WorldWideScience

Sample records for turbulent droplet dispersion

  1. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions

  2. Droplet behavior analysis in consideration of droplet entrainment from liquid film in annular dispersed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Keizo; Otake, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Isao; Serizawa, Akimi

    2000-01-01

    A method of droplet behavior simulation in an annular dispersed flow has been developed. In this method, both droplet deposition and entrainment from liquid film are considered. The Lagrangian method and stochastic model are used to analyze droplet diffusion and deposition behavior in a turbulent flow, and droplet entrainment from liquid film is calculated by an entrainment correlation. For the verification of this method, Gill's experiment is analyzed, in which the transition from annular flow with no entrainment to equilibrium annular dispersed flow was observed. Analysis results can also show the similar transition tendency. The experimental results of radial distribution of droplet mass flux are compared with analysis results. The agreement is good for low liquid flow rate, but entrainment rate must be adjusted for high liquid flow rate, in which gas turbulence is thought to be modified by high droplet density. In future work the effect of high droplet density on turbulence should be considered. (author)

  3. Simulation and modeling of turbulent non isothermal vapor-droplet dispersed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baalbaki, Daoud

    2011-01-01

    terms that need closure models are then identified, such as the terms of turbulence of the two phases and the terms of the interfacial transfer of mass, momentum, and energy. Then the momentum balance equation of the dispersed phase is derived via a statistical approach starting from a Lagrangian point of view. This derivation is required for the closure of the momentum interfacial transfer. Then we limit our interest on the terms that impact the spatial distribution of the droplets in context of our case of interest. A brief presentation of the different forces allows to understand the role of each force on the motion of the droplets. Consequently, our objective becomes to identify the terms that are not well modeled for the droplets flow case. In order to identify the terms that need a refined research, a parametric study is proposed, in Chapter 3, to show the effect of the modeling of the various terms specified in chapter 2. We first present the calculation software and the geometry of the study case with the choice of the mesh. A study case with basic models is done and the results are presented. This test case helps us to draw a general description of the droplets distribution, and to specify the role of each term. After that we discuss briefly the modeling of each term regarding the basic models used in the test. At the end of this chapter we specify the basic models which affect the radial distribution of the droplets, which requires more research. Chapter 4 discusses in details the models of turbulence of the both phases. Two models of different levels of numerical complexity and physical accuracy are considered for each phase. For the continuous phase the choice between an isotropic model and a non-isotropic model is studied, to check if the modeling of the anisotropy of the vapor turbulence has an important impact on the droplets distribution. For the droplets turbulence, two models have been studied: the simple algebraic model called Tchen-Hinze is compared

  4. Droplet dispersion angle measurements on a Pease-Antony Venturi scrubber

    OpenAIRE

    Puentes,N. A. G.; Guerra,V. G.; Coury,J. R.; Gonçalves,J. A. S.

    2012-01-01

    A Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber is a gas cleaning device that uses liquid, injected in the equipment as jets, to remove contaminants from the gas. The liquid jet is atomized into droplets, which are dispersed throughout the equipment due to the turbulence. The performance of the scrubber is affected by the spatial distribution of the droplets. Although CFD models have been used to predict the droplet dispersion, these models are expensive. Alternatively, the concept of "jet spreading angle" ...

  5. Evaporation of polydispersed droplets in a highly turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochet, M.; Bazile, Rudy; Ferret, B.; Cazin, S. [INPT, UPS, IMFT (Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse), Universite de Toulouse (France)

    2009-09-15

    A model experiment for the study of evaporating turbulent two-phase flows is presented here. The study focuses on a situation where pre-atomized and dispersed droplets vaporize and mix in a heated turbulent flow. The test bench consists in a channel flow with characteristics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence where fluctuations levels reach very high values (25% in the established zone). An ultrasonic atomizer allows the injection of a mist of small droplets of acetone in the carrier flow. The large range diameters ensure that every kind of droplet behavior with regards to turbulence is possible. Instantaneous concentration fields of the vaporized phase are extracted from fluorescent images (PLIF) of the two phase flow. The evolution of the mixing of the acetone vapor is analyzed for two different liquid mass loadings. Despite the high turbulence levels, concentration fluctuations remain significant, indicating that air and acetone vapor are not fully mixed far from the injector. (orig.)

  6. Water circulation in non-isothermal droplet-laden turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Simos, T.; Psihoyios, G.; Tsitouras, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapor. An incompressible flow formulation is applied for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent channel flow with a warm and a cold wall. Compared

  7. A Planar-Fluorescence Imaging Technique for Studying Droplet-Turbulence Interactions in Vaporizing Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santavicca, Dom A.; Coy, E.

    1990-01-01

    Droplet turbulence interactions directly affect the vaporization and dispersion of droplets in liquid sprays and therefore play a major role in fuel oxidizer mixing in liquid fueled combustion systems. Proper characterization of droplet turbulence interactions in vaporizing sprays require measurement of droplet size velocity and size temperature correlations. A planar, fluorescence imaging technique is described which is being developed for simultaneously measuring the size, velocity, and temperature of individual droplets in vaporizing sprays. Preliminary droplet size velocity correlation measurements made with this technique are presented. These measurements are also compared to and show very good agreement with measurements made in the same spray using a phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  8. Water droplet condensation and evaporation in turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    We propose a point-particle model for two-way coupling of water droplets dispersed in the turbulent flow of a carrier gas consisting of air and water vapour. We adopt an Euler–Lagrangian formulation based on conservation laws for the mass, momentum and energy of the continuous phase and on empirical

  9. Size Distribution and Dispersion of Droplets Generated by Impingement of Breaking Waves on Oil Slicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Miller, J.; Wang, J.; Koley, S. S.; Katz, J.

    2017-10-01

    This laboratory experimental study investigates the temporal evolution of the size distribution of subsurface oil droplets generated as breaking waves entrain oil slicks. The measurements are performed for varying wave energy, as well as large variations in oil viscosity and oil-water interfacial tension, the latter achieved by premixing the oil with dispersant. In situ measurements using digital inline holography at two magnifications are applied for measuring the droplet sizes and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) for determining the temporal evolution of turbulence after wave breaking. All early (2-10 s) size distributions have two distinct size ranges with different slopes. For low dispersant to oil ratios (DOR), the transition between them could be predicted based on a turbulent Weber (We) number in the 2-4 range, suggesting that turbulence plays an important role. For smaller droplets, all the number size distributions have power of about -2.1, and for larger droplets, the power decreases well below -3. The measured steepening of the size distribution over time is predicted by a simple model involving buoyant rise and turbulence dispersion. Conversely, for DOR 1:100 and 1:25 oils, the diameter of slope transition decreases from ˜1 mm to 46 and 14 µm, respectively, much faster than the We-based prediction, and the size distribution steepens with increasing DOR. Furthermore, the concentration of micron-sized droplets of DOR 1:25 oil increases for the first 10 min after entrainment. These phenomena are presumably caused by the observed formation and breakup oil microthreads associated with tip streaming.

  10. Droplet dispersion angle measurements on a Pease-Antony Venturi scrubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. G. Puentes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber is a gas cleaning device that uses liquid, injected in the equipment as jets, to remove contaminants from the gas. The liquid jet is atomized into droplets, which are dispersed throughout the equipment due to the turbulence. The performance of the scrubber is affected by the spatial distribution of the droplets. Although CFD models have been used to predict the droplet dispersion, these models are expensive. Alternatively, the concept of "jet spreading angle" could be used as a simple and quick way to estimate droplet dispersion. The purpose of this paper is to measure the spreading angle of jets transversally injected into the throat of a Venturi scrubber and correlate it with both gas and jet velocities. The throat gas velocities varied between 59 and 74 m/s and the jet velocity between 3.18 and 19.1 m/s. The angles were measured through image analysis, obtained with high velocity photography. The spreading angle was found to be strongly dependent on jet velocity.

  11. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil-brine interfacial tension and droplet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; So, L.L.C.

    2009-01-01

    The dispersion of oil spilled in water is influenced by chemical dispersants via the modification of the interfacial properties of the oil, such as oil-brine interfacial tension (IFT). In this study, the physical properties and dispersion of oil were measured in order to determine the effects of chemical dispersants on IFT and oil viscosity and the effects on oil droplet formation. In theory, the maximum size of oil droplet that forms under turbulent mixing increases with IFT. Therefore, a reduction in IFT reduces the size distribution of oil droplets. This paper presented the results of an ongoing project aimed at providing quantitative understanding the influence that chemical dispersants have on the size distribution of oil droplets and oil dispersion. Findings showed that a valid approach is to separate the direct effects of chemical dispersants on oil properties, specifically oil-brine IFT and the effects of mixing on dispersion of chemically treated oil. Under constant mixing conditions, the reduction of the maximum oil droplet size that overcomes the breakage process is determined by the effects of chemical dispersant on oil properties. This correlates well with the dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR) up to the critical micelle concentration (CMC). This good agreement can be attributed to the reduction of IFT with DOR. It was concluded that the reduction of IFT with dispersant concentration is an additional signature of oil composition on droplet formation, while mixing energy is an external parameter that is independent of oil properties. 17 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs

  12. Direct numerical simulation of droplet-laden isotropic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S.

    Interaction of liquid droplets with turbulence is important in numerous applications ranging from rain formation to oil spills to spray combustion. The physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction are largely unknown, especially when compared to that of solid particles. Compared to solid particles, droplets can deform, break up, coalesce and have internal fluid circulation. The main goal of this work is to investigate using direct numerical simulation (DNS) the physical mechanisms of droplet-turbulence interaction, both for non-evaporating and evaporating droplets. To achieve this objective, we develop and couple a new pressure-correction method with the volume-of-fluid (VoF) method for simulating incompressible two-fluid flows. The method's main advantage is that the variable coefficient Poisson equation that arises in solving the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for two-fluid flows is reduced to a constant coefficient equation. This equation can then be solved directly using, e.g., the FFT-based parallel Poisson solver. For a 10243 mesh, our new pressure-correction method using a fast Poisson solver is ten to forty times faster than the standard pressure-correction method using multigrid. Using the coupled pressure-correction and VoF method, we perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) of 3130 finite-size, non-evaporating droplets of diameter approximately equal to the Taylor lengthscale and with 5% droplet volume fraction in decaying isotropic turbulence at initial Taylor-scale Reynolds number Relambda = 83. In the droplet-laden cases, we vary one of the following three parameters: the droplet Weber number based on the r.m.s. velocity of turbulence (0.1 ≤ Werms ≤ 5), the droplet- to carrier-fluid density ratio (1 ≤ rhod/rho c ≤ 100) or the droplet- to carrier-fluid viscosity ratio (1 ≤ mud/muc ≤ 100). We derive the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) equations for the two-fluid, carrier-fluid and droplet-fluid flow. These equations allow

  13. DNS of droplet motion in a turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, Michele; Elghobashi, S.

    2013-11-01

    The objective of our research is to study the multi-way interactions between turbulence and vaporizing liquid droplets by performing direct numerical simulations (DNS). The freely-moving droplets are fully resolved in 3D space and time and all the relevant scales of the turbulent motion are simultaneously resolved down to the smallest length- and time-scales. Our DNS solve the unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes and continuity equations throughout the whole computational domain, including the interior of the liquid droplets. The droplet surface motion and deformation are captured accurately by using the Level Set method. The pressure jump condition, density and viscosity discontinuities across the interface as well as surface tension are accounted for. Here, we present only the results of the first stage of our research which considers the effects of turbulence on the shape change of an initially spherical liquid droplet, at density ratio (of liquid to carrier fluid) of 1000, moving in isotropic turbulent flow. We validate our results via comparison with available expe. This research has been supported by NSF-CBET Award 0933085 and NSF PRAC (Petascale Computing Resource Allocation) Award.

  14. Statistical steady states in turbulent droplet condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Jeremie; Krstulovic, Giorgio; Siewert, Christoph

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the general problem of turbulent condensation. Using direct numerical simulations we show that the fluctuations of the supersaturation field offer different conditions for the growth of droplets which evolve in time due to turbulent transport and mixing. This leads to propose a Lagrangian stochastic model consisting of a set of integro-differential equations for the joint evolution of the squared radius and the supersaturation along droplet trajectories. The model has two parameters fixed by the total amount of water and the thermodynamic properties, as well as the Lagrangian integral timescale of the turbulent supersaturation. The model reproduces very well the droplet size distributions obtained from direct numerical simulations and their time evolution. A noticeable result is that, after a stage where the squared radius simply diffuses, the system converges exponentially fast to a statistical steady state independent of the initial conditions. The main mechanism involved in this convergence is a loss of memory induced by a significant number of droplets undergoing a complete evaporation before growing again. The statistical steady state is characterised by an exponential tail in the droplet mass distribution.

  15. Hydrodynamic clustering of droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnen, Rudie; Yavuz, Altug; van Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2017-11-01

    Small, inertial particles are known to cluster in turbulent flows: particles are centrifuged out of eddies and gather in the strain-dominated regions. This so-called preferential concentration is reflected in the radial distribution function (RDF; a quantitative measure of clustering). We study clustering of water droplets in a loudspeaker-driven turbulence chamber. We track the motion of droplets in 3D and calculate the RDF. At moderate scales (a few Kolmogorov lengths) we find the typical power-law scaling of preferential concentration in the RDF. However, at even smaller scales (a few droplet diameters), we encounter a hitherto unobserved additional clustering. We postulate that the additional clustering is due to hydrodynamic interactions, an effect which is typically disregarded in modeling. Using a perturbative expansion of inertial effects in a Stokes-flow description of two interacting spheres, we obtain an expression for the RDF which indeed includes the additional clustering. The additional clustering enhances the collision probability of droplets, which enhances their growth rate due to coalescence. The additional clustering is thus an essential effect in precipitation modeling.

  16. Broadening of cloud droplet spectra through turbulent entrainment and eddy hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abade, Gustavo; Grabowski, Wojciech; Pawlowska, Hanna

    2017-11-01

    This work discusses the effect of cloud turbulence and turbulent entrainment on the evolution of the cloud droplet-size spectrum. We simulate an ensemble of idealized turbulent cloud parcels that are subject to entrainment events, modeled as a random Poisson process. Entrainment events, subsequent turbulent mixing inside the parcel, supersaturation fluctuations, and the resulting stochastic droplet growth by condensation are simulated using a Monte Carlo scheme. Quantities characterizing the turbulence intensity, entrainment rate and the mean fraction of environmental air entrained in an event are specified as external parameters. Cloud microphysics is described by applying Lagrangian particles, the so-called superdroplets. They are either unactivated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or cloud droplets that form from activated CCN. The model accounts for the transport of environmental CCN into the cloud by the entraining eddies at the cloud edge. Turbulent mixing of the entrained dry air with cloudy air is described using a linear model. We show that turbulence plays an important role in aiding entrained CCN to activate, providing a source of small cloud droplets and thus broadening the droplet size distribution. Further simulation results will be reported at the meeting.

  17. Aerosol indirect effect from turbulence-induced broadening of cloud-droplet size distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; Cantrell, Will; Chang, Kelken; Ciochetto, David; Niedermeier, Dennis; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.; Yang, Fan

    2016-11-28

    The influence of aerosol concentration on cloud droplet size distribution is investigated in a laboratory chamber that enables turbulent cloud formation through moist convection. The experiments allow steady-state microphysics to be achieved, with aerosol input balanced by cloud droplet growth and fallout. As aerosol concentration is increased the cloud droplet mean diameter decreases as expected, but the width of the size distribution also decreases sharply. The aerosol input allows for cloud generation in the limiting regimes of fast microphysics (τc < τt) for high aerosol concentration, and slow microphysics (τc > τt) for low aerosol concentration; here, τc is the phase relaxation time and τt is the turbulence correlation time. The increase in the width of the droplet size distribution for the low aerosol limit is consistent with larger variability of supersaturation due to the slow microphysical response. A stochastic differential equation for supersaturation predicts that the standard deviation of the squared droplet radius should increase linearly with a system time scale defined as τs-1c-1 + τt-1, and the measurements are in excellent agreement with this finding. This finding underscores the importance of droplet size dispersion for the aerosol indirect effect: increasing aerosol concentration not only suppresses precipitation formation through reduction of the mean droplet diameter, but perhaps more importantly, through narrowing of the droplet size distribution due to reduced supersaturation fluctuations. Supersaturation fluctuations in the low aerosol / slow microphysics limit are likely of leading importance for precipitation formation.

  18. The dynamics of droplets in moist Rayleigh-Benard turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrakar, Kamal Kant; van der Voort, Dennis; Kinney, Greg; Cantrell, Will; Shaw, Raymond

    2017-11-01

    Clouds are an intricate part of the climate, and strongly influence atmospheric dynamics and radiative balances. While properties such as cloud albedo and precipitation rate are large scale effects, these properties are determined by dynamics on the microscale, such droplet sizes, liquid water content, etc. The growth of droplets from condensation is dependent on a multitude of parameters, such as aerosol concentration (nucleation sites) and turbulence (scalar fluctuations and coalescence). However, the precise mechanism behind droplet growth and clustering in a cloud environment is still unclear. In this investigation we use a facility called the Pi Chamber to generate a (miniature) cloud in a laboratory setting with known boundary conditions, such as aerosol concentration, temperature, and humidity. Through the use of particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) on the droplets generated in the cloud, we can investigate the dynamics of these cloud droplets in the convective (Rayleigh-Benard) turbulence generated through an induced temperature gradient. We show the influence of the temperature gradient and Froude number (gravity forces) on the changing turbulence anisotropy, large scale circulation, and small-scale dissipation rates. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant AGS-1623429.

  19. Clustering and entrainment effects on the evaporation of dilute droplets in a turbulent jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Barba, Federico; Picano, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    The evaporation of droplets within turbulent sprays involves unsteady, multiscale, and multiphase processes which make its comprehension and modeling capabilities still limited. The present work aims to investigate the dynamics of droplet vaporization within a turbulent spatial developing jet in dilute, nonreacting conditions. We address the problem considering a turbulent jet laden with acetone droplets and using the direct numerical simulation framework based on a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian approach and the point droplet approximation. A detailed statistical analysis of both phases is presented. In particular, we show how crucial is the preferential sampling of the vapor phase induced by the inhomogeneous localization of the droplets through the flow. Strong droplet preferential segregation develops suddenly downstream from the inflow section both within the turbulent core and the jet mixing layer. Two distinct mechanisms have been found to drive this phenomenon: the inertial small-scale clustering in the jet core and the intermittent dynamics of droplets across the turbulent-nonturbulent interface in the mixing layer, where dry air entrainment occurs. These phenomenologies strongly affect the overall vaporization process and lead to an impressive widening of the droplet size and vaporization rate distributions in the downstream evolution of the turbulent spray.

  20. Deposition of micron liquid droplets on wall in impinging turbulent air jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tianshu; Nink, Jacob; Merati, Parviz [Western Michigan University, Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Tian, Tian; Li, Yong [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Sloan Automotive Laboratory, Cambridge, MA (United States); Shieh, Tom [Toyota Technical Center, Toyota Motor Engineering and Manufacturing North America, Inc, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-06-15

    The fluid mechanics of the deposition of micron liquid (olive oil) droplets on a glass wall in an impinging turbulent air jet is studied experimentally. The spatial patterns of droplets deposited on a wall are measured by using luminescent oil visualization technique, and the statistical data of deposited droplets are obtained through microscopic imagery. Two distinct rings of droplets deposited on a wall are found, and the mechanisms of the formation of the inner and outer rings are investigated based on global diagnostics of velocity and skin friction fields. In particular, the intriguing effects of turbulence, including large-scale coherent vortices and small-scale random turbulence, on micron droplet deposition on a wall and coalescence in the air are explored. (orig.)

  1. TRAJECTORY AND INCINERATION OF ROGUE DROPLETS IN A TURBULENT DIFFUSION FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    The trajectory and incineration efficiency of individual droplet streams of a fuel mixture injected into a swirling gas turbulent diffusion flame were measured as a function of droplet size, droplet velocity, interdroplet spacing, and droplet injection angle. Additional experimen...

  2. The Evaporation of Liquid Droplets in Highly Turbulent Gas Streams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gould, Richard

    1998-01-01

    Single acetone and heptane droplets were suspended from a hypodermic needle in turbulent airflow, and the Nusselt number was obtained from direct measurements of the droplet diameter and evaporation rate...

  3. Framework for simulating droplet vaporization in turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2017-11-01

    A framework for performing direct numerical simulations of droplet vaporization is presented. The work is motivated by spray combustion in engines wherein fuel droplets vaporize in a turbulent gas flow. The framework is built into a conservative finite volume code for simulating low Mach number turbulent multiphase flows. Phase tracking is performed using a discretely conservative geometric volume of fluid method, while the transport of mass fraction and temperature is performed using the BQUICK scheme. Special attention is given to the implementation of transport equations near the interface to ensure the consistency between fluxes of mass, momentum, and scalars. The effect of evaporation on the flow appears as a system of coupled source terms which depend on the local thermodynamic equilibrium between the phases. The sources are implemented implicitly using an unconditionally stable, monotone scheme. Two methodologies for resolving the system's thermodynamic equilibrium are compared for their accuracy, robustness, and computational expense. Verification is performed by comparing results to known solutions in one and three dimensions. Finally, simulations of droplets vaporizing in turbulence are demonstrated, and trends for mass fraction and temperature fields are discussed.

  4. Bringing Clouds into Our Lab! - The Influence of Turbulence on the Early Stage Rain Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mehmet Altug; Kunnen, Rudie; Heijst, Gertjan; Clercx, Herman

    2015-11-01

    We are investigating a droplet-laden flow in an air-filled turbulence chamber, forced by speaker-driven air jets. The speakers are running in a random manner; yet they allow us to control and define the statistics of the turbulence. We study the motion of droplets with tunable size (Stokes numbers ~ 0.13 - 9) in a turbulent flow, mimicking the early stages of raindrop formation. 3D Particle Tracking Velocimetry (PTV) together with Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) methods are chosen as the experimental method to track the droplets and collect data for statistical analysis. Thereby it is possible to study the spatial distribution of the droplets in turbulence using the so-called Radial Distribution Function (RDF), a statistical measure to quantify the clustering of particles. Additionally, 3D-PTV technique allows us to measure velocity statistics of the droplets and the influence of the turbulence on droplet trajectories, both individually and collectively. In this contribution, we will present the clustering probability quantified by the RDF for different Stokes numbers. We will explain the physics underlying the influence of turbulence on droplet cluster behavior. This study supported by FOM/NWO Netherlands.

  5. Large-eddy simulation and Lagrangian stochastic modelling of solid particle and droplet dispersion and mixing. Application to atmospheric pollution; Dispersion et melange turbulents de particules solides et de gouttelettes par une simulation des grandes echelles et une modelisation stochastique lagrangienne. Application a la pollution de l'atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinkovic, I.

    2005-07-15

    In order to study atmospheric pollution and the dispersion of industrial stack emissions, a large eddy simulation with the dynamic Smagorinsky-Germano sub-grid-scale model is coupled with Lagrangian tracking of fluid particles containing scalar, solid particles and droplets. The movement of fluid particles at a sub-grid level is given by a three-dimensional Langevin model. The stochastic model is written in terms of sub-grid-scale statistics at a mesh level. By introducing a diffusion model, the coupling between the large-eddy simulation and the modified three-dimensional Langevin model is applied to passive scalar dispersion. The results are validated by comparison with the wind-tunnel experiments of Fackrell and Robins (1982). The equation of motion of a small rigid sphere in a turbulent flow is introduced. Solid particles and droplets are tracked in a Lagrangian way. The velocity of solid particles and droplets is considered to have a large scale component (directly computed by the large-eddy simulation) and a sub-grid scale part. Because of inertia and gravity effects, solid particles and droplets, deviate from the trajectories of the surrounding fluid particles. Therefore, a modified Lagrangian correlation timescale is introduced into the Langevin model previously developed for the sub-grid velocity of fluid particles. Two-way coupling and collisions are taken into account. The results of the large-eddy simulation with solid particles are compared with the wind-tunnel experiments of Nalpanis et al. (1993) and of Taniere et al. (1997) on sand particles in saltation and in modified saltation, respectively. A model for droplet coalescence and breakup is implemented which allows to predict droplet interactions under turbulent flow conditions in the frame of the Euler/Lagrange approach. Coalescence and breakup are considered as a stochastic process with simple scaling symmetry assumption for the droplet radius, initially proposed by Kolmogorov (1941). At high

  6. Prediction of oil droplet size distribution in agitated aquatic environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Lee, K.; Hill, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    Oil spilled at sea undergoes many transformations based on physical, biological and chemical processes. Vertical dispersion is the hydrodynamic mechanism controlled by turbulent mixing due to breaking waves, vertical velocity, density gradients and other environmental factors. Spilled oil is dispersed in the water column as small oil droplets. In order to estimate the mass of an oil slick in the water column, it is necessary to know how the droplets formed. Also, the vertical dispersion and fate of oil spilled in aquatic environments can be modelled if the droplet-size distribution of the oil droplets is known. An oil spill remediation strategy can then be implemented. This paper presented a newly developed Monte Carlo model to predict droplet-size distribution due to Brownian motion, turbulence and a differential settling at equilibrium. A kinematic model was integrated into the proposed model to simulate droplet breakage. The key physical input of the model is the maximum droplet size permissible in the simulation. Laboratory studies were found to be in good agreement with field studies. 26 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs

  7. Direct numerical simulations of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    This work demonstrates direct numerical simulations of evaporating two phase flows, with applications to studying combustion in aircraft engines. Inside the engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber where it atomizes into droplets and evaporates. Combustion occurs as the fuel vapor mixes with the surrounding flow of turbulent gas. Understanding combustion, therefore, requires studying evaporation in a turbulent flow and the resulting vapor distribution. We study the problem using a finite volume framework to solve the Navier-Stokes and scalar transport equations under a low-Mach assumption [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008]. The liquid-gas interface is tracked using a conservative level-set method [Desjardins et al., J. Comp. Phys., 2008] which allows for a sharp reconstruction of the discontinuity across the interface. Special care is taken in the discretization of cells near the liquid-gas interface to ensure the stability and accuracy of the solution. Results are discussed for non-reacting simulations of liquid droplets evaporating into a turbulent field of inert gas.

  8. An efficient approach to transient turbulent dispersion modeling by CFD-statistical analysis of a many-puff system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ching, W-H; K H Leung, Michael; Leung, Dennis Y C

    2009-01-01

    Transient turbulent dispersion phenomena can be found in various practical problems, such as the accidental release of toxic chemical vapor and the airborne transmission of infectious droplets. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is an effective tool for analyzing such transient dispersion behaviors. However, the transient CFD analysis is often computationally expensive and time consuming. In the present study, a computationally efficient CFD-statistical hybrid modeling method has been developed for studying transient turbulent dispersion. In this method, the source emission is represented by emissions of many infinitesimal puffs. Statistical analysis is performed to obtain first the statistical properties of the puff trajectories and subsequently the most probable distribution of the puff trajectories that represent the macroscopic dispersion behaviors. In two case studies of ambient dispersion, the numerical modeling results obtained agree reasonably well with both experimental measurements and conventional k-ε modeling results published in the literature. More importantly, the proposed many-puff CFD-statistical hybrid modeling method effectively reduces the computational time by two orders of magnitude.

  9. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, J G M; Geld, C W M van der [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Geurts, B J, E-mail: e.russo@tue.nl [Faculty EEMCS, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-12-22

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach. The two-way coupling is investigated in terms of the effects of mass and heat transfer on the droplets distributions along the channel wall-normal direction and by comparison of the droplet temperature statistics with respect to the case without evaporation and condensation. A remarkable conclusion is that the presence of evaporating and condensing droplets results in an increase in the non-dimensional heat transfer coefficient of the channel flow represented by the Nusselt number.

  10. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  11. Effects of turbulence on the geometric collision rate of sedimenting droplets. Part 2. Theory and parameterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, Orlando; Rosa, Bogdan; Wang Lianping

    2008-01-01

    The effect of air turbulence on the geometric collision kernel of cloud droplets can be predicted if the effects of air turbulence on two kinematic pair statistics can be modeled. The first is the average radial relative velocity and the second is the radial distribution function (RDF). A survey of the literature shows that no theory is available for predicting the radial relative velocity of finite-inertia sedimenting droplets in a turbulent flow. In this paper, a theory for the radial relative velocity is developed, using a statistical approach assuming that gravitational sedimentation dominates the relative motion of droplets before collision. In the weak-inertia limit, the theory reveals a new term making a positive contribution to the radial relative velocity resulting from a coupling between sedimentation and air turbulence on the motion of finite-inertia droplets. The theory is compared to the direct numerical simulations (DNS) results in part 1, showing a reasonable agreement with the DNS data for bidisperse cloud droplets. For droplets larger than 30 μm in radius, a nonlinear drag (NLD) can also be included in the theory in terms of an effective inertial response time and an effective terminal velocity. In addition, an empirical model is developed to quantify the RDF. This, together with the theory for radial relative velocity, provides a parameterization for the turbulent geometric collision kernel. Using this integrated model, we find that turbulence could triple the geometric collision kernel, relative to the stagnant air case, for a droplet pair of 10 and 20 μm sedimenting through a cumulus cloud at R λ =2x10 4 and ε=600 cm 2 s -3 . For the self-collisions of 20 μm droplets, the collision kernel depends sensitively on the flow dissipation rate

  12. Heat transfer in droplet-laden turbulent channel flow with phase transition in the presence of a thin film of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bukhvostova, A.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geurts, B.J.; Grigoriadis, D.G.E.; Geurts, B.J.; Kuerten, H.; Fröhlich, J.; Armenio, V.

    2018-01-01

    In the field of multiphase systems droplet-laden channel flow presents a challenging topic not only because of how turbulent flow influences the mass and heat transfer properties of droplets but also how droplets modulate the flow. In this contribution we focus on droplet-laden turbulent channel

  13. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Geld, van der C.W.M.; Geurts, B.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  14. Modeling water droplet condensation and evaporation in DNS of turbulent channel flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Russo, E; Kuerten, Johannes G.M.; van der Geld, C.W.M.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    In this paper a point particle model for two-way coupling in water droplet-laden incompressible turbulent flow of air is proposed. The model is based on conservation laws and semi-empirical correlations. It has been implemented and tested in a DNS code based for turbulent channel flow with an

  15. DNS of spark ignition and edge flame propagation in turbulent droplet-laden mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neophytou, A.; Mastorakos, E.; Cant, R.S. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    A parametric study of forced ignition at the mixing layer between air and air carrying fine monosized fuel droplets is done through one-step chemistry direct numerical simulations to determine the influence of the size and volatility of the droplets, the spark location, the droplet-air mixing layer initial thickness and the turbulence intensity on the ignition success and the subsequent flame propagation. The propagation is analyzed in terms of edge flame displacement speed, which has not been studied before for turbulent edge spray flames. Spark ignition successfully resulted in a tribrachial flame if enough fuel vapour was available at the spark location, which occurred when the local droplet number density was high. Ignition was achieved even when the spark was offset from the spray, on the air side, due to the diffusion of heat from the spark, provided droplets evaporated rapidly. Large kernels were obtained by sparking close to the spray, since fuel was more readily available. At long times after the spark, for all flames studied, the probability density function of the displacement speed was wide, with a mean value in the range 0.55-0.75S{sub L}, with S{sub L} the laminar burning velocity of a stoichiometric gaseous premixed flame. This value is close to the mean displacement speed in turbulent edge flames with gaseous fuel. The displacement speed was negatively correlated with curvature. The detrimental effect of curvature was attenuated with a large initial kernel and by increasing the thickness of the mixing layer. The mixing layer was thicker when evaporation was slow and the turbulence intensity higher. However, high turbulence intensity also distorted the kernel which could lead to high values of curvature. The edge flame reaction component increased when the maximum temperature coincided with the stoichiometric contour. The results are consistent with the limited available experimental evidence and provide insights into the processes associated with

  16. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  17. Large Scale Behavior and Droplet Size Distributions in Crude Oil Jets and Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Joseph; Murphy, David; Morra, David

    2013-11-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout introduced several million barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Injected initially as a turbulent jet containing crude oil and gas, the spill caused formation of a subsurface plume stretching for tens of miles. The behavior of such buoyant multiphase plumes depends on several factors, such as the oil droplet and bubble size distributions, current speed, and ambient stratification. While large droplets quickly rise to the surface, fine ones together with entrained seawater form intrusion layers. Many elements of the physics of droplet formation by an immiscible turbulent jet and their resulting size distribution have not been elucidated, but are known to be significantly influenced by the addition of dispersants, which vary the Weber Number by orders of magnitude. We present experimental high speed visualizations of turbulent jets of sweet petroleum crude oil (MC 252) premixed with Corexit 9500A dispersant at various dispersant to oil ratios. Observations were conducted in a 0.9 m × 0.9 m × 2.5 m towing tank, where large-scale behavior of the jet, both stationary and towed at various speeds to simulate cross-flow, have been recorded at high speed. Preliminary data on oil droplet size and spatial distributions were also measured using a videoscope and pulsed light sheet. Sponsored by Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI).

  18. The role of pair dispersion in turbulent flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourgoin, M.; Ouellette, N.T.; Xu, H.T.

    2006-01-01

    Mixing and transport in turbulent flows - which have strong local concentration fluctuations - essential in many natural and industrial systems including reactions in chemical mixers, combustion in engines and burners, droplet formation in warm clouds, and biological odor detection and chemotaxis...

  19. A LIF-PIV investigation of turbulence induced by sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Dennis; Dam, Nico; van de Water, Willem; Clercx, Herman

    2017-11-01

    During the breakup of a high-speed liquid jet, it drags along and mixes the air surrounding it, creating turbulence. This turbulence can, in turn, influence the dispersion of the droplets in the resulting spray. Very little is known about the small-scale characteristics of the ambient turbulent flow. This work investigated spray-induced turbulence using (gas-phase) laser-induced fluorescent tracer particle image velocimetry (LIF-PIV), which suppresses the strong light scattering of jet and droplets on the images. The results for both a heptane (h) and water (w) spray (135 m/s and 125 m/s respectively) show that the heptane spray generates stronger turbulence due to the difference in breakup between the two fluids. Using a large-eddy estimation, carefully compensating for the finite size of the PIV windows, the dissipation rate ɛ and the small-scale turbulence characteristics are estimated as ɛh = 190 +/-25 m2s-3, ɛw = 120 +/-30 m2s-3, Reλ,h = 380 +/-40, Reλ,w = 290 +/-40, ηh = 65 +/-3 μm, and ηw = 75 +/-5 μm. We will discuss the influence of the turbulent fluctuations in the surrounding air on the dispersion of droplets. This work is part of the research programme of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM), which is part of the Dutch Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

  20. Strongly coupled dispersed two-phase flows; Ecoulements diphasiques disperses fortement couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zun, I.; Lance, M.; Ekiel-Jezewska, M.L.; Petrosyan, A.; Lecoq, N.; Anthore, R.; Bostel, F.; Feuillebois, F.; Nott, P.; Zenit, R.; Hunt, M.L.; Brennen, C.E.; Campbell, C.S.; Tong, P.; Lei, X.; Ackerson, B.J.; Asmolov, E.S.; Abade, G.; da Cunha, F.R.; Lhuillier, D.; Cartellier, A.; Ruzicka, M.C.; Drahos, J.; Thomas, N.H.; Talini, L.; Leblond, J.; Leshansky, A.M.; Lavrenteva, O.M.; Nir, A.; Teshukov, V.; Risso, F.; Ellinsen, K.; Crispel, S.; Dahlkild, A.; Vynnycky, M.; Davila, J.; Matas, J.P.; Guazelli, L.; Morris, J.; Ooms, G.; Poelma, C.; van Wijngaarden, L.; de Vries, A.; Elghobashi, S.; Huilier, D.; Peirano, E.; Minier, J.P.; Gavrilyuk, S.; Saurel, R.; Kashinsky, O.; Randin, V.; Colin, C.; Larue de Tournemine, A.; Roig, V.; Suzanne, C.; Bounhoure, C.; Brunet, Y.; Tanaka, A.T.; Noma, K.; Tsuji, Y.; Pascal-Ribot, S.; Le Gall, F.; Aliseda, A.; Hainaux, F.; Lasheras, J.; Didwania, A.; Costa, A.; Vallerin, W.; Mudde, R.F.; Van Den Akker, H.E.A.; Jaumouillie, P.; Larrarte, F.; Burgisser, A.; Bergantz, G.; Necker, F.; Hartel, C.; Kleiser, L.; Meiburg, E.; Michallet, H.; Mory, M.; Hutter, M.; Markov, A.A.; Dumoulin, F.X.; Suard, S.; Borghi, R.; Hong, M.; Hopfinger, E.; Laforgia, A.; Lawrence, C.J.; Hewitt, G.F.; Osiptsov, A.N.; Tsirkunov, Yu. M.; Volkov, A.N.

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of the Euromech 421 colloquium about strongly coupled dispersed two-phase flows. Behaviors specifically due to the two-phase character of the flow have been categorized as: suspensions, particle-induced agitation, microstructure and screening mechanisms; hydrodynamic interactions, dispersion and phase distribution; turbulence modulation by particles, droplets or bubbles in dense systems; collective effects in dispersed two-phase flows, clustering and phase distribution; large-scale instabilities and gravity driven dispersed flows; strongly coupled two-phase flows involving reacting flows or phase change. Topic l: suspensions particle-induced agitation microstructure and screening mechanisms hydrodynamic interactions between two very close spheres; normal stresses in sheared suspensions; a critical look at the rheological experiments of R.A. Bagnold; non-equilibrium particle configuration in sedimentation; unsteady screening of the long-range hydrodynamic interactions of settling particles; computer simulations of hydrodynamic interactions among a large collection of sedimenting poly-disperse particles; velocity fluctuations in a dilute suspension of rigid spheres sedimenting between vertical plates: the role of boundaries; screening and induced-agitation in dilute uniform bubbly flows at small and moderate particle Reynolds numbers: some experimental results. Topic 2: hydrodynamic interactions, dispersion and phase distribution: hydrodynamic interactions in a bubble array; A 'NMR scattering technique' for the determination of the structure in a dispersion of non-brownian settling particles; segregation and clustering during thermo-capillary migration of bubbles; kinetic modelling of bubbly flows; velocity fluctuations in a homogeneous dilute dispersion of high-Reynolds-number rising bubbles; an attempt to simulate screening effects at moderate particle Reynolds numbers using an hybrid formulation; modelling the two

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of droplet dispersion in venturi scrubbers with axial liquid injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtarian, N.; Talaei, A.; Karimikhosroabadi, M. [Islamic Azad University, Shahreza Branch, Shahreza (Iran); Sadeghi, F. [Chemical Engineering Department, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran); Talaie, M.R.

    2009-05-15

    Droplet dispersion in a Venturi scrubber with axial liquid injection was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The main objective of this study was to develop a mathematical model to predict droplet dispersion in a Venturi scrubber with axial liquid injection. The effects of the Peclet number and droplet size distribution on droplet dispersion were studied using the developed model. Sampling of the droplets was carried out, isokinetically, in 16 positions at the end of the throat section. The experimental data were used to find the parameters of the developed model, such as the Peclet number. From the results of this study, it was found that the Peclet number was not constant across the cross section of the scrubber channel. In order to achieve a better agreement between the results of the model and the experimental data, it was required to consider Peclet number variations across the Venturi channel. It was also revealed that the parameter representing the width of the Rosin-Rammler distribution of droplet size could not be considered constant and it was influenced significantly by the operating parameters such as liquid flow rate and gas velocity. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Research on the fundamental process of thermal-hydraulic behaviors in severe accident. Behavior of fine droplet flow. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H10-027-7. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Isao; Yoshida, Kenji; Matsuura, Keizo

    2002-03-01

    Analytical and experimental researches were carried out on the behavior of fine droplet flow in relation to the fundamental phenomena of thermohydraulics in severe accident. Simulation program of fine droplet behavior in turbulent gas flow was developed based on the eddy interaction model with improvement of Graham's stochastic model on eddy lifetime and eddy size. Furthermore, the developed program are capable of simulating the droplet behavior in annular dispersed flow based on the models of droplet entrainment from liquid film and turbulence modification of gas phase by liquid film. This program was confirmed by the various experimental data on droplet diffusion, deposition. Furthermore, this program was applied to the three dimensional droplet flow with the satisfactory agreement of experimental data. This means the developed program can be used as a simulation program for analysis of severe accident. Experimental research was carried out on the effect of liquid film on the turbulence field of gas flow in annular and annular dispersed flow. Averaged and turbulent velocity of gas phase were measured under various gas and liquid film flow rates. Turbulent velocity of gas phase in annular flow increased compared with single phase gas flow. This is due to turbulence generation by waves in liquid film. Corresponding to the turbulence modification by liquid film, distribution of averaged velocity of gas phase became flattened compared with single phase gas flow. (author)

  3. Chaotic Lagrangian models for turbulent relative dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacorata, Guglielmo; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    A deterministic multiscale dynamical system is introduced and discussed as a prototype model for relative dispersion in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic turbulence. Unlike stochastic diffusion models, here trajectory transport and mixing properties are entirely controlled by Lagrangian chaos. The anomalous "sweeping effect," a known drawback common to kinematic simulations, is removed through the use of quasi-Lagrangian coordinates. Lagrangian dispersion statistics of the model are accurately analyzed by computing the finite-scale Lyapunov exponent (FSLE), which is the optimal measure of the scaling properties of dispersion. FSLE scaling exponents provide a severe test to decide whether model simulations are in agreement with theoretical expectations and/or observation. The results of our numerical experiments cover a wide range of "Reynolds numbers" and show that chaotic deterministic flows can be very efficient, and numerically low-cost, models of turbulent trajectories in stationary, homogeneous, and isotropic conditions. The mathematics of the model is relatively simple, and, in a geophysical context, potential applications may regard small-scale parametrization issues in general circulation models, mixed layer, and/or boundary layer turbulence models as well as Lagrangian predictability studies.

  4. Research on the fundamental process of thermal-hydraulic behaviors in severe accident. Behavior of fine droplet flow. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H10-027-7. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Isao; Yoshida, Kenji [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka (Japan); Matsuura, Keizo [Nuclear Fuel Industry, Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-03-01

    Analytical and experimental researches were carried out on the behavior of fine droplet flow in relation to the fundamental phenomena of thermohydraulics in severe accident. Simulation program of fine droplet behavior in turbulent gas flow was developed based on the eddy interaction model with improvement of Graham's stochastic model on eddy lifetime and eddy size. Furthermore, the developed program are capable of simulating the droplet behavior in annular dispersed flow based on the models of droplet entrainment from liquid film and turbulence modification of gas phase by liquid film. This program was confirmed by the various experimental data on droplet diffusion, deposition. Furthermore, this program was applied to the three dimensional droplet flow with the satisfactory agreement of experimental data. This means the developed program can be used as a simulation program for analysis of severe accident. Experimental research was carried out on the effect of liquid film on the turbulence field of gas flow in annular and annular dispersed flow. Averaged and turbulent velocity of gas phase were measured under various gas and liquid film flow rates. Turbulent velocity of gas phase in annular flow increased compared with single phase gas flow. This is due to turbulence generation by waves in liquid film. Corresponding to the turbulence modification by liquid film, distribution of averaged velocity of gas phase became flattened compared with single phase gas flow. (author)

  5. Theoretical study of liquid droplet dispersion in a venturi scrubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathikalajahi, J; Talaie, M R; Taheri, M

    1995-03-01

    The droplet concentration distribution in an atomizing scrubber was calculated based on droplet eddy diffusion by a three-dimensional dispersion model. This model is also capable of predicting the liquid flowing on the wall. The theoretical distribution of droplet concentration agrees well with experimental data given by Viswanathan et al. for droplet concentration distribution in a venturi-type scrubber. The results obtained by the model show a non-uniform distribution of drops over the cross section of the scrubber, as noted by the experimental data. While the maximum of droplet concentration distribution may depend on many operating parameters of the scrubber, the results of this study show that the highest uniformity of drop distribution will be reached when penetration length is approximately equal to one-fourth of the depth of the scrubber. The results of this study can be applied to evaluate the removal efficiency of a venturi scrubber.

  6. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke and fumes, in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of

  7. Surface-induced patterns from evaporating droplets of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hongbo; Kristiansen, Kai De Lange; Wang, Peng; Bergli, Joakim; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2011-01-01

    Evaporation of aqueous droplets of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with a physisorbed layer of humic acid (HA) on a partially hydrophilic substrate induces the formation of a film of CNTs. Here, we investigate the role that the global geometry of the substrate surfaces has on the structure of the CNT film. On a flat mica or silica surface, the evaporation of a convex droplet of the CNT dispersion induces the well-known "coffee ring", while evaporation of a concave droplet (capillary meniscus) of the CNT dispersion in a wedge of two planar mica sheets or between two crossed-cylinder sheets induces a large area (>mm 2) of textured or patterned films characterized by different short- and long-range orientational and positional ordering of the CNTs. The resulting patterns appear to be determined by two competing or cooperative sedimentation mechanisms: (1) capillary forces between CNTs giving micrometer-sized filaments parallel to the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and (2) fingering instability at the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and subsequent pinning of CNTs on the surface giving micrometer-sized filaments of CNTs perpendicular to this boundary line. The interplay between substrate surface geometry and sedimentation mechanisms gives an extra control parameter for manipulating patterns of self-assembling nanoparticles at substrate surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  8. Surface-induced patterns from evaporating droplets of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Zeng, Hongbo

    2011-06-07

    Evaporation of aqueous droplets of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coated with a physisorbed layer of humic acid (HA) on a partially hydrophilic substrate induces the formation of a film of CNTs. Here, we investigate the role that the global geometry of the substrate surfaces has on the structure of the CNT film. On a flat mica or silica surface, the evaporation of a convex droplet of the CNT dispersion induces the well-known "coffee ring", while evaporation of a concave droplet (capillary meniscus) of the CNT dispersion in a wedge of two planar mica sheets or between two crossed-cylinder sheets induces a large area (>mm 2) of textured or patterned films characterized by different short- and long-range orientational and positional ordering of the CNTs. The resulting patterns appear to be determined by two competing or cooperative sedimentation mechanisms: (1) capillary forces between CNTs giving micrometer-sized filaments parallel to the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and (2) fingering instability at the boundary line of the evaporating droplet and subsequent pinning of CNTs on the surface giving micrometer-sized filaments of CNTs perpendicular to this boundary line. The interplay between substrate surface geometry and sedimentation mechanisms gives an extra control parameter for manipulating patterns of self-assembling nanoparticles at substrate surfaces. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  9. LDA measurement of droplet behavior across tie plate during dispersed flow portion of loca reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Srinivasan, J.; Cho, S.K.

    1980-01-01

    The flow of an air-water droplet dispersion in a simulated 3-D test section in the reflood portion of LOCA was studied. For this purpose, a new scheme of Laser-Doppler Anemometry for the simultaneous measurement of size and velocity of large-size [0.5 mm-6 mm] droplets was developed and utilized. It was observed that the size distribution of the reentrained droplets depends mainly on the flow regimes and is essentially independent of that of the incoming dispersion below the tie plate. 8 refs

  10. Stereoscopic measurements of particle dispersion in microgravity turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszmann, Daniel Eduardo

    2001-08-01

    The presence of particles in turbulent flows adds complexity to an already difficult subject. The work described in this research dissertation was intended to characterize the effects of inertia, isolated from gravity, on the dispersion of solid particles in a turbulent air flow. The experiment consisted of releasing particles of various sizes in an enclosed box of fan- generated, homogenous, isotropic, and stationary turbulent airflow and examining the particle behavior in a microgravity environment. The turbulence box was characterized in ground-based experiments using laser Doppler velocimetry techniques. Microgravity was established by free-floating the experiment apparatus during the parabolic trajectory of NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft. The microgravity generally lasted about 20 seconds, with about fifty parabolas per flight and one flight per day over a testing period of four days. To cover a broad range of flow regimes of interest, particles with Stokes numbers (St) of 1 to 300 were released in the turbulence box. The three- dimensional measurements of particle motion were made using a three-camera stereo imaging system with a particle-tracking algorithm. Digital photogrammetric techniques were used to determine the particle locations in three-dimensional space from the calibrated camera images. The epipolar geometry constraint was used to identify matching particles from the three different views and a direct spatial intersection scheme determined the coordinates of particles in three-dimensional space. Using velocity and acceleration constraints, particles in a sequence of frames were matched resulting in particle tracks and dispersion measurements. The goal was to compare the dispersion of different Stokes number particles in zero gravity and decouple the effects of inertia and gravity on the dispersion. Results show that higher inertia particles disperse less in zero gravity, in agreement with current models. Particles with St ~ 200

  11. Numerical modeling of turbulent evaporating gas-droplet two-phase flows in an afterburner diffusor of turbo-fan jet engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lixing; Zhang, Jian [Qinghua Univ., Beijing (China)

    1990-11-01

    Two-dimensional turbulent evaporating gas-droplet two-phase flows in an afterburner diffusor of turbofan jet engines are simulated here by a k-epsilon turbulence model and a particle trajectory model. Comparison of predicted gas velocity and temperature distributions with experimental results for the cases without liquid spray shows good agreement. Gas-droplet two-phase flow predictions give plausible droplet trajectories, fuel-vapor concentration distribution, gas-phase velocity and temperature field in the presence of liquid droplets. One run of computation with this method is made for a particular afterburner. The results indicate that the location of the atomizers is not favorable to flame stabilization and combustion efficiency. The proposed numerical modeling can also be adopted for optimization design and performance evaluation of afterburner combustors of turbofan jet engines. 7 refs.

  12. A combined volume-of-fluid method and low-Mach-number approach for DNS of evaporating droplets in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael; Ferrante, Antonino

    2017-11-01

    Our objective is to perform DNS of finite-size droplets that are evaporating in isotropic turbulence. This requires fully resolving the process of momentum, heat, and mass transfer between the droplets and surrounding gas. We developed a combined volume-of-fluid (VOF) method and low-Mach-number approach to simulate this flow. The two main novelties of the method are: (i) the VOF algorithm captures the motion of the liquid gas interface in the presence of mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation without requiring a projection step for the liquid velocity, and (ii) the low-Mach-number approach allows for local volume changes caused by phase change while the total volume of the liquid-gas system is constant. The method is verified against an analytical solution for a Stefan flow problem, and the D2 law is verified for a single droplet in quiescent gas. We also demonstrate the schemes robustness when performing DNS of an evaporating droplet in forced isotropic turbulence.

  13. Numerical calculation of two-phase turbulent jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saif, A.A.

    1995-05-01

    Two-phase turbulent round jets were numerically simulated using a multidimensional two-phase CFD code based on the two-fluid model. The turbulence phenomena were treated with the standard k-{epsilon} model. It was modified to take into account the additional dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy by the dispersed phase. Within the context of the two-fluid model it is more appropriate and physically justified to treat the diffusion by an interfacial force in the momentum equation. In this work, the diffusion force and the additional dissipation effect by the dispersed phase were modeled starting from the classical turbulent energy spectrum analysis. A cut-off frequency was proposed to decrease the dissipation effect by the dispersed phase when large size particles are introduced in the flow. The cut-off frequency combined with the bubble-induced turbulence effect allows for an increase in turbulence for large particles. Additional care was taken in choosing the right kind of experimental data from the literature so that a good separate effect test was possible for their models. The models predicted the experimental data very closely and they were general enough to predict extreme limit cases: water-bubble and air-droplet jets.

  14. Turbulent dispersivity under conditions relevant to airborne disease transmission between laboratory animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, Siobhan; Ristenpart, William

    2013-11-01

    Virologists and other researchers who test pathogens for airborne disease transmissibility often place a test animal downstream from an inoculated animal and later determine whether the test animal became infected. Despite the crucial role of the airflow in pathogen transmission between the animals, to date the infectious disease community has paid little attention to the effect of airspeed or turbulent intensity on the probability of transmission. Here we present measurements of the turbulent dispersivity under conditions relevant to experimental tests of airborne disease transmissibility between laboratory animals. We used time lapse photography to visualize the downstream transport and turbulent dispersion of smoke particulates released from a point source downstream of an axial fan, thus mimicking the release and transport of expiratory aerosols exhaled by an inoculated animal. We show that for fan-generated turbulence the plume width is invariant with the mean airspeed and, close to the point source, increases linearly with downstream position. Importantly, the turbulent dispersivity is insensitive to the presence of meshes placed downstream from the point source, indicating that the fan length scale dictates the turbulent intensity and corresponding dispersivity.

  15. Characteristics of droplet motion in effervescent sprays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jedelský Jan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved droplet size and velocity measurement was made using Phase-Doppler anemometry in an effervescent spray at GLR of 6 % and operation pressure drops 21 – 52 kPa. The spray shows a size dependent variation of mean as well as fluctuating axial and radial velocities of droplets similarly for all operation regimes. Particles under 13 μm follow the gas flow, axially decelerated due to gas expansion. Velocity of medium sized particles is positively size correlated and larger particles keep high velocity, given them during discharge. Fluctuating radial velocity of small particles is larger than that of large particles while fluctuating axial velocity increases with size. Small particles thus reach a ratio of radial to axial velocity fluctuations ~ 0.6 but large particles only ~ 0.1, which indicates large transverse dispersion of small particles. Overall fluctuating velocity ratios smaller than 0.5 document an anisotropic character of the liquid mass fluctuations. Power spectral density (PSD of axial velocity fluctuations of large droplets is uniform up to 1 kHz, while PSD of smaller particles drops down with frequency for frequencies > 100 Hz. Large particles thus preserve the fluctuations imposed during discharge while the gas turbulence drops with frequency. Turbulence intensity reaches 14 to 21 % depending on pressure. Such high-turbulence character of the flow probably results from a heterogeneous gas–liquid mixture at the discharge.

  16. Characteristics of droplet motion in effervescent sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedelský, Jan; Zaremba, Matouš; Malý, Milan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2014-03-01

    Time resolved droplet size and velocity measurement was made using Phase-Doppler anemometry in an effervescent spray at GLR of 6 % and operation pressure drops 21 - 52 kPa. The spray shows a size dependent variation of mean as well as fluctuating axial and radial velocities of droplets similarly for all operation regimes. Particles under 13 μm follow the gas flow, axially decelerated due to gas expansion. Velocity of medium sized particles is positively size correlated and larger particles keep high velocity, given them during discharge. Fluctuating radial velocity of small particles is larger than that of large particles while fluctuating axial velocity increases with size. Small particles thus reach a ratio of radial to axial velocity fluctuations ~ 0.6 but large particles only ~ 0.1, which indicates large transverse dispersion of small particles. Overall fluctuating velocity ratios smaller than 0.5 document an anisotropic character of the liquid mass fluctuations. Power spectral density (PSD) of axial velocity fluctuations of large droplets is uniform up to 1 kHz, while PSD of smaller particles drops down with frequency for frequencies > 100 Hz. Large particles thus preserve the fluctuations imposed during discharge while the gas turbulence drops with frequency. Turbulence intensity reaches 14 to 21 % depending on pressure. Such high-turbulence character of the flow probably results from a heterogeneous gas-liquid mixture at the discharge.

  17. Simulating oil droplet dispersal from the Deepwater Horizon spill with a Lagrangian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Elizabeth W.; Schlag, Zachary; Adams, E. Eric; Sherwood, Christopher R.; He, Ruoying; Hyun, Hoon; Socolofsky, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    An analytical multiphase plume model, combined with time-varying flow and hydrographic fields generated by the 3-D South Atlantic Bight and Gulf of Mexico model (SABGOM) hydrodynamic model, were used as input to a Lagrangian transport model (LTRANS), to simulate transport of oil droplets dispersed at depth from the recent Deepwater Horizon MC 252 oil spill. The plume model predicts a stratification-dominated near field, in which small oil droplets detrain from the central plume containing faster rising large oil droplets and gas bubbles and become trapped by density stratification. Simulated intrusion (trap) heights of ∼ 310–370 m agree well with the midrange of conductivity-temperature-depth observations, though the simulated variation in trap height was lower than observed, presumably in part due to unresolved variability in source composition (percentage oil versus gas) and location (multiple leaks during first half of spill). Simulated droplet trajectories by the SABGOM-LTRANS modeling system showed that droplets with diameters between 10 and 50 μm formed a distinct subsurface plume, which was transported horizontally and remained in the subsurface for >1 month. In contrast, droplets with diameters ≥90 μm rose rapidly to the surface. Simulated trajectories of droplets ≤50 μm in diameter were found to be consistent with field observations of a southwest-tending subsurface plume in late June 2010 reported by Camilli et al. [2010]. Model results suggest that the subsurface plume looped around to the east, with potential subsurface oil transport to the northeast and southeast. Ongoing work is focusing on adding degradation processes to the model to constrain droplet dispersal.

  18. An operational calculus framework to characterize droplet size populations from turbulent breakup by a small number of parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Rafael; Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso M

    2010-01-01

    A systematic operational calculus framework that characterizes droplet/bubble size distributions resulting from turbulent breakup of an immiscible fluid into a carrier one is presented. The proposed formulation is derived from dynamical arguments; a finite-difference formulation of the integro-differential continuous coagulation and fragmentation equation is shown to exhibit the same structure as a discrete sequence of Mellin convolutions between the probability distribution of the evolving dispersed phase and a generic kernel. This kernel may have its physical correspondence with the probability distribution resulting from a single breakup event, e.g. a liquid ligament breakup in a ligament-mediated spray formation. The number of convolution steps in the sequence can be reduced to a single parameter. As an illustration, this procedure is applied to the exponential and the gamma distributions, obtaining as a result the Frechet distribution earlier used by Rosin and Rammler (1934 Kolloid-Zeitschrift 67 16-26), and by Nukiyama and Tanasawa (1939 Trans. Soc. Mech. Eng. Japan 5 62-7). Thus, the framework introduced in this work provides a physical foundation for the success of the Frechet distribution in accurately fitting experimentally measured droplet size distributions in sprays and emulsions.

  19. An operational calculus framework to characterize droplet size populations from turbulent breakup by a small number of parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, Rafael; Ganan-Calvo, Alfonso M, E-mail: amgc@us.e [Departamento de IngenierIa Aeroespacial y Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad de Sevilla, e-41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-05-07

    A systematic operational calculus framework that characterizes droplet/bubble size distributions resulting from turbulent breakup of an immiscible fluid into a carrier one is presented. The proposed formulation is derived from dynamical arguments; a finite-difference formulation of the integro-differential continuous coagulation and fragmentation equation is shown to exhibit the same structure as a discrete sequence of Mellin convolutions between the probability distribution of the evolving dispersed phase and a generic kernel. This kernel may have its physical correspondence with the probability distribution resulting from a single breakup event, e.g. a liquid ligament breakup in a ligament-mediated spray formation. The number of convolution steps in the sequence can be reduced to a single parameter. As an illustration, this procedure is applied to the exponential and the gamma distributions, obtaining as a result the Frechet distribution earlier used by Rosin and Rammler (1934 Kolloid-Zeitschrift 67 16-26), and by Nukiyama and Tanasawa (1939 Trans. Soc. Mech. Eng. Japan 5 62-7). Thus, the framework introduced in this work provides a physical foundation for the success of the Frechet distribution in accurately fitting experimentally measured droplet size distributions in sprays and emulsions.

