on the ion heat transport is analyzed. An expression is derived for calculating the ion heat transport over the entire range of collision rates

  6. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE TURBULENT emf AND TRANSPORT OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN A LIQUID SODIUM EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahbarnia, Kian; Brown, Benjamin P.; Clark, Mike M.; Kaplan, Elliot J.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Rasmus, Alex M.; Taylor, Nicholas Zane; Forest, Cary B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Jenko, Frank; Limone, Angelo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pinton, Jean-Francois; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier, E-mail: kian.rahbarnia@ipp.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS and Universite de Lyon, F-69364 Lyon (France)

    2012-11-10

    For the first time, we have directly measured the transport of a vector magnetic field by isotropic turbulence in a high Reynolds number liquid metal flow. In analogy with direct measurements of the turbulent Reynolds stress (turbulent viscosity) that governs momentum transport, we have measured the turbulent electromotive force (emf) by simultaneously measuring three components of velocity and magnetic fields, and computed the correlations that lead to mean-field current generation. Furthermore, we show that this turbulent emf tends to oppose and cancel out the local current, acting to increase the effective resistivity of the medium, i.e., it acts as an enhanced magnetic diffusivity. This has important implications for turbulent transport in astrophysical objects, particularly in dynamos and accretion disks.

  7. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE TURBULENT emf AND TRANSPORT OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN A LIQUID SODIUM EXPERIMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahbarnia, Kian; Brown, Benjamin P.; Clark, Mike M.; Kaplan, Elliot J.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Rasmus, Alex M.; Taylor, Nicholas Zane; Forest, Cary B.; Jenko, Frank; Limone, Angelo; Pinton, Jean-François; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, we have directly measured the transport of a vector magnetic field by isotropic turbulence in a high Reynolds number liquid metal flow. In analogy with direct measurements of the turbulent Reynolds stress (turbulent viscosity) that governs momentum transport, we have measured the turbulent electromotive force (emf) by simultaneously measuring three components of velocity and magnetic fields, and computed the correlations that lead to mean-field current generation. Furthermore, we show that this turbulent emf tends to oppose and cancel out the local current, acting to increase the effective resistivity of the medium, i.e., it acts as an enhanced magnetic diffusivity. This has important implications for turbulent transport in astrophysical objects, particularly in dynamos and accretion disks.

  8. Heat, mass, and momentum transport model for hydrogen diffusion flames in nuclear reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    It is now possible to analyze the time-dependent, fully three-dimensional behavior of hydrogen diffusion flames in nuclear reactor containments. This analysis involves coupling the full Navier-Stokes equations with multi-species transport to the global chemical kinetics of hydrogen combustion. A transport equation for the subgrid scale turbulent kinetic energy density is solved to produce the time and space dependent turbulent transport coefficients. The heat transfer coefficient governing the exchange of heat between fluid computational cells adjacent to wall cells is calculated by a modified Reynolds analogy formulation. The analysis of a MARK-III containment indicates very complex flow patterns that greatly influence fluid and wall temperatures and heat fluxes. 18 refs., 24 figs

  9. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2017-01-01

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB's)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB's] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  10. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-05

    Turbulence, and turbulence-driven transport are ubiquitous in magnetically confined plasmas, where there is an intimate relationship between turbulence, transport, instability driving mechanisms (such as gradients), plasma flows, and flow shear. Though many of the detailed physics of the interrelationship between turbulence, transport, drive mechanisms, and flow remain unclear, there have been many demonstrations that transport and/or turbulence can be suppressed or reduced via manipulations of plasma flow profiles. This is well known in magnetic fusion plasmas [e.g., high confinement mode (H-mode) and internal transport barriers (ITB’s)], and has also been demonstrated in laboratory plasmas. However, it may be that the levels of particle transport obtained in such cases [e.g. H-mode, ITB’s] are actually lower than is desirable for a practical fusion device. Ideally, one would be able to actively feedback control the turbulent transport, via manipulation of the flow profiles. The purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using both advanced model-based control algorithms, as well as non-model-based algorithms, to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles. The University of New Mexico was responsible for the experimental portion of the project, while our collaborators at the University of Montana provided plasma transport modeling, and collaborators at Lehigh University developed and explored control methods.

  11. Turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in low flow gyrokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I; Catto, Peter J

    2010-01-01

    We derive a self-consistent equation for the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks in the low flow ordering that only requires solving gyrokinetic Fokker-Planck and quasineutrality equations correct to second order in an expansion on the gyroradius over scale length. We also show that according to our orderings the long wavelength toroidal rotation and the long wavelength radial electric field satisfy the neoclassical relation that gives the toroidal rotation as a function of the radial electric field and the radial gradients of pressure and temperature. Thus, the radial electric field can be solved for once the toroidal rotation is calculated from the transport of toroidal angular momentum. Unfortunately, even though this methodology only requires a gyrokinetic model correct to second order in gyroradius over scale length, current gyrokinetic simulations are only valid to first order. To overcome this difficulty, we exploit the smallish ratio B p /B, where B is the total magnetic field and B p is its poloidal component. When B p /B is small, the usual first order gyrokinetic equation provides solutions that are accurate enough to employ for our expression for the transport of toroidal angular momentum. We show that current δf and full f simulations only need small corrections to achieve this accuracy. Full f simulations, however, are still unable to determine the long wavelength, radial electric field from the quasineutrality equation.

  12. Anomalous transport in turbulent plasmas and continuous time random walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balescu, R.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility of a model of anomalous transport problems in a turbulent plasma by a purely stochastic process is investigated. The theory of continuous time random walks (CTRW's) is briefly reviewed. It is shown that a particular class, called the standard long tail CTRW's is of special interest for the description of subdiffusive transport. Its evolution is described by a non-Markovian diffusion equation that is constructed in such a way as to yield exact values for all the moments of the density profile. The concept of a CTRW model is compared to an exact solution of a simple test problem: transport of charged particles in a fluctuating magnetic field in the limit of infinite perpendicular correlation length. Although the well-known behavior of the mean square displacement proportional to t 1/2 is easily recovered, the exact density profile cannot be modeled by a CTRW. However, the quasilinear approximation of the kinetic equation has the form of a non-Markovian diffusion equation and can thus be generated by a CTRW

  13. Theoretical studies of turbulence and anomalous transport in toroidal confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The research performed under this grant during the current year has focused on key issues with respect to turbulence and transport in toroidal confinement devices. This work includes theoretical and computational studies of electron thermal confinement which have concentrated on the role of sheared poloidal flow in suppressing turbulence and transport, trapped ion convective cell turbulence and microtearing turbulence; analytical studies of anomalous particle transport and pinch mechanisms, and comparison with experimental measurement; development of the theory of self-consistent radial transport of field-aligned momentum in the tokamak and RFP; and work on other topics (ion temperature gradient driven turbulence, RFP fluctuation theory, coherent structures). Progress and publications in these areas are briefly summarized in this report. 20 refs

  14. Rapid plasma heating by collective interactions, using strong turbulence and relativistic electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wharton, C.B.

    1977-01-01

    A multi-kilovolt, moderate density plasma was generated in a magnetic mirror confinement system by two methods: turbulent heating and relativistic electron beam. Extensive diagnostic development permitted the measurement of important plasma characteristics, leading to interesting and novel conclusions regarding heating and loss mechanisms. Electron and ion heating mechanisms were categorized, and parameter studies made to establish ranges of importance. Nonthermal ion and electron energy distributions were measured. Beam propagation and energy deposition studies yielded the spatial dependence of plasma heating

  15. Numerical Predictions of Early Stage Turbulence in Oscillatory Flow across Parallel-Plate Heat Exchangers of a Thermoacoustic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah A. Z. Mohd Saat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the predictions of turbulent transition in oscillatory flow subjected to temperature gradients, which often occurs within heat exchangers of thermoacoustic devices. A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was developed in ANSYS FLUENT and validated using the earlier experimental data. Four drive ratios (defined as maximum pressure amplitude to mean pressure were investigated: 0.30%, 0.45%, 0.65% and 0.83%. It has been found that the introduction of the turbulence model at a drive ratio as low as 0.45% improves the predictions of flow structure compared to experiments, which indicates that turbulent transition may occur at much smaller flow amplitudes than previously thought. In the current investigation, the critical Reynolds number based on the thickness of Stokes’ layer falls in the range between 70 and 100. The models tested included four variants of the RANS (Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes equations: k-ε, k-ω, shear-stress-transport (SST-k-ω and transition-SST, the laminar model being used as a reference. Discussions are based on velocity profiles, vorticity plots, viscous dissipation and the resulting heat transfer and their comparison with experimental results. The SST-k-ω turbulence model and, in some cases, transition-SST provide the best fit of the velocity profile between numerical and experimental data (the value of the introduced metric measuring the deviation of the CFD velocity profiles from experiment is up to 43% lower than for the laminar model and also give the best match in terms of calculated heat flux. The viscous dissipation also increases with an increase of the drive ratio. The results suggest that turbulence should be considered when designing thermoacoustic devices even in low-amplitude regimes in order to improve the performance predictions of thermoacoustic systems.

  16. The Effects of Land Surface Heating And Roughness Elements on the Structure and Scaling Laws of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghannam, Khaled

    structure function of the longitudinal and vertical velocity components is examined using five experimental data sets that span the roughness sub-layer above vegetation canopies, the atmospheric surface-layer above a lake and a grass field, and an open channel experiment. The results indicate that close to the wall/surface, this scaling exists in the longitudinal velocity structure function only, with the vertical velocity counterpart exhibiting a much narrower extent of this range due to smaller separation of scales. Phenomenological aspects of the large-scale eddies show that the length scale formed by the friction velocity and energy dissipation acts as a dominant similarity length scale in collapsing experimental data at different heights, mainly due to the imbalance between local production and dissipation of turbulence kinetic energy. • Nonlocal heat transport in the convective atmospheric boundary-layer: Failure of the mean gradient-diffusion (K-theory) in the convective boundary-layer is explored. Using large eddy simulation runs for the atmospheric boundary layer spanning weakly to strongly convective conditions, a generic diagnostic framework that encodes the role of third-order moments in nonlocal heat transport is developed and tested. The premise is that these nonlocal effects are responsible for the inherent asymmetry in vertical transport, and hence the necessary non-Gaussian nature of the joint probability density function (JPDF) of vertical velocity and potential temperature must account for these effects. Conditional sampling (quadrant analysis) of this function and the imbalance between the flow mechanisms of ejections and sweeps are used to characterize this asymmetry, which is then linked to the third-order moments using a cumulant-discard method for the Gram-Charlier expansion of the JPDF. The connection between the ejection-sweep events and the third-order moments shows that the concepts of bottom-up/top-down diffusion, or updraft/downdraft models

  17. Finite beta effects on turbulent transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hein, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    The research on the transport properties of magnetically confined plasmas plays an essential role towards the achievement of practical nuclear fusion energy. An economically viable fusion reactor is expected to operate at high plasma pressure. This implies that the detailed study of the impact of electromagnetic effects, whose strength increases with increasing pressure, is of critical importance. In the present work, the electromagnetic effects on the particle, momentum and heat transport channels have been investigated, with both analytical and numerical calculations. Transport processes due to a finite plasma pressure have been identified, their physical mechanisms have been explained, and their contributions have been quantified, showing that they can be significant under experimentally relevant conditions.

  18. Steady State Turbulent Transport in Magnetic Fusion Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Kolesnikov, R.; Wang, W.X.; Tang, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    For more than a decade, the study of microturbulence, driven by ion temperature gradient (ITG) drift instabilities in tokamak devices, has been an active area of research in magnetic fusion science for both experimentalists and theorists alike. One of the important impetus for this avenue of research was the discovery of the radial streamers associated the ITG modes in the early nineties using a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. Since then, ITG simulations based on the codes with increasing realism have become possible with the dramatic increase in computing power. The notable examples were the demonstration of the importance of nonlinearly generated zonal flows in regulating ion thermal transport and the transition from Bohm to GyroBoham scaling with increased device size. In this paper, we will describe another interesting nonlinear physical process associated with the parallel acceleration of the ions, that is found to play an important role for the steady state turbulent transport. Its discovery is again through the use of the modern massively parallel supercomputers

  19. ION ACOUSTIC TURBULENCE, ANOMALOUS TRANSPORT, AND SYSTEM DYNAMICS IN HALL EFFECT THRUSTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    NUMBER (Include area code) 30 June 2017 Briefing Charts 26 May 2017 - 30 June 2017 ION ACOUSTIC TURBULENCE, ANOMALOUS TRANSPORT, AND SYSTEM DYNAMICS ...Robert Martin N/A ION ACOUSTIC TURBULENCE, ANOMALOUS TRANSPORT, AND SYSTEM DYNAMICS IN HALL EFFECT THRUSTERS Robert Martin1, Jonathan Tran2 1AIR FORCE...Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited. PA# 17394 1 / 13 OUTLINE 1 INTRODUCTION 2 TRANSPORT 3 DYNAMIC SYSTEM 4 SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

  20. Study of Variable Turbulent Prandtl Number Model for Heat Transfer to Supercritical Fluids in Vertical Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Dai, Xiaoye; Wang, Dabiao; Shi, Lin

    2018-06-01

    In order to improve the prediction performance of the numerical simulations for heat transfer of supercritical pressure fluids, a variable turbulent Prandtl number (Prt) model for vertical upward flow at supercritical pressures was developed in this study. The effects of Prt on the numerical simulation were analyzed, especially for the heat transfer deterioration conditions. Based on the analyses, the turbulent Prandtl number was modeled as a function of the turbulent viscosity ratio and molecular Prandtl number. The model was evaluated using experimental heat transfer data of CO2, water and Freon. The wall temperatures, including the heat transfer deterioration cases, were more accurately predicted by this model than by traditional numerical calculations with a constant Prt. By analyzing the predicted results with and without the variable Prt model, it was found that the predicted velocity distribution and turbulent mixing characteristics with the variable Prt model are quite different from that predicted by a constant Prt. When heat transfer deterioration occurs, the radial velocity profile deviates from the log-law profile and the restrained turbulent mixing then leads to the deteriorated heat transfer.

  1. Combined Influence of Strain and Heat Loss on Turbulent Premixed Flame Stabilization

    KAUST Repository

    Tay-Wo-Chong, Luis

    2015-11-16

    The present paper argues that the prediction of turbulent premixed flames under non-adiabatic conditions can be improved by considering the combined effects of strain and heat loss on reaction rates. The effect of strain in the presence of heat loss on the consumption speed of laminar premixed flames was quantified by calculations of asymmetric counterflow configurations (“fresh-to-burnt”) with detailed chemistry. Heat losses were introduced by setting the temperature of the incoming stream of products on the “burnt” side to values below those corresponding to adiabatic conditions. The consumption speed decreased in a roughly exponential manner with increasing strain rate, and this tendency became more pronounced in the presence of heat losses. An empirical relation in terms of Markstein number, Karlovitz Number and a non-dimensional heat loss parameter was proposed for the combined influence of strain and heat losses on the consumption speed. Combining this empirical relation with a presumed probability density function for strain in turbulent flows, an attenuation factor that accounts for the effect of strain and heat loss on the reaction rate in turbulent flows was deduced and implemented into a turbulent combustion model. URANS simulations of a premixed swirl burner were carried out and validated against flow field and OH chemiluminescence measurements. Introducing the effects of strain and heat loss into the combustion model, the flame topology observed experimentally was correctly reproduced, with good agreement between experiment and simulation for flow field and flame length.

  2. Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bailly, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the major problems of turbulence and turbulent processes, including  physical phenomena, their modeling and their simulation. After a general introduction in Chapter 1 illustrating many aspects dealing with turbulent flows, averaged equations and kinetic energy budgets are provided in Chapter 2. The concept of turbulent viscosity as a closure of the Reynolds stress is also introduced. Wall-bounded flows are presented in Chapter 3, and aspects specific to boundary layers and channel or pipe flows are also pointed out. Free shear flows, namely free jets and wakes, are considered in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 deals with vortex dynamics. Homogeneous turbulence, isotropy, and dynamics of isotropic turbulence are presented in Chapters 6 and 7. Turbulence is then described both in the physical space and in the wave number space. Time dependent numerical simulations are presented in Chapter 8, where an introduction to large eddy simulation is offered. The last three chapters of the book summarize remarka...

  3. Transport in Auxiliary Heated NSTX Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, B.P.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Bitte, M.L.; Bourdelle, C.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; Maingi, R.; Menard, J.E.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paul, S.F.; Redi, M.H.; Roquemore, A.L.; Rosenberg, A.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Stutman, D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Soukhanovskii, V.A.; Wilson, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    The NSTX spherical torus (ST) provides a unique platform to investigate magnetic confinement in auxiliary-heated plasmas at low aspect ratio. Auxiliary power is routinely coupled to ohmically heated plasmas by deuterium neutral-beam injection (NBI) and by high-harmonic fast waves (HHFW) launch. While theory predicts both techniques to preferentially heat electrons, experiment reveals the electron temperature is greater than the ion temperature during HHFW, but the electron temperature is less than the ion temperature during NBI. In the following we present the experimental data and the results of transport analyses

  4. Role of Turbulent Prandtl Number on Heat Flux at Hypersonic Mach Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Edwards, J. R.; Hassan, H. A.; Gaffney, R. L., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    A new turbulence model suited for calculating the turbulent Prandtl number as part of the solution is presented. The model is based on a set of two equations: one governing the variance of the enthalpy and the other governing its dissipation rate. These equations were derived from the exact energy equation and thus take into consideration compressibility and dissipation terms. The model is used to study two cases involving shock wave/boundary layer interaction at Mach 9.22 and Mach 5.0. In general, heat transfer prediction showed great improvement over traditional turbulence models where the turbulent Prandtl number is assumed constant. It is concluded that using a model that calculates the turbulent Prandtl number as part of the solution is the key to bridging the gap between theory and experiment for flows dominated by shock wave/boundary layer interactions.

  5. On the calculation of length scales for turbulent heat transfer correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, M.J.; Hollingsworth, D.K.

    1999-07-01

    Turbulence length scale calculation methods were critically reviewed for their usefulness in boundary layer heat transfer correlations. Merits and deficiencies in each calculation method were presented. A rigorous method for calculating an energy-based integral scale was introduced. The method uses the variance of the streamwise velocity and a measured dissipation spectrum to calculate the length scale. Advantages and disadvantages of the new method were discussed. A principal advantage is the capability to decisively calculate length scales in a low-Reynolds-number turbulent boundary layer. The calculation method was tested with data from grid-generated, free-shear-layer, and wall-bounded turbulence. In each case, the method proved successful. The length scale is well behaved in turbulent boundary layers with momentum thickness Reynolds numbers from 400 to 2,100 and in flows with turbulent Reynolds numbers as low as 90.

  6. Density effects on tokamak edge turbulence and transport with magnetic X-points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Ryutov, D.D.; Umansky, M.V.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Bulmer, R.H.; Russell, D.A.; Myra, J.R.; D'Ippolito, D.A.; Greenwald, M.; Snyder, P.B.; Mahdavi, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Results are presented from the 3D electromagnetic turbulence code BOUT, the 2D transport code UEDGE, and theoretical analysis of boundary turbulence and transport in a real divertor-plasma geometry and its relationship to the density limit. Key results include: (1) a transition of the boundary turbulence from resistive X-point to resistive-ballooning as a critical plasma density is exceeded; (2) formation of an X-point MARFE in 2D UEDGE transport simulations for increasing outboard radial transport as found by BOUT for increasing density; (3) identification of convective transport by localized plasma 'blobs' in the SOL at high density during neutral fueling, and decorrelation of turbulence between the midplane and the divertor leg due to strong X-point magnetic shear; (4) a new divertor-leg instability driven at high plasma beta by a radial tilt of the divertor plate. (author)

  7. Subcooled He II heat transport in the channel with abrupt contractions/enlargements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, R.; Iwamoto, A.; Hamaguchi, S.; Mito, T.

    2002-01-01

    Heat transport mechanisms for subcooled He II in the channel with abrupt contractions and/or enlargements have been investigated under steady state conditions. The channel, made of G-10, contains various contraction geometries to simulate the cooling channel of a superconducting magnet. In other words, contractions are periodically placed along the channel to simulate the spacers within the magnet winding. A copper block heater inputs the heat to the channel from one end, while the other end is open to the He II bath. Temperature profiles were measured with temperature sensors embedded in the channel as a function of heat input. Calculations were performed using a simple one-dimensional turbulent heat transport equation and with geometric factor consideration. The effects on heat transport mechanisms in He II caused by abrupt change of channel geometry and size are discussed

  8. Transport equation for the time scale of a turbulent scalar field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbatskij, A.F.

    1999-01-01

    The two-parametric turbulence models cause serious difficulties by modeling the near-wall flows due to absence of the natural boundary condition on the wall for dissipation of the ε turbulence energy and the ε θ scalar field destruction. This difficulty may be overcome, if instead of the ε and ε θ , as the second parameter of the model, to apply the time scales of the turbulent dynamic and scalar fields. The equation of the scalar field is derived and numerical coefficients included therein, are determined from the simplest problems on the turbulent heat transfer [ru

  9. Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets for surface layer cooling induced by the passage of Hurricane Frances (2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peisheng; Sanford, Thomas B.; Imberger, JöRg

    2009-12-01

    Heat and turbulent kinetic energy budgets of the ocean surface layer during the passage of Hurricane Frances were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. In situ data obtained with the Electromagnetic-Autonomous Profiling Explorer (EM-APEX) floats were used to set up the initial conditions of the model simulation and to compare to the simulation results. The spatial heat budgets reveal that during the hurricane passage, not only the entrainment in the bottom of surface mixed layer but also the horizontal water advection were important factors determining the spatial pattern of sea surface temperature. At the free surface, the hurricane-brought precipitation contributed a negligible amount to the air-sea heat exchange, but the precipitation produced a negative buoyancy flux in the surface layer that overwhelmed the instability induced by the heat loss to the atmosphere. Integrated over the domain within 400 km of the hurricane eye on day 245.71 of 2004, the rate of heat anomaly in the surface water was estimated to be about 0.45 PW (1 PW = 1015 W), with about 20% (0.09 PW in total) of this was due to the heat exchange at the air-sea interface, and almost all the remainder (0.36 PW) was downward transported by oceanic vertical mixing. Shear production was the major source of turbulent kinetic energy amounting 88.5% of the source of turbulent kinetic energy, while the rest (11.5%) was attributed to the wind stirring at sea surface. The increase of ocean potential energy due to vertical mixing represented 7.3% of the energy deposited by wind stress.

  10. Experimental analysis for heat transfer of nanofluid with wire coil turbulators in a concentric tube heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyürek, Eda Feyza; Geliş, Kadir; Şahin, Bayram; Manay, Eyüphan

    2018-06-01

    Nanofluids are a novel class of heat transfer suspensions of metallic or nonmetallic nanopowders with a size of less than 100 nm in base fluids and they can increase heat transfer potential of the base fluids in various applications. In the last decade, nanofluids have become an intensive research topic because of their improved thermal properties and possible heat transfer applications. For comparison, an experiment using water as the working fluid in the heat exchanger without wire coils was also performed. Turbulent forced convection heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of Al2O3-water nanofluids in a concentric tube heat exchanger with and without wire coil turbulators were experimentally investigated in this research. Experiments effected particle volume concentrations of 0.4-0.8 to 1.2-1.6 vol% in the Reynolds number range from 4000 to 20,000. Two turbulators with the pitches of 25 mm and 39 mm were used. The average Nusselt number increased with increasing the Reynolds number and particle concentrations. Moreover, the pressure drop of the Al2O3-water nanofluid showed nearly equal to that of pure water at the same Reynolds number range. As a result, nanofluids with lower particle concentrations did not show an important influence on pressure drop change. Nonetheless, when the wire coils used in the heat exchanger, it increased pressure drop as well as the heat transfer coefficient.

  11. Transport coefficients for laminar and turbulent flow through a four-cusp channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Dutra, A. de; Parise, J.A.R.; Souza Mendes, P.R. de.

    1986-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficients for laminar and turbulent flow in a four-cusp channel were determined. A numerical solution was developed for laminar flow an and experimental study for turbulent flow was carried out. Systematic variations of the Reynolds number were done in the range 900-30000. The results show that the heat transfer coefficients for the four-cusp channel are much lower than the coefficients for the circular tube. (author) [pt

  12. Transport of inertial particles in a turbulent premixed jet flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battista, F; Picano, F; Casciola, C M; Troiani, G

    2011-01-01

    The heat release, occurring in reacting flows, induces a sudden fluid acceleration which particles follow with a certain lag, due to their finite inertia. Actually, the coupling between particle inertia and the flame front expansion strongly biases the spatial distribution of the particles, by inducing the formation of localized clouds with different dimensions downstream the thin flame front. A possible indicator of this preferential localization is the so-called Clustering Index, quantifying the departure of the actual particle distribution from the Poissonian, which would correspond to a purely random spatial arrangement. Most of the clustering is found in the flame brush region, which is spanned by the fluctuating instantaneous flame front. The effect is significant also for very light particles. In this case a simple model based on the Bray-Moss-Libby formalism is able to account for most of the deviation from the Poissonian. When the particle inertia increases, the effect is found to increases and persist well within the region of burned gases. The effect is maximum when the particle relaxation time is of the order of the flame front time scale. The evidence of this peculiar source of clustering is here provided by data from a direct numerical simulation of a turbulent premixed jet flame and confirmed by experimental data.

  13. Assessment of intermittency transport equations for modeling transition in boundary layers subjected to freestream turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suluksna, Keerati; Juntasaro, Ekachai

    2008-01-01

    The γ-Re θ transition model of Menter et al. [Menter, F.R., Langtry, R.B., Volker, S., Huang, P.G., 2005. Transition modelling for general purpose CFD codes. ERCOFTAC International Symposium Engineering Turbulence Modelling and Measurements] is a highly generalized transport equation model in which it has been developed based on the concept of local variables compatible with modern CFD methods where the unstructured grid and the parallel computing technique are usually integrated in. To perform the prediction with this model, two essential parameters, F length which is used to control the length of the transition region and Re θc which is used to control the onset of the transition location, must be specified to close the model. At present, both parameters are proprietary and their formulations are unpublished. For the first time here, the relations for both parameters are formulated by means of numerical experiments and analysis under the assumption of Re θc = Re θt corresponding with the bypass transition behavior. Based on this analysis, the optimized values of the parameters are found and their relations can be constructed as follows: Re θc = 803.73(Tu ∞ , le + 0.6067) -1.027 and F length = 163 ln(Tu ∞ , le ) + 3.625. The performance of this transition model is assessed by testing with the experimental cases of T3AM, T3A, and T3B. Detailed comparisons with the predicted results by the transition models of Suzen and Huang [Suzen, Y.B., Huang, P.G., 2000. Modeling of flow transition using an intermittency transport equation. J. Fluids Eng. 122, 273-284] and Lodefier et al. [Lodefier, K., Merci, B., De Langhe, C., Dick, E., 2003. Transition modelling with the SST turbulence model and intermittency transport equation. ASME Turbo Expo, Atlanta, GA, USA, June 16-19], and also with the predicted results by the k-ε model of Launder and Sharma [Launder, B.E., Sharma, B., 1974. Application of the energy dissipation model of turbulence to the calculation of

  14. Transport and turbulence in a magnetized plasma (application to tokamak plasmas); Transport et turbulence dans un plasma magnetise (application aux plasmas de tokamaks)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y

    2004-03-01

    This document gathers the lectures made in the framework of a Ph.D level physics class dedicated to plasma physics. This course is made up of 3 parts : 1) collisions and transport, 2) transport and turbulence, and 3) study of a few exchange instabilities. More precisely the first part deals with the following issues: thermonuclear fusion, Coulomb collisions, particles trajectories in a tokamak, neo-classical transport in tokamaks, the bootstrap current, and ware pinch. The second part involves: particle transport in tokamaks, quasi-linear transport, resonance islands, resonance in tokamaks, from quasi to non-linear transport, and non-linear saturation of turbulence. The third part deals with: shift velocities in fluid theory, a model for inter-change instabilities, Rayleigh-Benard instability, Hasegawa-Wakatani model, and Hasegawa-Mima model. This document ends with a series of appendices dealing with: particle-wave interaction, determination of the curvature parameter G, Rossby waves.

  15. The adjoint space in heat transport theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dam, H. van; Hoogenboom, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    The mathematical concept of adjoint operators is applied to the heat transport equation and an adjoint equation is defined with a detector function as source term. The physical meaning of the solutions for the latter equation is outlined together with an application in the field of perturbation analysis. (author)

  16. Electrostatic and magnetic measurements of turbulence and transport in Extrap T2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, A.; Sallander, E.

    1999-01-01

    Langmuir probe and magnetic pick-up coil measurements are used to study edge turbulence in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch. Magnetic fluctuations resonant outside the toroidal field reversal surface are observed where previously only fluctuations in the spectra of potential and electron density and temperature have been measured. Results are presented which imply that these fluctuations are coupled to and also correlated to the internally resonant tearing mode fluctuations. Evidence of coupling between low-frequency (<100 kHz) and high-frequency fluctuations is also presented. The normalized floating potential fluctuations are seen to increase with the edge electron temperature. This causes an increase of the potential and density fluctuation driven transport with the temperature which is faster than linear. These results, in combination, are consistent with a picture where internally resonant fluctuations couple to edge fluctuations through radial heat conduction from the stochastic core to the edge. (author)

  17. Electrostatic and magnetic measurements of turbulence and transport in Extrap T2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Anders; Sallander, Eva

    1999-10-01

    Langmuir probe and magnetic pick-up coil measurements are used to study edge turbulence in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch. Magnetic fluctuations resonant outside the toroidal field reversal surface are observed where previously only fluctuations in the spectra of potential and electron density and temperature have been measured. Results are presented which imply that these fluctuations are coupled to and also correlated to the internally resonant tearing mode fluctuations. Evidence of coupling between low-frequency (<100 kHz) and high-frequency fluctuations is also presented. The normalized floating potential fluctuations are seen to increase with the edge electron temperature. This causes an increase of the potential and density fluctuation driven transport with the temperature which is faster than linear. These results, in combination, are consistent with a picture where internally resonant fluctuations couple to edge fluctuations through radial heat conduction from the stochastic core to the edge.

