WorldWideScience

Sample records for turbine disk cooling

  1. Comparison of central axis and jet ring coolant supply for turbine disk cooling on a SSME-HPOTP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. W.; Metzger, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The test facility, test methods and results are presented for an experimental study modeling the cooling of turbine disks in the blade attachment regions with multiple impinging jets, in a configuration simulating the disk cooling method employed on the Space Shuttle Main Engine oxygen turbopump. The study's objective was to provide a comparison of detailed local convection heat transfer rates obtained for a single center-supply of disk coolant with those obtained with the present flight configuration where disk coolant is supplied through an array of 19 jets located near the disk outer radius. Specially constructed disk models were used in a program designed to evaluate possible benefits and identify any possible detrimental effects involved in employing an alternate disk cooling scheme. The study involved the design, construction and testing of two full scale rotating model disks, one plane and smooth for baseline testing and the second contoured to the present flight configuration, together with the corresponding plane and contoured stator disks. Local heat transfer rates are determined from the color display of encapsulated liquid crystals coated on the disk in conjunction with use of a computer vision system. The test program was composed of a wide variety of disk speeds, flowrates, and geometrical configurations, including testing for the effects of disk boltheads and gas ingestion from the gas path region radially outboard of the disk-cavity.

  2. Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Injestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines featuring high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. A designer is concerned about the level of stresses in the turbine rotor disk and its durability, both of which are affected significantly by the disk temperature distribution. This distribution also plays a major role in the radial position of the blade tip and thus, in establishing the clearance between the tip and the shroud. To counteract mainstream gas ingestion as well as to cool the rotor and the stator disks, it is necessary to inject cooling air (bled from the compressor discharge) into the wheel space. Since this bleeding of compressor air imposes a penalty on the engine cycle performance, the designers of disk cavity cooling and sealing systems need to accomplish these tasks with the minimum possible amount of bleed air without risking disk failure. This requires detailed knowledge of the flow characteristics and convective heat transfer in the cavity. The flow in the wheel space between the rotor and stator disks is quite complex. It is usually turbulent and contains recirculation regions. Instabilities such as vortices oscillating in space have been observed in the flow. It becomes necessary to obtain both a qualitative understanding of the general pattern of the fluid motion as well as a quantitative map of the velocity and pressure fields.

  3. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  4. Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

    2014-09-23

    An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

  5. Thermodynamic analysis of turbine blade cooling on the performance of gas turbine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarabchi, K.; Shokri, M.

    2002-01-01

    Turbine inlet temperature strongly affects gas turbine performance. Today blade cooling technologies facilitate the use of higher inlet temperatures. Of course blade cooling causes some thermodynamic penalties that destroys to some extent the positive effect of higher inlet temperatures. This research aims to model and evaluate the performance of gas turbine cycle with air cooled turbine. In this study internal and transpiration cooling methods has been investigated and the penalties as the result of gas flow friction, cooling air throttling, mixing of cooling air flow with hot gas flow, and irreversible heat transfer have been considered. In addition, it is attempted to consider any factor influencing actual conditions of system in the analysis. It is concluded that penalties due to blade cooling decrease as permissible temperature of the blade surface increases. Also it is observed that transpiration method leads to better performance of gas turbine comparing to internal cooling method

  6. Heating and cooling processes in disks*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woitke Peter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter summarises current theoretical concepts and methods to determine the gas temperature structure in protoplanetary disks by balancing all relevant heating and cooling rates. The processes considered are non-LTE line heating/cooling based on the escape probability method, photo-ionisation heating and recombination cooling, free-free heating/cooling, dust thermal accommodation and high-energy heating processes such as X-ray and cosmic ray heating, dust photoelectric and PAH heating, a number of particular follow-up heating processes starting with the UV excitation of H2, and the release of binding energy in exothermal reactions. The resulting thermal structure of protoplanetary disks is described and discussed.

  7. A plastic stress intensity factor approach to turbine disk structural integrity assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyannikov

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study based on a new fracture mechanics parameter is concerned with assessing the integrity of cracked steam turbine disk which operate under startup-shutdown cyclic loading conditions. Damage accumulation and growth in service have occurred on the inner surface of slot fillet of key. In order to determine elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameters full-size stress-strain state analysis of turbine disk was performed for a quote-elliptical part-through cracks under considering loading conditions. As a result distributions of elastic and plastic stress intensity factors along crack front in slot fillet of key of turbine disk depending on surface crack form are defined. An engineering approach to the prediction of carrying capacity of cracked turbine disk which is sensitive to the loading history at maintenance is proposed. The predictions of the rate of crack growth and residual lifetime of steam turbine disk are compared for elastic and elastic-plastic solutions. It is shown that the previously proposed elastic crack growth models provide overestimate the lifetime with respect to the present one. An advantage to use the plastic stress intensity factor to characterize the fracture resistance as the self-dependent unified parameter for a variety of turbine disk configurations rather than the magnitude of the elastic stress intensity factors alone is discussed.

  8. Dynamic behaviour of pump-turbine runner: From disk to prototype runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X X; Egusquiza, E; Valero, C; Presas, A

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, in order to increase output power of hydroelectric turbomachinery, the design head and the flow rate of the hydraulic turbines have been increased greatly. This has led to serious vibratory problems. The pump-turbines have to work at various operation conditions to satisfy the requirements of the power grid. However, larger hydraulic forces will result in high vibration levels on the turbines, especially, when the machines operate at off-design conditions. Due to the economic considerations, the pump-turbines are built as light as possible, which will change the dynamic response of the structures. According to industrial cases, the fatigue damage of the pump-turbine runner induced by hydraulic dynamic forces usually happens on the outer edge of the crown, which is near the leading edges of blades. To better understand the reasons for this kind of fatigue, it is extremely important to investigate the dynamic response behaviour of the hydraulic turbine, especially the runner, by experimental measurement and numerical simulation. The pump-turbine runner has a similar dynamic response behaviour of the circular disk. Therefore, in this paper the dynamic response analyses for circular disks with different dimensions and disk-blades-disk structures were carried out to better understand the fundamental dynamic behaviour for the complex turbomachinery. The influences of the pattern and number of blades were discussed in detail

  9. Experimental investigation of turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, W. A.; Johnson, B. V.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of turbine disk cavity aerodynamics and heat transfer was conducted to provide an experimental data base that can guide the aerodynamic and thermal design of turbine disks and blade attachments for flow conditions and geometries simulating those of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopump drive turbines. Experiments were conducted to define the nature of the aerodynamics and heat transfer of the flow within the disk cavities and blade attachments of a large scale model simulating the SSME turbopump drive turbines. These experiments include flow between the main gas path and the disk cavities, flow within the disk cavities, and leakage flows through the blade attachments and labyrinth seals. Air was used to simulate the combustion products in the gas path. Air and carbon dioxide were used to simulate the coolants injected at three locations in the disk cavities. Trace amounts of carbon dioxide were used to determine the source of the gas at selected locations on the rotors, the cavity walls, and the interstage seal. The measurements on the rotor and stationary walls in the forward and aft cavities showed that the coolant effectiveness was 90 percent or greater when the coolant flow rate was greater than the local free disk entrainment flow rate and when room temperature air was used as both coolant and gas path fluid. When a coolant-to-gas-path density ratio of 1.51 was used in the aft cavity, the coolant effectiveness on the rotor was also 90 percent or greater at the aforementioned condition. However, the coolant concentration on the stationary wall was 60 to 80 percent at the aforementioned condition indicating a more rapid mixing of the coolant and flow through the rotor shank passages. This increased mixing rate was attributed to the destabilizing effects of the adverse density gradients.

  10. Numerical simulations with a FSI-calibrated actuator disk model of wind turbines operating in stratified ABLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohari, S. M. Iman; Sarkar, Sutanu; Korobenko, Artem; Bazilevs, Yuri

    2017-11-01

    Numerical simulations of wind turbines operating under different regimes of stability are performed using LES. A reduced model, based on the generalized actuator disk model (ADM), is implemented to represent the wind turbines within the ABL. Data from the fluid-solid interaction (FSI) simulations of wind turbines have been used to calibrate and validate the reduced model. The computational cost of this method to include wind turbines is affordable and incurs an overhead as low as 1.45%. Using this reduced model, we study the coupling of unsteady turbulent flow with the wind turbine under different ABL conditions: (i) A neutral ABL with zero heat-flux and inversion layer at 350m, in which the incoming wind has the maximum mean shear between the heights of upper-tip and lower-tip; (2) A shallow ABL with surface cooling rate of -1 K/hr wherein the low level jet occurs at the wind turbine hub height. We will discuss how the differences in the unsteady flow between the two ABL regimes impact the wind turbine performance.

  11. Development of drag disk and turbines at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodrich, L.D.; Edson, J.L.; Averill, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    One of the parameters that must be measured in nuclear safety research is mass flow rate. The reactor environment associated with two-phase flow makes this measurement difficult. To accomplish this at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, a drag disk and turbine transducer conbination was developed. These transducers can withstand >2000 h of continuous operation in the reactor environment. Mechanical problems have been solved with these transducers to the point where the electrical coils are now the limiting factor on lifetime. This paper presents the results of the development of the drag disk and turbine with problems and solutions pointed out

  12. Cooling of gas turbines IX : cooling effects from use of ceramic coatings on water-cooled turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, W Byron; Livingood, John N B

    1948-01-01

    The hottest part of a turbine blade is likely to be the trailing portion. When the blades are cooled and when water is used as the coolant, the cooling passages are placed as close as possible to the trailing edge in order to cool this portion. In some cases, however, the trailing portion of the blade is so narrow, for aerodynamic reasons, that water passages cannot be located very near the trailing edge. Because ceramic coatings offer the possibility of protection for the trailing part of such narrow blades, a theoretical study has been made of the cooling effect of a ceramic coating on: (1) the blade-metal temperature when the gas temperature is unchanged, and (2) the gas temperature when the metal temperature is unchanged. Comparison is also made between the changes in the blade or gas temperatures produced by ceramic coatings and the changes produced by moving the cooling passages nearer the trailing edge. This comparison was made to provide a standard for evaluating the gains obtainable with ceramic coatings as compared to those obtainable by constructing the turbine blade in such a manner that water passages could be located very near the trailing edge.

  13. Turbine airfoil with ambient cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jr, Christian X.; Marra, John J.; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-06-07

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one ambient air cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels configured to receive ambient air at about atmospheric pressure. The ambient air cooling system may have a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of at least 0.5, and in at least one embodiment, may include a tip static pressure to ambient pressure ratio of between about 0.5 and about 3.0. The cooling system may also be configured such that an under root slot chamber in the root is large to minimize supply air velocity. One or more cooling channels of the ambient air cooling system may terminate at an outlet at the tip such that the outlet is aligned with inner surfaces forming the at least one cooling channel in the airfoil to facilitate high mass flow.

  14. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  15. Compatibility of gas turbine materials with steam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, V.; Tamboli, D.; Patel, Y. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines had been traditionally used for peak load plants and remote locations as they offer advantage of low installation costs and quick start up time. Their use as a base load generator had not been feasible owing to their poor efficiency. However, with the advent of gas turbines based combined cycle plants (CCPs), continued advances in efficiency are being made. Coupled with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions, coal compatibility and higher unit output, gas turbines are now competing with conventional power plants for base load power generation. Currently, the turbines are designed with TIT of 2300{degrees}F and metal temperatures are maintained around 1700{degrees}F by using air cooling. New higher efficiency ATS turbines will have TIT as high as 2700{degrees}F. To withstand this high temperature improved materials, coatings, and advances in cooling system and design are warranted. Development of advanced materials with better capabilities specifically for land base applications are time consuming and may not be available by ATS time frame or may prove costly for the first generation ATS gas turbines. Therefore improvement in the cooling system of hot components, which can take place in a relatively shorter time frame, is important. One way to improve cooling efficiency is to use better cooling agent. Steam as an alternate cooling agent offers attractive advantages because of its higher specific heat (almost twice that of air) and lower viscosity.

  16. Ultrasonic inspection method and system for detection of steeple cracking in turbine disk rims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birring, A.S.; Lamping, G.A.; Van der Veer, W.R.; Hanley, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    Steam turbine disks which operate under high cyclic stress in a moist environment can develop cracks in the disk-rim steeples. Detection of these cracks using nondestructive testing methods is necessary to assure safe operation and avoid unnecessary disk replacement. Both magnetic particle (MT) and ultrasonic testing (UT) can be used to inspect the steeples; however, UT can be used without removing the blades. A system for inspecting bladed steeples has been developed that can be applied on a range of disks including those in Westinghouse, General Electric, and Allis Chalmers turbines. The system performs an inspection as the turbine is rotated at slow speeds over turning rolls. This procedure greatly reduces inspection time because the inspection can be done without deblading the disk or resetting the inspection equipment for different rim segments

  17. Preliminary study of Friction disk type turbine for S-CO_2 cycle application (2016 Autumn Meeting of the KNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Seungjoon; Heo, Jin Young; Kwon, Jinsu; Lee, Jeong Ik

    2016-01-01

    Among the next generation reactors, a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) with the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO_2) Brayton cycle has been suggested as the advanced energy solution. The S-CO_2 power conversion system can achieve high efficiency with the SFR core thermal condition (450-550℃) and also can reduce the total cycle footprint due to high density of the working fluid. Moreover, the S-CO_2 power cycle can reduce the accident consequence compared to the steam Rankine cycle due to the mild sodium-CO_2 interaction. The S-CO_2 power cycle has different characteristic compare to the conventional steam Rankine cycle or gas Brayton cycle. For the turbine section, the expansion ratio is much smaller than the other cycles. Thus, different type of turbine should be evaluated for the advanced S-CO_2 technology and the KAIST research team considered a friction disk type turbine (Tesla turbine) concept for the S-CO_2 cycle applications. In this paper, the test result and analysis of a lab-scale Tesla turbine in the KAIST S-CO_2 experimental facility (S-CO_2PE) are briefly discussed. The KAIST research team investigated a friction disk type turbine, named as Tesla turbine, for the S-CO_2 power cycle applications. The preliminary test of a lab-scale Tesla turbine was conducted with compressed air. The generator, nozzle angle and bearing performances are tested. With the best performing nozzle angle and bearing, the Tesla turbine was tested under various S-CO_2 conditions. As a result, the S-CO_2PE facility generated electricity (0.5-5W). The isentropic efficiency was relatively low (0.8-1.3%). It seemed that, the authors need further study to understand the main mechanism and maximize the efficiency. After developing the design methodology, the design optimization will be conducted to show the applicability of the friction disk type turbine for the S-CO_2 power cycle

  18. Real-Time Closed Loop Modulated Turbine Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vikram; Culley, Dennis E.; Eldridge, Jeffrey; Jones, Scott; Woike, Mark; Cuy, Michael

    2014-01-01

    It has been noted by industry that in addition to dramatic variations of temperature over a given blade surface, blade-to-blade variations also exist despite identical design. These variations result from manufacturing variations, uneven wear and deposition over the life of the part as well as limitations in the uniformity of coolant distribution in the baseline cooling design. It is proposed to combine recent advances in optical sensing, actuation, and film cooling concepts to develop a workable active, closed-loop modulated turbine cooling system to improve by 10 to 20 the turbine thermal state over the flight mission, to improve engine life and to dramatically reduce turbine cooling air usage and aircraft fuel burn. A reduction in oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can also be achieved by using the excess coolant to improve mixing in the combustor especially for rotorcraft engines. Recent patents filed by industry and universities relate to modulating endwall cooling using valves. These schemes are complex, add weight and are limited to the endwalls. The novelty of the proposed approach is twofold 1) Fluidic diverters that have no moving parts are used to modulate cooling and can operate under a wide range of conditions and environments. 2) Real-time optical sensing to map the thermal state of the turbine has never been attempted in realistic engine conditions.

  19. Probabilistic Sensitivities for Fatigue Analysis of Turbine Engine Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry R. Millwater

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodology is developed and applied that determines the sensitivities of the probability-of-fracture of a gas turbine disk fatigue analysis with respect to the parameters of the probability distributions describing the random variables. The disk material is subject to initial anomalies, in either low- or high-frequency quantities, such that commonly used materials (titanium, nickel, powder nickel and common damage mechanisms (inherent defects or surface damage can be considered. The derivation is developed for Monte Carlo sampling such that the existing failure samples are used and the sensitivities are obtained with minimal additional computational time. Variance estimates and confidence bounds of the sensitivity estimates are developed. The methodology is demonstrated and verified using a multizone probabilistic fatigue analysis of a gas turbine compressor disk analysis considering stress scatter, crack growth propagation scatter, and initial crack size as random variables.

  20. Impingement jet cooling in gas turbines

    CERN Document Server

    Amano, R S

    2014-01-01

    Due to the requirement for enhanced cooling technologies on modern gas turbine engines, advanced research and development has had to take place in field of thermal engineering. Impingement jet cooling is one of the most effective in terms of cooling, manufacturability and cost. This is the first to book to focus on impingement cooling alone.

  1. Sequential cooling insert for turbine stator vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Russel B

    2017-04-04

    A sequential flow cooling insert for a turbine stator vane of a small gas turbine engine, where the impingement cooling insert is formed as a single piece from a metal additive manufacturing process such as 3D metal printing, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of radial extending impingement cooling air holes alternating with rows of radial extending return air holes on a pressure side wall, and where the insert includes a plurality of rows of chordwise extending second impingement cooling air holes on a suction side wall. The insert includes alternating rows of radial extending cooling air supply channels and return air channels that form a series of impingement cooling on the pressure side followed by the suction side of the insert.

  2. Powder metallurgy processing of high strength turbine disk alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Using vacuum-atomized AF2-1DA and Mar-M432 powders, full-scale gas turbine engine disks were fabricated by hot isostatically pressing (HIP) billets which were then isothermally forged using the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft GATORIZING forging process. While a sound forging was produced in the AF2-1DA, a container leak had occurred in the Mar-M432 billet during HIP. This resulted in billet cracking during forging. In-process control procedures were developed to identify such leaks. The AF2-1DA forging was heat treated and metallographic and mechanical property evaluation was performed. Mechanical properties exceeded those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability turbine disk alloys presently used.

  3. Development and validation of a full-range performance analysis model for a three-spool gas turbine with turbine cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yin; Gu, Chun-wei; Ji, Xing-xing

    2015-01-01

    The performance analysis of a gas turbine is important for both its design and its operation. For modern gas turbines, the cooling flow introduces a noteworthy thermodynamic loss; thus, the determination of the cooling flow rate will clearly influence the accuracy of performance calculations. In this paper, a full-range performance analysis model is established for a three-spool gas turbine with an open-circuit convective blade cooling system. A hybrid turbine cooling model is embedded in the analysis to predict the amount of cooling air accurately and thus to remove the errors induced by the relatively arbitrary value of cooling air requirements in the previous research. The model is subsequently used to calculate the gas turbine performance; the calculation results are validated with detailed test data. Furthermore, multistage conjugate heat transfer analysis is performed for the turbine section. The results indicate that with the same coolant condition and flow rate as those in the performance analysis, the blade metal has been effectively cooled; in addition, the maximum temperature predicted by conjugate heat transfer analysis is close to the corresponding value in the cooling model. Hence, the present model provides an effective tool for analyzing the performance of a gas turbine with cooling. - Highlights: • We established a performance model for a gas turbine with convective cooling. • A hybrid turbine cooling model is embedded in the performance analysis. • The accuracy of the model is validated with detailed test data of the gas turbine. • Conjugate heat transfer analysis is performed for the turbine for verification

  4. Cooling system with compressor bleed and ambient air for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Marra, John J.

    2017-11-21

    A cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine blade cooling fluid supply and from an ambient air source to the turbine blade cooling fluid supply to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The cooling system may include a compressor bleed conduit extending from a compressor to the turbine blade cooling fluid supply that provides cooling fluid to at least one turbine blade. The compressor bleed conduit may include an upstream section and a downstream section whereby the upstream section exhausts compressed bleed air through an outlet into the downstream section through which ambient air passes. The outlet of the upstream section may be generally aligned with a flow of ambient air flowing in the downstream section. As such, the compressed air increases the flow of ambient air to the turbine blade cooling fluid supply.

  5. Air cooled turbine component having an internal filtration system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeck, Alexander R [Orlando, FL

    2012-05-15

    A centrifugal particle separator is provided for removing particles such as microscopic dirt or dust particles from the compressed cooling air prior to reaching and cooling the turbine blades or turbine vanes of a turbine engine. The centrifugal particle separator structure has a substantially cylindrical body with an inlet arranged on a periphery of the substantially cylindrical body. Cooling air enters centrifugal particle separator through the separator inlet port having a linear velocity. When the cooling air impinges the substantially cylindrical body, the linear velocity is transformed into a rotational velocity, separating microscopic particles from the cooling air. Microscopic dust particles exit the centrifugal particle separator through a conical outlet and returned to a working medium.

  6. Preliminary study of Friction disk type turbine for S-CO{sub 2} cycle application (2016 Autumn Meeting of the KNS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Seungjoon; Heo, Jin Young; Kwon, Jinsu; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Among the next generation reactors, a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) with the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been suggested as the advanced energy solution. The S-CO{sub 2} power conversion system can achieve high efficiency with the SFR core thermal condition (450-550℃) and also can reduce the total cycle footprint due to high density of the working fluid. Moreover, the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle can reduce the accident consequence compared to the steam Rankine cycle due to the mild sodium-CO{sub 2} interaction. The S-CO{sub 2} power cycle has different characteristic compare to the conventional steam Rankine cycle or gas Brayton cycle. For the turbine section, the expansion ratio is much smaller than the other cycles. Thus, different type of turbine should be evaluated for the advanced S-CO{sub 2} technology and the KAIST research team considered a friction disk type turbine (Tesla turbine) concept for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle applications. In this paper, the test result and analysis of a lab-scale Tesla turbine in the KAIST S-CO{sub 2} experimental facility (S-CO{sub 2}PE) are briefly discussed. The KAIST research team investigated a friction disk type turbine, named as Tesla turbine, for the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle applications. The preliminary test of a lab-scale Tesla turbine was conducted with compressed air. The generator, nozzle angle and bearing performances are tested. With the best performing nozzle angle and bearing, the Tesla turbine was tested under various S-CO{sub 2} conditions. As a result, the S-CO{sub 2}PE facility generated electricity (0.5-5W). The isentropic efficiency was relatively low (0.8-1.3%). It seemed that, the authors need further study to understand the main mechanism and maximize the efficiency. After developing the design methodology, the design optimization will be conducted to show the applicability of the friction disk type turbine for the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle.

  7. A plastic stress intensity factor approach to turbine disk structural integrity assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Shlyannikov, V.; Zakharov, A.; Yarullin, R.

    2016-01-01

    This study based on a new fracture mechanics parameter is concerned with assessing the integrity of cracked steam turbine disk which operate under startup-shutdown cyclic loading conditions. Damage accumulation and growth in service have occurred on the inner surface of slot fillet of key. In order to determine elastic-plastic fracture mechanics parameters full-size stress-strain state analysis of turbine disk was performed for a quote-elliptical part-through cracks under consider...

  8. Probabilistic Sensitivities for Fatigue Analysis of Turbine Engine Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Harry R. Millwater; R. Wesley Osborn

    2006-01-01

    A methodology is developed and applied that determines the sensitivities of the probability-of-fracture of a gas turbine disk fatigue analysis with respect to the parameters of the probability distributions describing the random variables. The disk material is subject to initial anomalies, in either low- or high-frequency quantities, such that commonly used materials (titanium, nickel, powder nickel) and common damage mechanisms (inherent defects or su...

  9. Determination of elastic stresses in gas-turbine disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, S S

    1947-01-01

    A method is presented for the calculation of elastic stresses in symmetrical disks typical of those of a high-temperature gas turbine. The method is essentially a finite-difference solution of the equilibrium and compatibility equations for elastic stresses in a symmetrical disk. Account can be taken of point-to-point variations in disk thickness, in temperature, in elastic modulus, in coefficient of thermal expansion, in material density, and in Poisson's ratio. No numerical integration or trial-and-error procedures are involved and the computations can be performed in rapid and routine fashion by nontechnical computers with little engineering supervision. Checks on problems for which exact mathematical solutions are known indicate that the method yields results of high accuracy. Illustrative examples are presented to show the manner of treating solid disks, disks with central holes, and disks constructed either of a single material or two or more welded materials. The effect of shrink fitting is taken into account by a very simple device.

  10. Automation of ultrasonic testing of turbine disk billets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, V.E.; Domashevskij, B.N.; Pron', N.I.; Tkachenko, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    cations of ultrasonic facility for automation of testing turbine disk billets of 25Kh2PMFA and 34KhM1A steels are considered. The operating principle and the design of ''Disk-1'' facility are described, its test results are presented. It is shown that the facility increases the test efficiency five times, enables to estimate dimensions of revealed defect with regard to the quality of acoustic contact, thus facilitating the work of personnel and improving the test quality

  11. Turbine airfoil with laterally extending snubber having internal cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, Carmen Andrew; Messmann, Stephen John; Marsh, Jan H.

    2016-09-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one snubber with a snubber cooling system positioned therein and in communication with an airfoil cooling system is disclosed. The snubber may extend from the outer housing of the airfoil toward an adjacent turbine airfoil positioned within a row of airfoils. The snubber cooling system may include an inner cooling channel separated from an outer cooling channel by an inner wall. The inner wall may include a plurality of impingement cooling orifices that direct impingement fluid against an outer wall defining the outer cooling channel. In one embodiment, the cooling fluids may be exhausted from the snubber, and in another embodiment, the cooling fluids may be returned to the airfoil cooling system. Flow guides may be positioned in the outer cooling channel, which may reduce cross-flow by the impingement orifices, thereby increasing effectiveness.

  12. Research and development of cooled turbine for aircraft engines. Koku engine yo reikyaku turbine no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maya, T; Yamawaki, S [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-05-01

    For the turbine which is one of the principal elements of aircraft engine, progress in turbine use material development and cooling performance further heightened for the turbine are needed to grapple with the required heightening of turbine inlet temperature. In the present paper based on the turbine inlet temperature designed to be 1600[degree]C as a target, a two-dimensional model used for the turbine cooling performance test was structurally given together with the result of the above test which aimed at confirming the design calculation. As a result of cooling design for the turbine which was about 1600[degree]C in inlet temperature, the highest gas temperature was 1890 and 1470[degree]C on the stator blade and rotor blade, respectively. Both those blades were 0.66 and 0.62, respectively in cooling efficiency. To test the cooling performance, a two-dimensional cascade was tested with a doubly amplified model of cooling blade, the use of which could set its Reynolds number near that of the actual one. As compared with the actual operation, the test was made at low temperatures of 400 to 500[degree]C and low pressures of 0.02 to 0.03MPa. The test agreed with the design calculation in result. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.

  14. Gas turbine cooling modeling - Thermodynamic analysis and cycle simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordal, Kristin

    1999-02-01

    Considering that blade and vane cooling are a vital point in the studies of modern gas turbines, there are many ways to include cooling in gas turbine models. Thermodynamic methods for doing this are reviewed in this report, and, based on some of these methods, a number of model requirements are set up and a Cooled Gas Turbine Model (CGTM) for design-point calculations of cooled gas turbines is established. Thereafter, it is shown that it is possible to simulate existing gas turbines with the CGTM. Knowledge of at least one temperature in the hot part of the turbine (TET, TRIT or possibly TIT) is found to be vital for a complete heat balance over the turbine. The losses, which are caused by the mixing of coolant and main flow, are in the CGTM considered through a polytropic efficiency reduction factor S. Through the study of S, it can be demonstrated that there is more to gain from coolant reduction in a small and/or old turbine with poor aerodynamics, than there is to gain in a large, modern turbine, where the losses due to interaction between coolant and main flow are, relatively speaking, small. It is demonstrated, at the design point (TET=1360 deg C, {pi}=20) for the simple-cycle gas turbine, that heat exchanging between coolant and fuel proves to have a large positive impact on cycle efficiency, with an increase of 0.9 percentage points if all of the coolant passes through the heat exchanger. The corresponding improvement for humidified coolant is 0.8 percentage points. A design-point study for the HAT cycle shows that if all of the coolant is extracted after the humidification tower, there is a decrease in coolant requirements of 7.16 percentage points, from 19.58% to 12.52% of the compressed air, and an increase in thermal efficiency of 0.46 percentage points, from 53.46% to 53.92%. Furthermore, it is demonstrated with a TET-parameter variation, that the cooling of a simple-cycle gas turbine with humid air can have a positive effect on thermal efficiency

  15. Simulation and measurement of ferromagnetic impurities in non-magnetic aeroengine turbine disks using fluxgate magnetometers

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian Hantscher; Ruixin Zhou; Albert Seidl; Johann Hinken; Christian Ziep

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, ferromagnetic impurities in paramagnetic aeroengine turbine disks are investigated. Because such inclusions represent a significant threat in aviation, a detailed analysis is required for impured turbine disks. For this purpose, sensitive fluxgate magnetometers are used. After a premagnetisation, this sensor is able to detect small ferromagnetic particles by recording the variation of the magnetic flux density while the disk rotates below the sensor head. This trajectory create...

  16. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Composite Turbine Vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Parikh, Ankur H.; Nagpal, VInod K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop design concepts for a cooled ceramic vane to be used in the first stage of the High Pressure Turbine(HPT). To insure that the design concepts were relevant to the gas turbine industry needs, Honeywell International Inc. was subcontracted to provide technical guidance for this work. The work performed under this contract can be divided into three broad categories. The first was an analysis of the cycle benefits arising from the higher temperature capability of Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) compared with conventional metallic vane materials. The second category was a series of structural analyses for variations in the internal configuration of first stage vane for the High Pressure Turbine(HPT) of a CF6 class commercial airline engine. The third category was analysis for a radial cooled turbine vanes for use in turboshaft engine applications. The size, shape and internal configuration of the turboshaft engine vanes were selected to investigate a cooling concept appropriate to small CMC vanes.

  17. Ambient air cooling arrangement having a pre-swirler for gas turbine engine blade cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Tham, Kok-Mun; Schroeder, Eric; Meeroff, Jamie; Miller, Jr., Samuel R; Marra, John J

    2015-01-06

    A gas turbine engine including: an ambient-air cooling circuit (10) having a cooling channel (26) disposed in a turbine blade (22) and in fluid communication with a source (12) of ambient air: and an pre-swirler (18), the pre-swirler having: an inner shroud (38); an outer shroud (56); and a plurality of guide vanes (42), each spanning from the inner shroud to the outer shroud. Circumferentially adjacent guide vanes (46, 48) define respective nozzles (44) there between. Forces created by a rotation of the turbine blade motivate ambient air through the cooling circuit. The pre-swirler is configured to impart swirl to ambient air drawn through the nozzles and to direct the swirled ambient air toward a base of the turbine blade. The end walls (50, 54) of the pre-swirler may be contoured.