  20. Atomization of liquids in a Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber. Part II. Droplet dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J A S; Costa, M A M; Aguiar, M L; Coury, J R

    2004-12-10

    Droplet distribution is of fundamental importance to the performance of a Venturi scrubber. Ensuring good liquid distribution can increase performance at minimal liquid usage. In this study, droplet dispersion in a rectangular Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber, operating horizontally, was examined both theoretically and experimentally. The Venturi throat cross-section was 24 mm x 35 mm, and the throat length varied from 63 to 140 mm. Liquid was injected through a single orifice (1.0 mm diameter) on the throat wall. This arrangement allowed the study of the influence of jet penetration on droplet distribution. Gas velocity at the throat was 58.3 and 74.6 m/s, and the liquid flow rate was 286, 559 and 853 ml/min. A probe with a 2.7 mm internal diameter was used to isokinetically remove liquid from several positions inside the equipment. It was possible to study liquid distribution close to the injection point. A new model for droplet dispersion, which incorporates the new description of the jet atomization process developed by the present authors in the first article of this series, is proposed and evaluated. The model predicted well the experimental data.

  1. Droplet collisions in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenziel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Liquid droplets occur in many natural phenomena and play an important role in a large number of industrial applications. One of the distinct properties of droplets as opposed to solid particles is their ability to merge, or coalesce upon collision. Coalescence of liquid drops is of importance in for

  2. A computer model for dispersed fluid-solid turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Tulig, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    A computer model is being developed to simulate two-phase turbulent flow phenomena in fluids containing finely dispersed solids. The model is based on a dual-continuum picture of the individual phases and an extension of a two-equation turbulence closure theory. The resulting set of nonlinear partial differential equations are solved using a finite difference procedure with special treatment to promote convergence. The model has been checked against a number of idealized flow problems with known solutions. The authors are currently comparing model predictions with measurements to determine a proper set of turbulence parameters needed for simulating two-phase turbulent flows

  3. Numerical Simulations of Airflow and Droplet Dispersion in a Horizontal Ammonia Scrubber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia released in pig production industries can lead to eutrophication of surface waters, soil acidification, fertilization of vegetation and changes in ecosystems, etc. Air scrubbers with spray of aerosolized sulphur solution were used to remove the ammonia mixed in the airflow ventilated out...... plate or a flow straightener were tested. Impact of nozzle velocity and droplet residue size were analysed. It is found that additional input on the pump pressure to increase the injection velocity may not cause any more benefit in our cases, and the ammonia removal efficiency of the horizontal scrubber...... from a piggery. In this study, numerical method were used to investigate airflow pattern, droplet dispersion, ammonia absorption at droplet surface and overall removal efficiency in an air cleaner. Droplet trajectories and elapsed time in air were adopted to characterize the absorption efficiency...

  4. Interface-Resolving Simulation of Collision Efficiency of Cloud Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lian-Ping; Peng, Cheng; Rosa, Bodgan; Onishi, Ryo

    2017-11-01

    Small-scale air turbulence could enhance the geometric collision rate of cloud droplets while large-scale air turbulence could augment the diffusional growth of cloud droplets. Air turbulence could also enhance the collision efficiency of cloud droplets. Accurate simulation of collision efficiency, however, requires capture of the multi-scale droplet-turbulence and droplet-droplet interactions, which has only been partially achieved in the recent past using the hybrid direct numerical simulation (HDNS) approach. % where Stokes disturbance flow is assumed. The HDNS approach has two major drawbacks: (1) the short-range droplet-droplet interaction is not treated rigorously; (2) the finite-Reynolds number correction to the collision efficiency is not included. In this talk, using two independent numerical methods, we will develop an interface-resolved simulation approach in which the disturbance flows are directly resolved numerically, combined with a rigorous lubrication correction model for near-field droplet-droplet interaction. This multi-scale approach is first used to study the effect of finite flow Reynolds numbers on the droplet collision efficiency in still air. Our simulation results show a significant finite-Re effect on collision efficiency when the droplets are of similar sizes. Preliminary results on integrating this approach in a turbulent flow laden with droplets will also be presented. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Dispersant Effectiveness, In-Situ Droplet Size Distribution and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes two projects covered under an Interagency Agreement between the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in collaboration with the Bedford Institute of Oceanography, Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada (BIO DFO), New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and Dalhousie University. Both projects dovetail together in addressing the ability to differentiate physical from chemical dispersion effectiveness using dispersed oil simulations within a flume tank for improving forensic response monitoring tools. This report is split into separateTasks based upon the two projects funded by BSEE: 1) Dispersant Effectiveness, In-Situ Droplet Size Distribution and Numerical Modeling to Assess Subsurface Dispersant Injection as a Deepwater Blowout Oil Spill Response Option. 2) Evaluation of Oil Fluorescence Characteristics to Improve Forensic Response Tools. This report summarizes 2 collaborative projects funded through an Interagency Agreement with DOI BSEE and a Cooperative Agreement with DFO Canada. BSEE required that the projects be combined into one report as they are both covered under the one Interagency Agreement. Task B (Fluorescence of oils) is an SHC 3.62 FY16 product.

  6. Computations of droplet impingement on airfoils in two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Dug; Song, Dong Joo

    2005-01-01

    The aerodynamic effects of leading-edge accretion can raise important safety concerns since the formulation of ice causes severe degradation in aerodynamic performance as compared with the clean airfoil. The objective of this study is to develop a numerical simulation strategy for predicting the particle trajectory around an MS-0317 airfoil in the test section of the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel and to investigate the impingement characteristics of droplets on the airfoil surface. In particular, predictions of the mean velocity and turbulence diffusion using turbulent flow solver and continuous random walk method were desired throughout this flow domain in order to investigate droplet dispersion. The collection efficiency distributions over the airfoil surface in simulations with different numbers of droplets, various integration time-steps and particle sizes were compared with experimental data. The large droplet impingement data indicated the trends in impingement characteristics with respect to particle size; the maximum collection efficiency located at the upper surface near the leading edge, and the maximum value and total collection efficiency were increased as the particle size was increased. The extent of the area impinged on by particles also increased with the increment of the particle size, which is similar as compared with experimental data

  7. Development of a Laser Dopper Anemometer technique for the measurement of two phase dispersed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, J.

    1978-05-01

    A new optical technique using Laser-Doppler Anemometry is presented for the measurement of the local number densities and two-dimensional velocity probability densities of a turbulent dilute two-phase dispersion which has a distribution of particle size and a predominant direction of flow. This technique establishes that by a suitable scheme of discrimination on the signal amplitude, residence time and frequency of the Doppler signals caused by the scattered light from individual particles in the probing volume, the size distribution of moderately large particles in a dilute dispersed flow can be determined. The newly developed Laser-Doppler Anemometer (LDA) technique was applied to a solid particle-water two-phase flow and a water droplet-air two-phase flow. Particular emphasis was placed on turbulent two-phase water droplet-air flow inside a vertical rectangular channel. At each of nine different measuring locations along the transverse axis (starting at 250μ from the channel wall), over 20,000 Doppler signals were individually examined. The particle size and number density distributions, and the axial and lateral velocity distributions of both phases are reported. The analysis reveals some interesting features of two-phase dispersed flow. A film of water on the channel wall was formed due to the deposition of droplets from the flow. The water droplet entrainment from the wall film and the subsequent breakup of some of these into the flow are discussed. A discussion of the relationship between the particle distributions and turbulent flow characteristics is presented

  8. Turbulent mixing in three-dimensional droplet arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoby, M.R.G.; Navarro-Martinez, S.; Kronenburg, A.; Marquis, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The atomisation, evaporation and subsequent mixing of fuel from a liquid spray determines the effectiveness of the combustion processes in gas turbines and internal combustion engines. In the present paper, three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the evaporation of methanol droplets in hot environments are presented. The gas phase mixing is assessed by examining the scalar dissipation and the mixture fraction probability density function (PDF). Novel multi-conditional models are proposed that use mixture fraction and structural parameters as the conditioning variables for the scalar dissipation which is found to be well predicted in terms of magnitude and distribution. The β-PDF description of the mixture fraction seems to capture well the global behaviour for a laminar environment and for time-averaged results in turbulent cases. A novel model for the mixture fraction PDF is also proposed based on the multi-conditional model for scalar dissipation and an accurate representation of the PDF is achieved.

  9. Workshop day on ``films and droplets heat transport``; Journee d`etude sur ``le transport de chaleur par films ou gouttelettes``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This workshop day was organized by the French society of thermal engineers (SFT). This compilation of proceedings comprises 9 papers dealing with: the effect of droplets evaporation on a poly-dispersed jet under pressure (application to combustion chambers of diesel engines); effect of two-phase heat exchanges on the performances of a piston engine; heat and mass transfers in the entering region of a laminar liquid film; mass transfer at the interface of a free or sheared turbulent film; measurement of gasoline films thickness using laser induced fluorescence - evaluation of the evaporation quickness using several tracers (application to the intake manifold of port-injected and of indirect injection spark ignition engines); heat transfers and condensation inside ducts for the evacuation of combustion products; evaporation of a climbing film on a wall with discontinuous fins (application to the ebullition in heat exchangers); temperature measurement of droplets in a mono-dispersed jet using IR technique and refractometry; influence of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence on the vaporization of fuel droplets. (J.S.)

  10. Workshop day on ``films and droplets heat transport``; Journee d`etude sur ``le transport de chaleur par films ou gouttelettes``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This workshop day was organized by the French society of thermal engineers (SFT). This compilation of proceedings comprises 9 papers dealing with: the effect of droplets evaporation on a poly-dispersed jet under pressure (application to combustion chambers of diesel engines); effect of two-phase heat exchanges on the performances of a piston engine; heat and mass transfers in the entering region of a laminar liquid film; mass transfer at the interface of a free or sheared turbulent film; measurement of gasoline films thickness using laser induced fluorescence - evaluation of the evaporation quickness using several tracers (application to the intake manifold of port-injected and of indirect injection spark ignition engines); heat transfers and condensation inside ducts for the evacuation of combustion products; evaporation of a climbing film on a wall with discontinuous fins (application to the ebullition in heat exchangers); temperature measurement of droplets in a mono-dispersed jet using IR technique and refractometry; influence of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence on the vaporization of fuel droplets. (J.S.)

  11. Computational sensitivity study of spray dispersion and mixing on the fuel properties in a gas turbine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosshans, Holger; Szász, Robert-Zoltán [Division of Fluid Mechanics, Lund University (Sweden); Cao, Le [Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing (China); Fuchs, Laszlo, E-mail: holger.grosshans@uclouvain.be [Department of Mechanics, KTH, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-04-15

    A swirl stabilized gas turbine burner has been simulated in order to assess the effects of the fuel properties on spray dispersion and fuel–air mixing. The properties under consideration include fuel surface tension, viscosity and density. The turbulence of the gas phase is modeled applying the methodology of large eddy simulation whereas the dispersed liquid phase is described by Lagrangian particle tracking. The exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the two phases is accounted for by two-way coupling. Bag and stripping breakup regimes are considered for secondary droplet breakup, using the Reitz–Diwakar and the Taylor analogy breakup models. Moreover, a model for droplet evaporation is included. The results reveal a high sensitivity of the spray structure to variations of all investigated parameters. In particular, a decrease in the surface tension or the fuel viscosity, or an increase in the fuel density, lead to less stable liquid structures. As a consequence, smaller droplets are generated and the overall spray surface area increases, leading to faster evaporation and mixing. Furthermore, with the trajectories of the small droplets being strongly influenced by aerodynamic forces (and less by their own inertia), the spray is more affected by the turbulent structures of the gaseous phase and the spray dispersion is enhanced. (paper)

  12. Dispersion of (light) inertial particles in stratified turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aartrijk, M.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Armenio, Vincenzo; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Fröhlich, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    We present a brief overview of a numerical study of the dispersion of particles in stably stratified turbulence. Three types of particles arc examined: fluid particles, light inertial particles ($\\rho_p/\\rho_f = \\mathcal{O}(1)$) and heavy inertial particles ($\\rho_p/\\rho_f \\gg 1$). Stratification

  13. Annular dispersed flow analysis model by Lagrangian method and liquid film cell method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, K.; Kuchinishi, M.; Kataoka, I.; Serizawa, A.

    2003-01-01

    A new annular dispersed flow analysis model was developed. In this model, both droplet behavior and liquid film behavior were simultaneously analyzed. Droplet behavior in turbulent flow was analyzed by the Lagrangian method with refined stochastic model. On the other hand, liquid film behavior was simulated by the boundary condition of moving rough wall and liquid film cell model, which was used to estimate liquid film flow rate. The height of moving rough wall was estimated by disturbance wave height correlation. In each liquid film cell, liquid film flow rate was calculated by considering droplet deposition and entrainment flow rate. Droplet deposition flow rate was calculated by Lagrangian method and entrainment flow rate was calculated by entrainment correlation. For the verification of moving rough wall model, turbulent flow analysis results under the annular flow condition were compared with the experimental data. Agreement between analysis results and experimental results were fairly good. Furthermore annular dispersed flow experiments were analyzed, in order to verify droplet behavior model and the liquid film cell model. The experimental results of radial distribution of droplet mass flux were compared with analysis results. The agreement was good under low liquid flow rate condition and poor under high liquid flow rate condition. But by modifying entrainment rate correlation, the agreement become good even under high liquid flow rate. This means that basic analysis method of droplet and liquid film behavior was right. In future work, verification calculation should be carried out under different experimental condition and entrainment ratio correlation also should be corrected

  14. Evolution of a polydispersed spray in heated and in highly turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Florian; Bazile, Rudy

    2009-11-01

    This work aims to study experimentally the dispersion and the evaporation of a polydispersed and bi-component spray in highly turbulent and heated flow. A chamber is designed to generate a heated turbulent flow in which two-component droplets are injected. The two components are octane (85%) and 3-pentanone (15%) and are chosen such that the 3-pentanone vapour concentration can be characterized by laser techniques. The experimental setup consists of a vertical channel with optical access. Before the heated air is injected in the channel, it passes through a turbulence generator. The carrier flow is characterized using Laser Doppler Anemometry. The turbulence is shown to have isotropic properties after a distance equal to four times the width of the channel and to have high levels up to 30%. The liquid phase is characterized with Phase Doppler Anemometry which allows to measure the diameter, the longitudinal and the radial velocity of the droplets. The spatial evolution of the diameter probability density function (PDF) and of the rms and mean velocities are obtained. Droplets mass fluxes are also calculated. In the mixture, 3-pentanone is the only component that fluoresces. So the vapour concentration of 3-pentanone in the carrier flow is determined using Laser Induced Fluorescence.

  15. The impact of smoke from forest fires on the spectral dispersion of cloud droplet size distributions in the Amazonian region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, J A; Silva Dias, M A F

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the main microphysical characteristics of clouds developing in polluted and clean conditions in the biomass-burning season of the Amazon region are examined, with special attention to the spectral dispersion of the cloud droplet size distribution and its potential impact on climate modeling applications. The dispersion effect has been shown to alter the climate cooling predicted by the so-called Twomey effect. In biomass-burning polluted conditions, high concentrations of low dispersed cloud droplets are found. Clean conditions revealed an opposite situation. The liquid water content (0.43 ± 0.19 g m -3 ) is shown to be uncorrelated with the cloud drop number concentration, while the effective radius is found to be very much correlated with the relative dispersion of the size distribution (R 2 = 0.81). The results suggest that an increase in cloud condensation nuclei concentration from biomass-burning aerosols may lead to an additional effect caused by a decrease in relative dispersion. Since the dry season in the Amazonian region is vapor limiting, the dispersion effect of cloud droplet size distributions could be substantially larger than in other polluted regions.

  16. Turbulence modification due to bubbles and particles in dispersed two-phase upflows in a vertical pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosokawa, Shigeo; Tomiyama, Akio

    1999-01-01

    One of the key issues in two-phase turbulence modeling is the turbulence modification due to the momentum exchange between the dispersed and continuous phases. As for the gas-liquid two-phase flows in vertical pipes, Serizawa and Kataoka carried out detailed measurement of turbulence intensity and detected the turbulence modification. Gore and Crowe pointed out that the modification is well correlated with the ratio of a particle diameter to a turbulence length scale (d/l t ). However the modification may depend on not only the length scales but also the eddy viscosities of shear-induced and particle-induced turbulence. Hosokawa et al. proposed the ratio φ of the eddy viscosity induced by a dispersed phase to the shear-induced eddy viscosity and confirmed that measured turbulence modification was well correlated with φ for a gas-solid two-phase flow. In this study, we examine whether or not φ is also applicable to gas-liquid and solid-liquid two-phase dispersed upflows in vertical pipes. Using the eddy viscosity ratio instead of d/l t , we could obtain much better correlation. The critical point at which no modification occurred was close to φ = 1, irrespective of a type of a two-phase dispersed flow. Consequently, we could confirm that the eddy viscosity ratio is a more appropriate parameter for correlating the turbulent modification than the conventional critical parameter d/l t . (author)

  17. Comments on the dispersion equation of a turbulent plasma - an inhomogeneous, magnetoactive case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag, A.

    1978-03-01

    A weakly turbulent, magnetoactive plasma is considered in an inhomogeneous case with anisotropic temperature distribution. The dispersion relation is established following a method developed by Tsytovich and Nekrasov. The correction coefficients are calculated in the three principal scaling modes: (1) the turbulent frequencies predominate, (2) the cyclotronic velocities of the macroinstabilities predominate, (3) the turbulent frequencies are lower. (D.P.)

  18. Probability density function shape sensitivity in the statistical modeling of turbulent particle dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Jeng, San-Mou

    1992-01-01

    The performance of a recently introduced statistical transport model for turbulent particle dispersion is studied here for rigid particles injected into a round turbulent jet. Both uniform and isosceles triangle pdfs are used. The statistical sensitivity to parcel pdf shape is demonstrated.

  19. A Generalized turbulent dispersion model for bubbly flow numerical simulation in NEPTUNE-CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviéville, Jérôme, E-mail: Jerome-marcel.lavieville@edf.fr; Mérigoux, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.merigoux@edf.fr; Guingo, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guingo@edf.fr; Baudry, Cyril, E-mail: Cyril.baudry@edf.fr; Mimouni, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.mimouni@edf.fr

    2017-02-15

    The NEPTUNE-CFD code, based upon an Eulerian multi-fluid model, is developed within the framework of the NEPTUNE project, financially supported by EDF (Electricité de France), CEA (Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives), IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire) and AREVA-NP. NEPTUNE-CFD is mainly focused on Nuclear Safety applications involving two-phase water-steam flows, like two-phase Pressurized Shock (PTS) and Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB). Many of these applications involve bubbly flows, particularly, for application to flows in PWR fuel assemblies, including studies related to DNB. Considering a very usual model for interfacial forces acting on bubbles, including drag, virtual mass and lift forces, the turbulent dispersion force is often added to moderate the lift effect in orthogonal directions to the main flow and get the right dispersion shape. This paper presents a formal derivation of this force, considering on the one hand, the fluctuating part of drag and virtual mass, and on the other hand, Turbulent Pressure derivation obtained by comparison between Lagrangian and Eulerian description of bubbles motion. An extension of the Tchen’s theory is used to express the turbulent kinetic energy of bubbles and the two-fluid turbulent covariance tensor in terms of liquid turbulent velocities and time scale. The model obtained by this way, called Generalized Turbulent Dispersion Model (GTD), does not require any user parameter. The model is validated against Liu & Bankoff air-water experiment, Arizona State University (ASU) experiment, DEBORA experiment and Texas A&M University (TAMU) boiling flow experiments.

  20. Continuous growth of cloud droplets in cumulus cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Toshiyuki; Suehiro, Tamotsu; Saito, Izumi

    2016-01-01

    A new method to seamlessly simulate the continuous growth of droplets advected by turbulent flow inside a cumulus cloud was developed from first principle. A cubic box ascending with a mean updraft inside a cumulus cloud was introduced and the updraft velocity was self-consistently determined in such a way that the mean turbulent velocity within the box vanished. All the degrees of freedom of the cloud droplets and turbulence fields were numerically integrated. The box ascended quickly inside the cumulus cloud due to the updraft and the mean radius of the droplets grew from 10 to 24 μ m for about 10 min. The turbulent flow tended to slow down the time evolutions of the updraft velocity, the box altitude and the mean cloud droplet radius. The size distribution of the cloud droplets in the updraft case was narrower than in the absence of the updraft. It was also found that the wavenumeber spectra of the variances of the temperature and water vapor mixing ratio were nearly constant in the low wavenumber range. The future development of the new method was argued. (paper)

  1. Evaluation of the hydrodynamic behaviour of turbulence promoters in parallel plate electrochemical reactors by means of the dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colli, A.N.; Bisang, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: · The type of turbulence promoters has a strong influence on the hydrodynamics. · The dispersion model is appropriate for expanded plastic turbulence promoters. · The dispersion model is appropriate for glass beads turbulence promoters. - Abstract: The hydrodynamic behaviour of electrochemical reactors with parallel plate electrodes is experimentally studied using the stimulus-response method either with an empty reactor or with different turbulence promoters. Theoretical results which are in accordance with the analytical and numerical resolution of the dispersion model for a closed system are compared with the classical relationships of the normalized outlet concentration for open systems and the validity range of the equations is discussed. The experimental results were well correlated with the dispersion model using glass beads or expanded plastic meshes as turbulence promoters, which have shown the most advantageous performance. The Peclet number was higher than 63. The dispersion coefficient was found to increase linearly with flow velocity in these cases.

  2. Droplet generating device for droplet-based μTAS using electro-conjugate fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Y.; Takemura, K.; Edamura, K.

    2017-05-01

    Droplet-based μTAS, which carries out biochemical inspection and synthesis by handling samples as droplets on a single chip, has been attracting attentions in recent years. Although miniaturization of a chip is progressed, there are some problems in miniaturization of a whole system because of the necessity to connect syringe pumps to the chip. Thus, this study aims to realize a novel droplets generating device for droplet-based μTAS using electro-conjugate fluid (ECF). The ECF is a dielectric liquid generating a powerful flow when subjected to high DC voltage. The ECF flow generation allows us to realize a tiny hydraulic power source. Using the ECF flow, we can develop a droplet generating device for droplet-based μTAS by placing minute electrode pairs in flow channels. The device contains two channels filled with the ECF, which are dispersed and continuous phases meeting at a T-junction. When a sample in the dispersed phase is injected by the ECF flow to the continuous phase at T-junction, droplets are generated by shearing force between the two phases. We conducted droplet generating experiment and confirmed that droplets are successfully generated when the flow rate of the continuous phase is between 90 and 360 mm3 s-1, and the flow rate of the dispersed phase is between 10 and 40 mm3 s-1. We also confirmed that the droplet diameter and the droplet production rate are controllable by tuning the applied voltage to the electrode pairs.

  3. Large Eddy Simulation of Turbulence Modification and Particle Dispersion in a Fully-Developed Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Sarma; Pratap Vanka, Surya

    1999-11-01

    A LES study of the modification of turbulence in a fully-developed turbulent pipe flow by dispersed heavy particles at Re_τ = 360 is presented. A 64 (radial) x 64 (azimuthal) x 128 (axial) grid has been used. An Eulerian-Lagrangian approach has been used for treating the continuous and the dispersed phases respectively. The particle equation of motion included only the drag force. Three different LES models are used in the continuous fluid simulation: (i) A “No-Model” LES (coarse-grid DNS) (ii) Smagorinsky’s model and (iii) Schumann’s model . The motivation behind employing the Schumann’s model is to study the impact of sub-grid-scale fluctuations on the particle motion and their (SGS fluctuations) modulation, in turn, by the particles. The effect of particles on fluid turbulence is investigated by tracking 100000 particles of different diameters. Our studies confirm the preferential concentration of particles in the near wall region. It is observed that the inclusion of two-way coupling reduces the preferential concentration of particles. In addition, it was found that two-way coupling attenuates the fluid turbulence. However, we expect the above trends to differ depending upon the particle diameter, volumetric and mass fractions. The effect of SGS fluctuations on the particle dispersion and turbulence modulation is also being investigated. Other relevant statistics for the continuous and the dispersed phases are collected for the cases of one-way and two-way coupling. These statistics are compared to study the modulation of turbulence by the particles.

  4. Mechanisms of Complete Turbulence Suppression in Turbidity Currents Driven by Mono-Disperse and Bi-Disperse Suspensions of Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrugesh S. Shringarpure

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbidity currents are submarine flows where the sediment fluid mixture (heavy current drives along the sloping ocean floor displacing the surrounding clear fluid (light ambient. Under the influence of gravity, the suspended sediments drive the current and at the same time settle down on the ocean bed. The interplay of turbulent mixing and settling sediments leads to stable stratification of sediments in the turbidity current. In previous studies (Cantero et al. 2009b; Cantero et al., 2009a; Cantero et al., 2012a; Talling et al., 2007 it was observed that strong settling tendency (large sediment sizes could cause complete turbulence suppression. In this study, we will analyse this process of complete turbulence suppression by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS of turbidity currents. In wall bounded unstratified flows, it has been long established that turbulence is sustained by the process of auto-generation of near-wall hairpin like and quasi-streamwise turbulent vortical structures. It was also identified that auto-generation is possible only when the strength of the turbulent structures is greater than a threshold value (Zhou et. al., 1996. Through quadrant analysis of Reynolds stress events and visualization of turbulent vortical structures, we observe that stratification by sediments lead to damping and spatial re-distribution of turbulent vortical structures in the flow. We propose that complete turbulence suppression is brought about by a total shutdown in the auto-generation process of the existing turbulent structures in the flow. We also identify three parameters – Reynolds number (Reτ, Richardson number (Riτ and sediment settling velocity (V˜z that quantify the process of turbulence suppression. A criterion for complete turbulence suppression is also proposed which can be defined as a critical value for RiτV˜z. This critical value is a function of Ret and based on simulations, experiments and field observations it

  5. Syrlic: a Lagrangian code to handle industrial problems involving particles and droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peniguel, C.

    1997-01-01

    Numerous industrial applications require to solve droplets or solid particles trajectories and their effects on the flow. (fuel injection in combustion engine, agricultural spraying, spray drying, spray cooling, spray painting, particles separator, dispersion of pollutant, etc). SYRLIC is being developed to handle the dispersed phase while the continuous phase is tackled by classical Eulerian codes like N3S-EF, N3S-NATUR, ESTET. The trajectory of each droplet is calculated on unstructured grids or structured grids according the Eulerian code with SYRLIC is coupled. The forces applied to each particle are recalculated along each path. The Lagrangian approach treats the convection and the source terms exactly. It is particularly adapted to problems involving a wide range of particles characteristics (diameter, mass, etc). In the near future, wall interaction, heat transfer, evaporation more complex physics, etc, will be included. Turbulent effects will be accounted for by a Langevin equation. The illustration shows the trajectories followed by water droplets (diameter from 1 mm to 4 mm) in a cooling tower. the droplets are falling down due to gravity but are deflected towards the center of the tower because of a lateral wind. It is clear that particles are affected differently according their diameter. The Eulerian flow field used to compute the forces has been generated by N3S-AERO, on an unstructured mesh

  6. Drift-free kinetic equations for turbulent dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, A.; Swailes, D. C.; Skartlien, R.

    2012-11-01

    The dispersion of passive scalars and inertial particles in a turbulent flow can be described in terms of probability density functions (PDFs) defining the statistical distribution of relevant scalar or particle variables. The construction of transport equations governing the evolution of such PDFs has been the subject of numerous studies, and various authors have presented formulations for this type of equation, usually referred to as a kinetic equation. In the literature it is often stated, and widely assumed, that these PDF kinetic equation formulations are equivalent. In this paper it is shown that this is not the case, and the significance of differences among the various forms is considered. In particular, consideration is given to which form of equation is most appropriate for modeling dispersion in inhomogeneous turbulence and most consistent with the underlying particle equation of motion. In this regard the PDF equations for inertial particles are considered in the limit of zero particle Stokes number and assessed against the fully mixed (zero-drift) condition for fluid points. A long-standing question regarding the validity of kinetic equations in the fluid-point limit is answered; it is demonstrated formally that one version of the kinetic equation (derived using the Furutsu-Novikov method) provides a model that satisfies this zero-drift condition exactly in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems. In contrast, other forms of the kinetic equation do not satisfy this limit or apply only in a limited regime.

  7. Dynamics and molecular determinants of cytoplasmic lipid droplet clustering and dispersion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Orlicky

    Full Text Available Perilipin-1 (Plin1, a prominent cytoplasmic lipid droplet (CLD binding phosphoprotein and key physiological regulator of triglyceride storage and lipolysis in adipocytes, is thought to regulate the fragmentation and dispersion of CLD that occurs in response to β-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the dynamics and molecular determinants of these processes using cell lines stably expressing recombinant forms of Plin1 and/or other members of the perilipin family. Plin1 and a C-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1 (Plin1CT induced formation of single dense CLD clusters near the microtubule organizing center, whereas neither an N-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1, nor Plin2 or Plin3 induced clustering. Clustered CLD coated by Plin1, or Plin1CT, dispersed in response to isoproterenol, or other agents that activate adenylate cyclase, in a process inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, and blocked by microtubule disruption. Isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of CLD-associated Plin1 on serine 492 preceded their dispersion, and live cell imaging showed that cluster dispersion involved initial fragmentation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, which then fragmented into well-dispersed individual CLD. siRNA knockdown of the cortical actin binding protein, moesin, induced disaggregation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, and inhibited the reaggregation of dispersed CLD into tight clusters. Together these data suggest that the clustering and dispersion processes involve a complex orchestration of phosphorylation-dependent, microtubule-dependent and independent, and microfilament dependent steps.

  8. Dynamics and molecular determinants of cytoplasmic lipid droplet clustering and dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlicky, David J; Monks, Jenifer; Stefanski, Adrianne L; McManaman, James L

    2013-01-01

    Perilipin-1 (Plin1), a prominent cytoplasmic lipid droplet (CLD) binding phosphoprotein and key physiological regulator of triglyceride storage and lipolysis in adipocytes, is thought to regulate the fragmentation and dispersion of CLD that occurs in response to β-adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase. Here we investigate the dynamics and molecular determinants of these processes using cell lines stably expressing recombinant forms of Plin1 and/or other members of the perilipin family. Plin1 and a C-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1 (Plin1CT) induced formation of single dense CLD clusters near the microtubule organizing center, whereas neither an N-terminal CLD-binding fragment of Plin1, nor Plin2 or Plin3 induced clustering. Clustered CLD coated by Plin1, or Plin1CT, dispersed in response to isoproterenol, or other agents that activate adenylate cyclase, in a process inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89, and blocked by microtubule disruption. Isoproterenol-stimulated phosphorylation of CLD-associated Plin1 on serine 492 preceded their dispersion, and live cell imaging showed that cluster dispersion involved initial fragmentation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, which then fragmented into well-dispersed individual CLD. siRNA knockdown of the cortical actin binding protein, moesin, induced disaggregation of tight clusters into multiple smaller clusters, and inhibited the reaggregation of dispersed CLD into tight clusters. Together these data suggest that the clustering and dispersion processes involve a complex orchestration of phosphorylation-dependent, microtubule-dependent and independent, and microfilament dependent steps.

  9. Dispersion of swimming algae in laminar and turbulent channel flows: consequences for photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croze, Ottavio A; Sardina, Gaetano; Ahmed, Mansoor; Bees, Martin A; Brandt, Luca

    2013-04-06

    Shear flow significantly affects the transport of swimming algae in suspension. For example, viscous and gravitational torques bias bottom-heavy cells to swim towards regions of downwelling fluid (gyrotaxis). It is necessary to understand how such biases affect algal dispersion in natural and industrial flows, especially in view of growing interest in algal photobioreactors. Motivated by this, we here study the dispersion of gyrotactic algae in laminar and turbulent channel flows using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and a previously published analytical swimming dispersion theory. Time-resolved dispersion measures are evaluated as functions of the Péclet and Reynolds numbers in upwelling and downwelling flows. For laminar flows, DNS results are compared with theory using competing descriptions of biased swimming cells in shear flow. Excellent agreement is found for predictions that employ generalized Taylor dispersion. The results highlight peculiarities of gyrotactic swimmer dispersion relative to passive tracers. In laminar downwelling flow the cell distribution drifts in excess of the mean flow, increasing in magnitude with Péclet number. The cell effective axial diffusivity increases and decreases with Péclet number (for tracers it merely increases). In turbulent flows, gyrotactic effects are weaker, but discernable and manifested as non-zero drift. These results should have a significant impact on photobioreactor design.

  10. In situ droplet size and speed determination in a fluid-bed granulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Henrik; Larjo, Jussi; Antikainen, Osmo; Räikkönen, Heikki; Heinämäki, Jyrki; Yliruusi, Jouko

    2010-05-31

    The droplet size affects the final product in fluid-bed granulation and coating. In the present study, spray characteristics of aqueous granulation liquid (purified water) were determined in situ in a fluid-bed granulator. Droplets were produced by a pneumatic nozzle. Diode laser stroboscopy (DLS) was used for droplet detection and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) was used for determination of droplet size and speed. Increased atomization pressure decreased the droplet size and the effect was most strongly visible in the 90% size fractile. The droplets seemed to undergo coalescence after which only slight evaporation occurred. Furthermore, the droplets were subjected to a strong turbulence at the event of atomization, after which the turbulence reached a minimum value in the lower halve of the chamber. The turbulence increased as speed and droplet size decreased due to the effects of the fluidizing air. The DLS and PTV system used was found to be a useful and rapid tool in determining spray characteristics and in monitoring and predicting nozzle performance. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A droplet entrainment model for horizontal segregated flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Höhne, Thomas, E-mail: T.Hoehne@hzdr.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) – Institute of Fluid Dynamics, P.O. Box 510119, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Hänsch, Susann [Imperial College, Department of Mechanical Engineering, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We further developed the flow morphology detection model AIAD. • An advanced droplet entrainment model was introduced. • The new approach is applied against HAWAC experiments. - Abstract: One limitation in simulating horizontal segregated flows is that there is no treatment of droplet formation mechanisms at wavy surfaces. For self-generating waves and slugs, the interfacial momentum exchange and the turbulence parameters have to be modeled correctly. Furthermore, understanding the mechanism of droplet entrainment for heat and mass transfer processes is of great importance in the chemical and nuclear industry. The development of general computational fluid dynamics models is an essential precondition for the application of CFD codes to the modeling of flow related phenomena. The new formulation for the interfacial drag at the free surface and turbulence parameters within the algebraic interfacial area density model (AIAD) represents one step toward a more physical description of free surface flows including less empiricism. The AIAD approach allows the use of different physical models depending on the local fluid morphology inside a macro-scale multi-fluid framework. A further step of improving the modeling of free interfaces lies within the consideration of droplet entrainment mechanisms. In this paper a new sub-grid entrainment model is proposed, which assumes that due to liquid turbulence the interface gets rough and wavy leading to the formation of droplets. Therefore, the droplet entrainment model requires the consideration of an additional droplet phase, which is described with an own set of balance equations in the spirit of the particle model. Two local key factors determine the rate of droplet entrainment: the liquid turbulent kinetic energy as well as the outward velocity gradient of the liquid relative to the interface motion. The new droplet entrainment approach is included into CFD simulations for attempting to reproduce existing

  12. Development of bubble-induced turbulence model for advanced two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosoi, Hideaki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A two-fluid model can simulate two-phase flow by computational cost less than detailed two-phase flow simulation method such as interface tracking method. The two-fluid model is therefore useful for thermal hydraulic analysis in the large-scale domain such as rod bundles. However, since the two-fluid model includes a lot of constitutive equations verified by use of experimental results, it has problems that the result of analyses depends on accuracy of the constitutive equations. To solve these problems, an advanced two-fluid model has been developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. In this model, interface tracking method is combined with two-fluid model to accurately predict large interface structure behavior. Liquid clusters and bubbles larger than a computational cell are calculated using the interface tracking method, and those smaller than the cell are simulated by the two-fluid model. The constitutive equations to evaluate the effects of small bubbles or droplets on two-phase flow are also required in the advanced two-fluid model, just as with the conventional two-fluid model. However, the dependency of small bubbles and droplets on two-phase flow characteristics is relatively small, and fewer experimental results are required to verify the characteristics of large interface structures. Turbulent dispersion force model is one of the most important constitutive equations for the advanced two-fluid model. The turbulent dispersion force model has been developed by many researchers for the conventional two-fluid model. However, existing models implicitly include the effects of large bubbles and the deformation of bubbles, and are unfortunately not applicable to the advanced two-fluid model. In the previous study, the authors suggested the turbulent dispersion force model based on the analogy of Brownian motion. And the authors improved the turbulent dispersion force model in consideration of bubble-induced turbulence to improve the analysis results for small

  13. Probability density function of a puff dispersing from the wall of a turbulent channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios

    2015-11-01

    Study of dispersion of passive contaminants in turbulence has proved to be helpful in understanding fundamental heat and mass transfer phenomena. Many simulation and experimental works have been carried out to locate and track motions of scalar markers in a flow. One method is to combine Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Lagrangian Scalar Tracking (LST) to record locations of markers. While this has proved to be useful, high computational cost remains a concern. In this study, we develop a model that could reproduce results obtained by DNS and LST for turbulent flow. Puffs of markers with different Schmidt numbers were released into a flow field at a frictional Reynolds number of 150. The point of release was at the channel wall, so that both diffusion and convection contribute to the puff dispersion pattern, defining different stages of dispersion. Based on outputs from DNS and LST, we seek the most suitable and feasible probability density function (PDF) that represents distribution of markers in the flow field. The PDF would play a significant role in predicting heat and mass transfer in wall turbulence, and would prove to be helpful where DNS and LST are not always available.

  14. A numerical analysis of pollutant dispersion in street canyon: influence of the turbulent Schmidt number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouabdellah Abed

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Realizing the growing importance and availability of motor vehicles, we observe that the main source of pollution in the street canyons comes from the dispersion of automobile engine exhaust gas. It represents a substantial effect on the micro-climate conditions in urban areas. Seven idealized-2D building configurations are investigated by numerical simulations. The turbulent Schmidt number is introduced in the pollutant transport equation in order the take into account the proportion between the rate of momentum turbulent transport and the mass turbulent transport by diffusion. In the present paper, we attempt to approach the experimental test results by adjusting the values of turbulent Schmidt number to its corresponding application. It was with interest that we established this link for achieving our objectives, since the numerical results agree well with the experimental ones. The CFD code ANSYS CFX, the k, e and the RNGk-e models of turbulence have been adopted for the resolutions. From the simulation results, the turbulent Schmidt number is a range of 0.1 to 1.3 that has some effect on the prediction of pollutant dispersion in the street canyons. In the case of a flat roof canyon configuration (case: runa000, appropriate turbulent Schmidt number of 0.6 is estimated using the k-epsilon model and of 0.5 using the RNG k-e model.

  15. Sensitivity of cloud albedo to aerosol concentration and spectral dispersion of cloud droplet size distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorga, G. [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)]. E-mail: giorga@gw-chimie.math.unibuc.ro; Stefan, S. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania)

    2007-07-15

    Both the enhancement of the aerosol number concentration and the relative dispersion of the cloud droplet size distribution (spectral dispersion) on a regional scale can modify the cloud reflectivity. This work is focused on the role that pre-cloud aerosol plays in cloud reflectivity. Log-normal aerosol size distributions were used to describe two aerosol types: marine and rural. The number of aerosols that activate to droplets was obtained based on Abdul-Razzak and Ghan's (2000) activation parameterization. The cloud albedo taking into account the spectral dispersion effect in the parameterization of cloud effective radius and in the scattering asymmetry factor has been estimated. Two different scaling factors to account for dispersion were used. The sensitivity of cloud albedo to spectral dispersion-cloud droplet number concentration relationship in connection to the changes in liquid water content (LWC), and the cloud droplet effective radius has been also investigated. We obtained higher values of effective radius when dispersion is taken into account, with respect to the base case (without considering dispersion). The inferred absolute differences in effective radius values between calculations with each of the scaling factors are below 0.8 {mu}m as LWC ranges between 0.1 and 1.0 g m-3. The optical depth decreased by up to 14% (marine), and up to 29% (continental) when dispersion is considered in both effective radius and asymmetry factor ({beta}LDR scaling factor). Correspondingly, the relative change in cloud albedo is up to 6% (marine) and up to 11% (continental) clouds. For continental clouds, the calculated effective radius when dispersion is considered fits well within the measured range of effective radius in SCAR-B project. The calculated cloud albedo when dispersion is considered shows better agreement with the estimated cloud albedo from measured effective radius in SCAR-B project than the cloud albedo calculated without dispersion. In cleaner

  16. Laser--Doppler anemometry technique applied to two-phase dispersed flows in a rectangular channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.L.; Srinivasan, J.

    1979-01-01

    A new optical technique using Laser--Doppler anemometry has been applied to the local measurement of turbulent upward flow of a dilute water droplet--air two-phase dispersion in a vertical rectangular channel. Individually examined were over 20,000 droplet signals coming from each of a total of ten transversely placed measuring points, the closest of which to the channel wall was 250 μ away from the wall. Two flows of different patterns due to different imposed flow conditions were investigated, one with and the other without a liquid film formed on the channel wall. Reported are the size and number density distribution and the axial and lateral velocity distributions for the droplets as well as the axial and lateral velocity distributions for the air

  17. A new laboratory facility to study the interactions of aerosols, cloud droplets/ice crystals, and trace gases in a turbulent environment: The Π Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, W. H., II; Chang, K.; Ciochetto, D.; Niedermeier, D.; Bench, J.; Shaw, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A detailed understanding of gas-aerosol-cloud interaction within the turbulent atmosphere is of prime importance for an accurate understanding of Earth's climate system. As one example: While every cloud droplet began as an aerosol particle, not every aerosol particle becomes a cloud droplet. The particle to droplet transformation requires that the particle be exposed to some critical concentration of water vapor, which differs for different combinations of particle size and chemical composition. Similarly, the formation of ice particles in mixed phase clouds is also catalyzed by aerosol particles. Even in the simplest scenarios it is challenging to gain a full understanding of the aerosol activation and ice nucleation processes. At least two other factors contribute significantly to the complexity observed in the atmosphere. First, aerosols and cloud particles are not static entities, but are continuously interacting with their chemical environment, and therefore changing in their properties. Second, clouds are ubiquitously turbulent, so thermodynamic and compositional variables, such as water vapor or other trace gas concentrations, fluctuate in space and time. Indeed, the coupling between turbulence and microphysical processes is one of the major research challenges in cloud physics. We have developed a multiphase, turbulent reaction chamber, (dubbed the Π Chamber, after the internal volume of 3.14 cubic meters) designed to address the problems outlined above. It is capable of pressures ranging from sea level to ~ 100 mbar, and can sustain temperatures of +40 to -55 ºC. We can independently control the temperatures on the surfaces of three heat transfer zones. This allows us to establish a temperature gradient between the floor and ceiling inducing Rayleigh-Benard convection and inducing a turbulent environment. Interior surfaces are electropolished stainless steel to facilitate cleaning before and after chemistry experiments. At present, supporting

  18. A stochastic model of particle dispersion in turbulent reacting gaseous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David; Hewson, John

    2012-11-01

    We are performing fundamental studies of dispersive transport and time-temperature histories of Lagrangian particles in turbulent reacting flows. The particle-flow statistics including the full particle temperature PDF are of interest. A challenge in modeling particle motions is the accurate prediction of fine-scale aerosol-fluid interactions. A computationally affordable stochastic modeling approach, one-dimensional turbulence (ODT), is a proven method that captures the full range of length and time scales, and provides detailed statistics of fine-scale turbulent-particle mixing and transport. Limited results of particle transport in ODT have been reported in non-reacting flow. Here, we extend ODT to particle transport in reacting flow. The results of particle transport in three flow configurations are presented: channel flow, homogeneous isotropic turbulence, and jet flames. We investigate the functional dependence of the statistics of particle-flow interactions including (1) parametric study with varying temperatures, Reynolds numbers, and particle Stokes numbers; (2) particle temperature histories and PDFs; (3) time scale and the sensitivity of initial and boundary conditions. Flow statistics are compared to both experimental measurements and DNS data.

  19. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.C.B.; Dukler, A.E.

    1985-10-01

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data

  20. Measurement and simulation of the turbulent dispersion of a radioactive tracer in a two-phase flow system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensel, F; Rohde, U

    1998-10-01

    The turbulent dispersion of a radiotracer in an experimental setup with a natural convection liquid-gaseous flow was investigated. A liquid-gaseous bubbly flow was generated in a narrow tank by injection of pressurized air into water or by catalytic disintegration of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Turbulent Prandtl numbers for gas and tracer dispersion were varied. In the case of higher gas superficial velocities (J{sub gas}{approx}5-15 mm/s), a reasonable agreement was achieved between calculated and measured tracer transport velocity and dispersion coefficient values. A nearly linear correlation between j{sub gas} and D was found in agreement with other authors. The calculation results contribute to a better understanding of the phenomena and interpretation of the measurement results as well as to the validation of the CFD code for turbulent two-phase flow applications. Further investigations are necessary to improve the agreement in the cases of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} disintegration and low gas superficial velocities. (orig.)

  1. Measurement and simulation of the turbulent dispersion of a radioactive tracer in a two-phase flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensel, F.; Rohde, U.

    1998-01-01

    The turbulent dispersion of a radiotracer in an experimental setup with a natural convection liquid-gaseous flow was investigated. A liquid-gaseous bubbly flow was generated in a narrow tank by injection of pressurized air into water or by catalytic disintegration of H 2 O 2 . Turbulent Prandtl numbers for gas and tracer dispersion were varied. In the case of higher gas superficial velocities (J gas ∼5-15 mm/s), a reasonable agreement was achieved between calculated and measured tracer transport velocity and dispersion coefficient values. A nearly linear correlation between j gas and D was found in agreement with other authors. The calculation results contribute to a better understanding of the phenomena and interpretation of the measurement results as well as to the validation of the CFD code for turbulent two-phase flow applications. Further investigations are necessary to improve the agreement in the cases of H 2 O 2 disintegration and low gas superficial velocities. (orig.)

  2. Mathematical Model of Transfer and Deposition of Finely Dispersed Particles in a Turbulent Flow of Emulsions and Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laptev, A. G.; Basharov, M. M.

    2018-05-01

    The problem of modeling turbulent transfer of finely dispersed particles in liquids has been considered. An approach is used where the transport of particles is represented in the form of a variety of the diffusion process with the coefficient of turbulent transfer to the wall. Differential equations of transfer are written for different cases, and a solution of the cell model is obtained for calculating the efficiency of separation in a channel. Based on the theory of turbulent transfer of particles and of the boundary layer model, an expression has been obtained for calculating the rate of turbulent deposition of finely dispersed particles. The application of this expression in determining the efficiency of physical coagulation of emulsions in different channels and on the surface of chaotic packings is shown.

  3. Statistical descriptions of polydisperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jean-pierre.minier@edf.fr

    2016-12-15

    Disperse two-phase flows are flows containing two non-miscible phases where one phase is present as a set of discrete elements dispersed in the second one. These discrete elements, or ‘particles’, can be droplets, bubbles or solid particles having different sizes. This situation encompasses a wide range of phenomena, from nano-particles and colloids sensitive to the molecular fluctuations of the carrier fluid to inertia particles transported by the large-scale motions of turbulent flows and, depending on the phenomenon studied, a broad spectrum of approaches have been developed. The aim of the present article is to analyze statistical models of particles in turbulent flows by addressing this issue as the extension of the classical formulations operating at a molecular or meso-molecular level of description. It has a three-fold purpose: (1) to bring out the thread of continuity between models for discrete particles in turbulent flows (above the hydrodynamical level of description) and classical mesoscopic formulations of statistical physics (below the hydrodynamical level); (2) to reveal the specific challenges met by statistical models in turbulence; (3) to establish a methodology for modeling particle dynamics in random media with non-zero space and time correlations. The presentation is therefore centered on organizing the different approaches, establishing links and clarifying physical foundations. The analysis of disperse two-phase flow models is developed by discussing: first, approaches of classical statistical physics; then, by considering models for single-phase turbulent flows; and, finally, by addressing current formulations for discrete particles in turbulent flows. This brings out that particle-based models do not cease to exist above the hydrodynamical level and offer great interest when combined with proper stochastic formulations to account for the lack of equilibrium distributions and scale separation. In the course of this study, general

  4. Equilibrium-eulerian les model for turbulent poly-dispersed particle-laden flow

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo; Marchisio, Daniele Luca; Chidambaram, Narayanan; Fox, Rodney O.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient Eulerian method for poly-dispersed particles in turbulent flows is implemented, verified and validated for a channel flow. The approach couples a mixture model with a quadrature-based moment method for the particle size distribution in a LES framework, augmented by an approximate deconvolution method to reconstructs the unfiltered velocity. The particle velocity conditioned on particle size is calculated with an equilibrium model, valid for low Stokes numbers. A population balance equation is solved with the direct quadrature method of moments, that efficiently represents the continuous particle size distribution. In this first study particulate processes are not considered and the capability of the model to properly describe particle transport is investigated for a turbulent channel flow. First, single-phase LES are validated through comparison with DNS. Then predictions for the two-phase system, with particles characterised by Stokes numbers ranging from 0.2 to 5, are compared with Lagrangian DNS in terms of particle velocity and accumulation at the walls. Since this phenomenon (turbophoresis) is driven by turbulent fluctuations and depends strongly on the particle Stokes number, the approximation of the particle size distribution, the choice of the sub-grid scale model and the use of an approximate deconvolution method are important to obtain good results. Our method can be considered as a fast and efficient alternative to classical Lagrangian methods or Eulerian multi-fluid models in which poly-dispersity is usually neglected.

  5. Equilibrium-eulerian les model for turbulent poly-dispersed particle-laden flow

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2013-04-01

    An efficient Eulerian method for poly-dispersed particles in turbulent flows is implemented, verified and validated for a channel flow. The approach couples a mixture model with a quadrature-based moment method for the particle size distribution in a LES framework, augmented by an approximate deconvolution method to reconstructs the unfiltered velocity. The particle velocity conditioned on particle size is calculated with an equilibrium model, valid for low Stokes numbers. A population balance equation is solved with the direct quadrature method of moments, that efficiently represents the continuous particle size distribution. In this first study particulate processes are not considered and the capability of the model to properly describe particle transport is investigated for a turbulent channel flow. First, single-phase LES are validated through comparison with DNS. Then predictions for the two-phase system, with particles characterised by Stokes numbers ranging from 0.2 to 5, are compared with Lagrangian DNS in terms of particle velocity and accumulation at the walls. Since this phenomenon (turbophoresis) is driven by turbulent fluctuations and depends strongly on the particle Stokes number, the approximation of the particle size distribution, the choice of the sub-grid scale model and the use of an approximate deconvolution method are important to obtain good results. Our method can be considered as a fast and efficient alternative to classical Lagrangian methods or Eulerian multi-fluid models in which poly-dispersity is usually neglected.

  6. Self-propelled oil droplets consuming "fuel" surfactant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyota, Taro; Maru, Naoto; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2009-01-01

    A micrometer-sized oil droplet of 4-octylaniline containing 5 mol % of an amphiphilic catalyst exhibited a self-propelled motion, producing tiny oil droplets, in an aqueous dispersion of an amphiphilic precursor of 4-octylaniline. The tiny droplets on the surface of the self-propelled droplet wer...

  7. Turbulent diffusion modelling for windflow and dispersion analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartzis, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    The need for simple but reliable models for turbulent diffusion for windflow and atmospheric dispersion analysis is a necessity today if one takes into consideration the relatively high demand in computer time and costs for such an analysis, arising mainly from the often large solution domains needed, the terrain complexity and the transient nature of the phenomena. In the accident consequence assessment often there is a need for a relatively large number of cases to be analysed increasing further the computer time and costs. Within the framework of searching for relatively simple and universal eddy viscosity/diffusivity models, a new three dimensional non isotropic model is proposed applicable to any domain complexity and any atmospheric stability conditions. The model utilizes the transport equation for turbulent kinetic energy but introduces a new approach in effective length scale estimation based on the flow global characteristics and local atmospheric stability. The model is discussed in detail and predictions are given for flow field and boundary layer thickness. The results are compared with experimental data with satisfactory results

  8. The role of organelle proteins in carotenoid droplet dispersion in goldfish xanthophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, B.Y.

    1988-01-01

    In this study, I report on the evidence for the possible role of two carotenoid droplet (CD) proteins in CD dispersion. In order to identify the target of the ATP analogue 8-N 3 ATP, CDs, one of the major components in permeabilized xanthophore residues, were isolated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation and were tested for ATPase activity. An ATPase activity was found associated with CDs. Polypeptides analysis of the two subpopulations of 3 H-leucine labeled CDs by one dimensional and two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that there is more actin associated with HCD than with LCD, suggesting that the CD-ATPase may be an apparent actin activated ATPase. The properties of the CD-ATPase have been partially characterized with regard to its ionic requirement and the effects of known ATPase inhibitors and potential activators. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against CD proteins. The major monoclonal antibodies obtained are anti-p57s. The effects of these anti-p57s on dispersion of CDs in permeabilized xanthophores were determined and it was found that some inhibit CD dispersion while others do not

  9. Mathematical modeling of disperse two-phase flows

    CERN Document Server

    Morel, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This book develops the theoretical foundations of disperse two-phase flows, which are characterized by the existence of bubbles, droplets or solid particles finely dispersed in a carrier fluid, which can be a liquid or a gas. Chapters clarify many difficult subjects, including modeling of the interfacial area concentration. Basic knowledge of the subjects treated in this book is essential to practitioners of Computational Fluid Dynamics for two-phase flows in a variety of industrial and environmental settings. The author provides a complete derivation of the basic equations, followed by more advanced subjects like turbulence equations for the two phases (continuous and disperse) and multi-size particulate flow modeling. As well as theoretical material, readers will discover chapters concerned with closure relations and numerical issues. Many physical models are presented, covering key subjects including heat and mass transfers between phases, interfacial forces and fluid particles coalescence and breakup, a...

  10. The influence of gas phase velocity fluctuations on primary atomization and droplet deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourmatzis, A.; Masri, A. R.

    2014-02-01

    The effects of grid-generated velocity fluctuations on the primary atomization and subsequent droplet deformation of a range of laminar liquid jets are examined using microscopic high-speed backlit imaging of the break-up zone and laser Doppler anemometry of the gas phase separately. This is done for fixed gas mean flow conditions in a miniature wind tunnel experiment utilizing a selection of fuels, turbulence-generating grids and two syringe sizes. The constant mean flow allows for an isolated study of velocity fluctuation effects on primary atomization in a close approximation to homogeneous decaying turbulence. The qualitative morphology of the primary break-up region is examined over a range of turbulence intensities, and spectral analysis is performed in order to ascertain the break-up frequency which, for a case of no grid, compares well with the existing literature. The addition of velocity fluctuations tends to randomize the break-up process. Slightly downstream of the break-up region, image processing is conducted in order to extract a number of metrics, which do not depend on droplet sphericity, and these include droplet aspect ratio and orientation, the latter quantity being somewhat unconventional in spray characterization. A turbulent Weber number which takes into account gas phase fluctuations is utilized to characterize the resulting droplet shapes, in addition to a mean Weber number . Above a a clear positive relationship exists between the mean aspect ratio of droplets and the turbulent Weber number where is varied by altering all relevant variables including the velocity root mean square, the initial droplet diameter, the surface tension and the density.

  11. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-01-01

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future

  12. Dispersion bias, dispersion effect, and the aerosol-cloud conundrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yangang; Daum, Peter H; Guo Huan; Peng Yiran

    2008-01-01

    This work examines the influences of relative dispersion (the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) on cloud albedo and cloud radiative forcing, derives an analytical formulation that accounts explicitly for the contribution from droplet concentration and relative dispersion, and presents a new approach to parameterize relative dispersion in climate models. It is shown that inadequate representation of relative dispersion in climate models leads to an overestimation of cloud albedo, resulting in a negative bias of global mean shortwave cloud radiative forcing that can be comparable to the warming caused by doubling CO 2 in magnitude, and that this dispersion bias is likely near its maximum for ambient clouds. Relative dispersion is empirically expressed as a function of the quotient between cloud liquid water content and droplet concentration (i.e., water per droplet), yielding an analytical formulation for the first aerosol indirect effect. Further analysis of the new expression reveals that the dispersion effect not only offsets the cooling from the Twomey effect, but is also proportional to the Twomey effect in magnitude. These results suggest that unrealistic representation of relative dispersion in cloud parameterization in general, and evaluation of aerosol indirect effects in particular, is at least in part responsible for several outstanding puzzles of the aerosol-cloud conundrum: for example, overestimation of cloud radiative cooling by climate models compared to satellite observations; large uncertainty and discrepancy in estimates of the aerosol indirect effect; and the lack of interhemispheric difference in cloud albedo.

  13. Measurements of Turbulence Attenuation by a Dilute Dispersion of Solid Particles in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, John; Hwang, Wontae; Cabral, Patrick

    2002-11-01

    This research addresses turbulent gas flows laden with fine solid particles at sufficiently large mass loading that strong two-way coupling occurs. By two-way coupling we mean that the particle motion is governed largely by the flow, while the particles affect the gas-phase mean flow and the turbulence properties. Our main interest is in understanding how the particles affect the turbulence. Computational techniques have been developed which can accurately predict flows carrying particles that are much smaller than the smallest scales of turbulence. Also, advanced computational techniques and burgeoning computer resources make it feasible to fully resolve very large particles moving through turbulent flows. However, flows with particle diameters of the same order as the Kolmogorov scale of the turbulence are notoriously difficult to predict. Some simple flows show strong turbulence attenuation with reductions in the turbulent kinetic energy by up to a factor of five. On the other hand, some seemingly similar flows show almost no modification. No model has been proposed that allows prediction of when the strong attenuation will occur. Unfortunately, many technological and natural two-phase flows fall into this regime, so there is a strong need for new physical understanding and modeling capability. Our objective is to study the simplest possible turbulent particle-laden flow, namely homogeneous, isotropic turbulence with a uniform dispersion of monodisperse particles. We chose such a simple flow for two reasons. First, the simplicity allows us to probe the interaction in more detail and offers analytical simplicity in interpreting the results. Secondly, this flow can be addressed by numerical simulation, and many research groups are already working on calculating the flow. Our detailed data can help guide some of these efforts. By using microgravity, we can further simplify the flow to the case of no mean velocity for either the turbulence or the particles. In fact

  14. A CFD model for particle dispersion in turbulent boundary layer flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehbi, A.