  18. Multiscaling Dynamics of Impurity Transport in Drift-Wave Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futatani, S.; Benkadda, S.; Nakamura, Y.; Kondo, K.

    2008-01-01

    Intermittency effects and the associated multiscaling spectrum of exponents are investigated for impurities advection in tokamak edge plasmas. The two-dimensional Hasagawa-Wakatani model of resistive drift-wave turbulence is used as a paradigm to describe edge tokamak turbulence. Impurities are considered as a passive scalar advected by the plasma turbulent flow. The use of the extended self-similarity technique shows that the structure function relative scaling exponent of impurity density and vorticity follows the She-Leveque model. This confirms the intermittent character of the impurities advection in the turbulent plasma flow and suggests that impurities are advected by vorticity filaments

  19. ECRH and electron heat transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, X.L.; Giruzzi, G.; Dumont, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    It has been observed during the ECRH experiments in tokamaks that the shape of the electron temperature profile in stationary regimes is not very sensitive to the ECRH power deposition i.e. the temperature profile remains peaked at the center even though the ECRH power deposition is off-axis. Various models have been invoked for the interpretation of this profile resilience phenomenon: the inward heat pinch, the critical temperature gradient, the Self-Organized Criticality, etc. Except the pinch effect, all of these models need a specific form of the diffusivity in the heat transport equation. In this work, our approach is to solve a simplified time-dependent heat transport equation analytically in cylindrical geometry. The features of this analytical solution are analyzed, in particular the relationship between the temperature profile resilience and the Eigenmode of the physical system with respect to the heat transport phenomenon. Finally, applications of this analytical solution for the determination of the transport coefficient and the polarization of the EC waves are presented. It has been shown that the solution of the simplified transport equation in a finite cylinder is a Fourier-Bessel series. This series represents in fact a decomposition of the heat source in Eigenmode, which are characterized by the Bessel functions of order 0. The physical interpretation of the Eigenmodes is the following: when the heat source is given by a Bessel function of order 0, the temperature profile has exactly the same form as the source at every time. At the beginning of the power injection, the effectiveness of the temperature response is the same for each Eigenmode, and the response in temperature, having the same form as the source, is local. Conversely, in the later phase of the evolution, the effectiveness of the temperature response for each Eigenmode is different: the higher the order, the lower the effectiveness. In this case the response in temperature appears as

  20. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron transport from plasma turbulence: recent progress in gyrokinetic particle simulations of turbulent plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Z; Rewoldt, G; Ethier, S; Hahm, T S; Lee, W W; Lewandowski, J L V; Nishimura, Y; Wang, W X

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulations of turbulent plasmas using the gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) is surveyed. In particular, recent results for electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes and their resulting transport are presented. Also, turbulence spreading, and the effects of the parallel nonlinearity, are described. The GTC code has also been generalized for non-circular plasma cross-section, and initial results are presented. In addition, two distinct methods of generalizing the GTC code to be electromagnetic are described, along with preliminary results. Finally, a related code, GTC-Neo, for calculating neoclassical fluxes, electric fields, and velocities, are described

  1. Heat transfer enhancement in a turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical flat plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuji, Toshihiro; Kajitani, Tsuyoshi; Nishino, Tatsuhiko

    2007-01-01

    An experimental study on heat transfer enhancement for a turbulent natural convection boundary layer in air along a vertical flat plate has been performed by inserting a long flat plate in the spanwise direction (simple heat transfer promoter) and short flat plates aligned in the spanwise direction (split heat transfer promoter) with clearances into the near-wall region of the boundary layer. For a simple heat transfer promoter, the heat transfer coefficients increase by a peak value of approximately 37% in the downstream region of the promoter compared with those in the usual turbulent natural convection boundary layer. It is found from flow visualization and simultaneous measurements of the flow and thermal fields with hot- and cold-wires that such increase of heat transfer coefficients is mainly caused by the deflection of flows toward the outer region of the boundary layer and the invasion of low-temperature fluids from the outer region to the near-wall region with large-scale vortex motions riding out the promoter. However, heat transfer coefficients for a split heat transfer promoter exhibit an increase in peak value of approximately 60% in the downstream region of the promoter. Flow visualization and PIV measurements show that such remarkable heat transfer enhancement is attributed to longitudinal vortices generated by flows passing through the clearances of the promoter in addition to large-scale vortex motions riding out the promoter. Consequently, it is concluded that heat transfer enhancement of the turbulent natural convection boundary layer can be substantially achieved in a wide area of the turbulent natural convection boundary layer by employing multiple column split heat transfer promoters. It may be expected that the heat transfer enhancement in excess of approximately 40% can be accomplished by inserting such promoters

  2. Verification of Gyrokinetic Particle of Turbulent Simulation of Device Size Scaling Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Zhihong; S. ETHIER; T. S. HAHM; W. M. TANG

    2012-01-01

    Verification and historical perspective are presented on the gyrokinetic particle simulations that discovered the device size scaling of turbulent transport and indentified the geometry model as the source of the long-standing disagreement between gyrokinetic particle and continuum simulations.

  3. Turbulent Scalar Transport Model Validation for High Speed Propulsive Flows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort entails the validation of a RANS turbulent scalar transport model (SFM) for high speed propulsive flows, using new experimental data sets and...

  4. Heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam cooled rectangular channels with rib turbulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jianying; Gao, Tieyu; Li, Guojun [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-01-15

    We studied the heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam-cooled rectangular channels with rib turbulators on W side or H side walls in the Reynolds number (Re) range of 10000-80000. Each of the test channels was welded by four stainless steel plates to simulate the actual geometry and heat transfer structure of blade/vane internal cooling passage. The length of the channel L was 1000 mm, the cross section of the channel was 40 mm X 80 mm, and the pitch-to-rib height ratio p/e was kept at 10. The channel blockage ratio (W/H) was 0.047. Results showed that the Nusselt number (Nu) distributions displayed different trends at the entrance region with the increase of Re for the rib turbulators on the W side walls. The heat transfer performance of the rib turbulators on the H side walls was about 24- 27% higher than that on the W side walls at the same pumping power. In addition, semi-empirical correlations for the two cases, rib turbulators on W side walls and rib turbulators on H side walls, were developed based on the heat transfer results, which could be used in the design of the internal cooling passage of new generation steam-cooled gas turbine blade/vane.

  5. Turbulent Flow and Sand Dune Dynamics: Identifying Controls on Aeolian Sediment Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, C. M.; Wiggs, G.

    2007-12-01

    Sediment transport models are founded on cubic power relationships between the transport rate and time averaged flow parameters. These models have achieved limited success and recent aeolian and fluvial research has focused on the modelling and measurement of sediment transport by temporally varying flow conditions. Studies have recognised turbulence as a driving force in sediment transport and have highlighted the importance of coherent flow structures in sediment transport systems. However, the exact mechanisms are still unclear. Furthermore, research in the fluvial environment has identified the significance of turbulent structures for bedform morphology and spacing. However, equivalent research in the aeolian domain is absent. This paper reports the findings of research carried out to characterise the importance of turbulent flow parameters in aeolian sediment transport and determine how turbulent energy and turbulent structures change in response to dune morphology. The relative importance of mean and turbulent wind parameters on aeolian sediment flux was examined in the Skeleton Coast, Namibia. Measurements of wind velocity (using sonic anemometers) and sand transport (using grain impact sensors) at a sampling frequency of 10 Hz were made across a flat surface and along transects on a 9 m high barchan dune. Mean wind parameters and mass sand flux were measured using cup anemometers and wedge-shaped sand traps respectively. Vertical profile data from the sonic anemometers were used to compute turbulence and turbulent stress (Reynolds stress; instantaneous horizontal and vertical fluctuations; coherent flow structures) and their relationship with respect to sand transport and evolving dune morphology. On the flat surface time-averaged parameters generally fail to characterise sand transport dynamics, particularly as the averaging interval is reduced. However, horizontal wind speed correlates well with sand transport even with short averaging times. Quadrant

  6. Large eddy simulation of rotating turbulent flows and heat transfer by the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Tong-Miin; Wang, Chun-Sheng

    2018-01-01

    Due to its advantage in parallel efficiency and wall treatment over conventional Navier-Stokes equation-based methods, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) has emerged as an efficient tool in simulating turbulent heat and fluid flows. To properly simulate the rotating turbulent flow and heat transfer, which plays a pivotal role in tremendous engineering devices such as gas turbines, wind turbines, centrifugal compressors, and rotary machines, the lattice Boltzmann equations must be reformulated in a rotating coordinate. In this study, a single-rotating reference frame (SRF) formulation of the Boltzmann equations is newly proposed combined with a subgrid scale model for the large eddy simulation of rotating turbulent flows and heat transfer. The subgrid scale closure is modeled by a shear-improved Smagorinsky model. Since the strain rates are also locally determined by the non-equilibrium part of the distribution function, the calculation process is entirely local. The pressure-driven turbulent channel flow with spanwise rotation and heat transfer is used for validating the approach. The Reynolds number characterized by the friction velocity and channel half height is fixed at 194, whereas the rotation number in terms of the friction velocity and channel height ranges from 0 to 3.0. A working fluid of air is chosen, which corresponds to a Prandtl number of 0.71. Calculated results are demonstrated in terms of mean velocity, Reynolds stress, root mean square (RMS) velocity fluctuations, mean temperature, RMS temperature fluctuations, and turbulent heat flux. Good agreement is found between the present LBM predictions and previous direct numerical simulation data obtained by solving the conventional Navier-Stokes equations, which confirms the capability of the proposed SRF LBM and subgrid scale relaxation time formulation for the computation of rotating turbulent flows and heat transfer.

  7. The gyro-radius scaling of ion thermal transport from global numerical simulations of ITG turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Manfredi, G.

    1998-12-01

    A three-dimensional, fluid code is used to study the scaling of ion thermal transport caused by Ion-Temperature-Gradient-Driven (ITG) turbulence. The code includes toroidal effects and is capable of simulating the whole torus. It is found that both close to the ITG threshold and well above threshold, the thermal transport and the turbulence structures exhibit a gyro-Bohm scaling, at least for plasmas with moderate poloidal flow. (author)

  8. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

    2006-01-01

    A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

  9. Determination of thermal characteristics of combustion products of fire-tube heat generator with flow turbulator

    OpenAIRE

    Lukjanov Alexander V.; Ostapenko Dmitry V.; Basist Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    Boiler construction is one of the major industries of any state. The aim is to determine the effect of the turbulator on the intensity of heat transfer in the convective part of the fire-tube heat generator of domestic production. The improvement of convective heating surfaces is one of the ways to increase the energy efficiency of the fire-tube heat generator. Since model of the process of heat transfer of gas flow in the convective tubes is multifactorial and does not have clear analytical ...

  10. Heat Transfer in Directional Water Transport Fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zeng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Directional water transport fabrics can proactively transfer moisture from the body. They show great potential in making sportswear and summer clothing. While moisture transfer has been previously reported, heat transfer in directional water transport fabrics has been little reported in research literature. In this study, a directional water transport fabric was prepared using an electrospraying technique and its heat transfer properties under dry and wet states were evaluated, and compared with untreated control fabric and the one pre-treated with NaOH. All the fabric samples showed similar heat transfer features in the dry state, and the equilibrium temperature in the dry state was higher than for the wet state. Wetting considerably enhanced the thermal conductivity of the fabrics. Our studies indicate that directional water transport treatment assists in moving water toward one side of the fabric, but has little effect on thermal transfer performance. This study may be useful for development of “smart” textiles for various applications.

  11. Physics of turbulence control and transport barrier formation in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, E.J.; Burrell, K.H.; Carlstrom, T.N.

    1996-10-01

    This paper describes the physical mechanisms responsible for turbulence control and transport barrier formation on DIII-D as determined from a synthesis of results from different enhanced confinement regimes, including quantitative and qualitative comparisons to theory. A wide range of DIII-D data support the hypothesis that a single underlying physical mechanism, turbulence suppression via E x B shear flow is playing an essential, though not necessarily unique, role in reducing turbulence and transport in all of the following improved confinement regimes: H-mode, VH-mode, high-ell i modes, improved performance counter-injection L-mode discharges and high performance negative central shear (NCS) discharges. DIII-D data also indicate that synergistic effects are important in some cases, as in NCS discharges where negative magnetic shear also plays a role in transport barrier formation. This work indicates that in order to control turbulence and transport it is important to focus on understanding physical mechanisms, such as E x B shear, which can regulate and control entire classes of turbulent modes, and thus control transport. In the highest performance DIII-D discharges, NCS plasmas with a VH-mode like edge, turbulence is suppressed at all radii, resulting in neoclassical levels of ion transport over most of the plasma volume

  12. Turbulence and transport characteristics of a barrier in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A; Shimizu, A; Nakano, H; Ohsima, S; Itoh, K; Iguchi, H; Yoshimura, Y; Minami, T; Nagaoka, K; Takahashi, C; Kojima, M; Nishimura, S; Isobe, M; Suzuki, C; Akiyama, T; Nagashima, Y; Ida, K; Toi, K; Ido, T; Itoh, S-I; Matsuoka, K; Okamura, S; Diamond, P H

    2006-01-01

    Turbulence and zonal flow at a transport barrier are studied with twin heavy ion beam probes in a toroidal helical plasma. A wavelet analysis is used to extract turbulence properties, e.g. spectra of both density and potential fluctuations, the coherence and the phase between them and the dispersion relation. Particle transport estimated from the fundamental characteristics is found to clearly rise with their intermittent activities after the barrier is broken down. Time-dependent analysis reveals that the intermittency of turbulence is correlated with the evolution of the stationary zonal flow

  13. Turbulence and transport characteristics of a barrier in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.

    2005-10-01

    Turbulence and zonal flow at a transport barrier are studied with twin heavy ion beam probes in a toroidal helical plasma. A wavelet analysis is used to extract turbulence properties, e.g., spectra of both density and potential fluctuations, coherence and phase between them, and the dispersion relation. Particle transport estimated from the fundamental characteristics is found to clearly rise with their intermittent activities after the barrier is broken down. The time-dependent analysis reveals that intermittency of turbulence is correlated with evolution of stationary zonal flow. (author)

  14. Turbulent transport and shear at the E x B velocity in wall plasma of the TF-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    Turbulence of near-the-wall plasma and potentialities of affecting the turbulence and periphery transport of the TF-2 tokamak by inducing radial electric fields and ergodization of periphery magnetic structure have been investigated, the results are presented. Essential role of the E x B velocity shear in suppression of the turbulence and turbulent transport in periphery has been pointed out. Decrease in transport losses stemming from effect of radial electric fields is brought about suppression of turbulence amplitude, decrease in correlations and decrease in the width of the wave numbers spectrum. Profiles of plasma density, electron temperature, turbulence level, electric fields over entire periphery of discharge change as a result. Ergodization of magnetic structure also results in the change of properties of periphery turbulence and turbulent transport [ru

  15. Determination of thermal characteristics of combustion products of fire-tube heat generator with flow turbulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukjanov Alexander V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Boiler construction is one of the major industries of any state. The aim is to determine the effect of the turbulator on the intensity of heat transfer in the convective part of the fire-tube heat generator of domestic production. The improvement of convective heating surfaces is one of the ways to increase the energy efficiency of the fire-tube heat generator. Since model of the process of heat transfer of gas flow in the convective tubes is multifactorial and does not have clear analytical solution at present, the study of process above is carried out using the experimental method. The results of applying the flow turbulator as a broken tape in the fire-tube heat generator of KV-GM type are presented. On their basis it can be concluded about increasing of heat transfer in convective part of the unit. The use of efficient, reliable, easy to manufacture, relatively inexpensive turbulator in domestic fire-tube heat generators will allow to increase their energy conversion efficiency and reduce fuel consumption, which will have a positive economic effect.

  16. Fluid simulations of ∇Te-driven turbulence and transport in boundary plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.; Cohen, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    This paper is a report on simulations of a new drift wave type instability driven by the electron temperature gradient in tokamak scrapeoff-layers (SOL). A 2D(x,y) fluid code has been developed in order to explore the anomalous transport in the boundary plasmas. The simulation consists of a set of fluid equations (in the electrostatic limit) for the vorticity ∇ perpendicular 2 φ, the electron density n e and the temperature T e in a shearless plasma slab confined by a uniform, straight magnetic field B z with two diverter (or limiter) plates intercepting the magnetic field. The model has two regions separated by a magnetic separatrix: in the edge region inside the separatrix, the model is periodic along the magnetic field while in the SOL region outside the separatrix, the magnetic field is taken to be of finite length with model (logical sheath) boundary conditions at diverter (or limiter) plates. The simulation results show that the observed linear instability agrees well with theory, and that a saturated state of turbulence is reached. In saturated turbulence, clear evidence of the expected long-wavelength mode penetration into the edge is seen, an inverse cascade of wave energy (toward both long wavelengths and low frequencies) is observed. The simulation results also show that amplitudes of potential and the electron temperature fluctuations are somewhat above and the heat flux are somewhat below those of the simplest mixing-length estimates. The results from the self-consistent simulations to determine the microturbulent SOL electron temperature profile agree reasonably with the experimental measurements. The effects on the mode of neutral gas collisions at the divertor sheath and comparisons with the ionization driven turbulence are discussed

  17. Scalar transport across the turbulent/non-turbulent interface in jets: Schmidt number effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago S.; B. da Silva, Carlos; Idmec Team

    2016-11-01

    The dynamics of a passive scalar field near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface (TNTI) is analysed through direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent planar jets, with Reynolds numbers ranging from 142 <= Reλ <= 246 , and Schmidt numbers from 0 . 07 <= Sc <= 7 . The steepness of the scalar gradient, as observed from conditional profiles near the TNTI, increases with the Schmidt number. Conditional scalar gradient budgets show that for low and moderate Schmidt numbers a diffusive superlayer emerges at the TNTI, where the scalar gradient diffusion dominates, while the production is negligible. For low Schmidt numbers the growth of the turbulent front is commanded by the molecular diffusion, whereas the scalar gradient convection is negligible. The authors acknowledge the Laboratory for Advanced Computing at University of Coimbra for providing HPC, computing, consulting resources that have contributed to the research results reported within this paper. URL http://www.lca.uc.pt.

  18. Flow and Pollutant Transport in Urban Street Canyons of Different Aspect Ratios with Ground Heating: Large-Eddy Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xian-Xiang; Koh, Tieh-Yong; Britter, Rex E; Norford, Leslie Keith; Entekhabi, Dara

    2010-01-01

    A validated large-eddy simulation model was employed to study the effect of the aspect ratio and ground heating on the flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons. Three ground-heating intensities (neutral, weak and strong) were imposed in street canyons of aspect ratio 1, 2, and 0.5. The detailed patterns of flow, turbulence, temperature and pollutant transport were analyzed and compared. Significant changes of flow and scalar patterns were caused by ground heating in the street ca...

  19. An analytical wall-function for recirculating and impinging turbulent heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, K.; Ishibashi, Y.; Kuwata, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Improvement of the analytical wall-function is proposed. ► Strain parameter dependency is introduced to the prescribed eddy viscosity profile of the analytical wall-function. ► The model performance is evaluated in turbulent pipe, channel, back-step, abrupt expansion pipe and plane impinging flows. ► Generally improved heat transfer is obtained in all the test cases with the standard k-e model. -- Abstract: The performance of the analytical wall-function (AWF) of Craft et al. [Craft, T.J., Gerasimov, A.V., Iacovides, H., Launder, B.E., 2002, Progress in the generalisation of wall-function treatments. Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 23, 148–160.] is improved for predicting turbulent heat transfer in recirculating and impinging flows. Since constant parameters of the eddy viscosity formula were used to derive the AWF, the prediction accuracy of the original AWF tends to deteriorate in complex flows where those parameters need changing according to the local turbulence. To overcome such shortcomings, the present study introduces a functional behaviour on the strain parameter into the coefficient of the eddy viscosity of the AWF. The presently modified version of the AWF is validated in turbulent heat transfer of pipe flows, channel flows, back-step flows, pipe flows with abrupt expansion and plane impinging slot jets. The results confirm that the present modification successfully improves the performance of the original AWF for all the flows and heat transfer tested

  20. Turbulent flow and heat transfer from a slot jet impinging on a moving plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, Himadri; Saha, Sujoy K.

    2003-01-01

    The flow field due to an impinging jet over a moving surface at a moderately high Reynolds number, emanating from a rectangular slot nozzle has been computed using the large eddy simulation technique. A dynamic subgrid-scale stress model has been used for the small scales of turbulence. The velocity of the impinging surface perpendicular to the jet velocity has been varied up to two times the jet velocity at the nozzle exit. Turbulence quantities such as kinetic energy, production rate of turbulent kinetic energy and the Reynolds stresses are calculated for different surface velocities. It has been observed that, while the turbulent kinetic energy increases with increasing velocity of the impinging surface, production rate of turbulence initially increases with increasing surface velocity and then comes down. By analyzing the components of turbulent production it was found that P 33 is the dominant term up to the surface velocity of one unit and when the surface velocity is two times the jet velocity at the nozzle exit, the major contribution to turbulence production comes from P 13 and partly from P 11 . Heat transfer from the plate initially increases with non-dimensional surface velocity up to 1.2 and then comes down

  1. Evaluation of CFD Turbulent Heating Prediction Techniques and Comparison With Hypersonic Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Arthur D.; McClinton, Charles R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Results from a study to assess the accuracy of turbulent heating and skin friction prediction techniques for hypersonic applications are presented. The study uses the original and a modified Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model with a space marching code. Grid converged turbulent predictions using the wall damping formulation (original model) and local damping formulation (modified model) are compared with experimental data for several flat plates. The wall damping and local damping results are similar for hot wall conditions, but differ significantly for cold walls, i.e., T(sub w) / T(sub t) hypersonic vehicles. Based on the results of this study, it is recommended that the local damping formulation be used with the Baldwin-Lomax and Cebeci-Smith turbulence models in design and analysis of Hyper-X and future hypersonic vehicles.

  2. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kazuo; Nakamura, Yukio; Hiraki, Naoji; Itoh, Satoshi

    1981-01-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time). (author)

  3. Ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating in the TRIAM-1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Hiraki, N; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-07-01

    Temporal evolution and spatial profile of ion energy spectrum just after the application of current pulse for turbulent heating are investigated experimentally in TRIAM-1 and numerically with a Fokker-Planck equation. Two-component ion energy spectrum formed by turbulent heating relaxes to single one within tau sub(i) (ion collision time).

  4. Theoretical studies of turbulence and anomalous transport in toroidal confinement devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.

    1993-01-01

    The research performed under this grant has focused on key issues with respect to turbulence and transport in toroidal confinement devices. Progress and publications in these areas are summarized in this report. This work includes analytical and numerical studies of spectral energy transfer and the saturation dynamics and transport of dissipative and collisionless trapped electron turbulence, the role of flow curvature in L-H mode transition physics, fully nonlinear calculations of the anomalous particle transport from the ion mixing mode, and the development of a theory for the drift wave frequency spectrum. Novel aspects of this work include an elucidation of the role of nonlinear frequency shifts in producing nonstationary saturated states, an identification of reverse and non-conserved flows in Hasegawa-Mima turbulence, and a description of the way incoherent emission affects the frequency of turbulent fluctuations

  5. Statistical properties of turbulent transport and fluctuations in tokamak and stellarator devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidalgo, C; Pedrosa, M A; Milligen, B Van; Sanchez, E; Balbin, R; Garcia-Cortes, I [Euratom-CIEMAT Association, Madrid (Spain); Bleuel, J; Giannone, L.; Niedermeyer, H [Euratom-IPP Association, Garching (Germany)

    1997-05-01

    The statistical properties of fluctuations and turbulent transport have been studied in the plasma boundary region of stellarator (TJ-IU, W7-AS) and tokamak (TJ-I) devices. The local flux probability distribution function shows the bursty character of the flux and presents a systematic change as a function of the radial location. There exist large amplitude transport bursts that account for a significant part of the total flux. There is a strong similarity between the statistical properties of the turbulent fluxes in different devices. The value of the radial coherence associated with fluctuations and turbulent transport is strongly intermittent. This result emphasizes the importance of measurements with time resolution in understanding the interplay between the edge and the core regions in the plasma. For measurements in the plasma edge region of the TJ-IU torsatron, the turbulent flux does not, in general, show a larger radial coherence than the one associated with the fluctuations. (author). 14 refs, 6 figs.

  6. The effect of turbulence-radiation interaction on radiative entropy generation and heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, Miguel; Semiao, Viriato

    2007-01-01

    The analysis under the second law of thermodynamics is the gateway for optimisation in thermal equipments and systems. Through entropy minimisation techniques it is possible to increase the efficiency and overall performance of all kinds of thermal systems. Radiation, being the dominant mechanism of heat transfer in high-temperature systems, plays a determinant role in entropy generation within such equipments. Turbulence is also known to be a major player in the phenomenon of entropy generation. Therefore, turbulence-radiation interaction is expected to have a determinant effect on entropy generation. However, this is a subject that has not been dealt with so far, at least to the extent of the authors' knowledge. The present work attempts to fill that void, by studying the effect of turbulence-radiation interaction on entropy generation. All calculations are approached in such a way as to make them totally compatible with standard engineering methods for radiative heat transfer, namely the discrete ordinates method. It was found that turbulence-radiation interaction does not significantly change the spatial pattern of entropy generation, or heat transfer, but does change significantly their magnitude, in a way approximately proportional to the square of the intensity of turbulence

  7. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent concentric annular pipe flow Part 2: Heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Seo Yoon; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2003-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation is performed for turbulent heat transfer in a concentric annulus at Re D h =8900 and Pr=0.71 for two radius ratios (R 1 /R 2 =0.1 and 0.5) and wall heat flux ratio q * =1.0. Main emphasis is placed on the transverse curvature effect on near-wall turbulent thermal structures. Near-wall turbulent thermal structures close to the inner and outer walls are scrutinized by computing the lower-order statistics. The fluctuating temperature variance and turbulent heat flux budgets are illustrated to confirm the results of the lower-order statistics. Probability density functions of the splat/anti-splat process are investigated to analyze the transverse curvature effect on the strong relationship between sweep and splat events. The present numerical results show that the turbulent thermal structures near the outer wall are more activated than those near the inner wall, which may be attributed to the different vortex regeneration processes between the inner and outer walls

  8. PROTON HEATING IN SOLAR WIND COMPRESSIBLE TURBULENCE WITH COLLISIONS BETWEEN COUNTER-PROPAGATING WAVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Wang, Linghua; Pei, Zhongtian [School of Earth and Space Sciences, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China); Marsch, Eckart [Institute for Experimental and Applied Physics, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D-24118 Kiel (Germany); Chen, Christopher H. K. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Zhang, Lei [Sate Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Salem, Chadi S.; Bale, Stuart D., E-mail: jshept@gmail.com [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Magnetohydronamic turbulence is believed to play a crucial role in heating laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas. However, the precise connection between the turbulent fluctuations and the particle kinetics has not yet been established. Here we present clear evidence of plasma turbulence heating based on diagnosed wave features and proton velocity distributions from solar wind measurements by the Wind spacecraft. For the first time, we can report the simultaneous observation of counter-propagating magnetohydrodynamic waves in the solar wind turbulence. As opposed to the traditional paradigm with counter-propagating Alfvén waves (AWs), anti-sunward AWs are encountered by sunward slow magnetosonic waves (SMWs) in this new type of solar wind compressible turbulence. The counter-propagating AWs and SWs correspond, respectively, to the dominant and sub-dominant populations of the imbalanced Elsässer variables. Nonlinear interactions between the AWs and SMWs are inferred from the non-orthogonality between the possible oscillation direction of one wave and the possible propagation direction of the other. The associated protons are revealed to exhibit bi-directional asymmetric beams in their velocity distributions: sunward beams appear in short, narrow patterns and anti-sunward in broad extended tails. It is suggested that multiple types of wave–particle interactions, i.e., cyclotron and Landau resonances with AWs and SMWs at kinetic scales, are taking place to jointly heat the protons perpendicular and in parallel.

  9. THE EFFECT OF INTERMITTENT GYRO-SCALE SLAB TURBULENCE ON PARALLEL AND PERPENDICULAR COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Earlier work based on nonlinear guiding center (NLGC) theory suggested that perpendicular cosmic-ray transport is diffusive when cosmic rays encounter random three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence dominated by uniform two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with a minor uniform slab turbulence component. In this approach large-scale perpendicular cosmic-ray transport is due to cosmic rays microscopically diffusing along the meandering magnetic field dominated by 2D turbulence because of gyroresonant interactions with slab turbulence. However, turbulence in the solar wind is intermittent and it has been suggested that intermittent turbulence might be responsible for the observation of 'dropout' events in solar energetic particle fluxes on small scales. In a previous paper le Roux et al. suggested, using NLGC theory as a basis, that if gyro-scale slab turbulence is intermittent, large-scale perpendicular cosmic-ray transport in weak uniform 2D turbulence will be superdiffusive or subdiffusive depending on the statistical characteristics of the intermittent slab turbulence. In this paper we expand and refine our previous work further by investigating how both parallel and perpendicular transport are affected by intermittent slab turbulence for weak as well as strong uniform 2D turbulence. The main new finding is that both parallel and perpendicular transport are the net effect of an interplay between diffusive and nondiffusive (superdiffusive or subdiffusive) transport effects as a consequence of this intermittency.