  18. MHD/gas turbine systems designed for low cooling water requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annen, K.D.; Eustis, R.H.

    1983-01-01

    The MHD/gas turbine combined-cycle system has been designed specifically for applications where the availability of cooling water is very limited. The base case systems which were studied consist of a coal-fired MHD plant with an air turbine bottoming plant and require no cooling water. In addition to the base case systems, systems were considered which included the addition of a vapor cycle bottoming plant to improve the thermal efficiency. These systems require a small amount of cooling water. The results show that the MHD/gas turbine systems have very good thermal and economic performances. The base case I MHD/gas turbine system (782 MW /SUB e/ ) requires no cooling water, has a heat rate which is 13% higher, and a cost of electricity which is only 7% higher than a comparable MHD/steam system (878 MW /SUB e/ ) having a cooling tower heat load of 720 MW. The case I vapor cycle bottomed systems have thermal and economic performances which approach and even exceed those of the MHD/steam system, while having substantially lower cooling water requirements. Performances of a second-generation MHD/gas turbine system and an oxygen-enriched, early commercial system are also evaluated. An analysis of nitric oxide emissions shows compliance with emission standards

  19. Estimation of gas turbine blades cooling efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskalenko, A.B.; Kozhevnikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper outlines the results of the evaluation of the most thermally stressed gas turbine elements, first stage power turbine blades, cooling efficiency. The calculations were implemented using a numerical simulation based on the Finite Element Method. The volume average temperature of the blade

  20. Fabrication of Turbine Disk Materials by Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudbrack, Chantal; Bean, Quincy A.; Cooper, Ken; Carter, Robert; Semiatin, S. Lee; Gabb, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Precipitation-strengthened, nickel-based superalloys are widely used in the aerospace and energy industries due to their excellent environmental resistance and outstanding mechanical properties under extreme conditions. Powder-bed additive manufacturing (AM) technologies offer the potential to revolutionize the processing of superalloy turbine components by eliminating the need for extensive inventory or expensive legacy tooling. Like selective laser melting (SLM), electron beam melting (EBM) constructs three-dimensional dense components layer-by-layer by melting and solidification of atomized, pre-alloyed powder feedstock within 50-200 micron layers. While SLM has been more widely used for AM of nickel alloys like 718, EBM offers several distinct advantages, such as less retained residual stress, lower risk of contamination, and faster build rates with multiple-electron-beam configurations. These advantages are particularly attractive for turbine disks, for which excessive residual stress and contamination can shorten disk life during high-temperature operation. In this presentation, we will discuss the feasibility of fabricating disk superalloy components using EBM AM. Originally developed using powder metallurgy forging processing, disk superalloys contain a higher refractory content and precipitate volume fraction than alloy 718, thus making them more prone to thermal cracking during AM. This and other challenges to produce homogeneous builds with desired properties will be presented. In particular, the quality of lab-scale samples fabricated via a design of experiments, in which the beam current, build temperature, and beam velocity were varied, will be summarized. The relationship between processing parameters, microstructure, grain orientation, and mechanical response will be discussed.

  1. High temperature initiation and propagation of cracks in 12%Cr-steel turbine disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Foletti

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to study the crack propagation in 12%Cr steel for turbine disks. Creep Crack Growth (CCG tests on CT specimens have been performed to define the proper fracture mechanics which describes the initiation of the crack propagation and the crack growth behaviour for the material at high temperature. Results have been used to study the occurrence of crack initiation on a turbine disk at the extreme working temperature and stress level experienced during service, and validate the use of C* integral in correlating creep growth rate on the disk component, in case C* is numerically calculated through FEM analysis or calculated by the use of reference stress concept.

  2. Turbine airfoil having near-wall cooling insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jr., Nicholas F.; Wiebe, David J.

    2017-09-12

    A turbine airfoil is provided with at least one insert positioned in a cavity in an airfoil interior. The insert extends along a span-wise extent of the turbine airfoil and includes first and second opposite faces. A first near-wall cooling channel is defined between the first face and a pressure sidewall of an airfoil outer wall. A second near-wall cooling channel is defined between the second face and a suction sidewall of the airfoil outer wall. The insert is configured to occupy an inactive volume in the airfoil interior so as to displace a coolant flow in the cavity toward the first and second near-wall cooling channels. A locating feature engages the insert with the outer wall for supporting the insert in position. The locating feature is configured to control flow of the coolant through the first or second near-wall cooling channel.

  3. Preliminary Test of Friction disk type turbine for S-CO{sub 2} cycle application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Seungjoon; Kim, Hyeon Tae; Lee, Jeong Ik [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Due to the relatively mild sodium-CO{sub 2} interaction, the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle can reduce the accident consequence compared to the steam Rankine cycle. Also the S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle can achieve high efficiency for SFR core thermal condition. Moreover, the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle can reduce the total cycle footprint due to high density of the working fluid. However, the high pressure operating condition and low viscosity of the fluid cause difficulties in designing appropriate seals and multi-stage turbo machineries. To solve the problem for designing turbo machineries in a creative way, KAIST research team tested a friction disk type turbine concept for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle application. In this paper, the investigation of the Tesla turbine and preliminary test results with compressed air are covered. The KAIST research team investigated a friction disk type turbine, named as Tesla turbine, for the S-CO{sub 2} power cycle applications. Due to the robust design of the fiction disk type, the Tesla turbine technology can be utilized not only for S-CO{sub 2} turbo machinery but also for the multi-phase or sludge flow turbo machinery. The preliminary test of lab-scale Tesla turbine with compressed air was conducted. The high pressure vessel was manufactured for the S-CO{sub 2} operating condition. The test will be concentrated on the turbine efficiency measurement under various conditions and development of the design methodology.

  4. Influence of precooling cooling air on the performance of a gas turbine combined cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Ik Hwan; Kang, Do Won; Kang, Soo Young; Kim, Tong Seop [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Cooling of hot sections, especially the turbine nozzle and rotor blades, has a significant impact on gas turbine performance. In this study, the influence of precooling of the cooling air on the performance of gas turbines and their combined cycle plants was investigated. A state of the art F class gas turbine was selected, and its design performance was deliberately simulated using detailed component models including turbine blade cooling. Off design analysis was used to simulate changes in the operating conditions and performance of the gas turbines due to precooling of the cooling air. Thermodynamic and aerodynamic models were used to simulate the performance of the cooled nozzle and rotor blade. In the combined cycle plant, the heat rejected from the cooling air was recovered at the bottoming steam cycle to optimize the overall plant performance. With a 200K decrease of all cooling air stream, an almost 1.78% power upgrade due to increase in main gas flow and a 0.70 percent point efficiency decrease due to the fuel flow increase to maintain design turbine inlet temperature were predicted.

  5. Turbine Airfoil Leading Edge Film Cooling Bibliography: 1972–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Kercher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling for turbine airfoil leading edges has been a common practice for at least 35 years as turbine inlet gas temperatures and pressures have continually increased along with cooling air temperatures for higher engine cycle efficiency. With substantial engine cycle performance improvements from higher gas temperatures, it has become increasingly necessary to film cool nozzle and rotor blade leading edges since external heat transfer coefficients and thus heat load are the highest in this airfoil region. Optimum cooling air requirements in this harsh environment has prompted a significant number of film cooling investigations and analytical studies reported over the past 25 years from academia, industry and government agencies. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the complex nature of leading edge film cooling from airfoil cascades, simulated airfoil leading edges and environment. This bibliography is a report of the open-literature references available which provide information on the complex aero–thermo interaction of leading edge gaseous film cooling with mainstream flow. From much of this investigative information has come successful operational leading edge film cooling design systems capable of sustaining airfoil leading edge durability in very hostile turbine environments.

  6. Aero-Thermo-Structural Design Optimization of Internally Cooled Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulikravich, G. S.; Martin, T. J.; Dennis, B. H.; Lee, E.; Han, Z.-X.

    1999-01-01

    A set of robust and computationally affordable inverse shape design and automatic constrained optimization tools have been developed for the improved performance of internally cooled gas turbine blades. The design methods are applicable to the aerodynamics, heat transfer, and thermoelasticity aspects of the turbine blade. Maximum use of the existing proven disciplinary analysis codes is possible with this design approach. Preliminary computational results demonstrate possibilities to design blades with minimized total pressure loss and maximized aerodynamic loading. At the same time, these blades are capable of sustaining significantly higher inlet hot gas temperatures while requiring remarkably lower coolant mass flow rates. These results suggest that it is possible to design internally cooled turbine blades that will cost less to manufacture, will have longer life span, and will perform as good, if not better than, film cooled turbine blades.

  7. Unsteady, Cooled Turbine Simulation Using a PC-Linux Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Michael G.; Turner, Mark G.; Chen, Jen-Pimg; Remotigue, Michael G.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2004-01-01

    The fist stage of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) of the GE90 engine was simulated with a three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Sokes solver, MSU Turbo, which uses source terms to simulate the cooling flows. In addition to the solver, its pre-processor, GUMBO, and a post-processing and visualization tool, Turbomachinery Visual3 (TV3) were run in a Linux environment to carry out the simulation and analysis. The solver was run both with and without cooling. The introduction of cooling flow on the blade surfaces, case, and hub and its effects on both rotor-vane interaction as well the effects on the blades themselves were the principle motivations for this study. The studies of the cooling flow show the large amount of unsteadiness in the turbine and the corresponding hot streak migration phenomenon. This research on the GE90 turbomachinery has also led to a procedure for running unsteady, cooled turbine analysis on commodity PC's running the Linux operating system.

  8. Materials and structural aspects of advanced gas-turbine helicopter engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freche, J. C.; Acurio, J.

    1979-01-01

    Advances in materials, coatings, turbine cooling technology, structural and design concepts, and component-life prediction of helicopter gas-turbine-engine components are presented. Stationary parts including the inlet particle separator, the front frame, rotor tip seals, vanes and combustors and rotating components - compressor blades, disks, and turbine blades - are discussed. Advanced composite materials are considered for the front frame and compressor blades, prealloyed powder superalloys will increase strength and reduce costs of disks, the oxide dispersion strengthened alloys will have 100C higher use temperature in combustors and vanes than conventional superalloys, ceramics will provide the highest use temperature of 1400C for stator vanes and 1370C for turbine blades, and directionally solidified eutectics will afford up to 50C temperature advantage at turbine blade operating conditions. Coatings for surface protection at higher surface temperatures and design trends in turbine cooling technology are discussed. New analytical methods of life prediction such as strain gage partitioning for high temperature prediction, fatigue life, computerized prediction of oxidation resistance, and advanced techniques for estimating coating life are described.

  9. Heat pipe turbine vane cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langston, L.; Faghri, A. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and an uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

  10. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

  11. Performance and economic enhancement of cogeneration gas turbines through compressor inlet air cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, M.; Bronconi, R.; Carnevale, E.

    1994-04-01

    Gas turbine air cooling systems serve to raise performance to peak power levels during the hot months when high atmospheric temperatures cause reductions in net power output. This work describes the technical and economic advantages of providing a compressor inlet air cooling system to increase the gas turbine's power rating and reduce its heat rate. The pros and cons of state-of-the-art cooling technologies, i.e., absorption and compression refrigeration, with and without thermal energy storage, were examined in order to select the most suitable cooling solution. Heavy-duty gas turbine cogeneration systems with and without absorption units were modeled, as well as various industrial sectors, i.e., paper and pulp, pharmaceuticals, food processing, textiles, tanning, and building materials. The ambient temperature variations were modeled so the effects of climate could be accounted for in the simulation. The results validated the advantages of gas turbine cogeneration with absorption air cooling as compared to other systems without air cooling.

  12. Impact of the use of a hybrid turbine inlet air cooling system in arid climates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Ansary, Hany A.; Orfi, Jamel A.; Ali, Mohamed E.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Cooling the air entering the compressor section of a gas turbine is a proven method of increasing turbine power output, especially during peak summer demand, and it is increasingly being used in powerplants worldwide. Two turbine inlet air cooling (TIAC) systems are widely used: evaporative cooling and mechanical chilling. In this work, the prospects of using a hybrid turbine inlet air cooling (TIAC) system are investigated. The hybrid system consists of mechanical chilling followed by evaporative cooling. Such a system is capable of achieving a significant reduction in inlet air temperature that satisfies desired power output levels, while consuming less power than conventional mechanical chilling and less water than conventional evaporative cooling, thus combining the benefits of both approaches. Two hybrid system configurations are studied. In the first configuration, the first stage of the system uses water-cooled chillers that are coupled with dry coolers such that the condenser cooling water remains in a closed loop. In the second configuration, the first stage of the system uses water-cooled chillers but with conventional cooling towers. An assessment of the performance and economics of those two configurations is made by comparing them to conventional mechanical chilling and using realistic data. It was found that the TIAC systems are capable of boosting the power output of the gas turbine by 10% or more (of the power output of the ISO conditions). The cost operation analysis shows clearly the hybrid TIAC method with wet cooling has the advantage over the other methods and It would be profitable to install it in the new gas turbine power plants. The figure below shows a comparison of the water consumption for the three different cases. - Highlights: • New hybrid system for the turbine inlet air cooling is studied. • Hybrid system of mechanical chilling followed by evaporative cooling is used. • Hybrid turbine inlet air cooling

  13. Cooling of Gas Turbines. 6; Computed Temperature Distribution Through Cross Section of Water-Cooled Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingood, John N. B.; Sams, Eldon W.

    1947-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the cross-sectional temperature distribution of a water-cooled turbine blade was made using the relaxation method to solve the differential equation derived from the analysis. The analysis was applied to specific turbine blade and the studies icluded investigations of the accuracy of simple methods to determine the temperature distribution along the mean line of the rear part of the blade, of the possible effect of varying the perimetric distribution of the hot gas-to -metal heat transfer coefficient, and of the effect of changing the thermal conductivity of the blade metal for a constant cross sectional area blade with two quarter inch diameter coolant passages.

  14. THE DIFFERENT EVOLUTION OF GAS AND DUST IN DISKS AROUND SUN-LIKE AND COOL STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Luhman, K.; Henning, Th.; Bouwman, J.; Meyer, M. R.; Lahuis, F.; Natta, A.

    2009-01-01

    Planet formation is profoundly impacted by the properties of protoplanetary disks and their central star. However, how disk properties vary with stellar parameters remains poorly known. Here, we present the first comprehensive, comparative Spitzer/IRS study of the dust and gas properties of disks around young Sun-like stars (K1-M5) and cool stars/brown dwarfs (M5-M9). The comparison of these two large samples of over 60 sources reveal major differences in the evolution of both the dust and gas components. We report the first detection of organic molecules in disks around brown dwarfs. The detection rate statistics and the line flux ratios of HCN and C 2 H 2 show a striking difference between the two samples, demonstrating a significant underabundance of HCN relative to C 2 H 2 in the disk surface of cool stars. We propose this to originate from the large difference in the UV irradiation around the two types of sources. The statistical comparison of the 10 μm silicate emission features also reveals a difference between the two samples. Cool stars and brown dwarfs show weaker features arising from more processed silicate grains in the disk atmosphere. These findings complement previous indications of flatter disk structures and longer disk lifetimes around cool stars. Our results highlight important differences in the chemical and physical evolution of protoplanetary disks as a function of stellar mass, temperature, and radiation field which should be taken into account in planet formation models. We note that the different chemistry of preplanetary materials in the disk may also influence the bulk composition and volatile content of the forming planets. In particular, if exogenous HCN has played a key role in the synthesis of prebiotic molecules on Earth as proposed, then prebiotic chemistry may unfold differently on planets around cool stars.

  15. Forging Long Shafts On Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilghman, Chris; Askey, William; Hopkins, Steven

    1989-01-01

    Isothermal-forging apparatus produces long shafts integral with disks. Equipment based on modification of conventional isothermal-forging equipment, required stroke cut by more than half. Enables forging of shafts as long as 48 in. (122 cm) on typical modified conventional forging press, otherwise limited to making shafts no longer than 18 in. (46cm). Removable punch, in which forged material cools after plastic deformation, essential novel feature of forging apparatus. Technology used to improve such products as components of gas turbines and turbopumps and of other shaft/disk parts for powerplants, drive trains, or static structures.

  16. Wet-steam erosion of steam turbine disks and shafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Averkina, N. V.; Zheleznyak, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.; Shishkin, V. I.

    2011-01-01

    A study of wet-steam erosion of the disks and the rotor bosses or housings of turbines in thermal and nuclear power plants shows that the rate of wear does not depend on the diagrammed degree of moisture, but is determined by moisture condensing on the surfaces of the diaphragms and steam inlet components. Renovating the diaphragm seals as an assembly with condensate removal provides a manifold reduction in the erosion.

  17. Improving Durability of Turbine Components Through Trenched Film Cooling and Contoured Endwalls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogard, David G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Thole, Karen A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The experimental and computational studies of the turbine endwall and vane models completed in this research program have provided a comprehensive understanding of turbine cooling with combined film cooling and TBC. To correctly simulate the cooling effects of TBC requires the use of matched Biot number models, a technique developed in our laboratories. This technique allows for the measurement of the overall cooling effectiveness which is a measure of the combined internal and external cooling for a turbine component. The overall cooling effectiveness provides an indication of the actual metal temperature that would occur at engine conditions, and is hence a more powerful performance indicator than the film effectiveness parameter that is commonly used for film cooling studies. Furthermore these studies include the effects of contaminant depositions which are expected to occur when gas turbines are operated with syngas fuels. Results from the endwall studies performed at Penn State University and the vane model studies performed at the University of Texas are the first direct measurements of the combined effects of film cooling and TBC. These results show that TBC has a dominating effect on the overall cooling effectiveness, which enhances the importance of the internal cooling mechanisms, and downplays the importance of the film cooling of the external surface. The TBC was found to increase overall cooling effectiveness by a factor of two to four. When combined with TBC, the primary cooling from film cooling holes was found to be due to the convective cooling within the holes, not from the film effectiveness on the surface of the TBC. Simulations of the deposition of contaminants on the endwall and vane surfaces showed that these depositions caused a large increase in surface roughness and significant degradation of film effectiveness. However, despite these negative factors, the depositions caused only a slight decrease in the overall cooling effectiveness on

  18. Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Raphael Durand

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

  19. Thermodynamic assessment of impact of inlet air cooling techniques on gas turbine and combined cycle performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohapatra, Alok Ku; Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The article is focused on the comparison of impact of two different methods of inlet air cooling (vapor compression and vapor absorption cooling) integrated to a cooled gas turbine based combined cycle plant. Air-film cooling has been adopted as the cooling technique for gas turbine blades. A parametric study of the effect of compressor pressure ratio, compressor inlet temperature (T i , C ), turbine inlet temperature (T i , T ), ambient relative humidity and ambient temperature on performance parameters of plant has been carried out. Optimum T i , T corresponding to maximum plant efficiency of combined cycle increases by 100 °C due to the integration of inlet air cooling. It has been observed that vapor compression cooling improves the efficiency of gas turbine cycle by 4.88% and work output by 14.77%. In case of vapor absorption cooling an improvement of 17.2% in gas cycle work output and 9.47% in gas cycle efficiency has been observed. For combined cycle configuration, however, vapor compression cooling should be preferred over absorption cooling in terms of higher plant performance. The optimum value of compressor inlet temperature has been observed to be 20 °C for the chosen set of conditions for both the inlet air cooling schemes. - Highlights: • Inlet air cooling improves performance of cooled gas turbine based combined cycle. • Vapor compression inlet air cooling is superior to vapor absorption inlet cooling. • For every turbine inlet temperature, there exists an optimum pressure ratio. • The optimum compressor inlet temperature is found to be 293 K

  20. Determination of stresses in gas-turbine disks subjected to plastic flow and creep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millenson, M B; Manson, S S

    1948-01-01

    A finite-difference method previously presented for computing elastic stresses in rotating disks is extended to include the computation of the disk stresses when plastic flow and creep are considered. A finite-difference method is employed to eliminate numerical integration and to permit nontechnical personnel to make the calculations with a minimum of engineering supervision. Illustrative examples are included to facilitate explanation of the procedure by carrying out the computations on a typical gas-turbine disk through a complete running cycle. The results of the numerical examples presented indicate that plastic flow markedly alters the elastic-stress distribution.

  1. Compressive residual stresses as a preventive measure against stress corrosion cracking on turbine components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.; Ewald, J.; Fischer, K.; Gruendler, O.; Potthast, E.; Stuecker, E.; Winzen, G.

    1987-01-01

    Disk type low pressure turbine rotors have been designed for a large variety of power plant applications. Developing disk type rotors required a concerted effort to design a shaft/disk shrink fit with a minimum of tensile stress concentrations in order to aim for the lowest possible susceptibility to corrosive attack, i.e. stress corrosion cracking. As a result of stresses, the regions of greatest concern are the shrink fit boundaries and the keyways of turbine disks. These stresses are caused by service loading, i.e. centrifugal and shrinkage stresses and by manufacturing procedure, i.e. residual stresses. The compressive residual stresses partly compensate the tensile service stresses so that an increase of compressive residual stresses decreases the whole stress state of the component. Special manufacturing procedures, e.g. accelerated cooling after tempering can induce compressive residual stresses up to about 400 MPa in the hub bore region of turbine disk

  2. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This project demonstrated that higher temperature capabilities of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can be used to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption in gas turbine engines. The work involved closely coupling aerothermal and structural analyses for the first-stage vane of a high-pressure turbine (HPT). These vanes are actively cooled, typically using film cooling. Ceramic materials have structural and thermal properties different from conventional metals used for the first-stage HPT vane. This project identified vane configurations that satisfy CMC structural strength and life constraints while maintaining vane aerodynamic efficiency and reducing vane cooling to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. The project examined modifications to vane internal configurations to achieve the desired objectives. Thermal and pressure stresses are equally important, and both were analyzed using an ANSYS® structural analysis. Three-dimensional fluid and heat transfer analyses were used to determine vane aerodynamic performance and heat load distributions.

  3. Cooling of nuclear power stations with high temperature reactors and helium turbine cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, S.; Hewing, G.

    1977-01-01

    On nuclear power stations with high temperature reactors and helium turbine cycles (HTR-single circuits) the residual heat from the energy conversion process in the primary and intermediate coolers is removed from cycled gas, helium. Water, which is circulated for safety reasons through a closed circuit, is used for cooling. The primary and intermediate coolers as well as other cooling equipment of the power plant are installed within the reactor building. The heat from the helium turbine cycle is removed to the environment most effectively by natural draught cooling towers. In this way a net plant efficiency of about 40% is attainable. The low quantities of residual heat thereby produced and the high (in comparison with power stations with steam turbine cycles) cooling agent pressure and cooling water reheat pressure in the circulating coolers enable an economically favourable design of the overall 'cold end' to be expected. In the so-called unit range it is possible to make do with one or two cooling towers. Known techniques and existing operating experience can be used for these dry cooling towers. After-heat removal reactor shutdown is effected by a separate, redundant cooling system with forced air dry coolers. The heat from the cooling process at such locations in the power station is removed to the environment either by a forced air dry cooling installation or by a wet cooling system. (orig.) [de

  4. A highly efficient Francis turbine designed for energy recovery in cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqing Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In China, cooling water entering cooling towers still retains surplus pressure between 39,240 and 147,150 Pa. In order to utilize this wasted energy, it is suggested that the surplus water energy can be harnessed to drive a type of hydroturbine installed in the inner platform of cooling tower and make the fan rotate via its coupled shafts. However, conventional hydroturbines are not suited for this job because of their low efficiency or unmatched rotating speed with that of the fan under the operating conditions of cooling towers. In this article, according to the requirements of turbine work environment in cooling towers, a new type of hydroturbine, Francis turbine with ultra-low specific speed (ns  = 50 m.kW, was designed to replace the fan motor in a cooling tower. Primarily, the shape, position, and number of runner blades were designed and optimized through theoretical analyses and computational fluid dynamics simulations. Additionally, metal elliptical volute and single-row ring guide vanes were applied to scale down the structural dimensions. Finally, the optimal scheme of the new Francis turbine was proven to have a high efficiency of 88% and good operation stability through testing of a physical model and can achieve the goal of harvesting renewable energy in the cooling tower.

  5. Use of cooling ponds and hydraulic turbines to save SRP energy consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    A substantial amount of energy can be saved by using cooling ponds to supply C and K reactors with cooling water. Hydraulic turbines between the reactor and the cooling pond can recover some of the power used to pump cooling water to the reactors. Cooling ponds would also reduce effluent temperature in the swamps adjacent to the Savannah River. Cooling ponds are evaluated in this memorandum

  6. Integrated circuit cooled turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Um, Jae Y.; Holloman, Harry; Koester, Steven

    2017-08-29

    A turbine rotor blade includes at least two integrated cooling circuits that are formed within the blade that include a leading edge circuit having a first cavity and a second cavity and a trailing edge circuit that includes at least a third cavity located aft of the second cavity. The trailing edge circuit flows aft with at least two substantially 180-degree turns at the tip end and the root end of the blade providing at least a penultimate cavity and a last cavity. The last cavity is located along a trailing edge of the blade. A tip axial cooling channel connects to the first cavity of the leading edge circuit and the penultimate cavity of the trailing edge circuit. At least one crossover hole connects the penultimate cavity to the last cavity substantially near the tip end of the blade.

  7. Report on the achievements in fiscal 1998. Hydrogen utilizing international clean energy system technology (WE-NET). Subtask 8. Development of hydrogen combustion turbine (development of major components such as turbine blades and rotors); 1998 nendo suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET). 8. Suiso nensho turbine no kaihatsu (turbine yoku, rotor nado shuyo kosei kiki no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The present research and development is intended to establish the fundamental technologies required to develop a pilot plant, by investigating development of such major component devices as turbine blades and rotors in a hydrogen combustion turbine. In the turbine moving and stator blade cooling technology, it is intended to achieve the power plant efficiency of 60% (based on HHV) as established in the interim evaluation performed in fiscal 1996. Therefore, the necessary element tests, detailed blade design, and partial fabrication were moved forward on the three kinds of the selected blade cooling systems as the cooling systems that can deal with the steam temperature condition as high as 1,700 degrees C. Fiscal 1998 will execute the design and fabrication of test blades and testing devices for blade cooling evaluation tests to be performed at Tashiro Township in Akita Prefecture. At the same time, evaluation and selection will be made on the three kinds of the cooling blades. In the rotor cooling technology, for the purpose of analyzing the rolling-in phenomenon of steam in the main turbine flow, a method will be developed to analyze rotor disk cavity temperatures based on CFD, the basic sealing conditions based thereon will be discussed, and generalization will be made on the rotor cooling technology. (NEDO)

  8. Cooled airfoil in a turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitt, Paul H; Kemp, David A; Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2015-04-21

    An airfoil in a gas turbine engine includes an outer wall and an inner wall. The outer wall includes a leading edge, a trailing edge opposed from the leading edge in a chordal direction, a pressure side, and a suction side. The inner wall is coupled to the outer wall at a single chordal location and includes portions spaced from the pressure and suction sides of the outer wall so as to form first and second gaps between the inner wall and the respective pressure and suction sides. The inner wall defines a chamber therein and includes openings that provide fluid communication between the respective gaps and the chamber. The gaps receive cooling fluid that provides cooling to the outer wall as it flows through the gaps. The cooling fluid, after traversing at least substantial portions of the gaps, passes into the chamber through the openings in the inner wall.

  9. Cooling intensification during quenching of power plant components - the way to increase reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisov, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    To enchance the complex of mechanical properties and to increase operation time of large components of power facilities, regimes of accelerated cooling are developed. Results of heat treatment with accelerated cooling of turbine rotor of steel 26KhN3M2FAA, disks of turbine welded rotor of steel 20KhN2MFAA, components of steel 35KhN3MFA, are given. Special steels with carbon content less than 0.30% for details of power machine-building are developed

  10. Corrosion fatigue of bladed disk attachments of low-pressure turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, K.; Sakurai, S.; Nomura, K.; Saito, E.; Namura, K.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism of a disk cracking in a low-pressure steam turbine was investigated by finite-element and fracture mechanics analysis and, based on the results of the investigation, a life assessment method was derived. The disk cracking was found to be caused by growth of corrosion pits, superposition of multiple vibration modes, and an increase in the standard deviation of the natural frequency of grouped blades after long-term operation. Taking these findings into consideration, the authors then developed a life-assessment method for disk cracking composed of evaluations (1) maximum corrosion pit size at the current situation, (2) corrosion pit growth after a certain term, and (3) failure-occurrence ratio for the estimated corrosion pit depth. Maximum corrosion-pit size is evaluated by extreme value statistical analysis using the data obtained by replica inspection. The failure-occurrence ratio is evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation considering two uncertainties, namely, the standard deviation of the natural frequency of grouped blades and the stimulus ratio. The values of both uncertainties were determined by the inverse problem analysis of the disk cracking. In light of these results, the authors found that replacing conventional tenon-shroud grouped blades with continuous-cover blades is effective from the view point of vibratory behavior. (orig.)

  11. Verification of Thermal Models of Internally Cooled Gas Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Shevchenko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of temperature field of cooled turbine blades is a required element of gas turbine engine design process. The verification is usually performed on the basis of results of test of full-size blade prototype on a gas-dynamic test bench. A method of calorimetric measurement in a molten metal thermostat for verification of a thermal model of cooled blade is proposed in this paper. The method allows obtaining local values of heat flux in each point of blade surface within a single experiment. The error of determination of local heat transfer coefficients using this method does not exceed 8% for blades with radial channels. An important feature of the method is that the heat load remains unchanged during the experiment and the blade outer surface temperature equals zinc melting point. The verification of thermal-hydraulic model of high-pressure turbine blade with cooling allowing asymmetrical heat removal from pressure and suction sides was carried out using the developed method. An analysis of heat transfer coefficients confirmed the high level of heat transfer in the leading edge, whose value is comparable with jet impingement heat transfer. The maximum of the heat transfer coefficients is shifted from the critical point of the leading edge to the pressure side.