    2008-01-01

    In Lagrangian particle dispersion modeling, the assumption that turbulence is isotropic everywhere yields erroneous predictions of particle deposition rates on walls, even in simple geometries. In this investigation, the stochastic particle tracking model in Fluent 6.2 is modified to include a better treatment of particle-turbulence interactions close to walls where anisotropic effects are significant. The fluid rms velocities in the boundary layer are computed using fits of DNS data obtained in channel flow. The new model is tested against correlations for particle removal rates in turbulent pipe flow and 90 o bends. Comparison with experimental data is much better than with the default model. The model is also assessed against data of particle removal in the human mouth-throat geometry where the flow is decidedly three-dimensional. Here, the agreement with the data is reasonable, especially in view of the fact that the DNS fits used are those of channel flows, for lack of better alternatives. The CFD Best Practice Guidelines are followed to a large extent, in particular by using multiple grid resolutions and at least second order discretization schemes

  15. Post-dryout heat transfer analysis model with droplet Lagrangian simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keizo Matsuura; Isao Kataoka; Kaichiro Mishima

    2005-01-01

    Post-dryout heat transfer analysis was carried out considering droplet behavior by using the Lagrangian simulation method. Post-dryout heat transfer is an important heat transfer mechanism in many industrial appliances. Especially in recent Japanese BWR licensing, the standard for assessing the integrity of fuel that has experienced boiling transition is being examined. Although post-dryout heat transfer analysis is important when predicting wall temperature, it is difficult to accurately predict the heat transfer coefficient in the post-dryout regime because of the many heat transfer paths and non-equilibrium status between droplet and vapor. Recently, an analysis model that deals with many heat transfer paths including droplet direct contact heat transfer was developed and its results showed good agreement with experimental results. The model also showed that heat transfer by droplet could not be neglected in the low mass flux condition. However, the model deals with droplet deposition behavior by experimental droplet deposition correlation, so it cannot estimate the effect of droplet flow on turbulent flow field and heat transfer. Therefore, in this study we deal with many droplets separately by using the Lagrangian simulation method and hence estimate the effect of droplet flow on the turbulent flow field. We analyzed post-dryout experimental results and found that they correlated well with the analysis results. (authors)

  16. Droplet size in flow: Theoretical model and application to polymer blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortelný, Ivan; Jůza, Josef

    2017-05-01

    The paper is focused on prediction of the average droplet radius, R, in flowing polymer blends where the droplet size is determined by dynamic equilibrium between the droplet breakup and coalescence. Expressions for the droplet breakup frequency in systems with low and high contents of the dispersed phase are derived using available theoretical and experimental results for model blends. Dependences of the coalescence probability, Pc, on system parameters, following from recent theories, is considered and approximate equation for Pc in a system with a low polydispersity in the droplet size is proposed. Equations for R in systems with low and high contents of the dispersed phase are derived. Combination of these equations predicts realistic dependence of R on the volume fraction of dispersed droplets, φ. Theoretical prediction of the ratio of R to the critical droplet radius at breakup agrees fairly well with experimental values for steadily mixed polymer blends.

  17. Sound Propagation in Saturated Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions Considering the Effect of Transpiration on Droplet Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixtures with evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson (1975) to accommodate the effects of transpiration on the linear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer. It is shown that the inclusion of transpiration in the presence of mass transfer improves the agreement between the theory and the experimental data of Cole and Dobbins (1971) for sound attenuation in air-water fogs at low droplet mass concentrations. The results suggest that transpiration has an appreciable effect on both sound absorption and dispersion for both low and high droplet mass concentrations.

  18. Governing parameters and dynamics of turbulent spray atomization from modern GDI injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Seoksu; Li, Tianyun; Sato, Kiyotaka; Yokohata, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the governing parameters and dynamics of turbulent spray atomization is essential for the advancement of fuel injection technologies, but no concrete understandings have been derived previously. The current study investigates the governing parameters and dynamics of turbulent spray atomization by experimental observations of near-nozzle spray phenomena using an X-ray imaging technique. The effects of critical injection parameters such as fuel property, injection pressure and ambient density on near-nozzle liquid feature size and velocity distributions were extensively studied using three injection nozzles having different levels of initial flow turbulence and dispersion. Based on the results, the governing parameters and dynamics of turbulent spray atomization and the issues on the advanced fuel injection control of modern engines were thoroughly discussed. The results showed that fuel and injection pressure effects on spray atomization became insignificant from a critical Weber number which decreased upon the increase in initial flow turbulence and dispersion. The increase in ambient density increased the resultant droplet size at downstream due to the faster deceleration of spray which brought the atomization termination location closer to the nozzle exit. The spray atomization was terminated at the location of ca. 72% exit velocity regardless of the injection condition. - Highlights: • Governing parameters and dynamics of turbulent spray atomization are investigated. • Fuel and injection pressure effects on atomization are saturated from critical We. • High ambient density increases drop sizes due to faster termination of atomization. • Atomization terminates when the spray velocity decays to ca. 72% of exit velocity. • Strategies for improvement of current injection technologies are discussed.

  19. Numerical and experimental studies of droplet-gas flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesang, Aage Ingebret

    2002-07-01

    This thesis considers droplet-gas flow by the use of numerical methods and experimental verification. A commercial vane separator was studied both numerical and by experiment. In addition some efforts are put into the numerical analysis of cyclones. The experimental part contains detailed measurements of the flow field between a pair of vanes in a vane separator and droplet size measurements. LDA (Laser Doppler Anemometry) was used to measure the velocity in two dimensions and corresponding turbulence quantities. The results from the LDA measurements are considered to be of high quality and are compared to numerical results obtained from a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis. The simulation showed good agreement between the numerical and experimental results. Combinations of different turbulence models; the standard k-epsilon model and the Reynold Stress Mode, different schemes; first order and higher order scheme and different near wall treatment of the turbulence; the Law of the wall and the Two-Layer Zonal model were used in the simulations. The Reynold Stress Model together with a higher order scheme performed rather poorly. The recirculation in parts of the separator was overpredicted in this case. For the other cases the overall predictions are satisfactory. PDA (Phase Doppler Anemometry) measurements were used to study the changes in the droplet size distribution through the vane separator. The PDA measurements show that smaller droplets are found at the outlet than present at the inlet. In the literature there exists different mechanisms for explaining the re-entrainment and generation of new droplets. The re-entrainments mechanisms are divided into four groups where droplet-droplet interaction, droplet break-up, splashing of impinging droplet and re-entrainment from the film are defined as the groups of re-entrainment mechanisms. Models for these groups are found in the literature and these models are tested for re-entrainment using the operational

  20. On the relevance of droplet sedimentation in stratocumulus-top mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro; de Lozar, Alberto

    2017-11-01

    The interaction between droplet sedimentation, turbulent mixing, evaporative cooling, and radiative cooling at the top of stratocumulus clouds has been studied using direct numerical simulations. This interaction is important to determine the mixing rate of the cloud and dry air above it, which eventually determines the cloud lifetime. By investigating the entrainment-rate equation, which is an analytical relationship between the contributions to cloud-top entrainment from the phenomena indicated above, we have found that the reduction of entrainment velocity by droplet sedimentation can be 2 to 3 times larger than previously conjectured. The reason is twofold. First, the reduction of evaporative cooling as droplets fall out of the inversion is stronger than previously observed in large-eddy simulations, where excessive mixing by turbulence models and numerical artifacts may have partially masked this effect of sedimentation on entrainment. Second, there is a non-negligible direct contribution from mass loading, as falling droplets leave behind more buoyant air in the inversion. This contribution is proportional to the fifth moment of the droplet-size distribution, which provides further evidence for the need to better understand the evolution of the droplet-size distribution.

  1. Droplet deposition above a quench front during reflood after a large break LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, R.

    1982-01-01

    Droplet deposition or migration towards the wall in a dispersed flow has been the subject of many investigations due to its industrial applications such as combustion of sprays of liquid fuel, evaporators, spray cooling, nuclear reactors, etc. Dispersed flow is characterized by high void and hence low droplet concentration and the theoretical study of droplet deposition is the treatment of a single droplet trajectory in the dispersed. As the droplet is travelling towards the wall, whether it will eventually be deposited on the wall or not, will be determined by the competing forces acting on it and by the boundary layer it is traversing through towards the wall. The mechanism of droplet deposition will be examined. The prediction of the boundary layer thickness will take into account the droplet size and density difference between the fluid and the droplet. Given the condition above the quench front, the minimum lateral velocity required for droplet deposition could be determined as a function of droplet diameter

  2. Statistical analysis of dispersion relations in turbulent solar wind fluctuations using Cluster data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perschke, C.; Narita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Multi-spacecraft measurements enable us to resolve three-dimensional spatial structures without assuming Taylor's frozen-in-flow hypothesis. This is very useful to study frequency-wave vector diagram in solar wind turbulence through direct determination of three-dimensional wave vectors. The existence and evolution of dispersion relation and its role in fully-developed plasma turbulence have been drawing attention of physicists, in particular, if solar wind turbulence represents kinetic Alfvén or whistler mode as the carrier of spectral energy among different scales through wave-wave interactions. We investigate solar wind intervals of Cluster data for various flow velocities with a high-resolution wave vector analysis method, Multi-point Signal Resonator technique, at the tetrahedral separation about 100 km. Magnetic field data and ion data are used to determine the frequency- wave vector diagrams in the co-moving frame of the solar wind. We find primarily perpendicular wave vectors in solar wind turbulence which justify the earlier discussions about kinetic Alfvén or whistler wave. The frequency- wave vector diagrams confirm (a) wave vector anisotropy and (b) scattering in frequencies.

  3. Investigation of the physical scaling of sea spray spume droplet production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairall, C. W.; Banner, M. L.; Peirson, W. L.; Asher, W.; Morison, R. P.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we report on a laboratory study, the Spray Production and Dynamics Experiment (SPANDEX), conducted at the University of New South Wales Water Research Laboratory in Australia. The goals of SPANDEX were to illuminate physical aspects of spume droplet production and dispersion; verify theoretical simplifications used to estimate the source function from ambient droplet concentration measurements; and examine the relationship between the implied source strength and forcing parameters such as wind speed, surface turbulent stress, and wave properties. Observations of droplet profiles give reasonable confirmation of the basic power law profile relationship that is commonly used to relate droplet concentrations to the surface source strength. This essentially confirms that, even in a wind tunnel, there is a near balance between droplet production and removal by gravitational settling. The observations also indicate considerable droplet mass may be present for sizes larger than 1.5 mm diameter. Phase Doppler Anemometry observations revealed significant mean horizontal and vertical slip velocities that were larger closer to the surface. The magnitude seems too large to be an acceleration time scale effect. Scaling of the droplet production surface source strength proved to be difficult. The wind speed forcing varied only 23% and the stress increased a factor of 2.2. Yet, the source strength increased by about a factor of 7. We related this to an estimate of surface wave energy flux through calculations of the standard deviation of small-scale water surface disturbance, a wave-stress parameterization, and numerical wave model simulations. This energy index only increased by a factor of 2.3 with the wind forcing. Nonetheless, a graph of spray mass surface flux versus surface disturbance energy is quasi-linear with a substantial threshold.

  4. Insights into Evaporative Droplet Dynamics in the High-Wind Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, T.; Richter, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Sea-spray droplets ejected into the air-sea boundary layer take part in a series of complex transport processes. To model the air-sea exchange of heat and moisture under high-wind conditions, it is important yet challenging to understand influences of evaporative droplets in the atmospheric boundary layer. We implement a high-resolution Eulerian-Lagrangian algorithm with droplets laden in a turbulent open-channel flow to reveal the dynamic and thermodynamic characteristics of evaporating sea spray. Our past numerical simulations demonstrated an overall weak modification to the total heat flux by evaporative droplets. This is due to redistributed sensible and latent heat fluxes from relatively small droplets that respond rapidly to the ambient environment or the limited residence time of larger droplets. However, droplets with a slower thermodynamic response to the environment indicate a potential to enhance the total heat flux, but this is dependent on concentration and suspension time. In the current study, we focus on correlations between the residence time and thermodynamic statistics of droplets in order to better understand how best to parameterize in large-scale models. In addition, we focus in detail on the different scales of turbulence to further characterize the range of influence that evaporating droplets have on the surrounding fluid.

  5. Multiphysics Simulations of Entrained Flow Gasification. Part I: Validating the Nonreacting Flow Solver and the Particle Turbulent Dispersion Model

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Mayank

    2012-01-19

    In this two-part paper, we describe the construction, validation, and application of a multiscale model of entrained flow gasification. The accuracy of the model is demonstrated by (1) rigorously constructing and validating the key constituent submodels against relevant canonical test cases from the literature and (2) validating the integrated model against experimental data from laboratory scale and commercial scale gasifiers. In part I, the flow solver and particle turbulent dispersion models are validated against experimental data from nonswirling flow and swirling flow test cases in an axisymmetric sudden expansion geometry and a two-phase flow test case in a cylindrical bluff body geometry. Results show that while the large eddy simulation (LES) performs best among all tested models in predicting both swirling and nonswirling flows, the shear stress transport (SST) k-ω model is the best choice among the commonly used Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. The particle turbulent dispersion model is accurate enough in predicting particle trajectories in complex turbulent flows when the underlying turbulent flow is well predicted. Moreover, a commonly used modeling constant in the particle dispersion model is optimized on the basis of comparisons with particle-phase experimental data for the two-phase flow bluff body case. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Stochastic linearization of turbulent dynamics of dispersive waves in equilibrium and non-equilibrium state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Shixiao W; Lu, Haihao; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2016-01-01

    Characterizing dispersive wave turbulence in the long time dynamics is central to understanding of many natural phenomena, e.g., in atmosphere ocean dynamics, nonlinear optics, and plasma physics. Using the β -Fermi–Pasta–Ulam nonlinear system as a prototypical example, we show that in thermal equilibrium and non-equilibrium steady state the turbulent state even in the strongly nonlinear regime possesses an effective linear stochastic structure in renormalized normal variables. In this framework, we can well characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics, which are dominated by long-wavelength renormalized waves. We further demonstrate that the energy flux is nearly saturated by the long-wavelength renormalized waves in non-equilibrium steady state. The scenario of such effective linear stochastic dynamics can be extended to study turbulent states in other nonlinear wave systems. (paper)

  7. Dispersive solid-phase extraction followed by vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the solidification of a floating organic droplet for the determination of benzoylurea insecticides in soil and sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guilong; He, Qiang; Mmereki, Daniel; Lu, Ying; Zhong, Zhihui; Liu, Hanyang; Pan, Weiliang; Zhou, Guangming; Chen, Junhua

    2016-04-01

    A novel dispersive solid-phase extraction combined with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet was developed for the determination of eight benzoylurea insecticides in soil and sewage sludge samples before high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The analytes were first extracted from the soil and sludge samples into acetone under optimized pretreatment conditions. Clean-up of the extract was conducted by dispersive solid-phase extraction using activated carbon as the sorbent. The vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet procedure was performed by using 1-undecanol with lower density than water as the extraction solvent, and the acetone contained in the solution also acted as dispersive solvent. Under the optimum conditions, the linearity of the method was in the range 2-500 ng/g with correlation coefficients (r) of 0.9993-0.9999. The limits of detection were in the range of 0.08-0.56 ng/g. The relative standard deviations varied from 2.16 to 6.26% (n = 5). The enrichment factors ranged from 104 to 118. The extraction recoveries ranged from 81.05 to 97.82% for all of the analytes. The good performance has demonstrated that the proposed methodology has a strong potential for application in the multiresidue analysis of complex matrices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effects of Fetch on Turbulent Flow and Pollutant Dispersion Within a Cubical Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michioka, Takenobu; Takimoto, Hiroshi; Ono, Hiroki; Sato, Ayumu

    2018-03-01

    The effects of fetch on turbulent flow and pollutant dispersion within a canopy formed by regularly-spaced cubical objects is investigated using large-eddy simulation. Six tracer gases are simultaneously released from a ground-level continuous pollutant line source placed parallel to the spanwise axis at the first, second, third, fifth, seventh and tenth rows. Beyond the seventh row, the standard deviations of the fluctuations in the velocity components and the Reynolds shear stresses reach nearly equivalent states. Low-frequency turbulent flow is generated near the bottom surface around the first row and develops as the fetch increases. The turbulent flow eventually passes through the canopy at a near-constant interval. The mean concentration within the canopy reaches a near-constant value beyond the seventh row. In the first and second rows, narrow coherent structures frequently affect the pollutant escape from the top of the canopy. These structures increase in width as the fetch increases, and they mainly affect the removal of pollutants from the canopy.

  9. Flow field induced particle accumulation inside droplets in rectangular channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Michael; Moskopp, Michael; Seemann, Ralf

    2015-07-07

    Particle concentration is a basic operation needed to perform washing steps or to improve subsequent analysis in many (bio)-chemical assays. In this article we present field free, hydrodynamic accumulation of particles and cells in droplets flowing within rectangular micro-channels. Depending on droplet velocity, particles either accumulate at the rear of the droplet or are dispersed over the entire droplet cross-section. We show that the observed particle accumulation behavior can be understood by a coupling of particle sedimentation to the internal flow field of the droplet. The changing accumulation patterns are explained by a qualitative change of the internal flow field. The topological change of the internal flow field, however, is explained by the evolution of the droplet shape with increasing droplet velocity altering the friction with the channel walls. In addition, we demonstrate that accumulated particles can be concentrated, removing excess dispersed phase by splitting the droplet at a simple channel junction.

  10. Internal flow inside droplets within a concentrated emulsion during droplet rearrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Chia Min; Gai, Ya; Tang, Sindy K. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Droplet microfluidics, in which each droplet serves as a micro-reactor, has found widespread use in high-throughput biochemical screening applications. These droplets are often concentrated at various steps to form a concentrated emulsion. As part of a serial interrogation and sorting process, such concentrated emulsions are typically injected into a tapered channel leading to a constriction that fits one drop at a time for the probing of droplet content in a serial manner. The flow physics inside the droplets under these flow conditions are not well understood but are critical for predicting and controlling the mixing of reagents inside the droplets as reactors. Here we investigate the flow field inside droplets of a concentrated emulsion flowing through a tapered microchannel using micro-particle image velocimetry. The confining geometry of the channel forces the number of rows of drops to reduce by one at specific and uniformly spaced streamwise locations, which are referred to as droplet rearrangement zones. Within each rearrangement zone, the phase-averaged velocity results show that the motion of the droplets involved in the rearrangement process, also known as a T1 event, creates vortical structures inside themselves and their adjacent droplets. These flow structures increase the circulation inside droplets up to 2.5 times the circulation in droplets at the constriction. The structures weaken outside of the rearrangement zones suggesting that the flow patterns created by the T1 process are transient. The time scale of circulation is approximately the same as the time scale of a T1 event. Outside of the rearrangement zones, flow patterns in the droplets are determined by the relative velocity between the continuous and disperse phases.

  11. Emulsion droplet interactions: a front-tracking treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Lachlan; Juric, Damir; Chergui, Jalel; Shin, Seungwon; Craster, Richard V.; Matar, Omar K.

    2017-11-01

    Emulsion coalescence influences a multitude of industrial applications including solvent extraction, oil recovery and the manufacture of fast-moving consumer goods. Droplet interaction models are vital for the design and scale-up of processing systems, however predictive modelling at the droplet-scale remains a research challenge. This study simulates industrially relevant moderate-inertia collisions for which a high degree of droplet deformation occurs. A hybrid front-tracking/level-set approach is used to automatically account for interface merging without the need for `bookkeeping' of interface connectivity. The model is implemented in Code BLUE using a parallel multi-grid solver, allowing both film and droplet-scale dynamics to be resolved efficiently. Droplet interaction simulations are validated using experimental sequences from the literature in the presence and absence of background turbulence. The framework is readily extensible for modelling the influence of surfactants and non-Newtonian fluids on droplet interaction processes. EPSRC, UK, MEMPHIS program Grant (EP/K003976/1), RAEng Research Chair (OKM), PETRONAS.

  12. Dispersion modeling by kinematic simulation: Cloud dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fung, J C H; Perkins, R J

    2008-01-01

    A new technique has been developed to compute mean and fluctuating concentrations in complex turbulent flows (tidal current near a coast and deep ocean). An initial distribution of material is discretized into any small clouds which are advected by a combination of the mean flow and large scale turbulence. The turbulence can be simulated either by kinematic simulation (KS) or direct numerical simulation. The clouds also diffuse relative to their centroids; the statistics for this are obtained from a separate calculation of the growth of individual clouds in small scale turbulence, generated by KS. The ensemble of discrete clouds is periodically re-discretized, to limit the size of the small clouds and prevent overlapping. The model is illustrated with simulations of dispersion in uniform flow, and the results are compared with analytic, steady state solutions. The aim of this study is to understand how pollutants disperses in a turbulent flow through a numerical simulation of fluid particle motion in a random flow field generated by Fourier modes. Although this homogeneous turbulent is rather a 'simple' flow, it represents a building block toward understanding pollutant dispersion in more complex flow. The results presented here are preliminary in nature, but we expect that similar qualitative results should be observed in a genuine turbulent flow.

  13. Studies of turbulent round jets through experimentation, simulation, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Ryan

    This thesis studies the physics of the turbulent round jet. In particular, it focuses on three different problems that have the turbulent round jet as their base flow. The first part of this thesis examines a compressible turbulent round jet at its sonic condition. We investigate the shearing effect such a jet has when impinging on a solid surface that is perpendicular to the flow direction. We report on experiments to evaluate the jet's ability to remove different types of explosive particles from a glass surface. Theoretical analysis revealed trends and enabled modeling to improve the predictability of particle removal for various jet conditions. The second part of thesis aims at developing a non-intrusive measurement technique for free-shear turbulent flows in nature. Most turbulent jet investigations in the literature, both in the laboratory and in the field, required specialized intrusive instrumentation and/or complex optical setups. There are many situations in naturally-occurring flows where the environment may prove too hostile or remote for existing instrumentation. We have developed a methodology for analyzing video of the exterior of a naturally-occurring flow and calculating the flow velocity. We found that the presence of viscosity gradients affects the velocity analysis. While these effects produce consistent, predictable changes, we became interested in the mechanism by which the viscosity gradients affect the mixing and development of the turbulent round jet. We conducted a stability analysis of the axisymmetric jet when a viscosity gradient is present. Finally, the third problem addressed in this thesis is the growth of liquid droplets by condensation in a turbulent round jet. A vapor-saturated turbulent jet issues into a cold, dry environment. The resulting mixing produces highly inhomogeneous regions of supersaturation, where droplets grow and evaporate. Non-linear interactions between the droplet growth rate and the supersaturation field make

  14. Development of local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation. Part 3: turbulent flow and plume dispersion in building arrays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nakayama, H.; Jurčáková, Klára; Nagai, H.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 5 (2013), s. 503-519 ISSN 0022-3131 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : local-scale high-resolution dispersion model * nuclear emergency response system * large-eddy simulation * spatially developing turbulent boundary layer flow Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.452, year: 2013

  15. Flashing liquid jets and two-phase droplet dispersion I. Experiments for derivation of droplet atomisation correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleary, Vincent; Bowen, Phil; Witlox, Henk

    2007-04-11

    The large-scale release of a liquid contained at upstream conditions above its local atmospheric boiling point is a scenario often given consideration in process industry risk analysis. Current-hazard quantification software often employs simplistic equilibrium two-phase approaches. Scaled water experiments have been carried out measuring droplet velocity and droplet size distributions for a range of exit orifice aspect ratios (L/d) and conditions representing low to high superheat. 2D Phase-Doppler Anemometry has been utilised to characterise droplet kinematics and spray quality. Droplet size correlations have been developed for non-flashing, the transition between non-flashing and flashing, and fully flashing jets. Using high-speed shadowography, transition between regimes is defined in terms of criteria identified in the external flow structure. An overview companion paper provides a wider overview of the problem and reports implementation of these correlations into consequence models and subsequent validation. The fluid utilised throughout is water, hence droplet correlations are developed in non-dimensional form to allow extrapolation to other fluids through similarity scaling, although verification of model performance for other fluids is required in future studies. Data is reduced via non-dimensionalisation in terms of the Weber number and Jakob number, essentially representing the fluid mechanics and thermodynamics of the system, respectively. A droplet-size distribution correlation has also been developed, conveniently presented as a volume undersize distribution based on the Rosin-Rammler distribution. Separate correlations are provided for sub-cooled mechanical break-up and fully flashing jets. This form of correlation facilitates rapid estimates of likely mass rainout quantities, as well as full distribution information for more rigorous two-phase thermodynamic modelling in the future.

  16. Retrieval of collision kernels from the change of droplet size distributions with linear inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onishi, Ryo; Takahashi, Keiko [Earth Simulator Center, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, 3173-25 Showa-machi, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama Kanagawa 236-0001 (Japan); Matsuda, Keigo; Kurose, Ryoichi; Komori, Satoru [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: onishi.ryo@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: matsuda.keigo@t03.mbox.media.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: takahasi@jamstec.go.jp, E-mail: kurose@mech.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: komori@mech.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2008-12-15

    We have developed a new simple inversion scheme for retrieving collision kernels from the change of droplet size distribution due to collision growth. Three-dimensional direct numerical simulations (DNS) of steady isotropic turbulence with colliding droplets are carried out in order to investigate the validity of the developed inversion scheme. In the DNS, air turbulence is calculated using a quasi-spectral method; droplet motions are tracked in a Lagrangian manner. The initial droplet size distribution is set to be equivalent to that obtained in a wind tunnel experiment. Collision kernels retrieved by the developed inversion scheme are compared to those obtained by the DNS. The comparison shows that the collision kernels can be retrieved within 15% error. This verifies the feasibility of retrieving collision kernels using the present inversion scheme.

  17. Development of Two Way Coupled Euler – Euler Droplets Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch BĚTÁK

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A development of droplet solver for 3D complex geometry is described in this work. This solver is composed of solvers for turbulent flow field and droplets. This code is based on the finite volume method. An open source CFD code OpenFOAM was chosen for its first implementation and first results are shown.

  18. Investigation of the propagation characteristics in turbulent dispersed two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, S.M.

    1980-01-01

    The propagation characteristics of turbulent dispersed two-phase flows have been studied experimentally using the Pitot tube associated with a conical hot-film anemometer. It is found that the mixture velocity increases with decreasing volumetric mixing ratio of the air and water. The void fraction distribution shows homogeneity across the test section in the special case of fully developed boundary layer two-phase flow. An expression is obtained which relates the local mixture velocity to the local void fraction, gas and liquid densities, and volumetric gas-liquid ratio

  19. Microfluidic droplet generator with controlled break-up mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Gonzalez, David Conchouso

    2017-04-13

    Droplet generation devices and systems that parallelize droplet generation devices are provided. The droplet generation devices can include a symmetric block-and-break system and a tapered droplet generation zone. The symmetric block-and-break system can include a pair of break channels and a pair of bypass channels symmetrically arranged with respect to the dispersed-phase input channel and the output channel. The droplet generation devices can generate monodisperse droplets with a predefined volume over a range of flow rates, pressures, and fluid properties. The droplet generation devices are therefore capable of parallelization to achieve large-capacity droplet generation, e.g. greater than 1 L/hr, with small overall coefficients of variation.

  20. A New Eulerian Model for Turbulent Evaporating Sprays in Recirculating Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wittig, S.; Hallmann, M.; Scheurlen, M.; Schmehl, R.

    1993-01-01

    A new Eulerian model for the computation of turbulent evaporating sprays in recirculating flows is derived. It comprises droplet heating and evaporation processes by solving separate transport equations for the droplet's temperature and diameter. Full coupling of the droplet and the gaseous phase is

  1. Study on factors affecting the droplet temperature in plasma MIG welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamat, Sarizam Bin; Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Yusoff, Mahani

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, the mechanism to control droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was discussed based on the measurements of the droplet temperature for a wide range of MIG currents with different plasma electrode diameters. The measurements of the droplet temperatures were conducted using a two color temperature measurement method. The droplet temperatures in the plasma MIG welding were then compared with those in the conventional MIG welding. As a result, the droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was found to be reduced in comparison with the conventional MIG welding under the same MIG current. Especially when the small plasma electrode diameter was used, the decrease in the droplet temperature reached maximally 500 K. Also, for a particular WFS, the droplet temperatures in the plasma MIG welding were lower than those in the conventional MIG welding. It is suggested that the use of plasma contributes to reducing the local heat input into the base metal by the droplet. The presence of the plasma surrounding the wire is considered to increase the electron density in its vicinity, resulting in the arc attachment expanding upwards along the wire surface to disperse the MIG current. This dispersion of MIG current causes a decrease in current density on the droplet surface, lowering the droplet temperature. Furthermore, dispersed MIG current also weakens the electromagnetic pinch force acting on the neck of the wire above the droplet. This leads to a larger droplet diameter with increased surface area through lower frequency of droplet detachment to decrease the MIG current density on the droplet surface, as compared to the conventional MIG welding at the same MIG current. Thus, the lower droplet temperature is caused by the reduction of heat flux into the droplet. Consequently, the mechanism to control droplet temperature in the plasma MIG welding was clarified.

  2. PIV Measurements of Atmospheric Turbulence and Pollen Dispersal Above a Corn Canopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; van Hout, R.; Luznik, L.; Katz, J.

    2003-12-01

    Dispersal of pollen grains by wind and gravity (Anemophilous) is one of the oldest means of plant fertilization available in nature. Recently, the growth of genetically modified foods has raised questions on the range of pollen dispersal in order to limit cross-fertilization between organically grown and transgenic crops. The distance that a pollen grain can travel once released from the anther is determined, among others, by the aerodynamic parameters of the pollen and the characteristics of turbulence in the atmosphere in which it is released. Turbulence characteristics of the flow above a pollinating corn field were measured using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The measurements were performed on the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay, in Maryland, during July 2003. Two PIV systems were used simultaneously, each with an overall sample area of 18x18 cm. The spacing between samples was about equal to the field of view. The PIV instrumentation, including CCD cameras, power supply and laser sheets forming optics were mounted on a measurement platform, consisting of a hydraulic telescopic arm that could be extended up to 10m. The whole system could be rotated in order to align it with the flow. The flow was seeded with smoke generated about 30m upstream of the sample areas. Measurements were carried out at several elevations, from just below canopy height up to 1m above canopy. The local meteorological conditions around the test site were monitored by other sensors including sonic anemometers, Rotorod pollen counters and temperature sensors. Each processed PIV image provides an instantaneous velocity distribution containing 64x64 vectors with a vector spacing of ~3mm. The pollen grains (~100mm) can be clearly distinguished from the smoke particles (~1mm) based on their size difference. The acquired PIV data enables calculation of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics including Reynolds stresses, spectra, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate. Data

  3. An experimental and numerical study into turbulent condensing steam jets in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oerlemans, S. [Faculty of Applied Physics Eindhoven, Univ. of Technology Eindhoven (Netherlands); Badie, R. [Philips Research Laboratories Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dongen, M.E.H. van [Faculty of Applied Physics, Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    Temperatures, velocities, and droplet sizes are measured in turbulent condensing steam jets produced by a facial sauna, for varying nozzle diameters and varying initial velocities (Re=3,600-9,200). The release of latent heat due to droplet condensation causes the temperature in the two-phase jet to be significantly higher than in a single-phase jet. At some distance from the nozzle, droplets reach a maximum size and start to evaporate again, which results in a change in sign of latent heat release. The distance of maximum size is determined from droplet size measurements. The experimental results are compared with semi-analytical expressions and with a fully coupled numerical model of the turbulent condensing steam jet. The increase in centreline temperature due to droplet condensation is successfully predicted. (orig.)

  4. Control of the droplet generation by an infrared laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the control of the droplet generation by a focused infrared (IR laser with a wavelength of 1550 nm was studied, in which the liquid water and the oil with the surfactant of Span 80 were employed as the disperse and continuous phases, respectively. The characteristics of the droplet generation controlled by the laser was explored under various flow rates, laser powers and spot positions and the comparison between the cases with/without the laser was also performed. The results showed that when the laser was focused on the region away from the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the droplet shedding was blocked due to the IR laser heating induced thermocapillary flow, leading to the increase of the droplet volume and the cycle time of the droplet generation as compared to the case without the laser. Decreasing the continuous phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume, cycle time of the droplet generation and the volume increase ratio, while increasing the disperse phase flow rate led to the increase of the droplet volume and the decrease of the cycle time and volume increase ratio. For a given flow rate ratio between the continuous and disperse phases, the increase of the flow rates decreased the volume increase ratio. In addition, it is also found that the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio all increased with the laser power. When the laser was focused at the inlet of the downstream channel, the droplet volume, the cycle time and the volume increase ratio were the largest. Moving the laser spot to the downstream or upstream led to the decrease of them. When the laser was focused on the outlet of the liquid water inflow channel, the generated droplet volume and cycle time of the droplet generation were even lower than the case without the laser because of the lowered viscosity. This works provides a comprehensive understanding of the characteristics of the droplet generation controlled

  5. Experimental and numerical study of atmospheric turbulence and dispersion in stable conditions and in near field at a complex site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed in order to study pollutants dispersion at a complex site with a focus on stable conditions, which are still challenging for numerical modelling. This experimental program is being conducted at the SIRTA site in a southern suburb of Paris and consists in measuring, in near field, the turbulence and the pollutants dispersion. The aim of this program is to characterize the fine structure of turbulence and associated dispersion through high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. Then, these measurements allow to validate and improve the performance of CFD simulation for turbulence and dispersion in a heterogeneous field. The instrumental set up includes 12 ultrasonic anemometers measuring continuously wind velocity and temperature at 10 Hz, and 6 photo-ionization detectors (PIDs) measuring gas concentration at 50 Hz during tracer tests. Intensive observations periods (IOPs) with gas releases have been performed since March 2012. First of all, a detailed study of flow on the site is made, because it must be characterised and properly simulated before attempting to simulate the pollutants dispersion. This study is based on two years of continuous measurements and on measurements performed during IOPs. Turbulence strong anisotropy in the surface layer is characterized by calculating variances, integral length scales and power spectra of the three wind velocity components. Propagation of turbulent structures between sensors has been characterized with velocity correlations. Energy spectra show several slopes in different frequency regions. Also, data analyses show impact of terrain heterogeneity on the measurements. The forest to the north of the experimental field modifies wind velocity and direction for a large northerly sector. It induces a strong directional wind shear and a wind deceleration below the forest height. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code, Code-Saturne, in RANS mode with a standard k

  6. Experimental and numerical study of atmospheric turbulence and dispersion in stable conditions and in near field at a complex site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed in order to study pollutants dispersion at a complex site with a focus on stable conditions, which are still challenging for numerical modelling. This experimental program is being conducted at the SIRTA site in a southern suburb of Paris and consists in measuring, in near field, the turbulence and the pollutants dispersion. The aim of this program is to characterize the fine structure of turbulence and associated dispersion through high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. Then, these measurements allow to validate and improve the performance of CFD simulation for turbulence and dispersion in a heterogeneous field. The instrumental set up includes 12 ultrasonic anemometers measuring continuously wind velocity and temperature at 10 Hz, and 6 photo-ionization detectors (PIDs) measuring gas concentration at 50 Hz during tracer tests. Intensive observations periods (IOPs) with gas releases have been performed since March 2012.First of all, a detailed study of flow on the site is made, because it must be characterised and properly simulated before attempting to simulate the pollutants dispersion. This study is based on two years of continuous measurements and on measurements performed during IOPs. Turbulence strong anisotropy in the surface layer is characterized by calculating variances, integral length scales and power spectra of the three wind velocity components. Propagation of turbulent structures between sensors has been characterized with velocity correlations. Energy spectra show several slopes in different frequency regions. Also, data analyses show impact of terrain heterogeneity on the measurements. The forest to the north of experimental field modifies wind velocity and direction for a large northerly sector. It induces a strong directional wind shear and a wind deceleration below the forest height. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code Code-Saturne in RANS mode with a standard κ

  7. Two-Fluid Models for Simulating Dispersed Multiphase Flows-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.X. Zhou

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of two-fluid models for simulating dispersed multiphase flows (gas-particle, gas-droplet, bubble-liquid, liquid-particle flows by the present author within the last 20 years is systematically reviewed. The two-fluid models based on Reynolds expansion, time averaging and mass-weighed averaging, and also PDF transport equations are described. Different versions of two-phase turbulence models, including the unified second-order moment (USM and k-ε-kp models, the DSM-PDF model, the SOM-MC model, the nonlinear k-e-kp model, and the USM-Θ model for dense gas-particle flows and their application and experimental validation are discussed.

  8. The Intrinsic Variability in the Water Vapor Saturation Ratio due to Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. C.; Cantrell, W. H.; Chandrakar, K. K.; Kostinski, A. B.; Niedermeier, D.; Shaw, R. A.

    2017-12-01

    In the atmosphere, the concentration of water vapor plays an important role in Earth's weather and climate. The mean concentration of water vapor is key to its efficiency as a greenhouse gas; the fluctuations about the mean are important for heat fluxes near the surface of earth. In boundary layer clouds, fluctuations in the water vapor concentration are linked to turbulence. Conditions representative of boundary layer clouds are simulated in Michigan Tech's multiphase, turbulent reaction chamber, the ∏ chamber, where the boundary conditions are controlled and repeatable. Measurements for temperature and water vapor concentration were recorded under forced Rayleigh-Bénard convection. As expected, the distributions for temperature and water vapor concentration broaden as the turbulence becomes more vigorous. From these two measurements the saturation ratio can be calculated. The fluctuations in the water vapor concentration are more important to the variability in the saturation ratio than fluctuations in temperature. In a cloud, these fluctuations in the saturation ratio can result in some cloud droplets experiencing much higher supersaturations. Those "lucky" droplets grow by condensation at a faster rate than other cloud droplets. The difference in the droplet growth rate could contribute to a broadened droplet distribution, which leads to the onset of collision-coalescence. With more intense turbulence these effect will become more pronounced as the fluctuations about the mean saturation ratio become more pronounced.

  9. Entropy Production in Pipeline Flow of Dispersions of Water in Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajinder Pal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Entropy production in pipeline adiabatic flow of water-in-oil emulsions is investigated experimentally in three different diameter pipes. The dispersed-phase (water droplets concentration of emulsion is varied from 0 to 41% vol. The entropy production rates in emulsion flow are compared with the values expected in single-phase flow of Newtonian fluids with the same properties (viscosity and density. While in the laminar regime the entropy production rates in emulsion flow can be described adequately by the single-phase Newtonian equations, a significant deviation from single-phase flow behavior is observed in the turbulent regime. In the turbulent regime, the entropy production rates in emulsion flow are found to be substantially smaller than those expected on the basis of single-phase equations. For example, the entropy production rate in water-in-oil emulsion flow at a dispersed-phase volume fraction of 0.41 is only 38.4% of that observed in flow of a single-phase Newtonian fluid with the same viscosity and density, when comparison is made at a Reynolds number of 4000. Thus emulsion flow in pipelines is more efficient thermodynamically than single-phase Newtonian flow.

  10. Computation of atmospheric dispersion coefficients from measurements of turbulence parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asculai, E.

    1975-04-01

    Some of the spectra of turbulence found in the literature are theoretical and some are experimental. The present work investigates the dependence of the dispersion coefficients (sigma sub(y) especially) on the shape of the spectrum, using the theoretical and the experimental data found in the literature. It seems that, contrary to accepted concepts, the value of P (in the proportion sigma α Tsup(P)) is larger under stable, than under unstable conditions. These values are of order 1, which does not agree with Taylor's asymptotic value of 1/2. The influence of the characteristics of the instrument - especially the time constant - on the estimation of sigma sub(y) is discussed. Inaccurate estimate of sigmasub(y) may result in underestimating concentrations by an order of magnitude (or even more). The results of the computations of sigma sub(y) for various release times given here enable a more accurate estimate of those concentrations. The results of a series of measurements demonstrating the principles discussed are presented, indicating a practical way of estimating the dispersion coefficients. (author)

  11. Diffusion and dispersion characteristics of hybridized discontinuous Galerkin methods for under-resolved turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Rodrigo; Fernandez, Pablo; Mengaldo, Gianmarco

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dispersion and diffusion characteristics of hybridized discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. This provides us with insights to develop robust and accurate high-order DG discretizations for under-resolved flow simulations. Using the eigenanalysis technique introduced in (Moura et al., JCP, 2015 and Mengaldo et al., Computers & Fluids, 2017), we present a dispersion-diffusion analysis for the linear advection-diffusion equation. The effect of the accuracy order, the Riemann flux and the viscous stabilization are investigated. Next, we examine the diffusion characteristics of hybridized DG methods for under-resolved turbulent flows. The implicit large-eddy simulation (iLES) of the inviscid and viscous Taylor-Green vortex (TGV) problems are considered to this end. The inviscid case is relevant in the limit of high Reynolds numbers Re , i.e. negligible molecular viscosity, while the viscous case explores the effect of Re on the accuracy and robustness of the simulations. The TGV cases considered here are particularly crucial to under-resolved turbulent free flows away from walls. We conclude the talk with a discussion on the connections between hybridized and standard DG methods for under-resolved flow simulations.

  12. A model for dispersed flow heat transfer in rod bundles during reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.

    1980-01-01

    The present model calculates the heat transfer characteristics of the non-equilibrium dispersed droplet flow regime above the quench front during reflood by solving simultaneously the wall-to-vapor interactions, wall-to-droplet interactions and vapor-to-droplet interactions by an iterative numerical method. The unique feature in the present study is various heat transfer mechanisms are combined in an overall energy balance equation, and the convective heat transfer to vapor is obtained by calculating the vapor temperature distributions at the heated walls. The reactor rod bundle geometry, axial variations of vapor temperature and flow properties, radiative heat transfers, and enhancement of heat transfer due to turbulence are considered carefully, so that the present model could be used to predict PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) reflood heat transfers, and hence the fuel cladding wall temperature transients. In order to achieve closure of the problem formulations, the droplet size and its motion are determined from the FLECHT (Full Length Emergency Cooling Heat Transfer Program) low flooding rate series consine axial power shape test data. The model is then verified by comparing the heat transfer predictions with FLECHT low flooding rate series skewed axial power shape test data. Comparisons of predictions with data show satisfactory agreements

  13. Hydrodynamic stability of inverted annular flow in an adiabatic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.; Linehan, J.

    1986-01-01

    Inverted annular flow was simulated adiabatically with turbulent water jets, issuing downward from large aspect ratio nozzles, enclosed in gas annuli. Velocities, diameters, and gas species were varied, and core jet length, shape, breakup mode, and dispersed core droplet sizes were recorded at approximately 750 data points. Inverted annular flow destabilization led to inverted slug flow at low relative velocities, and to dispersed droplet flow, core breakup length correlations were developed by extending work on free liquid jets to include this coaxial, jet disintegration phenomenon. The results show length dependence upon D/sub J/, Re/sub J/, We/sub J/, α, and We/sub G/,rel. Correlations for core shape, breakup mechanisms, and dispersed core droplet size were also developed, by extending the results of free jet stability, roll wave entrainment, and churn turbulent droplet stability studies

  14. Sound Propagation in Gas-Vapor-Droplet Suspensions with Evaporation and Nonlinear Particle Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandula, Max

    2012-01-01

    The Sound attenuation and dispersion in saturated gas-vapor-droplet mixture in the presence of evaporation has been investigated theoretically. The theory is based on an extension of the work of Davidson to accommodate the effects of nonlinear particle relaxation processes of mass, momentum and energy transfer on sound attenuation and dispersion. The results indicate the existence of a spectral broadening effect in the attenuation coefficient (scaled with respect to the peak value) with a decrease in droplet mass concentration. It is further shown that for large values of the droplet concentration the scaled attenuation coefficient is characterized by a universal spectrum independent of droplet mass concentration.

  15. Numerical fluid dynamics calculations of nonequilibrium steam-water flows with entrained droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    The present work has developed a computational fluid dynamics formulation that efficiently solves the conservation laws for a vapor field, a continuous liquid field, and two dispersed droplet fields. The thermal-hydraulic effects resulting from the exchange of mass, momentum and energy between the vapor and the dispersed droplet phases has been accurately modeled. This work is an advancement of the state-of-the-art for engineering analyses of nonequilibrium steam-water-droplet flows in heated channels. It is particularly applicable for boiling steam-water flows in which it is important to represent the effects of significant thermal nonequilibrium between the vapor and the liquid phases. This work was shown to be in good agreement with unique experimental measurements of significant thermal nonequilibrium between the vapor and dispersed droplets. The tests analyzed covered a range of mass fluxes and wall heating rates, and were all at low pressures where nonequilibrium effects are most pronounced

  16. Turbulence and dispersion flow of radioisotopes in the atmospheric Boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Said, S.I.M.

    2013-01-01

    There is an increase in the study of atmospheric pollution and harmful impact on environment, in this work attention was forward to atmospheric diffusion equation to evaluate the concentration pollution with different methods under different stability conditions. The material in the present thesis is organized in six chapters in the following way: Chapter (1), it describe as. In section 1.1, General Introduction, In section 1.2, Turbulence, In section 1.3, Turbulence of the atmosphere. In section 1.4, Atmospheric stability. In section 1.5, Atmospheric pollution. In section 1.6, Behavior of effluent released to the atmosphere. In section 1.7, Source Types. In section 1.8, Atmospheric Dispersion Theories (Modeling). In section 1.9 Comparison between Some Models. In section 1.10, The Planetary Boundary Layer. Chapter (2), it describe as: In section 2.1 , Introduction. In section 2.2, Analytical Method. In section 2.3, Numerical Method. In section 2.4, Statistical method. In chapter (3), it describe as: In section 3.1, Introduction. In section 3.2, Analytical solution. In section 3.3, statically methods.Chapter (4), it contain following: In section 4.1, Introduction. In section 4.2, Proposed model structure. In section 4.3, the effective height. In section 4.4, Mathematical technique In section 4. 5, Case study. In section 4.6, Verification. Chapter (5), one can find as: In section 5.1, Introduction. In section 5.2, Gaussian distributions. In section 5.3, Dispersion parameters schemes. In section 5.4, Result and discussion. In section 5.5 Statistical methods. Chapter (6), it can be arranged in the following: In section 6.1, Introduction. In section 6.2, Model formulation. In section 6.3, Results and Discussion. In section 6.4, Statistical method.

  17. Liquid crystal droplet formation and anchoring dynamics in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Ben; Shen, Amy; Feng, James; Link, Darren

    2004-11-01

    Liquid crystal drops dispersed in a continuous phase of silicon oil are generated with a narrow distribution in droplet size in microfluidic devices both above and below the nematic to isotropic transition temperature. For these two cases, we observe not only the different LC droplet generation and coalescence dynamics, but also distinct droplet morphology. Our experiments show that the nematic liquid crystalline order is important for the LC droplet formation and anchoring dynamics.

  18. Numerical Study on Sensitivity of Pollutant Dispersion on Turbulent Schmidt Number in a Street Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, J.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, sensitivity of pollutant dispersion on turbulent Schmidt number (Sct) was investigated in a street canyon using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. For this, numerical simulations with systematically varied Sct were performed and the CFD model results were validated against a wind‒tunnel measurement data. The results showed that root mean square error (RMSE) was quite dependent on Sct and dispersion patterns of non‒reactive scalar pollutant with different Sct were quite different among the simulation results. The RMSE was lowest in the case of Sct = 0.35 and the apparent dispersion pattern was most similar to the wind‒tunnel data in the case of Sct = 0.35. Also, numerical simulations using spatially weighted Sct were additionally performed in order for the best reproduction of the wind‒tunnel data. Detailed method and procedure to find the best reproduction will be presented.

  19. A Full-Scale Study of Exhaled Droplet Dispersion in the Microenvironment around one and two Persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Li, Yuguo; Khalegi, Farzad

    Airborne cross infection is based on transmission of microorganisms attached to exhaled droplets or particles. Traditionally two transmission routes are considered, namely via droplet nuclei ( 5-10 μm), and they correspond to two infection routes: droplet infection...... and airborne infection. A transition may take place from droplet-borne infection to airborne infection, because the exhaled droplets may evaporate in the air and droplets become droplet nuclei. Full-scale experiments on the movement of droplet nuclei (airborne infection) have been performed in a number...

  20. Comparison of various droplet breakup models in gas-liquid flows in high-pressure environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, H.; Ganji, D. D.; Omidvar, A.

    2008-01-01

    Droplet breakup affects spray penetration and evaporation, and plays a critical role in engine efficiency. The purpose of this research was to examine the rate of penetration and evaporation of droplets in a combustion chamber, and the efficiency of the engine when liquid jet is injected into the compressed gas chamber in an axi-symmetrical fashion leading to a turbulent and unsteady flow. As a result of interaction with the highly compressed air in the chamber, the liquid jet breaks up and forms minute droplets. These particles will in turn breakup because of aerodynamic forces, producing even smaller droplets. A number of models are available for analyzing the breakup of droplets; however, each model is typically reliable only over a limited parameter range. In this research three well-known models are applied for droplet breakup modeling and their results are compared. To obtain the details of the flow field, the Eulerian gas phase mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, as well as equations governing the transport of turbulence and fuel vapor mass fraction are solved together with equations of trajectory, momentum, mass and energy conservation for liquid droplets in Lagrangian form. The numerical solution is performed using the finite volume method and EPISO (Engine-PISO) algorithm. The results obtained from the models show that the breakup process in a high pressure environment significantly affects the penetration and evaporation rates of the spray, and the droplet size is determined by the balance between breakup and coalescence processes. It is also shown that the details of atomization in the nozzle do not significantly influence the ultimate size of droplets. It should be mentioned that droplet collision modeling has been taken into account in the computer code and is activated wherever necessary

  1. Turbulent Fogwater Flux Measurements Above A Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkard, R.; Eugster, W.; Buetzberger, P.; Siegwolf, R.

    Many forest ecosystems in elevated regions receive a significant fraction of their wa- ter and nutrient input by the interception of fogwater. Recently, several studies have demonstrated the suitability of the eddy covariance technique for the direct measure- ment of turbulent liquid water fluxes. Since summer 2001 a fogwater flux measure- ment equipment has been running at a montane site above a mixed forest canopy in Switzerland. The measurement equipment consists of a high-speed size-resolving droplet spectrometer and a three-dimensional ultrasonic anemometer. The chemical composition of the fogwater was determined from samples collected with a modified Caltech active strand collector. The deposition of nutrients by fog (occult deposition) was calculated by multiplying the total fogwater flux (total of measured turbulent and calculated gravitational flux) during each fog event by the ionic concentrations found in the collected fogwater. Several uncertainties still exist as far as the accuracy of the measurements is con- cerned. Although there is no universal statistical approach for testing the quality of the liquid water flux data directly, results of independent data quality checks of the two time series involved in the flux computation and accordingly the two instruments (ultrasonic anemometer and the droplet spectrometer) are presented. Within the measurement period, over 80 fog events with a duration longer than 2.5 hours were analyzed. An enormous physical and chemical heterogeneity among these fog events was found. We assume that some of this heterogeneity is due to the fact that fog or cloud droplets are not conservative entities: the turbulent flux of fog droplets, which can be referred to as the liquid water flux, is affected by phase change processes and coagulation. The measured coexistence of upward fluxes of small fog droplets (di- ameter < 10 µm) with the downward transport of larger droplets indicates the influ- ence of such processes. With the

  2. The dispersal of phytoplankton populations by enhanced turbulent mixing in a shallow coastal sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jaimie; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.; Hosegood, Philip J.; Torres, Ricardo

    2014-08-01

    A single tidal cycle survey in a Lagrangian reference frame was conducted in autumn 2010 to evaluate the impact of short-term, episodic and enhanced turbulent mixing on large chain-forming phytoplankton. Observations of turbulence using a free-falling microstructure profiler were undertaken, along with near-simultaneous profiles with an in-line digital holographic camera at station L4 (50° 15‧ N 4° 13‧ W, depth 50 m) in the Western English Channel. Profiles from each instrument were collected hourly whilst following a drogued drifter. Results from an ADCP attached to the drifter showed pronounced vertical shear, indicating that the water column structure consisted of two layers, restricting interpretation of the Lagrangian experiment to the upper ~ 25 m. Atmospheric conditions deteriorated during the mid-point of the survey, resulting in values of turbulent dissipation reaching a maximum of 10- 4 W kg- 1 toward the surface in the upper 10 m. Chain-forming phytoplankton > 200 μm were counted using the data from the holographic camera for the two periods, before and after the enhanced mixing event. As mixing increased phytoplankton underwent chain breakage, were dispersed by advection through their removal from the upper to lower layer and subjected to aggregation with other suspended material. Depth averaged counts of phytoplankton were reduced from a maximum of around 2050 L- 1 before the increased turbulence, to 1070 L- 1 after, with each of these mechanisms contributing to this reduction. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of phytoplantkon populations to moderate increases in turbulent activity, yielding consequences for accurate forecasting of the role played by phytoplankton in climate studies and also for the ecosystem in general in their role as primary producers.

  3. Response of two-phase droplets to intense electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James F.; Maloney, Daniel J.; Lawson, William F.; Casleton, Kent H.

    1993-01-01

    The response of two-phase droplets to intense radiant heating is studied to determine the incident power that is required for causing explosive boiling in the liquid phase. The droplets studied consist of strongly absorbing coal particles dispersed in a weakly absorbing water medium. Experiments are performed by confining droplets (radii of 37, 55, and 80 microns) electrodynamically and irradiating them from two sides with pulsed laser beams. Emphasis is placed on the transition region from accelerated droplet vaporization to droplet superheating and explosive boiling. The time scale observed for explosive boiling is more than 2 orders of magnitude longer than published values for pure liquids. The delayed response is the result of energy transfer limitations between the absorbing solid phase and the surrounding liquid.

  4. The validity of the kinetic collection equation revisited – Part 3: Sol–gel transition under turbulent conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baumgardner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm rain in real clouds is produced by the collision and coalescence of an initial population of small droplets. The production of rain in warm cumulus clouds is still one of the open problems in cloud physics, and although several mechanisms have been proposed in the past, at present there is no complete explanation for the rapid growth of cloud droplets within the size range of diameters from 10 to 50 μm. By using a collection kernel enhanced by turbulence and a fully stochastic simulation method, the formation of a runaway droplet is modeled through the turbulent collection process. When the runaway droplet forms, the traditional calculation using the kinetic collection equation is no longer valid, since the assumption of a continuous distribution breaks down. There is in essence a phase transition in the system from a continuous distribution to a continuous distribution plus a runaway droplet. This transition can be associated to gelation (also called sol–gel transition and is proposed here as a mechanism for the formation of large droplets required to trigger warm rain development in cumulus clouds. The fully stochastic turbulent model reveals gelation and the formation of a droplet with mass comparable to the mass of the initial system. The time when the sol–gel transition occurs is estimated with a Monte Carlo method when the parameter ρ (the ratio of the standard deviation for the largest droplet mass over all the realizations to the averaged value reaches its maximum value. Moreover, we show that the non-turbulent case does not exhibit the sol–gel transition that can account for the impossibility of producing raindrop embryos in such a system. In the context of cloud physics theory, gelation can be interpreted as the formation of the "lucky droplet" that grows at a much faster rate than the rest of the population and becomes the embryo for runaway raindrops.

  5. Radioactive droplet moisture transfer from nuclear power plant spray pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokhin, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    Problem on transfer of radioactive droplet moisture with an account of its evaporation from the nuclear power plant spray pool (NPP coolant) is considered. Formulae enabling evaluation of droplet and radioactive water admixture lifetime as a whole, as well as the maximum distance (by wind), over which it can extend, are obtained. Recommendations for decrease in the droplet dispersed composition and reduction in scale of radioactive contamination of underlying surface are given. 10 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Operating range, hold-up, droplet size and axial mixing of pulsed plate columns in highly disperse and low-continuity volume flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, H.; Miller, H.

    Operating behavior, hold-up, droplet size and axial mixing are investigated in highly disperse and slightly continuous volume flows in a pulsed plate column. The geometry of the column of 4-m length and 10-cm inside diameter was held constant. The hole shape of the column bases was changed, wherby the cylindrical, sharp-edge drilled hole is compared with the punched, nozzle-shaped hole in their effects on the fluid-dynamic behavior. In this case we varied the volume flows, the ratio of volume flows, the pulse frequency and the operating temperature. The operation was held constant for the aqueous, the organic, the continuous and the disperse phases. The objective was to demonstrate the applicability of pulsed plate columns with very large differences between the organic disperse and the aqueous continuous volume flow, to obtain design data for such columns and to perform a scale-up to industrial reprocessing plant-size. 18 references, 11 figures, 3 tables

  7. Post-dryout heat transfer and entrained droplet sizes at low pressure and low flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H.Y.; No, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    The entrainment mechanisms and the entrained droplet sizes with relation to the flow regimes are investigated. Through the analysis of many experimental post-dryout data, it is shown that the most probable flow regime near dryout or quench front is not annular flow but churn-turbulent flow when the mass flux is low. A correlation describing the initial droplet size just after the CHF position at low mass flux is suggested through regression analysis. The history-dependent post-dryout model of Varone and Rohsenow replaced by the Webb-Chen model for wall-vapor heat transfer is used as a reference model in the analysis. In the post-dryout region at low pressure and low flow, it is found that the suggested one-dimensional mechanistic model is not applicable when the vapor superficial velocity is very low. This is explained by the change of main entrainment mechanism with the change of flow regime. In bubbly or slug flow a number of tiny droplets generated from bubble burst become important in the heat transfer after dryout. Therefore, the suggested correlation is valid only in the churn-turbulent flow regime (j g * = 0.5∼4.5). It is also suggested that the droplet size generated from the churn-turbulent surface is dependent not only on the pressure but also on the vapor velocity. It turns out that the present model can predict the measured cladding and vapor temperatures within 20% and 25%, respectively

  8. On-demand liquid-in-liquid droplet metering and fusion utilizing pneumatically actuated membrane valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Bo-Chih; Su, Yu-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an active emulsification scheme that is capable of producing micro-droplets with desired volumes and compositions on demand. Devices with pneumatically actuated membranes constructed on top of specially designed microfluidic channels are utilized to meter and fuse liquid-in-liquid droplets. By steadily pressurizing a fluid and intermittently blocking its flow, droplets with desired volumes are dispersed into another fluid. Furthermore, droplets from multiple sources are fused together to produce combined droplets with desired compositions. In the prototype demonstration, a three-layer PDMS molding and irreversible bonding process was employed to fabricate the proposed microfluidic devices. For a dispersed-phase flow that is normally blocked by a membrane valve, the relationship between the volume (V) of a metered droplet and the corresponding valve open time (T) is found to be approximately V = kT a , in which k and a are constants determined mainly by the fluid-driving pressures. In addition to the metering device, functional droplet entrapment, fusion and flow-switching devices were also integrated in the system to produce desired combined droplets and deliver them to intended destinations upon request. As such, the demonstrated microfluidic system could potentially realize the controllability on droplet volume, composition and motion, which is desired for a variety of chemical and biological applications

  9. Modeling Evaporation and Particle Assembly in Colloidal Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2017-06-13

    Evaporation-induced assembly of nanoparticles in a drying droplet is of great importance in many engineering applications, including printing, coating, and thin film processing. The investigation of particle dynamics in evaporating droplets can provide fundamental hydrodynamic insight for revealing the processing-structure relationship in the particle self-organization induced by solvent evaporation. We develop a free-energy-based multiphase lattice Boltzmann method coupled with Brownian dynamics to simulate evaporating colloidal droplets on solid substrates with specified wetting properties. The influence of interface-bound nanoparticles on the surface tension and evaporation of a flat liquid-vapor interface is first quantified. The results indicate that the particles at the interface reduce surface tension and enhance evaporation flux. For evaporating particle-covered droplets on substrates with different wetting properties, we characterize the increase of evaporate rate via measuring droplet volume. We find that droplet evaporation is determined by the number density and circumferential distribution of interfacial particles. We further correlate particle dynamics and assembly to the evaporation-induced convection in the bulk and on the surface of droplet. Finally, we observe distinct final deposits from evaporating colloidal droplets with bulk-dispersed and interface-bound particles. In addition, the deposit pattern is also influenced by the equilibrium contact angle of droplet.