  10. THE EFFECT OF INTERMITTENT GYRO-SCALE SLAB TURBULENCE ON PARALLEL AND PERPENDICULAR COSMIC-RAY TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Roux, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    Earlier work based on nonlinear guiding center (NLGC) theory suggested that perpendicular cosmic-ray transport is diffusive when cosmic rays encounter random three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence dominated by uniform two-dimensional (2D) turbulence with a minor uniform slab turbulence component. In this approach large-scale perpendicular cosmic-ray transport is due to cosmic rays microscopically diffusing along the meandering magnetic field dominated by 2D turbulence because of gyroresonant interactions with slab turbulence. However, turbulence in the solar wind is intermittent and it has been suggested that intermittent turbulence might be responsible for the observation of 'dropout' events in solar energetic particle fluxes on small scales. In a previous paper le Roux et al. suggested, using NLGC theory as a basis, that if gyro-scale slab turbulence is intermittent, large-scale perpendicular cosmic-ray transport in weak uniform 2D turbulence will be superdiffusive or subdiffusive depending on the statistical characteristics of the intermittent slab turbulence. In this paper we expand and refine our previous work further by investigating how both parallel and perpendicular transport are affected by intermittent slab turbulence for weak as well as strong uniform 2D turbulence. The main new finding is that both parallel and perpendicular transport are the net effect of an interplay between diffusive and nondiffusive (superdiffusive or subdiffusive) transport effects as a consequence of this intermittency.

  11. Flow and heat transfer in laminar–turbulent transitional flow regime under rolling motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Hongsheng; Tan, Sichao; Zhuang, Nailiang; Lan, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer experiment in transitional flow regime under rolling motion. • Increases of average friction factor and Nu were found. • Periodic breakdown of laminar flow contributes to the increase. • Nonlinear variation of pressure drop or Nu with Re also contributes to the increase. • Effect of critical Reynolds number shift was discussed. - Abstract: Flow and heat transfer characteristics under rolling motion are extremely important to thermohydraulic analysis of offshore nuclear reactors. An experimental study was conducted in a heated rectangular channel to investigate flow and heat transfer in laminar–turbulent transitional flow regime under rolling motion. The results showed that the average friction factor and Nusselt number are higher than that of the corresponding steady flow as the flow rate fluctuates in transitional flow regime. Larger relative flow rate fluctuation was observed under larger rolling amplitude or higher rolling frequency. In the same manner, larger increases of average friction factor and Nusselt number were achieved under larger rolling amplitude or higher rolling frequency. The increases were mainly caused by the flow rate fluctuation through periodic breakdown of laminar flow and development of turbulence in laminar–turbulent transitional flow regime. First, turbulence, which enhances the rate of momentum and energy exchange, occurs near the crest of flow rate wave even the flow is still in laminar flow regime according to the average Reynolds number. Second, as a result of rapid increases of the friction and heat transfer with Reynolds number in transitional flow regime, the increases of the friction and the heat transfer near the crest of flow rate wave are larger than the decreases of them near the trough of flow rate wave, which also contributes to increases of average friction and heat transfer. Additionally, the effect of critical Reynolds number shift under unsteady flow and heating

  12. Integral representation of nonlinear heat transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Y.; Mima, K.; Haines, M.G.

    1985-07-01

    The electron distribution function in a plasma with steep temperature gradient is obtained from a Fokker-Planck equation by Green's function method. The formula describes the nonlocal effects on thermal transport over the range, λ e /L e /L → 0. As an example, the heat wave is analyzed numerically by the integral formula and it is found that the previous simulation results are well reproduced. (author)

  13. Simulation of Reynolds number influence on heat exchange in turbulent flow of medium slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartosik, A.

    2016-10-01

    The paper deals with the numerical simulation of mass and heat exchange in turbulent flow of solid-liquid mixture in the range of averaged solid particle diameter from 0.10mm to 0.80mm, named further as the medium slurry. Physical model assumes that dispersed phase is fully suspended and a turbulent flow is hydro-dynamically, and thermally developed in a straight horizontal pipeline. Taking into account the aforementioned assumptions the slurry is treated as a single-phase flow with increased density, while viscosity is equals to a carrier liquid viscosity. The mathematical model constitutes time averaged momentum equation in which the turbulent stress tensor was designated using a two-equation turbulence model, which makes use of the Boussinesq eddy-viscosity hypothesis. Turbulence damping function in the turbulence model was especially designed for the medium slurry. In addition, an energy equation has been used in which a convective term was determined from the energy balance acting on a unit pipe length, assuming linear changes of temperature in main flow direction. Finally, the mathematical model of non-isothermal medium slurry flow comprises four partial differential equations, namely momentum and energy equations, equations of kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate. Four partial differential equations were solved by a finite difference scheme using own computer code. The objective of the paper is to examine the influence of Reynolds number on temperature profiles and Nusselt number in turbulent flow of medium slurry in the range of solids concentration from 0% to 30% by volume. The effect of influential factors on heat transfer between the pipe and slurry is analysed. The paper demonstrates substantial impact of Reynolds number and solids volume fraction on the Nusselt number. The results of numerical simulation are reviewed.

  14. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jiahe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Li, Hui; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe

    2015-07-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  15. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Jiahe, E-mail: jsi@nmt.edu; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Nornberg, Mark D. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  16. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Si, Jiahe; Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations

  17. Electron thermal energy transport research based on dynamical relationship between heat flux and temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notake, Takashi; Inagaki, Shigeru; Tamura, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    In the nuclear fusion plasmas, both of thermal energy and particle transport governed by turbulent flow are anomalously enhanced more than neoclassical levels. Thus, to clarify a relationship between the turbulent flow and the anomalous transports has been the most worthwhile work. There are experimental results that the turbulent flow induces various phenomena on transport processes such as non-linearity, transition, hysteresis, multi-branches and non-locality. We are approaching these complicated problems by analyzing not conventional power balance but these phenomena directly. They are recognized as dynamical trajectories in the flux and gradient space and must be a clue to comprehend a physical mechanism of arcane anomalous transport. Especially, to elucidate the mechanism for electron thermal energy transport is critical in the fusion plasma researches because the burning plasmas will be sustained by alpha-particle heating. In large helical device, the dynamical relationships between electron thermal energy fluxes and electron temperature gradients are investigated by using modulated electron cyclotron resonance heating and modern electron cyclotron emission diagnostic systems. Some trajectories such as hysteresis loop or line segments with steep slope which represent non-linear property are observed in the experiment. (author)

  18. Turbulent flow in spiral tubes and effect of Prandtl number on a convective heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shistel', R.; Goss, Zh.

    1976-01-01

    Turbulent flow is analized of the fluid in the spiral tube with a pitch which is small enough as compared to the curvature radius. The effect of the curvature and the Prandtl number on the turbulent convection is studied. A description of three-dimensional model and its application for the spiral tubes is given. The example of heat convection in curved channels reveals the opportunity for employment of three-dimensional model to calculate the recirculating flows in complex-geometry channels, description of the turbulence field, and determination of the wall friction and heat transfer. The introduction of the wall functions into the numerical method affects adversely accuracy of calculations but ensures a considerable time saving and makes it possible to study the process in the first approximation. The example illustrates possible practical application of the calculation procedure

  19. Three dimensional heat transport modeling in Vossoroca reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcie Polli, Bruna; Yoshioka Bernardo, Julio Werner; Hilgert, Stephan; Bleninger, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Freshwater reservoirs are used for many purposes as hydropower generation, water supply and irrigation. In Brazil, according to the National Energy Balance of 2013, hydropower energy corresponds to 70.1% of the Brazilian demand. Superficial waters (which include rivers, lakes and reservoirs) are the most used source for drinking water supply - 56% of the municipalities use superficial waters as a source of water. The last two years have shown that the Brazilian water and electricity supply is highly vulnerable and that improved management is urgently needed. The construction of reservoirs affects physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the water body, e.g. stratification, temperature, residence time and turbulence reduction. Some water quality issues related to reservoirs are eutrophication, greenhouse gas emission to the atmosphere and dissolved oxygen depletion in the hypolimnion. The understanding of the physical processes in the water body is fundamental to reservoir management. Lakes and reservoirs may present a seasonal behavior and stratify due to hydrological and meteorological conditions, and especially its vertical distribution may be related to water quality. Stratification can control heat and dissolved substances transport. It has been also reported the importance of horizontal temperature gradients, e.g. inflows and its density and processes of mass transfer from shallow to deeper regions of the reservoir, that also may impact water quality. Three dimensional modeling of the heat transport in lakes and reservoirs is an important tool to the understanding and management of these systems. It is possible to estimate periods of large vertical temperature gradients, inhibiting vertical transport and horizontal gradients, which could be responsible for horizontal transport of heat and substances (e.g. differential cooling or inflows). Vossoroca reservoir was constructed in 1949 by the impoundment of São João River and is located near to

  20. Electron and ion heating by whistler turbulence: Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, R. Scott; Gary, S. Peter; Wang, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence are carried out on a collisionless, homogeneous, magnetized, electron-ion plasma model. In addition, the simulations use an initial ensemble of relatively long wavelength whistler modes with a broad range of initial propagation directions with an initial electron beta β e = 0.05. The computations follow the temporal evolution of the fluctuations as they cascade into broadband turbulent spectra at shorter wavelengths. Three simulations correspond to successively larger simulation boxes and successively longer wavelengths of the initial fluctuations. The computations confirm previous results showing electron heating is preferentially parallel to the background magnetic field B o , and ion heating is preferentially perpendicular to B o . The new results here are that larger simulation boxes and longer initial whistler wavelengths yield weaker overall dissipation, consistent with linear dispersion theory predictions of decreased damping, stronger ion heating, consistent with a stronger ion Landau resonance, and weaker electron heating

  1. Conjugate heat transfer for turbulent flow in a thick walled plain pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canli Eyub

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminar and turbulent flow have their own characteristics in respect of heat transfer in pipes. While conjugate heat transfer is a major concern for a thick walled pipe with laminar flow inside it, there are limited studies about a turbulent flow in a thick walled plain pipe considering the conjugate heat transfer. In order to conduct such a work by means of in-house developed code, it was desired to make a preliminary investigation with commercially available CFD codes. ANSYS CFD was selected as the tool since it has a positive reputation in the literature for reliability. Defined heat transfer problem was solved with SIMPLE and Coupled Schemes for pressure velocity coupling and results are presented accordingly.

  2. Time behaviours of visible lines in turbulently heated TRIAM-1 plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-08-01

    Spectroscopic studies were carried out on turbulently heated TRIAM-1 tokamak plasma. The temporal evolutions of the line radiance of visible lines were measured and two types of time behaviours of the line radiance were identified. The observed remarkable reduction of the line radiance of visible lines which have low ionization potential and are localized in the skin-layer due to the application of a pulsed electric-field for turbulent heating is attributed to the strong plasma heating in the peripherical region. Spatial profiles of neutrals and ions which are related to these lines are calculated, and the temporal variations of these profiles caused by the application of the heating pulse are discussed.

  3. One-Loop Operation of Primary Heat Transport System in MONJU During Heat Transport System Modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, T.; Tsushima, H.; Sakurai, N.; Jo, T.

    2006-01-01

    MONJU is a prototype fast breeder reactor (FBR). Modification work commenced in March 2005. Since June 2004, MONJU has changed to one-loop operation of the primary heat transport system (PHTS) with all of the secondary heat transport systems (SHTS) drained of sodium. The purposes of this change are to shorten the modification period and to reduce the cost incurred for circuit trace heating electrical consumption. Before changing condition, the following issues were investigated to show that this mode of operation was possible. The heat loss from the reactor vessel and the single primary loop must exceed the decay heat by an acceptable margin but the capacity of pre-heaters to keep the sodium within the primary vessel at about 200 deg. C must be maintained. With regard to the heat loss and the decay heat, the estimated heat loss in the primary system was in the range of 90-170 kW in one-loop operation, and the calculated decay heat was 21.2 kW. Although the heat input of the primary pump was considered, it was clear that circuit heat loss greatly exceeded the decay heat. As for pre-heaters, effective capacity was less than the heat loss. Therefore, the temperature of the reactor vessel room was raised to reduce the heat loss. One-loop operation of the PHTS was able to be executed by means of these measures. The cost of electrical consumption in the power plant has been reduced by one-loop operation of the PHTS and the modification period was shortened. (authors)

  4. Ion Heating by Fast Particle Induced Alfven Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, D.; Gorelenkov, N.; White, R.B.

    2001-01-01

    A novel mechanism that directly transfers energy from Super-Alfvenic energetic ions to thermal ions in high-beta plasmas is described. The mechanism involves the excitation of compressional Alfvin eigenmodes (CAEs) in the frequency range with omega less than or approximately equal to omega(subscript ci). The broadband turbulence resulting from the large number of excited modes causes stochastic diffusion in velocity space, which transfers wave energy to thermal ions. This effect may be important on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), and may scale up to reactor scenarios. This has important implications for low aspect ratio reactor concepts, since it potentially allows for the modification of the ignition criterion

  5. Local heat transfer coefficient for turbulent flow in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez y Fernandez, E.; Carajilescov, P.

    1983-03-01

    The correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients in heated triangular array of rod bundles, in terms of the flow hydrodynamic parameters is presented. The analysis is made first for fluid with Prandtl numbers varying from moderated to high (Pr>0.2), and then extended to fluids with low Prandtl numbers (0.004 [pt

  6. Large-Eddy Simulation of Flow and Pollutant Transport in Urban Street Canyons with Ground Heating

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xian-Xiang; Britter, Rex E.; Koh, Tieh Yong; Norford, Leslie Keith; Liu, Chun-Ho; Entekhabi, Dara; Leung, Dennis Y. C.

    2009-01-01

    Our study employed large-eddy simulation (LES) based on a one-equation subgrid-scale model to investigate the flow field and pollutant dispersion characteristics inside urban street canyons. Unstable thermal stratification was produced by heating the ground of the street canyon. Using the Boussinesq approximation, thermal buoyancy forces were taken into account in both the Navier–Stokes equations and the transport equation for subgrid-scale turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The LESs were valida...

  7. Turbulent mixed convection in asymmetrically heated vertical channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Ameni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an investigation of mixed convection from vertical heated channel is undertaken. The aim is to explore the heat transfer obtained by adding a forced flow, issued from a flat nozzle located in the entry section of a channel, to the up-going fluid along its walls. Forced and free convection are combined studied in order to increase the cooling requirements. The study deals with both symmetrically and asymmetrically heated channel. The Reynolds number based on the nozzle width and the jet velocity is assumed to be 3 103 and 2.104; whereas, the Rayleigh number based on the channel length and the wall temperature difference varies from 2.57 1010 to 5.15 1012. The heating asymmetry effect on the flow development including the mean velocity and temperature the local Nusselt number, the mass flow rate and heat transfer are examined.

  8. Local Entropy Production in Turbulent Shear Flows: A Tool for Evaluating Heat Transfer Performance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. HERWIG; F. KOCK

    2006-01-01

    Performance evaluation of heat transfer devices can be based on the overall entropy production in these devices.In our study we therefore provide equations for the systematic and detailed determination of local entropy production due to dissipation of mechanical energy and due to heat conduction, both in turbulent flows. After turbulence modeling has been incorporated for the fluctuating parts the overall entropy production can be determined by integration with respect to the whole flow domain. Since, however, entropy production rates show very steep gradients close to the wall, numerical solutions are far more effective with wall functions for the entropy production terms. These wall functions are mandatory when high Reynolds number turbulence models are used. For turbulent flow in a pipe with an inserted twisted tape as heat transfer promoter it is shown that based on the overall entropy production rate a clear statement from a thermodynamic point of view is possible. For a certain range of twist strength there is a decrease in overall entropy production compared to the case without insert. Also, the optimum twist strength can be determined. This information is unavailable when only pressure drop and heat transfer data are given.

  9. DNS of turbulent channel flow with conjugate heat transfer at Prandtl number 0.01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiselj, Iztok, E-mail: iztok.tiselj@ijs.si [' Jozef Stefan' Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Cizelj, Leon, E-mail: leon.cizelj@ijs.si [' Jozef Stefan' Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNS database for turbulent channel flow at Prandtl number 0.01 and various Re{sub {tau}}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two ideal boundary condition analyzed: non-fluctuating and fluctuating temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNS database with conjugate heat transfer for liquid sodium-steel contact. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Penetration of the turbulent temperature fluctuations into the solid wall analyzed. - Abstract: Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the fully developed velocity and temperature fields in a turbulent channel flow coupled with the unsteady conduction in the heated walls was carried out. Simulations were performed with passive scalar approximation at Prandtl number 0.01, which roughly corresponds to the Prandtl number of liquid sodium. DNSs were performed at friction Reynolds numbers 180, 395 and 590. The obtained statistical quantities like mean temperatures, profiles of the root-mean-square (RMS) temperature fluctuations for various thermal properties of wall and fluid, and various wall thicknesses were obtained from a pseudo-spectral channel-flow code. Even for the highest implemented Reynolds number the temperature profile in the fluid does not exhibit log-law region and the near-wall RMS temperature fluctuations show Reynolds number dependence. Conjugate heat transfer simulations of liquid sodium-steel system point to a relatively intensive penetration of turbulent temperature fluctuations into the heated wall. Database containing the results is available in a digital form.

  10. DNS of turbulent channel flow with conjugate heat transfer at Prandtl number 0.01

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiselj, Iztok; Cizelj, Leon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► DNS database for turbulent channel flow at Prandtl number 0.01 and various Re τ . ► Two ideal boundary condition analyzed: non-fluctuating and fluctuating temperature. ► DNS database with conjugate heat transfer for liquid sodium–steel contact. ► Penetration of the turbulent temperature fluctuations into the solid wall analyzed. - Abstract: Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the fully developed velocity and temperature fields in a turbulent channel flow coupled with the unsteady conduction in the heated walls was carried out. Simulations were performed with passive scalar approximation at Prandtl number 0.01, which roughly corresponds to the Prandtl number of liquid sodium. DNSs were performed at friction Reynolds numbers 180, 395 and 590. The obtained statistical quantities like mean temperatures, profiles of the root-mean-square (RMS) temperature fluctuations for various thermal properties of wall and fluid, and various wall thicknesses were obtained from a pseudo-spectral channel-flow code. Even for the highest implemented Reynolds number the temperature profile in the fluid does not exhibit log-law region and the near-wall RMS temperature fluctuations show Reynolds number dependence. Conjugate heat transfer simulations of liquid sodium–steel system point to a relatively intensive penetration of turbulent temperature fluctuations into the heated wall. Database containing the results is available in a digital form.

  11. Critical condition for current-driven instability excited in turbulent heating of TRIAM-1 tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Y; Watanabe, T; Nagao, A; Nakamura, K; Kikuchi, M; Aoki, T; Hiraki, N; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Mitarai, O

    1982-02-01

    Critical condition for current-driven instability excited in turbulently heated TRIAM-1 tokamak plasma is investigated experimentally. Resistive hump in loop voltage, plasma density fluctuation and rapid increase of electron temperature in a skin layer are simultaneously observed at the time when the electron drift velocity amounts to the critical drift velocity for low-frequency ion acoustic instability.

  12. Heat transfer in initial region of a plane channel at different turbulence levels of inlet flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukomel, A.S.; Gutsev, D.F.; Velichko, V.I.

    1976-01-01

    Local heat transfer has been experimentally studied on the initial portion of the flat channel in the turbulent air flow. The channel measures 37.5 mm in height and 212.5 mm in width. The heat transfer measurements have been taken at inlet flow turbulence of epsilon 0 =0.7-0.8%. The charts are plotted showing variation of trannser with inlet and additional agitation of the flow. Critical values are found of the Reynolds number which are characteristic of the zones with various types of flow (laminar, transient and turbulent) at epsilon 0 =0.7-0.8%: Resub(crit 1) = 9.3x10sup(4), Resub(crit 2) = 2.9x10sup(5). With the increase of epsilon 0 up to 5% and above, the flow in the boundary layer becomes turbulent practically from the very beginning of the experimental portion. Considerable increase has been revealed of the heat transfer in this group of the experiments. At epsilon (>=) 5% the heat transfer grows up regularly

  13. Simplified computational simulation of liquid metal behaviour in turbulent flow with heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, E.B. da.

    1992-09-01

    The present work selected the available bibliography equations and empirical relationships to the development of a computer code to obtain the turbulent velocity and temperature profiles in liquid metal tube flow with heat generation. The computer code is applied to a standard problem and the results are considered satisfactory, at least from the viewpoint of qualitative behaviour. (author). 50 refs, 21 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Fluid simulations of ∇Te-driven turbulence and transport in boundary plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, X.Q.

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that the edge plasma plays a crucial role in global tokamak confinement. This paper is a report on simulations of a new drift wave type instability driven by the electron temperature gradient in tokamak scrapeoff-layers (SOL). A 2d fluid code has been developed in order to explore the anomalous transport in the boundary plasmas. The simulation consists of a set of fluid equations for the vorticity ∇ perpendicular 2 φ, the electron density n c and the temperature T c in a shearless plasma slab confined by a uniform, straight magnetic field B z with two divertor (or limiter) plates intercepting the magnetic field. The model has two regions separated by a magnetic separatrix: in the edge region inside the separatrix, the model is periodic along the magnetic field while in the SOL region outside the separatrix, the magnetic field is taken to be of finite length with model boundary conditions at diverter plates. The simulation results show that the observed linear instability agrees well with theory, and that a saturated state of turbulence is reached. In saturated turbulence, clear evidence of the expected long-wavelength mode penetration into the edge is seen, an inverse cascade of wave energy is observed. The simulation results also show that amplitudes of potential and the electron temperature fluctuations are somewhat above and the heat flux are somewhat below those of the simplest mixing-length estimates, and furthermore the large-scale radial structures of fluctuation quantities indicate that the cross-field transport is not diffusive. After saturation, the electron density and temperature profiles are flattened. A self-consistent simulation to determine the microturbulent SOL electron temperature profile has been done, the results of which reasonably agree with the experimental measurements

  15. Wall roughness induces asymptotic ultimate turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Xiaojue; Verschoof, Ruben Adriaan; Bakhuis, Dennis; Huisman, Sander Gerard; Verzicco, Roberto; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2018-01-01

    Turbulence governs the transport of heat, mass and momentum on multiple scales. In real-world applications, wall-bounded turbulence typically involves surfaces that are rough; however, characterizing and understanding the effects of wall roughness on turbulence remains a challenge. Here, by

  16. On Displacement Height, from Classical to Practical Formulation: Stress, Turbulent Transport and Vorticity Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogachev, Andrey; Kelly, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Displacement height ( d) is an important parameter in the simple modelling of wind speed and vertical fluxes above vegetative canopies, such as forests. Here we show that, aside from implicit definition through a (displaced) logarithmic profile, accepted formulations for d do not consistently predict flow properties above a forest. Turbulent transport can affect the displacement height, and is an integral part of what is called the roughness sublayer. We develop a more general approach for estimation of d, through production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent transport, and show how previous stress-based formulations for displacement height can be seen as simplified cases of a more general definition including turbulent transport. Further, we also give a simplified and practical form for d that is in agreement with the general approach, exploiting the concept of vortex thickness scale from mixing-layer theory. We assess the new and previous displacement height formulations by using flow statistics derived from the atmospheric boundary-layer Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes model SCADIS as well as from wind-tunnel observations, for different vegetation types and flow regimes in neutral conditions. The new formulations tend to produce smaller d than stress-based forms, falling closer to the classic logarithmically-defined displacement height. The new, more generally defined, displacement height appears to be more compatible with profiles of components of the turbulent kinetic energy budget, accounting for the combined effects of turbulent transport and shear production. The Coriolis force also plays a role, introducing wind-speed dependence into the behaviour of the roughness sublayer; this affects the turbulent transport, shear production, stress, and wind speed, as well as the displacement height, depending on the character of the forest. We further show how our practical (`mixing-layer') form for d matches the new turbulence-based relation, as well as

  17. Effects of turbulent hyporheic mixing on reach-scale solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, K. R.; Li, A.; Packman, A. I.

    2017-12-01

    Turbulence rapidly mixes solutes and fine particles into coarse-grained streambeds. Both hyporheic exchange rates and spatial variability of hyporheic mixing are known to be controlled by turbulence, but it is unclear how turbulent mixing influences mass transport at the scale of stream reaches. We used a process-based particle-tracking model to simulate local- and reach-scale solute transport for a coarse-bed stream. Two vertical mixing profiles, one with a smooth transition from in-stream to hyporheic transport conditions and a second with enhanced turbulent transport at the sediment-water interface, were fit to steady-state subsurface concentration profiles observed in laboratory experiments. The mixing profile with enhanced interfacial transport better matched the observed concentration profiles and overall mass retention in the streambed. The best-fit mixing profiles were then used to simulate upscaled solute transport in a stream. Enhanced mixing coupled in-stream and hyporheic solute transport, causing solutes exchanged into the shallow subsurface to have travel times similar to the water column. This extended the exponential region of the in-stream solute breakthrough curve, and delayed the onset of the heavy power-law tailing induced by deeper and slower hyporheic porewater velocities. Slopes of observed power-law tails were greater than those predicted from stochastic transport theory, and also changed in time. In addition, rapid hyporheic transport velocities truncated the hyporheic residence time distribution by causing mass to exit the stream reach via subsurface advection, yielding strong exponential tempering in the in-stream breakthrough curves at the timescale of advective hyporheic transport through the reach. These results show that strong turbulent mixing across the sediment-water interface violates the conventional separation of surface and subsurface flows used in current models for solute transport in rivers. Instead, the full distribution of

  18. Enhanced discreteness, renormalization, and anomalous transport in turbulent plasma. Final technical report, 15 September 1991--14 September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, S.

    1997-01-01

    The Principal Investigator, Professor Shayne Johnston, devoted 25% of his time during the academic year 1991--92 to this grant. The central idea underlying this project was a renormalized vision of a turbulent plasma in which electrons become microclumps, discreteness is thereby enhanced,and transport processes, still essentially classical, become anomalous. After two years of continued investigation, the PI believes strongly that this vision remains viable and compelling as an approach to electron heat conduction in the tokamak core. The simple analysis presented below shows that electrostatic waves can indeed correlate resonant repelling particles on length scales much shorter than a wavelength, thus causing enhanced discreteness within Debye clouds

  19. Electron Heating at Kinetic Scales in Magnetosheath Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasapis, Alexandros; Matthaeus, W. H.; Parashar, T. N.; LeContel, O.; Retinò, A.; Breuillard, H.; Khotyaintsev, Y.; Vaivads, A.; Eriksson, E.; Lavraud, B.; Moore, T. E.; Burch, J. L.; Torbert, R. B.; Chutter, M.; Needell, J.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Marklund, G.; Ergun, R. E.; Goodrich, K. A.; Wilder, F. D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a statistical study of coherent structures at kinetic scales, using data from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission in the Earth’s magnetosheath. We implemented the multi-spacecraft partial variance of increments (PVI) technique to detect these structures, which are associated with intermittency at kinetic scales. We examine the properties of the electron heating occurring within such structures. We find that, statistically, structures with a high PVI index are regions of significant electron heating. We also focus on one such structure, a current sheet, which shows some signatures consistent with magnetic reconnection. Strong parallel electron heating coincides with whistler emissions at the edges of the current sheet.

  20. Delay of turbulent by surface heating in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakeri, V.H.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layer flow visualization studies in water on a 1.5 cal tangent ogive body with surface heating are reported. Existing laminar boundary layer separation was observed to be eliminated with sufficient surface heating. In addition, transition location was observed to be significantly delayed. With surface temperature difference of about 27 0 C no disturbances in the boundary layer could be detected up to (X/D) = 2.5 as compared to observed transition at about (X/D) = 1.32 under slightly heated conditions. Present observations are found to be in agreement with the theoretical computations of Wazzan et al. in a qualitative sense. (orig.)

  1. Modeling Radiative Heat Transfer and Turbulence-Radiation Interactions in Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Chandan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sircar, Arpan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Ferreyro-Fernandez, Sebastian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Imren, Abdurrahman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Haworth, Daniel C [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Roy, Somesh P [Marquette University (United States); Ge, Wenjun [University of California Merced (United States); Modest, Michael F [University of California Merced (United States)

    2017-04-26

    Detailed radiation modelling in piston engines has received relatively little attention to date. Recently, it is being revisited in light of current trends towards higher operating pressures and higher levels of exhaust-gas recirculation, both of which enhance molecular gas radiation. Advanced high-efficiency engines also are expected to function closer to the limits of stable operation, where even small perturbations to the energy balance can have a large influence on system behavior. Here several different spectral radiation property models and radiative transfer equation (RTE) solvers have been implemented in an OpenFOAM-based engine CFD code, and simulations have been performed for a full-load (peak pressure ~200 bar) heavy-duty diesel engine. Differences in computed temperature fields, NO and soot levels, and wall heat transfer rates are shown for different combinations of spectral models and RTE solvers. The relative importance of molecular gas radiation versus soot radiation is examined. And the influence of turbulence-radiation interactions is determined by comparing results obtained using local mean values of composition and temperature to compute radiative emission and absorption with those obtained using a particle-based transported probability density function method.