  12. Turbine Internal and Film Cooling Modeling For 3D Navier-Stokes Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Kenneth; Garg Vijay; Ameri, Ali

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research project is to make use of NASA Glenn on-site computational facilities in order to develop, validate and apply aerodynamic, heat transfer, and turbine cooling models for use in advanced 3D Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes such as the Glenn-" code. Specific areas of effort include: Application of the Glenn-HT code to specific configurations made available under Turbine Based Combined Cycle (TBCC), and Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) projects. Validating the use of a multi-block code for the time accurate computation of the detailed flow and heat transfer of cooled turbine airfoils. The goal of the current research is to improve the predictive ability of the Glenn-HT code. This will enable one to design more efficient turbine components for both aviation and power generation. The models will be tested against specific configurations provided by NASA Glenn.

  13. The k-ε-fP model applied to double wind turbine wakes using different actuator disk force methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2015-01-01

    The newly developed k-ε-fP  eddy viscosity model is applied to double wind turbine wake configurations in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer, using a Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes solver. The wind turbines are represented by actuator disks. A proposed variable actuator disk force method...... two methods overpredict it. The results of the k-ε-fP  eddy viscosity model are also compared with the original k-ε eddy viscosity model and large-eddy simulations. Compared to the large-eddy simulations-predicted velocity and power deficits, the k-ε-fP  is superior to the original k-ε model...

  14. Transient stress control of aeroengine disks based on active thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Shuiting; Wang, Ziyao; Li, Guo; Liu, Chuankai; Yang, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The essence of cooling in turbine system is a process of thermal management. • Active thermal management is proposed to control transient stress of disks. • The correlation between thermal load and transient stress of disks is built. • Stress level can be declined by actively adjusting the thermal load distribution. • Artificial temperature gradient can be used to counteract stress from rotating. - Abstract: The physical essence of cooling in the turbine system is a process of thermal management. In order to overcome the limits of passive thermal management based on thermal protection, the concept of active thermal management based on thermal load redistribution has been proposed. On this basis, this paper focuses on a near real aeroengine disk during a transient process and studies the stress control mechanism of active thermal management in transient conditions by a semi-analytical method. Active thermal management is conducted by imposing extra heating energy on the disk hub, which is represented by the coefficient of extra heat flow η. The results show that the transient stress level can be effectively controlled by actively adjusting the thermal load distribution. The decline ratio of the peak equivalent stress of the disk hub can be 9.0% for active thermal management load condition (η = 0.2) compared with passive condition (η = 0), even at a rotation speed of 10,000 r/min. The reason may be that the temperature distribution of the disk turns into an artificial V-shape because of the extra heating energy on the hub, and the resulting thermal stresses induced by the negative temperature gradients counteract parts of the stress from rotating.

  15. Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagepalli, Bharat [Niskayuna, NY; Barnes, Gary R [Delanson, NY; Gadre, Aniruddha D [Rexford, NY; Jansen, Patrick L [Scotia, NY; Bouchard, Jr., Charles G.; Jarczynski, Emil D [Scotia, NY; Garg, Jivtesh [Cambridge, MA

    2008-09-23

    A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

  16. The deterministic prediction of failure of low pressure steam turbine disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chun; Macdonald, D.D.

    1993-01-01

    Localized corrosion phenomena, including pitting corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and corrosion fatigue, are the principal causes of corrosion-induced damage in electric power generating facilities and typically result in more than 50% of the unscheduled outages. Prediction of damage, so that repairs and inspections can be made during scheduled outages, could have an enormous impact on the economics of electric power generation. To date, prediction of corrosion damage has been made on the basis of empirical/statistical methods that have proven to be insufficiently robust and accurate to form the basis for the desired inspection/repair protocol. In this paper, we describe a deterministic method for predicting localized corrosion damage. We have used the method to illustrate how pitting corrosion initiates stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for low pressure steam turbine disks downstream of the Wilson line, where a thin condensed liquid layer exists on the steel disk surfaces. Our calculations show that the SCC initiation and propagation are sensitive to the oxygen content of the steam, the environment in the thin liquid condensed layer, and the stresses that the disk experiences in service

  17. Cogen-absorption plants for refrigeration purposes and turbine air inlet cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langreck, Juergen [Colibri bv (Netherlands)

    2000-04-01

    Most cogeneration systems produce power and heat but with absorption refrigeration plants (ARP) the products are power and 'cold'. An ARP driven by heat from a turbine exhaust can provide the cooling for the inlet air with very low consumption of electricity, consequently there is a significant increase in power output from the cogeneration unit. Two different ARP systems are currently available but the author describes only the ammonia-water system, which can achieve temperatures down to -60 degrees C. The article discusses the principle behind ARP, the capital cost and returns on investment, how the cogeneration plant is linked to the ARP, ARP for turbine inlet air cooling, and the potential applications of cogeneration-ARP.

  18. Co-generation on steam industrial systems with disks turbines; Co-geracao em sistemas industriais de vapor com turbinas de discos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lezsovits, Ferenc [Universidad de Tecnologia y Economia de Budapest (Hungary)

    2010-03-15

    The disk turbine, also called Tesla turbine, being of simple construction and low cost, can be used as steam pressure reduction on industrial systems, generating simultaneously electric power, becoming the co-generation even at lower levels. Can be used for various operational parameters and mass flux ratios.This paper analyses the advantages and disadvantages of the turbines under various operation conditions.

  19. Turbine airfoil with controlled area cooling arrangement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2010-04-27

    A gas turbine airfoil (10) includes a serpentine cooling path (32) with a plurality of channels (34,42,44) fluidly interconnected by a plurality of turns (38,40) for cooling the airfoil wall material. A splitter component (50) is positioned within at least one of the channels to bifurcate the channel into a pressure-side channel (46) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the pressure side (24) and a suction-side channel (48) passing in between the outer wall (28) and the inner wall (30) of the suction side (26) longitudinally downstream of an intermediate height (52). The cross-sectional area of the pressure-side channel (46) and suction-side channel (48) are thereby controlled in spite of an increasing cross-sectional area of the airfoil along its longitudinal length, ensuring a sufficiently high mach number to provide a desired degree of cooling throughout the entire length of the airfoil.

  20. Analytical Modelling of the Effects of Different Gas Turbine Cooling Techniques on Engine Performance =

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Selcuk Can

    In this research, MATLAB SimulinkRTM was used to develop a cooled engine model for industrial gas turbines and aero-engines. The model consists of uncooled on-design, mean-line turbomachinery design and a cooled off-design analysis in order to evaluate the engine performance parameters by using operating conditions, polytropic efficiencies, material information and cooling system details. The cooling analysis algorithm involves a 2nd law analysis to calculate losses from the cooling technique applied. The model is used in a sensitivity analysis that evaluates the impacts of variations in metal Biot number, thermal barrier coating Biot number, film cooling effectiveness, internal cooling effectiveness and maximum allowable blade temperature on main engine performance parameters of aero and industrial gas turbine engines. The model is subsequently used to analyze the relative performance impact of employing Anti-Vortex Film Cooling holes (AVH) by means of data obtained for these holes by Detached Eddy Simulation-CFD Techniques that are valid for engine-like turbulence intensity conditions. Cooled blade configurations with AVH and other different external cooling techniques were used in a performance comparison study. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  1. CFD and Experimental Studies on Wind Turbines in Complex Terrain by Improved Actuator Disk Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Yan, Shu; Mu, Yanfei; Chen, Xinming; Shi, Shaoping

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, an onshore wind farm in mountainous area of southwest China was investigated through numerical and experimental methods. An improved actuator disk method, taking rotor data (i.e. blade geometry information, attack angle, blade pitch angle) into account, was carried out to investigate the flow characteristic of the wind farm, especially the wake developing behind the wind turbines. Comparing to the classic AD method and the situ measurements, the improved AD shows better agreements with the measurements. The turbine power was automatically predicted in CFD by blade element method, which agreed well with the measurement results. The study proved that the steady CFD simulation with improved actuator disk method was able to evaluate wind resource well and give good balance between computing efficiency and accuracy, in contrary to much more expensive computation methods such as actuator-line/actuator-surface transient model, or less accurate methods such as linear velocity reduction wake model.

  2. Achieving better cooling of turbine blades using numerical simulation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inozemtsev, A. A.; Tikhonov, A. S.; Sendyurev, C. I.; Samokhvalov, N. Yu.

    2013-02-01

    A new design of the first-stage nozzle vane for the turbine of a prospective gas-turbine engine is considered. The blade's thermal state is numerically simulated in conjugate statement using the ANSYS CFX 13.0 software package. Critical locations in the blade design are determined from the distribution of heat fluxes, and measures aimed at achieving more efficient cooling are analyzed. Essentially lower (by 50-100°C) maximal temperature of metal has been achieved owing to the results of the performed work.

  3. Demonstration of Enabling Spar-Shell Cooling Technology in Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downs, James [Florida Turbine Technologies Inc., Jupiter, FL (United States)

    2014-12-29

    In this Advanced Turbine Program-funded Phase III project, Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. (FTT) has developed and tested, at a pre-commercial prototypescale, spar-shell turbine airfoils in a commercial gas turbine. The airfoil development is based upon FTT’s research and development to date in Phases I and II of Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grants. During this program, FTT has partnered with an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM), Siemens Energy, to produce sparshell turbine components for the first pre-commercial prototype test in an F-Class industrial gas turbine engine and has successfully completed validation testing. This project will further the commercialization of this new technology in F-frame and other highly cooled turbine airfoil applications. FTT, in cooperation with Siemens, intends to offer the spar-shell vane as a first-tier supplier for retrofit applications and new large frame industrial gas turbines. The market for the spar-shell vane for these machines is huge. According to Forecast International, 3,211 new gas turbines units (in the >50MW capacity size range) will be ordered in ten years from 2007 to 2016. FTT intends to enter the market in a low rate initial production. After one year of successful extended use, FTT will quickly ramp up production and sales, with a target to capture 1% of the market within the first year and 10% within 5 years (2020).

  4. Selection of a turbine cooling system applying multi-disciplinary design considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, B

    2001-05-01

    The presented paper describes a multi-disciplinary cooling selection approach applied to major gas turbine engine hot section components, including turbine nozzles, blades, discs, combustors and support structures, which maintain blade tip clearances. The paper demonstrates benefits of close interaction between participating disciplines starting from early phases of the hot section development. The approach targets advancements in engine performance and cost by optimizing the design process, often requiring compromises within individual disciplines.

  5. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  6. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy Assessed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, John

    2002-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic aircraft will require nickel-base disk alloys that can be used at temperatures in excess of 1300 F. Smaller turbine engines, with higher rotational speeds, also require disk alloys with high strength. To address these challenges, NASA funded a series of disk programs in the 1990's. Under these initiatives, Honeywell and Allison focused their attention on Alloy 10, a high-strength, nickel-base disk alloy developed by Honeywell for application in the small turbine engines used in regional jet aircraft. Since tensile, creep, and fatigue properties are strongly influenced by alloy grain size, the effect of heat treatment on grain size and the attendant properties were studied in detail. It was observed that a fine grain microstructure offered the best tensile and fatigue properties, whereas a coarse grain microstructure offered the best creep resistance at high temperatures. Therefore, a disk with a dual microstructure, consisting of a fine-grained bore and a coarse-grained rim, should have a high potential for optimal performance. Under NASA's Ultra-Safe Propulsion Project and Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program, a disk program was initiated at the NASA Glenn Research Center to assess the feasibility of using Alloy 10 to produce a dual-microstructure disk. The objectives of this program were twofold. First, existing dual-microstructure heat treatment (DMHT) technology would be applied and refined as necessary for Alloy 10 to yield the desired grain structure in full-scale forgings appropriate for use in regional gas turbine engines. Second, key mechanical properties from the bore and rim of a DMHT Alloy 10 disk would be measured and compared with conventional heat treatments to assess the benefits of DMHT technology. At Wyman Gordon and Honeywell, an active-cooling DMHT process was used to convert four full-scale Alloy 10 disks to a dual-grain microstructure. The resulting microstructures are illustrated in the

  7. Alternative Liquid Fuel Effects on Cooled Silicon Nitride Marine Gas Turbine Airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holowczak, J.

    2002-03-01

    With prior support from the Office of Naval Research, DARPA, and U.S. Department of Energy, United Technologies is developing and engine environment testing what we believe to be the first internally cooled silicon nitride ceramic turbine vane in the United States. The vanes are being developed for the FT8, an aeroderivative stationary/marine gas turbine. The current effort resulted in further manufacturing and development and prototyping by two U.S. based gas turbine grade silicon nitride component manufacturers, preliminary development of both alumina, and YTRIA based environmental barrier coatings (EBC's) and testing or ceramic vanes with an EBC coating.

  8. Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant, T.; Buhagiar, D.; Farrugia, R. N.

    2014-06-01

    A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units.

  9. Offshore Floating Wind Turbine-driven Deep Sea Water Pumping for Combined Electrical Power and District Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sant, T; Buhagiar, D; Farrugia, R N

    2014-01-01

    A new concept utilising floating wind turbines to exploit the low temperatures of deep sea water for space cooling in buildings is presented. The approach is based on offshore hydraulic wind turbines pumping pressurised deep sea water to a centralised plant consisting of a hydro-electric power system coupled to a large-scale sea water-cooled air conditioning (AC) unit of an urban district cooling network. In order to investigate the potential advantages of this new concept over conventional technologies, a simplified model for performance simulation of a vapour compression AC unit was applied independently to three different systems, with the AC unit operating with (1) a constant flow of sea surface water, (2) a constant flow of sea water consisting of a mixture of surface sea water and deep sea water delivered by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine and (3) an intermittent flow of deep sea water pumped by a single offshore hydraulic wind turbine. The analysis was based on one year of wind and ambient temperature data for the Central Mediterranean that is known for its deep waters, warm climate and relatively low wind speeds. The study confirmed that while the present concept is less efficient than conventional turbines utilising grid-connected electrical generators, a significant portion of the losses associated with the hydraulic transmission through the pipeline are offset by the extraction of cool deep sea water which reduces the electricity consumption of urban air-conditioning units

  10. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je-Chin Han; Schobeiri, M.T. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect on Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  11. Analysis of combustion turbine inlet air cooling systems applied to an operating cogeneration power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacartegui, R.; Jimenez-Espadafor, F.; Sanchez, D.; Sanchez, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, combustion turbine inlet air cooling (CTIAC) systems are analyzed from an economic outlook, their effects on the global performance parameters and the economic results of the power plant. The study has been carried out on a combined cogeneration system, composed of a General Electric PG 6541 gas turbine and a heat recovery steam generator. The work has been divided into three parts. First, a revision of the present CTIAC technologies is shown, their effects on power plant performance and evaluation of the associated investment and maintenance costs. In a second phase of the work, the cogeneration plant was modelled with the objective of evaluating the power increase and the effects on the generated steam and the thermal oil. The cogeneration power plant model was developed, departing from the recorded operational data of the plant in 2005 and the gas turbine model offered by General Electric, to take into consideration that, in 2000, the gas turbine had been remodelled and the original performance curves should be corrected. The final objective of this model was to express the power plant main variables as a function of the gas turbine intake temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Finally, this model was applied to analyze the economic interest of different intake cooling systems, in different operative ranges and with different cooling capacities

  12. Nuclear closed-cycle gas turbine (HTGR-GT): dry cooled commercial power plant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Boland, C.R.

    1979-11-01

    Combining the modern and proven power conversion system of the closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) with an advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) results in a power plant well suited to projected utility needs into the 21st century. The gas turbine HTGR (HTGR-GT) power plant benefits are consistent with national energy goals, and the high power conversion efficiency potential satisfies increasingly important resource conservation demands. Established technology bases for the HTGR-GT are outlined, together with the extensive design and development program necessary to commercialize the nuclear CCGT plant for utility service in the 1990s. This paper outlines the most recent design studies by General Atomic for a dry-cooled commercial plant of 800 to 1200 MW(e) power, based on both non-intercooled and intercooled cycles, and discusses various primary system aspects. Details are given of the reactor turbine system (RTS) and on integrating the major power conversion components in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel

  13. Gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ok Ryong

    2004-01-01

    This book introduces gas turbine cycle explaining general thing of gas turbine, full gas turbine cycle, Ericson cycle and Brayton cycle, practical gas turbine cycle without pressure loss, multiaxial type gas turbine cycle and special gas turbine cycle, application of basic theory on a study on suction-cooling gas turbine cycle with turbo-refrigerating machine using the bleed air, and general performance characteristics of the suction-cooling gas turbine cycle combined with absorption-type refrigerating machine.

  14. Computational investigation of hydrokinetic turbine arrays in an open channel using an actuator disk-LES model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seokkoo; Yang, Xiaolei; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2012-11-01

    While a considerable amount of work has focused on studying the effects and performance of wind farms, very little is known about the performance of hydrokinetic turbine arrays in open channels. Unlike large wind farms, where the vertical fluxes of momentum and energy from the atmospheric boundary layer comprise the main transport mechanisms, the presence of free surface in hydrokinetic turbine arrays inhibits vertical transport. To explore this fundamental difference between wind and hydrokinetic turbine arrays, we carry out LES with the actuator disk model to systematically investigate various layouts of hydrokinetic turbine arrays mounted on the bed of a straight open channel with fully-developed turbulent flow fed at the channel inlet. Mean flow quantities and turbulence statistics within and downstream of the arrays will be analyzed and the effect of the turbine arrays as means for increasing the effective roughness of the channel bed will be extensively discussed. This work was supported by Initiative for Renewable Energy & the Environment (IREE) (Grant No. RO-0004-12), and computational resources were provided by Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  15. Contingency power for small turboshaft engines using water injection into turbine cooling air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Berger, Brett; Klann, Gary A.; Clark, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Because of one engine inoperative requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot day, high altitude takeoff situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stresses is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  16. The Effect of Protoplanetary Disk Cooling Times on the Formation of Gas Giant Planets by Gravitational Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, Alan P., E-mail: aboss@carnegiescience.edu [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road, NW, Washington, DC 20015-1305 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Observational evidence exists for the formation of gas giant planets on wide orbits around young stars by disk gravitational instability, but the roles of disk instability and core accretion for forming gas giants on shorter period orbits are less clear. The controversy extends to population synthesis models of exoplanet demographics and to hydrodynamical models of the fragmentation process. The latter refers largely to the handling of radiative transfer in three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamical models, which controls heating and cooling processes in gravitationally unstable disks, and hence dense clump formation. A suite of models using the β cooling approximation is presented here. The initial disks have masses of 0.091 M {sub ⊙} and extend from 4 to 20 au around a 1 M {sub ⊙} protostar. The initial minimum Toomre Qi values range from 1.3 to 2.7, while β ranges from 1 to 100. We show that the choice of Q {sub i} is equal in importance to the β value assumed: high Q{sub i} disks can be stable for small β , when the initial disk temperature is taken as a lower bound, while low Q{sub i} disks can fragment for high β . These results imply that the evolution of disks toward low Q{sub i} must be taken into account in assessing disk fragmentation possibilities, at least in the inner disk, i.e., inside about 20 au. The models suggest that if low Q{sub i} disks can form, there should be an as yet largely undetected population of gas giants orbiting G dwarfs between about 6 au and 16 au.

  17. Analysis of Turbine Blade Relative Cooling Flow Factor Used in the Subroutine Coolit Based on Film Cooling Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat transfer correlations of data on flat plates are used to explore the parameters in the Coolit program used for calculating the quantity of cooling air for controlling turbine blade temperature. Correlations for both convection and film cooling are explored for their relevance to predicting blade temperature as a function of a total cooling flow which is split between external film and internal convection flows. Similar trends to those in Coolit are predicted as a function of the percent of the total cooling flow that is in the film. The exceptions are that no film or 100 percent convection is predicted to not be able to control blade temperature, while leaving less than 25 percent of the cooling flow in the convection path results in nearing a limit on convection cooling as predicted by a thermal effectiveness parameter not presently used in Coolit.

  18. Model-based fault detection for generator cooling system in wind turbines using SCADA data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchersen, Anders Bech; Kinnaert, Michel

    2016-01-01

    In this work, an early fault detection system for the generator cooling of wind turbines is presented and tested. It relies on a hybrid model of the cooling system. The parameters of the generator model are estimated by an extended Kalman filter. The estimated parameters are then processed by an ...

  19. Sensitivity-Based Simulation Software for Optimization of Turbine Blade Cooling Strategies, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In recent years, there has been a tendency to use ever-higher gas turbine inlet temperatures, resulting in ever-higher heat loads necessitating efficient cooling....

  20. Vibration of imperfect rotating disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the theoretical and numerical calculations of the flexural vibrations of a bladed disk. The main focus of this study is to elaborate the basic background for diagnostic and identification methods for ascertaining the main properties of the real structure or an experimental model of turbine disks. The reduction of undesirable vibrations of blades is proposed by using damping heads, which on the experimental model of turbine disk are applied only on a limited number of blades. This partial setting of damping heads introduces imperfection in mass, stiffness and damping distribution on the periphery and leads to more complicated dynamic properties than those of a perfect disk. Calculation of FEM model and analytic—numerical solution of disk behaviour in the limited (two modes frequency range shows the splitting of resonance with an increasing speed of disk rotation. The spectrum of resonance is twice denser than that of a perfect disk.

  1. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    OpenAIRE

    Shashishekara S. Talya; J. N. Rajadas; A. Chattopadhyay

    1999-01-01

    Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with ...

  2. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a cooling system for the transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, David J.; Rodriguez, Jose L.

    2015-12-08

    A cooling system is provided for a transition (420) of a gas turbine engine (410). The cooling system includes a cowling (460) configured to receive an air flow (111) from an outlet of a compressor section of the gas turbine engine (410). The cowling (460) is positioned adjacent to a region of the transition (420) to cool the transition region upon circulation of the air flow within the cowling (460). The cooling system further includes a manifold (121) to directly couple the air flow (111) from the compressor section outlet to an inlet (462) of the cowling (460). The cowling (460) is configured to circulate the air flow (111) within an interior space (426) of the cowling (460) that extends radially outward from an inner diameter (423) of the cowling to an outer diameter (424) of the cowling at an outer surface.

  3. Airfoil, platform, and cooling passage measurements on a rotating transonic high-pressure turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickol, Jeremy B.

    An experiment was performed at The Ohio State University Gas Turbine Laboratory for a film-cooled high-pressure turbine stage operating at design-corrected conditions, with variable rotor and aft purge cooling flow rates. Several distinct experimental programs are combined into one experiment and their results are presented. Pressure and temperature measurements in the internal cooling passages that feed the airfoil film cooling are used as boundary conditions in a model that calculates cooling flow rates and blowing ratio out of each individual film cooling hole. The cooling holes on the suction side choke at even the lowest levels of film cooling, ejecting more than twice the coolant as the holes on the pressure side. However, the blowing ratios are very close due to the freestream massflux on the suction side also being almost twice as great. The highest local blowing ratios actually occur close to the airfoil stagnation point as a result of the low freestream massflux conditions. The choking of suction side cooling holes also results in the majority of any additional coolant added to the blade flowing out through the leading edge and pressure side rows. A second focus of this dissertation is the heat transfer on the rotor airfoil, which features uncooled blades and blades with three different shapes of film cooling hole: cylindrical, diffusing fan shape, and a new advanced shape. Shaped cooling holes have previously shown immense promise on simpler geometries, but experimental results for a rotating turbine have not previously been published in the open literature. Significant improvement from the uncooled case is observed for all shapes of cooling holes, but the improvement from the round to more advanced shapes is seen to be relatively minor. The reduction in relative effectiveness is likely due to the engine-representative secondary flow field interfering with the cooling flow mechanics in the freestream, and may also be caused by shocks and other

  4. A review of helium gas turbine technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No, Hee Cheon; Kim, Ji Hwan; Kim, Hyeun Min

    2007-01-01

    Current High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) are based on a closed brayton cycle with helium gas as the working fluid. Thermodynamic performance of the axial-flow helium gas turbines is of critical concern as it considerably affects the overall cycle efficiency. Helium gas turbines pose some design challenges compared to steam or air turbomachinery because of the physical properties of helium and the uniqueness of the operating conditions at high pressure with low pressure ratio. This report present a review of the helium Brayton cycle experiences in Germany and in Japan. The design and availability of helium gas turbines for HTGR are also presented in this study. We have developed a new throughflow calculation code to calculate the design-point performance of helium gas turbines. Use of the method has been illustrated by applying it to the GTHTR300 reference

  5. Influence of different means of turbine blade cooling on the thermodynamic performance of combined cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanjay; Singh, Onkar; Prasad, B.N.

    2008-01-01

    A comparative study of the influence of different means of turbine blade cooling on the thermodynamic performance of combined cycle power plant is presented. Seven schemes involving air and steam as coolants under open and closed loop cooling techniques have been studied. The open loop incorporates the internal convection, film and transpiration cooling techniques. Closed loop cooling includes only internal convection cooling. It has been found that closed loop steam cooling offers more specific work and consequently gives higher value of plant efficiency of about 60%, whereas open loop transpiration steam cooling, open loop steam internal convection cooling, transpiration air cooling, film steam cooling, film air, and internal convection air cooling have been found to yield lower values of plant efficiency in decreasing order as compared to closed loop steam cooling

  6. Effects of Hot Streak and Phantom Cooling on Heat Transfer in a Cooled Turbine Stage Including Particulate Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bons, Jeffrey [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Ameri, Ali [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-01-08

    The objective of this research effort was to develop a validated computational modeling capability for the characterization of the effects of hot streaks and particulate deposition on the heat load of modern gas turbines. This was accomplished with a multi-faceted approach including analytical, experimental, and computational components. A 1-year no cost extension request was approved for this effort, so the total duration was 4 years. The research effort succeeded in its ultimate objective by leveraging extensive experimental deposition studies complemented by computational modeling. Experiments were conducted with hot streaks, vane cooling, and combinations of hot streaks with vane cooling. These studies contributed to a significant body of corporate knowledge of deposition, in combination with particle rebound and deposition studies funded by other agencies, to provide suitable conditions for the development of a new model. The model includes the following physical phenomena: elastic deformation, plastic deformation, adhesion, and shear removal. It also incorporates material property sensitivity to temperature and tangential-normal velocity rebound cross-dependencies observed in experiments. The model is well-suited for incorporation in CFD simulations of complex gas turbine flows due to its algebraic (explicit) formulation. This report contains model predictions compared to coefficient of restitution data available in the open literature as well as deposition results from two different high temperature turbine deposition facilities. While the model comparisons with experiments are in many cases promising, several key aspects of particle deposition remain elusive. The simple phenomenological nature of the model allows for parametric dependencies to be evaluated in a straightforward manner. This effort also included the first-ever full turbine stage deposition model published in the open literature. The simulations included hot streaks and simulated vane cooling

  7. Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer results and operating data from a natural-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaguila, Anthony J; Freche, John C

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant heat-transfer data and operating data were obtained with a natural-convection water-cooled turbine over range of turbine speeds and inlet-gas temperatures. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for natural-convection heat transfer. The turbine data were displaced from a theoretical equation for natural convection heat transfer in the turbulent region and from natural-convection data obtained with vertical cylinders and plates; possible disruption of natural convection circulation within the blade coolant passages was thus indicated. Comparison of non dimensional temperature-ratio parameters for the blade leading edge, midchord, and trailing edge indicated that the blade cooling effectiveness is greatest at the midchord and least at the trailing edge.

  8. Contingency power for a small turboshaft engine by using water injection into turbine cooling air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiadny, Thomas J.; Klann, Gary A.

    1992-01-01

    Because of one-engine-inoperative (OEI) requirements, together with hot-gas reingestion and hot-day, high-altitude take-off situations, power augmentation for multiengine rotorcraft has always been of critical interest. However, power augmentation by using overtemperature at the turbine inlet will shorten turbine life unless a method of limiting thermal and mechanical stress is found. A possible solution involves allowing the turbine inlet temperature to rise to augment power while injecting water into the turbine cooling air to limit hot-section metal temperatures. An experimental water injection device was installed in an engine and successfully tested. Although concern for unprotected subcomponents in the engine hot section prevented demonstration of the technique's maximum potential, it was still possible to demonstrate increases in power while maintaining nearly constant turbine rotor blade temperature.

  9. Conjugate heat transfer investigation on the cooling performance of air cooled turbine blade with thermal barrier coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yongbin; Ma, Chao; Ge, Bing; Zang, Shusheng

    2016-08-01

    A hot wind tunnel of annular cascade test rig is established for measuring temperature distribution on a real gas turbine blade surface with infrared camera. Besides, conjugate heat transfer numerical simulation is performed to obtain cooling efficiency distribution on both blade substrate surface and coating surface for comparison. The effect of thermal barrier coating on the overall cooling performance for blades is compared under varied mass flow rate of coolant, and spatial difference is also discussed. Results indicate that the cooling efficiency in the leading edge and trailing edge areas of the blade is the lowest. The cooling performance is not only influenced by the internal cooling structures layout inside the blade but also by the flow condition of the mainstream in the external cascade path. Thermal barrier effects of the coating vary at different regions of the blade surface, where higher internal cooling performance exists, more effective the thermal barrier will be, which means the thermal protection effect of coatings is remarkable in these regions. At the designed mass flow ratio condition, the cooling efficiency on the pressure side varies by 0.13 for the coating surface and substrate surface, while this value is 0.09 on the suction side.

  10. Optimizing parameters of GTU cycle and design values of air-gas channel in a gas turbine with cooled nozzle and rotor blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kler, A. M.; Zakharov, Yu. B.

    2012-09-01

    The authors have formulated the problem of joint optimization of pressure and temperature of combustion products before gas turbine, profiles of nozzle and rotor blades of gas turbine, and cooling air flow rates through nozzle and rotor blades. The article offers an original approach to optimization of profiles of gas turbine blades where the optimized profiles are presented as linear combinations of preliminarily formed basic profiles. The given examples relate to optimization of the gas turbine unit on the criterion of power efficiency at preliminary heat removal from air flows supplied for the air-gas channel cooling and without such removal.

  11. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Turbine Bladed Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2012-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. The standard technique for forced response analysis to assess structural integrity is to decompose a CFD generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non-harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. These complications suggest the question of whether frequency domain analysis is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements. It was hypothesized that the randomness and other variation from the standard harmonic excitation would reduce the blade structural response, but the results showed little reduction. The second study was of a realistic model of a bladed-disk excited by the same CFD used in the J2X engine program. The results showed that the transient analysis results were up to 10% higher for "clean" nodal diameter excitations and six times larger for "messy" excitations, where substantial Fourier content around the main harmonic exists.