  10. Relation between Raman backscattering from droplets and bulk water: Effect of refractive index dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakhotnik, Taras; Reichardt, Jens

    2018-03-01

    A theoretical framework is presented that permits investigations of the relation between inelastic backscattering from microparticles and bulk samples of Raman-active materials. It is based on the Lorentz reciprocity theorem and no fundamental restrictions concerning the microparticle shape apply. The approach provides a simple and intuitive explanation for the enhancement of the differential backscattering cross-section in particles in comparison to bulk. The enhancement factor for scattering of water droplets in the diameter range from 0 to 60 μm (vitally important for the a priori measurement of liquid water content of warm clouds with spectroscopic Raman lidars) is about a factor of 1.2-1.6 larger (depending on the size of the sphere) than an earlier study has shown. The numerical calculations are extended to 1000 μm and demonstrate that dispersion of the refractive index of water becomes an important factor for spheres larger than 100 μm. The physics of the oscillatory phenomena predicted by the simulations is explained.

  11. Study of droplet entrainment from bubbling surface in a bubble column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez de Santiago, M.

    1991-05-01

    In a bubble column droplets are ejected from the free surface by bubble bursting or splashing. Depending on their size, the droplets are partly carried away by the streaming gas or fall back to the bubbling surface by gravity force. Experiments have been carried out to determine the void fraction in the column by means of an optical probe. In the interfacial zone the bubble bursting process was captured with a high-speed video camera. Simultaneous measurements were made of size and velocity of droplets at several distances from the bubbling surface with a Phase-Doppler Anemometry. The bubble column can be divided into three regions: A lower zone with a flat profile of the local void fraction, a central zone where the flow regime is steady and an upper zone where the local void fraction grows rapidly. A two-parameter log-normal distribution function was proposed in order to describe the polydisperse distribution of droplet-size. Results were obtained concerning the entrainment, concentration, volume fraction and interfacial area of droplets. Finally, it was found that the turbulence intensity affects the droplet terminal velocity for droplets smaller than the Kolmogorov microscale [fr

  12. Nanoparticle motion on the surface of drying droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingfei; Yong, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Advances in solution-based printing and surface patterning techniques for additive manufacturing demand a clear understanding of particle dynamics in drying colloidal droplets and its relationship with deposit structure. Although the evaporation-driven deposition has been studied thoroughly for the particles dispersed in the bulk of the droplet, few investigations have focused on the particles strongly adsorbed to the droplet surface. We modeled the assembly and deposition of the surface-active particles in a drying sessile droplet with a pinned contact line by the multiphase lattice Boltzmann-Brownian dynamics method. The particle trajectory and its area density profile characterize the assembly dynamics and deposition pattern development during evaporation. While the bulk-dispersed particles continuously move to the contact line, forming the typical "coffee-ring" deposit, the interface-bound particles migrate first toward the apex and then to the contact line as the droplet dries out. To understand this unexpected behavior, we resolve the droplet velocity field both in the bulk and within the interfacial region. The simulation results agree well with the analytical solution for the Stokes flow inside an evaporating droplet. At different stages of evaporation, our study reveals that the competition between the tangential surface flow and the downward motion of the evaporating liquid-vapor interface governs the dynamics of the interface-bound particles. In particular, the interface displacement contributes to the particle motion toward the droplet apex in a short phase, while the outward advective flow prevails at the late stage of drying and carries the particles to the contact line. The final deposit of the surface-adsorbed particles exhibits a density enhancement at the center, in addition to a coffee ring. Despite its small influence on the final deposit in the present study, the distinct dynamics of surface-active particles due to the interfacial confinement

  13. Coalescence kinetics of dispersed crude oil in a laboratory reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterling, M.C. Jr.; Ojo, T.; Autenrieth, R.L.; Bonner, J.S.; Page, C.A.; Ernst, A.N.S.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to examine the effects of salinity and mixing energy on the resurfacing and coalescence rates of chemically dispersed crude oil droplets. This kinetic study involved the use of mean shear rates to characterize the mixing energy in a laboratory reactor. Coagulation kinetics of dispersed crude oil were determined within a range of mean shear rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 per second, and with salinity values of 10 and 30 per cent. Observed droplet distributions were fit to a transport-reaction model to estimate collision efficiency values and their dependence on salinity and mixing energy. Dispersant efficiencies were compared with those derived from other laboratory testing methods. Experimentally determined dispersant efficiencies were found to be 10 to 50 per cent lower than predicted using a non-interacting droplet model, but dispersant efficiencies were higher than those predicted using other testing methods. 24 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  14. Effects of chemical dispersants on oil physical properties and dispersion. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Fingas, M.; Hollebone, B.P.; Brown, C.E.; Pjontek, D.

    2007-01-01

    Laboratory and field testing have shown that the dispersion of oil spilled in water is influenced by chemical dispersants via the modification of the interfacial properties of the oil, such as oil-brine interfacial tension (IFT). This study focused on new laboratory experiments that measured the effects on the physical properties and dispersion of oil, with particular reference to the effects of chemical dispersants on IFT and oil viscosity and the subsequent effects on oil droplet formation. Experiments were conducted at 15 degrees C using Arabian Medium, Alaska North Slope and South Louisiana crude and Corexit 9500 and Corexit 9527 chemical dispersants. The dispersants were denser than the 3 oils. The effect of IFT reduction on oil dispersion was measured and showed substantial reduction in the size and enhancement of the concentration of oil droplets in the water column. It was shown that the brine-oil IFT associated with the 3 crudes reduced to less than 3.6 mN/m with the application of the chemical dispersants, even at a low dispersant-to-oil ratio (DOR) value of 1:200. The use of chemical dispersants increased the viscosity of the dispersant-oil mixture up to 40 per cent over the neat crude oil. It was shown that for each mixing condition, an optimum value of DOR exists that provides for maximal dispersant effectiveness. The IFT reaches maximum reduction at optimum DOR. It was suggested that oil spill modelling can be improved with further study of IFT reduction with DOR and variations of critical micelle concentration with the type and solubility of chemical dispersant, oil type and oil to water ratio. 13 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs

  15. Sodium leakage and combustion tests. Measurement and distribution of droplet size using various spray nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Keiichi; Hirabayashi, Masaru; Onojima, T.; Gunji, Minoru; Ara, Kuniaki; Oki, Yoshihisa

    1999-04-01

    In order to develop a numerical code simulating sodium fires initiated frame dispersion of droplets, measured data of droplet diameter as well as its distribution are needed. In the present experiment the distribution of droplet diameter was measured using water, oil and sodium. The tests elucidated the influential factors with respect to the droplet diameter. In addition, we sought to develop a similarity law between water and sodium. The droplet size distribution of sodium using the large diameter droplet (Elnozzle) was predicted. (J.P.N.)

  16. Experimental study on oxidation and combustion characteristics of sodium droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhigang; Sun Shubin; Liu Chongchong; Tang Yexin

    2015-01-01

    In the operation of the sodium-cooled fast reactor, the accident caused by the leakage and combustion of liquid sodium is common and frequent. In this paper, the oxidation and combustion characteristics of sodium droplets were studied by carrying out the experiments of the oxidation and combustion under different conditions of initial temperatures (140-370℃) of the sodium droplets and oxygen concentrations (4%-21%). The oxidation and combustion behaviors were visualized by a set of combustion apparatus of sodium droplet and a high speed camera. The experiment results show that the columnar oxides grow longer as the initial temperature of sodium droplet and oxygen concentration become lower. Under the same oxygen concentration condition, the sodium droplet with the higher initial temperature is easier to ignite and burn. When the initial temperature of sodium droplet is below 200℃, it is very difficult to ignite. If there is a turbulence damaging the oxide layer on the surface, the sodium droplet will also burn gradually. When the initial temperature ranges from 140℃ to 370℃ and the oxygen fraction is equal to or higher than 12%, the sodium droplet could burn completely and the maximum combustion temperature could roughly reach 600-800℃. When the oxygen concentration is below 12%, the sodium droplet could not burn completely and the highest combustion temperature is below 600℃. The results are helpful to the research on the columnar flow and spray sodium fire. (authors)

  17. Bioreactor droplets from liposome-stabilized all-aqueous emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Daniel C.; Strulson, Christopher A.; Cacace, David N.; Bevilacqua, Philip C.; Keating, Christine D.

    2014-08-01

    Artificial bioreactors are desirable for in vitro biochemical studies and as protocells. A key challenge is maintaining a favourable internal environment while allowing substrate entry and product departure. We show that semipermeable, size-controlled bioreactors with aqueous, macromolecularly crowded interiors can be assembled by liposome stabilization of an all-aqueous emulsion. Dextran-rich aqueous droplets are dispersed in a continuous polyethylene glycol (PEG)-rich aqueous phase, with coalescence inhibited by adsorbed ~130-nm diameter liposomes. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and dynamic light scattering data indicate that the liposomes, which are PEGylated and negatively charged, remain intact at the interface for extended time. Inter-droplet repulsion provides electrostatic stabilization of the emulsion, with droplet coalescence prevented even for submonolayer interfacial coatings. RNA and DNA can enter and exit aqueous droplets by diffusion, with final concentrations dictated by partitioning. The capacity to serve as microscale bioreactors is established by demonstrating a ribozyme cleavage reaction within the liposome-coated droplets.

  18. Downstream pressure and elastic wall reflection of droplet flow in a T-junction microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yan; Liu, Zhaomiao; Zhao, Fuwang

    2016-08-01

    This paper discusses pressure variation on a wall during the process of liquid flow and droplet formation in a T-junction microchannel. Relevant pressure in the channel, deformation of the elastic wall, and responses of the droplet generation are analyzed using a numerical method. The pressure difference between the continuous and dispersed phases can indicate the droplet-generation period. The pressure along the channel of the droplet flow is affected by the position of droplets, droplet-generation period, and droplet escape from the outlet. The varying pressures along the channel cause a nonuniform deformation of the wall when they are elastic. The deformation is a vibration and has the same period as the droplet generation arising from the process of droplet formation.

  19. Flow Visualization in Supersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael Wayne

    This thesis is a collection of novel flow visualizations of two different flat-plate, zero pressure gradient, supersonic, turbulent boundary layers (M = 2.8, Re _theta ~ 82,000, and M = 2.5, Re_ theta ~ 25,000, respectively). The physics of supersonic shear flows has recently drawn increasing attention with the renewed interest in flight at super and hypersonic speeds. This work was driven by the belief that the study of organized, Reynolds -stress producing turbulence structures will lead to improved techniques for the modelling and control of high-speed boundary layers. Although flow-visualization is often thought of as a tool for providing qualitative information about complex flow fields, in this thesis an emphasis is placed on deriving quantitative results from image data whenever possible. Three visualization techniques were applied--'selective cut-off' schlieren, droplet seeding, and Rayleigh scattering. Two experiments employed 'selective cut-off' schlieren. In the first, high-speed movies (40,000 fps) were made of strong density gradient fronts leaning downstream at between 30^circ and 60^ circ and travelling at about 0.9U _infty. In the second experiment, the same fronts were detected with hot-wires and imaged in real time, thus allowing the examination of the density gradient fronts and their associated single-point mass -flux signals. Two experiments employed droplet seeding. In both experiments, the boundary layer was seeded by injecting a stream of acetone through a single point in the wall. The acetone is atomized by the high shear at the wall into a 'fog' of tiny (~3.5mu m) droplets. In the first droplet experiment, the fog was illuminated with copper-vapor laser sheets of various orientations. The copper vapor laser pulses 'froze' the fog motion, revealing a variety of organized turbulence structures, some with characteristic downstream inclinations, others with large-scale roll-up on the scale of delta. In the second droplet experiment, high

  20. Light particles in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagendra Prakash, Vivek

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with the broad topic of particles in turbulence, which has applications in a diverse number of fields. A vast majority of fluid flows found in nature and in the industry are turbulent and contain dispersed elements. In this thesis, I have focused on light particles (air bubbles in

  1. Integration of Gas Enhanced Oil Recovery in Multiphase Fermentations for the Microbial Production of Fuels and Chemicals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedraza de la Cuesta, S.; van der Wielen, L.A.M.; Cuellar Soares, M.C.

    2018-01-01

    In multiphase fermentations where the product forms a second liquid phase or where solvents are added for product extraction, turbulent conditions disperse the oil phase as droplets. Surface-active components (SACs) present in the fermentation broth can stabilize the product droplets thus forming

  2. Hydrodynamics of annular-dispersed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, M.; Kataoka, I.

    1982-01-01

    The interfacial drag, droplet entrainment, and droplet size distributions are important for detailed mechanistic modeling of annular dispersed two-phase flow. In view of this, recently developed correlations for these parameters are presented and discussed in this paper. The drag correlations for multiple fluid particle systems have been developed from a similarity hypothesis based on the mixture viscosity model. The results show that the drag coefficient depends on the particle Reynolds number and droplet concentration. The onset on droplet entrainment significantly alters the mechanisms of mass, momentum, and energy transfer between the film and gas core flow as well as the transfer between the two-phase mixture and the wall. By assuming the roll wave entrainment mechanism, the correlations for the amount of entrained droplet as well as for the droplet size distribution have been obtained from a simple model in collaboration with a large number of data

  3. Phenomenology and control of buckling dynamics in multicomponent colloidal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Binita; Basu, Saptarshi

    2015-06-01

    Self-assembly of nano sized particles during natural drying causes agglomeration and shell formation at the surface of micron sized droplets. The shell undergoes sol-gel transition leading to buckling at the weakest point on the surface and produces different types of structures. Manipulation of the buckling rate with inclusion of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS) and salt (anilinium hydrochloride, AHC) to the nano-sized particle dispersion (nanosilica) is reported here in an acoustically levitated single droplet. Buckling in levitated droplets is a cumulative, complicated function of acoustic streaming, chemistry, agglomeration rate, porosity, radius of curvature, and elastic energy of shell. We put forward our hypothesis on how buckling occurs and can be suppressed during natural drying of the droplets. Global precipitation of aggregates due to slow drying of surfactant-added droplets (no added salts) enhances the rigidity of the shell formed and hence reduces the buckling probability of the shell. On the contrary, adsorption of SDS aggregates on salt ions facilitates the buckling phenomenon with an addition of minute concentration of the aniline salt to the dispersion. Variation in the concentration of the added particles (SDS/AHC) also leads to starkly different morphologies and transient behaviour of buckling (buckling modes like paraboloid, ellipsoid, and buckling rates). Tuning of the buckling rate causes a transition in the final morphology from ring and bowl shapes to cocoon type of structure.

  4. Macro-scale turbulence modelling for flows in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinson, F.

    2006-03-01

    - This work deals with the macroscopic modeling of turbulence in porous media. It concerns heat exchangers, nuclear reactors as well as urban flows, etc. The objective of this study is to describe in an homogenized way, by the mean of a spatial average operator, turbulent flows in a solid matrix. In addition to this first operator, the use of a statistical average operator permits to handle the pseudo-aleatory character of turbulence. The successive application of both operators allows us to derive the balance equations of the kind of flows under study. Two major issues are then highlighted, the modeling of dispersion induced by the solid matrix and the turbulence modeling at a macroscopic scale (Reynolds tensor and turbulent dispersion). To this aim, we lean on the local modeling of turbulence and more precisely on the k - ε RANS models. The methodology of dispersion study, derived thanks to the volume averaging theory, is extended to turbulent flows. Its application includes the simulation, at a microscopic scale, of turbulent flows within a representative elementary volume of the porous media. Applied to channel flows, this analysis shows that even within the turbulent regime, dispersion remains one of the dominating phenomena within the macro-scale modeling framework. A two-scale analysis of the flow allows us to understand the dominating role of the drag force in the kinetic energy transfers between scales. Transfers between the mean part and the turbulent part of the flow are formally derived. This description significantly improves our understanding of the issue of macroscopic modeling of turbulence and leads us to define the sub-filter production and the wake dissipation. A f - f - w >f model is derived. It is based on three balance equations for the turbulent kinetic energy, the viscous dissipation and the wake dissipation. Furthermore, a dynamical predictor for the friction coefficient is proposed. This model is then successfully applied to the study of

  5. Mechanism and simulation of droplet coalescence in molten steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing; Zhang, Tao; Ni, Hai-qi; Luo, Zhi-guo

    2017-11-01

    Droplet coalescence in liquid steel was carefully investigated through observations of the distribution pattern of inclusions in solidified steel samples. The process of droplet coalescence was slow, and the critical Weber number ( We) was used to evaluate the coalescence or separation of droplets. The relationship between the collision parameter and the critical We indicated whether slow coalescence or bouncing of droplets occurred. The critical We was 5.5, which means that the droplets gradually coalesce when We ≤ 5.5, whereas they bounce when We > 5.5. For the carbonate wire feeding into liquid steel, a mathematical model implementing a combined computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-discrete element method (DEM) approach was developed to simulate the movement and coalescence of variably sized droplets in a bottom-argon-blowing ladle. In the CFD model, the flow field was solved on the premise that the fluid was a continuous medium. Meanwhile, the droplets were dispersed in the DEM model, and the coalescence criterion of the particles was added to simulate the collision- coalescence process of the particles. The numerical simulation results and observations of inclusion coalescence in steel samples are consistent.

  6. Stabilization of liquid crystal dispersions with acrylamide copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.J.; Kim, M.H.; Lee, J.R. [Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The effects of hydrophobic moieties(styrene and methyl methacrylate) on the stability of a liquid crystal(LC, E-7)-in-water dispersion stabilized by copolymers of hydrophilic acrylamide with hydrophobic monomers have been studied in terms of nematic curvilinear aligned phase(NCAP) system. It was observed that the preferential adsorption hydrophobic moieties onto LC droplet surface resulted in steric stabilization of the dispersion, due to increasing the interfacial tension of LC and reducing the LC droplet size. According to the interfacial tension, coalescence time, and sedimented layer thickness measurements, it was proposed that the presence of hydrophobic moieties allows to form the apolar microenvironment in the round of LC droplet and finally reduces the anchoring effect between LC and the polymeric wall. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Encapsulation of Single Nanoparticle in Fast-Evaporating Micro-droplets Prevents Particle Agglomeration in Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ming; Shi, Xinjian; Lyu, Fengjiao; Levy-Wendt, Ben Louis; Zheng, Xiaolin; Tang, Sindy K Y

    2017-08-09

    This work describes the use of fast-evaporating micro-droplets to finely disperse nanoparticles (NPs) in a polymer matrix for the fabrication of nanocomposites. Agglomeration of particles is a key obstacle for broad applications of nanocomposites. The classical approach to ensure the dispersibility of NPs is to modify the surface chemistry of NPs with ligands. The surface properties of NPs are inevitably altered, however. To overcome the trade-off between dispersibility and surface-functionality of NPs, we develop a new approach by dispersing NPs in a volatile solvent, followed by mixing with uncured polymer precursors to form micro-droplet emulsions. Most of these micro-droplets contain no more than one NP per drop, and they evaporate rapidly to prevent the agglomeration of NPs during the polymer curing process. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate the design and fabrication of TiO 2 NP@PDMS nanocomposites for solar fuel generation reactions with high photocatalytic efficiency and recyclability arising from the fine dispersion of TiO 2 . Our simple method eliminates the need for surface functionalization of NPs. Our approach is applicable to prepare nanocomposites comprising a wide range of polymers embedded with NPs of different composition, sizes, and shapes. It has the potential for creating nanocomposites with novel functions.

  8. Plume meander and dispersion in a stable boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, April L.; Miller, David R.; Nappo, Carmen J.

    2010-11-01

    Continuous lidar measurements of elevated plume dispersion and corresponding micrometeorology data are analyzed to establish the relationship between plume behavior and nocturnal boundary layer dynamics. Contrasting nights of data from the JORNADA field campaign in the New Mexico desert are analyzed. The aerosol lidar measurements were used to separate the plume diffusion (plume spread) from plume meander (displacement). Mutiresolution decomposition was used to separate the turbulence scale (90 s). Durations of turbulent kinetic energy stationarity and the wind steadiness were used to characterize the local scale and submesoscale turbulence. Plume meander, driven by submesoscale wind motions, was responsible for most of the total horizontal plume dispersion in weak and variable winds and strong stability. This proportion was reduced in high winds (i.e., >4 m s-1), weakly stable conditions but remained the dominant dispersion mechanism. The remainder of the plume dispersion in all cases was accounted for by internal spread of the plume, which is a small eddy diffusion process driven by turbulence. Turbulence stationarity and the wind steadiness are demonstrated to be closely related to plume diffusion and plume meander, respectively.

  9. Dispersant effectiveness: Studies into the causes of effectiveness variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.; Tennyson, E.

    1995-01-01

    Effectiveness, a key issue of using dispersants, is affected by many interrelated factors. The principal factors involved are the oil composition, dispersant formulation, sea surface turbulence and dispersant quantity. Oil composition is a very strong determinant. Current dispersant formulation effectiveness correlates strongly with the amount of saturate component in the oil. The other components of the oil, the asphaltenes, resins or polars and aromatic fractions show a negative correlation with the dispersant effectiveness. Viscosity is also a predictor of dispersant effectiveness and may have an effect because it is in turn determined by oil composition. Dispersant composition is significant and interacts with oil composition. Dispersants show high effectiveness at HLB values near 10. Sea turbulence strongly affects dispersant effectiveness.Effectiveness rises with increasing turbulence to a maximum value. Effectiveness for current commercial dispersants is gaussian around a peak salinity value. Peak effectiveness is achieved at very high dispersant quantities--at a ratio of 1:5, dispersant-to-oil volume. Dispersant effectiveness for those oils tested and under the conditions measured, is approximately logarithmic with dispersant quantity and will reach about 50% of its peak value at a dispersant to oil ratio of about 1:20 and near zero at a ratio of about 1:50

  10. Wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarenko, Sergey [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Mathematics Inst.

    2011-07-01

    Wave Turbulence refers to the statistical theory of weakly nonlinear dispersive waves. There is a wide and growing spectrum of physical applications, ranging from sea waves, to plasma waves, to superfluid turbulence, to nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. Beyond the fundamentals the book thus also covers new developments such as the interaction of random waves with coherent structures (vortices, solitons, wave breaks), inverse cascades leading to condensation and the transitions between weak and strong turbulence, turbulence intermittency as well as finite system size effects, such as ''frozen'' turbulence, discrete wave resonances and avalanche-type energy cascades. This book is an outgrow of several lectures courses held by the author and, as a result, written and structured rather as a graduate text than a monograph, with many exercises and solutions offered along the way. The present compact description primarily addresses students and non-specialist researchers wishing to enter and work in this field. (orig.)

  11. New Approaches in Modeling Multiphase Flows and Dispersion in Turbulence, Fractal Methods and Synthetic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolleau, FCGA; Redondo, J-M

    2012-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the main contributions from the first five workshops held by Ercoftac Special Interest Group on Synthetic Turbulence Models (SIG42. It is intended as an illustration of the sig's activities and of the latest developments in the field. This volume investigates the use of Kinematic Simulation (KS) and other synthetic turbulence models for the particular application to environmental flows. This volume offers the best syntheses on the research status in KS, which is widely used in various domains, including Lagrangian aspects in turbulence mixing/stirring, partic

  12. Mixing efficiency inside micro-droplets coalesced by two components in cross-structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yanlin; Liu, Zhaomiao; Pang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    The mixing of micro-droplets is used in analytical chemistry, medicine production and material synthesis owing to its advantages including the encapsulation and narrow time residence distribution. In this work, droplets are coalesced by two dispersed phase with different flow rates, generated in cross-structure and mixed in planar serpentine structure. The mixing efficiency of micro-droplets under control characters including the width of entrance and the flow rate of dispersed phases have been investigated by experiments and numerical simulations. The UDS (user-defined scalar) as dimensionless concentration of the solution is adopted in simulation, and is used to calculate the concentration and the mixing effect. By changing the flow rates and the entrances` width, the changing rules of the mixing characters have been obtained. The asymmetry distributions of components make rapid mixing process in half part of each droplet when travel through a straight channel. Increasing of the ratio of entrance width result into larger droplet and weaken the chaotic mixing effect. Meanwhile, the coalesced mechanism can be performed by ranging the ratio of flow rates, the ranges are also determined by the widths of entrances. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11572013).

  13. The pdf approach to turbulent polydispersed two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Peirano, Eric

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a probabilistic approach to turbulent polydispersed two-phase flows. The two-phase flows considered are composed of a continuous phase, which is a turbulent fluid, and a dispersed phase, which represents an ensemble of discrete particles (solid particles, droplets or bubbles). Gathering the difficulties of turbulent flows and of particle motion, the challenge is to work out a general modelling approach that meets three requirements: to treat accurately the physically relevant phenomena, to provide enough information to address issues of complex physics (combustion, polydispersed particle flows, …) and to remain tractable for general non-homogeneous flows. The present probabilistic approach models the statistical dynamics of the system and consists in simulating the joint probability density function (pdf) of a number of fluid and discrete particle properties. A new point is that both the fluid and the particles are included in the pdf description. The derivation of the joint pdf model for the fluid and for the discrete particles is worked out in several steps. The mathematical properties of stochastic processes are first recalled. The various hierarchies of pdf descriptions are detailed and the physical principles that are used in the construction of the models are explained. The Lagrangian one-particle probabilistic description is developed first for the fluid alone, then for the discrete particles and finally for the joint fluid and particle turbulent systems. In the case of the probabilistic description for the fluid alone or for the discrete particles alone, numerical computations are presented and discussed to illustrate how the method works in practice and the kind of information that can be extracted from it. Comments on the current modelling state and propositions for future investigations which try to link the present work with other ideas in physics are made at the end of the paper.

  14. Sphagnum moss disperses spores with vortex rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight L; Edwards, Joan

    2010-07-23

    Sphagnum spores, which have low terminal velocities, are carried by turbulent wind currents to establish colonies many kilometers away. However, spores that are easily kept aloft are also rapidly decelerated in still air; thus, dispersal range depends strongly on release height. Vascular plants grow tall to lift spores into sufficient wind currents for dispersal, but nonvascular plants such as Sphagnum cannot grow sufficiently high. High-speed videos show that exploding capsules of Sphagnum generate vortex rings to efficiently carry spores high enough to be dispersed by turbulent air currents. Spores launched ballistically at similar speeds through still air would travel a few millimeters and not easily reach turbulent air. Vortex rings are used by animals; here, we report vortex rings generated by plants.

  15. Modelling of coughed droplets in a hospital ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadrizadeh, Sasan; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Coughing and its importance for spreading respiratory infectious diseases has been confirmed in many previous studies. The dispersion process of respiratory droplets released by the coughing of a patient in a hospital ward was studied using computational fluid dynamics simulation. Two relatively ...

  16. Taylor dispersion in premixed combustion: Questions from turbulent combustion answered for laminar flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daou, Joel; Pearce, Philip; Al-Malki, Faisal

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of Taylor dispersion in premixed combustion and use it to clarify fundamental issues related to flame propagation in a flow field. In particular, simple analytical formulas are derived for variable density laminar flames with arbitrary Lewis number Le providing clear answers to important questions arising in turbulent combustion, when these questions are posed for the case of one-scale laminar parallel flows. Exploiting, in the context of a laminar Poiseuille flow model, a thick flame distinguished asymptotic limit for which the flow amplitude is large with the Reynolds number Re fixed, three main contributions are made. First, a link is established between Taylor dispersion [G. Taylor, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A 219, 186 (1953), 10.1098/rspa.1953.0139] and Damköhler's second hypothesis [G. Damköhler, Ber. Bunsen. Phys. Chem. 46, 601 (1940)] by describing analytically the enhancement of the effective propagation speed UT due to small flow scales. More precisely, it is shown that Damköhler's hypothesis is only partially correct for one-scale parallel laminar flows. Specifically, while the increase in UT due to the flow is shown to be directly associated with the increase in the effective diffusivity as suggested by Damköhler, our results imply that UT˜Re (for Re≫1 ) rather than UT˜√{Re} , as implied by Damköhler's hypothesis. Second, it is demonstrated analytically and confirmed numerically that, when UT is plotted versus the flow amplitude for fixed values of Re, the curve levels off to a constant value depending on Re. We may refer to this effect as the laminar bending effect as it mimics a similar bending effect known in turbulent combustion. Third, somewhat surprising implications associated with the dependence of UT and of the effective Lewis number Leeff on the flow are reported. For example, Leeff is found to vary from Le to Le-1 as Re varies from small to large values. Also, UT is found to be a monotonically increasing function

  17. Kinetic and dynamic probability-density-function descriptions of disperse turbulent two-phase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Profeta, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    This article analyzes the status of two classical one-particle probability density function (PDF) descriptions of the dynamics of discrete particles dispersed in turbulent flows. The first PDF formulation considers only the process made up by particle position and velocity Zp=(xp,Up) and is represented by its PDF p (t ;yp,Vp) which is the solution of a kinetic PDF equation obtained through a flux closure based on the Furutsu-Novikov theorem. The second PDF formulation includes fluid variables into the particle state vector, for example, the fluid velocity seen by particles Zp=(xp,Up,Us) , and, consequently, handles an extended PDF p (t ;yp,Vp,Vs) which is the solution of a dynamic PDF equation. For high-Reynolds-number fluid flows, a typical formulation of the latter category relies on a Langevin model for the trajectories of the fluid seen or, conversely, on a Fokker-Planck equation for the extended PDF. In the present work, a new derivation of the kinetic PDF equation is worked out and new physical expressions of the dispersion tensors entering the kinetic PDF equation are obtained by starting from the extended PDF and integrating over the fluid seen. This demonstrates that, under the same assumption of a Gaussian colored noise and irrespective of the specific stochastic model chosen for the fluid seen, the kinetic PDF description is the marginal of a dynamic PDF one. However, a detailed analysis reveals that kinetic PDF models of particle dynamics in turbulent flows described by statistical correlations constitute incomplete stand-alone PDF descriptions and, moreover, that present kinetic-PDF equations are mathematically ill posed. This is shown to be the consequence of the non-Markovian characteristic of the stochastic process retained to describe the system and the use of an external colored noise. Furthermore, developments bring out that well-posed PDF descriptions are essentially due to a proper choice of the variables selected to describe physical systems

  18. Ultrasound-driven Megahertz Faraday Waves for Generation of Monodisperse Micro Droplets and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chen S.; Mao, Rong W.; Lin, Shih K.; Tsai, Shirley C.; Boss, Gerry; Brenner, Matt; Smaldone, Gerry; Mahon, Sari; Shahverdi, Kaveh; Zhu, Yun

    Our theoretical findings on instability of Faraday waves at megahertz (MHz) drive frequency and realization of silicon-based MHz multiple-Fourier horn ultrasonic nozzles (MFHUNs) together have enabled generation of mono-disperse droplets of controllable diameter (2.5-6.0 μm) at very low electrical drive power (generator has imminent application to pulmonary (inhalation) drug delivery and other potential applications. Here an update of advances on analysis and design of the MHz MFHUNs and the underlying physical mechanism for generation of mono-disperse micro droplets, and the nebulizer platform for application to detoxification of cyanide poisoning are presented.

  19. Modelling for post-dryout heat transfer and droplet sizes at low pressure and low flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, H.Y.; No, H.C.

    1996-01-01

    A correlation describing the initial droplet size just after the CHF position at low mass flux is suggested through regression analysis. The history-dependent post-dryout model of Varone and Rohsenow replaced by the Webb-Chen model for wall-vapor heat transfer is used as a reference model in the analysis. In the post-dryout region at low pressure and low flow, it is found that the suggested one-dimensional mechanistic model is valid only in the churn-turbulent flow regime (j* g = 0.5 ∼ 4.5). It is also suggested that the droplet size generated from the churn-turbulent surface is dependent not only on the pressure but also on the vapor velocity. It turns out that the present model can predict the measured cladding and vapor temperatures within 20% and 15%, respectively

  20. Lagrangian properties of particles in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toschi, F.; Bodenschatz, E.

    2009-01-01

    The Lagrangian description of turbulence is characterized by a unique conceptual simplicity and by an immediate connection with the physics of dispersion and mixing. In this article, we report some motivations behind the Lagrangian description of turbulence and focus on the statistical properties of

  1. Atmospheric turbulence and diffusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (well known in the atmospheric dispersion community as the Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Laboratory, ATDL) is one of several field facilities of NOAAs Air Resources Laboratory, headquartered in Silver Spring, Maryland. The laboratory conducts research on matters of atmospheric diffusion and turbulent exchange, concerning air quality. ATDD focuses attention on the physics of the lower atmosphere, with special emphasis on the processes contributing to atmospheric transport, dispersion, deposition, and air-surface exchange, and on the development of predictive capabilities using the results of this research. Research is directed toward issues of national and global importance related to the missions of DOE, to DOE's Oak Ridge Field Office, and to NOAA. The program is divided into four major projects: plume transport and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer, complex topography, canopy micrometeorology, and air-surface exchange

  2. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with solidification of floating organic droplets for simultaneous extraction of pesticides, pharmaceuticals and personal care products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marube, Liziane Cardoso; Caldas, Sergiane Souza; Soares, Karina Lotz; Primel, Ednei Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplets (DLLME-SFO) has been applied to the extraction of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) and pesticides from water samples. The PPCPs included bisphenol A, sodium diclofenac, gemfibrozil, furosemide, glibenclamide, nifedipine, nimesulide, propylparaben and triclocarban. The pesticides included 2,4-D, atrazine, azoxystrobin, cyproconazole, clomazone, dichloran, difenoconazole, diuron, epoxiconazole, fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, fipronil, iprodione, irgarol, propanil, propiconazole, tebuconazole, and trifloxystrobin. The type and volume of extraction solvent, type and volume of disperser solvent, ionic strength and pH were optimized. All species were then quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 50 to 500 ng L −1 , and the linearity ranged from the LOQ of each compound up to 10,000 ng L −1 . Recoveries ranged from 63 to 120 %, with relative standard deviations lower than 14 %. It is making use of a low-toxicity and affordable extraction solvent (1-dodecanol) and was successfully applied to the analysis of surface water samples. (author)

  3. Development of CFD analysis method based on droplet tracking model for BWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Yoichi; Minato, Akihiko; Ichikawa, Ryoko; Mashara, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the minimum critical power ratio (MCPR) of the boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assembly depends on the spacer grid type. Recently, improvement of the critical power is being studied by using a spacer grid with mixing devices attaching various types of flow deflectors. In order to predict the critical power of the improved BWR fuel assembly, we have developed an analysis method based on the consideration of detailed thermal-hydraulic mechanism of annular mist flow regime in the subchannels for an arbitrary spacer type. The proposed method is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with a droplet tracking model for analyzing the vapor-phase turbulent flow in which droplets are transported in the subchannels of the BWR fuel assembly. We adopted the general-purpose CFD software Advance/FrontFlow/red (AFFr) as the base code, which is a commercial software package created as a part of Japanese national project. AFFr employs a three-dimensional (3D) unstructured grid system for application to complex geometries. First, AFFr was applied to single-phase flows of gas in the present paper. The calculated results were compared with experiments using a round cellular spacer in one subchannel to investigate the influence of the choice of turbulence model. The analyses using the large eddy simulation (LES) and re-normalisation group (RNG) k-ε models were carried out. The results of both the LES and RNG k-ε models show that calculations of velocity distribution and velocity fluctuation distribution in the spacer downstream reproduce the experimental results qualitatively. However, the velocity distribution analyzed by the LES model is better than that by the RNG k-ε model. The velocity fluctuation near the fuel rod, which is important for droplet deposition to the rod, is also simulated well by the LES model. Then, to examine the effect of the spacer shape on the analytical result, the gas flow analyses with the RNG k-ε model were performed

  4. Performance of droplet generator and droplet collector in liquid droplet radiator under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, T.; Itami, M.; Nagata, H.; Kudo, I.; Iwasaki, A.; Hosokawa, S.

    2002-06-01

    The Liquid Droplet Radiator (LDR) has an advantage over comparable conventional radiators in terms of the rejected heat power-weight ratio. Therefore, the LDR has attracted attention as an advanced radiator for high-power space systems that will be prerequisite for large space structures. The performance of the LDR under microgravity condition has been studied from the viewpoint of operational space use of the LDR in the future. In this study, the performances of a droplet generator and a droplet collector in the LDR are investigated using drop shafts in Japan: MGLAB and JAMIC. As a result, it is considered that (1) the droplet generator can produce uniform droplet streams in the droplet diameter range from 200 to 280 [µm] and the spacing range from 400 to 950 [µm] under microgravity condition, (2) the droplet collector with the incidence angle of 35 degrees can prevent a uniform droplet stream, in which droplet diameter is 250 [µm] and the velocity is 16 [m/s], from splashing under microgravity condition, whereas splashes may occur at the surface of the droplet collector in the event that a nonuniform droplet stream collides against it.

  5. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  6. Macro-scale turbulence modelling for flows in porous media; Modelisation a l'echelle macroscopique d'un ecoulement turbulent au sein d'un milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinson, F

    2006-03-15

    - This work deals with the macroscopic modeling of turbulence in porous media. It concerns heat exchangers, nuclear reactors as well as urban flows, etc. The objective of this study is to describe in an homogenized way, by the mean of a spatial average operator, turbulent flows in a solid matrix. In addition to this first operator, the use of a statistical average operator permits to handle the pseudo-aleatory character of turbulence. The successive application of both operators allows us to derive the balance equations of the kind of flows under study. Two major issues are then highlighted, the modeling of dispersion induced by the solid matrix and the turbulence modeling at a macroscopic scale (Reynolds tensor and turbulent dispersion). To this aim, we lean on the local modeling of turbulence and more precisely on the k - {epsilon} RANS models. The methodology of dispersion study, derived thanks to the volume averaging theory, is extended to turbulent flows. Its application includes the simulation, at a microscopic scale, of turbulent flows within a representative elementary volume of the porous media. Applied to channel flows, this analysis shows that even within the turbulent regime, dispersion remains one of the dominating phenomena within the macro-scale modeling framework. A two-scale analysis of the flow allows us to understand the dominating role of the drag force in the kinetic energy transfers between scales. Transfers between the mean part and the turbulent part of the flow are formally derived. This description significantly improves our understanding of the issue of macroscopic modeling of turbulence and leads us to define the sub-filter production and the wake dissipation. A f - <{epsilon}>f - <{epsilon}{sub w}>f model is derived. It is based on three balance equations for the turbulent kinetic energy, the viscous dissipation and the wake dissipation. Furthermore, a dynamical predictor for the friction coefficient is proposed. This model is then

  7. Towards an integrated multiscale simulation of turbulent clouds on PetaScale computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lianping; Ayala, Orlando; Parishani, Hossein; Gao, Guang R; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Li Xiaoming; Rossi, Louis; Orozco, Daniel; Torres, Claudio; Grabowski, Wojciech W; Wyszogrodzki, Andrzej A; Piotrowski, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    The development of precipitating warm clouds is affected by several effects of small-scale air turbulence including enhancement of droplet-droplet collision rate by turbulence, entrainment and mixing at the cloud edges, and coupling of mechanical and thermal energies at various scales. Large-scale computation is a viable research tool for quantifying these multiscale processes. Specifically, top-down large-eddy simulations (LES) of shallow convective clouds typically resolve scales of turbulent energy-containing eddies while the effects of turbulent cascade toward viscous dissipation are parameterized. Bottom-up hybrid direct numerical simulations (HDNS) of cloud microphysical processes resolve fully the dissipation-range flow scales but only partially the inertial subrange scales. it is desirable to systematically decrease the grid length in LES and increase the domain size in HDNS so that they can be better integrated to address the full range of scales and their coupling. In this paper, we discuss computational issues and physical modeling questions in expanding the ranges of scales realizable in LES and HDNS, and in bridging LES and HDNS. We review our on-going efforts in transforming our simulation codes towards PetaScale computing, in improving physical representations in LES and HDNS, and in developing better methods to analyze and interpret the simulation results.

  8. Transport of expiratory droplets in an aircraft cabin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jitendra K; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-02-01

    The droplets exhaled by an index patient with infectious disease such as influenza or tuberculosis may be the carriers of contagious agents. Indoor environments such as the airliner cabins may be susceptible to infection from such airborne contagious agents. The present investigation computed the transport of the droplets exhaled by the index patient seated in the middle of a seven-row, twin-aisle, fully occupied cabin using the CFD simulations. The droplets exhaled were from a single cough, a single breath, and a 15-s talk of the index patient. The expiratory droplets were tracked by using Lagrangian method, and their evaporation was modeled. It was found that the bulk airflow pattern in the cabin played the most important role on the droplet transport. The droplets were contained in the row before, at, and after the index patient within 30 s and dispersed uniformly to all the seven rows in 4 minutes. The total airborne droplet fraction reduced to 48, 32, 20, and 12% after they entered the cabin for 1, 2, 3, and 4 min, respectively, because of the ventilation from the environmental control system. It is critical to predict the risk of airborne infection to take appropriate measures to control and mitigate the risk. Most of the studies in past either assume a homogenous distribution of contaminants or use steady-state conditions. The present study instead provides information on the transient movement of the droplets exhaled by an index passenger in an aircraft cabin. These droplets may contain active contagious agents and can be potent enough to cause infection. The findings can be used by medical professionals to estimate the spatial and temporal distribution of risk of infection to various passengers in the cabin. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Impacts of Modelling Simplifications on Predicted Dispersion of Human Expiratory Droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Xu, Chunwen

    2016-01-01

    simplifying the room air condition into isothermal condition, or neglecting the body plume of the manikin. It will also change the microenvironment completely by simplifying the shape of human grid in to a robot shape. The trajectories of both the exhalation airflows and droplet nuclei are significantly...

  10. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of droplet formation in T-junction geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busuioc, Sergiu; Ambruş, Victor E.; Sofonea, Victor

    2017-01-01

    The formation of droplets in T-junction configurations is investigated using a two-dimensional Lattice Boltzmann model for liquid-vapor systems. We use an expansion of the equilibrium distribution function with respect to Hermite polynomials and an off-lattice velocity set. To evolve the distribution functions we use the second order corner transport upwind numerical scheme and a third order scheme is used to compute the gradient operators in the force term. The droplet formation successfully recovers the squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes. We find that the droplet length decreases proportionally with the flow rate of the continuous phase and increases with the flow rate of the dispersed phase in all simulation configurations and has a linear dependency on the surface tension parameter κ.

  11. How much crude oil can zooplankton ingest? Estimating the quantity of dispersed crude oil defecated by planktonic copepods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L.; Buskey, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated and quantified defecation rates of crude oil by 3 species of marine planktonic copepods (Temora turbinata, Acartia tonsa, and Parvocalanus crassirostris) and a natural copepod assemblage after exposure to mechanically or chemically dispersed crude oil. Between 88 and 100% of the analyzed fecal pellets from three species of copepods and a natural copepod assemblage exposed for 48 h to physically or chemically dispersed light crude oil contained crude oil droplets. Crude oil droplets inside fecal pellets were smaller (median diameter: 2.4–3.5 μm) than droplets in the physically and chemically dispersed oil emulsions (median diameter: 6.6 and 8.0 μm, respectively). This suggests that copepods can reject large crude oil droplets or that crude oil droplets are broken into smaller oil droplets before or during ingestion. Depending on the species and experimental treatments, crude oil defecation rates ranged from 5.3 to 245 ng-oil copepod"−"1 d"−"1, which represent a mean weight-specific defecation rate of 0.026 μg-oil μg-C_c_o_p_e_p_o_d"1 d"−"1. Considering a dispersed crude oil concentration commonly found in the water column after oil spills (1 μl L"−"1) and copepod abundances in high productive coastal areas, copepods may defecate ∼1.3–2.6 mg-oil m"−"3 d"−"1, which would represent ∼0.15%–0.30% of the total dispersed oil per day. Our results indicate that ingestion and subsequent defecation of crude oil by planktonic copepods has a small influence on the overall mass of oil spills in the short term, but may be quantitatively important in the flux of oil from surface water to sediments and in the transfer of low-solubility, toxic petroleum hydrocarbons into food webs after crude oil spills in the sea. - Highlights: • Copepods exposed to dispersed crude oil produced fecal pellets contained numerous small oil droplets (2.4 to 3.5 µm). • Copepods could reject large oil droplets or oil droplets are broken into

  12. Influence of physical and chemical dispersion on the biodegradation of oil under simulated marine conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swannell, R. P. J.; Daniel, F.; Croft, B. C.; Engelhardt, M. A.; Wilson, S.; Mitchell, D. J.; Lunel, T.

    1997-01-01

    Dispersion and biodegradation of oil was studied in marine microcosms designed to simulate oil dispersion at sea. Dispersion was studied using both Phase Doppler Particle Analyser and a Chamber Slide technique. In both natural and artificial seawater, oil addition was observed to encourage the growth of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the presence of sufficient nitrogen and phosphorus. Results showed that microorganisms enhanced oil dispersion by colonizing physically-dispersed oil droplets and preventing re-coalescence with the surface slick. The addition of dispersants increased the rate of colonization as well as the number of degraded droplets. These results suggest that stimulation of physical dispersion by chemical means increase the rate of oil biodegradation under natural conditions. 25 refs., 3 tabs., 14 figs

  13. Experimental study of micron size droplets in a two phase flow in a converging - diverging nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurski, Kristine

    1997-01-01

    The fluid present in a pressurized vessel in normal operation is generally a mono-phase one. In accidental regime (a breach for example), a two-phase (ring and/or dispersed) flow appears and the flow is submitted to large accelerations when passing through the breach, and is then dispersed in the atmosphere. This research thesis reports an experimental simulation of an accident by generating, through a discharge of an upstream vessel into a downstream vessel, a strongly accelerated gaseous-liquid two-phase flow, with an essentially dispersed configuration in a convergent-divergent nozzle. In order to characterize the speed and diameter evolution of the dispersed liquid phase, the author reports a comparative study of two different liquid aerosols: micron-size droplets of di-octyl phthalate (DOP) of known concentration and diameter, and water droplets obtained by heterogeneous spontaneous condensation [fr

  14. On Electron-Scale Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Baumjohann, W.; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Motschmann, U.; Giles, B.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Torbert, R. B.; Russell, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the dispersion relation for turbulence magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind is determined directly on small scales of the order of the electron inertial length, using four-point magnetometer observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. The data are analyzed using the high-resolution adaptive wave telescope technique. Small-scale solar wind turbulence is primarily composed of highly obliquely propagating waves, with dispersion consistent with that of the whistler mode.

  15. Large Eddy Simulations of Two-phase Turbulent Reactive Flows in IC Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz; Schock, Harold; Jaberi, Farhad

    2008-11-01

    The two-phase filtered mass density function (FMDF) subgrid-scale (SGS) model is used for large-eddy simulation (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. The LES/FMDF is implemented via an efficient, hybrid numerical method. In this method, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinate systems are solved with a generalized, high-order, multi-block, compact differencing scheme. The spray and the FMDF are implemented with Lagrangian methods. The reliability and the consistency of the numerical methods are established for different IC engines and the complex interactions among mean and turbulent velocity fields, fuel droplets and combustion are shown to be well captured with the LES/FMDF. In both spark-ignition/direct-injection and diesel engines, the droplet size and velocity distributions are found to be modified by the unsteady, vortical motions generated by the incoming air during the intake stroke. In turn, the droplets are found to change the in-cylinder flow structure. In the spark-ignition engine, flame propagation is similar to the experiment. In the diesel engine, the maximum evaporated fuel concentration is near the cylinder wall where the flame starts, which is again consistent with the experiment.

  16. Transition from weak wave turbulence regime to solitonic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Roumaissa; Mordant, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    The Weak Turbulence Theory (WTT) is a statistical theory describing the interaction of a large ensemble of random waves characterized by very different length scales. For both weak non-linearity and weak dispersion a different regime is predicted where solitons propagate while keeping their shape unchanged. The question under investigation here is which regime between weak turbulence or soliton gas does the system choose ? We report an experimental investigation of wave turbulence at the surface of finite depth water in the gravity-capillary range. We tune the wave dispersion and the level of nonlinearity by modifying the depth of water and the forcing respectively. We use space-time resolved profilometry to reconstruct the deformed surface of water. When decreasing the water depth, we observe a drastic transition between weak turbulence at the weakest forcing and a solitonic regime at stronger forcing. We characterize the transition between both states by studying their Fourier Spectra. We also study the efficiency of energy transfer in the weak turbulence regime. We report a loss of efficiency of angular transfer as the dispersion of the wave is reduced until the system bifurcates into the solitonic regime. This project has recieved funding from the European Research Council (ERC, Grant Agreement No. 647018-WATU).

  17. Control over multiscale mixing in broadband-forced turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of explicit flow modulation on the dispersion of a passive scalar field are studied. Broadband forcing is applied to homogeneous isotropic turbulence to modulate the energy cascading and alter the kinetic energy spectrum. Consequently, a manipulation of turbulent flow can be achieved

  18. Local-scale high-resolution atmospheric dispersion model using large-eddy simulation. LOHDIM-LES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiromasa; Nagai, Haruyasu

    2016-03-01

    We developed LOcal-scale High-resolution atmospheric DIspersion Model using Large-Eddy Simulation (LOHDIM-LES). This dispersion model is designed based on LES which is effective to reproduce unsteady behaviors of turbulent flows and plume dispersion. The basic equations are the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equation, and the scalar conservation equation. Buildings and local terrain variability are resolved by high-resolution grids with a few meters and these turbulent effects are represented by immersed boundary method. In simulating atmospheric turbulence, boundary layer flows are generated by a recycling turbulent inflow technique in a driver region set up at the upstream of the main analysis region. This turbulent inflow data are imposed at the inlet of the main analysis region. By this approach, the LOHDIM-LES can provide detailed information on wind velocities and plume concentration in the investigated area. (author)

  19. Modeling of corium dispersion in DCH accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.

    1996-01-01

    A model that governs the dispersion process in the direct containment heating (DCH) reactor accident scenario is developed by a stepwise approach. In this model, the whole transient is subdivided into four phases with an isothermal assumption. These are the liquid and gas discharge, the liquid film flow in the cavity before gas blowdown, the liquid and gas flow in the cavity with droplet entrainment, and the liquid transport and re-entrainment in the subcompartment. In each step, the dominant driving mechanisms are identified to construct the governing equations. By combining all the steps together, the corium dispersion information is obtained in detail. The key parameters are predicted quantitatively. These include the fraction of liquid that flows out of the cavity before gas blowdown, the dispersion fraction and the mean droplet diameter in the cavity, the cavity pressure rise due to the liquid friction force, and the dispersion fractions in the containment via different paths. Compared with the data of the 1:10 scale experiments carried out at Purdue University, fairly good agreement is obtained. A stand-alone prediction of the corium dispersion under prototypic Zion reactor conditions is carried out by assuming an isothermal process without chemical reactions. (orig.)

  20. Offshore and coastal dispersion (OCD) model. Users guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanna, S.R.; Schulman, L.L.; Paine, R.J.; Pleim, J.E.

    1984-09-01

    The Offshore and Coastal Dispersion (OCD) model was adapted from the EPA guideline model MPTER to simulate the effect of offshore emissions from point sources in coastal regions. Modifications were made to incorporate overwater plume transport and dispersion as well as changes that occur as the plume crosses the shoreline. Hourly meteorological data are needed from overwater and overland locations. Turbulence intensities are used but are not mandatory. For overwater dispersion, the turbulence intensities are parameterized from boundary-layer similarity relationships if they are not measured. Specifications of emission characteristics and receptor locations are the same as for MPTER; 250 point sources and 180 receptors may be used

  1. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev; Li, Erqiang; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T

    2014-01-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  2. Soft colloidal probes for AFM force measurements between water droplets in oil

    KAUST Repository

    Vakarelski, Ivan Uriev

    2014-11-01

    Here we introduce an extension of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) colloidal probe technique, as a simple and reliable experimental approach to measure the interaction forces between small water droplets (~80-160. μm) dispersed in oil. Small water droplets are formed by capillary breakup of a microscale water jet in air, which is forced out of a fine capillary nozzle, and deposited on a superhydrophobic substrate immersed in tetradecane oil medium. In these conditions the water droplets are very loosely attached to the superhydrophobic substrate and are easily picked up with a hydrophobic AFM cantilever to form a soft colloidal probe. Sample force measurements are conducted to demonstrate the capability of the technique.

  3. Optical rogue waves and soliton turbulence in nonlinear fibre optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genty, G.; Dudley, J. M.; de Sterke, C. M.

    2009-01-01

    We examine optical rogue wave generation in nonlinear fibre propagation in terms of soliton turbulence. We show that higher-order dispersion is sufficient to generate localized rogue soliton structures, and Raman scattering effects are not required.......We examine optical rogue wave generation in nonlinear fibre propagation in terms of soliton turbulence. We show that higher-order dispersion is sufficient to generate localized rogue soliton structures, and Raman scattering effects are not required....

  4. Improved model of quasi-particle turbulence (with applications to Alfven and drift wave turbulence)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca, J. T.; Hizanidis, K.

    2011-01-01

    We consider the classical problem of wave stability and dispersion in a turbulent plasma background. We adopt a kinetic description for the quasi-particle turbulence. We describe an improved theoretical approach, which goes beyond the geometric optics approximation and retains the recoil effects associated with the emission and absorption of low frequency waves by nearly resonant quasi-particles. We illustrate the present approach by considering two particular examples. One is the excitation of zonal flows by drift wave turbulence or driftons. The other is the coupling between ion acoustic waves and Alfven wave turbulence, eventually leading to saturation of Alfven wave growth. Both examples are relevant to anomalous transport in magnetic fusion devices. Connection with previous results is established. We show that these results are recovered in the geometric optics approximation.

  5. Predicting Catastrophic Phase Inversion on the Basis of Droplet Coalescence Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaessen, G.E.J.; Visschers, M.; Stein, H.N.

    1996-01-01

    A predictive model for catastrophic phase inversion, based on the kinetics of droplet breakup and coalescence, is presented here. Two inversion mechanisms can be distinguished, depending on the direction of the phase inversion process. With the surfactant predominantly present in the dispersed

  6. DNS of droplet-vortex interaction with a Karman vortex street

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, M.; Schmehl, R.; Koch, R.; Wittig, S.; Bauer, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting fuel spray interaction with large scale vortex structures still is a major challenge for state-of-the-art CFD codes. In order to elucidate the mechanisms involved, a fundamental study has been carried out in which the interaction of water droplets with a Karman vortex street is investigated. The disperse two-phase flow around a cylinder has been computed taking into account the mass, momentum and heat transfer between both phases. Flow conditions are chosen such that large scale vortices are generated by periodic flow separations of the well known Karman vortex street. A homogeneous distribution of water droplets is injected into the hot air up-stream of the computational domain. The mixing process as well as the impact of the droplets on the gas phase instabilities is analyzed in the downstream region where large scale vortex structures are present

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Dispersion of Liquids by Ejection Atomizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhipov, V. A.; Bondarchuk, S. S.; Evsevleev, M. Ya.; Zharova, I. K.; Zhukov, A. S.; Zmanovskii, S. V.; Kozlov, E. A.; Konovalenko, A. I.; Trofimov, V. F.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of the dispersivity of liquid droplets in the spray cone of ejection atomizers. The calculational droplet size distribution function was measured by the method of low angles of the probe laser radiation scattering indicatrix on a pneumohydraulic bench under cold blow conditions. The efficiency of the proposed circuit designs of atomizers has been analyzed.

  8. Turbulence effects on warm-rain formation in precipitating shallow convection revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Seifert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Two different collection kernels which include turbulence effects on the collision rate of liquid droplets are used as a basis to develop a parameterization of the warm-rain processes autoconversion, accretion, and self-collection. The new parameterization is tested and validated with the help of a 1-D bin microphysics model. Large-eddy simulations of the rain formation in shallow cumulus clouds confirm previous results that turbulence effects can significantly enhance the development of rainwater in clouds and the occurrence and amount of surface precipitation. The detailed behavior differs significantly for the two turbulence models, revealing a considerable uncertainty in our understanding of such effects. In addition, the large-eddy simulations show a pronounced sensitivity to grid resolution, which suggests that besides the effect of sub-grid small-scale isotropic turbulence which is parameterized as part of the collection kernel also the larger turbulent eddies play an important role for the formation of rain in shallow clouds.

  9. Trajectory and Relative Dispersion Case Studies and Statistics from the Green River Mesoscale Deformation, Dispersion, and Dissipation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Brand Lee

    A major field program to study beta-mesoscale transport and dispersion over complex mountainous terrain was conducted during 1969 with the cooperation of three government agencies at the White Sands Missile Range in central Utah. The purpose of the program was to measure simultaneously on a large number of days the synoptic and mesoscale wind fields, the relative dispersion between pairs of particle trajectories and the rate of small scale turbulence dissipation. The field program included measurements during more than 60 days in the months of March, June, and November. The large quantity of data generated from this program has been processed and analyzed to provide case studies and statistics to evaluate and refine Lagrangian variable trajectory models. The case studies selected to illustrate the complexities of mesoscale transport and dispersion over complex terrain include those with terrain blocking, lee waves, and stagnation, as well as those with large vertical wind shears and horizontal wind field deformation. The statistics of relative particle dispersion were computed and compared to the classical theories of Richardson and Batchelor and the more recent theories of Lin and Kao among others. The relative particle dispersion was generally found to increase with travel time in the alongwind and crosswind directions, but in a more oscillatory than sustained or even accelerated manner as predicted by most theories, unless substantial wind shears or finite vertical separations between particles were present. The relative particle dispersion in the vertical was generally found to be small and bounded even when substantial vertical motions due to lee waves were present because of the limiting effect of stable temperature stratification. The data show that velocity shears have a more significant effect than turbulence on relative particle dispersion and that sufficient turbulence may not always be present above the planetary boundary layer for "wind direction shear

  10. Giant molecular cloud collisions as triggers of star formation. VI. Collision-induced turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Benjamin; Tan, Jonathan C.; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Christie, Duncan; Li, Qi

    2018-05-01

    We investigate collisions between giant molecular clouds (GMCs) as potential generators of their internal turbulence. Using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of self-gravitating, magnetized, turbulent GMCs, we compare kinematic and dynamic properties of dense gas structures formed when such clouds collide compared to those that form in non-colliding clouds as self-gravity overwhelms decaying turbulence. We explore the nature of turbulence in these structures via distribution functions of density, velocity dispersions, virial parameters, and momentum injection. We find that the dense clumps formed from GMC collisions have higher effective Mach number, greater overall velocity dispersions, sustain near-virial equilibrium states for longer times, and are the conduit for the injection of turbulent momentum into high density gas at high rates.

  11. Experimental simulation of corium dispersion phenomena in direct containment heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.