  2. Transition Heat Transfer Modeling Based on the Characteristics of Turbulent Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Fred; Boyle, Robert

    1998-01-01

    While turbulence models are being developed which show promise for simulating the transition region on a turbine blade or vane, it is believed that the best approach with the greatest potential for practical use is the use of models which incorporate the physics of turbulent spots present in the transition region. This type of modeling results in the prediction of transition region intermittency which when incorporated in turbulence models give a good to excellent prediction of the transition region heat transfer. Some models are presented which show how turbulent spot characteristics and behavior can be employed to predict the effect of pressure gradient and Mach number on the transition region. The models predict the spot formation rate which is needed, in addition to the transition onset location, in the Narasimha concentrated breakdown intermittency equation. A simplified approach is taken for modeling turbulent spot growth and interaction in the transition region which utilizes the turbulent spot variables governing transition length and spot generation rate. The models are expressed in terms of spot spreading angle, dimensionless spot velocity, dimensionless spot area, disturbance frequency and Mach number. The models are used in conjunction with a computer code to predict the effects of pressure gradient and Mach number on the transition region and compared with VKI experimental turbine data.

  3. Turbulence Heating ObserveR – satellite mission proposal

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaivads, A.; Retinò, A.; Souček, Jan; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Valentini, F.; Escoubet, C. P.; Alexandrova, O.; André, M.; Bale, S. D.; Balikhin, M.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.; Caprioli, D.; Chen, C. H. K.; Clacey, E.; Cully, C. M.; Keyser de, J.; Eastwood, J. P.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Eriksson, S.; Goldstein, M. L.; Graham, D. B.; Haaland, S.; Hoshino, M.; Ji, H.; Karimabadi, H.; Kucharek, H.; Lavraud, B.; Marcucci, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Moore, T. E.; Nakamura, R.; Narita, Y.; Němeček, Z.; Norgren, C.; Opgenoorth, H.; Palmroth, M.; Perrone, D.; Pinçon, J.-L.; Rathsman, P.; Rothkaehl, H.; Sahraoui, F.; Servidio, S.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Vainio, L.; Vörös, Z.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 5 (2016), 905820501/1-905820501/16 ISSN 0022-3778 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : plasma heating * plasma properties * space plasma physics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.160, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/journal-of-plasma-physics/article/div-classtitleturbulence-heating-observer-satellite-mission-proposaldiv/01BB69B09206CE04C48BEDA8F24ED33C/core-reader

  4. Investigations of the role of nonlinear couplings in structure formation and transport regulation in plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Christopher George

    Studies of nonlinear couplings and dynamics in plasma turbulence are presented. Particular areas of focus are analytic studies of coherent structure formation in electron temperature gradient turbulence, measurement of nonlinear energy transfer in simulations of plasma turbulence, and bispectral analysis of experimental and computational data. The motivation for these works has been to develop and expand the existing theories of plasma transport, and verify the nonlinear predictions of those theories in simulation and experiment. In Chapter II, we study electromagnetic secondary instabilities of electron temperature gradient turbulence. The growth rate for zonal flow generation via modulational instability of electromagnetic ETG turbulence is calculated, as well as that for zonal (magnetic) field generation. In Chapter III, the stability and saturation of streamers in ETG turbulence is considered, and shown to depend sensitively upon geometry and the damping rates of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. Requirements for a credible theory of streamer transport are presented. In addition, a self-consistent model for interactions between ETG and ITG (ion temperature gradient) turbulence is presented. In Chapter IV, the nonlinear transfer of kinetic and internal energy is measured in simulations of plasma turbulence. The regulation of turbulence by radial decorrelation due to zonal flows and generation of zonal flows via the Reynolds stress are explicitly demonstrated, and shown to be symmetric facets of a single nonlinear process. Novel nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows are discussed. In Chapter V, measurements of fluctuation bicoherence in the edge of the DIII-D tokamak are presented. It is shown that the bicoherence increases transiently before a L-H transition, and decays to its initial value after the barrier has formed. The increase in bicoherence is localized to the region where the transport barrier forms, and shows strong coupling between well

  5. RANS-based simulation of turbulent wave boundary layer and sheet-flow sediment transport processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuhrman, David R.; Schløer, Signe; Sterner, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A numerical model coupling the horizontal component of the incompressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equationswith two-equation k−ω turbulence closure is presented and used to simulate a variety of turbulent wave boundary layer processes. The hydrodynamic model is additionally coupled...... with bed and suspended load descriptions, the latter based on an unsteady turbulent-diffusion equation, for simulation of sheet-flow sediment transport processes. In addition to standard features common within such RANS-based approaches, the present model includes: (1) hindered settling velocities at high...

  6. Bringing global gyrokinetic turbulence simulations to the transport timescale using a multiscale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; LoDestro, Lynda L.; Told, Daniel; Merlo, Gabriele; Ricketson, Lee F.; Campos, Alejandro; Jenko, Frank; Hittinger, Jeffrey A. F.

    2018-05-01

    The vast separation dividing the characteristic times of energy confinement and turbulence in the core of toroidal plasmas makes first-principles prediction on long timescales extremely challenging. Here we report the demonstration of a multiple-timescale method that enables coupling global gyrokinetic simulations with a transport solver to calculate the evolution of the self-consistent temperature profile. This method, which exhibits resiliency to the intrinsic fluctuations arising in turbulence simulations, holds potential for integrating nonlocal gyrokinetic turbulence simulations into predictive, whole-device models.

  7. Plasma turbulence. Structure formation, selection rule, dynamic response and dynamics transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Sanae I.

    2010-01-01

    The five-year project of Grant-in-Aid for Specially Promoted Research entitled general research on the structure formation and selection rule in plasma turbulence had brought many outcomes. Based on these outcomes, the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) program entitled general research on dynamic response and dynamic transport in plasma turbulence has started. In the present paper, the state-of-the-art of the research activities on the structure formation, selection rule and dynamics in plasma turbulence are reviewed with reference to outcomes of these projects. (author)

  8. Simulator Investigations of the Problems of Flying a Swept-Wing Transport Aircraft in Heavy Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Richard S.; Larsen, William E.

    1965-01-01

    An investigation of several factors which may contribute to the problem of piloting jet transport aircraft in heavy turbulence was conducted by using a piloted simulator that included the most significant airplane response and cockpit vibrations induced by rough air. Results indicated that the primary fuselage structural frequency contributed significantly to a distracting cockpit environment, and there was obtained evidence of severely reduced instrument flight proficiency during simulated maneuvering flight in heavy turbulence. It is concluded that the addition of similar rough-air response capabilities to training simulators would be of value in pilot indoctrination in turbulent-flight procedures.

  9. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  10. Heat and momentum transport scalings in vertical convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkina, Olga

    2016-11-01

    For vertical convection, where a fluid is confined between two differently heated isothermal vertical walls, we investigate the heat and momentum transport, which are measured, respectively, by the Nusselt number Nu and the Reynolds number Re . For laminar vertical convection we derive analytically the dependence of Re and Nu on the Rayleigh number Ra and the Prandtl number Pr from our boundary layer equations and find two different scaling regimes: Nu Pr 1 / 4 Ra 1 / 4 , Re Pr - 1 / 2 Ra 1 / 2 for Pr > 1 . Direct numerical simulations for Ra from 105 to 1010 and Pr from 0.01 to 30 are in excellent ageement with our theoretical findings and show that the transition between the regimes takes place for Pr around 0.1. We summarize the results from and present new theoretical and numerical results for transitional and turbulent vertical convection. The work is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Grant Sh 405/4 - Heisenberg fellowship.

  11. Dynamical and statistical phenomena of circulation and heat transfer in periodically forced rotating turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterl, Sebastian; Li, Hui-Min; Zhong, Jin-Qiang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present results from an experimental study into turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection forced externally by periodically modulated unidirectional rotation rates. We find that the azimuthal rotation velocity θ ˙(t ) and thermal amplitude δ (t ) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) are modulated by the forcing, exhibiting a variety of dynamics including increasing phase delays and a resonant peak in the amplitude of θ ˙(t ) . We also focus on the influence of modulated rotation rates on the frequency of occurrence η of stochastic cessation or reorientation events, and on the interplay between such events and the periodically modulated response of θ ˙(t ) . Here we identify a mechanism by which η can be amplified by the modulated response, and these normally stochastic events can occur with high regularity. We provide a modeling framework that explains the observed amplitude and phase responses, and we extend this approach to make predictions for the occurrence of cessation events and the probability distributions of θ ˙(t ) and δ (t ) during different phases of a modulation cycle, based on an adiabatic approach that treats each phase separately. Last, we show that such periodic forcing has consequences beyond influencing LSC dynamics, by investigating how it can modify the heat transport even under conditions where the Ekman pumping effect is predominant and strong enhancement of heat transport occurs. We identify phase and amplitude responses of the heat transport, and we show how increased modulations influence the average Nusselt number.

  12. The influence of meridional ice transport on Europa's ocean stratification and heat content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P.; Manucharyan, G.; Thompson, A. F.; Goodman, J. C.; Vance, S.

    2017-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Europa likely hosts a saltwater ocean beneath its icy surface. Geothermal heating and rotating convection in the ocean may drive a global overturning circulation that redistributes heat vertically and meridionally, preferentially warming the ice shell at the equator. Here we assess thepreviously unconstrained influence of ocean-ice coupling on Europa's ocean stratification and heat transport. We demonstrate that a relatively fresh layer can form at the ice-ocean interface due to a meridional ice transport forced by the differential ice shell heating between the equator and the poles. We provide analytical and numerical solutions for the layer's characteristics, highlighting their sensitivity to critical ocean parameters. For a weakly turbulent and highly saline ocean, a strong buoyancy gradient at the base of the freshwater layer can suppress vertical tracer exchange with the deeper ocean. As a result, the freshwater layer permits relatively warm deep ocean temperatures.

  13. Evolution of a polydispersed spray in heated and in highly turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Florian; Bazile, Rudy

    2009-11-01

    This work aims to study experimentally the dispersion and the evaporation of a polydispersed and bi-component spray in highly turbulent and heated flow. A chamber is designed to generate a heated turbulent flow in which two-component droplets are injected. The two components are octane (85%) and 3-pentanone (15%) and are chosen such that the 3-pentanone vapour concentration can be characterized by laser techniques. The experimental setup consists of a vertical channel with optical access. Before the heated air is injected in the channel, it passes through a turbulence generator. The carrier flow is characterized using Laser Doppler Anemometry. The turbulence is shown to have isotropic properties after a distance equal to four times the width of the channel and to have high levels up to 30%. The liquid phase is characterized with Phase Doppler Anemometry which allows to measure the diameter, the longitudinal and the radial velocity of the droplets. The spatial evolution of the diameter probability density function (PDF) and of the rms and mean velocities are obtained. Droplets mass fluxes are also calculated. In the mixture, 3-pentanone is the only component that fluoresces. So the vapour concentration of 3-pentanone in the carrier flow is determined using Laser Induced Fluorescence.

  14. CFD modeling of heat transfer performance of MgO-water nanofluid under turbulent flow

    OpenAIRE

    Davarnejad, Reza; Jamshidzadeh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of turbulent heat transfer behavior of Magnesium Oxide-water nanofluid in a circular tube was studied. The modeling was two dimensional under k–ε turbulence model. The base fluid was pure water and the volume fraction of nanoparticles in the base fluid was 0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. The applied Reynolds number range was 3000–19000. Three individual models including single phase, Volume of Fluid (VOF) and mixture were used. T...

  15. Heating and acceleration of solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous expanding plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofman, Leon, E-mail: Leon.Ofman@nasa.gov [Department of Physics, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Visiting, Department of Geosciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ozak, Nataly [Centre for mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Near the Sun (< 10R{sub s}) the acceleration, heating, and propagation of the solar wind are likely affected by the background inhomogeneities of the magnetized plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super-Alfvénic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  16. Stochastic modelling of conjugate heat transfer in near-wall turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozorski, Jacek; Minier, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01

    The paper addresses the conjugate heat transfer in turbulent flows with temperature assumed to be a passive scalar. The Lagrangian approach is applied and the heat transfer is modelled with the use of stochastic particles. The intensity of thermal fluctuations in near-wall turbulence is determined from the scalar probability density function (PDF) with externally provided dynamical statistics. A stochastic model for the temperature field in the wall material is proposed and boundary conditions for stochastic particles at the solid-fluid interface are formulated. The heated channel flow with finite-thickness walls is considered as a validation case. Computation results for the mean temperature profiles and the variance of thermal fluctuations are presented and compared with available DNS data

  17. Stochastic modelling of conjugate heat transfer in near-wall turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozorski, Jacek [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, Fiszera 14, 80952 Gdansk (Poland)]. E-mail: jp@imp.gda.pl; Minier, Jean-Pierre [Research and Development Division, Electricite de France, 6 quai Watier, 78400 Chatou (France)

    2006-10-15

    The paper addresses the conjugate heat transfer in turbulent flows with temperature assumed to be a passive scalar. The Lagrangian approach is applied and the heat transfer is modelled with the use of stochastic particles. The intensity of thermal fluctuations in near-wall turbulence is determined from the scalar probability density function (PDF) with externally provided dynamical statistics. A stochastic model for the temperature field in the wall material is proposed and boundary conditions for stochastic particles at the solid-fluid interface are formulated. The heated channel flow with finite-thickness walls is considered as a validation case. Computation results for the mean temperature profiles and the variance of thermal fluctuations are presented and compared with available DNS data.

  18. CFD evaluation of turbulence model on heat transfer in 5 × 5 rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao Yanmeng; Yang Lixin; Zhang Yuxiang; Pang Zhengzheng

    2014-01-01

    Different turbulence models may lead to different results when analyzing fuel assemblies using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. In this paper, a 5 × 5 rod bundle model was built to analyze the relationship between flow and heat transfer. The pressure drop and Nu were calculated using ANSYS CFX. Three factors evaluating swirling flow and cross-flow were used to analyze the inner relationship between flow field and heat transfer. The performances of various turbulence models, including eddy viscosity model and Reynold stress model, were evaluated. The comparison between numerical and similar experimental results indicates that Reynold stress model is more appropriate for modeling flow features and heat transfer in spacer grids discussed in this paper. (authors)

  19. First-principles simulations of heat transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puligheddu, Marcello; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2017-11-01

    Advances in understanding heat transport in solids were recently reported by both experiment and theory. However an efficient and predictive quantum simulation framework to investigate thermal properties of solids, with the same complexity as classical simulations, has not yet been developed. Here we present a method to compute the thermal conductivity of solids by performing ab initio molecular dynamics at close to equilibrium conditions, which only requires calculations of first-principles trajectories and atomic forces, thus avoiding direct computation of heat currents and energy densities. In addition the method requires much shorter sequential simulation times than ordinary molecular dynamics techniques, making it applicable within density functional theory. We discuss results for a representative oxide, MgO, at different temperatures and for ordered and nanostructured morphologies, showing the performance of the method in different conditions.

  20. Monju secondary heat transport system sodium leak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takeo; Hiroi, Hiroshi; Usami, Shin; Iwata, Koji.

    1996-01-01

    On December 8, 1995, the sodium leakage from the secondary heat transport system (SHTS) occurred in the piping room of the reactor auxiliary building in Monju. The secondary sodium leaked through a temperature sensor, due to the breakaway of the tip of the well tube of the sensor installed near the outlet of the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) in the C loop of SHTS. The reactor core remained cooled and thus, from the viewpoint of radiological hazards, the safety of the reactor was secured. There were no adverse effects for operating personnel or the surrounding environment. The cause of the well tube failure is considered to result from high cycle fatigue due to flow induced vibrations. Delay in draining the sodium from the leaking loop increased the consequential effects from sodium combustion products. (author)

  1. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Smith, Justin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  2. Simple heat transfer correlations for turbulent tube flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taler Dawid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents three power-type correlations of a simple form, which are valid for Reynolds numbers range from 3·103 ≤ Re ≤ 106, and for three different ranges of Prandtl number: 0.1 ≤ Pr ≤ 1.0, 1.0 < Pr ≤ 3.0, and 3.0 < Pr ≤ 103. Heat transfer correlations developed in the paper were compared with experimental results available in the literature. The comparisons performed in the paper confirm the good accuracy of the proposed correlations. They are also much simpler compared with the relationship of Gnielinski, which is also widely used in the heat transfer calculations.

  3. Numerical study on turbulent heat transfer and pressure drop of nanofluid in coiled tube-in-tube heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, Wael I.A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The performance of helically coiled tube heat exchanger using nanofluid is modeled. • The 3D turbulent flow and conjugate heat transfer of CTITHE are solved using FVM. • The effects of nanoparticle concentration and curvature ratio are investigated. • The Gnielinski correlation for Nu for turbulent flow in helical tubes can be used for water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluid. - Abstract: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study has been carried out to study the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water-based Al 2 O 3 nanofluid flowing inside coiled tube-in-tube heat exchangers. The 3D realizable k–ε turbulent model with enhanced wall treatment was used. Temperature dependent thermophysical properties of nanofluid and water were used and heat exchangers were analyzed considering conjugate heat transfer from hot fluid in the inner-coiled tube to cold fluid in the annulus region. The overall performance of the tested heat exchangers was assessed based on the thermo-hydrodynamic performance index. Design parameters were in the range of; nanoparticles volume concentrations 0.5%, 1.0% and 2.0%, coil diameters 0.18, 0.24 and 0.30 m, inner tube and annulus sides flow rates from 2 to 5 LPM and 10 to 25 LPM, respectively. Nanofluid flows inside inner tube side or annular side. The results obtained showed a different behavior depending on the parameter selected for the comparison with the base fluid. Moreover, when compared at the same Re or Dn, the heat transfer coefficient increases by increasing the coil diameter and nanoparticles volume concentration. Also, the friction factor increases with the increase in curvature ratio and pressure drop penalty is negligible with increasing the nanoparticles volume concentration. Conventional correlations for predicting average heat transfer and friction factor in turbulent flow regime such as Gnielinski correlation and Mishra and Gupta correlation, respectively, for helical tubes are also valid for

  4. TOUGH, Unsaturated Groundwater Transport and Heat Transport Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruess, K.A.; Cooper, C.; Osnes, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: A successor to the TOUGH program, TOUGH2 offers added capabilities and user features, including the flexibility to handle different fluid mixtures (water, water with tracer; water, CO 2 ; water, air; water, air with vapour pressure lowering, and water, hydrogen), facilities for processing of geometric data (computational grids), and an internal version control system to ensure referenceability of code applications. TOUGH (Transport of Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat) is a multi-dimensional numerical model for simulating the coupled transport of water, vapor, air, and heat in porous and fractured media. The program provides options for specifying injection or withdrawal of heat and fluids. Although primarily designed for studies of high-level nuclear waste isolation in partially saturated geological media, it should also be useful for a wider range of problems in heat and moisture transfer, and in the drying of porous materials. For example, geothermal reservoir simulation problems can be handled simply by setting the air mass function equal to zero on input. The TOUGH simulator was developed for problems involving strongly heat-driven flow. To describe these phenomena a multi-phase approach to fluid and heat flow is used, which fully accounts for the movement of gaseous and liquid phases, their transport of latent transitions between liquid and vapor. TOUGH takes account of fluid flow in both liquid and gaseous phases occurring under pressure, viscous, and gravity forces according to Darcy's law. Interference between the phases is represented by means of relative permeability functions. The code handles binary, but not Knudsen, diffusion in the gas phase and capillary and phase absorption effects for the liquid phase. Heat transport occurs by means of conduction with thermal conductivity dependent on water saturation, convection, and binary diffusion, which includes both sensible and latent heat. 2 - Method of solution: All

  5. Equipartition and transport in two-dimensional electrostatic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.; Nycander, J.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1998-01-01

    Turbulent equipartition is investigated for the nonlinear evolution of pressure driven flute modes of a plasma in an inhomogeneous magnetic field. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is recovered by linear stability analysis, and occurs when the pressure profile is more peaked than the profile of the...

  6. Temporal evolutions of electron temperature and density of turbulently-heated tokamak plasmas in TRIAM-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiraki, N; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, Y; Itoh, S [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    1981-04-01

    The temporal evolution of the electron temperature and density are measured in a turbulent heating experiment in TRIAM-1. Skin-like profiles of the electron temperature and density are clearly observed. The anomality in the electrical resistivity of the plasma in this skin-layer is estimated, and the plasma heating in this skin-layer is regarded as being due to anomalous joule heating arising from this anomalous resistivity. The ratio of drift velocity to electron thermal velocity in the layer is also calculated, and it is shown that the conditions needed to make the current-driven ion-acoustic instability triggerable are satisfied.

  7. Turbulent mixing and fluid transport within Florida Bay seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer C. R.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2017-10-01

    Seagrasses serve an important function in the ecology of Florida Bay, providing critical nursery habitat and a food source for a variety of organisms. They also create significant benthic structure that induces drag, altering local hydrodynamics that can influence mixing and nutrient dynamics. Thalassia testudinum seagrass meadows were investigated to determine how shoot density and morphometrics alter local wave conditions, the generation of turbulence, and fluid exchange above and within the canopy. Sparsely vegetated and densely vegetated meadows were monitored, with shoot densities of 259 ± 26 and 484 ± 78 shoots m-2, respectively. The temporal and spatial structure of velocity and turbulence were measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeters and an in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) system positioned both above and within the seagrass canopy. The retention of fluid within the canopy was determined by examining e-folding times calculated from the concentration curves of dye plumes released within the seagrass canopy. Results show that a shear layer with an inflection point develops at the top of the seagrass canopy, which generates instabilities that impart turbulence into the seagrass meadow. Compared to the overlying water column, turbulence was enhanced within the sparse canopy due to flow interaction with the seagrass blades, but reduced within the dense canopy. Wave generated oscillatory motion penetrated deeper into the canopy than unidirectional currents, enhancing fluid exchange. Both shoot density and the relative magnitude of wave- versus current-driven flow conditions were found to be important controls on turbulent exchange of water masses across the canopy-water interface.

  8. Nature of turbulent transport across sheared zonal flows: insights from gyrokinetic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R; Newman, D E; Leboeuf, J-N; Decyk, V K

    2011-01-01

    The traditional view regarding the reduction of turbulence-induced transport across a stable sheared flow invokes a reduction of the characteristic length scale in the direction perpendicular to the flow as a result of the shearing and stretching of eddies caused by the differential pull exerted in the direction of the flow. A reduced effective transport coefficient then suffices to capture the reduction, that can then be readily incorporated into a transport model. However, recent evidence from gyrokinetic simulations of the toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode suggests that the dynamics of turbulent transport across sheared flows changes in a more fundamental manner, and that the use of reduced effective transport coefficients fails to capture the full dynamics that may exhibit both subdiffusion and non-Gaussian statistics. In this contribution, after briefly reviewing these results, we propose some candidates for the physical mechanisms responsible for endowing transport with such non-diffusive characteristics, backing these proposals with new numerical gyrokinetic data.

  9. Gyrokinetic Studies on Turbulence-Driven and Neoclassical Nondiffusive Toroidal-Momentum Transport and the Effect of Residual Fluctuations in Strong ExB Shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Lee, W. W.; Tang, W. M.; Kaye, S. M.; Diamond, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    A significant inward flux of toroidal momentum is found in global gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient turbulence, leading to core plasma rotation spin-up. The underlying mechanism is identified to be the generation of residual stress due to the k parallel symmetry breaking induced by global quasistationary zonal flow shear. Simulations also show a significant off-diagonal element associated with the ion temperature gradient in the neoclassical momentum flux, while the overall neoclassical flux is small. In addition, the residual turbulence found in the presence of strong ExB flow shear may account for neoclassical-level ion heat and anomalous momentum transport widely observed in experiments

  10. Convective heat transfer characteristics in the turbulent region of molten salt in concentric tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y.S.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, J.H.; Yuan, X.F.; Tian, J.; Tang, Z.F.; Zhu, H.H.; Fu, Y.; Wang, N.X.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand the heat transfer behavior and characteristics of molten salt in heat exchanger, the convective heat transfer characteristics of molten salt in salt-to-oil concentric tube are studied. Overall heat transfer coefficients of the heat exchanger are calculated using Wilson plots. Heat transfer coefficients of tube side molten salt with the range of Reynolds number from 10,000 to 50,000 and the Prandtl number from 11 to 27 are evaluated invoking the calculated overall heat transfer coefficients. The effects of velocity and temperature on the convective heat transfer in the turbulent region of molten salt are studied by comparing with the traditional correlations. The results show that the heat transfer characteristics of molten salt are in line with the empirical heat transfer correlation; however, Dittus–Boelter, Gnielinski, Sieder–Tate and Hausen correlations all give a larger deviation for the experimental data. Finally, based on the experimental data and Sieder–Tate correlation, a modified heat transfer correlation is proposed and good agreement is observed between the experimental data and the modified correlation. The results will also provide an important reference for the design of the heat exchangers in the Thorium-based Molten Salt Reactor.

  11. Time-dependent transport of energetic particles in magnetic turbulence: computer simulations versus analytical theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, V.; Shalchi, A.

    2018-06-01

    We explore numerically the transport of energetic particles in a turbulent magnetic field configuration. A test-particle code is employed to compute running diffusion coefficients as well as particle distribution functions in the different directions of space. Our numerical findings are compared with models commonly used in diffusion theory such as Gaussian distribution functions and solutions of the cosmic ray Fokker-Planck equation. Furthermore, we compare the running diffusion coefficients across the mean magnetic field with solutions obtained from the time-dependent version of the unified non-linear transport theory. In most cases we find that particle distribution functions are indeed of Gaussian form as long as a two-component turbulence model is employed. For turbulence setups with reduced dimensionality, however, the Gaussian distribution can no longer be obtained. It is also shown that the unified non-linear transport theory agrees with simulated perpendicular diffusion coefficients as long as the pure two-dimensional model is excluded.

  12. Safety factor profile dependence of turbulent structure formation in relevant to internal transport barrier relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, S.; Yagi, M.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: It is widely understood that the improved confinement mode with transport barrier is necessary to achieve the self-ignition condition in ITER. The negative magnetic shear, mean ExB flow shear, and zonal flow are considered to play important roles for ITB formation. In our previous study, it is found that the non-linear interaction between the meso-scale modes produces non-local energy transfer to the off-resonant mode in the vicinity of q min surface and brings global relaxation of the temperature profile involving ITB collapse. Experimental studies indicate that a relationship exists between the ITB formation and safety factor q-profile, with a reversed magnetic shear (RS) configuration. Transitional ITB events occur on the low-order rational resonant surface. The ITB shape and location depend on the q-profile and q min position. These observations indicate that the q-profile might play an essential role in determining the turbulent structure. In this study, the effect of safety factor profile on the ion temperature gradient driven drift wave (ITG) turbulence is investigated using a global non-linear simulation code based on the gyro-fluid model. A heat source and toroidal momentum source are introduced. Dependence of safety factor profiles on ITB formation and its stability is examined to clarify the influence of the radial distribution of the rational surfaces and the q min value. It is found that the nonlinearly excited meso-scale mode in the vicinity of q min depends on the value of q min . A detailed analysis of the structure selection rule is in progress. (author)

  13. Progress towards modeling tokamak boundary plasma turbulence and understanding its role in setting divertor heat flux widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin

    2017-10-01

    QCMs (quasi-coherent modes) are well characterized in the edge of Alcator C-Mod, when operating in the Enhanced Dα (EDA) H-mode, a promising alternative regime for ELM (edge localized modes) suppressed operation. To improve the understanding of the physics behind the QCMs, three typical C-Mod EDA H-Mode discharges are simulated by BOUT + + using a six-field two-fluid model (based on the Braginskii equations). The simulated characteristics of the frequency versus wave number spectra of the modes is in reasonable agreement with phase contrast imaging data. The key simulation results are: 1) Linear spectrum analysis and the nonlinear phase relationship indicate the dominance of resistive-ballooning modes and drift-Alfven wave instabilities; 2) QCMs originate inside the separatrix; (3) magnetic flutter causes the mode spreading into the SOL; 4) the boundary electric field Er changes the turbulent characteristics of the QCMs and controls edge transport and the divertor heat flux width; 5) the magnitude of the divertor heat flux depends on the physics models, such as sources and sinks, sheath boundary conditions, and parallel heat flux limiting coefficient. The BOUT + + simulations have also been performed for inter-ELM periods of DIII-D and EAST discharges, and similar quasi-coherent modes have been found. The parallel electron heat fluxes projected onto the target from these BOUT + + simulations follow the experimental heat flux width scaling, in particular the inverse dependence of the width on the poloidal magnetic field with an outlier. Further turbulence statistics analysis shows that the blobs are generated near the pedestal peak gradient region inside the separatrix and contribute to the transport of the particle and heat in the SOL region. To understand the Goldston heuristic drift-based model, results will also be presented from self-consistent transport simulations with the electric and magnetic drifts in BOUT + + and with the sheath potential included in the

  14. Heating and Acceleration of Solar Wind Ions by Turbulent Wave Spectrum in Inhomogeneous Expanding Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, Leon; Ozak, Nataly; Vinas, Adolfo F.