  12. A basic condition-based maintenance strategy for air-cooled turbine generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laird, T.; Griffith, G.; Hoof, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the methods of using condition-based maintenance (CBM) for turbine generators. Even though it is focused on the maintenance strategy for air-cooled generators, all types of power producers can realize benefits from a better maintenance strategy at lower costs. A reliable assessment of the actual unit condition requires detailed knowledge of the unit design, operational weaknesses, cost of maintenance and operational capabilities. (author)

  13. High temperature turbine engine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carruthers, W.D.; Boyd, G.L.

    1993-07-20

    A hybrid ceramic/metallic gas turbine is described comprising; a housing defining an inlet, an outlet, and a flow path communicating the inlet with the outlet for conveying a flow of fluid through the housing, a rotor member journaled by the housing in the flow path, the rotor member including a compressor rotor portion rotatively inducting ambient air via the inlet and delivering this air pressurized to the flow path downstream of the compressor rotor, a combustor disposed in the flow path downstream of the compressor receiving the pressurized air along with a supply of fuel to maintain combustion providing a flow of high temperature pressurized combustion products in the flow path downstream thereof, the rotor member including a turbine rotor portion disposed in the flow path downstream of the combustor and rotatively expanding the combustion products toward ambient for flow from the turbine engine via the outlet, the turbine rotor portion providing shaft power driving the compressor rotor portion and an output shaft portion of the rotor member, a disk-like metallic housing portion journaling the rotor member to define a rotational axis therefore, and a disk-like annular ceramic turbine shroud member bounding the flow path downstream of the combustor and circumscribing the turbine rotor portion to define a running clearance therewith, the disk-like ceramic turbine shroud member having a reference axis coaxial with the rotational axis and being spaced axially from the metallic housing portion in mutually parallel concentric relation therewith and a plurality of spacers disposed between ceramic disk-like shroud member and the metallic disk-like housing portion and circumferentially spaced apart, each of the spacers having a first and second end portion having an end surface adjacent the shroud member and the housing portion respectively, the end surfaces having a cylindrical curvature extending transversely relative to the shroud member and the housing portion.

  14. Advanced LP turbine installation at 1300 MW nuclear power station Unterweser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, G.; Oeynhausen, H.; Termuehlen, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on Preussen Elektra AG's Unterweser power plant. The steam turbine-generator features a disk-type LP turbine rotor design developed in the late 1960's to early 1970's. This rotor design has been installed in 19 nuclear power plants. The 47 rotors in these plants have been in operation for an average of almost 10 years. The design of the 1970 vintage nuclear LP turbine rotors was based on extensive experience gained with disk-type rotors of fossil turbines built in the 1950's. When EPRI reported about corrosion cracking in nuclear LP turbines, a program was initiated by Siemens/KWU as original steam turbine supplier to ultrasonically inspect all their disk-type rotors in nuclear power plats. Indications on one rotor disk in the Unterweser plant was found. This single event was the only one found out of 310 disks inspected in nuclear power plants

  15. Exploring Disks Around Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    Giant planets are thought to form in circumstellar disks surrounding young stars, but material may also accrete into a smaller disk around the planet. Weve never detected one of these circumplanetary disks before but thanks to new simulations, we now have a better idea of what to look for.Image from previous work simulating a Jupiter-mass planet forming inside a circumstellar disk. The planet has its own circumplanetary disk of accreted material. [Frdric Masset]Elusive DisksIn the formation of giant planets, we think the final phase consists of accretion onto the planet from a disk that surrounds it. This circumplanetary disk is important to understand, since it both regulates the late gas accretion and forms the birthplace of future satellites of the planet.Weve yet to detect a circumplanetary disk thus far, because the resolution needed to spot one has been out of reach. Now, however, were entering an era where the disk and its kinematics may be observable with high-powered telescopes (like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array).To prepare for such observations, we need models that predict the basic characteristics of these disks like the mass, temperature, and kinematic properties. Now a researcher at the ETH Zrich Institute for Astronomy in Switzerland, Judit Szulgyi, has worked toward this goal.Simulating CoolingSzulgyi performs a series of 3D global radiative hydrodynamic simulations of 1, 3, 5, and 10 Jupiter-mass (MJ) giant planets and their surrounding circumplanetary disks, embedded within the larger circumstellar disk around the central star.Density (left column), temperature (center), and normalized angular momentum (right) for a 1 MJ planet over temperatures cooling from 10,000 K (top) to 1,000 K (bottom). At high temperatures, a spherical circumplanetary envelope surrounds the planet, but as the planet cools, the envelope transitions around 64,000 K to a flattened disk. [Szulgyi 2017]This work explores the effects of different planet temperatures and

  16. Coupling Network Computing Applications in Air-cooled Turbine Blades Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Yan, Peigang; Xie, Ming; Han, Wanjin

    2018-05-01

    Through establishing control parameters from blade outside to inside, the parametric design of air-cooled turbine blade based on airfoil has been implemented. On the basis of fast updating structure features and generating solid model, a complex cooling system has been created. Different flow units are modeled into a complex network topology with parallel and serial connection. Applying one-dimensional flow theory, programs have been composed to get pipeline network physical quantities along flow path, including flow rate, pressure, temperature and other parameters. These inner units parameters set as inner boundary conditions for external flow field calculation program HIT-3D by interpolation, thus to achieve full field thermal coupling simulation. Referring the studies in literatures to verify the effectiveness of pipeline network program and coupling algorithm. After that, on the basis of a modified design, and with the help of iSIGHT-FD, an optimization platform had been established. Through MIGA mechanism, the target of enhancing cooling efficiency has been reached, and the thermal stress has been effectively reduced. Research work in this paper has significance for rapid deploying the cooling structure design.

  17. Implementation of creep-fatigue model into finite-element code to assess cooled turbine blade.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dedekind, MO

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Turbine blades which are designed with airfoil cooling are subject to thermo-mechanical fatigue as well as creep damage. These problems arise due to thermal cycling and high operating temperatures in service. An implementation of fatigue and creep...

  18. Development of advanced P/M Ni-base superalloys for turbine disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garibov Genrikh S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the process of evolution of powder metallurgy in Russia the task permanently formulated was the following: to improve strength properties of P/M superalloys without application of additional complex HIPed blanks deformation operation. On the other hand development of a turbine disk material structure to ensure an improvement in aircraft engine performance requires the use of special HIP and heat treatment conditions. To ensure maximum strength properties of disk materials it is necessary to form a structure which would have optimum size of solid solution grains, γ′-phases and carbides. Along with that heating of the material up to a temperature determined by solvus of an alloy ensures a stable and reproducible level of mechanical properties of the disks. The above-said can be illustrated by successful mastering of new complex-alloyed VVP-class superalloys with the use of powder size − 100 μm. Application of special HIP and heat treatment conditions for these superalloys to obtain the desired grain size and the strengthening γ′-phase precipitates allowed a noticeable improvement in ultimate tensile strength and yield strength up to ≥1600 MPa and ≥1200 MPa respectively. 100 hrs rupture strength at 650 ∘C and 750 ∘C was improved up to 1140 MPa and 750 MPa respectively. P/M VVP nickel-base superalloys offer higher characteristics in comparison with many superalloys designed for the same purposes. HIPed disc compacts manufactured from PREP-powder have a homogeneous micro- and macrostructure, a stable level of mechanical properties.

  19. Coarse Grid Modeling of Turbine Film Cooling Flows Using Volumetric Source Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, James D.; Hunter, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    The recent trend in numerical modeling of turbine film cooling flows has been toward higher fidelity grids and more complex geometries. This trend has been enabled by the rapid increase in computing power available to researchers. However, the turbine design community requires fast turnaround time in its design computations, rendering these comprehensive simulations ineffective in the design cycle. The present study describes a methodology for implementing a volumetric source term distribution in a coarse grid calculation that can model the small-scale and three-dimensional effects present in turbine film cooling flows. This model could be implemented in turbine design codes or in multistage turbomachinery codes such as APNASA, where the computational grid size may be larger than the film hole size. Detailed computations of a single row of 35 deg round holes on a flat plate have been obtained for blowing ratios of 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0, and density ratios of 1.0 and 2.0 using a multiblock grid system to resolve the flows on both sides of the plate as well as inside the hole itself. These detailed flow fields were spatially averaged to generate a field of volumetric source terms for each conservative flow variable. Solutions were also obtained using three coarse grids having streamwise and spanwise grid spacings of 3d, 1d, and d/3. These coarse grid solutions used the integrated hole exit mass, momentum, energy, and turbulence quantities from the detailed solutions as volumetric source terms. It is shown that a uniform source term addition over a distance from the wall on the order of the hole diameter is able to predict adiabatic film effectiveness better than a near-wall source term model, while strictly enforcing correct values of integrated boundary layer quantities.

  20. Thermodynamic assessment of power requirements and impact of different gas-turbine inlet air cooling techniques at two different locations in Oman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawoud, B.; Zurigat, Y.H.; Bortmany, J.

    2005-01-01

    Gas-turbine inlet air cooling has been considered for boosting the power output during hot seasons. In this paper, the power requirements of several inlet air cooling techniques for gas-turbine power plants in two locations; namely, Marmul and Fahud, in Oman have been evaluated using typical meteorological year (TMY) data. The considered techniques are evaporative cooling, fogging cooling, absorption cooling using both LiBr-H 2 O and aqua-ammonia, and vapour-compression cooling systems. For evaporative cooling, an 88% approach to the wet-bulb temperature has been considered, compared with a 98% approach for fogging cooling. A design compressor inlet air temperature of 14 deg C has been assigned to LiBr-water chilling systems. For both aqua-ammonia absorption and vapour-compression refrigerating systems, a design compressor inlet air temperature of 8 deg C has been selected to avoid the formation of ice fragments as the air is drawn into the mouth of the compressor. These technologies have been compared with respect to their effectiveness in power boosting of small-size gas-turbine power plants used in two oil fields at Marmul and Fahud in the Sultanate of Oman. Fogging cooling is accompanied with 11.4% more electrical energy in comparison with evaporative cooling in both locations. The LiBr-H 2 O cooling offers 40% and 55% more energy than fogging cooling at Fahud and Marmul, respectively. Applying aqua-ammonia-water and vapour-compression cooling, a further annual energy production enhancement of 39% and 46% is expected in comparison with LiBr-H 2 O cooling at Fahud and Marmul, respectively

  1. Turbine airfoil fabricated from tapered extrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2013-07-16

    An airfoil (30) and fabrication process for turbine blades with cooling channels (26). Tapered tubes (32A-32D) are bonded together in a parallel sequence, forming a leading edge (21), a trailing edge (22), and pressure and suction side walls (23, 24) connected by internal ribs (25). The tapered tubes may be extruded without camber to simplify the extrusion process, then bonded along matching surfaces (34), forming a non-cambered airfoil (28), which may be cambered in a hot forming process and cut (48) to length. The tubes may have tapered walls that are thinner at the blade tip (T1) than at the base (T2), reducing mass. A cap (50) may be attached to the blade tip. A mounting lug (58) may be forged (60) on the airfoil base and then machined, completing the blade for mounting in a turbine rotor disk.

  2. Emergency cooling system for a gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.K.; Burylo, P.S.

    1975-01-01

    The site of the gas-cooled reactor with direct-circuit gas turbine is preferably the sea coast. An emergency cooling system with safety valve and emergency feed-water addition is designed which affects at least a part of the reactor core coolant after leaving the core. The emergency cooling system includes a water emergency cooling circuit with heat exchanger for the core coolant. The safety valve releases water or steam from the emergency coolant circuit when a certain temperature is exceeded; this is, however, replaced by the emergency feed-water. If the gas turbine exhibits a high and low pressure turbine stage, which are flowed through by coolant one behind another, a part of the coolant can be removed in front of each part turbine by two valves and be added to the haet exchanger. (RW/LH) [de

  3. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  4. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  5. Bimetallic Blisks with Shrouded Turbine Blades for Gas Turbine Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Magerramova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses prospects of using blisks with shrouded blades. Increasing an engine life and efficiency as well as mass reduction can also be achieved by increasing blade numbers and decreasing disk diameter. But design engineers are faced with the problem of blade placement because of the disk size and root dimensions.The problem of increasing life and cyclic durability, vibration strength, and lightweight design of the turbine gas turbine wheels, can be solved by an elimination of blade - disk locks.The technology of manufacturing one-piece blisks by connecting the blades with the disc part using hot isostatic pressing was developed. This technology allows us to use blades with shrouds. It is necessary to increase efficiency and to improve high cycle fatigue performance of rotor blades.One of the pressing problems is to ensure the necessary position of shrouds in relation to each other in the manufacturing process as well as in the service. Numerical studies of the influence of the shroud mounting position on blade strength during operation allowed us to develop a methodology of choosing a shroud mounting position.Based on the two turbine wheels (LPT and HPT calculations advantages of blisk design with respect to the lock-based design were shown. Application of bimetallic blisks with shrouded blades resulted in a lifespan increase and weight reduction.In addition, other advantages of blisk design are as follows: possible reduction in the number of parts, elimination of leaks and fretting that take place in the blade - disk locks, exception of expensive broaching operations and disk alloy saving. The shortcoming is elimination of damping in root connection. In addition, there are no widely used repair methods.Despite these disadvantages the usage of bimetallic turbine blisks with shrouded blades is very promising.

  6. Low Cost Heat Treatment Process for Production of Dual Microstructure Superalloy Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, John; Gabb, Tim; Kantzos, Pete; Furrer, David

    2003-01-01

    There are numerous incidents where operating conditions imposed on a component mandate different and distinct mechanical property requirements from location to location within the component. Examples include a crankshaft in an internal combustion engine, gears for an automotive transmission, and disks for a gas turbine engine. Gas turbine disks are often made from nickel-base superalloys, because these disks need to withstand the temperature and stresses involved in the gas turbine cycle. In the bore of the disk where the operating temperature is somewhat lower, the limiting material properties are often tensile and fatigue strength. In the rim of the disk, where the operating temperatures are higher than those of the bore, because of the proximity to the combustion gases, resistance to creep and crack growth are often the limiting properties.

  7. Assessment of off-design performance of a small-scale combined cooling and power system using an alternative operating strategy for gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Wei; Chen, Qiang; Lin, Ru-mou; Jin, Hong-guang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop an off-design model for a CCP system driven by gas turbine. • An alternative operating strategy is proposed to improve the system performance. • Off-design performance of the combined cooling and power system (CCP) is enhanced. • Effects of both the different operating strategy are analyzed and compared. • Performance enhancement mechanism of the proposed operating strategy is presented. - Abstract: A small-scale combined cooling and power (CCP) system usually serves district air conditioning apart from power generation purposes. The typical system consists of a gas turbine and an exhaust gas-fired absorption refrigerator. The surplus heat of the gas turbine is recovered to generate cooling energy. In this way, the CCP system has a high overall efficiency at the design point. However, the CCP system usually runs under off-design conditions because the users’ demand varies frequently. The operating strategy of the gas turbine will affect the thermodynamic performance of itself and the entire CCP system. The operating strategies for gas turbines include the reducing turbine inlet temperature (TIT) and the compressor inlet air throttling (IAT). A CCP system, consisting of an OPRA gas turbine and a double effects absorption refrigerator, is investigated to identify the effects of different operating strategies. The CCP system is simulated based on the partial-load model of gas turbine and absorption refrigerator. The off-design performance of the CCP system is compared under different operating strategies. The results show that the IAT strategy is the better one. At 50% rated power output of the gas turbine, the IAT operating strategy can increase overall system efficiency by 10% compared with the TIT strategy. In general, the IAT operating strategy is suited for other gas turbines. However, the benefits of IAT should be investigated in the future, when different gas turbine is adopted. This study may provide a new operating

  8. Three-dimensional GRMHD Simulations of Neutrino-cooled Accretion Disks from Neutron Star Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Daniel M.; Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-05-01

    Merging binaries consisting of two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a stellar-mass black hole typically form a massive accretion torus around the remnant black hole or long-lived NS. Outflows from these neutrino-cooled accretion disks represent an important site for r-process nucleosynthesis and the generation of kilonovae. We present the first three-dimensional, general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations including weak interactions and a realistic equation of state of such accretion disks over viscous timescales (380 ms). We witness the emergence of steady-state MHD turbulence, a magnetic dynamo with an ∼20 ms cycle, and the generation of a “hot” disk corona that launches powerful thermal outflows aided by the energy released as free nucleons recombine into α-particles. We identify a self-regulation mechanism that keeps the midplane electron fraction low (Y e ∼ 0.1) over viscous timescales. This neutron-rich reservoir, in turn, feeds outflows that retain a sufficiently low value of Y e ≈ 0.2 to robustly synthesize third-peak r-process elements. The quasi-spherical outflows are projected to unbind 40% of the initial disk mass with typical asymptotic escape velocities of 0.1c and may thus represent the dominant mass ejection mechanism in NS–NS mergers. Including neutrino absorption, our findings agree with previous hydrodynamical α-disk simulations that the entire range of r-process nuclei from the first to the third r-process peak can be synthesized in the outflows, in good agreement with observed solar system abundances. The asymptotic escape velocities and quantity of ejecta, when extrapolated to moderately higher disk masses, are consistent with those needed to explain the red kilonova emission following the NS merger GW170817.

  9. Estimation of Efficiency of the Cooling Channel of the Nozzle Blade of Gas-Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikulin, A. V.; Yaroslavtsev, N. L.; Zemlyanaya, V. A.

    2018-02-01

    The main direction of improvement of gas-turbine plants (GTP) and gas-turbine engines (GTE) is increasing the gas temperature at the turbine inlet. For the solution of this problem, promising systems of intensification of heat exchange in cooled turbine blades are developed. With this purpose, studies of the efficiency of the cooling channel of the nozzle blade in the basic modification and of the channel after constructive measures for improvement of the cooling system by the method of calorimetry in a liquid-metal thermostat were conducted. The combined system of heat-exchange intensification with the complicated scheme of branched channels is developed; it consists of a vortex matrix and three rows of inclined intermittent trip strips. The maximum value of hydraulic resistance ξ is observed at the first row of the trip strips, which is connected with the effect of dynamic impact of airflow on the channel walls, its turbulence, and rotation by 117° at the inlet to the channels formed by the trip strips. These factors explain the high value of hydraulic resistance equal to 3.7-3.4 for the first row of the trip strips. The obtained effect was also confirmed by the results of thermal tests, i.e., the unevenness of heat transfer on the back and on the trough of the blade is observed at the first row of the trip strips, which amounts 8-12%. This unevenness has a fading character; at the second row of the trip strips, it amounts to 3-7%, and it is almost absent at the third row. At the area of vortex matrix, the intensity of heat exchange on the blade back is higher as compared to the trough, which is explained by the different height of the matrix ribs on its opposite sides. The design changes in the nozzle blade of basic modification made it possible to increase the intensity of heat exchange by 20-50% in the area of the vortex matrix and by 15-30% on the section of inclined intermittent trip strips. As a result of research, new criteria dependences for the

  10. Gas fired advanced turbine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecren, R. T.; White, D. J.

    The basic concept thus derived from the Ericsson cycle is an intercooled, recuperated, and reheated gas turbine. Theoretical performance analyses, however, showed that reheat at high turbine rotor inlet temperatures (TRIT) did not provide significant efficiency gains and that the 50 percent efficiency goal could be met without reheat. Based upon these findings, the engine concept adopted as a starting point for the gas-fired advanced turbine system is an intercooled, recuperated (ICR) gas turbine. It was found that, at inlet temperatures greater than 2450 F, the thermal efficiency could be maintained above 50%, provided that the turbine cooling flows could be reduced to 7% of the main air flow or lower. This dual and conflicting requirement of increased temperatures and reduced cooling will probably force the abandonment of traditional air cooled turbine parts. Thus, the use of either ceramic materials or non-air cooling fluids has to be considered for the turbine nozzle guide vanes and turbine blades. The use of ceramic components for the proposed engine system is generally preferred because of the potential growth to higher temperatures that is available with such materials.

  11. Emergency cooling system for a nuclear reactor in a closed gas turbine plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frutschi, H.U.

    1974-01-01

    In undisturbed operation of the closed gas turbine plant with compressor stages, reactor, and turbine, a compressor stage driven by a separate motor is following with reduced power. The power input this way is so small that the working medium is just blown through without pressure increase. The compressor stage is connected with the reactor by means of a reactor feedback pipe with an additional cooler and with the other compressor stages by means of a recuperator in the pipe between these and the turbine. In case of emergency cooling, e.g. after the rupture of a pipe with decreasing pressure of the working medium, the feedback pipe is closed short and the additional compressor stage is brought to higher power. It serves as a coolant blower and transfers the necessary amount of working medium to the reactor. The compressor stage is controlled at a constant torque, so that the heat removal from the reactor is adapted to the conditions of the accident. (DG) [de

  12. Rotational effects on turbine blade cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govatzidakis, G.J.; Guenette, G.R.; Kerrebrock, J.L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    An experimental investigation of the influence of rotation on the heat transfer in a smooth, rectangular passage rotating in the orthogonal mode is presented. The passage simulates one of the cooling channels found in gas turbine blades. A constant heat flux is imposed on the model with either inward or outward flow. The effects of rotation and buoyancy on the Nusselt number were quantified by systematically varying the Rotation number, Density Ratio, Reynolds number, and Buoyancy parameter. The experiment utilizes a high resolution infrared temperature measurement technique in order to measure the wall temperature distribution. The experimental results show that the rotational effects on the Nusselt number are significant and proper turbine blade design must take into account the effects of rotation, buoyancy, and flow direction. The behavior of the Nusselt number distribution depends strongly on the particular side, axial position, flow direction, and the specific range of the scaling parameters. The results show a strong coupling between buoyancy and Corollas effects throughout the passage. For outward flow, the trailing side Nusselt numbers increase with Rotation number relative to stationary values. On the leading side, the Nusselt numbers tended to decrease with rotation near the inlet and subsequently increased farther downstream in the passage. The Nusselt numbers on the side walls generally increased with rotation. For inward flow, the Nusselt numbers generally improved relative to stationary results, but increases in the Nusselt number were relatively smaller than in the case of outward flow. For outward and inward flows, increasing the density ratio generally tended to decrease Nusselt numbers on the leading and trailing sides, but the exact behavior and magnitude depended on the local axial position and specific range of Buoyancy parameters.

  13. Multidisciplinary design optimization of film-cooled gas turbine blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Shashishekara S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Design optimization of a gas turbine blade geometry for effective film cooling toreduce the blade temperature has been done using a multiobjective optimization formulation. Three optimization formulations have been used. In the first, the average blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized. An upper bound constraint has been imposed on the maximum blade temperature. In the second, the maximum blade temperature is chosen as the objective function to be minimized with an upper bound constraint on the average blade temperature. In the third formulation, the blade average and maximum temperatures are chosen as objective functions. Shape optimization is performed using geometric parameters associated with film cooling and blade external shape. A quasi-three-dimensional Navier–Stokes solver for turbomachinery flows is used to solve for the flow field external to the blade with appropriate modifications to incorporate the effect of film cooling. The heat transfer analysis for temperature distribution within the blade is performed by solving the heat diffusion equation using the finite element method. The multiobjective Kreisselmeier–Steinhauser function approach has been used in conjunction with an approximate analysis technique for optimization. The results obtained using both formulations are compared with reference geometry. All three formulations yield significant reductions in blade temperature with the multiobjective formulation yielding largest reduction in blade temperature.

  14. Dynamic simulation for scram of high temperature gas-cooled reactor with indirect helium turbine cycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wenlong; Xie Heng

    2011-01-01

    A dynamic analysis code for this system was developed after the mathematical modeling and programming of important equipment of 10 MW High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Helium Turbine Power Generation (HTR-10GT), such as reactor core, heat exchanger and turbine-compressor system. A scram accident caused by a 0.1 $ reactivity injection at 5 second was simulated. The results show that the design emergency shutdown plan for this system is safe and reasonable and that the design of bypass valve has a large safety margin. (authors)

  15. Exergy, Economic and Environmental Analyses of Gas Turbine Inlet Air Cooling with a Heat Pump Using a Novel System Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Majdi Yazdi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbines incur a loss of output power during hot seasons due to high ambient air temperatures, and input air cooling systems are often used to partly offset this problem. Here, results are reported for an investigation of the utilization of a heat pump to cool the inlet air of a gas turbine compressor. The analyses are carried out for two climates: the city of Yazd, Iran, which has a hot, arid climate, and Tehran, Iran, which has a temperate climate. The heat pump input power is obtained from the gas turbine. The following parameters are determined, with and without the heat pump: net output power, first and second law efficiencies, quantities and costs of environmental pollutants, entropy generation and power generation. The results suggest that, by using the air-inlet cooling system, the mean output power increases during hot seasons by 11.5% and 10% for Yazd and Tehran, respectively, and that the costs of power generation (including pollution costs decrease by 11% and 10% for Yazd and Tehran, respectively. Also, the rate of generation of pollutants such as NOx and CO decrease by about 10% for Yazd and 35% for Tehran, while the average annual entropy generation rate increases by 9% for Yazd and 7% for Tehran, through air-inlet cooling. The average increase of the system first law efficiency is 2% and of the system second law efficiency is 1.5% with the inlet-air cooling system.

  16. Numerical study on film cooling and convective heat transfer characteristics in the cutback region of turbine blade trailing edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Yong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas turbine blade trailing edge is easy to burn out under the exposure of high-temperature gas due to its thin shape. The cooling of this area is an important task in gas turbine blade design. The structure design and analysis of trailing edge is critical because of the complexity of geometry, arrangement of cooling channels, design requirement of strength, and the working condition of high heat flux. In the present paper, a 3-D model of the trailing edge cooling channel is constructed and both structures with and without land are numerically investigated at different blowing ratio. The distributions of film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient on cutback and land surface are analyzed, respectively. According to the results, it is obtained that the distributions of film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient both show the symmetrical characteristics as a result of the periodic structure of the trailing edge. The increase of blowing ratio significantly improves the film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient on the cutback surface, which is beneficial to the cooling of trailing edge. It is also found that the land structure is advantageous for enhancing the streamwise film cooling effectiveness of the trailing edge surface while the film cooling effectiveness on the land surface remains at a low level. Convective heat transfer coefficient exhibits a strong dependency with the blowing ratio, which suggests that film cooling effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient must be both considered and analyzed in the design of trailing edge cooling structure.

  17. Study of Cycling Air-Cooling System with a Cold Accumulator for Micro Gas-Turbine Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochkov, V. F.; Stepanova, T. A.; Katenev, G. M.; Tumanovskii, V. A.; Borisova, P. N.

    2018-05-01

    Using the cycling air-cooling systems of the CTIC type (Combustion Turbine Inlet Cooling) with a cold accumulator in a micro gas-turbine installation (micro-GTI) to preserve its capacity under the seasonal temperature rise of outside air is described. Water ice is used as the body-storage in the accumulators, and ice water (water at 0.5-1.0°C) is used as the body that cools air. The ice water circulates between the accumulator and the air-water heat exchanger. The cold accumulator model with renewable ice resources is considered. The model contains the heat-exchanging tube lattice-evaporator covered with ice. The lattice is cross-flowed with water. The criterion heat exchange equation that describes the process in the cold accumulator under consideration is presented. The calculations of duration of its active operation were performed. The dependence of cold accumulator service life on water circulation rate was evaluated. The adequacy of the design model was confirmed experimentally in the mock-up of the cold accumulator with a refrigerating machine periodically creating a 200 kg ice reserve in the reservoir-storage. The design model makes it possible to determine the weight of ice reserve of the discharged cold accumulator for cooling the cycle air in the operation of a C-30 type micro- GTI produced by the Capstone Company or micro-GTIs of other capacities. Recommendations for increasing the working capacity of cold accumulators of CTIC-systems of a micro-GTI were made.

  18. Parametric simulation on enhancement of the Regenerative Gas Turbine performance by effect of Inlet Air Cooling system and Steam Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadel Abdulrazzaq Alkumait

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Iraq being one of the developing countries of the world considers energy efficiency and the impact of its generation on the environment an imperative process in improvement of its power generation policies. Iraq bearing high temperatures all year long results in reduction of air density, therefore, Inlet air Cooling and Steam Injection Gas Turbines are a striking addition to the regenerative gas turbines. Regenerating Gas turbines tend to have a high back work ratio and a high exhaust temperature, thus, it leads to a low efficiency in power generation in hotter climate. Moreover, STIG and IAC through fog cooling have known to be the best retrofitting methods available in the industry which improve the efficiency of generation from 30.5 to 43% and increase the power output from 22MW to 33.5MW as the outcomes of computer simulations reveal. Additionally, this happens without bringing about much extensive change to original features of the power generation cycle. Furthermore, STIG and spray coolers have also resulted in power boosting and exceeding generation efficiency of gas turbine power plant.

  19. Experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow using V and broken V ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sourabh; Amano, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land-based power generation, and various industrial applications. With an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures, developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output; these advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine designs to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream of gas are based on an increase in the heat transfer areas and on the promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, an improvement in performance is obtained by casting repeated continuous V- and broken V-shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channels into the core of the blade. A detailed experimental investigation is done for two pass square channels with a 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for a steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° V- and broken 60° V-ribs in a channel are considered. A series of thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for Reynolds numbers 16,000, 56,000 and 85,000 within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the rib. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. A series of experimental measurements is performed to predict the overall performance of the channel. This paper presents an attempt to collect information about the Nusselt number, the pressure drop and the overall performance of the eight different ribbed ducts at the specified Reynolds number. The main contribution of this study is to evaluate the best combination of rib arrangements

  20. Investigation of cool down processes in a NPP turbine of the K-1000-60/1500 type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereverzev, D.A.; Lebedev, A.G.; Palej, V.A.

    1985-01-01

    Methods of mathematical simulation were used to investigate cooling-off dynamics of separate NPP turbine parts of the K-1000-60/1500 type during shutdowns of different duration. Investigations indicated that a flange section of horizontal external casing joint in the steam inlet zone of the intermediate pressure casing is a main place limiting duration of turbine starting regime. When strengthening thermal protection of branch pipes, turbine start-up time (after shutdown during 72-168 h) can be reduced by 0.25-0.3 h; if also pick-ups are isolated than reduction of start-up duration will constitute 0.5-0.7 h. During shutdowns of shorter duration all critical assemblies will not limit in practice time of starting regime

  1. Shape design of internal cooling passages within a turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Grzegorz; Nowak, Iwona

    2012-04-01

    The article concerns the optimization of the shape and location of non-circular passages cooling the blade of a gas turbine. To model the shape, four Bezier curves which form a closed profile of the passage were used. In order to match the shape of the passage to the blade profile, a technique was put forward to copy and scale the profile fragments into the component, and build the outline of the passage on the basis of them. For so-defined cooling passages, optimization calculations were carried out with a view to finding their optimal shape and location in terms of the assumed objectives. The task was solved as a multi-objective problem with the use of the Pareto method, for a cooling system composed of four and five passages. The tool employed for the optimization was the evolutionary algorithm. The article presents the impact of the population on the task convergence, and discusses the impact of different optimization objectives on the Pareto optimal solutions obtained. Due to the problem of different impacts of individual objectives on the position of the solution front which was noticed during the calculations, a two-step optimization procedure was introduced. Also, comparative optimization calculations for the scalar objective function were carried out and set up against the non-dominated solutions obtained in the Pareto approach. The optimization process resulted in a configuration of the cooling system that allows a significant reduction in the temperature of the blade and its thermal stress.