    1996-01-01

    In a direct containment heating (DCH) accident scenario, the degree of corium dispersion is one of the most significant factors responsible for the reactor containment heating and pressurization. To study the mechanisms of the corium dispersion phenomenon, a DCH separate effect test facility of 1:10 linear scale for Zion PWR geometry is constructed. Experiments are carried out with air-water and air-woods metal simulating steam and molten core materials. The physical process of corium dispersion is studied in detail through various instruments, as well as with flow visualization at several locations. The accident transient begins with the liquid jet discharge at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel. Once the jet impinges on the cavity bottom floor, it immediately spreads out and moves rapidly to the cavity exit as a film flow. Part of the discharged liquid flows out of the cavity before gas blowdown, and the rest is subjected to the entrainment process due to the high speed gas stream. The liquid film and droplet flows from the reactor cavity will then experience subcompartment trapping and re-entrainment. Consequently, the dispersed liquid droplets that follow the gas stream are transported into the containment atmosphere, resulting in containment heating and pressurization in the prototypic condition. Comprehensive measurements are obtained in this study, including the liquid jet velocity, liquid film thickness and velocity transients in the test cavity, gas velocity and velocity profile in the cavity, droplet size distribution and entrainment rate, and the fraction of dispersed liquid in the containment building. These data are of great importance for better understanding of the corium dispersion mechanisms. (orig.)

  12. The dynamics of milk droplet-droplet collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Giulia; Kooiman, Roeland F.; Padding, Johan T.; Buist, Kay A.; Jongsma, Alfred; Innings, Fredrik; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Spray drying is an important industrial process to produce powdered milk, in which concentrated milk is atomized into small droplets and dried with hot gas. The characteristics of the produced milk powder are largely affected by agglomeration, combination of dry and partially dry particles, which in turn depends on the outcome of a collision between droplets. The high total solids (TS) content and the presence of milk proteins cause a relatively high viscosity of the fed milk concentrates, which is expected to largely influence the collision outcomes of drops inside the spray. It is therefore of paramount importance to predict and control the outcomes of binary droplet collisions. Only a few studies report on droplet collisions of high viscous liquids and no work is available on droplet collisions of milk concentrates. The current study therefore aims to obtain insight into the effect of viscosity on the outcome of binary collisions between droplets of milk concentrates. To cover a wide range of viscosity values, three milk concentrates (20, 30 and 46% TS content) are investigated. An experimental set-up is used to generate two colliding droplet streams with consistent droplet size and spacing. A high-speed camera is used to record the trajectories of the droplets. The recordings are processed by Droplet Image Analysis in MATLAB to determine the relative velocities and the impact geometries for each individual collision. The collision outcomes are presented in a regime map dependent on the dimensionless impact parameter and Weber ( We) number. The Ohnesorge ( Oh) number is introduced to describe the effect of viscosity from one liquid to another and is maintained constant for each regime map by using a constant droplet diameter ( d ˜ 700 μ m). In this work, a phenomenological model is proposed to describe the boundaries demarcating the coalescence-separation regimes. The collision dynamics and outcome of milk concentrates are compared with aqueous glycerol

  13. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 300 - Swirling Flask Dispersant Effectiveness Test, Revised Standard Dispersant Toxicity Test, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the test oil (i.e., a dispersant-to-oil ratio of 1:10). This ratio is used in the test tank with... minutes for oil droplet “settling.” 7. At the conclusion of the 10-minute settling period, carefully...

  14. Influence of gravity on inertial particle clustering in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J.; Nordsiek, H.; Saw, E. W.; Fugal, J. P.; Shaw, R. A.

    2008-11-01

    We report results from experiments aimed at studying inertial particles in homogeneous, isotropic turbulence, under the influence of gravitational settling. Conditions are selected to investigate the transition from negligible role of gravity to gravitationally dominated, as is expected to occur in atmospheric clouds. We measure droplet clustering, relative velocities, and the distribution of collision angles in this range. The experiments are carried out in a laboratory chamber with nearly homogeneous, isotropic turbulence. The turbulence is characterized using LDV and 2-frame holographic particle tracking velocimetry. We seed the flow with particles of various Stokes and Froude numbers and use digital holography to obtain 3D particle positions and velocities. From particle positions, we investigate the impact of gravity on inertial clustering through the calculation of the radial distribution function and we compare to computational results and other recent experiments.

  15. Sheet, ligament and droplet formation in swirling primary atomization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changxiao Shao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report direct numerical simulations of swirling liquid atomization to understand the physical mechanism underlying the sheet breakup of a non-turbulent liquid swirling jet which lacks in-depth investigation. The volume-of-fluid (VOF method coupled with adapted mesh refinement (AMR technique in GERRIS code is employed in the present simulation. The mechanisms of sheet, ligament and droplet formation are investigated. It is observed that the olive-shape sheet structure is similar to the experimental result qualitatively. The numerical results show that surface tension, pressure difference and swirling effect contribute to the contraction and extension of liquid sheet. The ligament formation is partially at the sheet rim or attributed to the extension of liquid hole. Especially, the movement of hairpin vortex exerts by an anti-radial direction force to the sheet surface and leads to the sheet thinness. In addition, droplet formation is attributed to breakup of ligament and central sheet.

  16. Sheet, ligament and droplet formation in swirling primary atomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Changxiao; Luo, Kun; Chai, Min; Fan, Jianren

    2018-04-01

    We report direct numerical simulations of swirling liquid atomization to understand the physical mechanism underlying the sheet breakup of a non-turbulent liquid swirling jet which lacks in-depth investigation. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method coupled with adapted mesh refinement (AMR) technique in GERRIS code is employed in the present simulation. The mechanisms of sheet, ligament and droplet formation are investigated. It is observed that the olive-shape sheet structure is similar to the experimental result qualitatively. The numerical results show that surface tension, pressure difference and swirling effect contribute to the contraction and extension of liquid sheet. The ligament formation is partially at the sheet rim or attributed to the extension of liquid hole. Especially, the movement of hairpin vortex exerts by an anti-radial direction force to the sheet surface and leads to the sheet thinness. In addition, droplet formation is attributed to breakup of ligament and central sheet.

  17. Liquid films and droplet deposition in a BWR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damsohn, M.

    2011-01-01

    time-averaged liquid film thickness decreases with decreasing liquid flow rate, increasing gas flow rate and increasing gas density. By the introduction of spacers, the liquid film is strongly structured into streaks downstream of the spacer in a distinct pattern depending on the spacer shape. The streaks are mainly generated by the effect of circumferential vector components of the gas shear stresses on the gas-liquid interface, which are generated by the spacer. The resulting local decrease of liquid mass flow rate can be interpreted as a deficiency of a given spacer geometry, since it may promote dryout under BWR conditions in close proximity to the spacer. Furthermore spacers increase the droplet deposition compared to an open channel flow, thus increasing the mass flow rate in the liquid film and the dryout margin. Spacer vanes enhance the droplet deposition by an enhanced turbulence of the gas core, a deflection of the gas streamlines and the direct impact of droplets on the spacer vanes. The contribution of each phenomenon to the deposition rate depends on the spacer design and flow conditions present. For the studied generic spacer geometries and experimental conditions, the contribution of the direct impact is dominant, while the contribution of enhanced turbulence seems to be negligible. Additional to the described phenomenon, droplet break-up occurs in spacer proximity, either by the impact on the spacer or by the high velocity gradients of the gas flow in the spacer. This break-up may change the contribution of the deposition effects. It is shown that a Lagrangian droplet tracking on basis of the same gas flow field used as input for the film thickness model can qualitatively reproduce most of the relevant effects observed in the experiments. Furthermore the model gives the right quantitative tendencies when flow parameters are varied. The combination of adiabatic experiments of the presented kind, complemented by the proposed simplified CFD modeling, can

  18. In-Situ Microprobe Observations of Dispersed Oil with Low-Temperature Low-Vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsen, H.T.

    2010-01-01

    A low cost cryostat stage from high heat capacity material is designed and constructed, in attempt to apply size distribution techniques for examination of oil dispersions. Different materials were tested according to their heat capacity to keep the liquid under investigation in frozen state as long as possible during the introduction of the cryostat stage to the low-vacuum scanning electron microscope. Different concentrations of non ionic surfactant were added to artificially contaminated with 10000 ppm Balayeam base oil in 3.5 % saline water, where oil and dispersing liquid have been added and shacked well to be investigated under the microscope as fine frozen droplets. The efficiency of dispersion was examined using low temperature low-vacuum scanning electron microscope. The shape and size distributions of freeze oil droplets were studied by digital imaging processing technique in conjunction with scanning electron microscope counting method. Also elemental concentration of oil droplets was analyzed.

  19. Numerical Coupling and Simulation of Point-Mass System with the Turbulent Fluid Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng

    A computational framework that combines the Eulerian description of the turbulence field with a Lagrangian point-mass ensemble is proposed in this dissertation. Depending on the Reynolds number, the turbulence field is simulated using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) or eddy viscosity model. In the meanwhile, the particle system, such as spring-mass system and cloud droplets, are modeled using the ordinary differential system, which is stiff and hence poses a challenge to the stability of the entire system. This computational framework is applied to the numerical study of parachute deceleration and cloud microphysics. These two distinct problems can be uniformly modeled with Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) and Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), and numerically solved in the same framework. For the parachute simulation, a novel porosity model is proposed to simulate the porous effects of the parachute canopy. This model is easy to implement with the projection method and is able to reproduce Darcy's law observed in the experiment. Moreover, the impacts of using different versions of k-epsilon turbulence model in the parachute simulation have been investigated and conclude that the standard and Re-Normalisation Group (RNG) model may overestimate the turbulence effects when Reynolds number is small while the Realizable model has a consistent performance with both large and small Reynolds number. For another application, cloud microphysics, the cloud entrainment-mixing problem is studied in the same numerical framework. Three sets of DNS are carried out with both decaying and forced turbulence. The numerical result suggests a new way parameterize the cloud mixing degree using the dynamical measures. The numerical experiments also verify the negative relationship between the droplets number concentration and the vorticity field. The results imply that the gravity has fewer impacts on the forced turbulence than the decaying turbulence. In summary, the

  20. Interactive computer modeling of combustion chemistry and coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, D. T.

    1984-01-01

    An interactive computer code for simulation of a high-intensity turbulent combustor as a single point inhomogeneous stirred reactor was developed from an existing batch processing computer code CDPSR. The interactive CDPSR code was used as a guide for interpretation and direction of DOE-sponsored companion experiments utilizing Xenon tracer with optical laser diagnostic techniques to experimentally determine the appropriate mixing frequency, and for validation of CDPSR as a mixing-chemistry model for a laboratory jet-stirred reactor. The coalescence-dispersion model for finite rate mixing was incorporated into an existing interactive code AVCO-MARK I, to enable simulation of a combustor as a modular array of stirred flow and plug flow elements, each having a prescribed finite mixing frequency, or axial distribution of mixing frequency, as appropriate. Further increase the speed and reliability of the batch kinetics integrator code CREKID was increased by rewriting in vectorized form for execution on a vector or parallel processor, and by incorporating numerical techniques which enhance execution speed by permitting specification of a very low accuracy tolerance.

  1. Hydrodynamics and PIV study in the impingement zone formed by a droplet train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjirakat, Anoop; Sadr, Reza; Zhang, Taolue; Muthusamy, Jayaveera; Alvarado, Jorge; Texas A; M University at Qatar Collaboration; Texas A; M University College Station Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Droplet impingement is encountered in numerous technical applications, such as ink jet printing, spray cooling, and fuel injection in internal combustion engines. Even though many studies in droplet impingement were conducted in past, not many have measured the near-wall velocities in the droplet impingement zone. With the goal of gaining a better understanding of the hydrodynamics in the impingement zone, well-controlled experiments are performed in combination with micro-PIV measurements and numerical simulations. Hydrodynamics of HFE-7100 droplets generated using a piezoelectric droplet generator, impinging on a pre-wetted surface is investigated. Micro-PIV studies in the high-velocity impingement zone are performed using one-micron meter fluorescent particles dispersed in HFE-7100 along with the double exposed images. Three-dimensional and 2D-axisymmetric numerical modeling for a transient droplet crown development is performed. The interface between the gas and the liquid is modeled using a Volume of Fluid (VOF) method. Numerical simulation results obtained are observed to be in good agreement with that of the experimental observations. Supported by National Priority Research Program (NPRP) of Qatar National Research Fund (QNRF), Grant No.: NPRP 6-1304-2-525.

  2. Acoustic droplet vaporization of vascular droplets in gas embolotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    This work is primarily motivated by a developmental gas embolotherapy technique for cancer treatment. In this methodology, infarction of tumors is induced by selectively formed vascular gas bubbles that arise from the acoustic vaporization of vascular droplets. Additionally, micro- or nano-droplets may be used as vehicles for localized drug delivery, with or without flow occlusion. In this talk, we examine the dynamics of acoustic droplet vaporization through experiments and theoretical/computational fluid mechanics models, and investigate the bioeffects of acoustic droplet vaporization on endothelial cells and in vivo. Functionalized droplets that are targeted to tumor vasculature are examined. The influence of fluid mechanical and acoustic parameters, as well as droplet functionalization, is explored. This work was supported by NIH Grant R01EB006476.

  3. Modeling of finite-size droplets and particles in multiphase flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Khare

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The conventional point-particle approach for treating the dispersed phase in a continuous flowfield is extended by taking into account the effect of finite particle size, using a Gaussian interpolation from Lagrangian points to the Eulerian field. The inter-phase exchange terms in the conservation equations are distributed over the volume encompassing the particle size, as opposed to the Dirac delta function generally used in the point-particle approach. The proposed approach is benchmarked against three different flow configurations in a numerical framework based on large eddy simulation (LES turbulence closure. First, the flow over a circular cylinder is simulated for a Reynolds number of 3900 at 1 atm pressure. Results show good agreement with experimental data for the mean streamwise velocity and the vortex shedding frequency in the wake region. The calculated flowfield exhibits correct physics, which the conventional point-particle approach fails to capture. The second case deals with diesel jet injection in quiescent environment over a pressure range of 1.1–5.0 MPa. The calculated jet penetration depth closely matches measurements. It decreases with increasing chamber pressure, due to enhanced drag force in a denser fluid environment. Finally, water and acetone jet injection normal to air crossflow is studied at 1 atm. The calculated jet penetration and Sauter mean diameter of liquid droplets compare very well with measurements.

  4. Aerosol-cloud feedbacks in a turbulent environment: Laboratory measurements representative of conditions in boundary layer clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, W. H.; Chandrakar, K. K.; Karki, S.; Kinney, G.; Shaw, R.

    2017-12-01

    Many of the climate impacts of boundary layer clouds are modulated by aerosol particles. As two examples, their interactions with incoming solar and upwelling terrestrial radiation and their propensity for precipitation are both governed by the population of aerosol particles upon which the cloud droplets formed. In turn, clouds are the primary removal mechanism for aerosol particles smaller than a few micrometers and larger than a few nanometers. Aspects of these interconnected phenomena are known in exquisite detail (e.g. Köhler theory), but other parts have not been as amenable to study in the laboratory (e.g. scavenging of aerosol particles by cloud droplets). As a complicating factor, boundary layer clouds are ubiquitously turbulent, which introduces fluctuations in the water vapor concentration and temperature, which govern the saturation ratio which mediates aerosol-cloud interactions. We have performed laboratory measurements of aerosol-cloud coupling and feedbacks, using Michigan Tech's Pi Chamber (Chang et al., 2016). In conditions representative of boundary layer clouds, our data suggest that the lifetime of most interstitial particles in the accumulation mode is governed by cloud activation - particles are removed from the Pi Chamber when they activate and settle out of the chamber as cloud droplets. As cloud droplets are removed, these interstitial particles activate until the initially polluted cloud cleans itself and all particulates are removed from the chamber. At that point, the cloud collapses. Our data also indicate that smaller particles, Dp defined through the use of the Dämkohler number, the ratio of the characteristic turbulence timescale to the cloud's microphysical response time. Chang, K., et al., 2016. A laboratory facility to study gas-aerosol-cloud interactions in a turbulent environment: The Π Chamber. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., doi:10.1175/BAMS-D-15-00203.1

  5. How much crude oil can zooplankton ingest? Estimating the quantity of dispersed crude oil defecated by planktonic copepods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L.; Buskey, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    % of the analyzed fecal pellets from three species of copepods and a natural copepod assemblage exposed for 48 h to physically or chemically dispersed light crude oil contained crude oil droplets. Crude oil droplets inside fecal pellets were smaller (median diameter: 2.4-3.5 mu m) than droplets in the physically...

  6. Two-phase flow patterns and size distribution of droplets in a microfluidic T-junction: Experimental observations in the squeezing regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Yassine; Daoud, Kamel; Tadrist, Lounès

    2017-04-01

    Generating micrometer sized droplets has been studied in a microfluidic system with T-junction geometry 250 μm in internal diameter and with PTFE capillary tubing. Several experiments were conducted by varying the flow rate of the dispersed phase from 2.78 ṡ10-11 m3 /s to 5.28 ṡ10-9 m3 /s and that of the continuous phase from 2.78 ṡ10-10 m3 /s to 1.94 ṡ10-9 m3 /s. The visualization of different flow regimes (drop, plug, and annular) was carried out for three configurations (not inverted in a horizontal position, inverted in a horizontal position, and inverted in a vertical position) for low capillary numbers. The model of Gauss was also chosen for a droplet size distribution in the dispersed phase, with the flow quality x varying from 0.016 to 0.44. The evolution of the drop size distribution as a function of the flow quality in the dispersed phase shows that the variation coefficient of the droplet's diameter is inversely proportional to the flow quality.

  7. Effect of droplet size on the droplet behavior on the heterogeneous surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ho Yeon; Son, Sung Wan; Ha, ManYeong [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yong Gap [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The characteristics of a three-dimensional hemispherical droplet on a heterogeneous surface were studied using the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The hydrophilic surface has a hydrophobic part at the center. The hemispherical droplets are located at the center of the heterogeneous surface. According to the contact angles of hydrophilic and hydrophobic bottom surfaces, the droplet either separates or reaches a new equilibrium state. The separation time varies according to the change in droplet size, and it affects the status of droplet separation. The droplet separation behavior was investigated by analyzing the velocity vector around the phase boundary line. The shape and separation time of a droplet are determined by the contact angle of each surface. The speed of droplet separation increases as the difference in contact angle increases between the hydrophobic surface and hydrophilic surface. The separation status and the separation time of a droplet are also determined by the change of the droplet size. As the size of the droplet decreases, the effect of surface tension decreases, and the separation time of the droplet also decreases. On the other hand, as the droplet becomes larger, the effect of surface tension increases and the time required for the droplet to separate also increases.

  8. Compression of turbulent magnetized gas in giant molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnboim, Yuval; Federrath, Christoph; Krumholz, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Interstellar gas clouds are often both highly magnetized and supersonically turbulent, with velocity dispersions set by a competition between driving and dissipation. This balance has been studied extensively in the context of gases with constant mean density. However, many astrophysical systems are contracting under the influence of external pressure or gravity, and the balance between driving and dissipation in a contracting, magnetized medium has yet to be studied. In this paper, we present three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of compression in a turbulent, magnetized medium that resembles the physical conditions inside molecular clouds. We find that in some circumstances the combination of compression and magnetic fields leads to a rate of turbulent dissipation far less than that observed in non-magnetized gas, or in non-compressing magnetized gas. As a result, a compressing, magnetized gas reaches an equilibrium velocity dispersion much greater than would be expected for either the hydrodynamic or the non-compressing case. We use the simulation results to construct an analytic model that gives an effective equation of state for a coarse-grained parcel of the gas, in the form of an ideal equation of state with a polytropic index that depends on the dissipation and energy transfer rates between the magnetic and turbulent components. We argue that the reduced dissipation rate and larger equilibrium velocity dispersion has important implications for the driving and maintenance of turbulence in molecular clouds and for the rates of chemical and radiative processes that are sensitive to shocks and dissipation.

  9. Dispersion of pollutants in a street canyon and street intersection under traffic-induced flow and turbulence using a low Re k-{epsilon} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jicha, M.; Katolicky, J.; Pospisil, J. [Brno University of Technology (Czech Republic). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2002-07-01

    A 3-D Eulerian-Lagrangian approach to moving vehicles is presented that takes into account the traffic-induced flow rate and turbulence. The method is applied to pollutant dispersion in an individual street canyon and a system of two street canyons forming a perpendicular intersection. The approach is based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations using a Eulerian approach for continuous phase and a Lagrangian approach for moving vehicles. The wind speed was assigned values of 4, 7 and 12 m/s. One-way and two-way traffic with different traffic rates per lane is considered. In the case of the intersection, a longitudinal wind direction was assumed. Predictions show differences in the pollutant dispersion in the case of one-way and two-way traffic. (author)

  10. Droplets in annular-dispersed gas-liquid pipe-flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van 't Westende, J.M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Annular-dispersed gas-liquid pipe-flows are commonly encountered in many industrial applications, and have already been studied for many decades. However, due to the great complexity of this type of flow, there are still many phenomena that are poorly understood. The aim of this thesis is to shed

  11. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, David J; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2012-09-04

    A computer numerical control (CNC) apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using "wire-guided" method (a pipette tip was used in this study). This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate). Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction). The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability), in rapid succession (using droplets), and with a high level of

  12. Relationship between concentration of surfactant and pressure for droplet creation, and effect on droplet size in microchannel O/W emulsification; Maikurochaneru ni yoru O/W nyukaho ni okeru kaimen kasseizai nodo to ekiteki seisei atsuryoku no kankei, oyobi koreraga ekitekikei ni oyobosu eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakatsu, T.; Komori, H.; Oda, N.; Yonemoto, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Graduate School of Engineering

    1998-03-01

    O/W (oil in water) emulsion is produced by micro-channel emulsification method, and the effects of surfactant concentration on the pressures at which droplet generation starts and stops are evaluated in connection with the water phase and oil phase interfacial tension. In addition, the effects of surfactant concentration and operational pressure on the droplet size are investigated by measuring the generated droplet distribution, mean droplet size, standard deviation, geometrical standard deviation, and the possibility of producing mono-dispersion emulsion whose droplet size is large than 10 micron. The breakthrough pressure and the minimum pressure for droplet generation become low with the increase of SDS (sodium lauryl sulfate) concentration. The surfactant concentration, however, is found to have no effect on the breakthrough pressure and the minimum pressure for droplet generation when the SDS concentration exceeds the critical micelle concentration. It is true also for a system added with NaCl. As regards droplet size, uniform 20{mu}m droplet is obtained irrespective of the surfactant concentration and pressure. 13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. A numerical study on the dynamics of droplet formation in a microfluidic double T-junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Ich-Long; Dang, Trung-Dung; Byon, Chan; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, droplet formations in microfluidic double T-junctions (MFDTD) are investigated based on a two-dimensional numerical model with volume of fluid method. Parametric ranges for generating alternating droplet formation (ADF) are identified. A physical background responsible for the ADF is suggested by analyzing the dynamical stability of flow system. Since the phase discrepancy between dispersed flows is mainly caused by non-symmetrical breaking of merging droplet, merging regime becomes the alternating regime at appropriate conditions. In addition, the effects of channel geometries on droplet formation are studied in terms of relative channel width. The predicted results show that the ADF region is shifted toward lower capillary numbers when channel width ratio is less than unity. The alternating droplet size increases with the increase of channel width ratio. When this ratio reaches unity, alternating droplets can be formed at very high water fraction (wf = 0.8). The droplet formation in MFDTD depends significantly on the viscosity ratio, and the droplet size in ADF decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratio. The understanding of underlying physics of the ADF phenomenon is useful for many applications, including nanoparticle synthesis with different concentrations, hydrogel bead generation, and cell transplantation in biomedical therapy.

  14. Effects of droplet interactions on droplet transport at intermediate Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun

    1987-01-01

    Effects of droplet interactions on drag, evaporation, and combustion of a planar droplet array, oriented perpendicular to the approaching flow, are studied numerically. The three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, with variable thermophysical properties, are solved using finite-difference techniques. Parameters investigated include the droplet spacing, droplet Reynolds number, approaching stream oxygen concentration, and fuel type. Results are obtained for the Reynolds number range of 5 to 100, droplet spacings from 2 to 24 diameters, oxygen concentrations of 0.1 and 0.2, and methanol and n-butanol fuels. The calculations show that the gasification rates of interacting droplets decrease as the droplet spacings decrease. The reduction in gasification rates is significant only at small spacings and low Reynolds numbers. For the present array orientation, the effects of interactions on the gasification rates diminish rapidly for Reynolds numbers greater than 10 and spacings greater than 6 droplet diameters. The effects of adjacent droplets on drag are shown to be small.

  15. The Effect of pH and High-Pressure Homogenization on Droplet Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ah Pis Yong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study are to revisit the effect of high pressure on homogenization and the influence of pH on the emulsion droplet sizes. The high-pressure homogenization (HPH involves two stages of processing, where the first stage involves in blending the coarse emulsion by a blender, and the second stage requires disruption of the coarse emulsion into smaller droplets by a high-pressure homogenizer. The pressure range in this review is in between 10-500 MPa. The homogenised droplet sizes can be reduced by increasing the homogenization recirculation, and there is a threshold point beyond that by applying pressure only, the size cannot be further reduced. Normally, homogenised emulsions are classified by their degree of kinetic stability. Dispersed phase present in the form of droplets while continuous phase also known as suspended droplets. With a proper homogenization recirculation and pressure, a more kinetically stable emulsion can be produced. The side effects of increasing homogenization pressure are that it can cause overprocessing of the emulsion droplets where the droplet sizes become larger rather than the expected smaller size. This can cause kinetic instability in the emulsion. The droplet size is usually measured by dynamic light scattering or by laser light scattering technique. The type of samples used in this reviews are such as chocolate and vanilla based powders; mean droplet sizes samples; basil oil; tomato; lupin protein; oil; skim milk, soymilk; coconut milk; tomato homogenate; corn; egg-yolk, rapeseed and sunflower; Poly(4-vinylpyridine/silica; and Complex 1 until complex 4 approaches from author case study. A relationship is developed between emulsion size and pH. Results clearly show that lower pH offers smaller droplet of emulsion and the opposite occurs when the pH is increased.

  16. Droplet size effects on film drainage between droplet and substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Benjamin; Spicer, Patrick T; Shen, Amy Q

    2006-06-06

    When a droplet approaches a solid surface, the thin liquid film between the droplet and the surface drains until an instability forms and then ruptures. In this study, we utilize microfluidics to investigate the effects of film thickness on the time to film rupture for water droplets in a flowing continuous phase of silicone oil deposited on solid poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces. The water droplets ranged in size from millimeters to micrometers, resulting in estimated values of the film thickness at rupture ranging from 600 nm down to 6 nm. The Stefan-Reynolds equation is used to model film drainage beneath both millimeter- and micrometer-scale droplets. For millimeter-scale droplets, the experimental and analytical film rupture times agree well, whereas large differences are observed for micrometer-scale droplets. We speculate that the differences in the micrometer-scale data result from the increases in the local thin film viscosity due to confinement-induced molecular structure changes in the silicone oil. A modified Stefan-Reynolds equation is used to account for the increased thin film viscosity of the micrometer-scale droplet drainage case.

  17. The Effects of Sooting and Radiation on Droplet Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-Ook; Manzello, Samuel L.; Choi, Mun Young

    1997-01-01

    The burning of liquid hydrocarbon fuels accounts for a significant portion of global energy production. With predicted future increases in demand and limited reserves of hydrocarbon fuel, it is important to maximize the efficiency of all processes that involve conversion of fuel. With the exception of unwanted fires, most applications involve introduction of liquid fuels into an oxidizing environment in the form of sprays which are comprised of groups of individual droplets. Therefore, tremendous benefits can result from a better understanding of spray combustion processes. Yet, theoretical developments and experimental measurements of spray combustion remains a daunting task due to the complex coupling of a turbulent, two-phase flow with phase change and chemical reactions. However, it is recognized that individual droplet behavior (including ignition, evaporation and combustion) is a necessary component for laying the foundation for a better understanding of spray processes. Droplet combustion is also an ideal problem for gaining a better understanding of non-premixed flames. Under the idealized situation producing spherically-symmetric flames (produced under conditions of reduced natural and forced convection), it represents the simplest geometry in which to formulate and solve the governing equations of mass, species and heat transfer for a chemically reacting two phase flow with phase change. The importance of this topic has promoted extensive theoretical investigations for more than 40 years.

  18. Model of formation of droplets during electric arc surfacing of functional coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Granovskii, Alexei Yu; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Gromov, Victor E.

    2016-01-01

    The mathematical model was developed for the initial stage of formation of an electrode metal droplet in the process of arc welding. Its essence lies in the fact that the presence of a temperature gradient in the boundary layer of the molten metal causes thermo-capillary instability, which leads to the formation of electrode metal droplets. A system of equations including Navier-Stokes equations, heat conduction and Maxwell's equations was solved as well as the boundary conditions for the system electrodes-plasma. Dispersion equation for thermo-capillary waves in the linear approximation for the plane layer was received and analyzed. The values of critical wavelengths, at which thermo-capillary instability appears in the nanometer wavelength range, were found. The parameters at which the mode of a fine-droplet transfer of the material takes place were theoretically defined.

  19. Impacts of Realistic Urban Heating, Part I: Spatial Variability of Mean Flow, Turbulent Exchange and Pollutant Dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarian, Negin; Martilli, Alberto; Kleissl, Jan

    2018-03-01

    As urbanization progresses, more realistic methods are required to analyze the urban microclimate. However, given the complexity and computational cost of numerical models, the effects of realistic representations should be evaluated to identify the level of detail required for an accurate analysis. We consider the realistic representation of surface heating in an idealized three-dimensional urban configuration, and evaluate the spatial variability of flow statistics (mean flow and turbulent fluxes) in urban streets. Large-eddy simulations coupled with an urban energy balance model are employed, and the heating distribution of urban surfaces is parametrized using sets of horizontal and vertical Richardson numbers, characterizing thermal stratification and heating orientation with respect to the wind direction. For all studied conditions, the thermal field is strongly affected by the orientation of heating with respect to the airflow. The modification of airflow by the horizontal heating is also pronounced for strongly unstable conditions. The formation of the canyon vortices is affected by the three-dimensional heating distribution in both spanwise and streamwise street canyons, such that the secondary vortex is seen adjacent to the windward wall. For the dispersion field, however, the overall heating of urban surfaces, and more importantly, the vertical temperature gradient, dominate the distribution of concentration and the removal of pollutants from the building canyon. Accordingly, the spatial variability of concentration is not significantly affected by the detailed heating distribution. The analysis is extended to assess the effects of three-dimensional surface heating on turbulent transfer. Quadrant analysis reveals that the differential heating also affects the dominance of ejection and sweep events and the efficiency of turbulent transfer (exuberance) within the street canyon and at the roof level, while the vertical variation of these parameters is less

  20. Droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling for simpler and faster PCR assay using wire-guided manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You David J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A computer numerical control (CNC apparatus was used to perform droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction, and rapid droplet thermocycling on a single superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater. Droplets were manipulated using “wire-guided” method (a pipette tip was used in this study. This methodology can be easily adapted to existing commercial robotic pipetting system, while demonstrated added capabilities such as vibrational mixing, high-speed centrifuging of droplets, simple DNA extraction utilizing the hydrophobicity difference between the tip and the superhydrophobic surface, and rapid thermocycling with a moving droplet, all with wire-guided droplet manipulations on a superhydrophobic surface and a multi-chambered PCB heater (i.e., not on a 96-well plate. Serial dilutions were demonstrated for diluting sample matrix. Centrifuging was demonstrated by rotating a 10 μL droplet at 2300 round per minute, concentrating E. coli by more than 3-fold within 3 min. DNA extraction was demonstrated from E. coli sample utilizing the disposable pipette tip to cleverly attract the extracted DNA from the droplet residing on a superhydrophobic surface, which took less than 10 min. Following extraction, the 1500 bp sequence of Peptidase D from E. coli was amplified using rapid droplet thermocycling, which took 10 min for 30 cycles. The total assay time was 23 min, including droplet centrifugation, droplet DNA extraction and rapid droplet thermocycling. Evaporation from of 10 μL droplets was not significant during these procedures, since the longest time exposure to air and the vibrations was less than 5 min (during DNA extraction. The results of these sequentially executed processes were analyzed using gel electrophoresis. Thus, this work demonstrates the adaptability of the system to replace many common laboratory tasks on a single platform (through re-programmability, in rapid succession (using droplets

  1. Multi-scale simulation of droplet-droplet interactions and coalescence

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musehane, Ndivhuwo M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Conference on Computational and Applied Mechanics Potchefstroom 3–5 October 2016 Multi-scale simulation of droplet-droplet interactions and coalescence 1,2Ndivhuwo M. Musehane?, 1Oliver F. Oxtoby and 2Daya B. Reddy 1. Aeronautic Systems, Council... topology changes that result when droplets interact. This work endeavours to eliminate the need to use empirical correlations based on phenomenological models by developing a multi-scale model that predicts the outcome of a collision between droplets from...

  2. Lagrangian modelling of dispersion, sedimentation and resuspension processes in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidhagen, L.; Rahm, L.; Nyberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    The model is based on a modified Langevin's equation which simulates the turbulent crossflow velocity fluctuations in shear flows. The velocity and turbulence fields used are generated by a 2-dimensional hydrodynamical model including a k-ε turbulence scheme. Since the dispersion model is formulated for only low particle concentrations, it is decoupled from the hydrodynamical model calculations. A great drawback in conventional dispersion modelling is the more or less unavoidable numerical diffusion. The use of a Lagrangian particle model will avoid this effect and the resulting too low concentrations for a given release. One consequence is a more realistic distribution of deposited particles. However, with regard to the overall deposition rates the simulated sedimentation process agrees well with well-established advection/diffusion model formulations. With a modified hydrodynamic model, the dispersion model can directly be applied to stratified 3D simulations. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Preventing droplet deformation during dielectrophoretic centering of a compound emulsion droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Greg; Blue, Brent

    2012-11-01

    Compound droplets, or droplets-within-droplets, are traditionally key components in applications ranging from drug delivery to the food industry. Presently, millimeter-sized compound droplets are precursors for shell targets in inertial fusion energy work. However, a key constraint in target fabrication is a uniform shell wall thickness, which in turn requires a centered core droplet in the compound droplet precursor. Previously, Bei et al. (2009, 2010) have shown that compound droplets could be centered in a static fluid using an electric field of 0.7 kV/cm at 20 MHz. Randall et al. (2012) developed a process to center the core of a moving compound droplet, though the ~kV/cm field induced small (fluid mechanics and interfacial rheology perspective and we discuss the effective interfacial charge from an emulsifier and its impact on centering. Work funded by General Atomics Internal R&D.

  4. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T P Mangan

    Full Text Available Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  5. Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation by Soufriere Hills Volcanic Ash Immersed in Water Droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T P; Atkinson, J D; Neuberg, J W; O'Sullivan, D; Wilson, T W; Whale, T F; Neve, L; Umo, N S; Malkin, T L; Murray, B J

    2017-01-01

    Fine particles of ash emitted during volcanic eruptions may sporadically influence cloud properties on a regional or global scale as well as influencing the dynamics of volcanic clouds and the subsequent dispersion of volcanic aerosol and gases. It has been shown that volcanic ash can trigger ice nucleation, but ash from relatively few volcanoes has been studied for its ice nucleating ability. In this study we quantify the efficiency with which ash from the Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat nucleates ice when immersed in supercooled water droplets. Using an ash sample from the 11th February 2010 eruption, we report ice nucleating efficiencies from 246 to 265 K. This wide range of temperatures was achieved using two separate droplet freezing instruments, one employing nanolitre droplets, the other using microlitre droplets. Soufriere Hills volcanic ash was significantly more efficient than all other ash samples that have been previously examined. At present the reasons for these differences are not understood, but may be related to mineralogy, amorphous content and surface chemistry.

  6. Fractal dimension and turbulence in Giant HII Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caicedo-Ortiz, H E; Santiago-Cortes, E; López-Bonilla, J; er piso, CP 07738, México D.F (Mexico))" data-affiliation=" (ESFM, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Edif. 9, 1er piso, CP 07738, México D.F (Mexico))" >Castañeda, H O

    2015-01-01

    We have measured the fractal dimensions of the Giant HII Regions Hubble X and Hubble V in NGC6822 using images obtained with the Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). These measures are associated with the turbulence observed in these regions, which is quantified through the velocity dispersion of emission lines in the visible. Our results suggest low turbulence behaviour

  7. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    -differences. Other methods as infra-red sensing are used for visualizing purpose. The results are used to calibrate an integral model of the dispersion. Conclusions are that the dispersion of a buoyant surface plume can be treated the superposition of a buoyancy induced stretching and turbulent diffusion, reduced...

  8. "Hypothetical" Heavy Particles Dynamics in LES of Turbulent Dispersed Two-Phase Channel Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorokhovski, M.; Chtab, A.

    2003-01-01

    The extensive experimental study of dispersed two-phase turbulent flow in a vertical channel has been performed in Eaton's research group in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stanford University. In Wang & Squires (1996), this study motivated the validation of LES approach with Lagrangian tracking of round particles governed by drag forces. While the computed velocity of the flow have been predicted relatively well, the computed particle velocity differed strongly from the measured one. Using Monte Carlo simulation of inter-particle collisions, the computation of Yamamoto et al. (2001) was specifically performed to model Eaton's experiment. The results of Yamamoto et al. (2001) improved the particle velocity distribution. At the same time, Vance & Squires (2002) mentioned that the stochastic simualtion of inter-particle collisions is too expensive, requiring significantly more CPU resources than one needs for the gas flow computation. Therefore, the need comes to account for the inter-particle collisions in a simpler and still effective way. To present such a model in the framework of LES/Lagrangian particle approach, and to compare the calculated results with Eaton's measurement and modeling of Yamamoto is the main objective of the present paper.

  9. Evaporation-triggered microdroplet nucleation and the four life phases of an evaporating Ouzo droplet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, H.; Diddens, C.; Lv, P.; Kuerten, J.G.M.; Zhang, X.; Lohse, D.

    2016-01-01

    Evaporating liquid droplets are omnipresent in nature and technology, such as in inkjet printing, coating, deposition of materials, medical diagnostics, agriculture, the food industry, cosmetics, or spills of liquids. Whereas the evaporation of pure liquids, liquids with dispersed particles, or even

  10. Dispersion of effluents in the atmosphere; Dispersion des effluents dans l`atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `convection` section of the French association of thermal engineers with the support of the environment and energy mastery agency (ADEME). This book of proceedings contains 10 papers entitled: `physical modeling of atmospheric dispersion in wind tunnels. Some industrial examples`; `modeling of the noxious effects of a fire on the environment of an industrial site: importance of thermal engineering related hypotheses`; `atmospheric diffusion of a noxious cloud: fast evaluation method of safety areas around refrigerating installations that use ammonia`; `modeling of atmospheric flows in urban areas in order to study the dispersion of pollutants`; `use of a dispersion parameter to characterize the evolution of a diffusion process downstream of a linear source of passive contaminant placed inside a turbulent boundary layer`; `elements of reflexion around the development of an analytical methodology applied to the elaboration of measurement strategies of air quality in ambient and outdoor atmospheres around industrial sites`; `state-of-the-art about treatment techniques for VOC-rich gaseous effluents`; `characteristics of the time variation of the atmospheric pollution in the Paris region and visualization of its space distribution`; `mass-spectrometry for the measurement of atmospheric pollutants`; `volume variations in natural convection turbulence`. (J.S.)

  11. Dispersion of effluents in the atmosphere; Dispersion des effluents dans l`atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This conference day was organized by the `convection` section of the French association of thermal engineers with the support of the environment and energy mastery agency (ADEME). This book of proceedings contains 10 papers entitled: `physical modeling of atmospheric dispersion in wind tunnels. Some industrial examples`; `modeling of the noxious effects of a fire on the environment of an industrial site: importance of thermal engineering related hypotheses`; `atmospheric diffusion of a noxious cloud: fast evaluation method of safety areas around refrigerating installations that use ammonia`; `modeling of atmospheric flows in urban areas in order to study the dispersion of pollutants`; `use of a dispersion parameter to characterize the evolution of a diffusion process downstream of a linear source of passive contaminant placed inside a turbulent boundary layer`; `elements of reflexion around the development of an analytical methodology applied to the elaboration of measurement strategies of air quality in ambient and outdoor atmospheres around industrial sites`; `state-of-the-art about treatment techniques for VOC-rich gaseous effluents`; `characteristics of the time variation of the atmospheric pollution in the Paris region and visualization of its space distribution`; `mass-spectrometry for the measurement of atmospheric pollutants`; `volume variations in natural convection turbulence`. (J.S.)

  12. Nonaqueous Dispersion Formed by an Emulsion Solvent Evaporation Method Using Block-Random Copolymer Surfactant Synthesized by RAFT Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezaki, Naofumi; Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Mori, Hideharu

    2015-10-27

    As surfactants for preparation of nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, three copolymers composed of stearyl methacrylate (SMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) with different monomer sequences (i.e., random, block, and block-random) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Despite having the same comonomer composition, the copolymers exhibited different functionality as surfactants for creating emulsions with respective dispersed and continuous phases consisting of methanol and isoparaffin solvent. The optimal monomer sequence for the surfactant was determined based on the droplet sizes and the stabilities of the emulsions created using these copolymers. The block-random copolymer led to an emulsion with better stability than obtained using the random copolymer and a smaller droplet size than achieved with the block copolymer. Modification of the epoxy group of the GMA unit by diethanolamine (DEA) further decreased the droplet size, leading to higher stability of the emulsion. The DEA-modified block-random copolymer gave rise to nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions after evaporation of methanol from the emulsions containing colored dyes in their dispersed phases. These dispersions exhibited high stability, and the particle sizes were small enough for application to the inkjet printing process.

  13. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  14. GROWTH OF A LOCALIZED SEED MAGNETIC FIELD IN A TURBULENT MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jungyeon; Yoo, Hyunju

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence dynamo deals with the amplification of a seed magnetic field in a turbulent medium and has been studied mostly for uniform or spatially homogeneous seed magnetic fields. However, some astrophysical processes (e.g., jets from active galaxies, galactic winds, or ram-pressure stripping in galaxy clusters) can provide localized seed magnetic fields. In this paper, we numerically study amplification of localized seed magnetic fields in a turbulent medium. Throughout the paper, we assume that the driving scale of turbulence is comparable to the size of the system. Our findings are as follows. First, turbulence can amplify a localized seed magnetic field very efficiently. The growth rate of magnetic energy density is as high as that for a uniform seed magnetic field. This result implies that magnetic field ejected from an astrophysical object can be a viable source of a magnetic field in a cluster. Second, the localized seed magnetic field disperses and fills the whole system very fast. If turbulence in a system (e.g., a galaxy cluster or a filament) is driven at large scales, we expect that it takes a few large-eddy turnover times for the magnetic field to fill the whole system. Third, growth and turbulence diffusion of a localized seed magnetic field are also fast in high magnetic Prandtl number turbulence. Fourth, even in decaying turbulence, a localized seed magnetic field can ultimately fill the whole system. Although the dispersal rate of the magnetic field is not fast in purely decaying turbulence, it can be enhanced by an additional forcing.

  15. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2014-06-25

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  16. Simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun; Attili, Antonio; Alshaarawi, Amjad; Bisetti, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale simulation of aerosol nucleation and growth in a turbulent mixing layer is performed and analyzed with the aim of elucidating the key processes involved. A cold gaseous stream is mixed with a hot stream of vapor, nanometer sized droplets nucleate as the vapor becomes supersaturated, and subsequently grow as more vapor condenses on their surface. All length and time scales of fluid motion and mixing are resolved and the quadrature method of moments is used to describe the dynamics of the condensing, non-inertial droplets. The results show that a region of high nucleation rate is located near the cold, dry stream, while particles undergo intense growth via condensation on the hot, humid vapor side. Supersaturation and residence times are such that number densities are low and neither coagulation nor vapor scavenging due to condensation are significant. The difference in Schmidt numbers of aerosol particles (approximated as infinity) and temperature and vapor (near unity) causes a drift of the aerosol particles in scalar space and contributes to a large scatter in the conditional statistics of aerosol quantities. The spatial distribution of the aerosol reveals high volume fraction on the hot side of the mixing layer. This distribution is due to drift against the mean and is related to turbulent mixing, which displaces particles from the nucleation region (cold side) into the growth region (hot side). Such a mechanism is absent in laminar flows and is a distinct feature of turbulent condensing aerosols.

  17. Turbulence associated with the sawtooth internal disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoletti, J.; Laviron, C.; Olivain, J.; Pecquet, A.L.

    1989-05-01

    Specific turbulence associated with the sawtooth internal disruption has been observed on TFR tokamak plasmas by analyzing density fluctuations with CO 2 laser light scattering. The time localization is clearly connected with the successive phases of the relaxation process. Some specific turbulence appears in relation to the kink motion, but the main burst corresponds to the collapse phase. We concentrate our study on this strong burst and show first its frequency and wave number spectral properties and the corresponding pseudo dispersion relation. The specific turbulence is spatially localized. It is within the interior of the q = 1 surface and extends approximately 120 0 azimuthally. Taking into account the twisting of the central plasma during the turbulent kink phase, this location agrees with the azimuthal position of the ''sooner and faster'' outgoing heat flux. The power level of this turbulence is two orders of magnitude larger than the local quasi-stationary turbulence. These observations are in fair agreement with the predictions of the sawtooth disruption model previously proposed by Andreoletti. The observed specific turbulence shows several similarities with the so called ''magnetodrift turbulence'' described in the model

  18. CHEMICAL OIL SPILL DISPERSANTS: UPDATE STATE-OF-THE- ART ON MECHANISM OF ACTION AND LABORATORY TESTING FOR PERFORMANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical dispersants are formulations designed to facilitate dispersion of an oil slick into small droplets that disperse to non-problematic concentrations in an underlying water column. This project had two primary objectives: (1) update information on mechanisms of action of ...

  19. [Synthesis of hollow titania microspheres by using microfluidic droplet-template].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingyun; Jiang, Lei; Qin, Jianhu

    2011-09-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics is of great interest due to its particular characteristics compared with the conventional methods, such as reduced reagent consumption, rapid mixing, high-throughput, shape controlled, etc. A novel method using microfluidic droplet as soft template for the synthesis of hollow titania microspheres was developed. A typical polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device containing "flow-focusing" geometry was used to generate water/oil (W/O) droplet. The mechanism for the hollow structure formation was based on the interfacial hydrolysis reaction between the continuous phase containing titanium butoxide precursor and the dispersed containing water. The continuous phase mixed with butanol was added in the downstream of the channel after the hydrolysis reaction. This step was used for drawing the water out of the microgels for further hydrolysis. The microgels obtained through a glass pipe integrated were washed, dried under vacuum and calcined after aging for a certain time. The fluorescence and scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the microspheres indicated the hollow structure and the thickness of the shell. In addition, these microspheres with thin shell (about 2 microm) were apt to rupture and collapse. Droplet-based microfluidic offered a gentle and size-controllable manner to moderate this problem. Moreover, it has potential applications in photocatalysis combined with some modification realized on the chip simultaneously.

  20. Micro-Droplet Detection Method for Measuring the Concentration of Alkaline Phosphatase-Labeled Nanoparticles in Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rufeng; Wang, Yibei; Xu, Hong; Fei, Baowei; Qin, Binjie

    2017-11-21

    This paper developed and evaluated a quantitative image analysis method to measure the concentration of the nanoparticles on which alkaline phosphatase (AP) was immobilized. These AP-labeled nanoparticles are widely used as signal markers for tagging biomolecules at nanometer and sub-nanometer scales. The AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration measurement can then be directly used to quantitatively analyze the biomolecular concentration. Micro-droplets are mono-dispersed micro-reactors that can be used to encapsulate and detect AP-labeled nanoparticles. Micro-droplets include both empty micro-droplets and fluorescent micro-droplets, while fluorescent micro-droplets are generated from the fluorescence reaction between the APs adhering to a single nanoparticle and corresponding fluorogenic substrates within droplets. By detecting micro-droplets and calculating the proportion of fluorescent micro-droplets to the overall micro-droplets, we can calculate the AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration. The proposed micro-droplet detection method includes the following steps: (1) Gaussian filtering to remove the noise of overall fluorescent targets, (2) a contrast-limited, adaptive histogram equalization processing to enhance the contrast of weakly luminescent micro-droplets, (3) an red maximizing inter-class variance thresholding method (OTSU) to segment the enhanced image for getting the binary map of the overall micro-droplets, (4) a circular Hough transform (CHT) method to detect overall micro-droplets and (5) an intensity-mean-based thresholding segmentation method to extract the fluorescent micro-droplets. The experimental results of fluorescent micro-droplet images show that the average accuracy of our micro-droplet detection method is 0.9586; the average true positive rate is 0.9502; and the average false positive rate is 0.0073. The detection method can be successfully applied to measure AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration in fluorescence microscopy.

  1. Micro-Droplet Detection Method for Measuring the Concentration of Alkaline Phosphatase-Labeled Nanoparticles in Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufeng Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper developed and evaluated a quantitative image analysis method to measure the concentration of the nanoparticles on which alkaline phosphatase (AP was immobilized. These AP-labeled nanoparticles are widely used as signal markers for tagging biomolecules at nanometer and sub-nanometer scales. The AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration measurement can then be directly used to quantitatively analyze the biomolecular concentration. Micro-droplets are mono-dispersed micro-reactors that can be used to encapsulate and detect AP-labeled nanoparticles. Micro-droplets include both empty micro-droplets and fluorescent micro-droplets, while fluorescent micro-droplets are generated from the fluorescence reaction between the APs adhering to a single nanoparticle and corresponding fluorogenic substrates within droplets. By detecting micro-droplets and calculating the proportion of fluorescent micro-droplets to the overall micro-droplets, we can calculate the AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration. The proposed micro-droplet detection method includes the following steps: (1 Gaussian filtering to remove the noise of overall fluorescent targets, (2 a contrast-limited, adaptive histogram equalization processing to enhance the contrast of weakly luminescent micro-droplets, (3 an red maximizing inter-class variance thresholding method (OTSU to segment the enhanced image for getting the binary map of the overall micro-droplets, (4 a circular Hough transform (CHT method to detect overall micro-droplets and (5 an intensity-mean-based thresholding segmentation method to extract the fluorescent micro-droplets. The experimental results of fluorescent micro-droplet images show that the average accuracy of our micro-droplet detection method is 0.9586; the average true positive rate is 0.9502; and the average false positive rate is 0.0073. The detection method can be successfully applied to measure AP-labeled nanoparticle concentration in fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Turbulence Modulation by Non-Spherical Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias

    This study deals with the interaction between turbulence and non-spherical particles and represents an extension of the modeling framework for particleladen flows. The effect of turbulence on particles is commonly referred to as turbulent dispersion while the effect of particles on the carrier....... This study encompass an outlook on existing work, an experimental study, development of a numerical model and a case study advancing the modeling techniques for pulverized coal combustion to deal with larger non-spherical biomass particles. Firstly, existing knowledge concerning the motion of non......-spherical particles and turbulence modulation are outlined. A complete description of the motion of non-spherical particles is still lacking. However, evidence suggests that the equation of motion for a sphere only represent an asymptotical value for a more general, but yet unformulated, description of the motion...

  3. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  4. Wind tunnel measurements of pollutant turbulent fluxes in urban intersections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentieri, Matteo; Hayden, Paul; Robins, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have been carried out at the EnFlo laboratory to measure mean and turbulent tracer fluxes in geometries of real street canyon intersections. The work was part of the major DAPPLE project, focussing on the area surrounding the intersection between Marylebone Road and Gloucester Place in Central London, UK. Understanding flow and dispersion in urban streets is a very important issue for air quality management and planning, and turbulent mass exchange processes are important phenomena that are very often neglected in urban modelling studies. The adopted methodology involved the combined use of laser Doppler anemometry and tracer concentration measurements. This methodology was applied to quantify the mean and turbulent flow and dispersion fields within several street canyon intersections. Vertical profiles of turbulent tracer flux were also measured. The technique, despite a number of limitations, proved reliable and allowed tracer balance calculations to be undertaken in the selected street canyon intersections. The experience gained in this work will enable much more precise studies in the future as issues affecting the accuracy of the experimental technique have been identified and resolved.

  5. Solid-phase extraction assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet to determine sildenafil and its analogues in dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Roh, Si Hun; Shaodong, Jia; Hong, Ji Yeon; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Shin, Byong-Kyu; Park, Jeong Hill; Lee, Jeongmi; Kwon, Sung Won

    2017-08-01

    A novel analytical method for the simultaneous determination of the concentration of sildenafil and its five analogues in dietary supplements using solid-phase extraction assisted reversed-phase dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet combined with ion-pairing liquid chromatography with an ultraviolet detector was developed. Parameters that affect extraction efficiency were systematically investigated, including the type of solid-phase extraction cartridge, pH of the extraction environment, and the type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvent. The method linearity was in the range of 5.0-100 ng/mL for sildenafil, homosildenafil, udenafil, benzylsildenafil, and thiosildenafil and 10-100 ng/mL for acetildenafil. The coefficients of determination were ≥0.996 for all regression curves. The sensitivity values expressed as limit of detection were between 2.5 and 7.5 ng/mL. Furthermore, intraday and interday precisions expressed as relative standard deviations were less than 5.7 and 9.9%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of sildenafil and its five analogues in complex dietary supplements. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Droplet Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Michael Paolo

    When a mixture of two materials, such as aluminum and tin, or alcohol and water, is cooled below a certain temperature, the two components begin to separate. If one component is dilute in the other, it may separate out in the form of small spheres, and these will begin to enlarge, depleting the supersaturated material around them. If the dynamics is sufficiently slow, thermodynamics gives one considerable information about how the droplets grow. Two types of experiment have explored this behavior and given puzzling results. Nucleation experiments measure the rate at which droplets initially appear from a seemingly homogeneous mixture. Near the critical point in binary liquids, experiments conducted in the 1960's and early 1970's showed that nucleation was vastly slower than theory seemed to predict. The resolution of this problem arises by considering in detail the dynamics of growing droplets and comparing it with what experiments actually measure. Here will be presented a more detailed comparison of theory and experiment than has before been completed, obtaining satisfactory agreement with no free parameters needed. A second type of experiment measures droplet size distributions after long times. In the late stage, droplets compete with each other for material, a few growing at the expense of others. A theory first proposed by Lifshitz and Slyozov claims that this distribution, properly scaled, should be universal, and independent of properties of materials. Yet experimental measurements consistently find distributions that are more broad and squat than the theory would predict. Satisfactory agreement with experiment can be achieved by considering two points. First, one must study the complete time development of droplet size distributions, to understand when the asymptotic regime obtains. Second, droplet size distributions are spread by correlations between droplets. If one finds a small droplet, it is small because large droplets nearby are competing with it

  7. Experimental study of inverted-annular-flow hydrodynamics utilizing an adiabatic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jarlais, G.

    1983-03-01

    In experiments, inverted annular flow was simulated adiabatically with turbulent water jets, issuing downward from long aspect nozzles, enclosed in gas annuli. Velocities, diameters, and gas species were varied, and core jet length, shape, break-up mode, and dispersed-core droplet sizes were recorded at approximately 750 data points. Inverted annular flow was observed to develop into inverted slug flow at low relative velocities, and into dispersed droplet flow at high relative velocities. For both of the above transitions from inverted annular flow, correlations for core jet length were developed by extending work done on free liquid jets to include this new, coaxial, jet disintegration phenomenon. Jet break-up length is correlated as a function of jet diameter, jet Reynolds number, jet Weber number, void fraction, and gas Weber number. Correlations for core shape, break-up mechanisms and dispersed core droplet size for the case of transition to inverted slug flow were developed

  8. A one-dimensional semi-empirical model considering transition boiling effect for dispersed flow film boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu-Jou [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Pan, Chin, E-mail: cpan@ess.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China); Low Carbon Energy Research Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Seven heat transfer mechanisms are studied numerically by the model. • A semi-empirical method is proposed to account for the transition boiling effect. • The parametric effects on the heat transfer mechanisms are investigated. • The thermal non-equilibrium phenomenon between vapor and droplets is investigated. - Abstract: The objective of this paper is to develop a one-dimensional semi-empirical model for the dispersed flow film boiling considering transition boiling effects. The proposed model consists of conservation equations, i.e., vapor mass, vapor energy, droplet mass and droplet momentum conservation, and a set of closure relations to address the interactions among wall, vapor and droplets. The results show that the transition boiling effect is of vital importance in the dispersed flow film boiling regime, since the flowing situation in the downstream would be influenced by the conditions in the upstream. In addition, the present paper, through evaluating the vapor temperature and the amount of heat transferred to droplets, investigates the thermal non-equilibrium phenomenon under different flowing conditions. Comparison of the wall temperature predictions with the 1394 experimental data in the literature, the present model ranging from system pressure of 30–140 bar, heat flux of 204–1837 kW/m{sup 2} and mass flux of 380–5180 kg/m{sup 2} s, shows very good agreement with RMS of 8.80% and standard deviation of 8.81%. Moreover, the model well depicts the thermal non-equilibrium phenomenon for the dispersed flow film boiling.

  9. Turbulent Plume Dispersion over Two-dimensional Idealized Urban Street Canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C. C. C.; Liu, C. H.

    2012-04-01

    Human activities are the primary pollutant sources which degrade the living quality in the current era of dense and compact cities. A simple and reasonably accurate pollutant dispersion model is helpful to reduce pollutant concentrations in city or neighborhood scales by refining architectural design or urban planning. The conventional method to estimate the pollutant concentration from point/line sources is the Gaussian plume model using empirical dispersion coefficients. Its accuracy is pretty well for applying to rural areas. However, the dispersion coefficients only account for the atmospheric stability and streamwise distance that often overlook the roughness of urban surfaces. Large-scale buildings erected in urban areas significantly modify the surface roughness that in turn affects the pollutant transport in the urban canopy layer (UCL). We hypothesize that the aerodynamic resistance is another factor governing the dispersion coefficient in the UCL. This study is thus conceived to study the effects of urban roughness on pollutant dispersion coefficients and the plume behaviors. Large-eddy simulations (LESs) are carried out to examine the plume dispersion from a ground-level pollutant source over idealized 2D street canyons in neutral stratification. Computations with a wide range of aspect ratios (ARs), including skimming flow to isolated flow regimes, are conducted. The vertical profiles of pollutant distribution for different values of friction factor are compared that all reach a self-similar Gaussian shape. Preliminary results show that the pollutant dispersion is closely related to the friction factor. For relatively small roughness, the factors of dispersion coefficient vary linearly with the friction factor until the roughness is over a certain level. When the friction factor is large, its effect on the dispersion coefficient is less significant. Since the linear region covers at least one-third of the full range of friction factor in our empirical

  10. Coherent structures in turbulence : Their generation, identification, and contribution to tracer particle dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudar Vishwanathappa, M.