    2016-01-01

    Near the Sun (plasma. The heating and the acceleration of the solar wind ions by turbulent wave spectrum in inhomogeneous plasma is studied using a 2.5D hybrid model. The hybrid model describes the kinetics of the ions, while the electrons are modeled as massless neutralizing fluid in an expanding box approach. Turbulent magnetic fluctuations dominated by power-law frequency spectra, which are evident from in-situ as well as remote sensing measurements, are used in our models. The effects of background density inhomogeneity across the magnetic field on the resonant ion heating are studied. The effect of super- Alfvenic ion drift on the ion heating is investigated. It is found that the turbulent wave spectrum of initially parallel propagating waves cascades to oblique modes, and leads to enhanced resonant ion heating due to the inhomogeneity. The acceleration of the solar wind ions is achieved by the parametric instability of large amplitude waves in the spectrum, and is also affected by the inhomogeneity. The results of the study provide the ion temperature anisotropy and drift velocity temporal evolution due to relaxation of the instability. The non-Maxwellian velocity distribution functions (VDFs) of the ions are modeled in the inhomogeneous solar wind plasma in the acceleration region close to the Sun.

  15. Turbulence Control Through Selective Surface Heating Using Microwave Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    3 Model Size 3 Mod el Vibrator Array Fig.3.5. New optimized experimental chamber in MRTI – the full electrodynamic analogue of new wind...before the model burnout that enable only a limited number of test runs. The main drawback of the MW heating resultd from the non-uniformity of energy... burnout occurred in a certain point, organic substances in model burnt out and were blown away but some of them consisting mainly of carbon

  16. Numerical prediction of local transitional features of turbulent forced gas flows in circular tubes with strong heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezato, Koichiro; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Shehata, A.M.; McEligot, D.M.

    1997-03-01

    Previous numerical simulation for the laminarization due to heating of the turbulent flow in pipe were assessed by comparison with only macroscopic characteristics such as heat transfer coefficient and pressure drop, since no experimental data on the local distributions of the velocity and temperature in such flow situation was available. Recently, Shehata and McEligot reported the first measurements of local distributions of velocity and temperature for turbulent forced air flow in a vertical circular tube with strongly heating. They carried out the experiments in three situations from turbulent flow to laminarizing flow according to the heating rate. In the present study, we analyzed numerically the local transitional features of turbulent flow evolving laminarizing due to strong heating in their experiments by using the advanced low-Re two-equation turbulence model. As the result, we successfully predicted the local distributions of velocity and temperature as well as macroscopic characteristics in three turbulent flow conditions. By the present study, a numerical procedure has been established to predict the local characteristics such as velocity distribution of the turbulent flow with large thermal-property variation and laminarizing flow due to strong heating with enough accuracy. (author). 60 refs

  17. Heat transport in an anharmonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Shiladitya; Mukherjee, Krishnendu

    2018-04-01

    We study transport of heat in an ordered, anharmonic crystal in the form of slab geometry in three dimensions. Apart from attaching baths of Langevin type to two extreme surfaces, we also attach baths of same type to the intermediate surfaces of the slab. Since the crystal is uninsulated, it exchanges energy with the intermediate heat baths. We find that both Fourier’s law of heat conduction and the Newton’s law of cooling hold to leading order in anharmonic coupling. The leading behavior of the temperature profile is exponentially falling from high to low temperature surface of the slab. As the anharmonicity increases, profiles fall more below the harmonic one in the log plot. In the thermodynamic limit thermal conductivity remains independent of the environment temperature and its leading order anharmonic contribution is linearly proportional to the temperature change between the two extreme surfaces of the slab. A fast crossover from one-dimensional (1D) to three-dimensional (3D) behavior of the thermal conductivity is observed in the system.

  18. Transitional and turbulent flat-plate boundary layers with heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz

    2010-11-01

    We report on our direct numerical simulation of two incompressible, nominally zero-pressure-gradient flat-plate boundary layers from momentum thickness Reynolds number 80 to 1950. Heat transfer between the constant-temperature solid surface and the free-stream is also simulated with molecular Prandtl number=1. Throughout the entire flat-plate, the ratio of Stanton number and skin-friction St/Cfdeviates from the exact Reynolds analogy value of 0.5 by less than 1.5%. Turbulent Prandtl number t peaks at the wall. Preponderance of hairpin vortices is observed in both the transitional and turbulent regions of the boundary layers. In particular, the internal structure of merged turbulent spots is hairpin forest; the internal structure of infant turbulent spots is hairpin packet. Numerous hairpin vortices are readily detected in both the near-wall and outer regions of the boundary layers up to momentum thickness Reynolds number 1950. This suggests that the hairpin vortices in the turbulent region are not simply the aged hairpin forests convected from the upstream transitional region. Temperature iso-surfaces in the companion thermal boundary layers are found to be a useful tracer in identifying hairpin vortex structures.

  19. Visualization of the heat release zone of highly turbulent premixed jet flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Liang; Tan, Jianguo; Zhu, Jiajian

    2017-10-01

    Visualization of the heat release zone (HRZ) of highly turbulent flames is significantly important to understand the interaction between turbulence and chemical reactions, which is the foundation to design and optimize engines. Simultaneous measurements of OH and CH2O using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) were performed to characterize the HRZ. A well-designed piloted premixed jet burner was employed to generate four turbulent premixed CH4/air jet flames, with different jet Reynolds numbers (Rejet) ranging from 4900 to 39200. The HRZ was visualized by both the gradient of OH and the pixel-by-pixel product of OH and CH2O. It is shown that turbulence has an increasing effect on the spatial structure of the flame front with an increasing height above the jet exit for the premixed jet flames, which results in the broadening of the HRZ and the increase of the wrinkling. The HRZ remains thin as the Rejet increases, whereas the preheat zone is significantly broadened and thickened. This indicates that the smallest turbulent eddies can only be able to enter the flame front rather than the HRZ in the present flame conditions. The flame quenching is observed with Rejet = 39200, which may be due to the strong entrainment of the cold air from outside of the burned gas region.

  20. SciDAC GSEP: Gyrokinetic Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-12-30

    Energetic particle (EP) confinement is a key physics issue for burning plasma experiment ITER, the crucial next step in the quest for clean and abundant energy, since ignition relies on self-heating by energetic fusion products (α-particles). Due to the strong coupling of EP with burning thermal plasmas, plasma confinement property in the ignition regime is one of the most uncertain factors when extrapolating from existing fusion devices to the ITER tokamak. EP population in current tokamaks are mostly produced by auxiliary heating such as neutral beam injection (NBI) and radio frequency (RF) heating. Remarkable progress in developing comprehensive EP simulation codes and understanding basic EP physics has been made by two concurrent SciDAC EP projects GSEP funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fusion Energy Science (OFES), which have successfully established gyrokinetic turbulence simulation as a necessary paradigm shift for studying the EP confinement in burning plasmas. Verification and validation have rapidly advanced through close collaborations between simulation, theory, and experiment. Furthermore, productive collaborations with computational scientists have enabled EP simulation codes to effectively utilize current petascale computers and emerging exascale computers. We review here key physics progress in the GSEP projects regarding verification and validation of gyrokinetic simulations, nonlinear EP physics, EP coupling with thermal plasmas, and reduced EP transport models. Advances in high performance computing through collaborations with computational scientists that enable these large scale electromagnetic simulations are also highlighted. These results have been widely disseminated in numerous peer-reviewed publications including many Phys. Rev. Lett. papers and many invited presentations at prominent fusion conferences such as the biennial International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Fusion Energy Conference and the annual meeting of the

  1. Up-down symmetry of the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parra, Felix I.; Barnes, Michael; Peeters, Arthur G.

    2011-01-01

    Two symmetries of the local nonlinear δf gyrokinetic system of equations in tokamaks in the high flow regime are presented. The turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum changes sign under an up-down reflection of the tokamak and a sign change of both the rotation and the rotation shear. Thus, the turbulent transport of toroidal angular momentum must vanish for up-down symmetric tokamaks in the absence of both rotation and rotation shear. This has important implications for the modeling of spontaneous rotation.

  2. Flux and turbulence measurements at a densely built-up site in Marseille: Heat, mass (water and carbon dioxide), and momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmond, C. S. B.; Salmond, J. A.; Oke, T. R.; Offerle, B.; Lemonsu, A.

    2004-12-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) observations above the densely built-up center of Marseille during the Expérience sur site pour contraindre les modèles de pollution atmosphérique et de transport d'émissions (ESCOMPTE) summertime measurement campaign extend current understanding of surface atmosphere exchanges in cities. The instrument array presented opportunities to address issues of the representativeness of local-scale fluxes in urban settings. Separate EC systems operated at two levels, and a telescoping tower allowed the pair to be exposed at two different sets of heights. The flux and turbulence observations taken at the four heights, stratified by wind conditions (mistral wind and sea breeze), are used to address the partitioning of the surface energy balance in an area with large roughness elements. The turbulent sensible heat flux dominates in the daytime, although the storage heat flux is a significant term that peaks before solar noon. The turbulent latent heat flux is small but not negligible. Carbon dioxide fluxes show that this central city district is almost always a source, but the vegetation reduces the magnitude of the fluxes in the afternoon. The atmosphere in such a heavily developed area is rarely stable. The turbulence characteristics support the empirical functions proposed by M. Roth.

  3. Dissipation and heating in solar wind turbulence: from the macro to the micro and back again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, Khurom H; Osman, Kareem T; Chapman, Sandra C

    2015-05-13

    The past decade has seen a flurry of research activity focused on discerning the physics of kinetic scale turbulence in high-speed astrophysical plasma flows. By 'kinetic' we mean spatial scales on the order of or, in particular, smaller than the ion inertial length or the ion gyro-radius--the spatial scales at which the ion and electron bulk velocities decouple and considerable change can be seen in the ion distribution functions. The motivation behind most of these studies is to find the ultimate fate of the energy cascade of plasma turbulence, and thereby the channels by which the energy in the system is dissipated. This brief Introduction motivates the case for a themed issue on this topic and introduces the topic of turbulent dissipation and heating in the solar wind. The theme issue covers the full breadth of studies: from theory and models, massive simulations of these models and observational studies from the highly rich and vast amount of data collected from scores of heliospheric space missions since the dawn of the space age. A synopsis of the theme issue is provided, where a brief description of all the contributions is discussed and how they fit together to provide an over-arching picture on the highly topical subject of dissipation and heating in turbulent collisionless plasmas in general and in the solar wind in particular. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. TIME-DEPENDENT TURBULENT HEATING OF OPEN FLUX TUBES IN THE CHROMOSPHERE, CORONA, AND SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woolsey, L. N.; Cranmer, S. R., E-mail: lwoolsey@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-10-01

    We investigate several key questions of plasma heating in open-field regions of the corona that connect to the solar wind. We present results for a model of Alfvén-wave-driven turbulence for three typical open magnetic field structures: a polar coronal hole, an open flux tube neighboring an equatorial streamer, and an open flux tube near a strong-field active region. We compare time-steady, one-dimensional turbulent heating models against fully time-dependent three-dimensional reduced-magnetohydrodynamic modeling of BRAID. We find that the time-steady results agree well with time-averaged results from BRAID. The time dependence allows us to investigate the variability of the magnetic fluctuations and of the heating in the corona. The high-frequency tail of the power spectrum of fluctuations forms a power law whose exponent varies with height, and we discuss the possible physical explanation for this behavior. The variability in the heating rate is bursty and nanoflare-like in nature, and we analyze the amount of energy lost via dissipative heating in transient events throughout the simulation. The average energy in these events is 10{sup 21.91} erg, within the “picoflare” range, and many events reach classical “nanoflare” energies. We also estimated the multithermal distribution of temperatures that would result from the heating-rate variability, and found good agreement with observed widths of coronal differential emission measure distributions. The results of the modeling presented in this paper provide compelling evidence that turbulent heating in the solar atmosphere by Alfvén waves accelerates the solar wind in open flux tubes.

  5. The influence of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, G.J.; Sielwa, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    The study is presented of the effects of heat transfer and the variations of the properties of the fluids in turbulent flow in tube. One model for the turbulent Eddy viscosity and termal Eddy diffusivity developed by CEBECI; NA and HABIB was utilized. The theoretical results agree well with experimental results [pt

  6. Non-diffusive transport in 3-D pressure driven plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, D.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.

    2005-01-01

    Numerical evidence of non-diffusive transport in 3-dimensional, resistive, pressure-gradient-driven plasma turbulence is presented. It is shown that the probability density function (pdf) of tracers is strongly non-Gaussian and exhibits algebraic decaying tails. To describe these results, a transport model using fractional derivative operators in proposed. The model incorporates in a unified way non-locality (i.e., non-Fickian transport), memory effects (i.e., non-Markovian transport), and non-diffusive scaling features known to be present in fusion plasmas. There is quantitative agreement between the model and the turbulent transport numerical calculations. In particular, the model reproduces the shape and space-time scaling of the pdf, and the super-diffusive scaling of the moments. (author)

  7. Charge and current transport in open field lines turbulence: Influence of plasma-surface boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futtersack, R., E-mail: romain.futtersack@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse, LAPLACE, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Hagelaar, G. [Universite Paul Sabatier Toulouse, LAPLACE, 118 Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Ghendrih, Ph.; Simonin, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the impact of both parallel and transverse boundary conditions on the current and charge transport in open field line systems using the TOKAM2D code, which solves a minimal model for interchange turbulence. Various limit test cases are discussed and analyzed. In the parallel direction, the sheath conductivity is found to play an essential role in the stabilization of large-scale potential structures, leading to the formation of transport channel or transport barrier respectively for an insulating end wall or a wall with an enhanced sheath conductivity. On another hand, the addition of transverse boundary conditions intrinsically changes the transport characteristics, influencing both radial profiles and probability density functions. It underlines that in some cases a detailed description of the plasma-wall interaction process is required to get a proper description of the current loop pattern that determines electrostatic turbulent transport.

  8. Heat transfer by liquids in suspension in a turbulent gas stream (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grison, E.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1960-01-01

    The introduction of a small volume of liquid into a turbulent gas stream used as cooling agent improves considerably the heat transfer coefficient of the gas. When the turbulent regime is established, one observes in a cylindrical tube two types of flow whether the liquid wets or does not wet the wall. In the first case, one gets on the wall an annular liquid film and droplets in suspension are in the gas stream. In the second case, a fog of droplets is formed without any liquid film on the wall. Experiments were performed with the following mixtures: water-hydrogen, water-nitrogen, ethanol-nitrogen (wetting liquids) introduced into a stainless steel tube of 4 mm ID, electrically heated on 320 mm of length. We varied the gas flow rate (Reynolds until 50000), the rate of the liquid flow rate to gas flow rate (until 15), the pressure (until 10 kg/cm 2 ), the temperature (until the boiling point) and the heat flux (until 250 W/cm 2 ). Two types of burnout were observed. A formula of correlation of the burnout heat flux is given. Making use of the analogy between mass transfer and heat transfer, a dimensionless formula of correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients is established. (author) [fr

  9. Planform structure and heat transfer in turbulent free convection over horizontal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerthan, S. Ananda; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    2000-04-01

    This paper deals with turbulent free convection in a horizontal fluid layer above a heated surface. Experiments have been carried out on a heated surface to obtain and analyze the planform structure and the heat transfer under different conditions. Water is the working fluid and the range of flux Rayleigh numbers (Ra) covered is 3×107-2×1010. The different conditions correspond to Rayleigh-Bénard convection, convection with either the top water surface open to atmosphere or covered with an insulating plate, and with an imposed external flow on the heated boundary. Without the external flow the planform is one of randomly oriented line plumes. At large Rayleigh number Ra and small aspect ratio (AR), these line plumes seem to align along the diagonal, presumably due to a large scale flow. The side views show inclined dyelines, again indicating a large scale flow. When the external flow is imposed, the line plumes clearly align in the direction of external flow. The nondimensional average plume spacing, Raλ1/3, varies between 40 and 90. The heat transfer rate, for all the experiments conducted, represented as RaδT-1/3, where δT is the conduction layer thickness, varies only between 0.1-0.2, showing that in turbulent convection the heat transfer rates are similar under the different conditions.

  10. Turbulence induced radial transport of toroidal momentum in boundary plasma of EAST tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, N.; Yan, N.; Xu, G. S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wang, L.; Ding, S. Y.; Chen, R.; Chen, L.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Shao, L. M.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence induced toroidal momentum transport in boundary plasma is investigated in H-mode discharge using Langmuir-Mach probes on EAST. The Reynolds stress is found to drive an inward toroidal momentum transport, while the outflow of particles convects the toroidal momentum outwards in the edge plasma. The Reynolds stress driven momentum transport dominates over the passive momentum transport carried by particle flux, which potentially provides a momentum source for the edge plasma. The outflow of particles delivers a momentum flux into the scrape-off layer (SOL) region, contributing as a momentum source for the SOL flows. At the L-H transitions, the outward momentum transport suddenly decreases due to the suppression of edge turbulence and associated particle transport. The SOL flows start to decelerate as plasma entering into H-mode. The contributions from turbulent Reynolds stress and particle transport for the toroidal momentum transport are identified. These results shed lights on the understanding of edge plasma accelerating at L-H transitions.

  11. Observation of a current-limited double layer in a linear turbulent-heating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inuzuka, H.; Torii, Y.; Nagatsu, M.; Tsukishima, T.

    1985-01-01

    Time- and space-resolved measurements of strong double layers (DLs) have been carried out for the first time on a linear turbulent-heating device, together with those of fluctuation spectra and precise current measurements. A stable stong DL is formed even when the electric current through the DL is less than the so-called Bohm value. Discussion of the formation and decay processes is given, indicating a transition from an ion-acoustic DL to a monotonic DL

  12. Role of Turbulent Prandtl Number on Heat Flux at Hypersonic Mach Number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Edwards, J. R.; Hassan, H. A.

    2004-01-01

    Present simulation of turbulent flows involving shock wave/boundary layer interaction invariably overestimates heat flux by almost a factor of two. One possible reason for such a performance is a result of the fact that the turbulence models employed make use of Morkovin's hypothesis. This hypothesis is valid for non-hypersonic Mach numbers and moderate rates of heat transfer. At hypersonic Mach numbers, high rates of heat transfer exist in regions where shock wave/boundary layer interactions are important. As a result, one should not expect traditional turbulence models to yield accurate results. The goal of this investigation is to explore the role of a variable Prandtl number formulation in predicting heat flux in flows dominated by strong shock wave/boundary layer interactions. The intended applications involve external flows in the absence of combustion such as those encountered in supersonic inlets. This can be achieved by adding equations for the temperature variance and its dissipation rate. Such equations can be derived from the exact Navier-Stokes equations. Traditionally, modeled equations are based on the low speed energy equation where the pressure gradient term and the term responsible for energy dissipation are ignored. It is clear that such assumptions are not valid for hypersonic flows. The approach used here is based on the procedure used in deriving the k-zeta model, in which the exact equations that governed k, the variance of velocity, and zeta, the variance of vorticity, were derived and modeled. For the variable turbulent Prandtl number, the exact equations that govern the temperature variance and its dissipation rate are derived and modeled term by term. The resulting set of equations are free of damping and wall functions and are coordinate-system independent. Moreover, modeled correlations are tensorially consistent and invariant under Galilean transformation. The final set of equations will be given in the paper.

  13. Turbulent heat mixing of a heavy liquid metal flow in the MEGAPIE target geometry-The heated jet experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stieglitz, Robert; Daubner, Markus; Batta, A.; Lefhalm, C.-H.

    2007-01-01

    The MEGAPIE target installed at the Paul-Scherrer Institute is an example of a spallation target using eutectic liquid lead-bismuth (Pb 45 Bi 55 ) both as coolant and neutron source. An adequate cooling of the target requires a conditioning of the flow, which is realized by a main flow transported in an annular gap downwards, u-turned at a hemispherical shell into a cylindrical riser tube. In order to avoid a stagnation point close to the lowest part of the shell a jet flow is superimposed to the main flow, which is directed towards to the stagnation point and flows tangentially along the shell. The heated jet experiment conducted in the THEADES loop of the KALLA laboratory is nearly 1:1 representation of the lower part of the MEGAPIE target. It is aimed to study the cooling capability of this specific geometry in dependence on the flow rate ratio (Q main /Q jet ) of the main flow (Q main ) to the jet flow (Q jet ). Here, a heated jet is injected into a cold main flow at MEGAPIE relevant flow rate ratios. The liquid metal experiment is accompanied by a water experiment in almost the same geometry to study the momentum field as well as a three-dimensional turbulent numerical fluid dynamic simulation (CFD). Besides a detailed study of the envisaged nominal operation of the MEGAPIE target with Q main /Q jet = 15 deviations from this mode are investigated in the range from 7.5 ≤ Q main /Q jet ≤ 20 in order to give an estimate on the safe operational threshold of the target. The experiment shows that, the flow pattern establishing in this specific design and the turbulence intensity distribution essentially depends on the flow rate ratio (Q main /Q jet ). All Q main /Q jet -ratios investigated exhibit an unstable time dependent behavior. The MEGAPIE design is highly sensitive against changes of this ratio. Mainly three completely different flow patterns were identified. A sufficient cooling of the lower target shell, however, is only ensured if Q main /Q jet ≤ 12

  14. Turbulent flow heat transfer in ET-RR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mina, A.R.

    1990-01-01

    In nuclear reactors the effect of heat transfer coefficient, which depends on the constant C. Is primordial in calculating the clad surface temperatures. To determine the constant C of ET-RR-1 fuel bundles based on in-pile measurements different well known and recommended values of C are verified. A computer program is written to calculate steady thermal core characteristics at different operating conditions. The total flow rate is distributed considering same pressure drop across the core irrespective of bundle location. The total reactor power is readily distributed as Bessel function. The flow and power per bundle are equally distributed among the fuel rods irrespective of their positions inside the bundle. It is found that the constant C equals 0.047 gives acceptable compatibility between measurements and calculations. The maximum clad surface temperature is shifted from the core center

  15. Transient heat transport studies in JET conventional and advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.

    2003-01-01

    Transient transport studies are a valuable complement to steady-state analysis for the understanding of transport mechanisms and the validation of physics-based transport models. This paper presents results from transient heat transport experiments in JET and their modelling. Edge cold pulses and modulation of ICRH (in mode conversion scheme) have been used to provide detectable electron and ion temperature perturbations. The experiments have been performed in conventional L-mode plasmas or in Advanced Tokamak regimes, in the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). In conventional plasmas, the issues of stiffness and non-locality have been addressed. Cold pulse propagation in ITB plasmas has provided useful insight into the physics of ITB formation. The use of edge perturbations for ITB triggering has been explored. Modelling of the experimental results has been performed using both empirical models and physics-based models. Results of cold pulse experiments in ITBs have also been compared with turbulence simulations. (author)

  16. Turbulent mixed buoyancy driven flow and heat transfer in lid driven enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Sharma, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent mixed buoyancy driven flow and heat transfer of air in lid driven rectangular enclosure has been investigated for Grashof number in the range of 10 8 to 10 11 and for Richardson number 0.1, 1 and 10. Steady two dimensional Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes equations and conservation equations of mass and energy, coupled with the Boussinesq approximation, are solved. The spatial derivatives in the equations are discretized using the finite-element method. The SIMPLE algorithm is used to resolve pressure-velocity coupling. Turbulence is modeled with the k-ω closure model with physical boundary conditions along with the Boussinesq approximation, for the flow and heat transfer. The predicted results are validated against benchmark solutions reported in literature. The results include stream lines and temperature fields are presented to understand flow and heat transfer characteristics. There is a marked reduction in mean Nusselt number (about 58%) as the Richardson number increases from 0.1 to 10 for the case of Ra=10 10 signifying the effect of reduction of top lid velocity resulting in reduction of turbulent mixing. (author)

  17. Bringing global gyrokinetic turbulence simulations to the transport timescale using a multiscale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeffrey; Lodestro, Lynda; Told, Daniel; Merlo, Gabriele; Ricketson, Lee; Campos, Alejandro; Jenko, Frank; Hittinger, Jeffrey

    2017-10-01

    Predictive whole-device simulation models will play an increasingly important role in ensuring the success of fusion experiments and accelerating the development of fusion energy. In the core of tokamak plasmas, a separation of timescales between turbulence and transport makes a single direct simulation of both processes computationally expensive. We present the first demonstration of a multiple-timescale method coupling global gyrokinetic simulations with a transport solver to calculate the self-consistent, steady-state temperature profile. Initial results are highly encouraging, with the coupling method appearing robust to the difficult problem of turbulent fluctuations. The method holds potential for integrating first-principles turbulence simulations into whole-device models and advancing the understanding of global plasma behavior. Work supported by US DOE under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and the Exascale Computing Project (17-SC-20-SC).

  18. Turbulent flow structures and aeolian sediment transport over a barchan sand dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggs, G. F. S.; Weaver, C. M.

    2012-03-01

    The turbulent structure of airflow over a barchan sand dune is determined using quadrant analysis of wind velocity data derived from sonic anemometers. Results indicate an increased frequency of ejection and sweep events in the toe region of the dune, characteristic of the turbulent bursting process. In contrast, at the crest there was a significant increase in the occurrence of outward interactions. Combined with high frequency saltation data our analyses show that turbulent structures characterised by a positive streamwise fluctuating velocity (+u‧ sweeps at the toe and outward interactions at the crest) have a dominant influence on sand transport on the dune, together accounting for up to 83% and 95% of transporting events at the toe and crest respectively.

  19. Observation of fluctuations responsible for stochastic ion heating in a turbulent plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amagishi, Y.; Iguchi, H.; Ito, Y.; Kawabe, T.

    1977-10-01

    Experiments are described in which the correlation time and fluctuation level of ion acoustic waves are measured under the condition of turbulent heating using twin capacitive probes. At the anomalously resistive time, the correlation time becomes shorter, typically several periods of ion waves, and the energy density of the waves is of the order of 10 -2 n sub(e)T sub(e). The ion heating rate previously reported is well explained by these results to be due to stochastic mechanism. (auth.)

  20. Heat transfer through turbulent boundary layers - The effects of introduction of and recovery from convex curvature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the heat transfer through a turbulent boundary layer on a convexly curved isothermal wall and on a flat plate following the curved section. Data were taken for one free-stream velocity and two different ratios of boundary layer thickness to radius of curvature delta/R = 0.051 and delta/R = 0.077. Only small differences were observed in the distribution of heat transfer rates for the two boundary layer thicknesses tested, although differences were noted in the temperature distributions within the boundary layer

  1. Momentum, heat, and mass transfer analogy for vertical hydraulic transport of inert particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaćimovski Darko R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical liquid-solids flow, as well as in single phase flow, were studied. The aim of this investigation was to establish the analogy among those phenomena. Also, effect of particles concentration on momentum, heat and mass transfer was studied. The experiments in hydraulic transport were performed in a 25.4 mm I.D. cooper tube equipped with a steam jacket, using spherical glass particles of 1.94 mm in diameter and water as a transport fluid. The segment of the transport tube used for mass transfer measurements was inside coated with benzoic acid. In the hydraulic transport two characteristic flow regimes were observed: turbulent and parallel particle flow regime. The transition between two characteristic regimes (γ*=0, occurs at a critical voidage ε≈0.85. The vertical two-phase flow was considered as the pseudofluid, and modified mixture-wall friction coefficient (fw and modified mixture Reynolds number (Rem were introduced for explanation of this system. Experimental data show that the wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer coefficients, in vertical flow of pseudofluid, for the turbulent regime are significantly higher than in parallel regime. Wall-to-bed, mass and heat transfer coefficients in hydraulic transport of particles were much higher then in single-phase flow for lower Reynolds numbers (Re15000, there was not significant difference. The experimental data for wall-to-bed momentum, heat and mass transfer in vertical flow of pseudofluid in parallel particle flow regime, show existing analogy among these three phenomena. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172022

  2. Heat transfer, velocity-temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress from Navier-Stokes computations of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. R.; Hingst, W. R.; Porro, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    The properties of 2-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interaction flows were calculated by using a compressible turbulent Navier-Stokes numerical computational code. Interaction flows caused by oblique shock wave impingement on the turbulent boundary layer flow were considered. The oblique shock waves were induced with shock generators at angles of attack less than 10 degs in supersonic flows. The surface temperatures were kept at near-adiabatic (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) and cold wall (ratio of wall static temperature to free stream total temperature) conditions. The computational results were studied for the surface heat transfer, velocity temperature correlation, and turbulent shear stress in the interaction flow fields. Comparisons of the computational results with existing measurements indicated that (1) the surface heat transfer rates and surface pressures could be correlated with Holden's relationship, (2) the mean flow streamwise velocity components and static temperatures could be correlated with Crocco's relationship if flow separation did not occur, and (3) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model should be modified for turbulent shear stress computations in the interaction flows.

  3. Validation Plan of Turbulence Models for Internal Gas Flow Analysis in a Heated Rectangular Riser Duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sin-Yeob; Shin, Dong-Ho; Park, Goon-Cherl; Cho, Hyoung Kyu [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chan-Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    VHTR being developed at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute adopts an air-cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) incorporating rectangular riser channels to remove the afterheat emitted from the reactor vessel. Because the performance of RCCS is determined by heat removal rate through the RCCS riser, it is important to understand the heat transfer phenomena in the RCCS riser to ensure the safety of the reactor. In the mixed convection, due to the buoyance force induced by temperature and density differences, local flow structure and heat transfer mode near the heated wall have significantly dissimilar characteristics from both forced convection and free convection. In this study, benchmark calculation was conducted to reproduce the previous statements that V2F turbulence model can capture the mixed convection phenomena with the Shehata's experimental data. Then, the necessity of the model validation for the mixed convection phenomena was confirmed with the CFD analyses for the geometry of the prototype RCCS riser. For the purpose of validating the turbulence models for mixed convection phenomena in the heated rectangular riser duct, validation plan with three experimental tests was introduced. Among them, the flow visualization test facility with preserved cross-section geometry was introduced and a preliminary test result was shown.