  2. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  3. A study of silver behavior in Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawa, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    A Gas-turbine High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (GT-HTGR) is one of the promising reactor systems of future HTGRs. In the design of GT-HTGR, behavior of fission products, especially of silver, is considered to be important from the view point of maintenance of gas-turbine. A study of silver behavior in the GT-HTGR was carried out based on current knowledge. The purposes of this study were to determine an importance of the silver problem quantitatively, countermeasures to the problem and items of future research and development which will be needed. In this study, inventory, fractional release from fuel, plateout in the primary circuit and radiation dose were evaluated, respectively. Based on this study, it is predicted that gamma-ray from plateout silver in gas-turbine system contributes about a half of total radiation dose after reactor shutdown. In future, more detail data for silver release from fuel, plateout behavior, etc. using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), for example, will be needed to carry out reasonable design. (author)

  4. Integrated axial and tangential serpentine cooling circuit in a turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J; Dalton, John P

    2015-05-05

    A continuous serpentine cooling circuit forming a progression of radial passages (44, 45, 46, 47A, 48A) between pressure and suction side walls (52, 54) in a MID region of a turbine airfoil (24). The circuit progresses first axially, then tangentially, ending in a last radial passage (48A) adjacent to the suction side (54) and not adjacent to the pressure side (52). The passages of the axial progression (44, 45, 46) may be adjacent to both the pressure and suction side walls of the airfoil. The next to last radial passage (47A) may be adjacent to the pressure side wall and not adjacent to the suction side wall. The last two radial passages (47A, 48A) may be longer along the pressure and suction side walls respectively than they are in a width direction, providing increased direct cooling surface area on the interiors of these hot walls.

  5. Characterization of Deficiencies in the Frequency Domain Forced Response Analysis Technique for Supersonic Turbine Bladed Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Schmauch, Preston

    2011-01-01

    Turbine blades in rocket and jet engine turbomachinery experience enormous harmonic loading conditions. These loads result from the integer number of upstream and downstream stator vanes as well as the other turbine stages. Assessing the blade structural integrity is a complex task requiring an initial characterization of whether resonance is possible and then performing a forced response analysis if that condition is met. The standard technique for forced response analysis in rocket engines is to decompose a CFD-generated flow field into its harmonic components, and to then perform a frequency response analysis at the problematic natural frequencies. Recent CFD analysis and water-flow testing at NASA/MSFC, though, indicates that this technique may miss substantial harmonic and non-harmonic excitation sources that become present in complex flows. A substantial effort has been made to account for this denser spatial Fourier content in frequency response analysis (described in another paper by the author), but the question still remains whether the frequency response analysis itself is capable of capturing the excitation content sufficiently. Two studies comparing frequency response analysis with transient response analysis, therefore, of bladed-disks undergoing this complex flow environment have been performed. The first is of a bladed disk with each blade modeled by simple beam elements. Six loading cases were generated by varying a baseline harmonic excitation in different ways based upon cold-flow testing from Heritage Fuel Air Turbine Test. It was hypothesized that the randomness and other variation from the standard harmonic excitation would reduce the blade structural response, but the results showed little reduction. The second study was of a realistic model of a bladed-disk excited by the same CFD used in the J2X engine program. It was hypothesized that enforcing periodicity in the CFD (inherent in the frequency response technique) would overestimate the

  6. A New Superalloy Enabling Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Wheels for Improved Combined Cycle Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detor, Andrew [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States). GE Global Research; DiDomizio, Richard [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States). GE Global Research; McAllister, Don [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Sampson, Erica [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States). GE Global Research; Shi, Rongpei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Zhou, Ning [General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States). GE Global Research

    2017-01-03

    The drive to increase combined cycle turbine efficiency from 62% to 65% for the next-generation advanced cycle requires a new heavy duty gas turbine wheel material capable of operating at 1200°F and above. Current wheel materials are limited by the stability of their major strengthening phase (gamma double prime), which coarsens at temperatures approaching 1200°F, resulting in a substantial reduction in strength. More advanced gamma prime superalloys, such as those used in jet engine turbine disks, are also not suitable due to size constraints; the gamma prime phase overages during the slow cooling rates inherent in processing thick-section turbine wheels. The current program addresses this need by screening two new alloy design concepts. The first concept exploits a gamma prime/gamma double prime coprecipitation reaction. Through manipulation of alloy chemistry, coprecipitation is controlled such that gamma double prime is used only to slow the growth of gamma prime during slow cooling, preventing over-aging, and allowing for subsequent heat treatment to maximize strength. In parallel, phase field modeling provides fundamental understanding of the coprecipitation reaction. The second concept uses oxide dispersion strengthening to improve on two existing alloys that exhibit excellent hold time fatigue crack growth resistance, but have insufficient strength to be considered for gas turbine wheels. Mechanical milling forces the dissolution of starting oxide powders into a metal matrix allowing for solid state precipitation of new, nanometer scale oxides that are effective at dispersion strengthening.

  7. Experimental investigation of gas turbine airfoil aerodynamic performance without and with film cooling in an annular sector cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiers, S.H.

    2002-02-01

    The steady growing of industrialization, the densification of the anthroposphere, the increasing concern over the effects of gas turbine cruise emissions on the atmosphere threaten the growth of air transportation, and the perception about the possible climatic impact of CO{sub 2} emissions causes a public distinctive sense of responsibility. The conventional energy production techniques, which are based on fossil fuel, will keep its central importance within the global energy production. Forecasts about the increasing air transportation give duplication in the next 10-15 years. The optimization of the specific fuel consumption is necessary to decrease the running costs and the pollution emissions in the atmosphere, which makes an increased process efficiency of stationary turbines as well as of jet engines essential. This leads to the necessity of an increased thermodynamic efficiency of the overall process and the optimization of the aerodynamic components. Due to the necessity of more detailed three-dimensional data on the behavior of film cooled blades an annular sector cascade turbine test facility has gone into service. The annular sector cascade facility is a relative cost efficient solution compared to a full annular facility to investigate three-dimensional effects on a non cooled and cooled turbine blade. The aerodynamic investigations on the annular sector cascade facility are part of a broad perspective where experimental data from a hot annular sector cascade facility and the cold annular sector facility are used to verify, calibrate and understand the physics for both internal and external calculation methods for flow and heat transfer prediction. The objective of the present study is the design and validation of a cold flow annular sector cascade facility, which meets the flow conditions in a modem turbine as close as possible, with emphasis on achieving periodic flow conditions. The first part of this study gives the necessary background on this

  8. Determination of blade-to-coolant heat-transfer coefficients on a forced-convection, water-cooled, single-stage turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freche, John C; Schum, Eugene F

    1951-01-01

    Blade-to-coolant convective heat-transfer coefficients were obtained on a forced-convection water-cooled single-stage turbine over a large laminar flow range and over a portion of the transition range between laminar and turbulent flow. The convective coefficients were correlated by the general relation for forced-convection heat transfer with laminar flow. Natural-convection heat transfer was negligible for this turbine over the Grashof number range investigated. Comparison of turbine data with stationary tube data for the laminar flow of heated liquids showed good agreement. Calculated average midspan blade temperatures using theoretical gas-to-blade coefficients and blade-to-coolant coefficients from stationary-tube data resulted in close agreement with experimental data.

  9. Experimental and numerical study of near bleed hole heat transfer enhancement in internal turbine blade cooling channels

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scheepers, G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an experimental and numerical study of the heat transfer augmentation near the entrance to a gas turbine film cooling hole at different engine representative suction ratios (Vhole/V). For the experimental component the use...

  10. Auxiliary cooling device for power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanoi, Kozo.

    1996-01-01

    An auxiliary cooling sea water pipeline for pumping up cooling sea water, an auxiliary cooling sea water pipeline and a primary side of an auxiliary cooling heat exchanger are connected between a sea water taking vessel and a sea water discharge pit. An auxiliary cooling water pump is connected to an auxiliary water cooling pipeline on the second side of the auxiliary cooling heat exchanger. The auxiliary cooling water pipeline is connected with each of auxiliary equipments of a reactor system and each of auxiliary equipments of the turbine system connected to a turbine auxiliary cooling water pipeline in parallel. During ordinary operation of the reactor, heat exchange for each of the auxiliary equipments of the reactor and heat exchange for each of the equipments of the turbine system are conducted simultaneously. Since most portions of the cooling devices of each of the auxiliary equipments of the reactor system and each of the auxiliary equipments of the turbine system can be used in common, the operation efficiency of the cooling device is improved. In addition, the space for the pipelines and the cost for the equipments can be reduced. (I.N.)

  11. Feasibility analysis of gas turbine inlet air cooling by means of liquid nitrogen evaporation for IGCC power augmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, Mirko; Pinelli, Michele; Spina, Pier Ruggero; Vaccari, Anna; Venturini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) are energy systems mainly composed of a gasifier and a combined cycle power plant. Since the gasification process usually requires oxygen as the oxidant, an Air Separation Unit (ASU) is also part of the plant. In this paper, a system for power augmentation in IGCC is evaluated. The system is based on gas turbine inlet air cooling by means of liquid nitrogen spray. In fact, nitrogen is a product of the ASU, but is not always exploited. In the proposed plant, the nitrogen is first liquefied to be used for inlet air cooling or stored for later use. This system is not characterized by the limits of water evaporative cooling systems (the lower temperature is limited by air saturation) and refrigeration cooling (the effectiveness is limited by the pressure drop in the heat exchanger). A thermodynamic model of the system is built by using a commercial code for energy conversion system simulation. A sensitivity analysis on the main parameters is presented. Finally the model is used to study the capabilities of the system by imposing the real temperature profiles of different sites for a whole year and by comparing to traditional inlet air cooling strategies. - Highlights: • Gas turbine inlet air cooling by means of liquid nitrogen spray. • Humidity condensation may form a fog which provides further power augmentation. • High peak and off peak electric energy price ratios make the system profitable

  12. Design and optimization of a multistage turbine for helium cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braembussche, R.A. van den; Brouckaert, J.F.; Paniagua, G.; Briottet, L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the aerodynamic design and explores the performance limits of a 600 MWt multistage helium turbine for a high temperature nuclear reactor closed cycle gas turbine. The design aims for maximum performance while limiting the number of stages for reasons of rotor dynamics and weight. A first part discusses the arguments that allow a preliminary selection of the overall dimensions by means of performance prediction correlations and simplified stress considerations. The rotational speed being fixed at 3000 rpm, the only degrees of freedom for the design are: the impeller diameter, number of stages and stage loading. The optimum load distribution of the different stages, the main flow parameters and the blade overall dimensions are defined by means of a 2D through-flow analysis method. The resulting absolute and relative flow angles and span-wise velocity variation are the input for a first detailed design by an inverse method. The latter defines the different 2D blade sections corresponding to prescribed optimum velocity distributions. The final 3D blade definition is made by means of a computer based 3D-DESIGN system developed at the von Karman Institute. This method combines a 3D Navier-Stokes (NS) solver, Database, Artificial Neural Network and Genetic Algorithm into a two level optimization technique for compressor and turbine stages. The use of 3D Navier-Stokes solvers allows full accounting of the secondary flow losses and optimization of the compound leaning of the stator vanes. The performance of the individual stages is used to define the multistage operating curves. The last part of the paper describes an evaluation of the cooling requirements of the first turbine rotor

  13. A method and device for cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, Daniel.

    1974-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a device for cooling steam. The invention refers to a method for cooling steam from a turbine, e.g. a turbine coupled to a high power nuclear reactor, in which a fluid F in the state of a two-phase mixture (steam and condensation liquid) is circulated, in a closed circuit, in conduits passing through a condenser associated with the turbine in which fluid F contained in said conduits vaporizes by heat-exchange with the condenser hot steam, then through a cooling tower wherein the fluid condenses by heat-exchange with a coolant. This can be applied to cooling the steam in a turbine associated with a nuclear reactor [fr

  14. Parametric Simulation on Enhancement of the Regenerative Gas Turbine Performance by Effect of Inlet Air Cooling System and Steam Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadel A. Alkumait

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aadel Abdulrazzaq Alkumait/Tikrit Journal of Engineering Sciences 22(1 (201538-44Iraq being one of the developing countries of the world considers energy efficiency and the impact of its generation on the environment an imperative process in improvement of its power generation policies. Iraq bearing high temperatures all year long results in reduction of air density, therefore, Inlet air Cooling and Steam Injection Gas Turbines are a striking addition to the regenerative gas turbines. Regenerating Gas turbines tend to have a high back work ratio and a high exhaust temperature, thus, it leads to a low efficiency in power generation in hotter climate. Moreover, STIG and IAC through fog cooling have known to be the best retrofitting methods available in the industry which improve the efficiency of generation from 30.5 to 43% and increase the power output from 22MW to 33.5MW as the outcomes of computer simulations reveal. Additionally, this happens without bringing about much extensive change to original features of the power generation cycle. Furthermore, STIG and spray coolers have also resulted in power boosting and exceeding generation efficiency of gas turbine power plant.

  15. An analytic approach to optimize tidal turbine fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelz, P.; Metzler, M.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by global warming due to CO2-emission various technologies for harvesting of energy from renewable sources are developed. Hydrokinetic turbines get applied to surface watercourse or tidal flow to gain electrical energy. Since the available power for hydrokinetic turbines is proportional to the projected cross section area, fields of turbines are installed to scale shaft power. Each hydrokinetic turbine of a field can be considered as a disk actuator. In [1], the first author derives the optimal operation point for hydropower in an open-channel. The present paper concerns about a 0-dimensional model of a disk-actuator in an open-channel flow with bypass, as a special case of [1]. Based on the energy equation, the continuity equation and the momentum balance an analytical approach is made to calculate the coefficient of performance for hydrokinetic turbines with bypass flow as function of the turbine head and the ratio of turbine width to channel width.

  16. Assessment and status report High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor gas-turbine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Purpose of this report is to present a brief summary assessment of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor - Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) technology. The focal point for the study was a potential 2000 MW(t)/800 MW(e) HTGR-GT commercial plant. Principal findings of the study were that: the HTGR-GT is feasible, but with significantly greater development risk than the HTGR-SC (Steam Cycle). At the level of performance corresponding to the reference design, no incremental economic incentive can be identified for the HTGR-GT to offset the increased development costs and risk relative to the HTGR-SC. The relative economics of the HTGR-GT and HTGR-SC are not significantly impacted by dry cooling considerations. While reduced cycel complexity may ultimately result in a reliability advantage for the HTGR-GT, the value of that potential advantage was not quantified

  17. Model-Based Fault Detection and Isolation of a Liquid-Cooled Frequency Converter on a Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peng; Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2012-01-01

    advanced fault detection and isolation schemes. In this paper, an observer-based fault detection and isolation method for the cooling system in a liquid-cooled frequency converter on a wind turbine which is built up in a scalar version in the laboratory is presented. A dynamic model of the scale cooling...... system is derived based on energy balance equation. A fault analysis is conducted to determine the severity and occurrence rate of possible component faults and their end effects in the cooling system. A method using unknown input observer is developed in order to detect and isolate the faults based...... on the developed dynamical model. The designed fault detection and isolation algorithm is applied on a set of measured experiment data in which different faults are artificially introduced to the scaled cooling system. The experimental results conclude that the different faults are successfully detected...

  18. A Three-Dimensional Coupled Internal/External Simulation of a Film-Cooled Turbine Vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, James D.; Rigby, David L.; Ameri, Ali A.

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes simulation has been performed for a realistic film-cooled turbine vane using the LeRC-HT code. The simulation includes the flow regions inside the coolant plena and film cooling holes in addition to the external flow. The vane is the subject of an upcoming NASA Glenn Research Center experiment and has both circular cross-section and shaped film cooling holes. This complex geometry is modeled using a multi-block grid which accurately discretizes the actual vane geometry including shaped holes. The simulation matches operating conditions for the planned experiment and assumes periodicity in the spanwise direction on the scale of one pitch of the film cooling hole pattern. Two computations were performed for different isothermal wall temperatures, allowing independent determination of heat transfer coefficients and film effectiveness values. The results indicate separate localized regions of high heat transfer coefficient values, while the shaped holes provide a reduction in heat flux through both parameters. Hole exit data indicate rather simple skewed profiles for the round holes, but complex profiles for the shaped holes with mass fluxes skewed strongly toward their leading edges.

  19. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; O'Connor, Evan; Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D.

    2013-01-01

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M ☉ neutron star, 5.6 M ☉ black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M 2 = 0.9) system with the K 0 = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M ☉ of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M ☉ forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y e of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L ν ∼ 10 54 erg s –1 ), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution

  20. Heat generation by a wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corten, G.P. [ECN Wind, Petten (Netherlands)

    2001-01-01

    It will be shown that an actuator disk operating in wind turbine mode extracts more energy from the fluid than can be transferred into useful energy. At the Lanchester-Betz limit the decrease of the kinetic energy in the wind is converted by 2 /3 into useful power and by 1 /3 into heat. Behind the wind turbine the outer flow and the flow that has passed the actuator disk will mix. In this process momentum is conserved but part of the kinetic energy will dissipate in heat via viscous shear. 7 refs.

  1. Integration of steam injection and inlet air cooling for a gas turbine generation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.J.; Chiou, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    The temperature of exhaust gases from simple cycle gas turbine generation sets (GENSETs) is usually very high (around 500 deg. C), and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) is often used to recover the energy from the exhaust gases and generate steam. The generated steams can be either used for many useful processes (heating, drying, separation etc.) or used back in the power generation system for enhancing power generation capacity and efficiency. Two well-proven techniques, namely steam injection gas turbine (STIG) and inlet air cooling (IAC) are very effective features that can use the generated steam to improve the power generation capacity and efficiency. Since the energy level of the generated steam needed for steam injection is different from that needed by an absorption chiller to cool the inlet air, a proper arrangement is required to implement both the STIG and the IAC features into the simple cycle GENSET. In this study, a computer code was developed to simulate a Tai power's Frame 7B simple cycle GENSET. Under the condition of local summer weather, the benefits obtained from the system implementing both STIG and IAC features are more than a 70% boost in power and 20.4% improvement in heat rate

  2. Hydrogen utilization international clean energy system technology (WE-NET). Subtask 8. Development of hydrogen combustion turbines (development of the main component devices such as turbine blades and rotors); Suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET). Subtask 8. Suiso nensho turbine no kaihatsu (turbine yoku, rotor nado shuyo kosei kiki no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The paper described the result of the fiscal 1996 development relating to hydrogen combustion turbines, as one of the hydrogen utilization technologies, which have excellent environmentality and are expected of remarkably high efficiency. In the film cooling system of first-stage moving/stationary blades, the smaller the pitch of film pore is, the higher the mean cooling efficiency becomes, indicating 0.7 at maximum. As compared with the conventional shower head type, the metal temperature can be reduced 30-40degC. In the recovery type inner (convection) cooling system, by reducing the blade number, the consumption amount of coolant can be reduced 6% in stationary blade and 13% in moving blade, as compared with the result of the preceding year. In the element test of the hybrid cooling system, film cooling efficiency was actually measured by the porous module test equipment, and the result well agreed with the calculation result. In the water cooling system, studied were water (stationary blade) and vapor (moving blade) of the closed cooling structure for realization of a cycle efficiency of 60%. In rotor/disk cooling, analyses were made of seal characteristic grasp tests and characteristics of the rotor. The effect of deflection in the mainstream was small. Besides, proper value of the seal overlapping amount could be obtained. 6 refs., 368 figs., 55 tabs.

  3. Airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George

    2010-12-21

    An airfoil for a turbine of a gas turbine engine is provided. The airfoil comprises a main body comprising a wall structure defining an inner cavity adapted to receive a cooling air. The wall structure includes a first diffusion region and at least one first metering opening extending from the inner cavity to the first diffusion region. The wall structure further comprises at least one cooling circuit comprising a second diffusion region and at least one second metering opening extending from the first diffusion region to the second diffusion region. The at least one cooling circuit may further comprise at least one third metering opening, at least one third diffusion region and a fourth diffusion region.

  4. Advances in measuring techniques for turbine cooling test rigs - Status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Instrumentation development pertaining to turbine cooling research has resulted in the design and testing of several new systems. Pressure measurements on rotating components are being made with a rotating system incorporating ten miniature transducers and a slip-ring assembly. The system has been tested successfully up to speeds of 9000 rpm. An advanced system development combining pressure transducer and thermocouple signals is also underway. Thermocouple measurements on rotating components are transferred off the shaft by a 72-channel rotating data system. Thermocouple data channels are electronically processed on board and then removed from the shaft in the form of a digital serial train by one winding of a rotary transformer.

  5. 18th national meeting for energy saving promotion (prize winning case awarded by Ministry of International Trade and Industry). ; Development of air cooling equipment for gas turbine combustion. Dai 18 kai sho energy suishin zenkoku taikai (tsusho sangyo daijinsho jusho jirei). ; Gas turbine nenshoyo kuki reikyaku sochi no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-30

    This paper describes a development of air cooling equipment for gas turbine combustion in a 1090-MW combined plant and a discussion on its cooling effect. An open-type gas turbine reduces its output when suction temperature rises. This is a characteristic for a combined plant with high heat efficiency not capable of exhibiting its ability in summer. As a result of testing cooling methods, water spraying nozzles utilizing latent evaporation heat of water were installed at a gas turbine suction opening. Effects of cooling the gas turbine combustion air resulted in reducing the gas turbine suction temperature by 1.8[degree]C as a result of water spray at an ambient temperature of 30[degree]C and a relative humidity of 60%, increasing the plant output by 12 MW as a result of cooling the suction air, and improving the heat efficiency by about 0.035%. The amount of ammonia used for reducing nitrogen oxide generation was reduced by 10.8 kg/hr. Under an assumption of experimenting the water spray in summer on a 15-hour per day basis for 50 days, a calculation indicates an annual economic effect of about 13.5 million yen. 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Database Reorganization in Parallel Disk Arrays with I/O Service Stealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabback, Peter; Onyuksel, Ibrahim; Scheuermann, Peter; Weikum, Gerhard

    1996-01-01

    We present a model for data reorganization in parallel disk systems that is geared towards load balancing in an environment with periodic access patterns. Data reorganization is performed by disk cooling, i.e. migrating files or extents from the hottest disks to the coldest ones. We develop an approximate queueing model for determining the effective arrival rates of cooling requests and discuss its use in assessing the costs versus benefits of cooling.

  7. Pressure transients analysis of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor with direct helium turbine cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, M.; Dupont, J. F.; Jacquemoud, P.; Mylonas, R. [Eidgenoessisches Inst. fuer Reaktorforschung, Wuerenlingen (Switzerland)

    1981-01-15

    The direct coupling of a gas cooled reactor with a closed gas turbine cycle leads to a specific dynamic plant behaviour, which may be summarized as follows: a) any operational transient involving a variation of the core mass flow rate causes a variation of the pressure ratio of the turbomachines and leads unavoidably to pressure and temperature transients in the gas turbine cycle; and b) very severe pressure equalization transients initiated by unlikely events such as the deblading of one or more turbomachines must be taken into account. This behaviour is described and illustrated through results gained from computer analyses performed at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research (EIR) in Wurenlingen within the scope of the Swiss-German HHT project.

  8. Advanced Turbine Blade Cooling Techniques, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can...

  9. Gas-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The invention aims at simplying gas-cooled nuclear reactors. For the cooling gas, the reactor is provided with a main circulation system comprising one or several energy conversion main groups such as gas turbines, and an auxiliary circulation system comprising at least one steam-generating boiler heated by the gas after its passage through the reactor core and adapted to feed a steam turbine with motive steam. The invention can be applied to reactors the main groups of which are direct-cycle gas turbines [fr

  10. BLACK HOLE-NEUTRON STAR MERGERS WITH A HOT NUCLEAR EQUATION OF STATE: OUTFLOW AND NEUTRINO-COOLED DISK FOR A LOW-MASS, HIGH-SPIN CASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deaton, M. Brett; Duez, Matthew D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Foucart, Francois; O' Connor, Evan [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada); Ott, Christian D.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela [TAPIR, MC 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kidder, Lawrence E.; Muhlberger, Curran D., E-mail: mbdeaton@wsu.edu, E-mail: m.duez@wsu.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    Neutrino emission significantly affects the evolution of the accretion tori formed in black hole-neutron star mergers. It removes energy from the disk, alters its composition, and provides a potential power source for a gamma-ray burst. To study these effects, simulations in general relativity with a hot microphysical equation of state (EOS) and neutrino feedback are needed. We present the first such simulation, using a neutrino leakage scheme for cooling to capture the most essential effects and considering a moderate mass (1.4 M{sub ☉} neutron star, 5.6 M{sub ☉} black hole), high-spin (black hole J/M {sup 2} = 0.9) system with the K{sub 0} = 220 MeV Lattimer-Swesty EOS. We find that about 0.08 M{sub ☉} of nuclear matter is ejected from the system, while another 0.3 M{sub ☉} forms a hot, compact accretion disk. The primary effects of the escaping neutrinos are (1) to make the disk much denser and more compact, (2) to cause the average electron fraction Y{sub e} of the disk to rise to about 0.2 and then gradually decrease again, and (3) to gradually cool the disk. The disk is initially hot (T ∼ 6 MeV) and luminous in neutrinos (L{sub ν} ∼ 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}), but the neutrino luminosity decreases by an order of magnitude over 50 ms of post-merger evolution.

  11. Investigation of heat transfer and flow using ribs within gas turbine blade cooling passage: Experimental and hybrid LES/RANS modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sourabh

    Gas turbines are extensively used for aircraft propulsion, land based power generation and various industrial applications. Developments in innovative gas turbine cooling technology enhance the efficiency and power output, with an increase in turbine rotor inlet temperatures. These advancements of turbine cooling have allowed engine design to exceed normal material temperature limits. For internal cooling design, techniques for heat extraction from the surfaces exposed to hot stream are based on the increase of heat transfer areas and on promotion of turbulence of the cooling flow. In this study, it is obtained by casting repeated continuous V and broken V shaped ribs on one side of the two pass square channel into the core of blade. Despite extensive research on ribs, only few papers have validated the numerical data with experimental results in two pass channel. In the present study, detailed experimental investigation is carried out for two pass square channels with 180° turn. Detailed heat transfer distribution occurring in the ribbed passage is reported for steady state experiment. Four different combinations of 60° and Broken 60° V ribs in channel are considered. Thermocouples are used to obtain the temperature on the channel surface and local heat transfer coefficients are obtained for various Reynolds numbers, within the turbulent flow regime. Area averaged data are calculated in order to compare the overall performance of the tested ribbed surface and to evaluate the degree of heat transfer enhancement induced by the ribs with. Flow within the channels is characterized by heat transfer enhancing ribs, bends, rotation and buoyancy effects. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out for the same geometries using different turbulence models such as k-o Shear stress transport (SST) and Reynolds stress model (RSM). These CFD simulations were based on advanced computing in order to improve the accuracy of three dimensional metal

  12. An Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Endwall Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer in a Gas Turbine Nozzle Guide Vane with Slot Film Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqefl, Mahmood Hasan

    In many regions of the high-pressure gas turbine, film cooling flows are used to protect the turbine components from the combustor exit hot gases. Endwalls are challenging to cool because of the complex system of secondary flows that disturb surface film coolant coverage. The secondary flow vortices wash the film coolant from the surface into the mainstream significantly decreasing cooling effectiveness. In addition to being effected by secondary flow structures, film cooling flow can also affect these structures by virtue of their momentum exchange. In addition, many studies in the literature have shown that endwall contouring affects the strength of passage secondary flows. Therefore, to develop better endwall cooling schemes, a good understanding of passage aerodynamics and heat transfer as affected by interactions of film cooling flows with secondary flows is required. This experimental and computational study presents results from a linear, stationary, two-passage cascade representing the first stage nozzle guide vane of a high-pressure gas turbine with an axisymmetrically contoured endwall. The sources of film cooling flows are upstream combustor liner coolant and endwall slot film coolant injected immediately upstream of the cascade passage inlet. The operating conditions simulate combustor exit flow features, with a high Reynolds number of 390,000 and approach flow turbulence intensity of 11% with an integral length scale of 21% of the chord length. Measurements are performed with varying slot film cooling mass flow to mainstream flow rate ratios (MFR). Aerodynamic effects are documented with five-hole probe measurements at the exit plane. Heat transfer is documented through recovery temperature measurements with a thermocouple. General secondary flow features are observed. Total pressure loss measurements show that varying the slot film cooling MFR has some effects on passage loss. Velocity vectors and vorticity distributions show a very thin, yet intense

  13. Computational Analysis of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine for Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Wi S.; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Energy demands at a remote site are increased as the world energy requirement diversifies so that they should generate power on their own site. A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) becomes a viable option for these sites. Generally, the economic feasibility of a high power reactor is greater than that for SMR. As a result the supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle is being considered for a power conversion system to increase economic competitiveness of SMR. The Brayton cycle efficiency is much higher than that for the Rankine cycle. Moreover, the components of the Brayton cycle are smaller than Rankine cycle's due to high heat capacity when a supercritical fluid is adopted. A lead (Pb) cooled SMR, BORIS, and a supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle, MOBIS, are being developed at the Seoul National University (SNU). Dostal et al. have compared some advanced power cycles and proposed the use of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) driven Brayton cycle. According to their suggestion SCO{sub 2} is adopted as a working fluid for MOBIS. The turbo machineries are most important components for the Brayton cycle. The turbo machineries of Brayton cycle consists of a turbine to convert kinetic energy of the fluid into mechanical energy of the shaft, and a compressor to recompress and recover the driving force of the working fluid. Therefore, turbine performance is one of the pivotal factors in increasing the cycle efficiency. In MOBIS a supercritical gas turbine is designed in the Gas Advanced Turbine Operation (GATO) and analyzed in the Turbine Integrated Numerical Analysis (TINA). A three-dimensional (3D) numerical analysis is employed for more detailed design to account for the partial flow which the one-dimensional (1D) analysis cannot consider.