    2017-01-01

    Turbulence is implicitly present or explicitly desired in many natural and industrial processes, such as, flow over solid surfaces, cloud formation, pollination, combustion, and chemical mixing. Hence, a better understanding of turbulence can aid in fuel saving by reducing drag in the case of flow

  11. Advances in fluid modeling and turbulence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Akira; Ninokata, Hisashi; Tanaka, Nobukazu

    2002-01-01

    The context of this book consists of four fields: Environmental Fluid Mechanics; Industrial Fluid Mechanics; Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics; and Turbulence Measurements. Environmental Fluid Mechanics includes free surface flows in channels, rivers, seas, and estuaries. It also discusses wind engineering issues, ocean circulation model and dispersion problems in atmospheric, water and ground water environments. In Industrial Fluid Mechanics, fluid phenomena in energy exchanges, modeling of turbulent two- or multi-phase flows, swirling flows, flows in combustors, variable density flows and reacting flows, flows in turbo-machines, pumps and piping systems, and fluid-structure interaction are discussed. In Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics, progress in modeling turbulent flows and heat/mass transfers, computational fluid dynamics/numerical techniques, parallel computing algorithms, applications of chaos/fractal theory in turbulence are reported. In Turbulence Measurements, experimental studies of turbulent flows, experimental and post-processing techniques, quantitative and qualitative flow visualization techniques are discussed. Separate abstracts were presented for 15 of the papers in this issue. The remaining 89 were considered outside the subject scope of INIS. (J.P.N.)

  12. Simulation of turbulent flow in a packed bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, B.; Yu, A. [Centre for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems and School of Material Science and Engineering, The University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Wright, B.; Zulli, P. [BlueScope Steel Research Laboratories, P.O. Box 202, Port Kembla, NSW 2505 (Australia)

    2006-05-15

    Numerous models for simulating the flow and transport in packed beds have been proposed in the literature with few reported applications. In this paper, several turbulence models for porous media are applied to the gas flow through a randomly packed bed and are examined by means of a parametric study against some published experimental data. These models predict widely different turbulent eddy viscosity. The analysis also indicates that deficiencies exist in the formulation of some model equations and selection of a suitable turbulence model is important. With this realization, residence time distribution and velocity distribution are then simulated by considering a radial profile of porosity and turbulence induced dispersion, and the results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of droplet formation in confined channels with thermocapillary flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Sbragaglia, M.; Belardinelli, D.; Sugiyama, K.

    2016-12-01

    Based on mesoscale lattice Boltzmann simulations with the "Shan-Chen" model, we explore the influence of thermocapillarity on the breakup properties of fluid threads in a microfluidic T-junction, where a dispersed phase is injected perpendicularly into a main channel containing a continuous phase, and the latter induces periodic breakup of droplets due to the cross-flowing. Temperature effects are investigated by switching on-off both positive-negative temperature gradients along the main channel direction, thus promoting a different thread dynamics with anticipated-delayed breakup. Numerical simulations are performed at changing the flow rates of both the continuous and dispersed phases, as well as the relative importance of viscous forces, surface tension forces, and thermocapillary stresses. The range of parameters is broad enough to characterize the effects of thermocapillarity on different mechanisms of breakup in the confined T-junction, including the so-called "squeezing" and "dripping" regimes, previously identified in the literature. Some simple scaling arguments are proposed to rationalize the observed behavior, and to provide quantitative guidelines on how to predict the droplet size after breakup.

  14. MULTIFLUID MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENT DECAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downes, T. P.; O'Sullivan, S.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation that occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512 3 resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity, and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingly we find that, at least at these resolutions, the majority of the physics of multifluid turbulence can be captured by simply introducing fixed (in time and space) resistive terms into the induction equation without the need for a full multifluid MHD treatment. The velocity dispersion is also examined and, in common with previously published results, it is found not to be power law in nature.

  15. Helium-filled soap bubbles tracing fidelity in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleiros, David Engler; Tuinstra, Marthijn; Sciacchitano, Andrea; Scarano, Fulvio

    2018-03-01

    The use of helium-filled soap bubbles (HFSB) as flow tracers for particle image velocimetry (PIV) and particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) to measure the properties of turbulent boundary layers is investigated in the velocity range from 30 to 50 m/s. The experiments correspond to momentum thickness-based Reynolds numbers of 3300 and 5100. A single bubble generator delivers nearly neutrally buoyant HFSB to seed the air flow developing over the flat plate. The HFSB motion analysis is performed by PTV using single-frame multi-exposure recordings. The measurements yield the local velocity and turbulence statistics. Planar two-component-PIV measurements with micron-sized droplets (DEHS) conducted under the same conditions provide reference data for the quantities of interest. In addition, the behavior of air-filled soap bubbles is studied where the effect of non-neutral buoyancy is more pronounced. The mean velocity profiles as well as the turbulent stresses obtained with HFSB are in good agreement with the flow statistics obtained with DEHS particles. The study illustrates that HFSB tracers can be used to determine the mean velocity and the turbulent fluctuations of turbulent boundary layers above a distance of approximately two bubble diameters from the wall. This work broadens the current range of application of HFSB from external aerodynamics of large-scale-PIV experiments towards wall-bounded turbulence.

  16. [Micro-droplet characterization and its application for amino acid detection in droplet microfluidic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huiling; Dong, Libing; Tu, Ran; Du, Wenbin; Ji, Shiru; Wang, Qinhong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the droplet microfluidic system attracts interests due to its high throughput and low cost to detect and screen. The picoliter micro-droplets from droplet microfluidics are uniform with respect to the size and shape, and could be used as monodispensed micro-reactors for encapsulation and detection of single cell or its metabolites. Therefore, it is indispensable to characterize micro-droplet and its application from droplet microfluidic system. We first constructed the custom-designed droplet microfluidic system for generating micro-droplets, and then used the micro-droplets to encapsulate important amino acids such as glutamic acid, phenylalanine, tryptophan or tyrosine to test the droplets' properties, including the stability, diffusivity and bio-compatibility for investigating its application for amino acid detection and sorting. The custom-designed droplet microfluidic system could generate the uniformed micro-droplets with a controllable size between 20 to 50 microm. The micro-droplets could be stable for more than 20 h without cross-contamination or fusion each other. The throughput of detection and sorting of the system is about 600 micro-droplets per minute. This study provides a high-throughput platform for the analysis and screening of amino acid-producing microorganisms.

  17. Mathematical model for prediction of droplet sizes and distribution associated with impact of liquid-containing projectile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shelke, Ashish V.; Gera, B.; Maheshwari, N.K.; Singh, R.K.

    2018-01-01

    After the events of 9/11, the impact of fast flying commercial aircraft is considered as major hazard threatening the Nuclear Power Plant's (NPP) safety. The study of fuel spillage phenomenon and fireball formation is important to understand fire hazards due to burning of dispersed aviation fuel. The detailed analysis of fuel dispersion is very difficult to deliberate because both, large NPP structures and the large size of commercial aircrafts. Sandia National Laboratories, USA conducted impact tests using cylindrical projectiles filled with water to measure the associated parameters. Due to combustion properties and volatile nature of hydrocarbon fuels, the obtained parameters from impact studies using water are incomplete in fire analysis of flammable droplet clouds. A mathematical model is developed for prediction of droplet sizes and distribution associated with the impact of a liquid-containing projectile. The model can predict the transient behavior of droplet cloud. It is validated with experimental data available in literature. In the present study, the analysis has been performed using water and kerosene. The data obtained can be utilized as boundary and initial condition for CFD analysis. This information is useful for fire hazard analysis of aircraft impacts on NPP structures.

  18. Turbulent circulation above the surface heat source in a stably stratified environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the numerical modeling of turbulent structure of the penetrating convection above the urban heat island with a small aspect ratio in a stably stratified medium at rest are presented. The gradient diffusion representations for turbulent momentum and heat fluxes are used, which depend on three parameters — the turbulence kinetic energy, the velocity of its spectral expenditure, and the dispersion of temperature fluctuations. These parameters are found from the closed differential equations of balance in the RANS approach of turbulence description. The distributions of averaged velocity and temperature fields as well as turbulent characteristics agree well with measurement data.

  19. Turbulent structure of stably stratified inhomogeneous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Oaki

    2018-04-01

    Effects of buoyancy force stabilizing disturbances are investigated on the inhomogeneous flow where disturbances are dispersed from the turbulent to non-turbulent field in the direction perpendicular to the gravity force. Attaching the fringe region, where disturbances are excited by the artificial body force, a Fourier spectral method is used for the inhomogeneous flow stirred at one side of the cuboid computational box. As a result, it is found that the turbulent kinetic energy is dispersed as layered structures elongated in the streamwise direction through the vibrating motion. A close look at the layered structures shows that they are flanked by colder fluids at the top and hotter fluids at the bottom, and hence vertically compressed and horizontally expanded by the buoyancy related to the countergradient heat flux, though they are punctuated by the vertical expansion of fluids at the forefront of the layered structures, which is related to the downgradient heat flux, indicating that the layered structures are gravity currents. However, the phase between temperature fluctuations and vertical velocity is shifted by π/2 rad, indicating that temperature fluctuations are generated by the propagation of internal gravity waves.

  20. 3-Dimensional Microorifice Fabricated Utilizing Single Undercut Etching Process for Producing Ultrasmall Water and Chitosan Droplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Hsin Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This research reports a microfluidic device for producing small droplets via a microorifice and a T-junction structure. The orifice is fabricated using an isotropic undercut etching process of amorphous glass materials. Since the equivalent hydraulic diameter of the produced microorifice can be as small as 1.1 μm, the microdevice can easily produce droplets of the size smaller than 10 μm in diameter. In addition, a permanent hydrophobic coating technique is also applied to modify the main channel to be hydrophobic to enhance the formation of water-based droplets. Experimental results show that the developed microfluidic chip with the ultrasmall orifice can steadily produce water-in-oil droplets with different sizes. Uniform water-in-oil droplets with the size from 60 μm to 6.5 μm in diameter can be formed by adjusting the flow rate ratio of the continuous phase and the disperse phases from 1 to 7. Moreover, curable linear polymer of chitosan droplets with the size smaller than 100 μm can also be successfully produced using the developed microchip device. The microfluidic T-junction with a micro-orifice developed in the present study provides a simple yet efficient way to produce various droplets of different sizes.

  1. Simultaneous measurement of monocomponent droplet temperature/refractive index, size and evaporation rate with phase rainbow refractometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingchun; Crua, Cyril; Li, Haipeng; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Mädler, Lutz; Wu, Xuecheng; Gréhan, Gérard

    2018-07-01

    The accurate measurements of droplet temperature, size and evaporation rate are of great importance to characterize the heat and mass transfer during evaporation/condensation processes. The nanoscale size change of a micron-sized droplet exactly describes its transient mass transfer, but is difficult to measure because it is smaller than the resolutions of current size measurement techniques. The Phase Rainbow Refractometry (PRR) technique is developed and applied to measure droplet temperature, size and transient size changes and thereafter evaporation rate simultaneously. The measurement principle of PRR is theoretically derived, and it reveals that the phase shift of the time-resolved ripple structures linearly depends on, and can directly yield, nano-scale size changes of droplets. The PRR technique is first verified through the simulation of rainbows of droplets with changing size, and results show that PRR can precisely measure droplet refractive index, absolute size, as well as size change with absolute and relative errors within several nanometers and 0.6%, respectively, and thus PRR permits accurate measurements of transient droplet evaporation rates. The evaporations of flowing single n-nonane droplet and mono-dispersed n-heptane droplet stream are investigated by two PRR systems with a high speed linear CCD and a low speed array CCD, respectively. Their transient evaporation rates are experimentally determined and quantitatively agree well with the theoretical values predicted by classical Maxwell and Stefan-Fuchs models. With the demonstration of evaporation rate measurement of monocomponent droplet in this work, PRR is an ideal tool for measurements of transient droplet evaporation/condensation processes, and can be extended to multicomponent droplets in a wide range of industrially-relevant applications.

  2. Volume-of-fluid simulations in microfluidic T-junction devices: Influence of viscosity ratio on droplet size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekouei, Mehdi; Vanapalli, Siva A.

    2017-03-01

    We used volume-of-fluid (VOF) method to perform three-dimensional numerical simulations of droplet formation of Newtonian fluids in microfluidic T-junction devices. To evaluate the performance of the VOF method we examined the regimes of drop formation and determined droplet size as a function of system parameters. Comparison of the simulation results with four sets of experimental data from the literature showed good agreement, validating the VOF method. Motivated by the lack of adequate studies investigating the influence of viscosity ratio (λ) on the generated droplet size, we mapped the dependence of drop volume on capillary number (0.001 1. In addition, we find that at a given capillary number, the size of droplets does not vary appreciably when λ 1. We develop an analytical model for predicting the droplet size that includes a viscosity-dependent breakup time for the dispersed phase. This improved model successfully predicts the effects of the viscosity ratio observed in simulations. Results from this study are useful for the design of lab-on-chip technologies and manufacture of microfluidic emulsions, where there is a need to know how system parameters influence the droplet size.

  3. THE TURBULENCE SPECTRUM OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE GALACTIC RING SURVEY: A DENSITY-DEPENDENT PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS CALIBRATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Jackson, James; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S.; Brunt, Christopher; Heyer, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Turbulence plays a major role in the formation and evolution of molecular clouds. Observationally, turbulent velocities are convolved with the density of an observed region. To correct for this convolution, we investigate the relation between the turbulence spectrum of model clouds, and the statistics of their synthetic observations obtained from principal component analysis (PCA). We apply PCA to spectral maps generated from simulated density and velocity fields, obtained from hydrodynamic simulations of supersonic turbulence, and from fractional Brownian motion (fBm) fields with varying velocity, density spectra, and density dispersion. We examine the dependence of the slope of the PCA pseudo-structure function, α PCA , on intermittency, on the turbulence velocity (β v ) and density (β n ) spectral indexes, and on density dispersion. We find that PCA is insensitive to β n and to the log-density dispersion σ s , provided σ s ≤ 2. For σ s > 2, α PCA increases with σ s due to the intermittent sampling of the velocity field by the density field. The PCA calibration also depends on intermittency. We derive a PCA calibration based on fBm structures with σ s ≤ 2 and apply it to 367 13 CO spectral maps of molecular clouds in the Galactic Ring Survey. The average slope of the PCA structure function, (α PCA ) = 0.62 ± 0.2, is consistent with the hydrodynamic simulations and leads to a turbulence velocity exponent of (β v ) = 2.06 ± 0.6 for a non-intermittent, low density dispersion flow. Accounting for intermittency and density dispersion, the coincidence between the PCA slope of the GRS clouds and the hydrodynamic simulations suggests β v ≅ 1.9, consistent with both Burgers and compressible intermittent turbulence.

  4. Lossless droplet transfer of droplet-based microfluidic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Page, Jason S [Kennewick, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2011-11-22

    A transfer structure for droplet-based microfluidic analysis is characterized by a first conduit containing a first stream having at least one immiscible droplet of aqueous material and a second conduit containing a second stream comprising an aqueous fluid. The interface between the first conduit and the second conduit can define a plurality of apertures, wherein the apertures are sized to prevent exchange of the first and second streams between conduits while allowing lossless transfer of droplets from the first conduit to the second conduit through contact between the first and second streams.

  5. A thermomechanical model for the fragmentation of a liquid metal droplet cooled by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivochkin, Yu P.; Monastyrskiy, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    A thermo mechanical aspect of the fragmentation of a liquid metal droplet, solidified as it falls into cold water, is considered in the presented model. The formation of a solid phase in the form of continuous, fluid-tight and relatively rigid casting skin results in a pressure decrease inside the droplet due to the difference between liquid and solid metal density. Because of the high compression modulus of the melt, the pressure in the droplet becomes negative when the thickness of the solid skin achieves several microns. The tensile stress in the melt results in the deformation of the casting skin or the melt’s continuity violation in the form of a shrinkage pore. The rupture of the deformed solid crust results in the penetration of steam jets into the liquid part of the drop. Due to the difference in pressure in the surrounding steam and in the droplet, the casting skin is crushed and the melt is blown out. Both scenarios contribute to the hydrodynamic destruction of the droplet. The suggested thermo mechanical model gives a qualitative explanation for experimental data. In the experimental part of the work, droplets of molten Sn were solidified in water. The solidified pieces of the droplets usually include deformed, thin-walled shells and dispersed particles. On a qualitative level the composition and shape of the solid fragments can be explained within the bounds of the suggested thermo mechanical model.

  6. Observational study of the relationship between entrainment rate and relative dispersion in deep convective clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohao; Lu, Chunsong; Zhao, Tianliang; Liu, Yangang; Zhang, Guang Jun; Luo, Shi

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of entrainment rate (λ) on relative dispersion (ε) of cloud droplet size distributions (CDSD) in the 99 growing precipitating deep convective clouds during TOGA-COARE. The results show that entrainment suppresses ε, which is opposite to the traditional understanding that entrainment-mixing broadens CDSD. To examine how the relationship between ε and λ is affected by droplets with different sizes, CDSDs are divided into three portions with droplet radius processes is developed to illustrate the possible scenarios entailing different relationships between ε and λ. The number concentration of small droplets and the degree of evaporation of small droplets are found to be key factors that shift the sign (i.e., positive or negative) of the ε-λ relationship.

  7. Experimental study of drop breakup in a turbulent flow; Etude experimentale de la rupture de gouttes dans un ecoulement turbulent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galinat, S.

    2005-04-15

    This work presents the drop breakup phenomenon in a turbulent flow induced by a cross-section restriction in a pipe. A global analysis of single-drop breakup, in a finite volume downstream of the orifice, has allowed deriving statistical quantities such as the break-up probability and the daughter-drop distribution. These parameters are function of a global Weber number based on the maximal pressure drop through the orifice. At a local scale, the locations of breakup events are distributed heterogeneously and depend on the flow Reynolds number. The local hydrodynamic study in downstream of the orifice, which has been done by using Particle Image Velocimetry, reveals the specific breakup zones. Otherwise, this analysis has proved that the turbulence is the predominant external stress at the drop scale. The relation between drop deformation and the external stress along the trajectory has been simulated numerically by the response of a damped oscillator to the locally measured instantaneous turbulence forcing. The results of statistical analysis have allowed to introduce a breakup criterion, based on a unique deformation threshold value for all experiments. This multi-scale approach has been conducted to study drop breakup mechanisms in a concentrated dispersion. The breakup probability decrease with the increase of dispersed phase concentration, which influences the turbulent Weber number distribution in downstream of the orifice. (author)

  8. Speciation of Tl(III and Tl(I in hair samples by dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Z. Mohammadi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dispersive liquid–liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet was successfully used as a sample preparation method prior to flame atomic absorption determination of trace amounts of Tl(III and Tl(I in hair samples. In the proposed method, 1-(2-pyridylazo-2-naphthol, 1-dodecanol and ethanol were used as chelating agent, extraction and dispersive solvent, respectively. Several factors that may be affected in the extraction process, such as type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents, pH, salting out effect, ionic strength and extraction time were studied. Under the optimal conditions, linearity was maintained between 6.0 and 900.0 ng mL−1 for Tl(III. The relative standard deviation for seven replicate determinations of 0.2 μg mL−1 Tl(III was 2.5%. The detection limit based on 3Sb for Tl(III in the original solution was 2.1 ng mL−1. The proposed method has been applied for the determination of trace amounts of thallium in hair samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  9. Dispersion under low wind speed conditions using Gaussian Plume approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakesh, P.T.; Srinivas, C.V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatesan, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2018-01-01

    For radioactive dose computation due to atmospheric releases, dispersion models are essential requirement. For this purpose, Gaussian plume model (GPM) is used in the short range and advanced particle dispersion models are used in all ranges. In dispersion models, other than wind speed the most influential parameter which determines the fate of the pollutant is the turbulence diffusivity. In GPM the diffusivity is represented using empirical approach. Studies show that under low wind speed conditions, the existing diffusivity relationships are not adequate in estimating the diffusion. An important phenomenon that occurs during the low wind speed is the meandering motions. It is found that under meandering motions the extent of plume dispersion is more than the estimated value using conventional GPM and particle transport models. In this work a set of new turbulence parameters for the horizontal diffusion of the plume is suggested and using them in GPM, the plume is simulated and is compared against observation available from Hanford tracer release experiment

  10. Printed droplet microfluidics for on demand dispensing of picoliter droplets and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Russell H; Tang, Shi-Yang; Siltanen, Christian A; Shahi, Payam; Zhang, Jesse Q; Poust, Sean; Gartner, Zev J; Abate, Adam R

    2017-08-15

    Although the elementary unit of biology is the cell, high-throughput methods for the microscale manipulation of cells and reagents are limited. The existing options either are slow, lack single-cell specificity, or use fluid volumes out of scale with those of cells. Here we present printed droplet microfluidics, a technology to dispense picoliter droplets and cells with deterministic control. The core technology is a fluorescence-activated droplet sorter coupled to a specialized substrate that together act as a picoliter droplet and single-cell printer, enabling high-throughput generation of intricate arrays of droplets, cells, and microparticles. Printed droplet microfluidics provides a programmable and robust technology to construct arrays of defined cell and reagent combinations and to integrate multiple measurement modalities together in a single assay.

  11. Lateral dispersion coefficients as functions of averaging time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheih, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    Plume dispersion coefficients are discussed in terms of single-particle and relative diffusion, and are investigated as functions of averaging time. To demonstrate the effects of averaging time on the relative importance of various dispersion processes, and observed lateral wind velocity spectrum is used to compute the lateral dispersion coefficients of total, single-particle and relative diffusion for various averaging times and plume travel times. The results indicate that for a 1 h averaging time the dispersion coefficient of a plume can be approximated by single-particle diffusion alone for travel times <250 s and by relative diffusion for longer travel times. Furthermore, it is shown that the power-law formula suggested by Turner for relating pollutant concentrations for other averaging times to the corresponding 15 min average is applicable to the present example only when the averaging time is less than 200 s and the tral time smaller than about 300 s. Since the turbulence spectrum used in the analysis is an observed one, it is hoped that the results could represent many conditions encountered in the atmosphere. However, as the results depend on the form of turbulence spectrum, the calculations are not for deriving a set of specific criteria but for demonstrating the need in discriminating various processes in studies of plume dispersion

  12. An Interactive Microsoft(registered tm) Excel Program for Tracking a Single Evaporating Droplet in Crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, K. H.; Urip, E.; Yang, S. L.; Marek, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    Droplet interaction with a high temperature gaseous crossflow is important because of its wide application in systems involving two phase mixing such as in combustion requiring quick mixing of fuel and air with the reduction of pollutants and for jet mixing in the dilution zone of combustors. Therefore, the focus of this work is to investigate dispersion of a two-dimensional atomized and evaporating spray jet into a two-dimensional crossflow. An interactive Microsoft Excel program for tracking a single droplet in crossflow that has previously been developed will be modified to include droplet evaporation computation. In addition to the high velocity airflow, the injected droplets are also subjected to combustor temperature and pressure that affect their motion in the flow field. Six ordinary differential equations are then solved by 4th-order Runge-Kutta method using Microsoft Excel software. Microsoft Visual Basic programming and Microsoft Excel macrocode are used to produce the data and plot graphs describing the droplet's motion in the flow field. This program computes and plots the data sequentially without forcing the user to open other types of plotting programs. A user's manual on how to use the program is included.

  13. Turbulence and star formation in molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    Data for many molecular clouds and condensations show that the internal velocity dispersion of each region is well correlated with its size and mass, and these correlations are approximately of power-law form. The dependence of velocity dispersion on region size is similar to the Kolmogoroff law for subsonic turbulence, suggesting that the observed motions are all part of a common hierarchy of interstellar turbulent motions. The regions studied are mostly gravitationally bound and in approximate virial equilibrium. However, they cannot have formed by simple gravitational collapse, and it appears likely that molecular clouds and their substructures have been created at least partly by processes of supersonic hydrodynamics. The hierarchy of subcondensations may terminate with objects so small that their internal motions are no longer supersonic; this predicts a minimum protostellar mass of the order of a few tenths of a solar mass. Massive 'protostellar' clumps always have supersonic internal motions and will therefore develop complex internal structures, probably leading to the formation of many pre-stellar condensation nuclei that grow by accretion to produce the final stellar mass spectrum. Molecular clouds must be transient structures, and are probably dispersed after not much more than 10 7 yr. (author)

  14. Wavenumber spectrum of whistler turbulence: Particle-in-cell simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, S.; Gary, S. Peter; Narita, Y.

    2010-01-01

    The forward cascade of decaying whistler turbulence is studied in low beta plasma to understand essential properties of the energy spectrum at electron scales, by using a two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. This simulation demonstrates turbulence in which the energy cascade rate is greater than the dissipation rate at the electron inertial length. The PIC simulation shows that the magnetic energy spectrum of forward-cascaded whistler turbulence at electron inertial scales is anisotropic and develops a very steep power-law spectrum which is consistent with recent solar wind observations. A comparison of the simulated spectrum with that predicted by a phenomenological turbulence scaling model suggests that the energy cascade at the electron inertial scale depends on both magnetic fluctuations and electron velocity fluctuations, as well as on the whistler dispersion relation. Thus, not only kinetic Alfven turbulence but also whistler turbulence may explain recent solar wind observations of very steep magnetic spectra at short scales.

  15. Experimental investigation of molten salt droplet quenching and solidification processes of heat recovery in thermochemical hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghandehariun, S.; Wang, Z.; Naterer, G.F.; Rosen, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal efficiency of a thermochemical cycle of hydrogen production is improved. • Direct contact heat recovery from molten salt is analyzed. • Falling droplets quenched into water are investigated experimentally. - Abstract: This paper investigates the heat transfer and X-ray diffraction patterns of solidified molten salt droplets in heat recovery processes of a thermochemical Cu–Cl cycle of hydrogen production. It is essential to recover the heat of the molten salt to enhance the overall thermal efficiency of the copper–chlorine cycle. A major portion of heat recovery within the cycle can be achieved by cooling and solidifying the molten salt exiting an oxygen reactor. Heat recovery from the molten salt is achieved by dispersing the molten stream into droplets. In this paper, an analytical study and experimental investigation of the thermal phenomena of a falling droplet quenched into water is presented, involving the droplet surface temperature during descent and resulting composition change in the quench process. The results show that it is feasible to quench the molten salt droplets for an efficient heat recovery process without introducing any material imbalance for the overall cycle integration.

  16. Multiscale coherent structures in tokamak plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Zhang, W.; Yang, Q. W.; Wang, L.; Wen, Y. Z.

    2006-01-01

    A 12-tip poloidal probe array is used on the HT-7 superconducting tokamak [Li, Wan, and Mao, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 42, 135 (2000)] to measure plasma turbulence in the edge region. Some statistical analysis techniques are used to characterize the turbulence structures. It is found that the plasma turbulence is composed of multiscale coherent structures, i.e., turbulent eddies and there is self-similarity in a relative short scale range. The presence of the self-similarity is found due to the structural similarity of these eddies between different scales. These turbulent eddies constitute the basic convection cells, so the self-similar range is just the dominant scale range relevant to transport. The experimental results also indicate that the plasma turbulence is dominated by low-frequency and long-wavelength fluctuation components and its dispersion relation shows typical electron-drift-wave characteristics. Some large-scale coherent structures intermittently burst out and exhibit a very long poloidal extent, even longer than 6 cm. It is found that these large-scale coherent structures are mainly contributed by the low-frequency and long-wavelength fluctuating components and their presence is responsible for the observations of long-range correlations, i.e., the correlation in the scale range much longer than the turbulence decorrelation scale. These experimental observations suggest that the coexistence of multiscale coherent structures results in the self-similar turbulent state

  17. Droplet based microfluidics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seemann, Ralf; Brinkmann, Martin; Pfohl, Thomas; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Droplet based microfluidics is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of research combining soft matter physics, biochemistry and microsystems engineering. Its applications range from fast analytical systems or the synthesis of advanced materials to protein crystallization and biological assays for living cells. Precise control of droplet volumes and reliable manipulation of individual droplets such as coalescence, mixing of their contents, and sorting in combination with fast analysis tools allow us to perform chemical reactions inside the droplets under defined conditions. In this paper, we will review available drop generation and manipulation techniques. The main focus of this review is not to be comprehensive and explain all techniques in great detail but to identify and shed light on similarities and underlying physical principles. Since geometry and wetting properties of the microfluidic channels are crucial factors for droplet generation, we also briefly describe typical device fabrication methods in droplet based microfluidics. Examples of applications and reaction schemes which rely on the discussed manipulation techniques are also presented, such as the fabrication of special materials and biophysical experiments.

  18. Collisions and turbulence in optical rogue wave formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genty, G.; de Sterke, C.M.; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    We discuss optical rogue wave generation in terms of collisions and turbulence processes. Simulations of picosecond pulse propagation in optical fibres show rogue soliton generation from either third-order dispersion or Raman scattering independently. Simulations of rogue soliton emergence...

  19. On the pollutant removal, dispersion, and entrainment over two-dimensional idealized street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Ho; Wong, Colman C. C.

    2014-01-01

    Pollutant dispersion over urban areas is not that well understood, in particular at the street canyon scale. This study is therefore conceived to examine how urban morphology modifies the pollutant removal, dispersion, and entrainment over urban areas. An idealized computational domain consisting of 12 two-dimensional (2D) identical street canyons of unity aspect ratio is employed. The large-eddy simulation (LES) is used to calculate the turbulent flows and pollutant transport in the urban boundary layer (UBL). An area source of uniform pollutant concentration is applied on the ground of the first street canyon. A close examination on the roof-level turbulence reveals patches of low-speed air masses in the streamwise flows and narrow high-speed downdrafts in the shear layer. Different from the flows over a smooth surface, the turbulence intensities are peaked near the top of the building roughness. The pollutant is rather uniformly distributed inside a street canyon but disperses quickly in the UBL over the buildings. Partitioning the vertical pollutant flux into its mean and turbulent components demystifies that the pollutant removal is mainly governed by turbulence. Whereas, mean wind carries pollutant into and out of a street canyon simultaneously. In addition to wind speed promotion, turbulent mixing is thus required to dilute the ground-level pollutants, which are then removed from the street canyon to the UBL. Atmospheric flows slow down rapidly after the leeward buildings, leading to updrafts carrying pollutants away from the street canyons (the basic pollutant removal mechanism).

  20. Fast electric control of the droplet size in a microfluidic T-junction droplet generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaeian, Mostafa; Hardt, Steffen

    2018-05-01

    The effect of DC electric fields on the generation of droplets of water and xanthan gum solutions in sunflower oil at a microfluidic T-junction is experimentally studied. The electric field leads to a significant reduction of the droplet diameter, by about a factor of 2 in the case of water droplets. The droplet size can be tuned by varying the electric field strength, an effect that can be employed to produce a stream of droplets with a tailor-made size sequence. Compared to the case of purely hydrodynamic droplet production without electric fields, the electric control has about the same effect on the droplet size if the electric stress at the liquid/liquid interface is the same as the hydrodynamic stress.

  1. Can a droplet break up under flow without elongating? Fragmentation of smectic monodisperse droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courbin, L.; Engl, W.; Panizza, P.

    2004-06-01

    We study the fragmentation under shear flow of smectic monodisperse droplets at high volume fraction. Using small angle light scattering and optical microscopy, we reveal the existence of a break-up mechanism for which the droplets burst into daughter droplets of the same size. Surprisingly, this fragmentation process, which is strain controlled and occurs homogeneously in the cell, does not require any transient elongation of the droplets. Systematic experiments as a function of the initial droplet size and the applied shear rate show that the rupture is triggered by an instability of the inner droplet structure.

  2. The impact of boundary layer turbulence on snow growth and precipitation: Idealized Large Eddy Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xia; Xue, Lulin; Geerts, Bart; Kosović, Branko

    2018-05-01

    Ice particles and supercooled droplets often co-exist in planetary boundary-layer (PBL) clouds. The question examined in this numerical study is how large turbulent PBL eddies affect snow growth and surface precipitation from mixed-phase PBL clouds. In order to simplify this question, this study assumes an idealized BL with well-developed turbulence but no surface heat fluxes or radiative heat exchanges. Large Eddy Simulations with and without resolved PBL turbulence are compared. This comparison demonstrates that the impact on snow growth in mixed-phase clouds is controlled by two opposing mechanisms, a microphysical and a dynamical one. The cloud microphysical impact of large turbulent eddies is based on the difference in saturation vapor pressure over water and over ice. The net outcome of alternating turbulent up- and downdrafts is snow growth by diffusion and/or accretion (riming). On the other hand, turbulence-induced entrainment and detrainment may suppress snow growth. In the case presented herein, the net effect of these microphysical and dynamical processes is positive, but in general the net effect depends on ambient conditions, in particular the profiles of temperature, humidity, and wind.

  3. Understanding spatial and temporal behavior of sea spray droplets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer using an Eulerian-Lagrangian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissanka, I. D.; Richter, D. H.

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that sea spray droplets can play a significant role in air-sea heat and moisture exchange. The larger spray droplets have potential to transfer considerable amount of mass, momentum and heat, however they remain closer to surface and their residence times are shorter due to the faster settling. On the other hand, smaller droplets have high vertical mobility which allows sufficient time for droplets to adjust to ambient conditions. Hence, to study the heat and moisture characteristics of sea spray droplets it is important to understand how different droplet sizes behave in the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL), especially their temporal evolutions. In this study sea spray droplet transport in the MABL is simulated using Large Eddy Simulation combined with a Lagrangian Particle model which represents spray droplets of varying size. The individual droplets are tracked while their radius and temperature evolve based on local ambient conditions. The particles are advected based on the local resolved velocities and the particle dispersion due to sub-filtered scale motions are modeled using a Lagrangian stochastic model. In this study a series of simulations are conducted with the focus of understanding fundamental droplet microphysics, which will help characterize and quantify the lifetime and airborne concentrations of spray droplets in the MABL, thus elucidating ongoing knowledge gaps which are impossible to fill using observations alone. We measure the size resolved spray droplet vertical concentrations, particle residence times, and temporal evolution of droplet radius and temperature to explain the behavior of sea spry droplets in MABL. The PDF of residence time of different initial droplet sizes and joint PDFs of droplet life time and radius and temperature for different droplet sizes are calculated to further quantify the temporal and spatial behavior of sea spray droplets in the MABL, which can be used as inputs into bulk models

  4. Dual-nozzle microfluidic droplet generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Wook; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Tae Hyun; Ha, Jang Ho; Ahrberg, Christian D.; Chung, Bong Geun

    2018-05-01

    The droplet-generating microfluidics has become an important technique for a variety of applications ranging from single cell analysis to nanoparticle synthesis. Although there are a large number of methods for generating and experimenting with droplets on microfluidic devices, the dispensing of droplets from these microfluidic devices is a challenge due to aggregation and merging of droplets at the interface of microfluidic devices. Here, we present a microfluidic dual-nozzle device for the generation and dispensing of uniform-sized droplets. The first nozzle of the microfluidic device is used for the generation of the droplets, while the second nozzle can accelerate the droplets and increase the spacing between them, allowing for facile dispensing of droplets. Computational fluid dynamic simulations were conducted to optimize the design parameters of the microfluidic device.

  5. Heat transfer by liquids in suspension in a turbulent gas stream (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grison, E.; Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay

    1960-01-01

    The introduction of a small volume of liquid into a turbulent gas stream used as cooling agent improves considerably the heat transfer coefficient of the gas. When the turbulent regime is established, one observes in a cylindrical tube two types of flow whether the liquid wets or does not wet the wall. In the first case, one gets on the wall an annular liquid film and droplets in suspension are in the gas stream. In the second case, a fog of droplets is formed without any liquid film on the wall. Experiments were performed with the following mixtures: water-hydrogen, water-nitrogen, ethanol-nitrogen (wetting liquids) introduced into a stainless steel tube of 4 mm ID, electrically heated on 320 mm of length. We varied the gas flow rate (Reynolds until 50000), the rate of the liquid flow rate to gas flow rate (until 15), the pressure (until 10 kg/cm 2 ), the temperature (until the boiling point) and the heat flux (until 250 W/cm 2 ). Two types of burnout were observed. A formula of correlation of the burnout heat flux is given. Making use of the analogy between mass transfer and heat transfer, a dimensionless formula of correlation of the local heat transfer coefficients is established. (author) [fr

  6. Electrical actuation of dielectric droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, N; Bahadur, V; Garimella, S V

    2008-01-01

    Electrical actuation of liquid droplets at the microscale offers promising applications in the fields of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip devices. Much prior research has targeted the electrical actuation of electrically conducting liquid droplets; however, the actuation of dielectric droplets has remained relatively unexplored, despite the advantages associated with the use of a dielectric droplet. This paper presents modeling and experimental results on the electrical actuation of dielectric droplets between two flat plates. A first-order analytical model, based on the energy-minimization principle, is developed to estimate the electrical actuation force on a dielectric droplet as it moves between two flat plates. Two versions of this analytical model are benchmarked for their suitability and accuracy against a detailed numerical model. The actuation force prediction is then combined with available semi-analytical expressions for predicting the forces opposing droplet motion to develop a model that predicts transient droplet motion under electrical actuation. Electrical actuation of dielectric droplets is experimentally demonstrated by moving transformer oil droplets between two flat plates under the influence of an actuation voltage. Droplet velocities and their dependence on the plate spacing and the applied voltage are experimentally measured and showed reasonable agreement with predictions from the models developed

  7. Inertial-range spectrum of whistler turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Narita

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theoretical model of an inertial-range energy spectrum for homogeneous whistler turbulence. The theory is a generalization of the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan concept of the inertial-range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. In the model the dispersion relation is used to derive scaling laws for whistler waves at highly oblique propagation with respect to the mean magnetic field. The model predicts an energy spectrum for such whistler waves with a spectral index −2.5 in the perpendicular component of the wave vector and thus provides an interpretation about recent discoveries of the second inertial-range of magnetic energy spectra at high frequencies in the solar wind.

  8. Turbulence and transport characteristics of a barrier in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A; Shimizu, A; Nakano, H; Ohsima, S; Itoh, K; Iguchi, H; Yoshimura, Y; Minami, T; Nagaoka, K; Takahashi, C; Kojima, M; Nishimura, S; Isobe, M; Suzuki, C; Akiyama, T; Nagashima, Y; Ida, K; Toi, K; Ido, T; Itoh, S-I; Matsuoka, K; Okamura, S; Diamond, P H

    2006-01-01

    Turbulence and zonal flow at a transport barrier are studied with twin heavy ion beam probes in a toroidal helical plasma. A wavelet analysis is used to extract turbulence properties, e.g. spectra of both density and potential fluctuations, the coherence and the phase between them and the dispersion relation. Particle transport estimated from the fundamental characteristics is found to clearly rise with their intermittent activities after the barrier is broken down. Time-dependent analysis reveals that the intermittency of turbulence is correlated with the evolution of the stationary zonal flow

  9. Turbulence and transport characteristics of a barrier in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.

    2005-10-01

    Turbulence and zonal flow at a transport barrier are studied with twin heavy ion beam probes in a toroidal helical plasma. A wavelet analysis is used to extract turbulence properties, e.g., spectra of both density and potential fluctuations, coherence and phase between them, and the dispersion relation. Particle transport estimated from the fundamental characteristics is found to clearly rise with their intermittent activities after the barrier is broken down. The time-dependent analysis reveals that intermittency of turbulence is correlated with evolution of stationary zonal flow. (author)

  10. Optical calorimetry in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamoun, Jacob; Pattekar, Ashish; Afshinmanesh, Farzaneh; Martini, Joerg; Recht, Michael I

    2018-05-29

    A novel microfluidic calorimeter that measures the enthalpy change of reactions occurring in 100 μm diameter aqueous droplets in fluoropolymer oil has been developed. The aqueous reactants flow into a microfluidic droplet generation chip in separate fluidic channels, limiting contact between the streams until immediately before they form the droplet. The diffusion-driven mixing of reactants is predominantly restricted to within the droplet. The temperature change in droplets due to the heat of reaction is measured optically by recording the reflectance spectra of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) that are added to one of the reactant streams. As the droplets travel through the channel, the spectral characteristics of the TLC represent the internal temperature, allowing optical measurement with a precision of ≈6 mK. The microfluidic chip and all fluids are temperature controlled, and the reaction heat within droplets raises their temperature until thermal diffusion dissipates the heat into the surrounding oil and chip walls. Position resolved optical temperature measurement of the droplets allows calculation of the heat of reaction by analyzing the droplet temperature profile over time. Channel dimensions, droplet generation rate, droplet size, reactant stream flows and oil flow rate are carefully balanced to provide rapid diffusional mixing of reactants compared to thermal diffusion, while avoiding thermal "quenching" due to contact between the droplets and the chip walls. Compared to conventional microcalorimetry, which has been used in this work to provide reference measurements, this new continuous flow droplet calorimeter has the potential to perform titrations ≈1000-fold faster while using ≈400-fold less reactants per titration.

  11. Polarization and switching properties of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal gratings. I. Theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Richard L.

    2002-12-01

    Polarization properties and electro-optical switching behavior of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid-crystal (HPDLC) reflection and transmission gratings are studied. A theoretical model is developed that combines anisotropic coupled-wave theory with an elongated liquid-crystal-droplet switching model and includes the effects of a statistical orientational distribution of droplet-symmetry axes. Angle- and polarization-dependent switching behaviors of HPDLC gratings are elucidated, and the effects on dynamic range are described. A new type of electro-optical switching not seen in ordinary polymer-dispersed liquid crystals, to the best of the author's knowledge, is presented and given a physical interpretation. The model provides valuable insight to the physics of these gratings and can be applied to the design of HPDLC holographic optical elements.

  12. Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

    2003-01-01

    The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics

  13. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi

    2015-01-01

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds

  14. STAR FORMATION IN TURBULENT MOLECULAR CLOUDS WITH COLLIDING FLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Tomoaki [Faculty of Humanity and Environment, Hosei University, Fujimi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8160 (Japan); Dobashi, Kazuhito; Shimoikura, Tomomi, E-mail: matsu@hosei.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-10

    Using self-gravitational hydrodynamical numerical simulations, we investigated the evolution of high-density turbulent molecular clouds swept by a colliding flow. The interaction of shock waves due to turbulence produces networks of thin filamentary clouds with a sub-parsec width. The colliding flow accumulates the filamentary clouds into a sheet cloud and promotes active star formation for initially high-density clouds. Clouds with a colliding flow exhibit a finer filamentary network than clouds without a colliding flow. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) for the density and column density can be fitted by lognormal functions for clouds without colliding flow. When the initial turbulence is weak, the column density PDF has a power-law wing at high column densities. The colliding flow considerably deforms the PDF, such that the PDF exhibits a double peak. The stellar mass distributions reproduced here are consistent with the classical initial mass function with a power-law index of –1.35 when the initial clouds have a high density. The distribution of stellar velocities agrees with the gas velocity distribution, which can be fitted by Gaussian functions for clouds without colliding flow. For clouds with colliding flow, the velocity dispersion of gas tends to be larger than the stellar velocity dispersion. The signatures of colliding flows and turbulence appear in channel maps reconstructed from the simulation data. Clouds without colliding flow exhibit a cloud-scale velocity shear due to the turbulence. In contrast, clouds with colliding flow show a prominent anti-correlated distribution of thin filaments between the different velocity channels, suggesting collisions between the filamentary clouds.

  15. New perspectives on superparameterization for geophysical turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Grooms, Ian

    2014-01-01

    This is a research expository paper regarding superparameterization, a class of multi-scale numerical methods designed to cope with the intermittent multi-scale effects of inhomogeneous geophysical turbulence where energy often inverse-cascades from the unresolved scales to the large scales through the effects of waves, jets, vortices, and latent heat release from moist processes. Original as well as sparse space–time superparameterization algorithms are discussed for the important case of moist atmospheric convection including the role of multi-scale asymptotic methods in providing self-consistent constraints on superparameterization algorithms and related deterministic and stochastic multi-cloud parameterizations. Test models for the statistical numerical analysis of superparameterization algorithms are discussed both to elucidate the performance of the basic algorithms and to test their potential role in efficient multi-scale data assimilation. The very recent development of grid-free seamless stochastic superparameterization methods for geophysical turbulence appropriate for “eddy-permitting” mesoscale ocean turbulence is presented here including a general formulation and illustrative applications to two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence, and another difficult test case involving one-dimensional models of dispersive wave turbulence. This last test case has randomly generated solitons as coherent structures which collapse and radiate wave energy back to the larger scales, resulting in strong direct and inverse turbulent energy cascades

  16. Experimental investigation of droplet separation in a horizontal counter-current air/water stratified flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, Stephan Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    A stratified counter-current two-phase gas/liquid flow can occur in various technical systems. In the past investigations have mainly been motivated by the possible occurrence of these flows in accident scenarios of nuclear light water-reactors and in numerous applications in process engineering. However, the precise forecast of flow parameters, is still challenging, for instance due to their strong dependency on the geometric boundary conditions. A new approach which uses CFD methods (Computational Fluid Dynamics) promises a better understanding of the flow phenomena and simultaneously a higher scalability of the findings. RANS methods (Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes) are preferred in order to compute industrial processes and geometries. A very deep understanding of the flow behavior and equation systems based on real physics are necessary preconditions to develop the equation system for a reliable RANS approach with predictive power. Therefore, local highly resolved, experimental data is needed in order to provide and validate the required turbulence and phase interaction models. The central objective of this work is to provide the data needed for the code development for these unsteady, turbulent and three-dimensional flows. Experiments were carried out at the WENKA facility (Water Entrainment Channel Karlsruhe) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). The work consists of a detailed description of the test-facility including a new bended channel, the measurement techniques and the experimental results. The characterization of the new channel was done by flow maps. A high-speed imaging study gives an impression of the occurring flow regimes, and different flow phenomena like droplet separation. The velocity distributions as well as various turbulence values were investigated by particle image velocimetry (PIV). In the liquid phase fluorescent tracer-particles were used to suppress optical reflections from the phase surface (fluorescent PIV, FPIV

  17. Direct numerical simulation of two-phases turbulent combustion: application to study of propagation and structure of flames; Simulation numerique directe de la combustion turbulente diphasique: application a l'etude de la propagation et de la structure des flammes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canneviere, K.

    2003-12-15

    This work is devoted to the study of the propagation and the structure of two-phases turbulent flames. To this end, Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are used. First, numerical systems for two-phases flow simulations is presented along with a specific chemical model. Then, a study of laminar spray flames is carried out. An analytical study related to the dynamics of evaporation of droplets is first proposed where the influence on the equivalence ratio of the ratio between the heating delay of the droplet and the evaporation delay is detailed. The simulation of a propagating flame through a cloud of droplets is carried out and a pulsating behavior is highlighted. A study of these flames according to the topology of liquid fuel enabled us to characterize a double flame structure composed of a premixed flame and a diffusion flame. Our last study is devoted to spray turbulent flames. Two-phase combustion of turbulent jets has been simulated. By varying the spray injection parameters (density, equivalence ratio), a database has been generated. This database allowed us to describe local and global flame regimes appearing in the combustion of sprays. They have been categorized in four main structures: open and closed external regime, group combustion and mixed combustion. Eventually, a combustion diagram has been developed. It involves the spray vaporization time, the mean inter-space between droplets or group of droplets and eventually the injected equivalence ratio. (author)

  18. Modelling the droplet interaction in a hostile environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foissac, A.

    2011-01-01

    During the situation of a nuclear reactor cooling loss, the pressure of the containment building may increase due to a release of steam, of gas coming from fission products and also of explosive gas, like di-hydrogen, created by chemical reaction in the primary cooling system. The procedure plan consists in using the spray system, constituted by hundreds of nozzles, in order to decrease pressure and temperature, to wash out fission products and to enhance gas mixing to avoid explosive gas local accumulation. The efficiency of the spray system may depend on the size and the velocity of the spray droplets. These parameters can be modified by collisions, occurring as soon as the spray envelopes overlap. This work models the droplet size and velocity poly-dispersion, and its evolution due to the collisions, then, implements these models in the Eulerian NEPTUNE-CFD code. The sectional method is chosen, and the collision is modeled from the results obtained on an experimental facility for the study of the droplet binary collision under typical conditions of a reactor severe accident. The numerical simulation of the spray system has then been performed, and compared to the experimental results on a large scale bench for characterizing large industrial sprays. A good agreement is obtained. These results provide a first step toward a comprehensive simulation of a whole scenario of a reactor vessel under severe accident conditions with spray activation. (author)

  19. Particles in wall-bounded turbulent flows deposition, re-suspension and agglomeration

    CERN Document Server

    Pozorski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    The book presents an up-to-date review of turbulent two-phase flows with the dispersed phase, with an emphasis on the dynamics in the near-wall region. New insights to the flow physics are provided by direct numerical simuation and by fine experimental techniques. Also included are models of particle dynamics in wall-bounded turbulent flows, and a description of particle surface interactions including muti-layer deposition and re-suspension.

  20. Predicting the onset of nucleate boiling in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, W J; Mudawar, I [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA). School of Mechanical Engineering

    1989-02-01

    Experiments are performed to develop a fundamental understanding of boiling incipience in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films. Incipience conditions are measured and correlated for water and a fluorocarbon (FC-72) liquid. Incipience in water films is influenced by turbulent eddies and, to a larger extent, by interfacial waves. A new approach to predicting incipience in water and other non-wetting fluids is presented. This approach utilizes physical parameters of commonly accepted incipience models and provides a means of correcting these models for the effects of turbulent eddies and roll waves. This study also demonstrates some unique incipience characteristics of fluorocarbon films. The weak surface tension forces of FC-72 allow droplets and liquid streams to break of the crests of incoming roll waves prior to, and during nucleate boiling. The low contact angle of FC-72 allows the liquid to penetrate deep inside wall cavities. Thus incipience from these flooded cavities requires much higher wall superheat than predicted from incipience models. (author).

  1. Predicting the onset of nucleate boiling in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, W.J.; Mudawar, I.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments are performed to develop a fundamental understanding of boiling incipience in wavy free-falling turbulent liquid films. Incipience conditions are measured and correlated for water and a fluorocarbon (FC-72) liquid. Incipience in water films is influenced by turbulent eddies and, to a larger extent, by interfacial waves. A new approach to predicting incipience in water and other non-wetting fluids is presented. This approach utilizes physical parameters of commonly accepted incipience models and provides a means of correcting these models for the effects of turbulent eddies and roll waves. This study also demonstrates some unique incipience characteristics of fluorocarbon films. The weak surface tension forces of FC-72 allow droplets and liquid streams to break of the crests of incoming roll waves prior to, and during nucleate boiling. The low contact angle of FC-72 allows the liquid to penetrate deep inside wall cavities. Thus incipience from these flooded cavities requires much higher wall superheat than predicted from incipience models. (author)

  2. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  3. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  4. Theory of neoclassical resistivity-gradient-driven turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, O.J.; Diamond, P.H.; Hahm, T.S.

    1988-12-01

    It is shown that rippling instabilities can tap the density gradient expansion free energy source through the density dependence of the neoclassical resistivity. Linear analyses show that the region where neoclassical rippling modes are significantly excited extends from the edge of the plasma to the region where ν/sub *e/ ≤ 1. Since these modes are non-dispersive, diamagnetic effects are negligible in comparison to the nonlinear decorrelation rate at saturation. Thus, the relevant regime is the 'strong turbulence' regime. The turbulent radial diffusivities of the temperature and the density are obtained as eigenvalues of the renormalized eigenmode equations at steady state. The density gradient acts to enhance the level of turbulence, compared to that driven by the temperature gradient alone. The saturated turbulent state is characterized by: current decoupling, the breakdown of Boltzmann relation, a radial mode scale of density fluctuations exceeding that of temperature fluctuations, implying that density diffusivity exceeds temperature diffusivity, and that density fluctuation levels exceed temperature fluctuation levels. Magnetic fluctuation levels are negligible. 29 refs., 1 fig

  5. Butschli Dynamic Droplet System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armstrong, R.; Hanczyc, M.

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical oil-water systems such as droplets display lifelike properties and may lend themselves to chemical programming to perform useful work, specifically with respect to the built environment. We present Butschli water-in-oil droplets as a model for further investigation into the development...... reconstructed the Butschli system and observed its life span under a light microscope, observing chemical patterns and droplet behaviors in nearly three hundred replicate experiments. Self-organizing patterns were observed, and during this dynamic, embodied phase the droplets provided a means of introducing...... temporal and spatial order in the system with the potential for chemical programmability. The authors propose that the discrete formation of dynamic droplets, characterized by their lifelike behavior patterns, during a variable window of time (from 30 s to 30 min after the addition of alkaline water...

  6. Characterization of a dielectric microdroplet thermal interface material with dispersed nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdan, A.; Sahli, F.; Richards, R.; Richards, C.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the fabrication and characterization of a dielectric microdroplet thermal interface material (TIM). Glycerin droplets, 1 μL, were tested as TIMs in this study. Copper nanoparticles having a diameter of 25 nm were dispersed in glycerin at different volume fractions to enhance its thermal conductivity. An increase of 57.5% in the thermal conductivity of glycerin was measured at a volume fraction of 15%. A minimum thermal interface resistance of 30.37 mm 2 K/W was measured for the glycerin microdroplets at a deformed droplet height of 10.2 μm. Good agreement between experimental measurements and the predictions of a model based on Maxwell’s equation of rules of mixtures was obtained. The effect of nanoparticles' size on the effective thermal conductivity of glycerin was studied. Nanoparticles with diameters of 60–80 and 300 nm were dispersed in glycerin at a volume fraction of 5%, and their results were compared to those of the 25 nm particles.

  7. Impact of entrainment on cloud droplet spectra: theory, observations, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, W.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the impact of entrainment and mixing on microphysical properties of warm boundary layer clouds is an important aspect of the representation of such clouds in large-scale models of weather and climate. Entrainment leads to a reduction of the liquid water content in agreement with the fundamental thermodynamics, but its impact on the droplet spectrum is difficult to quantify in observations and modeling. For in-situ (e.g., aircraft) observations, it is impossible to follow air parcels and observe processes that lead to changes of the droplet spectrum in different regions of a cloud. For similar reasons traditional modeling methodologies (e.g., the Eulerian large eddy simulation) are not useful either. Moreover, both observations and modeling can resolve only relatively narrow range of spatial scales. Theory, typically focusing on differences between idealized concepts of homogeneous and inhomogeneous mixing, is also of a limited use for the multiscale turbulent mixing between a cloud and its environment. This presentation will illustrate the above points and argue that the Lagrangian large-eddy simulation with appropriate subgrid-scale scheme may provide key insights and eventually lead to novel parameterizations for large-scale models.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of the turbulent transport of airborne contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, C.W.; Barr, S.

    1975-09-01

    A generalized, three-dimensional Monte Carlo model and computer code (SPOOR) are described for simulating atmospheric transport and dispersal of small pollutant clouds. A cloud is represented by a large number of particles that we track by statistically sampling simulated wind and turbulence fields. These fields are based on generalized wind data for large-scale flow and turbulent energy spectra for the micro- and mesoscales. The large-scale field can be input from a climatological data base, or by means of real-time analyses, or from a separate, subjectively defined data base. We introduce the micro- and mesoscale wind fluctuations through a power spectral density, to include effects from a broad spectrum of turbulent-energy scales. The role of turbulence is simulated in both meander and dispersal. Complex flow fields and time-dependent diffusion rates are accounted for naturally, and shear effects are simulated automatically in the ensemble of particle trajectories. An important adjunct has been the development of computer-graphics displays. These include two- and three-dimensional (perspective) snapshots and color motion pictures of particle ensembles, plus running displays of differential and integral cloud characteristics. The model's versatility makes it a valuable atmospheric research tool that we can adapt easily into broader, multicomponent systems-analysis codes. Removal, transformation, dry or wet deposition, and resuspension of contaminant particles can be readily included

  9. Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

    2003-08-06

    The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

  10. Shock wave-induced evaporation of water droplets in a gas-droplet mixture 646

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, H.W.J.; Cleijne, J.W.; Smolders, H.J.; Dongen, van M.E.H.

    1988-01-01

    A model is presented for the droplet evaporation process induced by a shock wave propagating in a fog. The model is based on the existence of a quasi-steady wet bulb state of the droplets during evaporation. It is shown that for moderate shock strength, Ma = <2,=" and=" droplet=" radii=" in=" the="

  11. LNG vapor dispersion prediction with the DEGADIS dense-gas dispersion model. Topical report, April 1988-July 1990. Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havens, J.; Spicer, T.

    1990-09-01

    The topical report is one of a series on the development of methods for LNG vapor dispersion prediction for regulatory application. The results indicate that the DEGADIS model is superior both phenomenologically and in performance to the Gaussian line source model promulgated in 49 CFR 193 for LNG vapor dispersion simulation. Availability of the DEGADIS model for VAX and IBM-PC formats provides for wider use of the model and greater potential for industry and regulatory acceptance. The acceptance is seen as an important interim objective while research continues on vapor dispersion estimation methods which provide for effects of vapor detention systems, turbulence induced by plant structure, and plant/area topographical features

  12. Modeling molecular mixing in a spatially inhomogeneous turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Daniel W.; Deb, Rajdeep

    2012-02-01

    Simulations of spatially inhomogeneous turbulent mixing in decaying grid turbulence with a joint velocity-concentration probability density function (PDF) method were conducted. The inert mixing scenario involves three streams with different compositions. The mixing model of Meyer ["A new particle interaction mixing model for turbulent dispersion and turbulent reactive flows," Phys. Fluids 22(3), 035103 (2010)], the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model and its velocity-conditional variant, i.e., the IECM model, were applied. For reference, the direct numerical simulation data provided by Sawford and de Bruyn Kops ["Direct numerical simulation and lagrangian modeling of joint scalar statistics in ternary mixing," Phys. Fluids 20(9), 095106 (2008)] was used. It was found that velocity conditioning is essential to obtain accurate concentration PDF predictions. Moreover, the model of Meyer provides significantly better results compared to the IECM model at comparable computational expense.

  13. Large-eddy simulation of heavy particle dispersion in wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvetti, M.V. [DICI, University of Pisa, I-56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-10

    Capabilities and accuracy issues in Lagrangian tracking of heavy particles in velocity fields obtained from large-eddy simulations (LES) of wall-bounded turbulent flows are reviewed. In particular, it is shown that, if no subgrid scale (SGS) model is added to the particle motion equations, particle preferential concentration and near-wall accumulation are significantly underestimated. Results obtained with SGS modeling for the particle motion equations based on approximate deconvolution are briefly recalled. Then, the error purely due to filtering in particle tracking in LES flow fields is singled out and analyzed. The statistical properties of filtering errors are characterized in turbulent channel flow both from an Eulerian and a Lagrangian viewpoint. Implications for stochastic SGS modeling in particle motion equations are briefly outlined.