  4. Entropy Generation Analysis and Performance Evaluation of Turbulent Forced Convective Heat Transfer to Nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The entropy generation analysis of fully turbulent convective heat transfer to nanofluids in a circular tube is investigated numerically using the Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS model. The nanofluids with particle concentration of 0%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 6% are treated as single phases of effective properties. The uniform heat flux is enforced at the tube wall. To confirm the validity of the numerical approach, the results have been compared with empirical correlations and analytical formula. The self-similarity profiles of local entropy generation are also studied, in which the peak values of entropy generation by direct dissipation, turbulent dissipation, mean temperature gradients and fluctuating temperature gradients for different Reynolds number as well as different particle concentration are observed. In addition, the effects of Reynolds number, volume fraction of nanoparticles and heat flux on total entropy generation and Bejan number are discussed. In the results, the intersection points of total entropy generation for water and four nanofluids are observed, when the entropy generation decrease before the intersection and increase after the intersection as the particle concentration increases. Finally, by definition of Ep, which combines the first law and second law of thermodynamics and attributed to evaluate the real performance of heat transfer processes, the optimal Reynolds number Reop corresponding to the best performance and the advisable Reynolds number Read providing the appropriate Reynolds number range for nanofluids in convective heat transfer can be determined.

  5. Effect of Twisted-Tape Turbulators and Nanofluid on Heat Transfer in a Double Pipe Heat Exchanger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heydar Maddah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer and overall heat transfer in a double pipe heat exchanger fitted with twisted-tape elements and titanium dioxide nanofluid were studied experimentally. The inner and outer diameters of the inner tube were 8 and 16 mm, respectively, and cold and hot water were used as working fluids in shell side and tube side. The twisted tapes were made from aluminum sheet with tape thickness (d of 1 mm, width (W of 5 mm, and length of 120 cm. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles with a diameter of 30 nm and a volume concentration of 0.01% (v/v were prepared. The effects of temperature, mass flow rate, and concentration of nanoparticles on the overall heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer changes in the turbulent flow regime Re≥2300, and counter current flow were investigated. When using twisted tape and nanofluid, heat transfer coefficient was about 10 to 25 percent higher than when they were not used. It was also observed that the heat transfer coefficient increases with operating temperature and mass flow rate. The experimental results also showed that 0.01% TiO2/water nanofluid with twisted tape has slightly higher friction factor and pressure drop when compared to 0.01% TiO2/water nanofluid without twisted tape. The empirical correlations proposed for friction factor are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. On the observability of turbulent transport rates by Argo: supporting evidence from an inversion experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Forget

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Although estimation of turbulent transport parameters using inverse methods is not new, there is little evaluation of the method in the literature. Here, it is shown that extended observation of the broad-scale hydrography by Argo provides a path to improved estimates of regional turbulent transport rates. Results from a 20-year ocean state estimate produced with the ECCO v4 (Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, version 4 non-linear inverse modeling framework provide supporting evidence. Turbulent transport parameter maps are estimated under the constraints of fitting the extensive collection of Argo profiles collected through 2011. The adjusted parameters dramatically reduce misfits to in situ profiles as compared with earlier ECCO solutions. They also yield a clear reduction in the model drift away from observations over multi-century-long simulations, both for assimilated variables (temperature and salinity and independent variables (biogeochemical tracers. Despite the minimal constraints imposed specifically on the estimated parameters, their geography is physically plausible and exhibits close connections with the upper-ocean stratification as observed by Argo. The estimated parameter adjustments furthermore have first-order impacts on upper-ocean stratification and mixed layer depths over 20 years. These results identify the constraint of fitting Argo profiles as an effective observational basis for regional turbulent transport rate inversions. Uncertainties and further improvements of the method are discussed.

  7. Turbulence and transport of passive scalar in magnetohydrodynamic channel flows with different orientations of magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Prasanta K.; Zikanov, Oleg

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Turbulent passive scalar transport in an MHD flow in a channel is studied using DNS. ► Magnetic fields of wall-normal, spanwise, and streamwise orientations are considered. ► Magnetic fields suppress turbulent transport and modifies scalar distribution. ► The effect is particularly strong at wall-normal and spanwise magnetic fields. ► Decrease of Nusselt number is approximated by a linear function of magnetic interaction parameter. - Abstract: DNS of turbulent flow and passive scalar transport in a channel are conducted for the situation when the fluid is electrically conducting (for example, a liquid metal) and the flow is affected by an imposed magnetic field. The cases of wall-normal, spanwise, and streamwise orientation of the magnetic field are considered. As main results, we find that the magnetic fields, especially those in the wall-normal and spanwise directions, significantly reduce the turbulent scalar transport and modify the properties of the scalar distribution.

  8. Applications of Turbulence Models for Transport of Dissolved Pollutants and Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole

    The present report concerns itself with numerical models of turbulent transport and mixing, with emphasis on the description of the mixing processes which occur in recipients and tanks. Consequently a part of the report is dedicated to a discussion of flows where differences in density play...

  9. Turbulent transport reduction by E x B velocity shear during edge plasma biasing in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Oost, G. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium); Adamek, J.; Antoni, V.; Balan, P.; Boedo, J.A.; Devynck, P.; Duran, I.; Eliseev, L.; Gunn, J.P.; Hron, M.; Ionita, C.; Jachmich, S.; Kirnev, G.S.; Martines, E.; Melnikov, A.; Peleman, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Silva, C.; Stoeckel, J.; Tendler, M.; Varandas, C.; Van Schoor, M.; Vershkov, V.; Weynants, R.R.

    2004-07-01

    Experiments in the tokamaks TEXTOR, CASTOR, T-10 and ISTTOK have provided new and complementary evidence on the physics of the universal mechanism of E x B velocity shear stabilization of turbulence, concomitant transport barrier formation and radial conductivity by using various edge biasing techniques. (orig.)

  10. 2ND EF Conference in Turbulent Heat Transfer, Manchester, UK 1998. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    out most of the turbulent transport processes in the flow are being simulated with some realism ; but an LES will often be considerably more...sensitivity [volts/K] ß-aA err) =±(A2+B2U°)E- 1 u X thermal conductivity [W-m^.Kŕ] V cinematic viscosity [m^sŕ] P density [Kg.m" 3] <f> energy

  11. Turbulence, transport, and zonal flows in the Madison symmetric torus reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Z. R.; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, P. W.; Hauff, T.

    2017-12-01

    The robustness and the effect of zonal flows in trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG) turbulence in the reversed-field pinch (RFP) are investigated from numerical solutions of the gyrokinetic equations with and without magnetic external perturbations introduced to model tearing modes. For simulations without external magnetic field perturbations, zonal flows produce a much larger reduction of transport for the density-gradient-driven TEM turbulence than they do for the ITG turbulence. Zonal flows are studied in detail to understand the nature of their strong excitation in the RFP and to gain insight into the key differences between the TEM- and ITG-driven regimes. The zonal flow residuals are significantly larger in the RFP than in tokamak geometry due to the low safety factor. Collisionality is seen to play a significant role in the TEM zonal flow regulation through the different responses of the linear growth rate and the size of the Dimits shift to collisionality, while affecting the ITG only minimally. A secondary instability analysis reveals that the TEM turbulence drives zonal flows at a rate that is twice that of the ITG turbulence. In addition to interfering with zonal flows, the magnetic perturbations are found to obviate an energy scaling relation for fast particles.

  12. Characteristics of low-frequency oscillation intensity of airsea turbulent heat fluxes over the northwest Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the daily turbulent heat fluxes and related meteorological variables datasets (1985-2006) from Objectively Analyzed air-sea Fluxes (OAFlux) Project of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), characteristics of low-frequency oscillation intensity of air-sea turbulent heat fluxes over the northwest Pacific are analyzed by linear perturbation method and correlation analysis. It can be concluded that: 1) the distribution of low-frequency oscillation intensity of latent heat flux (LHF) over the northwest Pacific is mainly affected by that of low-frequency oscillation intensity of anomalous air-sea humidity gradient (Δq′) as well as mean air-sea humidity gradient ( Δ q), while the distribution of low-frequency oscillation intensity of sensible heat flux (SHF) is mainly affected by that of low-frequency oscillation intensity of anomalous air-sea temperature gradient (ΔT′). 2) The low-frequency oscillation of turbulent heat fluxes over the northwest Pacific is the strongest in winter and the weakest in summer. And the seasonal transition of low-frequency oscillation intensity of LHF is jointly influenced by those of low-frequency oscillation intensity of Δq′, low-frequency oscillation intensity of anomalous wind speed (U′), Δ q and mean wind speed (U ), while the seasonal transition of low-frequency oscillation intensity of SHF is mainly influenced by those of low-frequency oscillation intensity of ΔT′ and U . 3) Over the tropical west Pacific and sea areas north of 20°N, the low-frequency oscillation of LHF (SHF) is mainly influenced by atmospheric variables qa′ (Ta′) and U′, indicating an oceanic response to overlying atmospheric forcing. In contrast, over the tropical eastern and central Pacific south of 20°N, qs′ (Ts′) also greatly influences the low-frequency oscillation of LHF (SHF).

  13. Self-consistent gyrokinetic modeling of neoclassical and turbulent impurity transport

    OpenAIRE

    Estève , D. ,; Sarazin , Y.; Garbet , X.; Grandgirard , V.; Breton , S. ,; Donnel , P. ,; Asahi , Y. ,; Bourdelle , C.; Dif-Pradalier , G; Ehrlacher , C.; Emeriau , C.; Ghendrih , Ph; Gillot , C.; Latu , G.; Passeron , C.

    2018-01-01

    International audience; Trace impurity transport is studied with the flux-driven gyrokinetic GYSELA code [V. Grandgirard et al., Comp. Phys. Commun. 207, 35 (2016)]. A reduced and linearized multi-species collision operator has been recently implemented, so that both neoclassical and turbulent transport channels can be treated self-consistently on an equal footing. In the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime likely relevant for tungsten, the standard expression of the neoclassical impurity flux is shown t...

  14. Numerical investigation of turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer in complex ducts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokni, M.

    1998-01-01

    The need for a reliable and reasonable accurate turbulence model without specific convergence problem for calculating duct flows in industrial applications has become more evident. In this study a general computational method has been developed for calculating turbulent quantities in any arbitrary three dimensional duct. Four different turbulence models for predicting the turbulent Reynolds stresses namely; standard k-{epsilon} model, the non-linear-k-{epsilon} model of Speziale, an Explicit Algebraic Stress Model (EASM) and a full Reynolds Stress Model (RSM) are compared with each other. The advantages, disadvantages and accuracy of these models are discussed. The turbulent heat fluxes are modeled by the SED concept, the GGDH and the WET methods. The advantages of GGDH and WET compared to SED are discussed and the limitations of these models are clarified. The two-equation model of temperature invariance and its dissipation rate for calculating turbulent heat fluxes are also discussed. The low Reynolds number version of all the models are considered except for the RSM. At high Reynolds numbers the wall functions for both the temperature field and the flow field are applied. It has been shown that the standard k-{epsilon} model with the curvilinear transformation provides false secondary motions in general non-orthogonal ducts and can not be used for predicting the turbulent secondary motions in ducts. The numerical method is based on the finite volume technique with non-staggered grid arrangement. The SIMPLEC algorithm is used for pressure-velocity coupling. A modified SIP and TDMA solving methods are implemented for solving the equations. The van Leer, QUICK and hybrid schemes are applied for treating the convective terms. However, in order to achieve stability in the k and {epsilon} equations, the hybrid scheme is used for the convective terms in these equations. Periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the main flow direction for decreasing the number of

  15. Comparative study of micromixing models in transported scalar PDF simulations of turbulent nonpremixed bluff body flames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merci, Bart [Department of Flow, Heat and Combustion Mechanics, Ghent University-UGent, Ghent (Belgium); Roekaerts, Dirk [Department of Multi-Scale Physics, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands); Naud, Bertrand [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Pope, Stephen B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2006-07-15

    Numerical simulation results are presented for turbulent jet diffusion flames with various levels of turbulence-chemistry interaction, stabilized behind a bluff body (Sydney Flames HM1-3). Interaction between turbulence and combustion is modeled with the transported joint-scalar PDF approach. The mass density function transport equation is solved in a Lagrangian manner. A second-moment-closure turbulence model is applied to obtain accurate mean flow and turbulent mixing fields. The behavior of two micromixing models is discussed: the Euclidean minimum spanning tree model and the modified Curl coalescence dispersion model. The impact of the micromixing model choice on the results in physical space is small, although some influence becomes visible as the amount of local extinction increases. Scatter plots and profiles of conditional means and variances of thermochemical quantities, conditioned on the mixture fraction, are discussed both within and downstream of the recirculation region. A distinction is made between local extinction and incomplete combustion, based on the CO species mass fraction. The differences in qualitative behavior between the micromixing models are explained and quantitative comparison to experimental data is made. (author)

  16. Vorticity, backscatter and counter-gradient transport predictions using two-level simulation of turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, R.; Menon, S.

    2018-04-01

    The two-level simulation (TLS) method evolves both the large-and the small-scale fields in a two-scale approach and has shown good predictive capabilities in both isotropic and wall-bounded high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows in the past. Sensitivity and ability of this modelling approach to predict fundamental features (such as backscatter, counter-gradient turbulent transport, small-scale vorticity, etc.) seen in high Re turbulent flows is assessed here by using two direct numerical simulation (DNS) datasets corresponding to a forced isotropic turbulence at Taylor's microscale-based Reynolds number Reλ ≈ 433 and a fully developed turbulent flow in a periodic channel at friction Reynolds number Reτ ≈ 1000. It is shown that TLS captures the dynamics of local co-/counter-gradient transport and backscatter at the requisite scales of interest. These observations are further confirmed through a posteriori investigation of the flow in a periodic channel at Reτ = 2000. The results reveal that the TLS method can capture both the large- and the small-scale flow physics in a consistent manner, and at a reduced overall cost when compared to the estimated DNS or wall-resolved LES cost.

  17. Edge gradient and safety factor effects on electrostatic turbulent transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Ing Hwie.

    1992-05-01

    Electrostatic turbulence and transport measurements are performed on the Tokapole-II tokamak at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, as the safety-factor and the edge equilibrium gradients and varied substantially. Tokapole-II is a poloidal divertor tokamak capable of operating at a wide range of safety factors due to its unique magnetic limiter configuration. It also has retractable material limiters in a large scrape-off region, which permits the study of edge boundary conditions like density and temperature gradients. The turbulence is independent of safety factor, but strongly sensitive to the local density gradient, which itself depends upon the limiter configuration. When a material limiter is inserted in a high discharge, the density gradient is increased locally together with a local increase of the turbulence. On the other hand, limiter insertion in low discharges did not increase the density gradient as much and the turbulence properties are unchanged with respect to the magnetic limiter case. It is conducted then, that electrostatic turbulence is caused by the density gradient. Although the electrostatic fluctuation driven transport is enhanced in the large density gradient case, it is in all cases to small to explain the observed energy confinement times. To explore instabilities with small wavelengths, a 0.5 mm diameter shperical Langmuir probe was constructed, and its power compared with the power measured by larger cylindrical probes

  18. DUST TRANSPORT IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS THROUGH TURBULENCE AND SETTLING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, N. J.; Carballido, A.; Sano, T.

    2010-01-01

    We apply ionization balance and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) calculations to investigate whether magnetic activity moderated by recombination on dust grains can account for the mass accretion rates and the mid-infrared spectra and variability of protostellar disks. The MHD calculations use the stratified shearing-box approach and include grain settling and the feedback from the changing dust abundance on the resistivity of the gas. The two-decade spread in accretion rates among solar-mass T Tauri stars is too large to result solely from variations in the grain size and stellar X-ray luminosity, but can plausibly be produced by varying these parameters together with the disk magnetic flux. The diverse shapes and strengths of the mid-infrared silicate bands can come from the coupling of grain settling to the distribution of the magnetorotational turbulence, through the following three effects. First, recombination on grains 1 μm or smaller yields a magnetically inactive dead zone extending more than two scale heights from the midplane, while turbulent motions in the magnetically active disk atmosphere overshoot the dead zone boundary by only about one scale height. Second, grains deep in the dead zone oscillate vertically in wave motions driven by the turbulent layer above, but on average settle at the rates found in laminar flow, so that the interior of the dead zone is a particle sink and the disk atmosphere will become dust-depleted unless resupplied from elsewhere. Third, with sufficient depletion, the dead zone is thinner and mixing dredges grains off the midplane. The last of these processes enables evolutionary signatures such as the degree of settling to sometimes decrease with age. The MHD results also show that the magnetic activity intermittently lifts clouds of small grains into the atmosphere. Consequently the photosphere height changes by up to one-third over timescales of a few orbits, while the extinction along lines of sight grazing the disk surface

  19. Enstrophy transport conditional on local flow topologies in different regimes of premixed turbulent combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Papapostolou, Vassilios

    2017-09-11

    Enstrophy is an intrinsic feature of turbulent flows, and its transport properties are essential for the understanding of premixed flame-turbulence interaction. The interrelation between the enstrophy transport and flow topologies, which can be assigned to eight categories based on the three invariants of the velocity-gradient tensor, has been analysed here. The enstrophy transport conditional on flow topologies in turbulent premixed flames has been analysed using a Direct Numerical Simulation database representing the corrugated flamelets (CF), thin reaction zones (TRZ) and broken reaction zones (BRZ) combustion regimes. The flame in the CF regime exhibits considerable flame-generated enstrophy, and the dilatation rate and baroclinic torque contributions to the enstrophy transport act as leading order sink and source terms, respectively. Consequently, flow topologies associated with positive dilatation rate values, contribute significantly to the enstrophy transport in the CF regime. By contrast, enstrophy decreases from the unburned to the burned gas side for the cases representing the TRZ and BRZ regimes, with diminishing influences of dilatation rate and baroclinic torque. The enstrophy transport in the TRZ and BRZ regimes is governed by the vortex-stretching and viscous dissipation contributions, similar to non-reacting flows, and topologies existing for all values of dilatation rate remain significant contributors.

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of Flow and Pollutant Transport in Urban Street Canyons with Ground Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Xiang; Britter, Rex E.; Koh, Tieh Yong; Norford, Leslie K.; Liu, Chun-Ho; Entekhabi, Dara; Leung, Dennis Y. C.

    2010-11-01

    Our study employed large-eddy simulation (LES) based on a one-equation subgrid-scale model to investigate the flow field and pollutant dispersion characteristics inside urban street canyons. Unstable thermal stratification was produced by heating the ground of the street canyon. Using the Boussinesq approximation, thermal buoyancy forces were taken into account in both the Navier-Stokes equations and the transport equation for subgrid-scale turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The LESs were validated against experimental data obtained in wind-tunnel studies before the model was applied to study the detailed turbulence, temperature, and pollutant dispersion characteristics in the street canyon of aspect ratio 1. The effects of different Richardson numbers ( Ri) were investigated. The ground heating significantly enhanced mean flow, turbulence, and pollutant flux inside the street canyon, but weakened the shear at the roof level. The mean flow was observed to be no longer isolated from the free stream and fresh air could be entrained into the street canyon at the roof-level leeward corner. Weighed against higher temperature, the ground heating facilitated pollutant removal from the street canyon.

  1. Transport and turbulence in a magnetized argon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogels, J.M.M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Three aspects of the longitudinal motion of ionized and neutral particles in a hollow cathode arc are investigated. The longitudinal plasma momentum balance of the column has been investigated, we have studied the momentum balance in relation to turbulence and we have investigated the source properties of the cathode. The study of the plasma momentum balance contains two aspects: (1) to collect experimental data on ion drift velocities and temperatures with Fabry-Perot interferometry, on electron densities and temperatures with Thomson scattering or optical spectroscopy and on neutral densities with a collisional radiative model combined with the ion energy balance; (2) to check the (classical) theory of the momentum balance with these data. The coupling between these aspects has been investigated and found to be in good agreement. (Auth.)

  2. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  3. Interaction of chemical reactions and radiant heat transfer with temperature turbulent pulsations and its effect on heat traner in high-temperature gas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petukhov, B.S.; Zal'tsman, I.G.; Shikov, V.K.

    1980-01-01

    Methods of taking account of mutual effect of chemical transformations, radiation and turbulence in the calculations of heat transfer in gas flows are considered. Exponential functions of medium parameters are used to describe chemical sources and optical properties of media. It is shown using as an example the dissociation reaction C 2 reversible 2C that the effect of temperature and composition pulsations on recombination rates is negligibly small. It is also shown on the example of turbulent flow of hot molecular gas in a flat channel with cold walls that at moderate temperatures the effect of temperature pulsations on heat radiation flow can be significant (30-40%). The calculational results also show that there is a region in a turbulent boundary layer where the radiation greatly affects the coefficient of turbulent heat transfer

  4. Aerodynamics, heat and mass transfer in steam-aerosol turbulent flows in containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, B.I.; Pershukov, V.A.; Ris, V.V. [Research & Engineering Centre of Nuclear Plants Safety, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    In this report an analysis of aerodynamic and heat transfer processes at the blowdown of gas-dispersed mixture into the containment volume is presented. A few models for description of the volume averaged and local characteristics are analyzed. The mathematical model for description of the local characteristics of the turbulent gas-dispersed flows was developed. The calculation of aerodynamic, heat and mass transfer characteristics was based on the Navier-Stokes, energy and gas mass fractions conservation equations. For calculation of dynamics and deposition of the aerosols the original diffusion-inertia model is developed. The pulsating characteristics of the gaseous phase were calculated on the base (k-{xi}) model of turbulence with modification to account thermogravitational force action and influence of particle mass loading. The appropriate boundary conditions using the {open_quotes}near-wall function{close_quotes} approach was obtained. Testing of the mathematical models and boundary conditions has shown a good agreement between computation and data of comparison. The described mathematical models were applied to two- and three dimensional calculations of the turbulent flow in containment at the various stages of the accident.

  5. A Dual-Plane PIV Study of Turbulent Heat Transfer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernet, Mark P.; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Locke, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film cooling is a widely used technique in turbomachinery and rocket propulsion applications, where cool injection air protects a surface from hot combustion gases. The injected air typically has a different velocity and temperature from the free stream combustion flow, yielding a flow field with high turbulence and large temperature differences. These thin film cooling flows provide a good test case for evaluating computational model prediction capabilities. The goal of this work is to provide a database of flow field measurements for validating computational flow prediction models applied to turbulent heat transfer flows. In this work we describe the application of a Dual-Plane Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) technique in a thin film cooling wind tunnel facility where the injection air stream velocity and temperatures are varied in order to provide benchmark turbulent heat transfer flow field measurements. The Dual-Plane PIV data collected include all three components of velocity and all three components of vorticity, spanning the width of the tunnel at multiple axial measurement planes.

  6. A theory for natural convection turbulent boundary layers next to heated vertical surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, W.K. Jr.; Capp, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    The turbulent natural convection boundary layer next to a heated vertical surface is analyzed by classical scaling arguments. It is shown that the fully developed turbulent boundary layer must be treated in two parts: and outer region consisting of most of the boundary layer in which viscous and conduction terms are negligible and an inner region in which the mean convection terms are negligible. The inner layer is identified as a constant heat flux layer. A similarity analysis yields universal profiles for velocity and temperature in the outer and constant heat flux layers. An asymptotic matching of these profiles in an intermediate layer (the buoyant sublayer) yields analytical expressions for the buoyant sublayer profiles. Asymptotic heat transfer and friction laws are obtained for the fully developed boundary layers. Finally, conductive and thermo-viscous sublayers characterized by a linear variation of velocity and temperature are shown to exist at the wall. All predictions are seen to be in excellent agreement with the abundant experimental data. (author)

  7. Turbulent boundary layer heat transfer experiments: Convex curvature effects including introduction and recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, T. W.; Moffat, R. J.; Johnston, J. P.; Kays, W. M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the heat transfer rate through turbulent and transitional boundary layers on an isothermal, convexly curved wall and downstream flat plate. The effect of convex curvature on the fully turbulent boundary layer was a reduction of the local Stanton numbers 20% to 50% below those predicted for a flat wall under the same circumstances. The recovery of the heat transfer rates on the downstream flat wall was extremely slow. After 60 cm of recovery length, the Stanton number was still typically 15% to 20% below the flat wall predicted value. Various effects important in the modeling of curved flows were studied separately. These are: the effect of initial boundary layer thickness, the effect of freestream velocity, the effect of freestream acceleration, the effect of unheated starting length, and the effect of the maturity of the boundary layer. An existing curvature prediction model was tested against this broad heat transfer data base to determine where it could appropriately be used for heat transfer predictions.

  8. Radially sheared azimuthal flows and turbulent transport in a cylindrical helicon plasma device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tynan, G R; Burin, M J; Holland, C; Antar, G; Diamond, P H

    2004-01-01

    A radially sheared azimuthal flow is observed in a cylindrical helicon plasma device. The shear flow is roughly azimuthally symmetric and contains both time-stationary and slowly varying components. The turbulent radial particle flux is found to peak near the density gradient maximum and vanishes at the shear layer location. The shape of the radial plasma potential profile associated with the azimuthal E x B flow is predicted accurately by theory. The existence of the mean shear flow in a plasma with finite flow damping from ion-neutral collisions and no external momentum input implies the existence of radial angular momentum transport from the turbulent Reynolds-stress

  9. The dynamics of marginality and self-organized criticality as a paradigm for turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, D.E.; Carreras, B.A.; Diamond, P.H.; Hahm, T.S.

    1995-01-01

    A general paradigm, based on the concept of self-organized criticality (SOC), for turbulent transport in magnetically confined plasmas has been recently suggested as an explanation for some of the apparent discrepancies between most theoretical models of turbulent transport and experimental observations of the transport in magnetically confined plasmas. This model describes the dynamics of the transport without relying on the underlying local fluctuation mechanisms. Computations based on a cellular automata realization of such a model have found that noise driven SOC systems can maintain average profiles that are linearly stable (submarginal) and yet are able to sustain active transport dynamics. It is also found that the dominant scales in the transport dynamics in the absence of sheared flow are system scales rather than the underlying local fluctuation scales. The addition of sheared flow into the dynamics leads to a large reduction of the system-scale transport events and a commensurate increase in the fluctuation-scale transport events needed to maintain the constant flux. The dynamics of these models and the potential ramifications for transport studies are discussed

  10. Self-consistent gyrokinetic modeling of neoclassical and turbulent impurity transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estève, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Grandgirard, V.; Breton, S.; Donnel, P.; Asahi, Y.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ehrlacher, C.; Emeriau, C.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Gillot, C.; Latu, G.; Passeron, C.

    2018-03-01

    Trace impurity transport is studied with the flux-driven gyrokinetic GYSELA code (Grandgirard et al 2016 Comput. Phys. Commun. 207 35). A reduced and linearized multi-species collision operator has been recently implemented, so that both neoclassical and turbulent transport channels can be treated self-consistently on an equal footing. In the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime that is probably relevant for tungsten, the standard expression for the neoclassical impurity flux is shown to be recovered from gyrokinetics with the employed collision operator. Purely neoclassical simulations of deuterium plasma with trace impurities of helium, carbon and tungsten lead to impurity diffusion coefficients, inward pinch velocities due to density peaking, and thermo-diffusion terms which quantitatively agree with neoclassical predictions and NEO simulations (Belli et al 2012 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 54 015015). The thermal screening factor appears to be less than predicted analytically in the Pfirsch-Schlüter regime, which can be detrimental to fusion performance. Finally, self-consistent nonlinear simulations have revealed that the tungsten impurity flux is not the sum of turbulent and neoclassical fluxes computed separately, as is usually assumed. The synergy partly results from the turbulence-driven in-out poloidal asymmetry of tungsten density. This result suggests the need for self-consistent simulations of impurity transport, i.e. including both turbulence and neoclassical physics, in view of quantitative predictions for ITER.

  11. External intermittency prediction using AMR solutions of RANS turbulence and transported PDF models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, D. A.; Fairweather, M.; Falle, S. A. E. G.

    2011-12-01

    External intermittency in turbulent round jets is predicted using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes modelling approach coupled to solutions of the transported probability density function (pdf) equation for scalar variables. Solutions to the descriptive equations are obtained using a finite-volume method, combined with an adaptive mesh refinement algorithm, applied in both physical and compositional space. This method contrasts with conventional approaches to solving the transported pdf equation which generally employ Monte Carlo techniques. Intermittency-modified eddy viscosity and second-moment turbulence closures are used to accommodate the effects of intermittency on the flow field, with the influence of intermittency also included, through modifications to the mixing model, in the transported pdf equation. Predictions of the overall model are compared with experimental data on the velocity and scalar fields in a round jet, as well as against measurements of intermittency profiles and scalar pdfs in a number of flows, with good agreement obtained. For the cases considered, predictions based on the second-moment turbulence closure are clearly superior, although both turbulence models give realistic predictions of the bimodal scalar pdfs observed experimentally.

  12. Fast electron generation and transport in a turbulent, magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoneking, W.R.