  14. Computational Analysis of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Gas Turbine for Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Wi S.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2008-01-01

    Energy demands at a remote site are increased as the world energy requirement diversifies so that they should generate power on their own site. A Small Modular Reactor (SMR) becomes a viable option for these sites. Generally, the economic feasibility of a high power reactor is greater than that for SMR. As a result the supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle is being considered for a power conversion system to increase economic competitiveness of SMR. The Brayton cycle efficiency is much higher than that for the Rankine cycle. Moreover, the components of the Brayton cycle are smaller than Rankine cycle's due to high heat capacity when a supercritical fluid is adopted. A lead (Pb) cooled SMR, BORIS, and a supercritical fluid driven Brayton cycle, MOBIS, are being developed at the Seoul National University (SNU). Dostal et al. have compared some advanced power cycles and proposed the use of a supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO 2 ) driven Brayton cycle. According to their suggestion SCO 2 is adopted as a working fluid for MOBIS. The turbo machineries are most important components for the Brayton cycle. The turbo machineries of Brayton cycle consists of a turbine to convert kinetic energy of the fluid into mechanical energy of the shaft, and a compressor to recompress and recover the driving force of the working fluid. Therefore, turbine performance is one of the pivotal factors in increasing the cycle efficiency. In MOBIS a supercritical gas turbine is designed in the Gas Advanced Turbine Operation (GATO) and analyzed in the Turbine Integrated Numerical Analysis (TINA). A three-dimensional (3D) numerical analysis is employed for more detailed design to account for the partial flow which the one-dimensional (1D) analysis cannot consider

  15. Flow visualization system for wind turbines without blades applied to micro reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.S.B.; Guimarães, L.N.F.; Placco, G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Flow visualization systems is a tool used in science and industry for characterization of projects that operate with drainage. This work presents the design and construction of a flow visualization system for passive turbines used in advanced fast micro reactors. In the system were generated images where it is possible to see the supersonic and transonic flow through the turbine disks. A test bench was assembled to generate images of the interior of the turbine where the flow is supersonic, allowing the study of the behavior of the boundary layer between disks. It is necessary to characterize the boundary layer of this type of turbine because its operation occurs in the transfer of kinetic energy between the fluid and the disks. The images generated, as well as their analyzes are presented as a result of this work

  16. Experimental Investigation of Turbine Vane Heat Transfer for Alternative Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nix, Andrew Carl [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The focus of this program was to experimentally investigate advanced gas turbine cooling schemes and the effects of and factors that contribute to surface deposition from particulate matter found in coal syngas exhaust flows on turbine airfoil heat transfer and film cooling, as well as to characterize surface roughness and determine the effects of surface deposition on turbine components. The program was a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary collaborative effort between aero-thermal and materials faculty researchers and the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The primary technical objectives of the program were to evaluate the effects of combustion of syngas fuels on heat transfer to turbine vanes and blades in land-based power generation gas turbine engines. The primary questions to be answered by this investigation were; What are the factors that contribute to particulate deposition on film cooled gas turbine components? An experimental program was performed in a high-temperature and pressure combustion rig at the DOE NETL; What is the effect of coal syngas combustion and surface deposition on turbine airfoil film cooling? Deposition of particulate matter from the combustion gases can block film cooling holes, decreasing the flow of the film coolant and the film cooling effectiveness; How does surface deposition from coal syngas combustion affect turbine surface roughness? Increased surface roughness can increase aerodynamic losses and result in decreased turbine hot section efficiency, increasing engine fuel consumption to maintain desired power output. Convective heat transfer is also greatly affected by the surface roughness of the airfoil surface; Is there any significant effect of surface deposition or erosion on integrity of turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings (TBC) and do surface deposits react with the TBC in any way to decrease its thermal insulating capability? Spallation and erosion of TBC is a persistent problem in

  17. Tests of spinning turbine fragment impact on casing models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbeck, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Ten 1/11-scale model turbine missile impact tests were conducted at a Naval spin chamber test facility to assess turbine missile effects in nuclear plant design. The objective of the tests was to determine the effects of missile spin, blade crush, and target edge conditions on the impact of turbine disk fragments on the steel casing. The results were intended for use in making realistic estimates for the initial conditions of fragments that might escape the casing in the event of a disk burst in a nuclear plant. The burst of a modified gas turbine rotor in a high-speed spin chamber provided three missiles with the proper rotational and translational velocities of actual steam turbine fragments. Tests of bladed, spinning missiles were compared with previous tests of unbladed, nonspinning missiles. The total residual energy of the spinning missiles, as observed from high-speed photographs of disk burst, was the same as that of the nonspinning missiles launched in a piercing orientation. Tests with bladed missiles showed that for equal burst speeds, the residual energy of bladed missiles is less than that of unbladed missiles. Impacts of missiles near the edge of targets resulted in residual missile velocities greater than for central impact. (orig.)

  18. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  19. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  20. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  1. Performance analysis and optimization of power plants with gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharati-Givi, Maryam

    The gas turbine is one of the most important applications for power generation. The purpose of this research is performance analysis and optimization of power plants by using different design systems at different operation conditions. In this research, accurate efficiency calculation and finding optimum values of efficiency for design of chiller inlet cooling and blade cooled gas turbine are investigated. This research shows how it is possible to find the optimum design for different operation conditions, like ambient temperature, relative humidity, turbine inlet temperature, and compressor pressure ratio. The simulated designs include the chiller, with varied COP and fogging cooling for a compressor. In addition, the overall thermal efficiency is improved by adding some design systems like reheat and regenerative heating. The other goal of this research focuses on the blade-cooled gas turbine for higher turbine inlet temperature, and consequently, higher efficiency. New film cooling equations, along with changing film cooling effectiveness for optimum cooling air requirement at the first-stage blades, and an internal and trailing edge cooling for the second stage, are innovated for optimal efficiency calculation. This research sets the groundwork for using the optimum value of efficiency calculation, while using inlet cooling and blade cooling designs. In the final step, the designed systems in the gas cycles are combined with a steam cycle for performance improvement.

  2. Full scale turbine-missile casing exit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Schamaun, J.T.; Sliter, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    Two full-scale tests have simulated the impact of a fragment from a failed turbine disk upon the steel casing of a low-pressure steam turbine with the objective of providing data for making more realistic assessments of turbine missile effects for nuclear power plant designers. Data were obtained on both the energy-absorbing mechanisms of the impact process and the post-impact trajectory of the fragment. (orig.)

  3. Parametric studies on different gas turbine cycles for a high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2005-01-01

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. In this paper, the various types of HTGR gas turbine cycles are concluded as three typical cycles of direct cycle, closed indirect cycle and open indirect cycle. Furthermore they are theoretically converted to three Brayton cycles of helium, nitrogen and air. Those three types of Brayton cycles are thermodynamically analyzed and optimized. The results show that the variety of gas affects the cycle pressure ratio more significantly than other cycle parameters, however, the optimized cycle efficiencies of the three Brayton cycles are almost the same. In addition, the turbomachines which are required for the three optimized Brayton cycles are aerodynamically analyzed and compared and their fundamental characteristics are obtained. Helium turbocompressor has lower stage pressure ratio and more stage number than those for nitrogen and air machines, while helium and nitrogen turbocompressors have shorter blade length than that for air machine

  4. Use of magnetic compression to support turbine engine rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomfret, Chris J.

    1994-01-01

    Ever since the advent of gas turbine engines, their rotating disks have been designed with sufficient size and weight to withstand the centrifugal forces generated when the engine is operating. Unfortunately, this requirement has always been a life and performance limiting feature of gas turbine engines and, as manufacturers strive to meet operator demands for more performance without increasing weight, the need for innovative technology has become more important. This has prompted engineers to consider a fundamental and radical breakaway from the traditional design of turbine and compressor disks which have been in use since the first jet engine was flown 50 years ago. Magnetic compression aims to counteract, by direct opposition rather than restraint, the centrifugal forces generated within the engine. A magnetic coupling is created between a rotating disk and a stationary superconducting coil to create a massive inwardly-directed magnetic force. With the centrifugal forces opposed by an equal and opposite magnetic force, the large heavy disks could be dispensed with and replaced with a torque tube to hold the blades. The proof of this concept has been demonstrated and the thermal management of such a system studied in detail; this aspect, especially in the hot end of a gas turbine engine, remains a stiff but not impossible challenge. The potential payoffs in both military and commercial aviation and in the power generation industry are sufficient to warrant further serious studies for its application and optimization.

  5. Variable electricity and steam from salt, helium and sodium cooled base-load reactors with gas turbines and heat storage - 15115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.; McDaniel, P.; Zohuri, B.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in utility natural-gas-fired air-Brayton combed cycle technology is creating the option of coupling salt-, helium-, and sodium-cooled nuclear reactors to Nuclear air-Brayton Combined Cycle (NACC) power systems. NACC may enable a zero-carbon electricity grid and improve nuclear power economics by enabling variable electricity output with base-load nuclear reactor operations. Variable electricity output enables selling more electricity at times of high prices that increases plant revenue. Peak power is achieved using stored heat or auxiliary fuel (natural gas, bio-fuels, hydrogen). A typical NACC cycle includes air compression, heating compressed air using nuclear heat and a heat exchanger, sending air through a turbine to produce electricity, reheating compressed air, sending air through a second turbine, and exhausting to a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). In the HRSG, warm air produces steam that is used to produce added electricity. For peak power production, auxiliary heat (natural gas, stored heat) is added before the air enters the second turbine to raise air temperatures and power output. Like all combined cycle plants, water cooling requirements are dramatically reduced relative to other power cycles because much of the heat rejection is in the form of hot air. (authors)

  6. Feasibility of water injection into the turbine coolant to permit gas turbine contingency power for helicopter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanfossen, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    A system which would allow a substantially increased output from a turboshaft engine for brief periods in emergency situations with little or no loss of turbine stress rupture life is proposed and studied analytically. The increased engine output is obtained by overtemperaturing the turbine; however, the temperature of the compressor bleed air used for hot section cooling is lowered by injecting and evaporating water. This decrease in cooling air temperature can offset the effect of increased gas temperature and increased shaft speed and thus keep turbine blade stress rupture life constant. The analysis utilized the NASA-Navy-Engine-Program or NNEP computer code to model the turboshaft engine in both design and off-design modes. This report is concerned with the effect of the proposed method of power augmentation on the engine cycle and turbine components. A simple cycle turboshaft engine with a 16:1 pressure ratio and a 1533 K (2760 R) turbine inlet temperature operating at sea level static conditions was studied to determine the possible power increase and the effect on turbine stress rupture life that could be expected using the proposed emergency cooling scheme. The analysis showed a 54 percent increse in output power can be achieved with no loss in gas generator turbine stress rupture life. A 231 K (415 F) rise in turbine inlet temperature is required for this level of augmentation. The required water flow rate was found to be .0109 kg water per kg of engine air flow.

  7. Elastic limit angular speed of solid and annular disks under thermo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Kashi Nath Sah

    disks, gas as well as steam turbine rotors, internal combustion engines, centrifugal compressors, and in aerospace industries. Mechanical design of disks entails the assessment of centrifugal as well as thermal stresses and they need to be designed for approximate uniform stress distributions. The analyses of stresses and ...

  8. TACT1- TRANSIENT THERMAL ANALYSIS OF A COOLED TURBINE BLADE OR VANE EQUIPPED WITH A COOLANT INSERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    As turbine-engine core operating conditions become more severe, designers must develop more effective means of cooling blades and vanes. In order to design reliable, cooled turbine blades, advanced transient thermal calculation techniques are required. The TACT1 computer program was developed to perform transient and steady-state heat-transfer and coolant-flow analyses for cooled blades, given the outside hot-gas boundary condition, the coolant inlet conditions, the geometry of the blade shell, and the cooling configuration. TACT1 can analyze turbine blades, or vanes, equipped with a central coolant-plenum insert from which coolant-air impinges on the inner surface of the blade shell. Coolant-side heat-transfer coefficients are calculated with the heat transfer mode at each station being user specified as either impingement with crossflow, forced convection channel flow, or forced convection over pin fins. A limited capability to handle film cooling is also available in the program. The TACT1 program solves for the blade temperature distribution using a transient energy equation for each node. The nodal energy balances are linearized, one-dimensional, heat-conduction equations which are applied at the wall-outer-surface node, at the junction of the cladding and the metal node, and at the wall-inner-surface node. At the mid-metal node a linear, three-dimensional, heat-conduction equation is used. Similarly, the coolant pressure distribution is determined by solving the set of transfer momentum equations for the one-dimensional flow between adjacent fluid nodes. In the coolant channel, energy and momentum equations for one-dimensional compressible flow, including friction and heat transfer, are used for the elemental channel length between two coolant nodes. The TACT1 program first obtains a steady-state solution using iterative calculations to obtain convergence of stable temperatures, pressures, coolant-flow split, and overall coolant mass balance. Transient

  9. TURBULENT DISKS ARE NEVER STABLE: FRAGMENTATION AND TURBULENCE-PROMOTED PLANET FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, Philip F. [TAPIR, Mailcode 350-17, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Christiansen, Jessie L., E-mail: phopkins@caltech.edu [SETI Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2013-10-10

    A fundamental assumption in our understanding of disks is that when the Toomre Q >> 1, the disk is stable against fragmentation into self-gravitating objects (and so cannot form planets via direct collapse). But if disks are turbulent, this neglects a spectrum of stochastic density fluctuations that can produce rare, high-density mass concentrations. Here, we use a recently developed analytic framework to predict the statistics of these fluctuations, i.e., the rate of fragmentation and mass spectrum of fragments formed in a turbulent Keplerian disk. Turbulent disks are never completely stable: we calculate the (always finite) probability of forming self-gravitating structures via stochastic turbulent density fluctuations in such disks. Modest sub-sonic turbulence above Mach number M∼0.1 can produce a few stochastic fragmentation or 'direct collapse' events over ∼Myr timescales, even if Q >> 1 and cooling is slow (t{sub cool} >> t{sub orbit}). In transsonic turbulence this extends to Q ∼ 100. We derive the true Q-criterion needed to suppress such events, which scales exponentially with Mach number. We specify to turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability, convection, or spiral waves and derive equivalent criteria in terms of Q and the cooling time. Cooling times ∼> 50 t{sub dyn} may be required to completely suppress fragmentation. These gravo-turbulent events produce mass spectra peaked near ∼(Q M{sub disk}/M{sub *}){sup 2} M{sub disk} (rocky-to-giant planet masses, increasing with distance from the star). We apply this to protoplanetary disk models and show that even minimum-mass solar nebulae could experience stochastic collapse events, provided a source of turbulence.

  10. TURBULENT DISKS ARE NEVER STABLE: FRAGMENTATION AND TURBULENCE-PROMOTED PLANET FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Christiansen, Jessie L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental assumption in our understanding of disks is that when the Toomre Q >> 1, the disk is stable against fragmentation into self-gravitating objects (and so cannot form planets via direct collapse). But if disks are turbulent, this neglects a spectrum of stochastic density fluctuations that can produce rare, high-density mass concentrations. Here, we use a recently developed analytic framework to predict the statistics of these fluctuations, i.e., the rate of fragmentation and mass spectrum of fragments formed in a turbulent Keplerian disk. Turbulent disks are never completely stable: we calculate the (always finite) probability of forming self-gravitating structures via stochastic turbulent density fluctuations in such disks. Modest sub-sonic turbulence above Mach number M∼0.1 can produce a few stochastic fragmentation or 'direct collapse' events over ∼Myr timescales, even if Q >> 1 and cooling is slow (t cool >> t orbit ). In transsonic turbulence this extends to Q ∼ 100. We derive the true Q-criterion needed to suppress such events, which scales exponentially with Mach number. We specify to turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability, convection, or spiral waves and derive equivalent criteria in terms of Q and the cooling time. Cooling times ∼> 50 t dyn may be required to completely suppress fragmentation. These gravo-turbulent events produce mass spectra peaked near ∼(Q M disk /M * ) 2 M disk (rocky-to-giant planet masses, increasing with distance from the star). We apply this to protoplanetary disk models and show that even minimum-mass solar nebulae could experience stochastic collapse events, provided a source of turbulence

  11. Emergency cooling process and device for nuclear reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    1985-01-01

    The emergency cooling system of a PWR containment, according to the principal patent, comprises a turbine fed by the humid air of the containment, a condenser in which the air flowing out of the turbine is dryed and cooled by an external coolant and a compressor actuated by the turbine and returning the dryed air in the containment [fr

  12. Multiple piece turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Keith D; Wilson, Jr., Jack W.

    2010-11-02

    A turbine airfoil, such as a rotor blade or a stator vane, for a gas turbine engine, the airfoil formed as a shell and spar construction with a plurality of dog bone struts each mounted within openings formed within the shell and spar to allow for relative motion between the spar and shell in the airfoil chordwise direction while also forming a seal between adjacent cooling channels. The struts provide the seal as well as prevent bulging of the shell from the spar due to the cooling air pressure.

  13. Numerical investigations of cooling holes system role in the protection of the walls of a gas turbine combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Sik Ali, Ahlem; Kriaa, Wassim; Mhiri, Hatem [Ecole Nationale D' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Unite de Thermique et Thermodynamique des Procedes industriels, Monastir (Tunisia); Bournot, Philippe [IUSTI, UMR CNRS 6595, Marseille (France)

    2012-05-15

    Numerical simulations in a gas turbine Swirl stabilized combustor were conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a cooling system in the protection of combustor walls. The studied combustion chamber has a high degree of geometrical complexity related to the injection system as well as the cooling system based on a big distribution of small holes (about 3,390 holes) bored on the flame tube walls. Two cases were considered respectively the flame tube without and with its cooling system. The calculations were carried out using the industrial CFD code FLUENT 6.2. The various simulations made it possible to highlight the role of cooling holes in the protection of the flame tube walls against the high temperatures of the combustion products. In fact, the comparison between the results of the two studied cases demonstrated that the walls temperature can be reduced by about 800 C by the mean of cooling holes technique. (orig.)

  14. Premixed direct injection disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin; Zuo, Baifang; Uhm, Jong Ho

    2013-04-23

    A fuel/air mixing disk for use in a fuel/air mixing combustor assembly is provided. The disk includes a first face, a second face, and at least one fuel plenum disposed therebetween. A plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes extend through the pre-mixing disk, each mixing tube including an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis and in fluid communication with the at least one fuel plenum. At least a portion of the plurality of fuel/air mixing tubes further includes at least one fuel injection hole have a fuel injection hole diameter extending through said outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

  15. Mechanical (turbines and auxiliary equipment)

    CERN Document Server

    Sherry, A; Cruddace, AE

    2013-01-01

    Modern Power Station Practice, Volume 3: Mechanical (Turbines and Auxiliary Equipment) focuses on the development of turbines and auxiliary equipment used in power stations in Great Britain. Topics covered include thermodynamics and steam turbine theory; turbine auxiliary systems such as lubrication systems, feed water heating systems, and the condenser and cooling water plants. Miscellaneous station services, and pipework in power plants are also described. This book is comprised of five chapters and begins with an overview of thermodynamics and steam turbine theory, paying particular attenti

  16. Implementation of a generalized actuator disk wind turbine model into the weather research and forecasting model for large-eddy simulation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirocha, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kosovic, B. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Aitken, M. L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Lundquist, J. K. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-01-10

    A generalized actuator disk (GAD) wind turbine parameterization designed for large-eddy simulation (LES) applications was implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. WRF-LES with the GAD model enables numerical investigation of the effects of an operating wind turbine on and interactions with a broad range of atmospheric boundary layer phenomena. Numerical simulations using WRF-LES with the GAD model were compared with measurements obtained from the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS-2011), the goal of which was to measure both the inflow to and wake from a 2.3-MW wind turbine. Data from a meteorological tower and two light-detection and ranging (lidar) systems, one vertically profiling and another operated over a variety of scanning modes, were utilized to obtain forcing for the simulations, and to evaluate characteristics of the simulated wakes. Simulations produced wakes with physically consistent rotation and velocity deficits. Two surface heat flux values of 20 W m–2 and 100 W m–2 were used to examine the sensitivity of the simulated wakes to convective instability. Simulations using the smaller heat flux values showed good agreement with wake deficits observed during TWICS-2011, whereas those using the larger value showed enhanced spreading and more-rapid attenuation. This study demonstrates the utility of actuator models implemented within atmospheric LES to address a range of atmospheric science and engineering applications. In conclusion, validated implementation of the GAD in a numerical weather prediction code such as WRF will enable a wide range of studies related to the interaction of wind turbines with the atmosphere and surface.

  17. Aero-thermal optimization of film cooling flow parameters on the suction surface of a high pressure turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ayoubi, Carole; Hassan, Ibrahim; Ghaly, Wahid

    2012-11-01

    This paper aims to optimize film coolant flow parameters on the suction surface of a high-pressure gas turbine blade in order to obtain an optimum compromise between a superior cooling performance and a minimum aerodynamic penalty. An optimization algorithm coupled with three-dimensional Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes analysis is used to determine the optimum film cooling configuration. The VKI blade with two staggered rows of axially oriented, conically flared, film cooling holes on its suction surface is considered. Two design variables are selected; the coolant to mainstream temperature ratio and total pressure ratio. The optimization objective consists of maximizing the spatially averaged film cooling effectiveness and minimizing the aerodynamic penalty produced by film cooling. The effect of varying the coolant flow parameters on the film cooling effectiveness and the aerodynamic loss is analyzed using an optimization method and three dimensional steady CFD simulations. The optimization process consists of a genetic algorithm and a response surface approximation of the artificial neural network type to provide low-fidelity predictions of the objective function. The CFD simulations are performed using the commercial software CFX. The numerical predictions of the aero-thermal performance is validated against a well-established experimental database.

  18. Research overview on vibration damping of mistuned bladed disk assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bladed disk assemblies are very important parts in auto engine and gas turbine, and is widely used in practical engineering. The mistuning existing commonly in the bladed disk assemblies can destroy the vibration characteristics of the bladed disk assemblies, which is one of the reasons for the high cycle fatigue failure of bladed disk assemblies, so it is necessary to research how to reduce the vibration of the bladed disk assemblies. On the basis of the review of relevant research at home and abroad, the mistuning vibration mechanism of the bladed disk assemblies is introduced, and the main technical methods of the vibration damping of bladed disk assemblies are reviewed, such as artificially active mistuning, collision damping, friction damping and optimization of the blade position. Some future research directions are presented.

  19. Heat Transfer in Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Vijay K.

    2001-01-01

    The turbine gas path is a very complex flow field. This is due to a variety of flow and heat transfer phenomena encountered in turbine passages. This manuscript provides an overview of the current work in this field at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Also, based on the author's preference, more emphasis is on the computational work. There is much more experimental work in progress at GRC than that reported here. While much has been achieved, more needs to be done in terms of validating the predictions against experimental data. More experimental data, especially on film cooled and rough turbine blades, are required for code validation. Also, the combined film cooling and internal cooling flow computation for a real blade is yet to be performed. While most computational work to date has assumed steady state conditions, the flow is clearly unsteady due to the presence of wakes. All this points to a long road ahead. However, we are well on course.

  20. The Fragmentation Criteria in Local Vertically Stratified Self-gravitating Disk Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baehr, Hans; Klahr, Hubert [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kratter, Kaitlin M., E-mail: baehr@mpia.de [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2017-10-10

    Massive circumstellar disks are prone to gravitational instabilities, which trigger the formation of spiral arms that can fragment into bound clumps under the right conditions. Two-dimensional simulations of self-gravitating disks are useful starting points for studying fragmentation because they allow high-resolution simulations of thin disks. However, convergence issues can arise in 2D from various sources. One of these sources is the 2D approximation of self-gravity, which exaggerates the effect of self-gravity on small scales when the potential is not smoothed to account for the assumed vertical extent of the disk. This effect is enhanced by increased resolution, resulting in fragmentation at longer cooling timescales β . If true, it suggests that the 3D simulations of disk fragmentation may not have the same convergence problem and could be used to examine the nature of fragmentation without smoothing self-gravity on scales similar to the disk scale height. To that end, we have carried out local 3D self-gravitating disk simulations with simple β cooling with fixed background irradiation to determine if 3D is necessary to properly describe disk fragmentation. Above a resolution of ∼40 grid cells per scale height, we find that our simulations converge with respect to the cooling timescale. This result converges in agreement with analytic expectations which place a fragmentation boundary at β {sub crit} = 3.

  1. Multimegawatt disk generator system for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbes, A.; Iwata, H.

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design of a 100 megawatt - 500 seconds disk MHD generator system suitable as a burst power source for a space based neutral particle beam (NPB) is presented. The system features two disk generators operated in the magnetic field produced by a single circular superconducting magnet. Gelled reactants are used as the energy source. The oxidizer gel includes the alkali seed. The high heat flux areas of the power train are water cooled. Heat is rejected to a hydrogen stream which is also used for cooling of the exit section. The hydrogen is also used to mitigate the effects of the exhaust products of combustion on the platform. The two disk channels are operated in parallel. A dc to dc converter consolidates the channel's output into a single 100 kilovolt dc output

  2. 76 FR 76097 - Amendment to the International Traffic in Arms Regulations: Establishment of U.S. Munitions List...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... blades, vanes, nozzles, disks and shrouds) ``specially designed'' for gas turbine engines controlled this...)) ``specially designed'' for gas turbine engines controlled in this category. (f) Components, parts, accessories... augmenters; and cooled nozzles) ``specially designed'' for gas turbine engines controlled in this category...

  3. Reactor-core isolation cooling system with dedicated generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazareno, E.V.; Dillmann, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor complex. It comprises a dual-phase nuclear reactor; a main turbine for converting phase-conversion energy stored by vapor into mechanical energy for driving a generator; a main generator for converting the mechanical energy into electricity; a fluid reservoir external to the reactor; a reactor core isolation cooling system with several components at least some of which require electrical power. It also comprises an auxiliary pump for pumping fluid from the reservoir into the reactor pressure vessel; an auxiliary turbine for driving the pump; control means for regulating the rotation rate of the auxiliary turbine; cooling means for cooling the control means; and an auxiliary generator coupled to the auxiliary turbine for providing at least a portion of the electrical power required by the components during a blackout condition

  4. The Mechanical Properties of Candidate Superalloys for a Hybrid Turbine Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; MacKay, Rebecca A.; Draper, Susan L.; Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanical properties of several cast blade superalloys and one powder metallurgy disk superalloy were assessed for potential use in a dual alloy hybrid disk concept of joined dissimilar bore and web materials. Grain size was varied for each superalloy class. Tensile, creep, fatigue, and notch fatigue tests were performed at 704 to 815 degC. Typical microstructures and failure modes were determined. Preferred materials were then selected for future study as the bore and rim alloys in this hybrid disk concept. Powder metallurgy superalloy LSHR at 15 micron grain size and single crystal superalloy LDS-1101+Hf were selected for further study, and future work is recommended to develop the hybrid disk concept.

  5. Braking System for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysiak, J. E.; Webb, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Operating turbine stopped smoothly by fail-safe mechanism. Windturbine braking systems improved by system consisting of two large steel-alloy disks mounted on high-speed shaft of gear box, and brakepad assembly mounted on bracket fastened to top of gear box. Lever arms (with brake pads) actuated by spring-powered, pneumatic cylinders connected to these arms. Springs give specific spring-loading constant and exert predetermined load onto brake pads through lever arms. Pneumatic cylinders actuated positively to compress springs and disengage brake pads from disks. During power failure, brakes automatically lock onto disks, producing highly reliable, fail-safe stops. System doubles as stopping brake and "parking" brake.

  6. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  7. Progress of a Cross-Correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting Radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Fralick, Gustave C.

    2015-01-01

    The modern turbine engine operates in a harsh environment at high speeds and is repeatedly exposed to combined high mechanical and thermal loads. The cumulative effects of these external forces lead to high stresses and strains on the engine components, such as the rotating turbine disks, which may eventually lead to a catastrophic failure if left undetected. The operating environment makes it difficult to use conventional strain gauges, therefore, non-contact strain measurement techniques is of interest to NASA and the turbine engine community. This presentation describes one such approach; the use of cross correlation analysis to measure strain experienced by the engine turbine disk with the goal of assessing potential faults and damage.

  8. System for cooling the containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, Didier.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a post-accidental cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. This system includes in series a turbine fed by the moist air contained in the vessel, a condenser in which the air is dried and cooled, a compressor actuated by the turbine and a cooling exchanger. The cold water flowing through the condenser and in the exchanger is taken from a tank outside the vessel and injected by a pump actuated by the turbine. The application is for nuclear reactors under pressure [fr

  9. Evaluation of the performance of the systems cooling auxiliary of the Almaraz NPP turbine building; Evaluacion del rendimiento de los sistemas de refrigeracion auxiliar del edificio de turbinas de CNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilar Carmona, G.

    2011-07-01

    After the successive performance improvements, to evacuate the thermal loads, and maintain acceptable temperatures throughout the year, added an auxiliary cooling system of the building of turbine, TCA system, composed of 5 shot forced by unit cooling towers.

  10. Reverse Brayton Cycle with Bladeless Turbo Compressor for Automotive Environmental Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan (Inventor); Ganapathi, Gani B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An automotive cabin cooling system uses a bladeless turbocompressor driven by automobile engine exhaust to compress incoming ambient air. The compressed air is directed to an intercooler where it is cooled and then to another bladeless turbine used as an expander where the air cools as it expands and is directed to the cabin interior. Excess energy may be captured by an alternator couple to the expander turbine. The system employs no chemical refrigerant and may be further modified to include another intercooler on the output of the expander turbine to isolate the cooled cabin environment.

  11. Modeling syngas-fired gas turbine engines with two dilutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mitchell E.

    2011-12-01

    Prior gas turbine engine modeling work at the University of Wyoming studied cycle performance and turbine design with air and CO2-diluted GTE cycles fired with methane and syngas fuels. Two of the cycles examined were unconventional and innovative. The work presented herein reexamines prior results and expands the modeling by including the impacts of turbine cooling and CO2 sequestration on GTE cycle performance. The simple, conventional regeneration and two alternative regeneration cycle configurations were examined. In contrast to air dilution, CO2 -diluted cycle efficiencies increased by approximately 1.0 percentage point for the three regeneration configurations examined, while the efficiency of the CO2-diluted simple cycle decreased by approximately 5.0 percentage points. For CO2-diluted cycles with a closed-exhaust recycling path, an optimum CO2-recycle pressure was determined for each configuration that was significantly lower than atmospheric pressure. Un-cooled alternative regeneration configurations with CO2 recycling achieved efficiencies near 50%, which was approximately 3.0 percentage points higher than the conventional regeneration cycle and simple cycle configurations that utilized CO2 recycling. Accounting for cooling of the first two turbine stages resulted in a 2--3 percentage point reduction in un-cooled efficiency, with air dilution corresponding to the upper extreme. Additionally, when the work required to sequester CO2 was accounted for, cooled cycle efficiency decreased by 4--6 percentage points, and was more negatively impacted when syngas fuels were used. Finally, turbine design models showed that turbine blades are shorter with CO2 dilution, resulting in fewer design restrictions.