  14. pH-Sensitive self-propelled motion of oil droplets in the presence of cationic surfactants containing hydrolyzable ester linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banno, Taisuke; Kuroha, Rie; Toyota, Taro

    2012-01-17

    Self-propelled oil droplets in a nonequilibrium system have drawn much attention as both a primitive type of inanimate chemical machinery and a dynamic model of the origin of life. Here, to create the pH-sensitive self-propelled motion of oil droplets, we synthesized cationic surfactants containing hydrolyzable ester linkages. We found that n-heptyloxybenzaldehyde oil droplets were self-propelled in the presence of ester-containing cationic surfactant. In basic solution prepared with sodium hydroxide, oil droplets moved as molecular aggregates formed on their surface. Moreover, the self-propelled motion in the presence of the hydrolyzable cationic surfactant lasted longer than that in the presence of nonhydrolyzable cationic surfactant. This is probably due to the production of a fatty acid by the hydrolysis of the ester-containing cationic surfactant and the subsequent neutralization of the fatty acid with sodium hydroxide. A complex surfactant was formed in the aqueous solution because of the cation and anion combination. Because such complex formation can induce both a decrease in the interfacial tension of the oil droplet and self-assembly with n-heptyloxybenzaldehyde and lauric acid in the aqueous dispersion, the prolonged movement of the oil droplet may be explained by the increase in heterogeneity of the interfacial tension of the oil droplet triggered by the hydrolysis of the ester-containing surfactant. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Electrohydrodynamic simulation of electrically controlled droplet generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouedraogo, Yun; Gjonaj, Erion; Weiland, Thomas; Gersem, Herbert De; Steinhausen, Christoph; Lamanna, Grazia; Weigand, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a full electrohydrodynamic simulation approach which allows for the accurate modeling of droplet dynamics under the influence of transient electric fields. The model takes into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. • Simulation results are shown for an electrically driven droplet generator using highly conductive acetone droplets and low conductivity pentane droplets, respectively. Excellent agreement with measurement is found. • We investigate the operation characteristic of the droplet generator by computing droplet sizes and detachment times with respect to the applied voltage. • The droplet charging effect is demonstrated for pentane droplets as well as for acetone droplets under long voltage pulses. We show that due to the very different relaxation times, the charging behavior of the two liquids is very different. • We demonstrate that due to this behavior, also the detachment mechanisms for acetone and pentane droplets are different. For low conductivity (pentane) droplets, droplet detachment is only possible after the electric fields are switched off. This is because the effective electric polarization force points upwards, thus, inhibiting the detachment of the droplet from the capillary tip. - Abstract: An electrohydrodynamic model for the simulation of droplet formation, detachment and motion in an electrically driven droplet generator is introduced. The numerical approach is based on the coupled solution of the multiphase flow problem with the charge continuity equation. For the latter, a modified convection-conduction model is applied, taking into account conductive, capacitive as well as convective electrical currents in the fluid. This allows for a proper description of charge relaxation phenomena in the moving fluid. In particular, the charge received by the droplet after detachment is an important parameter influencing the droplet dynamics in the test chamber

  16. Dispersion and transport of atmospheric pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cieslik, S.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the physical mechanisms that govern the dispersion and transport of air pollutant; the influence of the state of the 'carrying fluid', i.e. the role of meteorology; and finally, outlines the different techniques of assessing the process. Aspects of physical mechanisms and meteorology covered include: fate of an air pollutant; turbulence and dispersion; transport; wind speed and direction; atmospheric stability; and the role of atmospheric water. Assessment techniques covered are: concentrations measurements; modelling meteorological observations; and tracer releases. It is concluded that the only way to reduce air pollution is to pollute less. 10 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Effects of surface deposition and droplet injection on film cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jin; Cui, Pei; Vujanović, Milan; Baleta, Jakov; Duić, Neven; Guzović, Zvonimir

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Cooling effectiveness is significantly affected by the deposition size. • Coverage area for model without mist is reduced by increasing the deposition height. • Wall temperature is decreased by 15% with 2% mist injection. • Cooling coverage is increased by more than three times with 2% mist injection. • Cooling effectiveness for mist models is improved by increasing deposition height. - Abstract: In the present research, the influence of the particle dispersion onto the continuous phase in film cooling application was analysed by means of numerical simulations. The interaction between the water droplets and the main stream plays an important role in the results. The prediction of two-phase flow is investigated by employing the discrete phase model (DPM). The results present heat transfer characteristics in the near-wall region under the influence of mist cooling. The local wall temperature distribution and film cooling effectiveness are obtained, and results show that the film cooling characteristics on the downstream wall are affected by different height of surface deposits. It is also found that smaller deposits without mist injection provide a lower wall temperature and a better cooling performance. With 2% mist injection, evaporation of water droplets improves film cooling effectiveness, and higher deposits cause lateral and downstream spread of water droplets. The results indicate that mist injection can significantly enhance film cooling performance.

  18. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  19. Heteroaggregation of lipid droplets coated with sodium caseinate and lactoferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo Furtado, Guilherme; Michelon, Mariano; de Oliveira, Davi Rocha Bernardes; da Cunha, Rosiane Lopes

    2016-11-01

    Formation and characterization of droplet heteroaggregates were investigated by mixing two emulsions previously stabilized by proteins oppositely charged. Emulsions were composed of 5vol.% of sunflower oil and 95vol.% of sodium caseinate or lactoferrin aqueous dispersions. They were produced using ultrasound with fixed power (300W) and sonication time (6min). Different volume ratios (0-100%) of sodium caseinate-stabilized emulsion (droplet diameter around 1.75μm) to lactoferrin-stabilized emulsion (droplet diameter around 1.55μm) were mixed under conditions that both proteins showed opposite charges (pH7). Influence of ionic strength (0-400mM NaCl) on the heteroaggregates stability was also evaluated. Creaming stability, zeta potential, microstructure, mean particle diameter and rheological properties of the heteroaggregates were measured. These properties depended on the volume ratio (0-100%) of sodium caseinate to lactoferrin-stabilized emulsion (C:L) and the ionic strength. In the absence of salt, different zeta potential values were obtained, rheological properties (viscosity and elastic moduli) were improved and the largest heteroaggregates were formed at higher content of lactoferrin-stabilized emulsion (60-80%). The system containing 40 and 60vol.% of sodium caseinate and lactoferrin stabilized emulsion, respectively, presented good stability against phase separation besides showing enhanced rheological and size properties due to extensive droplets aggregation. Phase separation was observed only in the absence of sodium caseinate, demonstrating the higher susceptibility of lactoferrin to NaCl. The heteroaggregates produced may be useful functional agents for texture modification and controlled release since different rheological properties and sizes can be achieved depending on protein concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dispersion simulation of airborne effluent through tree canopy using OpenFOAM CFD code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakesh, P.T.; Venkatesan, R.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear plants are often surrounded by tree canopy as a part of landscaping and green belt development. The transport and dispersion of air borne pollutants within the tree/plant canopies is greatly controlled by turbulence. The density of the tree canopy, the height and type of the trees is of importance while determining the intensity of turbulence. In order to study the mechanical effect of the canopy and the consequent modification in the ground level concentration pattern from a ground level release of radioactivity, a CFD code called OpenFOAM is used. The main task of this study is the implementation of flow and dispersion through plant canopies in Open FOAM

  1. A random walk model to simulate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jun; Huang, Liuxing; Niu, Shengli; Xie, Honggang; Kuang, Feihong

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclide in large-medium scale, a numerical simulation method based on random walk model for radionuclide atmospheric dispersion was established in the paper. The route of radionuclide migration and concentration distribution of radionuclide can be calculated out by using the method with the real-time or historical meteorological fields. In the simulation, a plume of radionuclide is treated as a lot of particles independent of each other. The particles move randomly by the fluctuations of turbulence, and disperse, so as to enlarge the volume of the plume and dilute the concentration of radionuclide. The dispersion of the plume over time is described by the variance of the particles. Through statistical analysis, the relationships between variance of the particles and radionuclide dispersion characteristics can be derived. The main mechanisms considered in the physical model are: (1) advection of radionuclide by mean air motion, (2) mixing of radionuclide by atmospheric turbulence, (3) dry and wet deposition, (4) disintegration. A code named RADES was developed according the method. And then, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) in 1994 is simulated by the RADES and FLEXPART codes, the simulation results of the concentration distribution of tracer are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeini Jahromi, Elham; Bidari, Araz; Assadi, Yaghoub; Milani Hosseini, Mohammad Reza; Jamali, Mohammad Reza

    2007-01-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) technique was successfully used as a sample preparation method for graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS). In this extraction method, 500 μL methanol (disperser solvent) containing 34 μL carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) and 0.00010 g ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (chelating agent) was rapidly injected by syringe into the water sample containing cadmium ions (interest analyte). Thereby, a cloudy solution formed. The cloudy state resulted from the formation of fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride, which have been dispersed, in bulk aqueous sample. At this stage, cadmium reacts with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and therefore, hydrophobic complex forms which is extracted into the fine droplets of carbon tetrachloride. After centrifugation (2 min at 5000 rpm), these droplets were sedimented at the bottom of the conical test tube (25 ± 1 μL). Then a 20 μL of sedimented phase containing enriched analyte was determined by GF AAS. Some effective parameters on extraction and complex formation, such as extraction and disperser solvent type and their volume, extraction time, salt effect, pH and concentration of the chelating agent have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the enrichment factor 125 was obtained from only 5.00 mL of water sample. The calibration graph was linear in the rage of 2-20 ng L -1 with detection limit of 0.6 ng L -1 . The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.s) for ten replicate measurements of 20 ng L -1 of cadmium was 3.5%. The relative recoveries of cadmium in tap, sea and rivers water samples at spiking level of 5 and 10 ng L -1 are 108, 95, 87 and 98%, respectively. The characteristics of the proposed method have been compared with cloud point extraction (CPE), on-line liquid-liquid extraction, single drop microextraction (SDME), on-line solid phase extraction (SPE) and co-precipitation based on bibliographic data. Therefore, DLLME combined with

  3. Recent developments in the atmospheric dispersion models to be used for regulatory purposes and in risk evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graziani, G.

    1996-01-01

    Climatological models and those most widely used for risk evaluation are generally based on the classification of atmospheric turbulence according to the Pasquill-Gifford categories, and use the Gaussian solution of the dispersion equation. One of their main limitations is that they deal only with continuous or instantaneous (puff) emission. Furthermore, a discretisation in the definition of atmospheric turbulence is performed according to the Pasquill-Gifford categories. This can generate uncertainties, since partial information on the state of the atmosphere at the time of emission can lead to the choice of one category rather than another and consequently to select wrong dispersion parameters. Some of these limits, such as the assumption of flat or slowly varying terrain, and the choice of constant atmospheric conditions during the duration of the release, are intrinsic to the schematization required by these models. Other limitations, such as the finite duration of the emissions and the continuous variation of the physical quantities describing the effect of turbulence on dispersion parameters, can be overcome. This paper describes the possible improvements which can be made in the dispersion models used in regulating emissions in the atmosphere and to calculate the associated risk. In particular the turbulence is based on the definition of some physical quantities varying with continuity which can be easily deduced from simple observations at the meteorological station at release site. It then analyses the application of this approach to a simple dispersion model, which can take into account the finite and non-zero durations of accidental emissions

  4. Transitional-turbulent spots and turbulent-turbulent spots in boundary layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Wallace, James M; Skarda, Jinhie; Lozano-Durán, Adrián; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-03

    Two observations drawn from a thoroughly validated direct numerical simulation of the canonical spatially developing, zero-pressure gradient, smooth, flat-plate boundary layer are presented here. The first is that, for bypass transition in the narrow sense defined herein, we found that the transitional-turbulent spot inception mechanism is analogous to the secondary instability of boundary-layer natural transition, namely a spanwise vortex filament becomes a [Formula: see text] vortex and then, a hairpin packet. Long streak meandering does occur but usually when a streak is infected by a nearby existing transitional-turbulent spot. Streak waviness and breakdown are, therefore, not the mechanisms for the inception of transitional-turbulent spots found here. Rather, they only facilitate the growth and spreading of existing transitional-turbulent spots. The second observation is the discovery, in the inner layer of the developed turbulent boundary layer, of what we call turbulent-turbulent spots. These turbulent-turbulent spots are dense concentrations of small-scale vortices with high swirling strength originating from hairpin packets. Although structurally quite similar to the transitional-turbulent spots, these turbulent-turbulent spots are generated locally in the fully turbulent environment, and they are persistent with a systematic variation of detection threshold level. They exert indentation, segmentation, and termination on the viscous sublayer streaks, and they coincide with local concentrations of high levels of Reynolds shear stress, enstrophy, and temperature fluctuations. The sublayer streaks seem to be passive and are often simply the rims of the indentation pockets arising from the turbulent-turbulent spots.

  5. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  6. Evaporation of inclined water droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, In Gyu; Weon, Byung Mook

    2017-01-01

    When a drop is placed on a flat substrate tilted at an inclined angle, it can be deformed by gravity and its initial contact angle divides into front and rear contact angles by inclination. Here we study on evaporation dynamics of a pure water droplet on a flat solid substrate by controlling substrate inclination and measuring mass and volume changes of an evaporating droplet with time. We find that complete evaporation time of an inclined droplet becomes longer as gravitational influence by inclination becomes stronger. The gravity itself does not change the evaporation dynamics directly, whereas the gravity-induced droplet deformation increases the difference between front and rear angles, which quickens the onset of depinning and consequently reduces the contact radius. This result makes the evaporation rate of an inclined droplet to be slow. This finding would be important to improve understanding on evaporation dynamics of inclined droplets. PMID:28205642

  7. Evaluation of REMTECH PA-2 phased array SODAR performance in Complex Terrain using in-situ turbulence instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, D.R.; Catizone, P.A.; Hoffnagle, G.F. [TRC Environmental Corp., Windsor, CT (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The introduction of the Complex Terrain Dispersion Model Plus Algorithms for Unstable Situations (CTDMPLUS model) by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created a need for detailed vertical profiles of wind speed, direction and turbulence for regulatory modeling. Most EPA models use only a single level of wind data, assume wind direction within the boundary layer is uniform and extrapolate wind speed based on logarithmic profiles. CTDMPLUS offers a more realistic paradigm for transport and dispersion in the boundary layer by utilizing measured wind profiles if available. Profile data used by CTDMPLUS must include the layer in which the plume is dispersing. For tall stack, heated effluent plume, the profile must extend to heights of several hundred meters above stack top. Doppler SOund Detection And Ranging (SODAR) systems provide a cost effective method for collecting the profile data. While EPA has approved the use of mean wind speed and direction data from SODARs for regulatory modeling purposes, the use of turbulence data has not been unconditionally accepted. In order to use turbulence data from a SODAR, the user must obtain concurrence from the agency that the turbulence data are acceptable and may be required to demonstrate that the data are reliable. This paper presents the results of a SODAR data evaluation project.

  8. Application of dispersive Liquid-Liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine, and pyrethroid pesticides in aqueous sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo, Mei; Li, Man-Liang; Cheng, Jing; Matsadiq, Guzalnur; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Miao

    2012-01-01

    Dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of floating organic droplet (DLLME-SFO) technique was successfully applied for simultaneous assay of eight polychlorinated biphenyls, two organochlorine, and four pyrethroid pesticides multi-residue in aqueous samples by using GC-electron capture detection. The effects of various parameters such as kind of extractant and dispersant and volume of them, extraction time, effect of salt addition, and pH were optimized. As a result, 5.0 μL 1-dodecanol was chosen as extraction solvent, 600 μL methanol were used as dispersive solvent without salt addition, pH was adjusted to 7. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection (LOD) were ranged from 1.4 to 8.3 ng L -1 . Satisfactory linear range was observed from 5.0 to 2000 ng L -1 with correlation coefficient better than 0.9909. Good precisions were also acquired with RSD better than 13.6% for all target analytes. The enrichment factors of the method were ranged from 786 to 1427. The method can be successfully applied to simultaneous separation and determination of three class residues in real water samples and good recoveries were obtained ranging from 76 to 130, 73 to 129, and 78 to 130% for tap water, lake water, and industrial waste water, respectively. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Liquid droplet radiator technology issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Hertzberg, A.

    1985-01-01

    The operation of the liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is analyzed to establish design constraints for the LDR components and to predict the performance of an integrated LDR system. The design constraints largely result from mass loss considerations: fluid choice is governed by evaporation loss; droplet generation techniques must be capable of precise aiming of >10 5 droplet streams; and collection losses must be less than 1 droplet in 10 7 . Concepts for droplet generation and collection components are discussed and incorporated into a mass model for an LDR system. This model predicts that LDR's using lithium, Dow 705 silicone fluid, or NaK may be several times lighter than heat pipe radiators. 13 refs

  10. Experimental study of detonation of large-scale powder-droplet-vapor mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, C.-H.; Wang, Y.; Xue, K.; Wang, L.-F.

    2018-05-01

    Large-scale experiments were carried out to investigate the detonation performance of a 1600-m3 ternary cloud consisting of aluminum powder, fuel droplets, and vapor, which were dispersed by a central explosive in a cylindrically stratified configuration. High-frame-rate video cameras and pressure gauges were used to analyze the large-scale explosive dispersal of the mixture and the ensuing blast wave generated by the detonation of the cloud. Special attention was focused on the effect of the descending motion of the charge on the detonation performance of the dispersed ternary cloud. The charge was parachuted by an ensemble of apparatus from the designated height in order to achieve the required terminal velocity when the central explosive was detonated. A descending charge with a terminal velocity of 32 m/s produced a cloud with discernably increased concentration compared with that dispersed from a stationary charge, the detonation of which hence generates a significantly enhanced blast wave beyond the scaled distance of 6 m/kg^{1/3}. The results also show the influence of the descending motion of the charge on the jetting phenomenon and the distorted shock front.

  11. Aerodynamics, heat and mass transfer in steam-aerosol turbulent flows in containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, B.I.; Pershukov, V.A.; Ris, V.V. [Research & Engineering Centre of Nuclear Plants Safety, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    In this report an analysis of aerodynamic and heat transfer processes at the blowdown of gas-dispersed mixture into the containment volume is presented. A few models for description of the volume averaged and local characteristics are analyzed. The mathematical model for description of the local characteristics of the turbulent gas-dispersed flows was developed. The calculation of aerodynamic, heat and mass transfer characteristics was based on the Navier-Stokes, energy and gas mass fractions conservation equations. For calculation of dynamics and deposition of the aerosols the original diffusion-inertia model is developed. The pulsating characteristics of the gaseous phase were calculated on the base (k-{xi}) model of turbulence with modification to account thermogravitational force action and influence of particle mass loading. The appropriate boundary conditions using the {open_quotes}near-wall function{close_quotes} approach was obtained. Testing of the mathematical models and boundary conditions has shown a good agreement between computation and data of comparison. The described mathematical models were applied to two- and three dimensional calculations of the turbulent flow in containment at the various stages of the accident.

  12. Why is the Magellanic Stream so Turbulent? - A Simulational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elliott; Shelton, Robin L.

    2018-06-01

    As the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds travel through the Milky Way (MW) halo, gas is tidally and ram pressure stripped from them, forming the Leading Arm (LA) and Magellanic Stream (MS). The evolution of the LA and MS are an interest to astronomers because there is evidence that the diffuse gas that has been stripped off is able to fall onto the galactic disk and cool enough to fuel star formation in the MW. For et al, 2014 published a catalog of 251 high velocity clouds (HVCs) in the MS, many of which have head-tail morphologies, suggesting interaction with the Milky Way’s halo or other gas in the MS. For et al noticed that the pointing direction of the HVCs are random, which they interpreted as an indication of strong turbulence. They suggested the shock cascade scenario as a contributing process, where ablated cloud material generates turbulence (and H-alpha emission). We take a closer look at this process via simulations. We ran numerical simulations of clouds in the MS using the University of Chicago’s FLASH software. We simulated cases that had two clouds, where one trailed behind the other, and we simulated cases that had one cloud in order to examine the effects of drafting on cloud dynamics and velocity dispersion. Initial cloud temperatures ranged from 100 K to 20,000 K. We have created velocity dispersion maps from the FLASH simulation data to visualize turbulence. We compare these generated maps with 21 cm observations (most recently Westmeier, 2017), in order to search for signatures similar to the small scale turbulence seen in the simulations. We find that if the clouds are initially near to each other, then drafting allows the trailing cloud to catch the leading cloud and mix together. For greater separations, Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities disrupt the clouds enough before impact that drafting has a minimal role. Our velocity dispersion maps of the warmer clouds closely match values published in For et al, 2014; although, thermal broadening

  13. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a finite volume method

  14. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  15. A mechanistic Eulerian-Lagrangian model for dispersed flow film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, M.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a new mechanistic model of heat transfer in the dispersed flow regime is presented. The usual assumptions that render most of the available models unsuitable for the analysis of the reflooding phase of the LOCA are discussed, and a two-dimensional time-independent numerical model is developed. The gas temperature field is solved in a fixed-grid (Eulerian) mesh, with the droplets behaving as mass and energy sources. The histories of a large number of computational droplets are followed in a Lagrangian frame, considering evaporation, break-up and interactions with the vapor and with the wall. comparisons of calculated wall and vapor temperatures with experimental data are shown for two reflooding tests

  16. Evaluating the capabilities and uncertainties of droplet measurements for the fog droplet spectrometer (FM-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Spiegel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Droplet size spectra measurements are crucial to obtain a quantitative microphysical description of clouds and fog. However, cloud droplet size measurements are subject to various uncertainties. This work focuses on the error analysis of two key measurement uncertainties arising during cloud droplet size measurements with a conventional droplet size spectrometer (FM-100: first, we addressed the precision with which droplets can be sized with the FM-100 on the basis of the Mie theory. We deduced error assumptions and proposed a new method on how to correct measured size distributions for these errors by redistributing the measured droplet size distribution using a stochastic approach. Second, based on a literature study, we summarized corrections for particle losses during sampling with the FM-100. We applied both corrections to cloud droplet size spectra measured at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch for a temperature range from 0 °C to 11 °C. We showed that Mie scattering led to spikes in the droplet size distributions using the default sizing procedure, while the new stochastic approach reproduced the ambient size distribution adequately. A detailed analysis of the FM-100 sampling efficiency revealed that particle losses were typically below 10% for droplet diameters up to 10 μm. For larger droplets, particle losses can increase up to 90% for the largest droplets of 50 μm at ambient wind speeds below 4.4 m s−1 and even to >90% for larger angles between the instrument orientation and the wind vector (sampling angle at higher wind speeds. Comparisons of the FM-100 to other reference instruments revealed that the total liquid water content (LWC measured by the FM-100 was more sensitive to particle losses than to re-sizing based on Mie scattering, while the total number concentration was only marginally influenced by particle losses. Consequently, for further LWC measurements with the FM-100 we strongly recommend to consider (1 the

  17. Anisotropic Characteristics of Turbulence Dissipation in Swirling Flow: A Direct Numerical Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the anisotropic characteristics of turbulent energy dissipation rate in a rotating jet flow via direct numerical simulation. The turbulent energy dissipation tensor, including its eigenvalues in the swirling flows with different rotating velocities, is analyzed to investigate the anisotropic characteristics of turbulence and dissipation. In addition, the probability density function of the eigenvalues of turbulence dissipation tensor is presented. The isotropic subrange of PDF always exists in swirling flows relevant to small-scale vortex structure. Thus, with remarkable large-scale vortex breakdown, the isotropic subrange of PDF is reduced in strongly swirling flows, and anisotropic energy dissipation is proven to exist in the core region of the vortex breakdown. More specifically, strong anisotropic turbulence dissipation occurs concentratively in the vortex breakdown region, whereas nearly isotropic turbulence dissipation occurs dispersively in the peripheral region of the strong swirling flows.

  18. Guidelines for the formulation of Lagrangian stochastic models for particle simulations of single-phase and dispersed two-phase turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Chibbaro, Sergio; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we establish a set of criteria which are applied to discuss various formulations under which Lagrangian stochastic models can be found. These models are used for the simulation of fluid particles in single-phase turbulence as well as for the fluid seen by discrete particles in dispersed turbulent two-phase flows. The purpose of the present work is to provide guidelines, useful for experts and non-experts alike, which are shown to be helpful to clarify issues related to the form of Lagrangian stochastic models. A central issue is to put forward reliable requirements which must be met by Lagrangian stochastic models and a new element brought by the present analysis is to address the single- and two-phase flow situations from a unified point of view. For that purpose, we consider first the single-phase flow case and check whether models are fully consistent with the structure of the Reynolds-stress models. In the two-phase flow situation, coming up with clear-cut criteria is more difficult and the present choice is to require that the single-phase situation be well-retrieved in the fluid-limit case, elementary predictive abilities be respected and that some simple statistical features of homogeneous fluid turbulence be correctly reproduced. This analysis does not address the question of the relative predictive capacities of different models but concentrates on their formulation since advantages and disadvantages of different formulations are not always clear. Indeed, hidden in the changes from one structure to another are some possible pitfalls which can lead to flaws in the construction of practical models and to physically unsound numerical calculations. A first interest of the present approach is illustrated by considering some models proposed in the literature and by showing that these criteria help to assess whether these Lagrangian stochastic models can be regarded as acceptable descriptions. A second interest is to indicate how future

  19. Guidelines for the formulation of Lagrangian stochastic models for particle simulations of single-phase and dispersed two-phase turbulent flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minier, Jean-Pierre; Chibbaro, Sergio; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we establish a set of criteria which are applied to discuss various formulations under which Lagrangian stochastic models can be found. These models are used for the simulation of fluid particles in single-phase turbulence as well as for the fluid seen by discrete particles in dispersed turbulent two-phase flows. The purpose of the present work is to provide guidelines, useful for experts and non-experts alike, which are shown to be helpful to clarify issues related to the form of Lagrangian stochastic models. A central issue is to put forward reliable requirements which must be met by Lagrangian stochastic models and a new element brought by the present analysis is to address the single- and two-phase flow situations from a unified point of view. For that purpose, we consider first the single-phase flow case and check whether models are fully consistent with the structure of the Reynolds-stress models. In the two-phase flow situation, coming up with clear-cut criteria is more difficult and the present choice is to require that the single-phase situation be well-retrieved in the fluid-limit case, elementary predictive abilities be respected and that some simple statistical features of homogeneous fluid turbulence be correctly reproduced. This analysis does not address the question of the relative predictive capacities of different models but concentrates on their formulation since advantages and disadvantages of different formulations are not always clear. Indeed, hidden in the changes from one structure to another are some possible pitfalls which can lead to flaws in the construction of practical models and to physically unsound numerical calculations. A first interest of the present approach is illustrated by considering some models proposed in the literature and by showing that these criteria help to assess whether these Lagrangian stochastic models can be regarded as acceptable descriptions. A second interest is to indicate how future

  20. Numerical simulation on pollutant dispersion from vehicle exhaust in street configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Mohamed F; Kellnerová, R; Janour, Z

    2009-09-01

    The impact of the street configurations on pollutants dispersion from vehicles exhausts within urban canyons was numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Three-dimensional flow and dispersion of gaseous pollutants were modeled using standard kappa - epsilon turbulence model, which was numerically solved based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations by the commercial CFD code FLUENT. The concentration fields in the urban canyons were examined in three cases of street configurations: (1) a regular-shaped intersection, (2) a T-shaped intersection and (3) a Skew-shaped crossing intersection. Vehicle emissions were simulated as double line sources along the street. The numerical model was validated against wind tunnel results in order to optimize the turbulence model. Numerical predictions agreed reasonably well with wind tunnel results. The results obtained indicate that the mean horizontal velocity was very small in the center near the lower region of street canyon. The lowest turbulent kinetic energy was found at the separation and reattachment points associated with the corner of the down part of the upwind and downwind buildings in the street canyon. The pollutant concentration at the upwind side in the regular-shaped street intersection was higher than that in the T-shaped and Skew-shaped street intersections. Moreover, the results reveal that the street intersections are important factors to predict the flow patterns and pollutant dispersion in street canyon.

  1. Calibration of Discrete Random Walk (DRW) Model via G.I Taylor's Dispersion Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Prediction of particle dispersion in turbulent flows is still an important challenge with many applications to environmental, as well as industrial, fluid mechanics. Several models of dispersion have been developed to predict particle trajectories and their relative velocities, in combination with a RANS-based simulation of the background flow. The interaction of the particles with the velocity fluctuations at different turbulent scales represents a significant difficulty in generalizing the models to the wide range of flows where they are used. We focus our attention on the Discrete Random Walk (DRW) model applied to flow in a channel, particularly to the selection of eddies lifetimes as realizations of a Poisson distribution with a mean value proportional to κ / ɛ . We present a general method to determine the constant of this proportionality by matching the DRW model dispersion predictions for fluid element and particle dispersion to G.I Taylor's classical dispersion theory. This model parameter is critical to the magnitude of predicted dispersion. A case study of its influence on sedimentation of suspended particles in a tidal channel with an array of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines highlights the dependency of results on this time scale parameter. Support from US DOE through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, a UW-OSU partnership.

  2. A parameterization of cloud droplet nucleation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghan, S.J.; Chuang, C.; Penner, J.E.

    1993-01-01

    Droplet nucleation is a fundamental cloud process. The number of aerosols activated to form cloud droplets influences not only the number of aerosols scavenged by clouds but also the size of the cloud droplets. Cloud droplet size influences the cloud albedo and the conversion of cloud water to precipitation. Global aerosol models are presently being developed with the intention of coupling with global atmospheric circulation models to evaluate the influence of aerosols and aerosol-cloud interactions on climate. If these and other coupled models are to address issues of aerosol-cloud interactions, the droplet nucleation process must be adequately represented. Here we introduce a droplet nucleation parametrization that offers certain advantages over the popular Twomey (1959) parameterization

  3. Dispersion and current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelskifte, S.

    1986-04-01

    A model for the simulation of particle movements in water should incorporate the mutual distance dependent correlation. As long as reliable data are given accessible a model can be created of the dispersion in a given area from a statistical description of turbulence. Current measurements have been performed in an area north of the Swedish nuclear power plant Barsebaeck, and statistical time series analysis have made it possible to estimate multivariate autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) models for these data using the Box-Jenkins method. The correlation structure for the area has been investigated in detail. Transport and dispersion models for the marine environment are used in estimating doses to the population from the aquatic food chain. Some of these models are described with special emphasis on the time and length scales they cover. Furthermore, to illustrate the background of the simulation model, short introductuions are given to health physics, time series analysis, and turbulence theory. Analysis of the simulation model shows the relative importance of the different parameters. The model can be expanded to conditional simulation, where the current measurements are used directly to simulate the movement of one of the particles. Results from the model are also compared to results from a sampling of bioindicators (Fucus vesiculosus) along the Danish coast. The reliability of bioindicators in this kind of experiment is discussed. (author)

  4. Control of charged droplets using electrohydrodynamic repulsion for circular droplet patterning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Bumjoo; Sung, Jungwoo; Lim, Geunbae; Nam, Hyoryung; Kim, Sung Jae; Joo, Sang W

    2011-01-01

    We report a novel method to form a circular pattern of monodisperse microdroplets using an electrohydrodynamic repulsion (EDR) mechanism. EDR is a phenomenon of electrostatical bounced microdroplets from an accumulated droplet on a bottom substrate. In addition to a regular EDR system, by placing a ring electrode between the capillary and ground substrate, two separate regions were created. A parameter study of two regions was carried out for droplet formation and falling velocity to control the radius of the generated droplets and the circular patterns independently. Based on energy conservation theory, our experimental results showed that the free-falling region exerted crucial influences on the sizes of the circular patterns

  5. Turbulent circulation above the surface heat source in stably stratified atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, A. F.; Kurbatskaya, L. I.

    2016-10-01

    The 3-level RANS approach for simulating a turbulent circulation over the heat island in a stably stratified environment under nearly calm conditions is formulated. The turbulent kinetic energy its spectral consumption (dissipation) and the dispersion of turbulent fluctuations of temperature are found from differential equations, thus the correct modeling of transport processes in the interface layer with the counter-gradient heat flux is assured. The three-parameter turbulence RANS approach minimizes difficulties in simulating the turbulent transport in a stably stratified environment and reduces efforts needed for the numerical implementation of the 3-level RANS approach. Numerical simulation of the turbulent structure of the penetrative convection over the heat island under conditions of stably stratified atmosphere demonstrates that the three-equation model is able to predict the thermal circulation induced by the heat island. The temperature distribution, root-mean-square fluctuations of the turbulent velocity and temperature fields and spectral turbulent kinetic energy flux are in good agreement with the experimental data. The model describes such thin physical effects, as a crossing of vertical profiles of temperature of a thermal plume with the formation of the negative buoyancy area testifying to development of the dome-shaped form at the top part of a plume in the form of "hat".

  6. Morphological studies of polymer dispersed liquid crystal materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jin-Woo

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we have studied the morphologies of polymer dispersed liquid crystals (PDLCs) based on E7/NOA61. Scanning electron microscope studies show that the PDLC morphology is strongly affected by the LC concentration and the cure temperature. A typical PDLC morphology with isolated LC droplets dispersed in a polymer matrix is only observed at low LC compositions and at low cure temperatures. Increasing either the LC composition or the cure temperature results in a polymer ball morphology, in which LCs exist in irregularly shaped voids in the polymer network structure. It is shown that the transition between these two morphologies can be qualitatively explained using a pseudo-binary phase diagram.

  7. Behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrey, P.; Aupoix, B.

    2006-01-01

    The behaviour of turbulence models near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface is investigated. The analysis holds as well for two-equation as for Reynolds stress turbulence models using Daly and Harlow diffusion model. The behaviour near the interface is shown not to be a power law, as usually considered, but a more complex parametric solution. Why previous works seemed to numerically confirm the power law solution is explained. Constraints for turbulence modelling, i.e., for ensuring that models have a good behaviour near a turbulent/non-turbulent interface so that the solution is not sensitive to small turbulence levels imposed in the irrotational flow, are drawn

  8. Rheological and droplet size analysis of W/O/W multiple emulsions containing low concentrations of polymeric emulsifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGANA D. VASILJEVIĆ

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Multiple emulsions are complex dispersion systems which have many potential applications in pharmaceutics, cosmetics and the food industry. In practice, however, significant problems may arise because of their thermodynamic instability. In this study, W/O/W multiple emulsion systems containing low concentration levels of lipophilic polymeric primary emulsifiers cetyl dimethicone copolyol and PEG–30 dipolyhydroxystearate were evaluated. The concentrations of the primary emulsifiers were set at 1.6 and 2.4 % w/w in the final emulsions. Rheological and droplet size analysis of the investigated samples showed that the type and concentration of the primary lipophilic polymeric emulsifier markedly affected the characteristics of the multiple emulsions. The multiple emulsion prepared with 2.4 % w/w PEG–30 dipolyhydroxystearate as the primary emulsifier exhibited the highest apparent viscosity, yield stress and elastic modulus values, as well as the smallest droplet size. Furthermore, these parameters remained relatively constant over the study period, confirming the high stability of the investigated sample. The results obtained indicate that the changes observed in the investigated samples over time could be attributed to the swelling/breakdown mechanism of the multiple droplets. Such changes could be adequately monitored by rheological and droplet size analysis.

  9. Selfbound quantum droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, Tim; Wenzel, Matthias; Schmitt, Matthias; Boettcher, Fabian; Buehner, Carl; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2017-04-01

    Self-bound many-body systems are formed through a balance of attractive and repulsive forces and occur in many physical scenarios. Liquid droplets are an example of a self-bound system, formed by a balance of the mutual attractive and repulsive forces that derive from different components of the inter-particle potential. On the basis of the recent finding that an unstable bosonic dipolar gas can be stabilized by a repulsive many-body term, it was predicted that three-dimensional self-bound quantum droplets of magnetic atoms should exist. Here we report on the observation of such droplets using dysprosium atoms, with densities 108 times lower than a helium droplet, in a trap-free levitation field. We find that this dilute magnetic quantum liquid requires a minimum, critical number of atoms, below which the liquid evaporates into an expanding gas as a result of the quantum pressure of the individual constituents. Consequently, around this critical atom number we observe an interaction-driven phase transition between a gas and a self-bound liquid in the quantum degenerate regime with ultracold atoms.

  10. Assessment of particle-tracking models for dispersed particle-laden flows implemented in OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Greifzu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study two benchmark problems for turbulent dispersed particle-laden flow are investigated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD. How the CFD programs OpenFOAM and ANSYS FLUENT model these flows is tested and compared. The numerical results obtained with Lagrangian–Eulerian (LE point-particle (PP models for Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS simulations of the fluid flow in steady state and transient modes are compared with the experimental data available in the literature. The effect of the dispersion model on the particle motion is investigated in particular, as well as the order of coupling between the continuous carrier phase and the dispersed phase. First, a backward-facing step (BFS case is validated. As a second case, the confined bluff body (CBB is used. The simulated fluid flows correspond well with the experimental data for both test cases. The results for the dispersed solid phase reveal a good accordance between the simulation results and the experiments. It seems that particle dispersion is slightly under-predicted when ANSYS FLUENT is used, whereas the applied solver in OpenFOAM overestimates the dispersion somewhat. Only minor differences between the coupling schemes are detected due to the low volume fractions and mass loadings that are investigated. In the BFS test case the importance of the spatial dimension of the numerical model is demonstrated. Even if it is reasonable to assume a two-dimensional fluid flow structure, it is crucial to simulate the turbulent particle-laden flow with a three-dimensional model since the turbulent dispersion of the particles is three-dimensional.

  11. Dispersion of aircraft exhaust in the late wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerbeck, T; Gerz, T; Doernbrack, A [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1998-12-31

    The dispersion of aircraft emissions is investigated at cruising levels, i.e. in the free, stably stratified atmosphere near the tropopause. The study is based on large-eddy simulations in a domain of size 4.3 x 1.1{sup 2} km{sup 3} where the combined effects of typical atmospheric stratification, shear and turbulence are considered. The effect of a breaking gravity wave on the dispersion of the exhaust is analyzed. The mixing processes during the late wake flow are evaluated, i.e. in the dispersion and diffusion regimes when the organized flow by the wing tip vortices has ceased and the atmospheric motions gradually dominate the events. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  12. Dispersion of aircraft exhaust in the late wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerbeck, T.; Gerz, T.; Doernbrack, A. [Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    The dispersion of aircraft emissions is investigated at cruising levels, i.e. in the free, stably stratified atmosphere near the tropopause. The study is based on large-eddy simulations in a domain of size 4.3 x 1.1{sup 2} km{sup 3} where the combined effects of typical atmospheric stratification, shear and turbulence are considered. The effect of a breaking gravity wave on the dispersion of the exhaust is analyzed. The mixing processes during the late wake flow are evaluated, i.e. in the dispersion and diffusion regimes when the organized flow by the wing tip vortices has ceased and the atmospheric motions gradually dominate the events. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  13. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2017-11-21

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  14. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Within and Above an Urban Street Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, E. V.; Coceal, O.; Belcher, S. E.

    2018-03-01

    The transport of a passive scalar from a continuous point-source release in an urban street network is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). Dispersion through the network is characterized by evaluating horizontal fluxes of scalar within and above the urban canopy and vertical exchange fluxes through the canopy top. The relative magnitude and balance of these fluxes are used to distinguish three different regions relative to the source location: a near-field region, a transition region and a far-field region. The partitioning of each of these fluxes into mean and turbulent parts is computed. It is shown that within the canopy the horizontal turbulent flux in the street network is small, whereas above the canopy it comprises a significant fraction of the total flux. Vertical fluxes through the canopy top are predominantly turbulent. The mean and turbulent fluxes are respectively parametrized in terms of an advection velocity and a detrainment velocity and the parametrization incorporated into a simple box-network model. The model treats the coupled dispersion problem within and above the street network in a unified way and predictions of mean concentrations compare well with the DNS data. This demonstrates the usefulness of the box-network approach for process studies and interpretation of results from more detailed numerical simulations.

  15. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flows in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaeizadeh, Araz

    The two-phase compressible scalar filtered mass density function (FMDF) model is further developed and employed for large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent spray combustion in internal combustion (IC) engines. In this model, the filtered compressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved in a generalized curvilinear coordinate system with high-order, multi-block, compact differencing schemes for the turbulent velocity and pressure. However, turbulent mixing and combustion are computed with a new two-phase compressible scalar FMDF model. The spray and droplet dispersion/evaporation are modeled with a Lagrangian method. A new Lagrangian-Eulerian-Lagrangian computational method is employed for solving the flow, spray and scalar equation. The pressure effect in the energy equation, as needed in compressible flows, is included in the FMDF formulation. The performance of the new compressible LES/FMDF model is assessed by simulating the flow field and scalar mixing in a rapid compression machine (RCM), in a shock tube and in a supersonic co-axial jet. Consistency of temperatures predicted by the Eulerian finite-difference (FD) and Lagrangian Monte Carlo (MC) parts of the LES/FMDF model are established by including the pressure on the FMDF. It is shown that the LES/FMDF model is able to correctly capture the scalar mixing in both compressible subsonic and supersonic flows. Using the new two-phase LES/FMDF model, fluid dynamics, heat transfer, spray and combustion in the RCM with flat and crevice piston are studied. It is shown that the temperature distribution in the RCM with crevice piston is more uniform than the RCM with flat piston. The fuel spray characteristics and the spray parameters affecting the fuel mixing inside the RCM in reacting and non-reacting flows are also studied. The predicted liquid penetration and flame lift-off lengths for respectively non-reacting and reacting sprays are found to compare well with the available experimental data. Temperatures and

  16. Validation of OpenFoam for heavy gas dispersion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, A; Spruijt, M P N

    2013-11-15

    In the present paper heavy gas dispersion calculations were performed with OpenFoam. For a wind tunnel test case, numerical data was validated with experiments. For a full scale numerical experiment, a code to code comparison was performed with numerical results obtained from Fluent. The validation was performed in a gravity driven environment (slope), where the heavy gas induced the turbulence. For the code to code comparison, a hypothetical heavy gas release into a strongly turbulent atmospheric boundary layer including terrain effects was selected. The investigations were performed for SF6 and CO2 as heavy gases applying the standard k-ɛ turbulence model. A strong interaction of the heavy gas with the turbulence is present which results in a strong damping of the turbulence and therefore reduced heavy gas mixing. Especially this interaction, based on the buoyancy effects, was studied in order to ensure that the turbulence-buoyancy coupling is the main driver for the reduced mixing and not the global behaviour of the turbulence modelling. For both test cases, comparisons were performed between OpenFoam and Fluent solutions which were mainly in good agreement with each other. Beside steady state solutions, the time accuracy was investigated. In the low turbulence environment (wind tunnel test) which for both codes (laminar solutions) was in good agreement, also with the experimental data. The turbulent solutions of OpenFoam were in much better agreement with the experimental results than the Fluent solutions. Within the strong turbulence environment, both codes showed an excellent comparability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Eulerian-Lagrangian simulation of non-isothermal gas-solid flows: particle-turbulence interactions in pipe flows; Simulation eulerienne-lagrangienne d'ecoulements gaz-solide non isothermes: interactions particules-turbulence, application aux ecoulements en conduite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chagras, V.

    2004-03-15

    The aim of this work is to contribute to the numerical modeling of turbulent gas-solid flows in vertical or horizontal non isothermal pipes, which can be found in many industrial processes (pneumatic transport, drying, etc). The model is based on an Eulerian-Lagrangian approach allowing a fine description of the interactions between the two phases (action of the fluid upon the particles (dispersion), action of the particles upon the fluid (two way coupling) and between particles (collisions)), more or less influential according to the characteristics of the flow. The influence of the gas phase turbulence on the particle motion is taken into account using a non-isotropic dispersion model, which allows the generation of velocity and temperature fluctuations of the fluid seen by the particles. The numerical developments brought to the model for vertical and horizontal pipe flow have been validated by comparison with available experimental results from the literature. The sensitivity tests highlight the influence of the dispersion model, collisions and turbulence modulation (direct and non direct modifications ) on the dynamic and thermal behavior of the suspension. The model is able to predict the heat exchanges in the presence of particles for a wide range of flows in vertical and horizontal pipes. However numerical problems still exist in two-way coupling for very small particles and loading ratios above one. This is related to the problems encountered when modeling the coupling terms between the two phases (parameters C{sub {epsilon}}{sub 2} and C{sub {epsilon}}{sub 3} ) involved in the turbulence dissipation balance. (author)

  18. OCS in He droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grebenev, V.

    2000-06-01

    Phenomenon of superfluidity of para-hydrogen (pH{sub 2}){sub 1-17} and helium {sup 4}He{sub 1-7000} systems doped with an OCS chromophore molecule was investigated in this work. The study of such systems became possible after the development of the depletion spectroscopy technique in helium droplets. The droplets can be easily created and doped with up to 100 particles such as OCS, para-hydrogen or ortho-hydrogen molecules and {sup 4}He atoms. The measured infrared depletion spectra give the information about the temperature of the droplets and their aggregate state. The depletion spectrum of OCS in pure {sup 4}He droplets was comprehensively studied. The rovibrational OCS spectrum shows well resolved narrow lines. The spectrum is shifted to the red relative to the corresponding gas phase spectrum and the rotational constant of OCS in {sup 4}He droplet is three times smaller than that for free molecule. Different models of OCS rotation in the helium environment were discussed. It was shown that the shapes of the rovibrational lines are defined mainly by inhomogeneous broadening due to the droplet size distribution. The sub-rotational structure of the OCS rovibrational lines was revealed in microwave-infrared double resonance experiments. This structure arises due to the interaction of the OCS with the He environment. However, the information obtained in the experiments was not enough to understand the nature of this interaction. (orig.)

  19. Numerical methods of estimating the dispersion of radionuclides in atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladu, Mihaela; Ghitulescu, Alina; Popescu, Gheorghe; Piciorea, Iuliana

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The paper presents the method of dispersion calculation, witch can be applied for the DLE calculation. This is necessary to ensure a secure performance of the Experimental Pilot Plant for Tritium and Deuterium Separation (using the technology for detritiation based upon isotope catalytic exchange between tritiated heavy water and deuterium followed by cryogenic distillation of the hydrogen isotopes). For the calculation of the dispersion of radioactivity effluents in the atmosphere, at a given distance between source and receiver, the Gaussian mathematical model was used. This model is currently applied for estimating the long-term results of dispersion in case of continuous or intermittent emissions as basic information for long-term radioprotection measures for areas of the order of kilometres from the source. We have considered intermittent or continuous emissions of intensity lower than 1% per day relative to the annual emission. It is supposed that the radioactive material released into environment presents a gaussian dispersion both in horizontal and vertical plan. The local dispersion parameters could be determined directly with turbulence measurements or indirectly by determination of atmospheric stability. Weather parameters for characterizing the atmospheric dispersion include: - direction of wind relative to the source; - the speed of the wind at the height of emission; - parameters of dispersion to different distances, depending on the atmospheric turbulence which characterizes the mixing of radioactive materials in the atmosphere; - atmospheric stability range; - the height of mixture stratum; - the type and intensity of precipitations. The choice of the most adequate version of Gaussian model depends on the relation among the height where effluent emission is in progress, H (m), and the height at which the buildings influence the air motion, HB (m). There were defined three zones of distinct dispersion. This zones can have variable lengths

  20. The application of the 3D transient computational fluid dynamics to the radionuclide dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Eliene B.S. da; Sampaio, Paulo A.B. de

    2013-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) provides powerful tools for the study of dispersion of radionuclides, including problems where there is radioactive decay. This work presents a treatment to the dispersion of radionuclides through the usage of CFD, namely from the internal dispersion to the external one through either atmospheric or aquatic via. The first one is of fundamental importance, for example, to optimize the design of a room that will shelter the radioactive material, with the intent of aiming at the safety and the minimization of the dose in case of dispersion. The second one concerns the external dispersion, being of major relevance in accidents with releasing out from nuclear power plants, in order to study the safety analysis and also the environmental impact in the surroundings of the installation. In this work, the equations governing momentum, energy and transport with decay of radioactive materials are discretized in order that numerical solutions can be obtained. Finite element meshes and techniques for parallel and distributed computing are combined into a computer code, designed to take into account the effect of turbulence locally in the dispersion of the radioactive material released. Additionally, the code developed employs Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulence. (author)

  1. Turbulent structure of concentration plumes through application of video imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabberdt, W.F.; Martin, C. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Hoydysh, W.G.; Holynskyj, O. [Environmental Science & Services Corp., Long Island City, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Turbulent flows and dispersion in the presence of building wakes and terrain-induced local circulations are particularly difficult to simulate with numerical models or measure with conventional fluid modeling and ambient measurement techniques. The problem stems from the complexity of the kinematics and the difficulty in making representative concentration measurements. New laboratory video imaging techniques are able to overcome many of these limitations and are being applied to study a range of difficult problems. Here the authors apply {open_quotes}tomographic{close_quotes} video imaging techniques to the study of the turbulent structure of an ideal elevated plume and the relationship of short-period peak concentrations to long-period average values. A companion paper extends application of the technique to characterization of turbulent plume-concentration fields in the wake of a complex building configuration.

  2. Confocal micro-PIV measurement of droplet formation in a T-shaped micro-junction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, M; Kinoshita, H; Fujii, T; Oshima, M

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate a mechanism of microdroplet formation using 'multicolor confocal micro particle image velocimetry (PIV)' technique. The present system can measure dynamical behavior of multiphase flow separately and simultaneously. It also enables to identify the interactions between two immiscible fluids. We have applied this system to measure the water droplet formation at a micro T-shaped junction. We have also succeeded in dispersing fluorescent tracer particles into both phases. The interaction between the internal flow of to-be-dispersed water phase and of continuous oil phase is measured as a liquid-liquid multiphase flow. As a result of PIV measurement and interface scanning, the relationship between flow structure of each phase and interface shape is clarified. It indicates that the gap between the tip of to-be-dispersed phase and capillary wall, and interface area play an important role in the flow structure and shear stress on the interface.

  3. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  4. Particle Manipulation Methods in Droplet Microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenje, Maria; Fornell, Anna; Ohlin, Mathias; Nilsson, Johan

    2018-02-06

    This Feature describes the different particle manipulation techniques available in the droplet microfluidics toolbox to handle particles encapsulated inside droplets and to manipulate whole droplets. We address the advantages and disadvantages of the different techniques to guide new users.

  5. Colliding droplets: A short film presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1981-12-01

    A series of experiments were performed in which liquid droplets were caused to collide. Impact velocities to several meters per second and droplet diameters up to 600 micrometers were used. The impact parameters in the collisions vary from zero to greater than the sum of the droplet radii. Photographs of the collisions were taken with a high speed framing camera in order to study the impacts and subsequent behavior of the droplets.

  6. Two-phase wall function for modeling of turbulent boundary layer in subcooled boiling flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostjan Koncar; Borut Mavko; Yassin A Hassan

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The heat transfer and phase-change mechanisms in the subcooled flow boiling are governed mainly by local multidimensional mechanisms near the heated wall, where bubbles are generated. The structure of such 'wall boiling flow' is inherently non-homogeneous and is further influenced by the two-phase flow turbulence, phase-change effects in the bulk, interfacial forces and bubble interactions (collisions, coalescence, break-up). In this work the effect of two-phase flow turbulence on the development of subcooled boiling flow is considered. Recently, the modeling of two-phase flow turbulence has been extensively investigated. A notable progress has been made towards deriving reliable models for description of turbulent behaviour of continuous (liquid) and dispersed phase (bubbles) in the bulk flow. However, there is a lack of investigation considering the modeling of two-phase flow boundary layer. In most Eulerian two-fluid models standard single-phase wall functions are used for description of turbulent boundary layer of continuous phase. That might be a good approximation at adiabatic flows, but their use for boundary layers with high concentration of dispersed phase is questionable. In this work, the turbulent boundary layer near the heated wall will be modeled with the so-called 'two-phase' wall function, which is based on the assumption of additional turbulence due to bubble-induced stirring in the boundary layer. In the two-phase turbulent boundary layer the wall function coefficients strongly depend on the void fraction. Moreover, in the turbulent boundary layer with nucleating bubbles, the bubble size variation also has a significant impact on the liquid phase. As a basis, the wall function of Troshko and Hassan (2001), developed for adiabatic bubbly flows will be used. The simulations will be performed by a general-purpose CFD code CFX-4.4 using additional models provided by authors. The results will be compared to the boiling

  7. Simultaneous PLIF and PIV measurement of a near field turbulent immiscible buoyant oil jet fragmentation in water using liquid-liquid refractive index matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Xinzhi; Katz, Joseph

    2017-11-01

    Very little experimental data exits on the flow structure in the near field of a crude oil jet fragmenting in water because of inability to probe dense droplet cloud. Refractive index-matching is applied to overcome this challenge by using silicone oil and sugar water as a surrogate liquid pair. Their density ratio, viscosity ratio, and interfacial tension are closely matched with those of crude oil and seawater. Simultaneous PLIF and PIV measurements are conducted by fluorescently tagging the oil and seeding both phases with particles. With increasing jet Reynolds and Weber numbers, the oil plume breakup occurs closer to the nozzle, the spreading angle of the jet increases, and the droplet sizes decrease. The varying spread rate is attributed to differences in droplet size distributions. The location of primary oil breakup is consistent with the region of high strain rate fluctuations. What one may perceive as oil droplets in opaque fluids actually consists of multi-layers containing water droplets, which sometimes encapsulate smaller oil droplets, creating a ``Russian Doll'' like phenomenon. This system forms as ligaments of oil and water wrap around each other during entrainment. Results include profiles of mean velocity and turbulence parameters along with energy spectra. Gulf of Mexico Research Inititave.

  8. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  9. Droplet Vaporization In A Levitating Acoustic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, G. A.; Liu, S.; Ciobanescu, I.

    2003-01-01

    Combustion experiments using arrays of droplets seek to provide a link between single droplet combustion phenomena and the behavior of complex spray combustion systems. Both single droplet and droplet array studies have been conducted in microgravity to better isolate the droplet interaction phenomena and eliminate or reduce the effects of buoyancy-induced convection. In most experiments involving droplet arrays, the droplets are supported on fibers to keep them stationary and close together before the combustion event. The presence of the fiber, however, disturbs the combustion process by introducing a source of heat transfer and asymmetry into the configuration. As the number of drops in a droplet array increases, supporting the drops on fibers becomes less practical because of the cumulative effect of the fibers on the combustion process. To eliminate the effect of the fiber, several researchers have conducted microgravity experiments using unsupported droplets. Jackson and Avedisian investigated single, unsupported drops while Nomura et al. studied droplet clouds formed by a condensation technique. The overall objective of this research is to extend the study of unsupported drops by investigating the combustion of well-characterized drop clusters in a microgravity environment. Direct experimental observations and measurements of the combustion of droplet clusters would provide unique experimental data for the verification and improvement of spray combustion models. In this work, the formation of drop clusters is precisely controlled using an acoustic levitation system so that dilute, as well as dense clusters can be created and stabilized before combustion in microgravity is begun. While the low-gravity test facility is being completed, tests have been conducted in 1-g to characterize the effect of the acoustic field on the vaporization of single and multiple droplets. This is important because in the combustion experiment, the droplets will be formed and

  10. Mass spectrometry of acoustically levitated droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphall, Michael S; Jorabchi, Kaveh; Smith, Lloyd M

    2008-08-01

    Containerless sample handling techniques such as acoustic levitation offer potential advantages for mass spectrometry, by eliminating surfaces where undesired adsorption/desorption processes can occur. In addition, they provide a unique opportunity to study fundamental aspects of the ionization process as well as phenomena occurring at the air-droplet interface. Realizing these advantages is contingent, however, upon being able to effectively interface levitated droplets with a mass spectrometer, a challenging task that is addressed in this report. We have employed a newly developed charge and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (CALDI) technique to obtain mass spectra from a 5-microL acoustically levitated droplet containing peptides and an ionic matrix. A four-ring electrostatic lens is used in conjunction with a corona needle to produce bursts of corona ions and to direct those ions toward the droplet, resulting in droplet charging. Analyte ions are produced from the droplet by a 337-nm laser pulse and detected by an atmospheric sampling mass spectrometer. The ion generation and extraction cycle is repeated at 20 Hz, the maximum operating frequency of the laser employed. It is shown in delayed ion extraction experiments that both positive and negative ions are produced, behavior similar to that observed for atmospheric pressure matrix-assisted laser absorption/ionization. No ion signal is observed in the absence of droplet charging. It is likely, although not yet proven, that the role of the droplet charging is to increase the strength of the electric field at the surface of the droplet, reducing charge recombination after ion desorption.

  11. Leidenfrost boiling of water droplet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orzechowski Tadeusz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigations concerned a large water droplet at the heating surface temperature above the Leidenfrost point. The heating cylinder was the main component of experimental stand on which investigations were performed. The measurement system was placed on the high-sensitivity scales. Data transmission was performed through RS232 interface. The author-designed program, with extended functions to control the system, was applied. The present paper examines the behaviour of a large single drop levitating over a hot surface, unsteady mass of the drop, and heat transfer. In computations, the dependence, available in the literature, for the orthogonal droplet projection on the heating surface as a function of time was employed. It was confirmed that the local value of the heat transfer coefficient is a power function of the area of the droplet surface projection. Also, a linear relationship between the flux of mass evaporated from the droplet and the droplet orthogonal projection was observed.

  12. Leidenfrost boiling of water droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    The investigations concerned a large water droplet at the heating surface temperature above the Leidenfrost point. The heating cylinder was the main component of experimental stand on which investigations were performed. The measurement system was placed on the high-sensitivity scales. Data transmission was performed through RS232 interface. The author-designed program, with extended functions to control the system, was applied. The present paper examines the behaviour of a large single drop levitating over a hot surface, unsteady mass of the drop, and heat transfer. In computations, the dependence, available in the literature, for the orthogonal droplet projection on the heating surface as a function of time was employed. It was confirmed that the local value of the heat transfer coefficient is a power function of the area of the droplet surface projection. Also, a linear relationship between the flux of mass evaporated from the droplet and the droplet orthogonal projection was observed.

  13. Microbial communities related to biodegradation of dispersed Macondo oil at low seawater temperature with Norwegian coastal seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakstad, Odd G; Throne-Holst, Mimmi; Netzer, Roman; Stoeckel, Donald M; Atlas, Ronald M

    2015-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) accident in 2010 created a deepwater plume of small oil droplets from a deepwater well in the Mississippi Canyon lease block 252 (‘Macondo oil’). A novel laboratory system was used in the current study to investigate biodegradation of Macondo oil dispersions (10 μm or 30 μm median droplet sizes) at low oil concentrations (2 mg l−1) in coastal Norwegian seawater at a temperature of 4–5°C. Whole metagenome analyses showed that oil biodegradation was associated with the successive increased abundances of Gammaproteobacteria, while Alphaproteobacteria (Pelagibacter) became dominant at the end of the experiment. Colwellia and Oceanospirillales were related to n-alkane biodegradation, while particularly Cycloclasticus and Marinobacter were associated with degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons (HCs). The larger oil droplet dispersions resulted in delayed sequential changes of Oceanospirillales and Cycloclasticus, related with slower degradation of alkanes and aromatic HCs. The bacterial successions associated with oil biodegradation showed both similarities and differences when compared with the results from DWH field samples and laboratory studies performed with deepwater from the Gulf of Mexico. PMID:26485443

  14. The dynamics of small inertial particles in weakly stratified turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aartrijk, M.; Clercx, H.J.H.

    We present an overview of a numerical study on the small-scale dynamics and the large-scale dispersion of small inertial particles in stably stratified turbulence. Three types of particles are examined: fluid particles, light inertial particles (with particle-to-fluid density ratio 1Ͽp/Ͽf25) and

  15. Probability density function modeling of scalar mixing from concentrated sources in turbulent channel flow

    OpenAIRE

    Bakosi, J.; Franzese, P.; Boybeyi, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Dispersion of a passive scalar from concentrated sources in fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied with the probability density function (PDF) method. The joint PDF of velocity, turbulent frequency and scalar concentration is represented by a large number of Lagrangian particles. A stochastic near-wall PDF model combines the generalized Langevin model of Haworth & Pope with Durbin's method of elliptic relaxation to provide a mathematically exact treatment of convective and viscous ...