    1994-05-01

    The nature of fast electron generation and transport in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated using two electron energy analyzer (EEA) probes and a thermocouple calorimeter. The parallel velocity distribution of the fast electron population is well fit by a drifted Maxwellian distribution with temperature of about 100 eV and drift velocity of about 2 x 10 6 m/s. Cross-calibration of the EEA with the calorimeter provides a measurement of the fast electron perpendicular temperature of 30 eV, much lower than the parallel temperature, and is evidence that the kinetic dynamo mechanism (KDT) is not operative in MST. The fast electron current is found to match to the parallel current at the edge, and the fast electron density is about 4 x 10 11 cm -3 independent of the ratio of the applied toroidal electric field to the critical electric field for runaways. First time measurements of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport are reported. By correlating electron current fluctuations with radial magnetic fluctuations the transported flux of electrons is found to be negligible outside r/a∼0.9, but rises the level of the expected total particle losses inside r/a∼0.85. A comparison of the measured diffusion coefficient is made with the ausilinear stochastic diffusion coefficient. Evidence exists that the reduction of the transport is due to the presence of a radial ambipolar electric field of magnitude 500 V/m, that acts to equilibrate the ion and electron transport rates. The convective energy transport associated with the measured particle transport is large enough to account for the observed magnetic fluctuation induced energy transport in MST

  13. Turbulent heat transfer in a coolant channel of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Saha, Arun K.; Munshi, Prabhat

    2016-01-01

    Exact predictions in nuclear reactors are more crucial, because of the safety aspects. It necessitates the appropriate modeling of heat transfer phenomena in the reactors core. A two-dimensional thermal-hydraulics model is used to study the detailed analysis of the coolant region of a fuel pin. Governing equations are solved using Marker and Cell (MAC) method. Standard wall functions k-ε turbulence model is incorporated to consider the turbulent behaviour of the flow field. Validation of the code and a few results for a typical PWR running at normal operating conditions reported earlier. There were some discrepancies in the old calculations. These discrepancies have been resolved and updated results are presented in this work. 2D thermal-hydraulics model results have been compared with the 1D thermal-hydraulics model results and conclusions have been drawn. (author)

  14. Temperature fluctuations in fully-developed turbulent channel flow with heated upper wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Carla; Mueller, Michael; Hultmark, Marcus

    2013-11-01

    The interactions and scaling differences between the velocity field and temperature field in a wall-bounded turbulent flow are investigated. In particular, a fully developed turbulent channel flow perturbed by a step change in the wall temperature is considered with a focus on the details of the developing thermal boundary layer. For this specific study, temperature acts as a passive scalar, having no dynamical effect on the flow. A combination of experimental investigation and direct numerical simulation (DNS) is presented. Velocity and temperature data are acquired with high accuracy where, the flow is allowed to reach a fully-developed state before encountering a heated upper wall at constant temperature. The experimental data is compared with DNS data where simulations of the same configuration are conducted.

  15. Possible role of oceanic heat transport in early Eocene climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, L. C.; Walker, J. C.; Moore, T. C. Jr

    1995-01-01

    Increased oceanic heat transport has often been cited as a means of maintaining warm high-latitude surface temperatures in many intervals of the geologic past, including the early Eocene. Although the excess amount of oceanic heat transport required by warm high latitude sea surface temperatures can be calculated empirically, determining how additional oceanic heat transport would take place has yet to be accomplished. That the mechanisms of enhanced poleward oceanic heat transport remain undefined in paleoclimate reconstructions is an important point that is often overlooked. Using early Eocene climate as an example, we consider various ways to produce enhanced poleward heat transport and latitudinal energy redistribution of the sign and magnitude required by interpreted early Eocene conditions. Our interpolation of early Eocene paleotemperature data indicate that an approximately 30% increase in poleward heat transport would be required to maintain Eocene high-latitude temperatures. This increased heat transport appears difficult to accomplish by any means of ocean circulation if we use present ocean circulation characteristics to evaluate early Eocene rates. Either oceanic processes were very different from those of the present to produce the early Eocene climate conditions or oceanic heat transport was not the primary cause of that climate. We believe that atmospheric processes, with contributions from other factors, such as clouds, were the most likely primary cause of early Eocene climate.

  16. MASS TRANSPORT AND TURBULENCE IN GRAVITATIONALLY UNSTABLE DISK GALAXIES. II. THE EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldbaum, Nathan J. [National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1205 W. Clark St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Krumholz, Mark R. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Forbes, John C., E-mail: ngoldbau@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2016-08-10

    Self-gravity and stellar feedback are capable of driving turbulence and transporting mass and angular momentum in disk galaxies, but the balance between them is not well understood. In the previous paper in this series, we showed that gravity alone can drive turbulence in galactic disks, regulate their Toomre Q parameters to ∼1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to fuel star formation in the centers of present-day galaxies. In this paper we extend our models to include the effects of star formation feedback. We show that feedback suppresses galaxies’ star formation rates by a factor of ∼5 and leads to the formation of a multi-phase atomic and molecular interstellar medium. Both the star formation rate and the phase balance produced in our simulations agree well with observations of nearby spirals. After our galaxies reach steady state, we find that the inclusion of feedback actually lowers the gas velocity dispersion slightly compared to the case of pure self-gravity, and also slightly reduces the rate of inward mass transport. Nevertheless, we find that, even with feedback included, our galactic disks self-regulate to Q ∼ 1, and transport mass inwards at a rate sufficient to supply a substantial fraction of the inner disk star formation. We argue that gravitational instability is therefore likely to be the dominant source of turbulence and transport in galactic disks, and that it is responsible for fueling star formation in the inner parts of galactic disks over cosmological times.

  17. HEATING AND ACCELERATION OF THE FAST SOLAR WIND BY ALFVÉN WAVE TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Asgari-Targhi, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2016-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of reduced magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) turbulence in a magnetic flux tube at the center of a polar coronal hole. The model for the background atmosphere is a solution of the momentum equation and includes the effects of wave pressure on the solar wind outflow. Alfvén waves are launched at the coronal base and reflect at various heights owing to variations in Alfvén speed and outflow velocity. The turbulence is driven by nonlinear interactions between the counterpropagating Alfvén waves. Results are presented for two models of the background atmosphere. In the first model the plasma density and Alfvén speed vary smoothly with height, resulting in minimal wave reflections and low-energy dissipation rates. We find that the dissipation rate is insufficient to maintain the temperature of the background atmosphere. The standard phenomenological formula for the dissipation rate significantly overestimates the rate derived from our RMHD simulations, and a revised formula is proposed. In the second model we introduce additional density variations along the flux tube with a correlation length of 0.04 R {sub ⊙} and with relative amplitude of 10%. These density variations simulate the effects of compressive MHD waves on the Alfvén waves. We find that such variations significantly enhance the wave reflection and thereby the turbulent dissipation rates, producing enough heat to maintain the background atmosphere. We conclude that interactions between Alfvén and compressive waves may play an important role in the turbulent heating of the fast solar wind.

  18. Source effects on impurity and heat transport in a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, R.B.

    1980-12-01

    A recently developed generalization of neoclassical theory is extended here to study heat flux contributions to impurity transport, as well as the heat fluxes themselves. The theory accounts for the first four source moments, with external drags, which has been studied previously with either fewer moments or restricted to a collisional plasma. Conditions are established for which a momentum source may be used to modify the particle and heat transport. In the course of this work, the particle and heat transport is evaluated for a two species plasma with arbitrary plasma geometry, beta, and collisionality

  19. Passive heat transfer in a turbulent channel flow simulation using large eddy simulation based on the lattice Boltzmann method framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hong [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-Thermodynamics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang Jiao, E-mail: wangjiao@sjp.buaa.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-Thermodynamics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Tao Zhi [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Aero-Engine Aero-Thermodynamics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A double MRT-LBM is used to study heat transfer in turbulent channel flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Turbulent Pr is modeled by dynamic subgrid scale model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature gradients are calculated by the non-equilibrium temperature distribution moments. - Abstract: In this paper, a large eddy simulation based on the lattice Boltzmann framework is carried out to simulate the heat transfer in a turbulent channel flow, in which the temperature can be regarded as a passive scalar. A double multiple relaxation time (DMRT) thermal lattice Boltzmann model is employed. While applying DMRT, a multiple relaxation time D3Q19 model is used to simulate the flow field, and a multiple relaxation time D3Q7 model is used to simulate the temperature field. The dynamic subgrid stress model, in which the turbulent eddy viscosity and the turbulent Prandtl number are dynamically computed, is integrated to describe the subgrid effect. Not only the strain rate but also the temperature gradient is calculated locally by the non-equilibrium moments. The Reynolds number based on the shear velocity and channel half height is 180. The molecular Prandtl numbers are set to be 0.025 and 0.71. Statistical quantities, such as the average velocity, average temperature, Reynolds stress, root mean square (RMS) velocity fluctuations, RMS temperature and turbulent heat flux are obtained and compared with the available data. The results demonstrate great reliability of DMRT-LES in studying turbulence.

  20. Upgrading primary heat transport pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Rhodes, D.; McInnes, D.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the operating environment at the Bruce-A Nuclear Generating Station created the need for an upgraded Primary Heat Transport Pump (PHTP) seal. In particular, the requirement for low pressure running during more frequent start-ups exposed a weakness of the CAN2 seal and reduced its reliability. The primary concern at Bruce-A was the rotation of the CAN2 No. 2 stators in their holders. The introduction of low pressure running exacerbated this problem, giving rapid wear of the stator back face, overheating, and thermocracking. In addition, the resulting increase in friction between the stator and its holder increased stationary-side hysteresis and thereby changed the seal characteristic to the point where interseal pressure oscillations became prevalent. The resultant increased hysteresis also led to hard rubbing of the seal faces during temperature transients. An upgraded seal was required for improved reliability to avoid forced outages and to reduce maintenance costs. This paper describes this upgraded 'replacement seal' and its performance history. In spite of the 'teething' problems detailed in this paper, there have been no forced outages due to the replacement seal, and in the words of a seal maintenance worker at Bruce-A, 'it allows me to go home and sleep at night instead of worrying about seal failures.' (author)

  1. Heat release effects on mixing scales of non-premixed turbulent wall-jets: A direct numerical simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouransari, Zeinab; Vervisch, Luc; Johansson, Arne V.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A non-premixed turbulent flame close to a solid surface is studied using DNS. ► Heat release effects delay transition and enlarge fluctuation of density and pressure. ► The fine-scale structures damped and surface wrinkling diminished due to heat-release. ► Using semilocal scaling improves the collapse of turbulence statistic in inner region. ► There are regions of the flame where considerable (up to 10%) premixed burning occurs. -- Abstract: The present study concerns the role of heat release effects on characteristics mixing scales of turbulence in reacting wall-jet flows. Direct numerical simulations of exothermic reacting turbulent wall-jets are performed and compared to the isothermal reacting case. An evaluation of the heat-release effects on the structure of turbulence is given by examining the mixture fraction surface characteristics, diagnosing vortices and exploring the dissipation rate of the fuel and passive scalar concentrations, and moreover by illustration of probability density functions of reacting species and scatter plots of the local temperature against the mixture fraction. Primarily, heat release effects delay the transition, enlarge the fluctuation intensities of density and pressure and also enhance the fluctuation level of the species concentrations. However, it has a damping effect on all velocity fluctuation intensities and the Reynolds shear stress. A key result is that the fine-scale structures of turbulence are damped, the surface wrinkling is diminished and the vortices become larger due to heat-release effects. Taking into account the varying density by using semi-local scaling improves the collapse of the turbulence statistics in the inner region, but does not eliminate heat release induced differences in the outer region. Examining the two-dimensional premultiplied spanwise spectra of the streamwise velocity fluctuations indicates a shifting in the positions of the outer peaks, associated with large

  2. ELECTRON TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS AND CROSS-FIELD HEAT TRANSPORT IN THE EDGE OF DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RUDAKOV, DL; BOEDO, JA; MOYER, RA; KRASENINNIKOV, S; MAHDAVI, MA; McKEE, GR; PORTER, GD; STANGEBY, PC; WATKINS, JG; WEST, WP; WHYTE, DG.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The fluctuating E x B velocity due to electrostatic turbulence is widely accepted as a major contributor to the anomalous cross-field transport of particles and heat in the tokamak edge and scrape-off layer (SOL) plasmas. This has been confirmed by direct measurements of the turbulent E x B transport in a number of experiments. Correlated fluctuations of the plasma radial velocity v r , density n, and temperature T e result in time-average fluxes of particles and heat given by (for electrons): Equation 1--Λ r ES = r > = 1/B varφ θ ; Equation 2--Q r ES = e (tilde v) r > ∼ 3/2 kT e Λ r ES + 3 n e /2 B varφ e (tilde E) θ > Q conv + Q cond . The first term in Equation 2 is referred to as convective and the second term as conductive heat flux. Experimental determination of fluxes given by Equations 1 and 2 requires simultaneous measurements of the density, temperature and poloidal electric field fluctuations with high spatial and temporal resolution. Langmuir probes provide most readily available (if not the only) tool for such measurements. However, fast measurements of electron temperature using probes are non-trivial and are not always performed. Thus, the contribution of the T e fluctuations to the turbulent fluxes is usually neglected. Here they report results of the studies of T e fluctuations and their effect on the cross-field transport in the SOL of DIII-D

  3. Intense radiative heat transport across a nano-scale gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Ghafari, Amin; Bogy, David B.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the radiative heat transport in layered structures. The analysis is based on our prior description of the spectrum of thermally excited waves in systems with a heat flux. The developed method correctly predicts results for all known special cases for both large and closing gaps. Numerical examples demonstrate the applicability of our approach to the calculation of the radiative heat transport coefficient across various layered structures.

  4. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  5. Heat and Mass Transport in Heat Pipe Wick Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Iverson, B. D.; Davis, T. W.; Garimella, S V; North, M. T.; Kang, S.

    2007-01-01

    Anovel experimental approach is developed for characterizing the performance of heat pipe wick structures. This approach simulates the actual operation of wick structures in a heat pipe. Open, partially submerged, sintered copper wicks of varying pore size are studied under the partially saturated conditions found in normal heat pipe operation. A vertical wick orientation, where the capillary lift is in opposition to gravity, is selected to test the wicks under the most demanding conditions. ...

  6. Transport of cohesive sediments : Classification and requirements for turbulence modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruens, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a classification of sediment-laden flows, which gives an overview of the different transport forms of fine sediment and the interactions of the different processes as acting in an estuary. At the outs et of the proposed classification a distinction in physical states of

  7. CFD modeling of heat transfer performance of MgO-water nanofluid under turbulent flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Davarnejad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD modeling of turbulent heat transfer behavior of Magnesium Oxide-water nanofluid in a circular tube was studied. The modeling was two dimensional under k–ε turbulence model. The base fluid was pure water and the volume fraction of nanoparticles in the base fluid was 0.0625%, 0.125%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. The applied Reynolds number range was 3000–19000. Three individual models including single phase, Volume of Fluid (VOF and mixture were used. The results showed that the simulated data were in good agreement with the experimental ones available in the literature. According to the experimental work (literature and simulation (this research, Nusselt number (Nu increased with increasing the volume fraction of nanofluid. However friction factor of nanofluid increased but its effect was ignorable compared with the Nu on heat transfer increment. It was concluded that two phase models were more accurate than the others for heat transfer prediction particularly in the higher volume fractions of nanoparticle. The average deviation from experimental data for single phase model was about 11% whereas it was around 2% for two phase models.

  8. An analytical wall-function for turbulent flows and heat transfer over rough walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, K.; Craft, T.J.; Iacovides, H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the development of a refined wall-function strategy for the modelling of turbulent forced convection heat transfer over smooth and rough surfaces. In order to include the effects of fine-grain surface roughness, the present study extends a more fundamental work by Craft et al. [Craft, T.J., Gerasimov, A.V., Iacovides, H., Launder, B.E., 2002. Progress in the generalisation of wall-function treatment. Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 23, 148-160] on the development of advanced wall-functions of general applicability. The presently proposed model is validated through comparisons with data available for internal flows through channels and for external flows over flat and curved plates with both smooth and rough surfaces. Then, its further validation in separating flows over a sand dune and a sand-roughened ramp is discussed. The validation results suggest that the presently proposed form can be successfully applied to a wide range of attached and separated turbulent flows with heat transfer over smooth and fine-grain rough surfaces

  9. Turbulence-induced heat transfer in PBMR core using LES and RANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung-Jae; Yoon, Su-Jong; Park, Goon-Cherl; Lee, Won-Jae

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the results of numerical simulations on flow fields and relevant heat transfer in the pebble bed reactor (PBR) core, since the coolant passes a highly complicated random flow path with a high Reynolds number, an appropriate treatment of the turbulence is required. A set of simple experiments for the flow over a circular cylinder with heat transfer was conducted to finally select the large eddy simulation (LES) and k-ω model among the considering Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models for PBR application. Using these models, the PBR cores, whose geometries were simplified to the body-centered cubical (BCC) and face-centered cubical (FCC) structures, were simulated. A larger pressure drop, a more random flow field, a higher vorticity magnitude and a higher temperature at the local hot spots on the pebble surface were found in the results of the LES than in those of RANS for both geometries. In cases of the LES, the flow structures were resolved up to the grid scales. Irregular distributions of the flow and local heat transfer were found in the BCC core, while relatively regular distributions for the FCC core. The turbulent nature of the coolant flow in the pebble core evidently affected the fuel surface temperature distribution. (author)

  10. Final Report for Grant DE-FG03-99ER54551. [Turbulent plasma transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Newman

    2003-01-01

    The approach to treating plasma transport based on the paradigm of self-organized criticality (SOC) is largely due to the success of this paradigm as an explanation for some of the discrepancies between theoretical predictions of turbulent transport and the experimental observations. Characteristics of SOC systems are that they maintain average profiles that are linearly stable and yet are able to sustain active transport dynamics (as often observed in experiment). The dominant transport scales in SOC systems are not the underlying local fluctuation scales but are the scales of the system (again as often observed). Finally, in the presence of sheared flow, the transport can exhibit a large reduction in system sized transport. This reduction is accompanied by an increase in fluctuation (bursty) events needed to maintain the constant flux, this too is something that has been observed

  11. Charts Adapted from Van Driest's Turbulent Flat-plate Theory for Determining Values of Turbulent Aerodynamic Friction and Heat-transfer Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dorothy B; Faget, Maxime A

    1956-01-01

    A modified method of Van Driest's flat-plate theory for turbulent boundary layer has been found to simplify the calculation of local skin-friction coefficients which, in turn, have made it possible to obtain through Reynolds analogy theoretical turbulent heat-transfer coefficients in the form of Stanton number. A general formula is given and charts are presented from which the modified method can be solved for Mach numbers 1.0 to 12.0, temperature ratios 0.2 to 6.0, and Reynolds numbers 0.2 times 10 to the 6th power to 200 times 10 to the 6th power.

  12. Study of heat transfer and particle transport in Tore Supra and HL-2A tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, S.

    2011-12-01

    This thesis reports on experimental studies of heat and particles transport performed on 2 large tokamaks: Tore Supra (based at CEA/Cadarache, France) and HL-2A (based at the Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu, China). The modulated source is the Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) for the heat pinch and density pump-out studies, while the non-local transport experiments use the Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection (SMBI) as source of modulation. The emphasis is put on the inward heat pinch. In the off-axis ECRH modulation experiments on Tore Supra with low frequency (1 Hz), strong heat inward transport has been observed, in particular for low density. Two transport models have been applied in order to analyze the experimental behavior. The first one is the linear pinch model (LPM) and the second one is an empirical model based on micro-instabilities theory, named Critical Gradient Model (CGM). Good agreement has been found for all harmonics between the experimental data and the simulation using LPM. On the other hand, good agreement has not been achieved using CGM. The density pump-out with large particles and energy losses during ECRH is commonly observed in tokamaks. A new dynamic approach using the modulation technique has been used in HL-2A for analyzing the transient phase of the density pump-out. A correlation between the turbulence increase and the density pump-out has been found. The non-local transport phenomenon, characterized by a fast transient process compared to the normal diffusive response to the perturbation is observed. Both phenomena, i.e., pump-out and non-locality, show as simultaneous variation of density and temperature. This can be an inspiration for the usage of a transport matrix which considers the density and temperature evolution together. Simulations with a simple transport matrix, with non-diagonal terms coupling temperature and density qualitatively reproduce the non-local and pump-out effects qualitatively

  13. Self-organized criticality revisited: non-local transport by turbulent amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milovanov, Alexander V.; Rasmussen, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    We revise the applications of self-organized criticality (SOC) as a paradigmatic model for tokamak plasma turbulence. The work, presented here, is built around the idea that some systems do not develop a pure critical state associable with SOC, since their dynamical evolution involves as a compet......We revise the applications of self-organized criticality (SOC) as a paradigmatic model for tokamak plasma turbulence. The work, presented here, is built around the idea that some systems do not develop a pure critical state associable with SOC, since their dynamical evolution involves...... as a competing key factor an inverse cascade of the energy in reciprocal space. Then relaxation of slowly increasing stresses will give rise to intermittent bursts of transport in real space and outstanding transport events beyond the range of applicability of the 'conventional' SOC. Also, we are concerned...... with the causes and origins of non-local transport in magnetized plasma, and show that this type of transport occurs naturally in self-consistent strong turbulence via a complexity coupling to the inverse cascade. We expect these coupling phenomena to occur in the parameter range of strong nonlinearity and time...

  14. RANS modeling for particle transport and deposition in turbulent duct flows: Near wall model uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraju, S.T.; Sathiah, P.; Roelofs, F.; Dehbi, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Near-wall modeling uncertainties in the RANS particle transport and deposition are addressed in a turbulent duct flow. • Discrete Random Walk (DRW) model and Continuous Random Walk (CRW) model performances are tested. • Several near-wall anisotropic model accuracy is assessed. • Numerous sensitivity studies are performed to recommend a robust, well-validated near-wall model for accurate particle deposition predictions. - Abstract: Dust accumulation in the primary system of a (V)HTR is identified as one of the foremost concerns during a potential accident. Several numerical efforts have focused on the use of RANS methodology to better understand the complex phenomena of fluid–particle interaction at various flow conditions. In the present work, several uncertainties relating to the near-wall modeling of particle transport and deposition are addressed for the RANS approach. The validation analyses are performed in a fully developed turbulent duct flow setup. A standard k − ε turbulence model with enhanced wall treatment is used for modeling the turbulence. For the Lagrangian phase, the performance of a continuous random walk (CRW) model and a discrete random walk (DRW) model for the particle transport and deposition are assessed. For wall bounded flows, it is generally seen that accounting for near wall anisotropy is important to accurately predict particle deposition. The various near-wall correlations available in the literature are either derived from the DNS data or from the experimental data. A thorough investigation into various near-wall correlations and their applicability for accurate particle deposition predictions are assessed. The main outcome of the present work is a well validated turbulence model with optimal near-wall modeling which provides realistic particle deposition predictions

  15. Effect of air turbulence on gas transport in soil; comparison of approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbakhtiar, Alireza; Papadikis, Konstantinos; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Bridge, Jonathan; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    Greenhouse gases are playing the key role in global warming. Soil is a source of greenhouse gases such as methane (CH4). Radon (Rn) which is a radioactive gas can emit form subsurface into the atmosphere and leads to health concerns in urban areas. Temperature, humidity, air pressure and vegetation of soil can affect gas emissions inside soil (Oertel et al., 2016). It's shown in many cases that wind induced fluctuations is an important factor in transport of gas through soil and other porous media. An example is: landfill gas emissions (Poulsen et al., 2001). We applied an experimental equipment for measuring controlled air turbulence on gas transport in soil in relation to the depth of sample. Two approaches for measurement of effect of wind turbulence on gas transport were applied and compared. Experiments were carried out with diffusion of CO2 and air as tracer gases with average vertical wind speeds of 0 to 0.83 m s-1. In approach A, Six different sample thicknesses from 5 to 30 cm were selected and total of 4 different wind conditions with different speed and fluctuations were applied. In approach B, a sample with constant depth was used. Five oxygen sensors were places inside sample at different depths. Total of 111 experiments were carried out. Gas transport is described by advection-dispersion equation. Gas transport is quantified as a dispersion coefficient. Oxygen breakthrough curves as a function of distance to the surface of the sample exposed to wind were derived numerically with an explicit forward time, central space finite-difference based model to evaluate gas transport. We showed that wind turbulence-induced fluctuations is an important factor in gas transport that can increase gas transport with average of 45 times more than molecular diffusion under zero wind condition. Comparison of two strategies for experiments, indicated that, constant deep samples (Approach B) are more reliable for measurement of gas transport under influence of wind

  16. A structure-based model for the transport of passive scalars in homogeneous turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagiotou, C.F.; Kassinos, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Interacting Particle Representation Model (IPRM) is extended for passive scalar transport. • We develop a structure-based set of scale equations for the scalar field and couple them to the IPRM. • The complete model is evaluated for several cases of homogeneous deformation with good results. • We outline steps for coupling the new scalar scales to the Algebraic Structure-Based Model (ASBM). - Abstract: A structure-based model has been constructed, for the first time, for the study of passive scalar transport in turbulent flows. The scalar variance and the large-scale scalar gradient variance are proposed as the two turbulence scales needed for closure of the scalar equations in the framework of the Interacting Particle Representation Model (IPRM). The scalar dissipation rate is modeled in terms of the scalar variance and the large-scale enstrophy of the velocity field. Model parameters are defined by matching the decay rates in freely isotropic turbulence. The model is validated for a large number of cases of deformation in both fixed and rotating frames, showing encouraging results. The model shows good agreement with DNS results for the case of pure shear flow in the presence of either transverse or streamwise mean scalar gradient, while it correctly predicts the presence of direct cascade for the passive scalar variance in two dimensional isotropic turbulence.

  17. Numerical investigation of a spatially developing turbulent natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Keisuke; Hattori, Yasuo; Suto, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A large-eddy simulation of a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer is conducted. • First- and second-order moments of the heat and momentum showed a reasonable agreement with past experiments. • Coherent structure of turbulent vortex inherent in this boundary layer is discussed. - Abstract: Large-eddy simulation (LES) on a spatially developing natural convection boundary layer along a vertical heated plate was conducted. The heat transfer rate, friction velocity, mean velocity and temperature, and second-order turbulent properties both in the wall-normal and the stream-wise direction showed reasonable agreement with the findings of past experiments. The spectrum of velocity and temperature fluctuation showed a -2/3-power decay slope and -2-power decay slope respectively. Quadrant analysis revealed the inclination on Q1 and Q3 in the Reynolds stress and turbulent heat flux, changing their contribution along the distance from the plate surface. Following the convention, we defined the threshold region where the stream-wise mean velocity takes local maximum, the inner layer which is closer to the plate than the threshold region, the outer layer which is farther to the plate than the threshold region. The space correlation of stream-wise velocity tilted the head toward the wall in the propagating direction in the outer layer; on the other hand, the correlated motion had little inclination in the threshold region. The time history of the second invariant of gradient tensor Q revealed that the vortex strength oscillates both in the inner and the outer layers in between the laminar and the transition region. In the turbulent region, the vortex was often dominant in the outer layer. Instantaneous three-dimensional visualization of Q revealed the existence of high-speed fluid parcels associated with arch-shape vortices. These results were considered as an intrinsic structure in the outer layer, which is symmetrical to the structure of

  18. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-09-21

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  19. Gyrokinetics Simulation of Energetic Particle Turbulence and Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in research during this year elucidated the physics of precession resonance and its interaction with radial scattering to form phase space density granulations. Momentum theorems for drift wave-zonal flow systems involving precession resonance were derived. These are directly generalizable to energetic particle modes. A novel nonlinear, subcritical growth mechanism was identified, which has now been verified by simulation. These results strengthen the foundation of our understanding of transport in burning plasmas

  20. Spectral Cascade-Transport Turbulence Model Development for Two-Phase Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Cameron Scott

    Turbulence modeling remains a challenging problem in nuclear reactor applications, particularly for the turbulent multiphase flow conditions in nuclear reactor subchannels. Understanding the fundamental physics of turbulent multiphase flows is crucial for the improvement and further development of multiphase flow models used in reactor operation and safety calculations. Reactor calculations with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach continue to become viable tools for reactor analysis. The on-going increase in available computational resources allows for turbulence models that are more complex than the traditional two-equation models to become practical choices for nuclear reactor computational fluid dynamic (CFD) and multiphase computational fluid dynamic (M-CFD) simulations. Similarly, increased computational capabilities continue to allow for higher Reynolds numbers and more complex geometries to be evaluated using direct numerical simulation (DNS), thus providing more validation and verification data for turbulence model development. Spectral turbulence models are a promising approach to M-CFD simulations. These models resolve mean flow parameters as well as the turbulent kinetic energy spectrum, reproducing more physical details of the turbulence than traditional two-equation type models. Previously, work performed by other researchers on a spectral cascade-transport model has shown that the model behaves well for single and bubbly twophase decay of isotropic turbulence, single and two-phase uniform shear flow, and single-phase flow in a channel without resolving the near-wall boundary layer for relatively low Reynolds number. Spectral models are great candidates for multiphase RANS modeling since bubble source terms can be modeled as contributions to specific turbulence scales. This work focuses on the improvement and further development of the spectral cascadetransport model (SCTM) to become a three-dimensional (3D) turbulence model for use in M

  1. Characterizing a Model of Coronal Heating and Solar Wind Acceleration Based on Wave Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Linker, J.; Velli, M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the nature of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration is a key goal in solar and heliospheric research. While there have been many theoretical advances in both topics, including suggestions that they may be intimately related, the inherent scale coupling and complexity of these phenomena limits our ability to construct models that test them on a fundamental level for realistic solar conditions. At the same time, there is an ever increasing impetus to improve our spaceweather models, and incorporating treatments for these processes that capture their basic features while remaining tractable is an important goal. With this in mind, I will give an overview of our exploration of a wave-turbulence driven (WTD) model for coronal heating and solar wind acceleration based on low-frequency Alfvénic turbulence. Here we attempt to bridge the gap between theory and practical modeling by exploring this model in 1D HD and multi-dimensional MHD contexts. The key questions that we explore are: What properties must the model possess to be a viable model for coronal heating? What is the influence of the magnetic field topology (open, closed, rapidly expanding)? And can we simultaneously capture coronal heating and solar wind acceleration with such a quasi-steady formulation? Our initial results suggest that a WTD based formulation performs adequately for a variety of solar and heliospheric conditions, while significantly reducing the number of free parameters when compared to empirical heating and solar wind models. The challenges, applications, and future prospects of this type of approach will also be discussed.