  12. Design and development of gas cooled reactors with closed cycle gas turbines. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    Technological advances over the past fifteen years in the design of turbomachinery, recuperators and magnetic bearings provide the potential for a quantum improvement in nuclear power generation economics through the use of the HTGR with a closed cycle gas turbine. Enhanced international co-operation among national gas cooled reactor programmes in these common technology areas could facilitate the development of this nuclear power concept thereby achieving safety, environmental and economic benefits with overall reduced development costs. This TCM and Workshop was convened to provide the opportunity to review and examine the status of design activities and technology development in national HTGR programmes with specific emphasis on the closed cycle gas turbine, and to identify pathways which take advantage of the opportunity for international co-operation in the development of this concept. Refs, figs, tabs

  13. Design and development of gas cooled reactors with closed cycle gas turbines. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    Technological advances over the past fifteen years in the design of turbomachinery, recuperators and magnetic bearings provide the potential for a quantum improvement in nuclear power generation economics through the use of the HTGR with a closed cycle gas turbine. Enhanced international co-operation among national gas cooled reactor programmes in these common technology areas could facilitate the development of this nuclear power concept thereby achieving safety, environmental and economic benefits with overall reduced development costs. This TCM and Workshop was convened to provide the opportunity to review and examine the status of design activities and technology development in national HTGR programmes with specific emphasis on the closed cycle gas turbine, and to identify pathways which take advantage of the opportunity for international co-operation in the development of this concept. Refs, figs, tabs.

  14. The Dynamics of Truncated Black Hole Accretion Disks. I. Viscous Hydrodynamic Case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogg, J. Drew; Reynolds, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Truncated accretion disks are commonly invoked to explain the spectro-temporal variability in accreting black holes in both small systems, i.e., state transitions in galactic black hole binaries (GBHBs), and large systems, i.e., low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs). In the canonical truncated disk model of moderately low accretion rate systems, gas in the inner region of the accretion disk occupies a hot, radiatively inefficient phase, which leads to a geometrically thick disk, while the gas in the outer region occupies a cooler, radiatively efficient phase that resides in the standard geometrically thin disk. Observationally, there is strong empirical evidence to support this phenomenological model, but a detailed understanding of the dynamics of truncated disks is lacking. We present a well-resolved viscous, hydrodynamic simulation that uses an ad hoc cooling prescription to drive a thermal instability and, hence, produce the first sustained truncated accretion disk. With this simulation, we perform a study of the dynamics, angular momentum transport, and energetics of a truncated disk. We find that the time variability introduced by the quasi-periodic transition of gas from efficient cooling to inefficient cooling impacts the evolution of the simulated disk. A consequence of the thermal instability is that an outflow is launched from the hot/cold gas interface, which drives large, sub-Keplerian convective cells into the disk atmosphere. The convective cells introduce a viscous θ − ϕ stress that is less than the generic r − ϕ viscous stress component, but greatly influences the evolution of the disk. In the truncated disk, we find that the bulk of the accreted gas is in the hot phase.

  15. Effects of free-stream turbulence intensity and blowing ratio on film cooling of turbine blade leading edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. M.; Kim, Youn J.; Cho, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    We used a cylindrical model which simulates turbine blade leading edge to investigate the effects of free-stream turbulence intensity and blowing ratio on film cooling of turbine blade leading edge. Tests are carried out in a low-speed wind tunnel on a cylindrical model with three rows of injection holes. Mainstream Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter was 7.1x10 4 . Two types of turbulence grid are used to increase a free-stream turbulence intensity. The effect of coolant blowing ratio was studied for various blowing ratios. For each blowing ratios, wall temperatures around the surface of the test model are measured by thermocouples installed inside the model. Results show that blowing ratios have small effect on spanwise-averaged film effectiveness at high free-stream turbulence intensity. However, an increase in free-stream turbulence intensity enhances significantly spanwise-averaged film effectiveness at low blowing ratio

  16. Advanced LP turbine blade design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, M.; Pfeiffer, R.; Termuehlen, H.

    1990-01-01

    In the 1960's and early 1970's, the development of steam turbines for the utility industry was mainly influenced by the demand for increasing unit sizes. Nuclear plants in particular, required the design of LP turbines with large annulus areas for substantial mass and volumetric steam flows. Since then the development of more efficient LP turbines became an ongoing challenge. Extensive R and D work was performed in order to build efficient and reliable LP turbines often exposed to severe corrosion, erosion and dynamic excitation conditions. This task led to the introduction of an advanced disk-type rotor design for 1800 rpm LP turbines and the application of a more efficient, reaction-type blading for all steam turbine sections including the first stages of LP turbines. The most recent developments have resulted in an advanced design of large LP turbine blading, typically used in the last three stages of each LP turbine flow section. Development of such blading required detailed knowledge of the three dimensional, largely transonic, flow conditions of saturated steam. Also the precise assessment of blade stressing from dynamic conditions, such as speed and torsional resonance, as well as stochastic and aerodynamic excitation is of extreme importance

  17. Film-cooled turbine endwall in a transonic flow field; Filmgekuehlte Turbinenplattform in transsonischem Stroemungsfeld

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicklas, M.

    2000-11-01

    Aero and thermodynamic measurements at the endwall of a turbine nozzle guide vane were carried out. These investigations are the first where the complete blade passage at the endwall in a transonic flow field is analysed for heat transfer and adiabatic film-cooling effectiveness. The aerodynamic measurements identify an intensive interaction between the coolant air and the secondary flow field. Similarly strong variations in heat transfer and film-cooling effectiveness were found. Analysis of the heat transfer measurements indicates that the heat transfer represents an indispensable tool for the evaluation of platform film-cooling design. On the basis of infrared temperature measurements, a procedure for accurate analysis of heat transfer and film-cooling effectiveness in a complex transonic flow field was developed. This measurement technique combines high accuracy with flexibility of application. These investigations have led to design improvements for film-cooling systems at the platform. (orig.) [German] Aero- und thermodynamische Messungen an einer Plattform eines Turbinenleitrads werden beschrieben. Erstmals wird in einem transsonischen Stroemungsfeld die komplette Seitenwand bezueglich des Waermeuebergangs und der adiabaten Filmkuehleffektivitaet untersucht. Die aerodynamischen Messungen zeigen eine intensive Wechselwirkung der Kuehlluft mit dem Sekundaerstroemungsfeld. Daraus resultierend treten starke Aenderungen des Waermeuebergangs und der Filmkuehleffektivitaet auf. Die Resultate der Waermeuebergangsmessungen zeigen, dass der Waermeuebergang eine wichtige Groesse fuer die Bewertung eines Filmkuehldesigns an einer Plattform darstellt. Ein Messverfahren auf der Grundlage von Infrarot-Temperaturmessungen fuer eine genaue Analyse des Waermeuebergangs und der Filmkuehleffektivitaet in den komplexen Verhaeltnissen einer transsonischen Stroemung wurde entwickelt. Mit der verwendeten Messtechnik wird eine hohe Genauigkeit bei der Ermittlung der quantitativen

  18. A mathematical model of bird collisions with wind turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    When a bird flies through the disk swept out by the blades of a wind turbine rotor, the probability of collision depends on the motions and dimensions of the bird and the blades. The collision model in this paper predicts the probability for birds that glide upwind, downwind, an across the wind past simple one-dimensional blades represented by straight lines, and upwind and downwind past more realistic three-dimensional blades with chord and twist. Probabilities vary over the surface of the disk, and in most cases, the tip of the blade is less likely to collide with a bird than parts of the blade nearer the hub. The mean probability may be found by integration over the disk area. The collision model identifies the rotor characteristics that could be altered to make turbines safer for birds

  19. Resonance spiking by periodic loss in the double-sided liquid cooling disk oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Rongzhi; She, Jiangbo; Li, Dongdong; Li, Fuli; Peng, Bo

    2017-03-01

    A double-sided liquid cooling Nd:YAG disk oscillator working at a pump repetition rate of 20 Hz is demonstrated. The output energy of 376 mJ is realized, corresponding to the optical-optical efficiency of 12.8% and the slope efficiency of 14%. The pump pulse width is 300 µs and the laser pulse width is 260 µs. Instead of being a damped signal, the output of laser comprises undamped spikes. A periodic intra-cavity loss was found by numerical analysis, which has a frequency component near the eigen frequency of the relaxation oscillation. Resonance effect will induce amplified spikes even though the loss fluctuates in a small range. The Shark-Hartmann sensor was used to investigate the wavefront aberration induced by turbulent flow and temperature gradient. According to the wavefront and fluid mechanics analysis, it is considered that the periodic intra-cavity loss can be attributed to turbulent flow and temperature gradient.

  20. Innovative opto-mechanical design of a laser head for compact thin-disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macúchová, Karolina; Smrž, Martin; Řeháková, Martina; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-11-01

    We present recent progress in design of innovative versatile laser head for lasers based on thin-disk architecture which are being constructed at the HiLASE centre of the IOP in the Czech Republic. Concept of thin-disk laser technology allows construction of lasers providing excellent beam quality with high average output power and optical efficiency. Our newly designed thin-disk carrier and pump module comes from optical scheme consisting of a parabolic mirror and roof mirrors proposed in 90's. However, mechanical parts and a cooling system were in-house simplified and tailor-made to medium power lasers since no suitable setup was commercially available. Proposed opto-mechanical design is based on stable yet easily adjustable mechanics. The only water nozzle-cooled component is a room-temperature-operated thindisk mounted on a special cooling finger. Cooling of pump optics was replaced by heat conductive transfer from mirrors made of special Al alloy to a massive brass baseplate. Such mirrors are easy to manufacture and very cheap. Presented laser head was manufactured and tested in construction of Er and Yb doped disk lasers. Details of the latest design will be presented.

  1. Development of high temperature turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahara, Kitao; Nouse, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Toyoaki; Minoda, Mitsuhiro; Matsusue, Katsutoshi; Yanagi, Ryoji

    1988-07-01

    For the contribution to the development of FJR710, high by-pass ratio turbofan engine, with the study for many years of the development of high efficiency turbine for the jet engine, the first technical prize from the Energy Resource Research Committee was awarded in April, 1988. This report introduced its technical contents. In order to improve the thermal efficiency and enlarge the output, it is very effective to raise the gas temperature at the inlet of gas turbine. For its purpose, by cooling the nozzle and moving blades and having those blades operate at lower temperature than that of the working limitation, they realized, for the first time in Japan, the technique of cooling turbine to heighten the operational gas temperature. By that technique, it was enabled to raise the gas temperature at the inlet of turbine, to 1,350/sup 0/C from 850/sup 0/C. This report explain many important points of study covering the basic test, visualizing flow experiment, material discussion and structural design in the process of development. (9 figs)

  2. Multimegawatt disk generator system for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbes, H.; Iwata, H.

    1988-01-01

    The conceptual design of a 100 megawatt - 500 seconds disk MHD generator system suitable as a burst power source for a space based neutral particle beam (NPB) is presented. The system features two disk generators operated in the magnetic field produced by a single circular superconducting magnet. Gelled reactants are used as the energy source. The oxidizer gel includes the alkali seed. The high heat flux areas of the power train are water cooled. Heat is rejected to a hydrogen stream which is also used for cooling of the exit section. The hydrogen is also used to mitigate the effects of the exhaust products of combustion on the platform. The two disk channels are operated in parallel. A dc to dc converter consolidates the channel's output into a single 100 kilovolt dc output. Critical development issues relevant to the development of such power systems are identified and discussed. A R and D plan aimed at establishing the technical feasibility of the proposed system is also presented

  3. Yield surface investigation of alloys during model disk spin tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. P. Kuzmin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-turbine engines operate under heavy subsequently static loading conditions. Disks of gas-turbine engine are high loaded parts of irregular shape having intensive stress concentrators wherein a 3D stress strain state occurs. The loss of load-carrying capability or burst of disk can lead to severe accident or disaster. Therefore, development of methods to assess deformations and to predict burst is one of the most important problems.Strength assessment approaches are used at all levels of engine creation. In recent years due to actively developing numerical method, particularly FEA, it became possible to investigate load-carrying capability of irregular shape disks, to use 3D computing schemes including flow theory and different options of force and deformation failure criteria. In spite of a wide progress and practical use of strength assessment approaches, there is a lack of detailed research data on yield surface of disk alloys. The main purpose of this work is to validate the use of basis hypothesis of flow theory and investigate the yield surface of disk alloys during the disks spin test.The results of quasi-static numerical simulation of spin tests of model disk made from high-temperature forged alloy are presented. To determine stress-strain state of disk during loading finite element analysis is used. Simulation of elastic-plastic strain fields was carried out using incremental theory of plasticity with isotropic hardening. Hardening function was taken from the results of specimens tensile test. Specimens were cut from a sinkhead of model disk. The paper investigates the model sensitivity affected by V.Mises and Tresca yield criteria as well as the Hosford model. To identify the material model parameters the eddy current sensors were used in the experimental approach to measure rim radial displacements during the load-unload of spin test. The results of calculation made using different material models were compared with the

  4. Fracture of thermally loaded disks of materials in elastic-brittle state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, V.S.; Lanin, A.G.; Fedik, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture kinetics and limiting supporting power were studied in a solid thin disk axisymmetrically cooled from the periphery depending on the deqree of the stressed state nonuniformity and crack interaction. Basing on a strength approach of fracture linear mechanism it has become possible to obtain limit equilibrium curves and to evaluate thermoelastic stress redistribution on the boundary of the disk with one, two and four symmetrical radial cracks. Calculated data are confirmed by the results of the experiments performed with zirconium carbide water-cooled disks. It is shown that while determining the limit supporting power of a thermally loaded body, the loading history and fracture kinetics should be taken into account

  5. Coatings for Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Protection of Disk Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Jim; Gabb, Tim; Draper, Sue; Miller, Bob; Locci, Ivan; Sudbrack, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Increasing temperatures in aero gas turbines is resulting in oxidation and hot corrosion attack of turbine disks. Since disks are sensitive to low cycle fatigue (LCF), any environmental attack, and especially hot corrosion pitting, can potentially seriously degrade the life of the disk. Application of metallic coatings are one means of protecting disk alloys from this environmental attack. However, simply the presence of a metallic coating, even without environmental exposure, can degrade the LCF life of a disk alloy. Therefore, coatings must be designed which are not only resistant to oxidation and corrosion attack, but must not significantly degrade the LCF life of the alloy. Three different Ni-Cr coating compositions (29, 35.5, 45wt. Cr) were applied at two thicknesses by Plasma Enhanced Magnetron Sputtering (PEMS) to two similar Ni-based disk alloys. One coating also received a thin ZrO2 overcoat. The coated samples were also given a short oxidation exposure in a low PO2 environment to encourage chromia scale formation. Without further environmental exposure, the LCF life of the coated samples, evaluated at 760C, was less than that of uncoated samples. Hence, application of the coating alone degraded the LCF life of the disk alloy. Since shot peening is commonly employed to improve LCF life, the effect of shot peening the coated and uncoated surface was also evaluated. For all cases, shot peening improved the LCF life of the coated samples. Coated and uncoated samples were shot peened and given environmental exposures consisting of 500 hrs of oxidation followed by 50 hrs of hot corrosion, both at 760C). The high-Cr coating showed the best LCF life after the environmental exposures. Results of the LCF testing and post-test characterization of the various coatings will be presented and future research directions discussed.

  6. Steam turbines for PWR stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muscroft, J.

    1989-01-01

    The thermodynamic cycle requirements and mechanical design features applying to modern GEC 3000 rev/min steam turbines for pressurised water reactor power stations are reviewed. The most recent developments include machines of 630 MW and 985 MW output which are currently under construction. The importance of service experience with nuclear wet steam turbines associated with a variety of types of water cooled reactor and its relevance to the design of modern 3000 rev/min turbines for pressurised water reactor applications is emphasised. (author)

  7. Prediction of Film Cooling Effectiveness on a Gas Turbine Blade Leading Edge Using ANN and CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos, J. O.; García, J. C.; Urquiza, G.; Huicochea, A.; De Santiago, O.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, the area-averaged film cooling effectiveness (AAFCE) on a gas turbine blade leading edge was predicted by employing an artificial neural network (ANN) using as input variables: hole diameter, injection angle, blowing ratio, hole and columns pitch. The database used to train the network was built using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based on a two level full factorial design of experiments. The CFD numerical model was validated with an experimental rig, where a first stage blade of a gas turbine was represented by a cylindrical specimen. The ANN architecture was composed of three layers with four neurons in hidden layer and Levenberg-Marquardt was selected as ANN optimization algorithm. The AAFCE was successfully predicted by the ANN with a regression coefficient R2<0.99 and a root mean square error RMSE=0.0038. The ANN weight coefficients were used to estimate the relative importance of the input parameters. Blowing ratio was the most influential parameter with relative importance of 40.36 % followed by hole diameter. Additionally, by using the ANN model, the relationship between input parameters was analyzed.

  8. A New Energy-Critical Plane Damage Parameter for Multiaxial Fatigue Life Prediction of Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yong Yu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As one of fracture critical components of an aircraft engine, accurate life prediction of a turbine blade to disk attachment is significant for ensuring the engine structural integrity and reliability. Fatigue failure of a turbine blade is often caused under multiaxial cyclic loadings at high temperatures. In this paper, considering different failure types, a new energy-critical plane damage parameter is proposed for multiaxial fatigue life prediction, and no extra fitted material constants will be needed for practical applications. Moreover, three multiaxial models with maximum damage parameters on the critical plane are evaluated under tension-compression and tension-torsion loadings. Experimental data of GH4169 under proportional and non-proportional fatigue loadings and a case study of a turbine disk-blade contact system are introduced for model validation. Results show that model predictions by Wang-Brown (WB and Fatemi-Socie (FS models with maximum damage parameters are conservative and acceptable. For the turbine disk-blade contact system, both of the proposed damage parameters and Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT model show reasonably acceptable correlations with its field number of flight cycles. However, life estimations of the turbine blade reveal that the definition of the maximum damage parameter is not reasonable for the WB model but effective for both the FS and SWT models.

  9. Effect of jet nozzle geometry on flow and heat transfer performance of vortex cooling for gas turbine blade leading edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Changhe; Li, Liang; Wu, Xin; Feng, Zhenping

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We establish a suitable vortex chamber model for gas turbine blade leading edge. • Mechanism of vortex cooling is further discussed and presented. • Influences of jet nozzle geometry on vortex cooling characteristics are researched. • This paper focuses on assessment of flow field and thermal performance for different jet nozzle aspect ratio and area. - Abstract: In this paper, 3D viscous steady Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) equations are utilized to investigate the influence of jet nozzle geometry on flow and thermal behavior of vortex cooling for gas turbine blades. Comparison between calculation with different turbulence models and the experimental data is conducted, and results show that the standard k-ω model provides the best accuracy. The grid independence analysis is performed to obtain the proper mesh number. First, the mechanism of vortex cooling is further discussed, and the pronounced impact of kinetic turbulence intensity, thin thermal boundary layer, violent radial convection and complex vortices on enhanced heat transfer performance is confirmed. Then, seven jet nozzle aspect ratios and seven jet nozzle to chamber cross section area ratios are selected to research the flow field and thermal characteristics of vortex cooling focusing on the streamline, static pressure ratio, total pressure loss ratio and Nusselt number. It is presented that the jet nozzle aspect ratio and jet nozzle to chamber cross section area ratio both impose a significant effect on the flow and thermal parameters. The averaged Nusselt number decreases at first and then increases with the increasing jet nozzle aspect ratio, reaching highest when aspect ratio equals to 1. The effect of area ratio on averaged Nusselt number is complex. Finally, the heat transfer results in this study are compared with other previous works. Results indicate that good agreement with previous data is achieved, and the enhanced thermal behavior may be acquired by

  10. RADIATION PRESSURE-SUPPORTED ACCRETION DISKS: VERTICAL STRUCTURE, ENERGY ADVECTION, AND CONVECTIVE STABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Weimin

    2012-01-01

    By taking into account the local energy balance per unit volume between the viscous heating and the advective cooling plus the radiative cooling, we investigate the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported accretion disks in spherical coordinates. Our solutions show that the photosphere of the disk is close to the polar axis and therefore the disk seems to be extremely thick. However, the density profile implies that most of the accreted matter exists in a moderate range around the equatorial plane. We show that the well-known polytropic relation between the pressure and the density is unsuitable for describing the vertical structure of radiation pressure-supported disks. More importantly, we find that the energy advection is significant even for slightly sub-Eddington accretion disks. We argue that the non-negligible advection may help us understand why the standard thin disk model is likely to be inaccurate above ∼0.3 Eddington luminosity, which was found by some works on black hole spin measurement. Furthermore, the solutions satisfy the Solberg-Høiland conditions, which indicate the disk to be convectively stable. In addition, we discuss the possible link between our disk model and ultraluminous X-ray sources.

  11. Utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawada, Osamu; Onuki, Yoshiaki; Wasaoka, Takeshi.

    1974-01-01

    Concerning the utilization of multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the electric power generation with gas turbines is described: features of HTR-He gas turbine power plants; the state of development of He gas turbines; and combined cycle with gas turbines and steam turbines. The features of gas turbines concern heat dissipation into the environment and the mode of load operation. Outstanding work in the development of He gas turbines is that in Hochtemperatur Helium-Turbine Project in West Germany. The power generation with combined gas turbines and steam turbines appears to be superior to that with gas turbines alone. (Mori, K.)

  12. Gas Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woitke, Peter; Dent, Bill; Thi, Wing-Fai; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Rice, Ken; Williams, Jonathan; Sicilia-Aguilar, Aurora; Brown, Joanna; Kamp, Inga; Pascucci, Ilaria; Alexander, Richard; Roberge, Aki

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes a Splinter Session at the Cool Stars XV conference in St. Andrews with 3 review and 4 contributed talks. The speakers have discussed various approaches to understand the structure and evolution of the gas component in protoplanetary disks. These ranged from observational

  13. An Experimental Evaluation of Blockage Corrections for Current Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Hannah; Polagye, Brian

    2017-11-01

    Flow confinement has been shown to significantly alter the performance of turbines that extract power from water currents. These performance effects are related to the degree of constraint, defined by the ratio of turbine projected area to channel cross-sectional area. This quantity is referred to as the blockage ratio. Because it is often desirable to adjust experimental observations in water channels to unconfined conditions, analytical corrections for both wind and current turbines have been derived. These are generally based on linear momentum actuator disk theory but have been applied to turbines without experimental validation. This work tests multiple blockage corrections on performance and thrust data from a cross-flow turbine and porous plates (experimental analogues to actuator disks) collected in laboratory flumes at blockage ratios ranging between 10 and 35%. To isolate the effects of blockage, the Reynolds number, Froude number, and submergence depth were held constant while the channel width was varied. Corrected performance data are compared to performance in a towing tank at a blockage ratio of less than 5%. In addition to examining the accuracy of each correction, underlying assumptions are assessed to determine why some corrections perform better than others. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. DGE-1256082 and the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC).

  14. Future development of large steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevance, A.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt is made to forecast the future of the large steam turbines till 1985. Three parameters affect the development of large turbines: 1) unit output; and a 2000 to 2500MW output may be scheduled; 2) steam quality: and two steam qualities may be considered: medium pressure saturated or slightly overheated steam (light water, heavy water); light enthalpie drop, high pressure steam, high temperature; high enthalpic drop; and 3) the quality of cooling supply. The largest range to be considered might be: open system cooling for sea-sites; humid tower cooling and dry tower cooling. Bi-fluid cooling cycles should be also mentioned. From the study of these influencing factors, it appears that the constructor, for an output of about 2500MW should have at his disposal the followings: two construction technologies for inlet parts and for high and intermediate pressure parts corresponding to both steam qualities; exhaust sections suitable for the different qualities of cooling supply. The two construction technologies with the two steam qualities already exist and involve no major developments. But, the exhaust section sets the question of rotational speed [fr

  15. Film cooling effects on the tip flow characteristics of a gas turbine blade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation of the tip flow characteristics between a gas turbine blade tip and the shroud was conducted by a pressure-test system and a particle image velocimetry (PIV system. A three-times scaled profile of the GE-E3 blade with five film cooling holes was used as specimen. The effects on flow characteristics by the rim width and the groove depth of the squealer tip were revealed. The rim widths were (a 0.9%, (b 2.1%, and (c 3.0% of the axial chord, and the groove depths were (a 2.8%, (b 4.8%, and (c 10% of the blade span. Several pressure taps on the top plate above the blades were connected to pressure gauges. By a CCD camera the PIV system recorded the velocity field around the leading edge zone including the five cooling holes. The flow distributions both in the tip clearance and in the passage were revealed, and the influence of the inlet velocity was determined. In this work, the tip flow characteristics with and without film cooling were investigated. The effects of different global blowing ratios of M=0.5, 1.0, 1.3 and 2.5 were established. It was found that decreasing the rim width resulted in a lower mass flow rate of the leakage flow, and the pressure distributions from the leading edge to the trailing edge showed a linearly increasing trend. It was also found that if the inlet velocity was less than 1.5 m/s, the flow field in the passage far away from the suction side appeared as a stagnation zone.

  16. Transmission of High Frequency Vibrations in Rotating Systems. Application to Cavitation Detection in Hydraulic Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Valentín

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main causes of damage in hydraulic turbines is cavitation. While not all cavitation appearing in a turbine is of a destructive type, erosive cavitation can severely affect the structure, thus increasing maintenance costs and reducing the remaining useful life of the machine. Of all types of cavitation, the maximum erosion occurs when clouds of bubbles collapse on the runner surface (cloud cavitation. When this occurs it is associated with a substantial increase in noise, and vibrations that are propagated everywhere throughout the machine. The generation of these cavitation clouds may occur naturally or it may be the response to a periodic pressure fluctuation, like the rotor/stator interaction in a hydraulic turbine. Erosive bubble cavitation generates high-frequency vibrations that are modulated by the shedding frequency. Therefore, the methods for the detection of erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines are based on the measurement and demodulation of high-frequency vibrations. In this paper, the feasibility of detecting erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines is investigated experimentally in a rotating disk system, which represents a simplified hydraulic turbine structure. The test rig used consists of a rotating disk submerged in a tank of water and confined with nearby axial and radial rigid surfaces. The excitation patterns produced by cloud cavitation are reproduced with a PZT (piezoelectric patch located on the disk. These patterns include pseudo-random excitations of different frequency bands modulated by one low carrier frequency, which model the erosive cavitation characteristics. Different types of sensors have been placed in the stationary and in the rotating parts (accelerometers, acoustic emission (AE, and a microphone in order to detect the excitation pattern. The results obtained for all the sensors tested have been compared in detail for the different excitation patterns applied to the disk. With this information

  17. Film cooling for a closed loop cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdgick, Steven Sebastian; Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2003-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending therebetween. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. At least one film cooling hole is defined through a wall of at least one of the cavities for flow communication between an interior of the cavity and an exterior of the vane. The film cooling hole(s) are defined adjacent a potential low LCF life region, so that cooling medium that bleeds out through the film cooling hole(s) reduces a thermal gradient in a vicinity thereof, thereby the increase the LCF life of that region.

  18. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon de los Santos, G.

    2009-10-01

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  19. Exergy analysis of a combined power and cooling cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontalvo, Armando; Pinzon, Horacio; Duarte, Jorge; Bula, Antonio; Quiroga, Arturo Gonzalez; Padilla, Ricardo Vasquez

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive exergy analysis of a combined power and cooling cycle which combines a Rankine and absorption refrigeration cycle by using ammonia–water mixture as working fluid. A thermodynamic model was developed in Matlab ® to find out the effect of pressure ratio, ammonia mass fraction at the absorber and turbine efficiency on the total exergy destruction of the cycle. The contribution of each cycle component on the total exergy destruction was also determined. The results showed that total exergy destruction decreases when pressure ratio increases, and reaches a maximum at x ≈ 0.5, when ammonia mass fraction is varied at absorber. Also, it was found that the absorber, the boiler and the turbine had the major contribution to the total exergy destruction of the cycle, and the increase of the turbine efficiency reduces the total exergy destruction. The effect of rectification cooling source (external and internal) on the cycle output was investigated, and the results showed that internal rectification cooling reduces the total exergy destruction of the cycle. Finally, the effect of the presence or absence of the superheater after the rectification process was determined and it was obtained that the superheated condition reduces the exergy destruction of the cycle at high turbine efficiency values. Highlights: • A parametric exergy analysis of a combined power and cooling cycle is performed. • Two scenarios for rectifier cooling (internal and external) were studied. • Internal cooling source is more exergetic efficient than external cooling source. • The absorber and boiler have the largest total exergy destruction. • Our results show that the superheater reduces the exergy destruction of the cycle

  20. Conjugate calculation of a film-cooled blade for improvement of the leading edge cooling configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Moritz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Great efforts are still put into the design process of advanced film-cooling configurations. In particular, the vanes and blades of turbine front stages have to be cooled extensively for a safe operation. The conjugate calculation technique is used for the three-dimensional thermal load prediction of a film-cooled test blade of a modern gas turbine. Thus, it becomes possible to take into account the interaction of internal flows, external flow, and heat transfer without the prescription of heat transfer coefficients. The focus of the investigation is laid on the leading edge part of the blade. The numerical model consists of all internal flow passages and cooling hole rows at the leading edge. Furthermore, the radial gap flow is also part of the model. The comparison with thermal pyrometer measurements shows that with respect to regions with high thermal load a qualitatively and quantitatively good agreement of the conjugate results and the measurements can be found. In particular, the region in the vicinity of the mid-span section is exposed to a higher thermal load, which requires further improvement of the cooling arrangement. Altogether the achieved results demonstrate that the conjugate calculation technique is applicable for reasonable prediction of three-dimensional thermal load of complex cooling configurations for blades.

  1. Cryo-cooled high-power window for high-frequency plasma heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norajitra, P.; Bojarsky, E.; Reiser, H.; Haefner, H.E.