  16. Droplet generation during core reflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; De Jarlais, G.; Ishii, M.

    1983-01-01

    The process of entrainment and disintegration of liquid droplets by a flow of steam has considerable practical importance in calculating the effectivenes of the emergency core cooling system. Liquid entrainment is also important in determination of the critical heat flux point in general. Thus the analysis of the reflooding phase of a LOCA requires detailed knowledge of droplet size. Droplet size is mainly determined by the droplet generation mechanisms involved. To study these mechanisms, data generated in the PWR FLECHT SEASET series of experiments was analyzed. In addition, an experiment was performed in which the hydrodynamics of low quality post-CHF flow (inverted annular flow) were simulated in an adiabatic test section

  17. Influence of film dimensions on film droplet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Helene; Ljungström, Evert

    2012-02-01

    Aerosol particles may be generated from rupturing liquid films through a droplet formation mechanism. The present work was undertaken with the aim to throw some light on the influence of film dimensions on droplet formation with possible consequences for exhaled breath aerosol formation. The film droplet formation process was mimicked by using a purpose-built device, where fluid films were spanned across holes of known diameters. As the films burst, droplets were formed and the number and size distributions of the resulting droplets were determined. No general relation could be found between hole diameter and the number of droplets generated per unit surface area of fluid film. Averaged over all film sizes, a higher surface tension yielded higher concentrations of droplets. Surface tension did not influence the resulting droplet diameter, but it was found that smaller films generated smaller droplets. This study shows that small fluid films generate droplets as efficiently as large films, and that droplets may well be generated from films with diameters below 1 mm. This has implications for the formation of film droplets from reopening of closed airways because human terminal bronchioles are of similar dimensions. Thus, the results provide support for the earlier proposed mechanism where reopening of closed airways is one origin of exhaled particles.

  18. A compact and facile microfluidic droplet creation device using a piezoelectric diaphragm micropump for droplet digital PCR platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Naoaki; Nakashoji, Yuta; Koshirogane, Toshihiro; Kondo, Masaki; Tanaka, Yugo; Inoue, Kohei; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2017-10-01

    We have exploited a compact and facile microfluidic droplet creation device consisting of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chip possessing T-junction channel geometry, two inlet reservoirs, and one outlet reservoir, and a piezoelectric (PZT) diaphragm micropump with controller. Air was evacuated from the outlet reservoir using the PZT pump, reducing the pressure inside. The reduced pressure within the outlet reservoir pulled oil and aqueous solution preloaded in the inlet reservoirs into the microchannels, which then merged at the T-junction, successfully forming water-in-oil emulsion droplets at a rate of ∼1000 per second with minimal sample loss. We confirmed that the onset of droplet formation occurred immediately after turning on the pump (<1 s). Over repeated runs, droplet formation was highly reproducible, with droplet size purity (polydispersity, <4%) comparable to that achieved using other microfluidic droplet preparation techniques. We also demonstrated single-molecule PCR amplification in the created droplets, suggesting that the device could be used for effective droplet digital PCR platforms in most laboratories without requiring great expense, space, or time for acquiring technical skills. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng; Qian, Tiezheng

    2013-01-01

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  20. Binary particle separation in droplet microfluidics using acoustophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornell, Anna; Cushing, Kevin; Nilsson, Johan; Tenje, Maria

    2018-02-01

    We show a method for separation of two particle species with different acoustic contrasts originally encapsulated in the same droplet in a continuous two-phase system. This was realized by using bulk acoustic standing waves in a 380 μm wide silicon-glass microfluidic channel. Polystyrene particles (positive acoustic contrast particles) and in-house synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) particles (negative acoustic contrast particles) were encapsulated inside water-in-oil droplets either individually or in a mixture. At acoustic actuation of the system at the fundamental resonance frequency, the polystyrene particles were moved to the center of the droplet (pressure node), while the PDMS particles were moved to the sides of the droplet (pressure anti-nodes). The acoustic particle manipulation step was combined in series with a trifurcation droplet splitter, and as the original droplet passed through the splitter and was divided into three daughter droplets, the polystyrene particles were directed into the center daughter droplet, while the PDMS particles were directed into the two side daughter droplets. The presented method expands the droplet microfluidics tool-box and offers new possibilities to perform binary particle separation in droplet microfluidic systems.

  1. Hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets in one-component fluids

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xinpeng

    2013-04-24

    Using the dynamic van der Waals theory [Phys. Rev. E 75, 036304 (2007)], we numerically investigate the hydrodynamics of Leidenfrost droplets under gravity in two dimensions. Some recent theoretical predictions and experimental observations are confirmed in our simulations. A Leidenfrost droplet larger than a critical size is shown to be unstable and break up into smaller droplets due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the bottom surface of the droplet. Our simulations demonstrate that an evaporating Leidenfrost droplet changes continuously from a puddle to a circular droplet, with the droplet shape controlled by its size in comparison with a few characteristic length scales. The geometry of the vapor layer under the droplet is found to mainly depend on the droplet size and is nearly independent of the substrate temperature, as reported in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 074301 (2012)]. Finally, our simulations demonstrate that a Leidenfrost droplet smaller than a characteristic size takes off from the hot substrate because the levitating force due to evaporation can no longer be balanced by the weight of the droplet, as observed in a recent experimental study [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 034501 (2012)].

  2. Experimental test of liquid droplet radiator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattick, A.T.; Simon, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This liquid droplet radiator (LDR) is evolving rapidly as a lightweight system for heat rejection in space power systems. By using recirculating free streams of submillimeter droplets to radiate waste energy directly to space, the LDR can potentially be an order of magnitude lighter than conventional radiator systems which radiate from solid surfaces. The LDR is also less vulnerable to micrometeoroid damage than are conventional radiators, and it has a low transport volume. Three major development issues of this new heat rejection system are the ability to direct the droplet streams with sufficient precision to avoid fluid loss, radiative performance of the array of droplet streams which comprise the radiating elements of the LDR, and the efficacy of the droplet stream collector, again with respect to fluid loss. This paper reports experimental results bearing on the first two issues - droplet aiming in a multikilowatt-sized system, and radiated power from a large droplet array. Parallel efforts on droplet collection and LDR system design are being pursued by several research groups

  3. Impinging Water Droplets on Inclined Glass Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lance, Blake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ho, Clifford K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Multiphase computational models and tests of falling water droplets on inclined glass surfaces were developed to investigate the physics of impingement and potential of these droplets to self-clean glass surfaces for photovoltaic modules and heliostats. A multiphase volume-of-fluid model was developed in ANSYS Fluent to simulate the impinging droplets. The simulations considered different droplet sizes (1 mm and 3 mm), tilt angles (0°, 10°, and 45°), droplet velocities (1 m/s and 3 m/s), and wetting characteristics (wetting=47° contact angle and non-wetting = 93° contact angle). Results showed that the spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) decreased with increasing inclination angle due to the reduced normal force on the surface. The hydrophilic surface yielded greater spread factors than the hydrophobic surface in all cases. With regard to impact forces, the greater surface tilt angles yielded lower normal forces, but higher shear forces. Experiments showed that the experimentally observed spread factor (maximum droplet diameter during impact divided by the initial droplet diameter) was significantly larger than the simulated spread factor. Observed spread factors were on the order of 5 - 6 for droplet velocities of ~3 m/s, whereas the simulated spread factors were on the order of 2. Droplets were observed to be mobile following impact only for the cases with 45° tilt angle, which matched the simulations. An interesting phenomenon that was observed was that shortly after being released from the nozzle, the water droplet oscillated (like a trampoline) due to the "snapback" caused by the surface tension of the water droplet being released from the nozzle. This oscillation impacted the velocity immediately after the release. Future work should evaluate the impact of parameters such as tilt angle and surface wettability on the impact of particle/soiling uptake and removal to investigate ways that

  4. Effect of pore size distribution and flow segregation on dispersion in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, R.G.

    1978-11-01

    In order to study the effect of the pore size distribution and flow segregation on dispersion in a porous media, the dispersion of solute in an array of parallel pores is considered. Equations are obtained for the dispersion coefficient in laminar and turbulent flow, as a function of the particle Peclet number. The theory fits quite well cumulative experimental data from various researchers in the Peclet number range from 10 -3 to 10 6 . The model also predicts some trends, backed by experimental data, regarding the effect of particle size, particle size distribution and fluid velocity on dispersion

  5. A Novel A Posteriori Investigation of Scalar Flux Models for Passive Scalar Dispersion in Compressible Boundary Layer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braman, Kalen; Raman, Venkat

    2011-11-01

    A novel direct numerical simulation (DNS) based a posteriori technique has been developed to investigate scalar transport modeling error. The methodology is used to test Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes turbulent scalar flux models for compressible boundary layer flows. Time-averaged DNS velocity and turbulence fields provide the information necessary to evolve the time-averaged scalar transport equation without requiring the use of turbulence modeling. With this technique, passive dispersion of a scalar from a boundary layer surface in a supersonic flow is studied with scalar flux modeling error isolated from any flowfield modeling errors. Several different scalar flux models are used. It is seen that the simple gradient diffusion model overpredicts scalar dispersion, while anisotropic scalar flux models underpredict dispersion. Further, the use of more complex models does not necessarily guarantee an increase in predictive accuracy, indicating that key physics is missing from existing models. Using comparisons of both a priori and a posteriori scalar flux evaluations with DNS data, the main modeling shortcomings are identified. Results will be presented for different boundary layer conditions.

  6. The collaborative work of droplet assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Goodman, Joel M

    2017-10-01

    Three proteins have been implicated in the assembly of cytoplasmic lipid droplets: seipin, FIT2, and perilipin. This review examines the current theories of seipin function as well as the evidence for the involvement of all three proteins in droplet biogenesis, and ends with a proposal of how they collaborate to regulate the formation of droplets. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent Advances in Lipid Droplet Biology edited by Rosalind Coleman and Matthijs Hesselink. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Raman scattering temperature measurements for water vapor in nonequilibrium dispersed two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anastasia, C.M.; Neti, S.; Smith, W.R.; Chen, J.C.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the feasibility of using Raman scattering as a nonintrusive technique to measure vapor temperatures in dispersed two-phase flow. The Raman system developed for this investigation is described, including alignment of optics and optimization of the photodetector for photon pulse counting. Experimentally obtained Raman spectra are presented for the following single- and two-phase samples: liquid water, atmospheric nitrogen, superheated steam, nitrogen and water droplets in a high void fraction air/water mist, and superheated water vapor in nonequilibrium dispersed flow

  8. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  9. Investigation of Different Droplet Formation Regimes in a T-junction Microchannel Using the VOF Technique in OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Shima; Roohi, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    Here we aimed to investigate various droplet formation regimes in a two-dimensional T-junction microchannel geometry using the open source software OpenFOAM. Two incompressible fluids, continuous phase in the main channel and dispersed phase in the lateral channel, have been considered. The interFoam solver was used to simulate laminar flow with two incompressible and isothermal phases. We evaluated the capability of "Compressive Interface Capturing Scheme for Arbitrary Meshes (CICSAM)" volume of fluid (VOF) technique of the OpenFOAM for modeling of the droplet formation and movement in different regimes. The flow behavior in the T-junction microchannel over a wide range of capillary numbers (0.006 to 0.12), volume flow rate ratio (0.125, 0.25, 0.5), and contact angle (130° to 180°) in the squeezing, dripping and jetting regimes were examined.The importance of parameters such as contact angle, capillary number, flow rate ratio, and Reynolds number at the time of separation, as well as the formation of droplets, was investigated in different regimes. We found that droplet detachment time increases by increasing the contact angle in the squeezing regime while increasing the contact angle in the dripping regime results in a decrease in the droplet detachment time. We compare the role of pressure gradient and shear stress forces in the droplet formation process in both dripping and squeezing regimes in details. We also provide a classification of two-phase flow regimes in the investigated T-junction microchannel in terms of three main parameters of, e.g., flow rate ratio, contact angle, and capillary number.

  10. Evaporation of nanofluid droplet on heated surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeung Chan Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an experiment on the evaporation of nanofluid sessile droplet on a heated surface was conducted. A nanofluid of 0.5% volumetric concentration mixed with 80-nm-sized CuO powder and pure water were used for experiment. Droplet was applied to the heated surface, and images of the evaporation process were obtained. The recorded images were analyzed to find the volume, diameter, and contact angle of the droplet. In addition, the evaporative heat transfer coefficient was calculated from experimental result. The results of this study are summarized as follows: the base diameter of the droplet was maintained stably during the evaporation. The measured temperature of the droplet was increased rapidly for a very short time, then maintained constantly. The nanofluid droplet was evaporated faster than the pure water droplet under the experimental conditions of the same initial volume and temperature, and the average evaporative heat transfer coefficient of the nanofluid droplet was higher than that of pure water. We can consider the effects of the initial contact angle and thermal conductivity of nanofluid as the reason for this experimental result. However, the effect of surface roughness on the evaporative heat transfer of nanofluid droplet appeared unclear.

  11. PLANETESIMAL AND PROTOPLANET DYNAMICS IN A TURBULENT PROTOPLANETARY DISK: IDEAL UNSTRATIFIED DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Menou, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of planetesimals and planetary cores may be strongly influenced by density perturbations driven by magneto-rotational turbulence in their natal protoplanetary gas disks. Using the local shearing box approximation, we perform numerical simulations of planetesimals moving as massless particles in a turbulent, magnetized, unstratified gas disk. Our fiducial disk model shows turbulent accretion characterized by a Shakura-Sunyaev viscosity parameter of α ∼ 10 -2 , with rms density perturbations of ∼10%. We measure the statistical evolution of particle orbital properties in our simulations including mean radius, eccentricity, and velocity dispersion. We confirm random walk growth in time of all three properties, the first time that this has been done with direct orbital integration in a local model. We find that the growth rate increases with the box size used at least up to boxes of eight scale heights in horizontal size. However, even our largest boxes show velocity dispersions sufficiently low that collisional destruction of planetesimals should be unimportant in the inner disk throughout its lifetime. Our direct integrations agree with earlier torque measurements showing that type I migration dominates over diffusive migration by stochastic torques for most objects in the planetary core and terrestrial planet mass range. Diffusive migration remains important for objects in the mass range of kilometer-sized planetesimals. Discrepancies in the derived magnitude of turbulence between local and global simulations of magneto-rotationally unstable disks remains an open issue, with important consequences for planet formation scenarios.

  12. Droplet Translation Actuated by Photoelectrowetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Cesar; Deegan, Robert D

    2018-03-13

    In traditional electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) devices, droplets are moved about a substrate using electric fields produced by an array of discrete electrodes. In this study, we show that a drop can be driven across a substrate with a localized light beam by exploiting the photoelectrowetting (PEW) effect, a light-activated variant of EWOD. Droplet transport actuated by PEW eliminates the need for electrode arrays and the complexities entailed in their fabrication and control, and offers a new approach for designing lab-on-a-chip applications. We report measurements of the maximum droplet speed as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied bias, intensity of illumination, volume of the droplet, and viscosity and also introduce a model that reproduces these data.

  13. Gravity, turbulence and the scaling ``laws'' in molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier

    The so-called Larson (1981) scaling laws found empirically in molecular clouds have been generally interpreted as evidence that the clouds are turbulent and fractal. In the present contribution we discussed how recent observations and models of cloud formation suggest that: (a) these relations are the result of strong observational biases due to the cloud definition itself: since the filling factor of the dense structures is small, by thresholding the column density the computed mean density between clouds is nearly constant, and nearly the same as the threshold (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2012). (b) When accounting for column density variations, the velocity dispersion-size relation does not appears anymore. Instead, dense cores populate the upper-left corner of the δ v-R diagram (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a). (c) Instead of a δ v-R relation, a more appropriate relation seems to be δ v 2 / R = 2 GMΣ, which suggest that clouds are in collapse, rather than supported by turbulence (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a). (d) These results, along with the shapes of the star formation histories (Hartmann, Ballesteros-Paredes & Heitsch 2012), line profiles of collapsing clouds in numerical simulations (Heitsch, Ballesteros-Paredes & Hartmann 2009), core-to-core velocity dispersions (Heitsch, Ballesteros-Paredes & Hartmann 2009), time-evolution of the column density PDFs (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011b), etc., strongly suggest that the actual source of the non-thermal motions is gravitational collapse of the clouds, so that the turbulent, chaotic component of the motions is only a by-product of the collapse, with no significant ``support" role for the clouds. This result calls into question if the scale-free nature of the motions has a turbulent, origin (Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011a; Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2011b, Ballesteros-Paredes et al. 2012).

  14. Ontogenetic changes in larval swimming and orientation of pre-competent sea urchin Arbacia punctulata in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jeanette D.; Chan, Kit Yu Karen; Anderson, Erik J.; Mullineaux, Lauren S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many marine organisms have complex life histories, having sessile adults and relying on the planktonic larvae for dispersal. Larvae swim and disperse in a complex fluid environment and the effect of ambient flow on larval behavior could in turn impact their survival and transport. However, to date, most studies on larvae–flow interactions have focused on competent larvae near settlement. We examined the importance of flow on early larval stages by studying how local flow and ontogeny influence swimming behavior in pre-competent larval sea urchins, Arbacia punctulata. We exposed larval urchins to grid-stirred turbulence and recorded their behavior at two stages (4- and 6-armed plutei) in three turbulence regimes. Using particle image velocimetry to quantify and subtract local flow, we tested the hypothesis that larvae respond to turbulence by increasing swimming speed, and that the increase varies with ontogeny. Swimming speed increased with turbulence for both 4- and 6-armed larvae, but their responses differed in terms of vertical swimming velocity. 4-Armed larvae swam most strongly upward in the unforced flow regime, while 6-armed larvae swam most strongly upward in weakly forced flow. Increased turbulence intensity also decreased the relative time that larvae spent in their typical upright orientation. 6-Armed larvae were tilted more frequently in turbulence compared with 4-armed larvae. This observation suggests that as larvae increase in size and add pairs of arms, they are more likely to be passively re-oriented by moving water, rather than being stabilized (by mechanisms associated with increased mass), potentially leading to differential transport. The positive relationship between swimming speed and larval orientation angle suggests that there was also an active response to tilting in turbulence. Our results highlight the importance of turbulence to planktonic larvae, not just during settlement but also in earlier stages through morphology

  15. Colliding droplets: a short film presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    A series of experiments were performed in which liquid droplets were caused to collide. Impact velocities to several meters per second and droplet diameters up to 600 micrometers were used. The impact parameters in the collisions vary from zero to greater than the sum of the droplet radii. Photographs of the collisions were taken with a high speed framing camera in order to study the impacts and subsequent behavior of the droplets. The experiments will be discussed and a short movie film presentation of some of the impacts will be shown

  16. Cloud-turbulence interactions: Sensitivity of a general circulation model to closure assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkop, S.; Roeckner, E.

    1993-01-01

    Several approaches to parameterize the turbulent transport of momentum, heat, water vapour and cloud water for use in a general circulation model (GCM) have been tested in one-dimensional and three-dimensional model simulations. The schemes differ with respect to their closure assumptions (conventional eddy diffusivity model versus turbulent kinetic energy closure) and also regarding their treatment of cloud-turbulence interactions. The basis properties of these parameterizations are discussed first in column simulations of a stratocumulus-topped atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) under a strong subsidence inversion during the KONTROL experiment in the North Sea. It is found that the K-models tend to decouple the cloud layer from the adjacent layers because the turbulent activity is calculated from local variables. The higher-order scheme performs better in this respect because internally generated turbulence can be transported up and down through the action of turbulent diffusion. Thus, the TKE-scheme provides not only a better link between the cloud and the sub-cloud layer but also between the cloud and the inversion as a result of cloud-top entrainment. In the stratocumulus case study, where the cloud is confined by a pronounced subsidence inversion, increased entrainment favours cloud dilution through enhanced evaporation of cloud droplets. In the GCM study, however, additional cloud-top entrainment supports cloud formation because indirect cloud generating processes are promoted through efficient ventilation of the ABL, such as the enhanced moisture supply by surface evaporation and the increased depth of the ABL. As a result, tropical convection is more vigorous, the hydrological cycle is intensified, the whole troposphere becomes warmer and moister in general and the cloudiness in the upper part of the ABL is increased. (orig.)

  17. Settling of fixed erythrocyte suspension droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omenyi, S. N.; Snyder, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that when particles behave collectively rather than individually, the fractionation of micron-size particles on the basis of size, density, and surface characteristics by centrifugation and electrophoresis is hindered. The formation and sedimentation of droplets containing particles represent an extreme example of collective behavior and pose a major problem for these separation methods when large quantities of particles need to be fractionated. Experiments are described that measure droplet sizes and settling rates for a variety of particles and droplets. Expressions relating the particle concentration in a drop to measurable quantities of the fluids and particles are developed. The number of particles in each droplet is then estimated, together with the effective droplet density. Red blood cells from different animals fixed in glutaraldehyde provide model particle groups.

  18. Evaluation of turbulence measurement techniques from a single Doppler lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Bonin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of turbulence are essential to understand and quantify the transport and dispersal of heat, moisture, momentum, and trace gases within the planetary boundary layer (PBL. Through the years, various techniques to measure turbulence using Doppler lidar observations have been proposed. However, the accuracy of these measurements has rarely been validated against trusted in situ instrumentation. Herein, data from the eXperimental Planetary boundary layer Instrumentation Assessment (XPIA are used to verify Doppler lidar turbulence profiles through comparison with sonic anemometer measurements. For 17 days at the end of the experiment, a single scanning Doppler lidar continuously cycled through different turbulence measurement strategies: velocity–azimuth display (VAD, six-beam scans, and range–height indicators (RHIs with a vertical stare.Measurements of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE, turbulence intensity, and stress velocity from these techniques are compared with sonic anemometer measurements at six heights on a 300 m tower. The six-beam technique is found to generally measure turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity the most accurately at all heights (r2  ≈  0.78, showing little bias in its observations (slope of  ≈  0. 95. Turbulence measurements from the velocity–azimuth display method tended to be biased low near the surface, as large eddies were not captured by the scan. None of the methods evaluated were able to consistently accurately measure the shear velocity (r2 =  0.15–0.17. Each of the scanning strategies assessed had its own strengths and limitations that need to be considered when selecting the method used in future experiments.

  19. Multicomponent droplet vaporization in a convecting environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megaridis, C.M.; Sirignano, W.A.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper a parametric study of the fundamental exchange processes for energy, mass and momentum between the liquid and gas phases of multicomponent liquid vaporizing droplets is presented. The model, which examines an isolated, vaporizing, multicomponent droplet in an axisymmetric, convecting environment, considers the different volatilities of the liquid components, the alteration of the liquid-phase properties due to the spatial/temporal variations of the species concentrations and also the effects of multicomponent diffusion. In addition, the model accounts for variable thermophysical properties, surface blowing and droplet surface regression due to vaporization, transient droplet heating with internal liquid circulation, and finally droplet deceleration with respect to the free flow due to drag. The numerical calculation employs finite-difference techniques and an iterative solution procedure that provides time-varying spatially-resolved data for both phases. The effects of initial droplet composition, ambient temperature, initial Reynolds number (based on droplet diameter), and volatility differential between the two liquid components are investigated for a liquid droplet consisting of two components with very different volatilities. It is found that mixtures with higher concentration of the less volatile substance actually vaporize faster on account of intrinsically higher liquid heating rates

  20. Collisions of droplets on spherical particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2017-10-01

    Head-on collisions between droplets and spherical particles are examined for water droplets in the diameter range between 170 μm and 280 μm and spherical particles in the diameter range between 500 μm and 2000 μm. The droplet velocities range between 6 m/s and 11 m/s, while the spherical particles are fixed in space. The Weber and Ohnesorge numbers and ratio of droplet to particle diameter were between 92 deposition and splashing regimes, a regime is observed in the intermediate region, where the droplet forms a stable crown, which does not breakup but propagates along the particle surface and passes around the particle. This regime is prevalent when the droplets collide on small particles. The characteristics of the collision at the onset of rim instability are also described in terms of the location of the film on the particle surface and the orientation and length of the ejected crown. Proper orthogonal decomposition identified that the first 2 modes are enough to capture the overall morphology of the crown at the splashing threshold.

  1. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Abhishek [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); Basu, Saptarshi [Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Kumar, Ranganathan, E-mail: ranganathan.kumar@ucf.edu [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters. -- Highlights: ► Demonstrates the importance of rotation in a levitated droplet that leads to controlled morphology. ► Provides detailed measurements of Particle Image Velocimetry inside levitated droplets. ► Shows variation of vortex strength with the droplet diameter and viscosity of the liquid.

  2. Velocity and rotation measurements in acoustically levitated droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Basu, Saptarshi; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity scale inside an acoustically levitated droplet depends on the levitator and liquid properties. Using Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV), detailed velocity measurements have been made in a levitated droplet of different diameters and viscosity. The maximum velocity and rotation are normalized using frequency and amplitude of acoustic levitator, and droplet viscosity. The non-dimensional data are fitted for micrometer- and millimeter-sized droplets levitated in different levitators for different viscosity fluids. It is also shown that the rotational speed of nanosilica droplets at an advanced stage of vaporization compares well with that predicted by exponentially fitted parameters. -- Highlights: ► Demonstrates the importance of rotation in a levitated droplet that leads to controlled morphology. ► Provides detailed measurements of Particle Image Velocimetry inside levitated droplets. ► Shows variation of vortex strength with the droplet diameter and viscosity of the liquid.

  3. Evidence for strange kinetics in Hasegawa-Mima turbulent transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annibaldi, S.V.; Drury, L.O'C.; Manfredi, G.; Dendy, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied the transport of test particle ensembles moving in turbulent electrostatic fields governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) equation. As a result of the interplay of the linear dispersive term and the nonlinear term in the HM equation, 'strange kinetics' emerge: the poloidal particle transport undergoes a qualitative transition from diffusive, through supradiffusive, to ballistic. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  4. Levitated droplet dye laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzouz, H.; Alkafadiji, L.; Balslev, Søren

    2006-01-01

    a high quality optical resonator. Our 750 nL lasing droplets consist of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethylene glycol, at a concentration of 0.02 M. The droplets are optically pumped at 532 nm light from a pulsed, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser, and the dye laser emission is analyzed by a fixed grating...

  5. Water Entry by a Train of Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Huang, Xin; Chan, Chon U.; Frommhold, Philipp Erhard; Lippert, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The impact of single droplets on a deep pool is a well-studied phenomenon which reveals reach fluid mechanics. Lesser studied is the impact of a train of droplet and the accompanied formation of largely elongated cavities, in particular for well controlled droplets. The droplets with diameters of 20-40 μm and velocities of approx. 20 m/s are generated with a piezo-actuated nozzle at rates of 200-300 kHz. Individual droplets are selected by electric charging and deflection and the impact is visualized with stroboscopic photography and high-speed videos. We study in particular the formation and shape of the cavity as by varying the number of droplets from one to 64. The cavities reach centimetres in length with lateral diameters of the order of 100 of micrometres.

  6. Experimental characterization of a silicone oil-in-water droplet generator based on a micro T-junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, B.; Pulvirenti, B.; Puccetti, G.; Morini, G. L.

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with the emulsion of two immiscible fluids in a micro T-junction. An opposed-flow micro T-junction obtained by means of square microchannels (with a side of 300 µm) fabricated in a pure fused glass chip has been used for the formation of silicone oil-in-water (O/W) droplets. The experimental results have been obtained by considering both pure deionized water and a mixture of deionized water and surfactant (Tween 20) as the continuous flow. The results shown in this paper highlight that the presence of surfactant, also in very small concentrations, is able to change drastically the flow patterns of the two-phase flow generated by the T-junction. Concentration in weight of Tween 20 between 1 and 2% in the continuous flow is able to promote highly monodispersed emulsions with low polydispersity, especially for low flow rate ratios between the dispersed and continuous phase flows. On the contrary, by avoiding the use of surfactant, a stratified flow is obtained. The experimental results obtained in this work have been used in order to link the depth ratio of the stratified flow and the non-dimensional length of the plugs in droplet-based flow to the flow rate ratio between the dispersed and continuous flows.

  7. MULTIPHASE DROPLET/SLUG BREAK-UP MECHANISM IN MICROFLUIDIC T-JUNCTIONS AT VARIOUS WEBER NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Leng (Dawn Leow

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-MY X-NONE X-NONE The formation of immiscible liquid droplets, or slugs, in microchannels features the advantages of volume control and mixing enhancement over single-phase microflows. Although the applications of droplet-based microfluidics have been widely demonstrated, the fundamental physics governing droplet break-up remains an area of active research. This study defines an effective Weber (Weeff number that characterizes the interplay of interfacial tension, shear stress and channel pressure drop in driving slug formation in T-junction microchannel for a relative range of low, intermediate and high flow rates. The immiscible fluid system in this study consists of Tetradecane slug formation in Acetonitrile. The progressive deformation of slug interfaces during break-up events is observed. Experimental results indicate that, at a relatively low Weeff, clean slug break-up occurs at the intersection of the side and main channels. At intermediate Weeff, the connecting neck of the dispersed phase is stretched to a short and thin trail of laminar flow prior to breaking up a short distance downstream of the T-junction. At a relatively high Weeff, the connecting neck develops into a longer and thicker trail of laminar flow that breaks up further downstream of the main channel.

  8. Electrostatic charging and control of droplets in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongbo; Yao, Shuhuai

    2013-03-07

    Precharged droplets can facilitate manipulation and control of low-volume liquids in droplet-based microfluidics. In this paper, we demonstrate non-contact electrostatic charging of droplets by polarizing a neutral droplet and splitting it into two oppositely charged daughter droplets in a T-junction microchannel. We performed numerical simulation to analyze the non-contact charging process and proposed a new design with a notch at the T-junction in aid of droplet splitting for more efficient charging. We experimentally characterized the induced charge in droplets in microfabricated devices. The experimental results agreed well with the simulation. Finally, we demonstrated highly effective droplet manipulation in a path selection unit appending to the droplet charging. We expect our work could enable precision manipulation of droplets for more complex liquid handling in microfluidics and promote electric-force based manipulation in 'lab-on-a-chip' systems.

  9. Charge Transfer into Aqueous Droplets via Kilovolt Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, B. S.; Rosenberg, E. R.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2012-11-01

    When an aqueous droplet immersed in an insulating oil contacts an electrified surface, the droplet acquires net charge. For sufficiently large field strengths, the charged droplet is driven back and forth electrophoretically between the electrodes, in essence ``bouncing'' between them. Although it is clear that the droplet acquires charge, the underlying mechanism controlling the charge transfer process has been unclear. Here we demonstrate that the chemical species present in the droplet strongly affect the charge transfer process into the drop. Using two independent charge measurement techniques, high speed video velocimetry and direct current measurement, we show that the charge acquired during contact is strongly influenced by the droplet pH. We also provide physical evidence that the electrodes undergo electroplating or corrosion for droplets with appropriate chemical species present. Together, the observations strongly suggest that electrochemical reactions govern the charge transfer process into the droplet.

  10. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenou, M.; Sa'ar, A.; Kotler, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets

  11. Supersonic laser-induced jetting of aluminum micro-droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenou, M. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel); Sa' ar, A. [Racah Institute of Physics and the Harvey M. Kruger Family Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 91904 Jerusalem (Israel); Kotler, Z. [Additive Manufacturing Lab, Orbotech Ltd., P.O. Box 215, 81101 Yavne (Israel)

    2015-05-04

    The droplet velocity and the incubation time of pure aluminum micro-droplets, printed using the method of sub-nanosecond laser induced forward transfer, have been measured indicating the formation of supersonic laser-induced jetting. The incubation time and the droplet velocity were extracted by measuring a transient electrical signal associated with droplet landing on the surface of the acceptor substrate. This technique has been exploited for studying small volume droplets, in the range of 10–100 femto-litters for which supersonic velocities were measured. The results suggest elastic propagation of the droplets across the donor-to-acceptor gap, a nonlinear deposition dynamics on the surface of the acceptor and overall efficient energy transfer from the laser beam to the droplets.

  12. A theory of burn-out in heated channels at low mass velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randles, J.

    1963-01-01

    At low coolant mass velocities the fraction by weight of vapour flowing out of heated channels can become extremely large (∼ 90%). Consequently, the dominating feature of burn-out at small flow rates is that it occurs at high vapour qualities. For such a high degree of evaporation, the induced turbulence is very strong and the liquid phase is dispersed into a spray of droplets. By the application of the first law of thermodynamics and some basic relationships of turbulence theory to this spray, it is shown how an expression for the critical heat flux can be derived. By comparing this expression with the data from burn-out measurements on uniformly heated channels, reasonably good agreement is obtained. It is demonstrated that eddy slip and channel geometry are extremely important in the determination of the level of turbulence in the droplet motion. Having thus established a reasonable degree of plausibility for the theory, it is applied to channels heated by a chopped cosine form of power distribution. The results indicate that the effect of the axial variation of the power on the burnout heat flux can be described in a simple manner. (author)

  13. Magnetic fluid droplet in a harmonic electric field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvasov, D., E-mail: kvasovdmitry@gmail.com [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Naletova, V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Beketova, E.; Dikanskii, Yu. [North-Caucasus Federal University, Stavropol (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    A magnetic fluid droplet immersed in oil in an applied harmonic electric field is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is shown that deformations of the droplet observed experimentally are not described by the well-known theory. New double-layer droplet model which describes experimental data well is proposed. - Highlights: • The magnetic fluid droplet in the oil in a harmonic electric field is studied. • The paradoxical flattening effect of the droplet is observed experimentally. • For explaining this effect the model of the double-layer droplet is proposed. • Numerical and experimental data coincide qualitatively and quantitatively.

  14. Biodegradation of dispersed Macondo crude oil by indigenous Gulf of Mexico microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jian; Sandoval, Kathia; Ding, Yan [Southeaest Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami Beach, FL 33181 (United States); Stoeckel, Donald; Minard-Smith, Angela [Battelle 505 King Ave, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Andersen, Gary; Dubinsky, Eric A. [Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Atlas, Ronald [Department of Biology, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40292 (United States); Gardinali, Piero, E-mail: gardinal@fiu.edu [Southeaest Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, North Miami Beach, FL 33181 (United States); Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Because of the extreme conditions of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) release (turbulent flow at 1500 m depth and 5 °C water temperature) and the sub-surface application of dispersant, small but neutrally buoyant oil droplets < 70 μm were formed, remained in the water column and were subjected to in-situ biodegradation processes. In order to investigate the biodegradation of Macondo oil components during the release, we designed and performed an experiment to evaluate the interactions of the indigenous microbial communities present in the deep waters of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) with oil droplets of two representative sizes (10 μm and 30 μm median volume diameter) created with Macondo source oil in the presence of Corexit 9500 using natural seawater collected at the depth of 1100–1300 m in the vicinity of the DWH wellhead. The evolution of the oil was followed in the dark and at 5 °C for 64 days by collecting sacrificial water samples at fixed intervals and analyzing them for a wide range of chemical and biological parameters including volatile components, saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, dispersant markers, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, microbial cell counts and microbial population dynamics. A one phase exponential decay from a plateau model was used to calculate degradation rates and lag times for more than 150 individual oil components. Calculations were normalized to a conserved petroleum biomarker (30αβ-hopane). Half-lives ranged from about 3 days for easily degradable compounds to about 60 days for higher molecular weight aromatics. Rapid degradation was observed for BTEX, 2–3 ring PAHs, and n-alkanes below n-C23. The results in this experimental study showed good agreement with the n-alkane (n-C13 to n-C26) half-lives (0.6–9.5 days) previously reported for the Deepwater Horizon plume samples and other laboratory studies with chemically dispersed Macondo oil conducted at low temperatures (< 8 °C). The responses of the microbial populations also

  15. Measurement of heat transfer effectiveness during collision of a Leidenfrost droplet with a heated wall - 15447

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.S.; Kim, H.; Bae, S.W.; Kim, K.D.

    2015-01-01

    Droplet-wall collision heat transfer during dispersed flow film boiling plays a role in predicting cooling rate and peak cladding temperature of overheated fuels during reflood following a LOCA accident in nuclear power plants. This study aims at experimentally studying effects of collision velocity and angle, as dynamic characteristics of the colliding droplet, on heat transfer. The experiments were performed by varying collision velocity from 0.2 to 1.5 m/s and collision angle between the droplet path and the wall in the range from 30 to 90 degrees under atmosphere condition. A single droplet was impinged on an infrared-opaque Pt film deposited on an infrared-transparent sapphire plate, which combination permits to measure temperature distribution of the collision surface using a high-speed infrared camera from below. The instantaneous local surface heat flux was obtained by solving transient heat conduction equation for the heated substrate using the measured surface temperature data as the boundary condition of the collision surface. Total heat transfer amount of a single droplet collision was calculated by integrating the local heat flux distribution on the effective heat transfer area during the collision time. The obtained results confirmed the finding from the previous studies that with increasing collision velocity, the heat transfer effectiveness increases due to the increase of the heat transfer area and the local heat flux value. Interestingly, it was found that as collision angle of a droplet with a constant collision velocity decreases from 90 to 50 degrees and thus the vertical velocity component of the collision decreases, the total heat transfer amount per a collision increases. It was observed that the droplet colliding with an angle less than 90 degrees slides on the surface during the collision and the resulting collision area is larger than that in the normal collision. On the other hand, further decrease of collision angle below 40 degrees

  16. Numerical study of dispersing pollutant clouds in a built-up environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bingchen; Yee, Eugene; Lien, F.-S.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study numerically the dispersion of a passive scalar released from an instantaneous point source in a built-up (urban) environment using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A nonlinear k-ε turbulence model [Speziale, C.G., 1987. On nonlinear k-l and k-ε models of turbulence. J. Fluid Mech., 178, 459-475] was used for the closure of the mean momentum equations. A tensor diffusivity model [Yoshizawa, A., 1985. Statistical analysis of the anisotropy of scalar diffusion in turbulent shear flows. Phys. Fluids, 28, 3226-3231] was used for closure of the scalar transport equations. The concentration variance was also calculated from its transport equation, for which new values of Yoshizawa's closure coefficients are used, in order to account for the instantaneous tracer release and the complex geometry. A new dissipation length-scale model, required for the modelling of the dissipation rate of concentration variance, is also proposed. The numerical results for the flow, the pollutant concentration and the concentration variance, are compared with experimental data. This data was obtained from a water-channel simulation of a full-scale field experiment of tracer dispersion through a large array of building-like obstacles known as the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST)

  17. Numerical study of dispersing pollutant clouds in a built-up environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Bingchen [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba, 75A Chancellors Circle, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 5V6 (Canada)], E-mail: bc_wang@umanitoba.ca; Yee, Eugene [Defence Research and Development Canada - Suffield, P.O. Box 4000, STN Main, Medicine Hat, AB, T1A 8K6 (Canada)], E-mail: eugene.yee@drdc-rddc.gc.ca; Lien, F.-S. [Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3G1 (Canada)], E-mail: fslien@mecheng1.uwaterloo.ca

    2009-02-15

    In this paper, we study numerically the dispersion of a passive scalar released from an instantaneous point source in a built-up (urban) environment using a Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes method. A nonlinear k-{epsilon} turbulence model [Speziale, C.G., 1987. On nonlinear k-l and k-{epsilon} models of turbulence. J. Fluid Mech., 178, 459-475] was used for the closure of the mean momentum equations. A tensor diffusivity model [Yoshizawa, A., 1985. Statistical analysis of the anisotropy of scalar diffusion in turbulent shear flows. Phys. Fluids, 28, 3226-3231] was used for closure of the scalar transport equations. The concentration variance was also calculated from its transport equation, for which new values of Yoshizawa's closure coefficients are used, in order to account for the instantaneous tracer release and the complex geometry. A new dissipation length-scale model, required for the modelling of the dissipation rate of concentration variance, is also proposed. The numerical results for the flow, the pollutant concentration and the concentration variance, are compared with experimental data. This data was obtained from a water-channel simulation of a full-scale field experiment of tracer dispersion through a large array of building-like obstacles known as the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST)

  18. Oleoplaning droplets on lubricated surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dan; Timonen, Jaakko V. I.; Li, Ruoping; Velling, Seneca J.; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2017-10-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in using lubricated surfaces to achieve extreme liquid repellency: a foreign droplet immiscible with the underlying lubricant layer was shown to slide off at a small tilt angle behaviour was hypothesized to arise from a thin lubricant overlayer film sandwiched between the droplet and solid substrate, but this has not been observed experimentally. Here, using thin-film interference, we are able to visualize the intercalated film under both static and dynamic conditions. We further demonstrate that for a moving droplet, the film thickness follows the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin law. The droplet is therefore oleoplaning--akin to tyres hydroplaning on a wet road--with minimal dissipative force and no contact line pinning. The techniques and insights presented in this study will inform future work on the fundamentals of wetting for lubricated surfaces and enable their rational design.

  19. Multiphase Flow Dynamics 4 Turbulence, Gas Adsorption and Release, Diesel Fuel Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov

    2012-01-01

    The present Volume 4 of the successful monograh package “Multiphase Flow Dynamics”is devoted to selected Chapters of the multiphase fluid dynamics that are important for practical applications but did not find place in the previous volumes. The state of the art of the turbulence modeling in multiphase flows is presented. As introduction, some basics of the single phase boundary layer theory including some important scales and flow oscillation characteristics in pipes and rod bundles are presented. Then the scales characterizing the dispersed flow systems are presented. The description of the turbulence is provided at different level of complexity: simple algebraic models for eddy viscosity, simple algebraic models based on the Boussinesq hypothesis, modification of the boundary layer share due to modification of the bulk turbulence, modification of the boundary layer share due to nucleate boiling. The role of the following forces on the mathematical description of turbulent flows is discussed: the lift fo...

  20. Validation of a two-dimensional pollutant dispersion model in an isolated street canyon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, T.L.; Dong, G.; Leung, C.W.; Cheung, C.S. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Research Centre for Combustion and Pollution Control, Department of Mechanical Engineering; Hung, W.T. [The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon (Hong Kong). Department of Civil and Structural Engineering

    2002-07-01

    A two-dimensional numerical model based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a series of standard, Renormalization Group (RNG) and realizable k-{epsilon} turbulence models was developed to simulate the fluid-flow development and pollutant dispersion within an isolated street canyon using the FLUENT code. In the present study, the validation of the numerical model was evaluated using an extensive experimental database obtained from the atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel at the Meteorological Institute of Hamburg University, Germany (J. Wind Eng. Ind. Aerodyn. 62 (1996) 37). Among the studied turbulence models, the RNG k-{epsilon} turbulence model was found to be the most optimum turbulence model coupled with the two-dimensional street canyon model developed in the present study. Both the calculated and measured dimensionless pollutant concentrations have been shown to be less dependent on the variation of wind speed and source strength conditions for the studied street canyon aspect ratio of the B/H=1 case. However, the street canyon configuration has significant influence on the pollutant dispersion. The wider street and lower height of the buildings are favorable to pollutant dilution within the street canyon. The fluid-flow development has demonstrated that the rotative vortex or vortices generated within the urban street canyon can transport the pollutants from a line source to the wall surfaces of the buildings. (author)

  1. Simulation of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides using an Eulerian-Lagrangian modelling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Abdul; Espinosa, Francisco; Avila, Ruben; Raza, S; Irfan, N

    2008-12-01

    In this paper we present an atmospheric dispersion scenario for a proposed nuclear power plant in Pakistan involving the hypothetical accidental release of radionuclides. For this, a concept involving a Lagrangian stochastic particle model (LSPM) coupled with an Eulerian regional atmospheric modelling system (RAMS) is used. The atmospheric turbulent dispersion of radionuclides (represented by non-buoyant particles/neutral traces) in the LSPM is modelled by applying non-homogeneous turbulence conditions. The mean wind velocities governed by the topography of the region and the surface fluxes of momentum and heat are calculated by the RAMS code. A moving least squares (MLS) technique is introduced to calculate the concentration of radionuclides at ground level. The numerically calculated vertical profiles of wind velocity and temperature are compared with observed data. The results obtained demonstrate that in regions of complex terrain it is not sufficient to model the atmospheric dispersion of particles using a straight-line Gaussian plume model, and that by utilising a Lagrangian stochastic particle model and regional atmospheric modelling system a much more realistic estimation of the dispersion in such a hypothetical scenario was ascertained. The particle dispersion results for a 12 h ground release show that a triangular area of about 400 km(2) situated in the north-west quadrant of release is under radiological threat. The particle distribution shows that the use of a Gaussian plume model (GPM) in such situations will yield quite misleading results.

  2. Lipidomic and proteomic analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans lipid droplets and identification of ACS-4 as a lipid droplet-associated protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrablik, Tracy L. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Petyuk, Vladislav A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larson, Emily M. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Watts, Jennifer [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2015-06-27

    Lipid droplets are cytoplasmic organelles that store neutral lipids for membrane synthesis and energy reserves. In this study, we characterized the lipid and protein composition of purified C. elegans lipid droplets. These lipid droplets are composed mainly of triacylglycerols, surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer composed primarily of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. The fatty acid composition of the triacylglycerols was rich in fatty acid species obtained from the dietary E. coli, including cyclopropane fatty acids and cis-vaccenic acid. Unlike other organisms, C. elegans lipid droplets contain very little cholesterol or cholesterol esters. Comparison of the lipid droplet proteomes of wild type and high-fat daf-2 mutant strains shows a relative decrease of MDT-28 abundance in lipid droplets isolated from daf-2 mutants. Functional analysis of lipid droplet proteins identified in our proteomic studies indicated an enrichment of proteins required for growth and fat homeostasis in C. elegans.

  3. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  4. Transient Droplet Behavior and Droplet Breakup during Bulk and Confined Shear Flow in Blends with One Viscoelastic Component: Experiments, Modelling and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinaels, Ruth; Verhulst, Kristof; Renardy, Yuriko; Moldenaers, Paula

    2008-07-01

    The transient droplet deformation and droplet orientation after inception of shear, the shape relaxation after cessation of shear and droplet breakup during shear, are microscopically studied, both under bulk and confined conditions. The studied blends contain one viscoelastic Boger fluid phase. A counter rotating setup, based on a Paar Physica MCR300, is used for the droplet visualisation. For bulk shear flow, it is shown that the droplet deformation during startup of shear flow and the shape relaxation after cessation of shear flow are hardly influenced by droplet viscoelasticity, even at moderate to high capillary and Deborah numbers. The effects of droplet viscoelasticity only become visible close to the critical conditions and a novel break-up mechanism is observed. Matrix viscoelasticity has a more pronounced effect, causing overshoots in the deformation and significantly inhibiting relaxation. However, different applied capillary numbers prior to cessation of shear flow, with the Deborah number fixed, still result in a single master curve for shape retraction, as in fully Newtonian systems. The long tail in the droplet relaxation can be qualitatively described with a phenomenological model for droplet deformation, when using a 5-mode Giesekus model for the fluid rheology. It is found that the shear flow history significantly affects the droplet shape evolution and the breakup process in blends with one viscoelastic component. Confining a droplet between two plates accelerates the droplet deformation kinetics, similar to fully Newtonian systems. However, the increased droplet deformation, due to wall effects, causes the steady state to be reached at a later instant in time. Droplet relaxation is less sensitive to confinement, leading to slower relaxation kinetics only for highly confined droplets. For the blend with a viscoelastic droplet, a non-monotonous trend is found for the critical capillary number as a function of the confinement ratio. Finally

  5. Transient Droplet Behavior and Droplet Breakup during Bulk and Confined Shear Flow in Blends with One Viscoelastic Component: Experiments, Modelling and Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinaels, Ruth; Verhulst, Kristof; Moldenaers, Paula; Renardy, Yuriko

    2008-01-01

    The transient droplet deformation and droplet orientation after inception of shear, the shape relaxation after cessation of shear and droplet breakup during shear, are microscopically studied, both under bulk and confined conditions. The studied blends contain one viscoelastic Boger fluid phase. A counter rotating setup, based on a Paar Physica MCR300, is used for the droplet visualisation. For bulk shear flow, it is shown that the droplet deformation during startup of shear flow and the shape relaxation after cessation of shear flow are hardly influenced by droplet viscoelasticity, even at moderate to high capillary and Deborah numbers. The effects of droplet viscoelasticity only become visible close to the critical conditions and a novel break-up mechanism is observed. Matrix viscoelasticity has a more pronounced effect, causing overshoots in the deformation and significantly inhibiting relaxation. However, different applied capillary numbers prior to cessation of shear flow, with the Deborah number fixed, still result in a single master curve for shape retraction, as in fully Newtonian systems. The long tail in the droplet relaxation can be qualitatively described with a phenomenological model for droplet deformation, when using a 5-mode Giesekus model for the fluid rheology. It is found that the shear flow history significantly affects the droplet shape evolution and the breakup process in blends with one viscoelastic component. Confining a droplet between two plates accelerates the droplet deformation kinetics, similar to fully Newtonian systems. However, the increased droplet deformation, due to wall effects, causes the steady state to be reached at a later instant in time. Droplet relaxation is less sensitive to confinement, leading to slower relaxation kinetics only for highly confined droplets. For the blend with a viscoelastic droplet, a non-monotonous trend is found for the critical capillary number as a function of the confinement ratio. Finally

  6. Contribution to the study of the behaviour of solid particles in a confined turbulent flow using direct numerical simulation; Contribution a l'etude du comportement de particules solides en ecoulement turbulent confine par simulation numerique directe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambaud, P.

    2001-11-01

    The theme of this numerical thesis is on the behavior of solid particles embedded in a non-homogeneous and non-isotropic turbulent gas flow as the one tacking place in a plane channel. The turbulence is generated through the direct numerical simulation of Navier-Stokes equations discretized by formally second order in time and space finite difference operators. This Eulerian vision of the incompressible gas flow is completed by a Lagrangian formulation allowing to follow solid particles. In this formulation, the considered forces are the non-linear drag and the Saffman lift both corrected for wall effects. Furthermore, depending on the test cases studied, particle bouncing forces on the wall, gravity or electrostatic forces are taken into account. A three-dimensional Hermitian interpolation highlight the special care spend on the determination of the fluid velocity at the solid particle location. The first code application is dedicated to solid particles dispersion inside an horizontal channel, or in a channel operated in a weightlessness state. The huge amount of data from the Lagrangian tracking is reduced to the integral times of the turbulence seen by the solid particles on their trajectories. Those times are crucial in Lagrangian methods associated with a low numerical cost compared with the ones used in the present study. Among those methods, the one based on Langevin type equations have the best potential to handle industrial type problems. Nevertheless, this method needs to rebuild the fluid velocity fluctuations seen by the solid particles on their trajectories. This technic is able to reproduce the crossing trajectory effect, the inertial effect and the continuity effect, only if the integral times of the turbulence seen are known. Till now, those times were known thanks to a semi-empirical correlation from direct numerical simulation in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence (Wang and Stock 1993). However, although these conditions, this correlation was

  7. Development of an imaging system for single droplet characterization using a droplet generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minov, S Vulgarakis; Cointault, F; Vangeyte, J; Pieters, J G; Hijazi, B; Nuyttens, D

    2012-01-01

    The spray droplets generated by agricultural nozzles play an important role in the application accuracy and efficiency of plant protection products. The limitations of the non-imaging techniques and the recent improvements in digital image acquisition and processing increased the interest in using high speed imaging techniques in pesticide spray characterisation. The goal of this study was to develop an imaging technique to evaluate the characteristics of a single spray droplet using a piezoelectric single droplet generator and a high speed imaging technique. Tests were done with different camera settings, lenses, diffusers and light sources. The experiments have shown the necessity for having a good image acquisition and processing system. Image analysis results contributed in selecting the optimal set-up for measuring droplet size and velocity which consisted of a high speed camera with a 6 micros exposure time, a microscope lens at a working distance of 43 cm resulting in a field of view of 1.0 cm x 0.8 cm and a Xenon light source without diffuser used as a backlight. For measuring macro-spray characteristics as the droplet trajectory, the spray angle and the spray shape, a Macro Video Zoom lens at a working distance of 14.3 cm with a bigger field of view of 7.5 cm x 9.5 cm in combination with a halogen spotlight with a diffuser and the high speed camera can be used.

  8. Phase rainbow refractometry for accurate droplet variation characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingchun; Promvongsa, Jantarat; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Chen, Jia; Gréhan, Gérard

    2016-10-15

    We developed a one-dimensional phase rainbow refractometer for the accurate trans-dimensional measurements of droplet size on the micrometer scale as well as the tiny droplet diameter variations at the nanoscale. The dependence of the phase shift of the rainbow ripple structures on the droplet variations is revealed. The phase-shifting rainbow image is recorded by a telecentric one-dimensional rainbow imaging system. Experiments on the evaporating monodispersed droplet stream show that the phase rainbow refractometer can measure the tiny droplet diameter changes down to tens of nanometers. This one-dimensional phase rainbow refractometer is capable of measuring the droplet refractive index and diameter, as well as variations.

  9. Rayleigh-Bénard turbulence modified by two-way coupled inertial, nonisothermal particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyungwon John; O'Keefe, Kevin; Richter, David H.

    2018-03-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) combined with the Lagrangian point particle model is used to study Rayleigh-Bénard convection in order to understand modifications due to the interaction of inertial, nonisothermal particles with buoyancy-driven turbulence. In this system, turbulence can be altered through direct momentum coupling, as well as through buoyancy modification via thermal coupling between phases. We quantify the effect of the dispersed phase by changes to the total integrated turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) and Nusselt number (Nu). The dispersed particles experience gravitational settling and are introduced at the lower wall so that turbulence must overcome the settling velocity for the particles to vertically distribute throughout the domain. We focus primarily on particle inertia, settling velocity, mass fraction, and the ratio of the particle to fluid specific heat. Furthermore, individual contributions by the momentum coupling and thermal coupling are studied to see which most significantly changes Nu and TKE. Our results show that particles with Stokes number of order unity maximize Nu, corresponding to a peak of clustering and attenuation of TKE. Increased mass fractions lead to a linear increase of Nu and decrease of TKE. With varying specific heat ratio, Nu and TKE exhibit monotonic behaviors, where in the high limit particles become isothermal and depend upon the initialized particle temperature. It is also shown that particles two-way coupled only through momentum attenuate Nu and weaken TKE, while thermal-only coupling also weakens TKE but enhances Nu. When both couplings are present, however, thermal coupling overwhelms the momentum coupling attenuation, and the net result is an enhancement of Nu.

  10. Study and modeling of the dispersed phase behavior in a pulsed column: application to an oxalic precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amokrane, Abdenour

    2014-01-01

    The thesis focuses on the study and modeling of a pulsed column used in liquid-liquid extraction operations in the nuclear industry and which is otherwise considered for continuous precipitation operations in emulsion. Modeling the behavior of the dispersed phase in the column is undertaken in this manuscript. First, we began by modeling the continuous phase mean velocity and turbulence fields, which are responsible for transport, breakage and coalescence of the drops. The model developed, validated by PIV measurements, predicts turbulence in a satisfying way. Modeling the residence time distribution (RTD) of the drops by a Lagrangian approach is then achieved. This model is validated on measurements taken by a shadow-graph technique. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones. To model the droplet size distributions (DSD) in the column, we used the population balance equations (PBE) that we have coupled with the computational fluid dynamics equations (CFD). A continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with an optical sensor is used, at first, to acquire the DSD representative of our liquid-liquid system. Through a 0D modeling of the flow in the CSTR, and solving the inverse problem, we have determined the breakage and coalescence kernels relevant for our system, to be used in the PBE. These kernels were then used to predict the DSD in the pulsed column by a coupled CFD-PBE model based on the QMOM method. Finally, a validation of the coupled CFD-PBE model is made from DSD in good agreement with the experimental data both qualitatively and quantitatively. The validated model is then used to study the emulsion sensitivity to the column operating conditions. (author) [fr

  11. Spray Droplet Characterization from a Single Nozzle by High Speed Image Analysis Using an In-Focus Droplet Criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minov, Sofija Vulgarakis; Cointault, Frédéric; Vangeyte, Jürgen; Pieters, Jan G; Nuyttens, David

    2016-02-06

    Accurate spray characterization helps to better understand the pesticide spray application process. The goal of this research was to present the proof of principle of a droplet size and velocity measuring technique for different types of hydraulic spray nozzles using a high speed backlight image acquisition and analysis system. As only part of the drops of an agricultural spray can be in focus at any given moment, an in-focus criterion based on the gray level gradient was proposed to decide whether a given droplet is in focus or not. In a first experiment, differently sized droplets were generated with a piezoelectric generator and studied to establish the relationship between size and in-focus characteristics. In a second experiment, it was demonstrated that droplet sizes and velocities from a real sprayer could be measured reliably in a non-intrusive way using the newly developed image acquisition set-up and image processing. Measured droplet sizes ranged from 24 μm to 543 μm, depending on the nozzle type and size. Droplet velocities ranged from around 0.5 m/s to 12 m/s. The droplet size and velocity results were compared and related well with the results obtained with a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA).

  12. Freezing of Water Droplet due to Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Isao; Fushinobu, Kazuyoshi; Hashimoto, Yu

    In this study, the feasibility of cooling/freezing of phase change.. materials(PCMs) due to evaporation for cold storage systems was experimentally examined. A pure water was used as the test PCM, since the latent heat due to evaporation of water is about 7 times larger than that due to freezing. A water droplet, the diameter of which was 1-4 mm, was suspended in a test cell by a fine metal wire (O. D.= 100μm),and the cell was suddenly evacuated up to the pressure lower than the triple-point pressure of water, so as to enhance the evaporation from the water surface. Temperature of the droplet was measured by a thermocouple, and the cooling/freezing behavior and the temperature profile of the droplet surface were captured by using a video camera and an IR thermo-camera, respectively. The obtained results showed that the water droplet in the evacuated cell is effectively cooled by the evaporation of water itself, and is frozen within a few seconds through remarkable supercooling state. When the initial temperature of the droplet is slightly higher than the room temperature, boiling phenomena occur in the droplet simultaneously with the freezing due to evaporation. Under such conditions, it was shown that the degree of supercooling of the droplet is reduced by the bubbles generated in the droplet.

  13. Kinematic and dynamic pair collision statistics of sedimenting inertial particles relevant to warm rain initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Bogdan; Parishani, Hossein; Ayala, Orlando; Wang, Lian-Ping; Grabowski, Wojciech W

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach has become a reliable tool for studying turbulent collision-coalescence of cloud droplets relevant to warm rain development. It has been shown that small-scale turbulent motion can enhance the collision rate of droplets by either enhancing the relative velocity and collision efficiency or by inertia-induced droplet clustering. A hybrid DNS approach incorporating DNS of air turbulence, disturbance flows due to droplets, and droplet equation of motion has been developed to quantify these effects of air turbulence. Due to the computational complexity of the approach, a major challenge is to increase the range of scales or size of the computation domain so that all scales affecting droplet pair statistics are simulated. Here we discuss our on-going work in this direction by improving the parallel scalability of the code, and by studying the effect of large-scale forcing on pair statistics relevant to turbulent collision. New results at higher grid resolutions show a saturation of pair and collision statistics with increasing flow Reynolds number, for given Kolmogorov scales and small droplet sizes. Furthermore, we examine the orientation dependence of pair statistics which reflects an interesting coupling of gravity and <