  2. Numerical study of natural turbulent convection of nanofluids in a tall cavity heated from below

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mebrouk Ridha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper a numerical study of natural turbulent convection in a tall cavity filled with nanofluids. The cavity has a heat source embedded on its bottom wall, while the left, right and top walls of the cavity are maintained at a relatively low temperature. The working fluid is a water based nanofluid having three nanoparticle types: alumina, copper and copper oxid. The influence of pertinent parameters such as Rayleigh number, the type of nanofluid and solid volume fraction of nanoparticles on the cooling performance is studied. Steady forms of twodimensional Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes equations and conservation equations of mass and energy, coupled with the Boussinesq approximation, are solved by the control volume based discretisation method employing the SIMPLE algorithm for pressure-velocity coupling. Turbulence is modeled using the standard k-ε model. The Rayleigh number, Ra, is varied from 2.491009 to 2.491011. The volume fractions of nanoparticles were varied in the interval 0≤φ≤ 6% . Stream lines, isotherms, velocity profiles and Temperature profiles are presented for various combinations of Ra, the type of nanofluid and solid volume fraction of nanoparticles. The results are reported in the form of average Nusselt number on the heated wall. It is shown that for all values of Ra, the average heat transfer rate from the heat source increases almost linearly and monotonically as the solid volume fraction increases. Finally the average heat transfer rate takes on values that decrease according to the ordering Cu, CuO and Al2O3.

  3. Turbulent heat exchange between water and ice at an evolving ice-water interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Hirsh, Benjamin Henry; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2016-07-01

    We conduct laboratory experiments on the time evolution of an ice layer cooled from below and subjected to a turbulent shear flow of warm water from above. Our study is motivated by observations of warm water intrusion into the ocean cavity under Antarctic ice shelves, accelerating the melting of their basal surfaces. The strength of the applied turbulent shear flow in our experiments is represented in terms of its Reynolds number $\\textit{Re}$, which is varied over the range $2.0\\times10^3 \\le \\textit{Re} \\le 1.0\\times10^4$. Depending on the water temperature, partial transient melting of the ice occurs at the lower end of this range of $\\textit{Re}$ and complete transient melting of the ice occurs at the higher end. Following these episodes of transient melting, the ice reforms at a rate that is independent of $\\textit{Re}$. We fit our experimental measurements of ice thickness and temperature to a one-dimensional model for the evolution of the ice thickness in which the turbulent heat transfer is parameterized in terms of the friction velocity of the shear flow. The melting mechanism we investigate in our experiments can easily account for the basal melting rate of Pine Island Glacier ice shelf inferred from observations.

  4. Turbulent Heating between 0.2 and 1 au: A Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagud-Camps, Victor; Grappin, Roland; Verdini, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    The heating of the solar wind is key to understanding its dynamics and acceleration process. The observed radial decrease of the proton temperature in the solar wind is slow compared to the adiabatic prediction, and it is thought to be caused by turbulent dissipation. To generate the observed 1/R decrease, the dissipation rate has to reach a specific level that varies in turn with temperature, wind speed, and heliocentric distance. We want to prove that MHD turbulent simulations can lead to the 1/R profile. We consider here the slow solar wind, characterized by a quasi-2D spectral anisotropy. We use the expanding box model equations, which incorporate into 3D MHD equations the expansion due to the mean radial wind, allowing us to follow the plasma evolution between 0.2 and 1 au. We vary the initial parameters: Mach number, expansion parameter, plasma β, and properties of the energy spectrum as the spectral range and slope. Assuming turbulence starts at 0.2 au with a Mach number equal to unity, with a 3D spectrum mainly perpendicular to the mean field, we find radial temperature profiles close to 1/R on average. This is done at the price of limiting the initial spectral extent, corresponding to the small number of modes in the inertial range available, due to the modest Reynolds number reachable with high Mach numbers.

  5. Modeling of the L.F. turbulent spectrum during ohmic discharges, auxiliary heating and disruptions in Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truc, A.

    1983-07-01

    The spectrum of low frequency turbulence in the TFR tokamak, as observed along a central chord by a CO 2 laser light diffusion diagnostic, appears to be representable by four monomial branches joining to three vertices. This schematic representation permits to follow more easily the evolution of the turbulence during the life of the plasma, including the ohmic regime, the transitions to auxiliary heating and the minor and major disruptions

  6. Turbulent transport of passive scalar behind line sources in an unstably stratified open channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chun-Ho [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Department of Building and Real Estate; Leung, Dennis Y.C. [The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Department of Mechanical Engineering

    2006-11-15

    This study employs a direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique to study the flow, turbulence structure, and passive scalar plume transport behind line sources in an unstably stratified open channel flow. The scalar transport behaviors for five emission heights (z{sub s}=0, 0.25H, 0.5H, 0.75H, and H, where H is the channel height) at a Reynolds number of 3000, a Prandtl number and a Schmidt number of 0.72, and a Richardson number of -0.2 are investigated. The vertically meandering mean plume heights and dispersion coefficients calculated by the current DNS model agree well with laboratory results and field measurements in literature. It is found that the plume meandering is due to the movement of the positive and negative vertical turbulent scalar fluxes above and below the mean plume heights, respectively. These findings help explaining the plume meandering mechanism in the unstably stratified atmospheric boundary layer. (author)

  7. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.G.; Teo, A.C.Y.

    1999-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyro fluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  8. Self-consistent computation of transport barrier formation by fluid drift turbulence in tokamak geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, B.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A.; Teo, A.C-Y.

    2001-01-01

    (1) Computations of turbulence from the electromagnetic gyrofluid model are performed in a flux surface geometry representing the actual MHD equilibrium of the ASDEX Upgrade edge flux surfaces. The transition to ideal ballooning seen in simple geometries as the plasma beta rises is suppressed, leaving the transport at quantitatively realistic levels. Computations for core parameters at half-radius geometry show significant contribution due to the finite beta electron dynamics, possibly removing the standard ITG threshold. (2) Strong inward vorticity transport in edge turbulence, resulting from ion diamagnetic flows, may lead to a build up of mean ExB vorticity fast enough to cause an H-mode transition. (3) Friction of mean ion flows against neutrals involves both toroidal and poloidal flow components, leading to a finite radial current due to a given ExB profile even with zero poloidal rotation. (author)

  9. Characteristics of convective heat transport in a packed pebble-bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulmohsin, Rahman S., E-mail: rsar62@mst.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 West 11th Street/231 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, MO 65409-1230 (United States); Al-Dahhan, Muthanna H., E-mail: aldahhanm@mst.edu [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 West 11th Street/231 Schrenk Hall, Rolla, MO 65409-1230 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, 301 W. 14th St./222 Fulton Hall (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Highlights: • A fast-response heat transfer probe has been developed and used in this work. • Heat transport has been quantified in terms of local heat transfer coefficients. • The method of the electrically heated single sphere in packing has been applied. • The heat transfer coefficient increases from the center to the wall of packed bed. • This work advancing the knowledge of heat transport in the studied packed bed. - Abstract: Obtaining more precise results and a better understanding of the heat transport mechanism in the dynamic core of packed pebble-bed reactors is needed because this mechanism poses extreme challenges to the reliable design and efficient operation of these reactors. This mechanism can be quantified in terms of a solid-to-gas convective heat transfer coefficient. Therefore, in this work, the local convective heat transfer coefficients and their radial profiles were measured experimentally in a separate effect pilot-plant scale and cold-flow experimental setup of 0.3 m in diameter, using a sophisticated noninvasive heat transfer probe of spherical type. The effect of gas velocity on the heat transfer coefficient was investigated over a wide range of Reynolds numbers of practical importance. The experimental investigations of this work include various radial locations along the height of the bed. It was found that an increase in coolant gas flow velocity causes an increase in the heat transfer coefficient and that effect of the gas flow rate varies from laminar to turbulent flow regimes at all radial positions of the studied packed pebble-bed reactor. The results show that the local heat transfer coefficient increases from the bed center to the wall due to the change in the bed structure, and hence, in the flow pattern of the coolant gas. The findings clearly indicate that one value of an overall heat transfer coefficient cannot represent the local heat transfer coefficients within the bed; therefore, correlations are needed to

  10. Investigation of the influence of turbulence models on the prediction of heat transfer to low Prandtl number fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, R.; Ma, W.; Anglart, H.

    2011-01-01

    Despite many advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), heat transfer modeling and validation of code for liquid metal flows needs to be improved. This contribution aims to provide validation of several turbulence models implemented in OpenFOAM. 6 different low Reynolds number and 3 high Reynolds number turbulence models have been validated against experimental data for 3 different Reynolds numbers. The results show that most models are able to predict the temperature profile tendencies and that especially the k-ω-SST by Menter has good predictive capabilities. However, all turbulence models show deteriorating capabilities with decreasing Reynolds numbers. (author)

  11. Effect of Reynolds number, turbulence level and periodic wake flow on heat transfer on low pressure turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, D; Schulz, A; Wittig, S

    2001-05-01

    The development of effective cooling methods is of major importance for the design of new gas turbines blades. The conception of optimal cooling schemes requires a detailed knowledge of the heat transfer processes on the blade's surfaces. The thermal load of turbine blades is predominantly determined by convective heat transfer which is described by the local heat transfer coefficient. Heat transfer is closely related to the boundary layer development along the blade surface and hence depends on various flow conditions and geometrical parameters. Particularly Reynolds number, pressures gradient and turbulence level have great impact on the boundary layer development and the according heat transfer. Therefore, in the present study, the influence of Reynolds number, turbulence intensity, and periodic unsteady inflow on the local heat transfer of a typical low pressure turbine airfoil is experimentally examined in a plane cascade.

  12. One possible method of mathematical modeling of turbulent transport processes in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skvortsova, Nina N.; Batanov, German M.; Petrov, Alexander E.; Pshenichnikov, Anton A.; Sarksyan, Karen A.; Kharchev, Nikolay K.; Bening, Vladimir E.; Korolev, Victor Yu.

    2003-01-01

    It is proposed to use the mathematical modeling of the increments of fluctuating plasma variables to analyzing the probability characteristics of turbulent transport processes in plasma. It is shown that, in plasma of the L-2M stellarator and the TAU-1 linear device, the increments of the process of local fluctuating particle flux are stochastic in nature and their distribution is a scale mixture of Gaussians. (author)

  13. Numerical and Theoretical Studies of Turbulence and Transport with E x B Shear Flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.; Chance, M.S.; Hahm, T.S.; Lin, Z.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports: (1) substantial transport reduction by turbulence-driven E x B flows observed in 3D nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of microturbulence in magnetically-confined toroidal plasmas; (2) analytical derivation of the effective shearing rate for the time-dependent E x B flow; (3) interpretation of experimental data using linear gyrokinetic microinstability rotation models of E x B shear; and (4) other developments in gyrokinetic theory and simulation

  14. The plasma transport equations derived by multiple time-scale expansions and turbulent transport. I. General theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenstrasser, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple time-scale derivative expansion scheme is applied to the dimensionless Fokker--Planck equation and to Maxwell's equations, where the parameter range of a typical fusion plasma was assumed. Within kinetic theory, the four time scales considered are those of Larmor gyration, particle transit, collisions, and classical transport. The corresponding magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) time scales are those of ion Larmor gyration, Alfven, MHD collision, and resistive diffusion. The solution of the zeroth-order equations results in the force-free equilibria and ideal Ohm's law. The solution of the first-order equations leads under the assumption of a weak collisional plasma to the ideal MHD equations. On the MHD-collision time scale, not only the full set of the MHD transport equations is obtained, but also turbulent terms, where the related transport quantities are one order in the expansion parameter larger than those of classical transport. Finally, at the resistive diffusion time scale the known transport equations are arrived at including, however, also turbulent contributions. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  15. SciDAC Center for Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-12-18

    During the first year of the SciDAC gyrokinetic particle simulation (GPS) project, the GPS team (Zhihong Lin, Liu Chen, Yasutaro Nishimura, and Igor Holod) at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) studied the tokamak electron transport driven by electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence, and by trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence and ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence with kinetic electron effects, extended our studies of ITG turbulence spreading to core-edge coupling. We have developed and optimized an elliptic solver using finite element method (FEM), which enables the implementation of advanced kinetic electron models (split-weight scheme and hybrid model) in the SciDAC GPS production code GTC. The GTC code has been ported and optimized on both scalar and vector parallel computer architectures, and is being transformed into objected-oriented style to facilitate collaborative code development. During this period, the UCI team members presented 11 invited talks at major national and international conferences, published 22 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 10 papers in conference proceedings. The UCI hosted the annual SciDAC Workshop on Plasma Turbulence sponsored by the GPS Center, 2005-2007. The workshop was attended by about fifties US and foreign researchers and financially sponsored several gradual students from MIT, Princeton University, Germany, Switzerland, and Finland. A new SciDAC postdoc, Igor Holod, has arrived at UCI to initiate global particle simulation of magnetohydrodynamics turbulence driven by energetic particle modes. The PI, Z. Lin, has been promoted to the Associate Professor with tenure at UCI.

  16. Effect of wall thermal conductivity on the heat transfer process in annular turbulent gas flow for constant wall temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groshev, A.I.; Anisimov, V.V.; Kashcheev, V.M.; Khudasko, V.V.; Yur'ev, Yu.S.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of wall material on convective heat transfer of turbulent gas flow in an annular tube with account of longitudinal diffusion both in the wall and in the liquid is studied numerically. The conjugated problem is solved for P r =0.7 (Re=10 4 -10 6 ). Based on numerical calculations it is stated that thermal conductivity of the wall and gas essentially affects the degree of preliminary heating of liquid in the range of a non-heated section

  17. Fluid description of particle transport in hf heated magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klima, R.

    1980-01-01

    Particle fluxes averaged over high-frequency oscillations are analyzed. The collisional effects and the kinetic mechanisms of energy absorption are included. Spatial dependences of both the high-frequency and the (quasi-)steady electromagnetic fields are arbitrary. The equations governing the fluxes are deduced from the moments of the averaged kinetic equation. Explicit expressions for steady state fluxes are given in terms of electromagnetic field quantities. The results can also be applied to anomalous transport phenomena in weakly turbulent plasmas. (author)

  18. Application of a k-epsilon closure to a heated turbulent offset jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, G.; Kumar, R.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The complex flow which occurs when a heated turbulent jet discharges above a cool, isothermal surface was investigated numerically. This flow is influenced by significant flow curvature, buoyancy, impingement, and recirculation. The main features of the flow have been characterized in the literature by the exit Reynolds number and offset ratio. It is the purpose of this study to assess the applicability of a modified k-epsilon closure model to this flow. Comparisons with limited data for the unheated case and flow predictions for the heated case are presented. The impingement distance is determined to within 2 percent of the experimental results. However, detailed velocity profiles are not well predicted near the wall. Curvature modification and the wall boundary condition for epsilon significantly affect the solution. 15 references

  19. Spectroscopic study of turbulent heating in the high beta tokamak - Torus II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiou, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Visible spectroscopy, involving line profile and line intensity measurements, was used to study the turbulent heating of the rectangular cross-section high-beta tokamak Torus II. The spectroscopy was done in the visible wave-length region using a six channel polychrometer having 0.2 A resolution, which is capable of radial scans of the plasma. The plasma, obtained by ionizing helium, is heated by poloidal skin currents, induced by a rapid (tau/sub R/ approx. = 1.7 μsec) change of the toroidal magnetic field either parallel or anti-parallel to the initial toroidal bias magnetic field, which converts a cold toroidal Z-pinch plasma into a hot tokamak plasma

  20. Wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent heat transfer in a T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Michail; Papalexandris, Miltiadis V.

    2017-11-01

    In this talk we report on wall-resolved Large Eddy Simulations of turbulent heat transfer between a cold crossflow and a hot incoming jet in a T-junction. Due to their high efficiency in mixing and heat transfer, T-junctions are encountered in numerous industrial applications. Our study is motivated by the need to assess phenomena related to thermal fatigue that are often encountered at their walls. We first describe the important features of the flow with emphasis on the shear layers that are formed at the entry of the jet and the recirculation regions. We also show results for first- and second-order statistics of the flow and compare our predictions with previous experimental data. Lastly, we present results from the spectral analysis of the temperature signal that we performed in order to assess the oscillating mechanisms that dominate the flow and the risk of thermal fatigue at the walls of the T-junction.

  1. Numerical study of turbulent heat transfer from confined impinging jets using a pseudo-compressibility method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, M.; Rautaheimo, P.; Siikonen, T.

    1997-12-31

    A numerical investigation is carried out to predict the turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics of two-dimensional single and three impinging slot jets. Two low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} models, namely the classical model of Chien and the explicit algebraic stress model of Gatski and Speziale, are considered in the simulation. A cell-centered finite-volume scheme combined with an artificial compressibility approach is employed to solve the flow equations, using a diagonally dominant alternating direction implicit (DDADI) time integration method. A fully upwinded second order spatial differencing is adopted to approximate the convective terms. Roe`s damping term is used to calculate the flux on the cell face. A multigrid method is utilized for the acceleration of convergence. On average, the heat transfer coefficients predicted by both models show good agreement with the experimental results. (orig.) 17 refs.

  2. Edge transport and fluctuation induced turbulence characteristics in early SST-1 plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakati, B., E-mail: bharat.kakati@ipr.res.in; Pradhan, S., E-mail: pradhan@ipr.res.in; Dhongde, J.; Semwal, P.; Yohan, K.; Banaudha, M.

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Anomalous particle transport during the high MHD activity at SST-1. • Electrostatic turbulence is modulated by MHD activity at SST-1 tokamak. • Edge floating potential fluctuations shows poloidal long-range cross correlation. - Abstract: Plasma edge transport characteristics are known to be heavily influenced by the edge fluctuation induced turbulences. These characteristics play a critical role towards the confinement of plasma column in a Tokamak. The edge magnetic fluctuations and its subsequent effect on electrostatic fluctuations have been experimentally investigated for the first time at the edge of the SST-1 plasma column. This paper reports the correlations that exist and is experimentally been observed between the edge densities and floating potential fluctuations with the magnetic fluctuations. The edge density and floating potential fluctuations have been measured with the help of poloidally separated Langmuir probes, whereas the magnetic fluctuations have been measured with poloidally spaced Mirnov coils. Increase in magnetic fluctuations associated with enhanced MHD activities has been found to increase the floating potential and ion saturation current. These observations indicate electrostatic turbulence getting influenced with the MHD activities and reveal the edge anomalous particle transport during SST-1 tokamak discharge. Large-scale coherent structures have been observed in the floating potential fluctuations, indicating long-distance cross correlation in the poloidal directions. From bispectral analysis, a strong nonlinear coupling among the floating potential fluctuations is observed in the low-frequency range about 0–15 kHz.

  3. Augmented of turbulent heat transfer in an annular pipe with abrupt expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Togun Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of heat transfer to turbulent air flow in the abrupt axisymmetric expansion of an annular pipe. The experimental investigations were performed in the Reynolds number range from 5000 to 30000, the heat flux varied from 1000 to 4000 W/m2, and the expansion ratio was maintained at D/d=1, 1.25, 1.67 and 2. The sudden expansion was created by changing the inner diameter of the entrance pipe to an annular passage. The outer diameter of the inner pipe and the inner diameter of the outer pipe are 2.5 and 10 cm, respectively, where both of the pipes are subjected to uniform heat flux. The distribution of the surface temperature of the test pipe and the local Nusselt number are presented in this investigation. Due to sudden expansion in the cross section of the annular pipe, a separation flow was created, which enhanced the heat transfer. The reduction of the surface temperature on the outer and inner pipes increased with the increase of the expansion ratio and the Reynolds number, and increased with the decrease of the heat flux to the annular pipe. The peak of the local Nusselt number was between 1.64 and 1.7 of the outer and inner pipes for Reynolds numbers varied from 5000 to 30000, and the increase of the local Nusselt number represented the augmentation of the heat transfer rate in the sudden expansion of the annular pipe. This research also showed a maximum heat transfer enhancement of 63-78% for the outer and inner pipes at an expansion ratio of D/d=2 at a Re=30000 and a heat flux of 4000W/m2.

  4. The Heating of Solar Coronal Loops by Alfvén Wave Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A. [5001 Riverwood Avenue, Sarasota, FL 34231 (United States); Asgari-Targhi, M.; Voss, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we further develop a model for the heating of coronal loops by Alfvén wave turbulence (AWT). The Alfvén waves are assumed to be launched from a collection of kilogauss flux tubes in the photosphere at the two ends of the loop. Using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model for an active-region loop, we investigate how the waves from neighboring flux tubes interact in the chromosphere and corona. For a particular combination of model parameters we find that AWT can produce enough heat to maintain a peak temperature of about 2.5 MK, somewhat lower than the temperatures of 3–4 MK observed in the cores of active regions. The heating rates vary strongly in space and time, but the simulated heating events have durations less than 1 minute and are unlikely to reproduce the observed broad differential emission measure distributions of active regions. The simulated spectral line nonthermal widths are predicted to be about 27 km s{sup −1}, which is high compared to the observed values. Therefore, the present AWT model does not satisfy the observational constraints. An alternative “magnetic braiding” model is considered in which the coronal field lines are subject to slow random footpoint motions, but we find that such long-period motions produce much less heating than the shorter-period waves launched within the flux tubes. We discuss several possibilities for resolving the problem of producing sufficiently hot loops in active regions.

  5. The role of magnetic turbulence in astrophysical jet launching and cosmic ray transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casse, Fabien

    2001-01-01

    The first part of my thesis shows how Keplerian discs can launch MHD jets, under some conditions. The key points of this first part are the adding of viscosity inside the disc and a relevant energy equation, In particular, I have shown both analytically and numerically that the angular momentum transport is constrained by the MHD turbulence properties. I have also shown that one must take into account a relevant energy equation in order to have a more realistic description of jets observed in the Universe. Moreover, some energy turbulent transport mechanisms cannot be described in a simple MHD approach. In order to better understand the interaction between a turbulent magnetic field and charged particles, I have undertaken a study dealing with spatial and angular diffusion of hadrons with a chaotic magnetic field generated by a magnetic turbulence. In this study, it clearly appears that the spatial diffusion coefficient along the mean magnetic field extrapolate the results of quasi-linear theory for weak turbulence. At the opposite, in the inertial range, the spatial diffusion coefficient across the mean magnetic field is inconsistent with such a theory. Indeed the spatial diffusion coefficient across the mean magnetic field has a behaviour that can be interpreted as a chaotic diffusion regime as the one predicted by Rechester and Rosenbluth. Moreover, outside this range, the behaviours of all spatial diffusion coefficients are different of those expected in the framework of quasi-linear theory. At last, it has been found that a Bohm diffusion regime never occurs whatever the magnetic chaos. (author) [fr

  6. Application of the Lion's integral to calculate heat transfer with the N2O4 turbulent flow in a tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, V.Yu.; Tverkovkin, B.E.; Nesterenko, V.B.

    1976-01-01

    When carrying out engineering calculation of heat transfer in the case of turbulent flow of non-equilibrium reacting gas in a tube, it is necessary to dispose of criterion dependence to calculate Nusselt number. As a rule, dependences obtained by empirical methods are not widely adopted. It is proposed that the integral of Lion type be used for the heat transfer calculation in the form of which an expression for Nusselt number has been written under the conditions of turbulent flow with a non-equilibrium chemical reaction. On calculating turbulent fluctuations Millionshchikov two-layer model is used. A simple approximation of source-discharge of the mass of mixture components is suggested for the sake of simplification of Lion integral. The proposed theoretical dependences for the heat transfer calculation when chemical reactions are available substantially extend the field of application of Lion integral and may be used designing equipment with a chemically reacting coolant

  7. Study of instantaneous unsteady heat transfer in a rapid compression-expansion machine using zero dimensional k- ε turbulence model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhshan, Y.; Karim, G. A.; Mansouri, S. H.

    2003-01-01

    In this investigation, the instantaneous unsteady heat transfer within a pneumatically driven rapid compression-expansion machine that offers simple, well-controlled and known boundary conditions was studied. Values of the instantaneous apparent overall heat flux from the cylinder gas to the wall surfaces were calculated using a thermodynamics analysis of the experimentally measured pressure and volume temporal development. Corresponding heat flux values were also calculated through the application of a zero-dimensional k- ε turbulence model the characteristic velocity is a contribution of turbulence kinetic energy, mean kinetic energy of charged air into cylinder and piston motion for the calculation of Reynolds, Nusselt and Prandtl numbers. Comparison of the zero-dimensional k- ε turbulence model prediction with experimental data shows good agreement for all compression ratios

  8. Momentum-energy transport from turbulence driven by parallel flow shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, J.Q.; Horton, W.; Bengtson, R.D.; Li, G.X.

    1994-04-01

    The low frequency E x B turbulence driven by the shear in the mass flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is studied using the fluid theory in a slab configuration with magnetic shear. Ion temperature gradient effects are taken into account. The eigenfunctions of the linear instability are asymmetric about the mode rational surfaces. Quasilinear Reynolds stress induced by such asymmetric fluctuations produces momentum and energy transport across the magnetic field. Analytic formulas for the parallel and perpendicular Reynolds stress, viscosity and energy transport coefficients are given. Experimental observations of the parallel and poloidal plasma flows on TEXT-U are presented and compared with the theoretical models

  9. Analysis of turbulent natural convection heat transfer in a lower plenum during external cooling using the COSMO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, H.; Sawatari, Y.; Imada, T.

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of a large volumetrically heated melt pool is important to evaluate the feasibility of in-vessel retention by external flooding as an accident management. The COSMO (Coolability Simulation of Molten corium during severe accident) code has been developed at NUPEC to simulate turbulent natural convection heat transfer with internal heat source. The COSMO code solves thermal hydraulic conservation equations with turbulent model and can simulate melting and solidification process. The standard k-ε model has a limitation to describe the turbulent natural convection in the very high Rayleigh number condition (10 16 -10 17 ) assumed to occur in a lower plenum of RPV during a severe accident. This limitation results from the assumption of an analogy of momentum and energy transfer phenomena in the standard model. In this paper the modified turbulent model in which the turbulent number is treated, as a function of the flux Richardson number derived from the experiment, has been incorporated and verified by using the BALI experiments. It was found that the prediction of averaged Nusselt number became better than that of the standard model. In order to extend the COSMO code to the actual scale analysis under the external flooding conditions, more realistic boundary condition derived from the experiments should be treated. In this work the CHF correlation from ULPU experiment or the heat transfer coefficient correlation from CYBL experiment have been applied. The preliminary analysis of an actual scale analysis has been carried out under the condition of the TMI-2 accident. (author)

  10. Numerical prediction of turbulent heat transfer augmentation in an annular fuel channel with two-dimensional square ribs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Kazuyuki

    1996-01-01

    The square-ribbed fuel rod for high temperature gas-cooled reactors was developed in order to enhance the turbulent heat transfer in comparison with the standard fuel rod. To evaluate the heat transfer performance of the square-ribbed fuel rod, the turbulent heat transfer coefficients in an annular fuel channel with repeated two-dimensional square ribs were analyzed numerically on a fully developed incompressible flow using the k - ε turbulence model and the two-dimensional axisymmetrical coordinate system. Numerical analyses were carried out for a range of Reynolds numbers from 3000 to 20000 and ratios of square-rib pitch to height of 10, 20 and 40, respectively. The predicted values of the heat transfer coefficients agreed within an error of 10% for the square-rib pitch to height ratio of 10, 20% for 20 and 25% for 40, respectively, with the heat transfer empirical correlations obtained from the experimental data. It was concluded by the present study that the effect of the heat transfer augmentation by square ribs could be predicted sufficiently by the present numerical simulations and also a part of its mechanism could be explained by means of the change in the turbulence kinematic energy distribution along the flow direction. (author)

  11. DNS, LES and RANS of turbulent heat transfer in boundary layer with suddenly changing wall thermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Hirofumi; Yamada, Shohei; Tanaka, Masahiro; Houra, Tomoya; Nagano, Yasutaka

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the turbulent boundary layer with heat transfer by DNS. • Turbulent boundary layers with suddenly changing wall thermal conditions are observed. • The detailed turbulent statistics and structures in turbulent thermal boundary layer are discussed. • Turbulence models in LES and RANS are evaluated using DNS results. • LES and RANS are almost in good agreement with DNS results. -- Abstract: The objectives of this study are to investigate a thermal field in a turbulent boundary layer