    1991-09-01

    Within the framework of gyrotron window development, IMF pursues the concept of a single-disk window with edge cooling. Compared to a double-disk window with surface cooling, this concept offers a number of advantages in terms of safety, reliability, and ease of design and fabrication. The coolants which can be used for this purpose are liquid nitrogen and helium at very low temperature. (orig.) [de

  2. A new generation of wind turbines; Une nouvelle generation d'eoliennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nica, H. [Tesnic, Laval, PQ (Canada)

    2008-06-15

    Although homeowners have expressed a desire to use wind energy to supply their electricity needs, many technical barriers have stood in the way of installing wind turbines in urban settings. This was due in part to three-bladed vertical axis turbines, high technical costs, limited performances in urban settings and questionable aesthetics. Tesnic has considered these issues and proposed a completely different turbine that uses a different method for extracting energy from the wind. The first approved 3.6 kW model should appear by the end of 2009. This new turbine is based on the same principal of the steam turbine patented in 1913 by Nikola Tesla. Instead of having blades, the Tesla turbine used closely spaced parallel disks and was recognized as being very robust with a high efficiency rating. Tesnic's new wind powered turbine is a vertical axis turbine with a series of valves that directs the wind on a rotor assembly of disk space. A series of blades on its circumference redirects the wind through the assembly of discs and accelerates the rotation of the rotor. The turbine extracts the wind energy in several ways, including conventional drag and lift, adherence and the vortex effect. This gives a 50 per cent added value of efficiency compared to other wind powered turbines. The global market for small wind powered energy is in full expansion. It has been projected that small turbines with 1 kW capacity will be abundant by 2020. It was noted that for household wind powered energy, the market must consider issues of cost, low maintenance, noise pollution, visual aesthetics, durability and safety. Wind energy can also be used in several industries, including plastics, composites, light metals, textiles and electronics. 2 figs.

  3. Experimental and computational studies of film cooling with compound angle injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, R.J.; Eckert, E.R.G.; Patankar, S.V. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The thermal efficiency of gas turbine systems depends largely on the turbine inlet temperature. Recent decades have seen a steady rise in the inlet temperature and a resulting reduction in fuel consumption. At the same time, it has been necessary to employ intensive cooling of the hot components. Among various cooling methods, film cooling has become a standard method for cooling of the turbine airfoils and combustion chamber walls. The University of Minnesota program is a combined experimental and computational study of various film-cooling configurations. Whereas a large number of parameters influence film cooling processes, this research focuses on compound angle injection through a single row and through two rows of holes. Later work will investigate the values of contoured hole designs. An appreciation of the advantages of compound angle injection has risen recently with the demand for more effective cooling and with improved understanding of the flow; this project should continue to further this understanding. Approaches being applied include: (1) a new measurement system that extends the mass/heat transfer analogy to obtain both local film cooling and local mass (heat) transfer results in a single system, (2) direct measurement of three-dimensional turbulent transport in a highly-disturbed flow, (3) the use of compound angle and shaped holes to optimize film cooling performance, and (4) an exploration of anisotropy corrections to turbulence modeling of film cooling jets.

  4. Experiments on the Performance of Small Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine with Passive Pitch Control by Disk Pulley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work is to design a passive pitch-control mechanism for small horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT to generate stable power at high wind speeds. The mechanism uses a disk pulley as an actuator to passively adjust the pitch angle of blades by centrifugal force. For this design, aerodynamic braking is caused by the adjustment of pitch angles at high wind speeds. As a marked advantage, this does not require mechanical brakes that would incur electrical burn-out and structural failure under high speed rotation. This can ensure the survival of blades and generator in sever operation environments. In this paper, the analysis uses blade element momentum theory (BEMT to develop graphical user interface software to facilitate the performance assessment of the small-scale HAWT using passive pitch control (PPC. For verification, the HAWT system was tested in a full-scale wind tunnel for its aerodynamic performance. At low wind speeds, this system performed the same as usual, yet at high wind speeds, the equipped PPC system can effectively reduce the rotational speed to generate stable power.

  5. Structural and thermal analysis of a solid-cooled, low energy booster, radio-frequency-cavity tuner at the Superconducting Super Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, R.; Propp, A.; Dao, B.; Campbell, B.

    1993-04-01

    A three-dimensional heat conduction and structural model was developed to analyze and optimize the design of a solid-cooled low energy booster (LEB) radio-frequency (RF) cavity tuner concept. Consideration was given to three cooling options: (1) using beryllium oxide (BeO) disks, (2) using aluminum nitride (A1N) disks and (3) using neither BeO nor AlN disks. The results indicate that solid cooling is feasible from thermal and structural viewpoints if a minimum of two BeO disks or four AlN disks are used

  6. Structural and thermal analysis of a solid-cooled, low energy booster, radio-frequency-cavity tuner at the Superconducting Super Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, R.; Propp, A.; Dao, B.; Campbell, B.

    1993-04-01

    A three-dimensional heat conduction and structural model was developed to analyze and optimize the design of a solid-cooled low energy booster (LEB) radio-frequency (RF) cavity tuner concept. Consideration was given to three cooling options: (1) using beryllium oxide (BeO) disks, (2) using aluminum nitride (A1N) disks and (3) using neither BeO nor AlN disks. The results indicate that solid cooling is feasible from thermal and structural viewpoints if a minimum of two BeO disks or four AlN disks are used.

  7. Performance assessment of Darrieus wind turbine with symmetric and cambered airfoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cisse, H.; Trifu, O.; Paraschivoiu, I. [Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Mecanique

    2007-07-01

    This paper outlined the wind turbine and design software used to predict the flow conditions and performance of a straight-bladed Darrieus wind turbine. Three different blade sections were considered, notably the NACA 0018; the SNLA NLF 18/50 symmetrical airfoil; and the FX63-137 cambered airfoil. The numerical predictions of the flow conditions during the operation of the rotors were also presented. Torque yield for each blade section under a variety of operating conditions was presented. The numerical software program used in the study was based on a double-multiple streamtube model which considered a partition of the rotor in streamtubes and considered each of the 2 blade elements as an actuator disk. The actuator disk theory was based on a theory of momentum conservation. Wind velocities were determined in order to calculate forces acting on the actuator disks. A second set of equations was used to determine the forces acting on the upwind and downwind blade elements. Equations were also derived for the downwind interference factor. The following 3 main sets of data were used: (1) a geometry definition of the wind turbine; (2) operational conditions; and (3) main control parameters. Results of the study showed that the cambered airfoil blade section produced 10 times more torque in turbine starting conditions than the NACA 0018. Laminar airfoil lift to drag ratio at low angles of attack, and the use of appropriate Reynolds numbers resulted in higher efficiency. The large static stall angle of the cambered airfoil allowed higher power outputs than symmetrical airfoils. It was concluded that the starting torque of a Darrieus turbine can be increased by using a cambered blade section. 13 refs., 19 figs.

  8. X-RAY IRRADIATION OF THE LkCa 15 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, Stephen L. [CASA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Guedel, Manuel, E-mail: stephen.skinner@colorado.edu, E-mail: manuel.guedel@univie.ac.at [Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-03-01

    LkCa 15 in the Taurus star-forming region has recently gained attention as the first accreting T Tauri star likely to host a young protoplanet. High spatial resolution infrared observations have detected the suspected protoplanet within a dust-depleted inner gap of the LkCa 15 transition disk at a distance of {approx}15 AU from the star. If this object's status as a protoplanet is confirmed, then LkCa 15 will serve as a unique laboratory for constraining physical conditions within a planet-forming disk. Previous models of the LkCa 15 disk have accounted for disk heating by the stellar photosphere but have ignored the potential importance of X-ray ionization and heating. We report here the detection of LkCa 15 as a bright X-ray source with Chandra. The X-ray emission is characterized by a cool, heavily absorbed plasma component at kT {sub cool} Almost-Equal-To 0.3 keV and a harder component at kT {sub hot} Almost-Equal-To 5 keV. We use the observed X-ray properties to provide initial estimates of the X-ray ionization and heating rates within the tenuous inner disk. These estimates and the observed X-ray properties of LkCa 15 can be used as a starting point for developing more realistic disk models of this benchmark system.

  9. Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (BP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path. The thermodynamic analyses of gas turbine cycles with modifications such as intercooling, recuperating, and reheating have shown that intercooling is important to achieving high efficiency gas turbines. The gas turbine industry has considerable interest in adopting intercooling to advanced gas turbines of different capacities. This observation is reinforced by the US Navys Intercooled-Recuperative (ICR) gas turbine development program to power the surface ships. In an intercooler system, the air exiting the LP compressor must be decelerated to provide the necessary residence time in the heat exchanger. The cooler air must subsequently be accelerated towards the inlet of the HP compressor. The circumferential flow nonuniformities inevitably introduced by the heat exchanger, if not isolated, could lead to rotating stall in the compressors, and reduce the overall system performance and efficiency. Also, the pressure losses in the intercooler flow path adversely affect the system efficiency and hence, must be minimized. Thus, implementing intercooling requires fluid dynamically efficient flow path with minimum flow nonuniformities and consequent pressure losses.

  10. The gas turbine: Present technology and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minghetti, E.

    1997-03-01

    The gas turbine is the most widely used prime mover all over the world for either power generation or mechanical drive applications. The above fact is due to the recent great improvements that have been done especially in terms of efficiency, availability and reliability. The future for gas turbine technological development looks very promising. In fact, although tremendous growth has already taken place, there is still the potential for dramatic improvements in performance. Compared with the competitive prime movers (conventional steam power plants and reciprocating piston engines) the gas turbine technology is younger and still following a strong growth curve. The coming decades will witness the continued increasing in turbine inlet temperature, the development of new materials and refrigeration systems and the commercialization of inter cooled system and steam cooled turbines. With the very soon introduction of the G and H technology, expected single and combined cycle efficiencies for heavy duty machines are respectively 40% and 60%, while maintaining 'single digit' levels in pollutant emissions. In this report are given wide information on gas turbine present technology (Thermodynamics, features, design, performances, emission control, applications) and are discussed the main lines for the future developments. Finally are presented the research and technological development activities on gas turbine of Italian National Agency for new Technology Energy and the Environment Energy Department

  11. Four-dimensional characterization of inflow to and wakes from a multi-MW turbine: overview of the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundquist, J. K.; Banta, R. M.; Pichugina, Y.; Brewer, A.; Alvarez, R. J.; Sandberg, S. P.; Kelley, N. D.; Aitken, M.; Clifton, A.; Mirocha, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    To support substantial deployment of renewably-generated electricity from the wind, critical information about the variability of wind turbine wakes in the real atmosphere from multi-MW turbines is required. The assessment of the velocity deficit and turbulence associated with industrial-scale turbines is a major issue for wind farm design, particularly with respect to the optimization of the spacing between turbines. The significant velocity deficit and turbulence generated by upstream turbines can reduce the power production and produce harmful vibrations in downstream turbines, which can lead to excess maintenance costs. The complexity of wake effects depends on many factors arising from both hardware (turbine size, rotor speed, and blade geometry, etc.) and from meteorological considerations such as wind velocity, gradients of wind across the turbine rotor disk, atmospheric stability, and atmospheric turbulence. To characterize the relationships between the meteorological inflow and turbine wakes, a collaborative field campaign was designed and carried out at the Department of Energy's National Wind Technology Center (NREL/NWTC) in south Boulder, Colorado, in spring 2011. This site often experiences channeled flow with a consistent wind direction, enabling robust statistics of wake velocity deficits and turbulence enhancements. Using both in situ and remote sensing instrumentation, measurements upwind and downwind of multi-megawatt wind turbine in complex terrain quantified the variability of wind turbine inflow and wakes from an industrial-scale turbine. The turbine of interest has a rated power of 2.3 MW, a rotor diameter of 100m, and a hub height of 80m. In addition to several meteorological towers, one extending to hub height (80m) and another extending above the top of the rotor disk (135m), a Triton mini-sodar and a Windcube lidar characterized the inflow to the turbine and the variability across the site. The centerpiece instrument of the TWICS campaign

  12. Future needs for dry or peak shaved dry/wet cooling and significance to nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clukey, H.V.; McNelly, M.J.; Mitchell, R.C.

    1976-02-01

    U.S. requirements for uncommitted nuclear installations in water scarce areas that might require dry cooling tower systems are minimal through the year 2000 (6 to 23 GWe). In these areas it appears that peak-shaved dry/wet cooling systems are more attractive than all-dry tower cooling unless water costs were to approach the high level of several cents per gallon. The differential cooling system evaluated cost of peak-shaved dry/wet cooling systems above wet towers is typically $20 to $30/kWe for steam turbines; whereas, dry towers can represent an incremental burden of as much as $80/kWe. Gas turbine (Brayton Cycle) systems show similar benefits from an evaporative heat sink to those for steam turbine cycles--lower cooling system evaluated costs for peak-shaved dry/wet cooling systems than for conventional wet towers. These cooling system cost differentials do not reflect total costs for Brayton Cycle gas turbine plants. Together these added costs and uncertainties may substantially exceed the dollar incentives available for development of the Brayton Cycle for power generation needs for water deficient sites

  13. Computational Analysis of Droplet Mass and Size Effect on Mist/Air Impingement Cooling Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenglei Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Impingement cooling has been widely employed to cool gas turbine hot components such as combustor liners, combustor transition pieces, turbine vanes, and blades. A promising technology is proposed to enhance impingement cooling with water droplets injection. However, previous studies were conducted on blade shower head film cooling, and less attention was given to the transition piece cooling. As a continuous effort to develop a realistic mist impingement cooling scheme, this paper focuses on simulating mist impingement cooling under typical gas turbine operating conditions of high temperature and pressure in a double chamber model. Furthermore, the paper presents the effect of cooling effectiveness by changing the mass and size of the droplets. Based on the heat-mass transfer analogy, the results of these experiments prove that the mass of 3E – 3 kg/s droplets with diameters of 5–35 μm could enhance 90% cooling effectiveness and reduce 122 K of wall temperature. The results of this paper can provide guidance for corresponding experiments and serve as the qualification reference for future more complicated studies with convex surface cooling.

  14. Phase Stability of a Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, P.; Telesman, Jack; Gang, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Advanced powder metallurgy superalloy disks in aerospace turbine engines now entering service can be exposed to temperatures approaching 700 C, higher than those previously encountered. They also have higher levels of refractory elements, which can increase mechanical properties at these temperatures but can also encourage phase instabilities during service. Microstructural changes including precipitation of topological close pack phase precipitation and coarsening of existing gamma' precipitates can be slow at these temperatures, yet potentially significant for anticipated disk service times exceeding 1,000 h. The ability to quantify and predict such potential phase instabilities and degradation of capabilities is needed to insure structural integrity and air worthiness of propulsion systems over the full life cycle. A prototypical advanced disk superalloy was subjected to high temperature exposures, and then evaluated. Microstructural changes and corresponding changes in mechanical properties were quantified. The results will be compared to predictions of microstructure modeling software.

  15. Annular array technology for nondestructive turbine inspection. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light, G.M.

    1986-05-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) funded Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to fabricate and functionally test phased array transducers and an electronic control system with the intent of evaluating the phased array technology for use in the inspection of turbine disks. During this program a 13-element annular array and associated phased array electronics were fabricated and tested and the results of the tests compared to those predicted by theory. The prototype system performed well within the expected limits, and EPRI funded further work to fabricate and test a production unit. The production system consisted of a 25-element annular array and a 25-channel electronics system that had both pulser and receiver delay circuitry. In addition, during the program it was determined that miniaturized hybrid pulser/preamps would be needed to allow the phased array to work over distances exceeding 9.1 meters (30 feet) from the electronics. A circuit developed by SwRI was utilized and found to produce good pulsing capability that did not suffer from impedance mismatch. EPRI also funded (under a separate contract) the fabrication of a small scale static turbine test bed and a full scale dynamic test bed that contained full scale turbine geometries. These test beds were fabricated to enable the production phased array system to be evaluated on turbine disk surfaces. 26 figs

  16. Research Strategy for Modeling the Complexities of Turbine Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a NASA research program, known as the Coolant Flow Management Program, which focuses on the interaction between the internal coolant channel and the external film cooling of a turbine blade and/or vane in an aircraft gas turbine engine. The turbine gas path is really a very complex flow field. The combination of strong pressure gradients, abrupt geometry changes and intersecting surfaces, viscous forces, rotation, and unsteady blade/vane interactions all combine to offer a formidable challenge. To this, in the high pressure turbine, we add the necessity of film cooling. The ultimate goal of the turbine designer is to maintain or increase the high level of turbine performance and at the same time reduce the amount of coolant flow needed to achieve this end. Simply stated, coolant flow is a penalty on the cycle and reduces engine thermal efficiency. Accordingly, understanding the flow field and heat transfer associated with the coolant flow is a priority goal. It is important to understand both the film cooling and the internal coolant flow, particularly their interaction. Thus, the motivation for the Coolant Flow Management Program. The paper will begin with a brief discussion of the management and research strategy, will then proceed to discuss the current attack from the internal coolant side, and will conclude by looking at the film cooling effort - at all times keeping sight of the primary goal the interaction between the two. One of the themes of this paper is that complex heat transfer problems of this nature cannot be attacked by single researchers or even groups of researchers, each working alone. It truly needs the combined efforts of a well-coordinated team to make an impact. It is important to note that this is a government/industry/university team effort.

  17. Small hydraulic turbine drives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostafinski, W. A.

    1970-01-01

    Turbine, driven by the fluid being pumped, requires no external controls, is completely integrated into the flow system, and has bearings which utilize the main fluid for lubrication and cooling. Torque capabilities compare favorably with those developed by positive displacement hydraulic motors.

  18. Gas infall into atomic cooling haloes: on the formation of protogalactic disks and supermassive black holes at z > 10

    CERN Document Server

    Prieto, Joaquin; Haiman, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    We have performed cosmo-hydro simulations using the RAMSES code to study atomic cooling (ACHs) haloes at z=10 with masses 5E7Msun10 to date. We examine the morphology, angular momentum (AM), thermodynamic, and turbulence of these haloes, in order to assess the prevalence of disks and supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We find no correlation between either the magnitude or the direction of the AM of the gas and its parent DM halo. Only 3 haloes form rotationally supported cores. Two of the most massive haloes form massive, compact overdense blobs. These blobs have an accretion rate ~0.5 Msun/yr (at a distance of 100 pc), and are possible sites of SMBH formation. Our results suggest that the degree of rotational support and the fate of the gas in a halo is determined by its large-scale environment and merger history. In particular, the two haloes forming blobs are located at knots of the cosmic web, cooled early on, and experienced many mergers. The gas in these haloes is lumpy and highly turbulent, with Mach N....

  19. Cooling device for reactor suppression pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Togasaki, Susumu; Kato, Kiyoshi.

    1994-01-01

    In a cooling device of a reactor suppression pool, when a temperature of pool water is abnormally increased and a heat absorbing portion is heated by, for example, occurrence of an accident, coolants are sent to the outside of the reactor container to actuates a thermally operating portion by the heat energy of coolants and drive heat exchanging fluids of a secondary cooling system. If the heat exchanging fluids are sent to a cooling portion, the coolants are cooled and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. If the heat absorbing portion is heat pipes, the coolants are evaporated by heat absorbed from the suppression pool water, steams are sent to the thermally operating portion, then coolants are liquefied and caused to return to the heat absorbing portion. If the thermal operation portion is a gas turbine, the gas turbine is operated by the coolants, and it is converted to a rotational force to drive heat exchanging fluids by pumps. By constituting the cooling portion with a condensator, the coolants are condensed and liquefied and returned to the heat absorbing portion of the suppression pool water. (N.H.)

  20. Influence of thermal gradient on gas turbine combustor wall using impingement/effusion cooling techniques: CHT CFD predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. El-jummah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Internal wall heat transfer relevant to impingement/effusion cooling techniques was investigated using conjugate heat transfer (CHT computational fluid dynamics (CFD with ANSYS Fluent and ICEM commercial software. This work concentrates on the development of CHT CFD design procedures that are applicable to combustor wall and turbine blade heat transfer optimisation in gas turbine (GT. It specifically modelled and compares two configuration which are specifically relevant to the impingement and effusion holes density n (m-2 and is the ratio of the hole pitch X2. The configurations investigated are equal and unequal impingement and effusion holes density n (m-2, respectively, whereby in each case the variation in the number of cooling holes were carried out. The ratio of impingement and effusion number of holes/m2 (or hole density n, investigated were impingement/effusion: 4306/4306 and 1076/4306, respectively. The geometries were for impingement wall, hole pitch X to diameter D, X/D ratio of ~ 11 but different number of holes N for both n geometries, at a constant offset effusion wall, hole X/D of 4.7 of the same N for both the two configurations. The model geometries have a constant impingement gap of 8 mm with both impingement and effusion walls at 6.35 mm thick Nimonic - 75 material and were computed for varied air mass flux G from 0.1 - 0.94 kg/sm2. Symmetrical applications were employed in modelling each of the geometry, whereby for the impingement hole, only quarter of one hole was modelled, while for the effusion side the holes were either quarter or half modelled. The two n geometries were computed with k - ɛ turbulence model using standard wall functions, which also applies to all G. The predicted locally surface X2 (or hole square area average heat transfer coefficient (HTC h values compared with with previously published experimental data showed good agreement. The reduced internal gap flow recirculation with reduced heat transfer to

  1. Signatures of Young Planets in the Continuum Emission from Protostellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Andrea; Turner, Neal J.

    2018-06-01

    Many protostellar disks show central cavities, rings, or spiral arms likely caused by low-mass stellar or planetary companions, yet few such features are conclusively tied to bodies embedded in the disks. We note that even small features on the disk surface cast shadows, because the starlight grazes the surface. We therefore focus on accurately computing the disk thickness, which depends on its temperature. We present models with temperatures set by the balance between starlight heating and radiative cooling, which are also in vertical hydrostatic equilibrium. The planet has 20, 100, or 1000 M ⊕, ranging from barely enough to perturb the disk significantly, to clearing a deep tidal gap. The hydrostatic balance strikingly alters the appearance of the model disk. The outer walls of the planet-carved gap puff up under starlight heating, throwing a shadow across the disk beyond. The shadow appears in scattered light as a dark ring that could be mistaken for a gap opened by another more distant planet. The surface brightness contrast between outer wall and shadow for the 1000 M ⊕ planet is an order of magnitude greater than a model neglecting the temperature disturbances. The shadow is so deep that it largely hides the planet-launched outer arm of the spiral wave. Temperature gradients are such that outer low-mass planets undergoing orbital migration will converge within the shadow. Furthermore, the temperature perturbations affect the shape, size, and contrast of features at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths. Thus radiative heating and cooling are key to the appearance of protostellar disks with embedded planets.

  2. A summary of computational experience at GE Aircraft Engines for complex turbulent flows in gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, Ronald D.; Prakash, Chander

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation summarizes some CFD experience at GE Aircraft Engines for flows in the primary gaspath of a gas turbine engine and in turbine blade cooling passages. It is concluded that application of the standard k-epsilon turbulence model with wall functions is not adequate for accurate CFD simulation of aerodynamic performance and heat transfer in the primary gas path of a gas turbine engine. New models are required in the near-wall region which include more physics than wall functions. The two-layer modeling approach appears attractive because of its computational complexity. In addition, improved CFD simulation of film cooling and turbine blade internal cooling passages will require anisotropic turbulence models. New turbulence models must be practical in order to have a significant impact on the engine design process. A coordinated turbulence modeling effort between NASA centers would be beneficial to the gas turbine industry.

  3. Cooling methods of station blackout scenario for LWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-08-15

    The objective of this study is to analyze the cooling method of station blackout scenario for both the BWR and PWR plants by RELAP5 code and to check the validity of the cooling method proposed by the utilities. In the BWR plant cooling scenario, the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System (RCIC), which is operated with high pressure steam from the reactor, injects cooling water into the reactor to keep the core water level. The steam generated in the core is released into the suppression pool at containment vessel to condense. To restrict the containment vessel pressure rising, the ventilation from the wet-well is operated. The scenario is analyzed by RELAP5 code. In the PWR plant scenario, the primary pressure is decreased by the turbine-driven auxiliary feed water system operated with secondary side steam of the steam generators (SGs). And the core cooling is kept by the natural circulation flow at the primary loop. From the RELAP5 code analysis, it was shown that the primary system cooling was practicable by using the turbine-driven auxiliary feed water system. (author)

  4. The choice of design speed for PWR turbines for 50 Hz generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, F.R.; Kalderon, D.

    1983-01-01

    Turbines for use with water-cooled reactors, by virtue of their large output, coupled to their larger steam flow per unit output than for fossil-fuelled units, require large total blade exhaust areas; this has led to the adoption of 1800 rpm as the design speed where generation is at 60 Hz, but for generation at 50 Hz both 1500 rpm and 3000 rpm turbines can be deployed over a wide range of outputs. The paper points out why half-speed units, universal for generation at 60 Hz, are often uneconomic for 50 Hz generation. Full-speed and half-speed machines are compared in size, weight, constructional features, reliability, and efficiency. Taking into account economic practice in selection of condenser pressures, the available cooling water temperatures, and also the current and foreseeable turbine blade annulus areas, combinations of outputs and cooling water temperatures where each type of turbine is likely to be economically preferable are identified. (author)

  5. The atmospheric cooling of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuenberger, J.M.; Mayor, J.C.; Gassmann, F.; Lieber, K.

    1978-08-01

    Four different types of nuclear reactor are considered: light water reactors, high temperature reactors with steam circulation and with direct gas turbine circulation, and fast breeder reactors. Wet and dry cooling towers are described and experimental studies carried out using cooling tower models are presented. (G.T.H.)

  6. Wireless In-situ Nondestructive Inspection of Engine Rotor Disks with Ultrasonic Guided Waves, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The structural integrity of jet engine turbine or fan rotor disks is vital for aviation safety. Cumulative cracks at critical loading and high stress areas, if not...

  7. Thermodynamic performance optimization of a combined power/cooling cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouraghaie, M.; Atashkari, K.; Besarati, S.M.; Nariman-zadeh, N.

    2010-01-01

    A combined thermal power and cooling cycle has already been proposed in which thermal energy is used to produce work and to generate a sub-ambient temperature stream that is suitable for cooling applications. The cycle uses ammonia-water mixture as working fluid and is a combination of a Rankine cycle and absorption cycle. The very high ammonia vapor concentration, exiting turbine under certain operating conditions, can provide power output as well as refrigeration. In this paper, the goal is to employ multi-objective algorithms for Pareto approach optimization of thermodynamic performance of the cycle. It has been carried out by varying the selected design variables, namely, turbine inlet pressure (P h ), superheater temperature (T superheat ) and condenser temperature (T condensor ). The important conflicting thermodynamic objective functions that have been considered in this study are turbine work (w T ), cooling capacity (q cool ) and thermal efficiency (η th ) of the cycle. It is shown that some interesting and important relationships among optimal objective functions and decision variables involved in the combined cycle can be discovered consequently. Such important relationships as useful optimal design principles would have not been obtained without the use of a multi-objective optimization approach.

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1993. International clean energy system technology to utilize hydrogen - WE-NET (Sub-task 8. Development of hydrogen burning turbines - Development of main components including turbine blades and rotors); 1993 nendo seika hokokusho. Suiso riyo kokusai clean energy system gijutsu (WE-NET) (Sub tusk 8: Suiso nensho tabin no kaihatsu - tabin yoku rota tou shuyou kosei kiki no kaihatsu)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Among the research and development items in relation with the 'development of hydrogen burning turbines' based on the WE-NET project, surveys have been performed on developing the main components including turbine blades and rotors. The current fiscal year has surveyed the latest trends in the existing gas turbine and rotor cooling technologies, and the technological problems were extracted from the viewpoint of application to the hydrogen fueled turbines. Since the hydrogen fueled turbines have the entrance temperature higher than that of power generation gas turbines, development of the blade cooling technology is important. Main cooling methods available are the film cooling and transpiration cooling, whose technological development is necessary in the advanced forms. Cooling method for the inner side of blades includes the impingement cooling and the pin fin cooling, whereas the V-letter shaped turbulence accelerating rib and the serpentine flow path structure are considered promising. Increasing the anti-heat temperature of blades may be realized by utilizing ceramics. As a technology close to putting it into practical use, application of heat shield coating is promising. (NEDO)

  9. Film cooling air pocket in a closed loop cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yufeng Phillip; Itzel, Gary Michael; Osgood, Sarah Jane; Bagepalli, Radhakrishna; Webbon, Waylon Willard; Burdgick, Steven Sebastian

    2002-01-01

    Turbine stator vane segments have radially inner and outer walls with vanes extending between them. The inner and outer walls are compartmentalized and have impingement plates. Steam flowing into the outer wall plenum passes through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the outer wall upper surface. The spent impingement steam flows into cavities of the vane having inserts for impingement cooling the walls of the vane. The steam passes into the inner wall and through the impingement plate for impingement cooling of the inner wall surface and for return through return cavities having inserts for impingement cooling of the vane surfaces. To provide for air film cooing of select portions of the airfoil outer surface, at least one air pocket is defined on a wall of at least one of the cavities. Each air pocket is substantially closed with respect to the cooling medium in the cavity and cooling air pumped to the air pocket flows through outlet apertures in the wall of the airfoil to cool the same.

  10. Evaluation, Comparison and Optimization of the Compact Recuperator for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Helium Turbine System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Haoran; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie; Ye Ping; Yu Xiaoli; Zhao Gang

    2014-01-01

    Helium turbine system is a promising method to covert the nuclear power generated by the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) into electricity with inherent safety, compact configuration and relative high efficiency. And the recuperator is one of the key components for the HTGR helium turbine system. It is used to recover the exhaust heat out of turbine and pass it to the helium from high pressure compressor, and hence increase the cycle’s efficiency dramatically. On the other hand, the pressure drop within the recuperator will reduce the cycle efficiency, especially on low pressure side of recuperator. It is necessary to optimize the design of recuperator to achieve better performance of HTGR helium turbine system. However, this optimization has to be performed with the restriction of the size of the pressure vessel which contains the power conversion unit. This paper firstly presents an analysis to investigate the effects of flow channel geometry, recuperator’s power and size on heat transfer and pressure drop. Then the relationship between the recuperator design and system performance is established with an analytical model, followed by the evaluations of the current recuperator designs of GT-MHR, GTHTR300 and PBMR, in which several effective technical measures to optimize the recuperator are compared. Finally it is found that the most important factors for optimizing recuperator design, i.e. the cross section dimensions and tortuosity of flow channel, which can also be extended to compact intermediate heat exchangers. It turns out that a proper optimization can increase the cycle’s efficiency by 1~2 percentage, which could also raise the economy and competitiveness of future commercial HTGR plants. (author)

  11. Accretion disk emission from a BL Lacertae object

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wandel, A.; Urry, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    It is suggested here that the UV and X-ray emission of BL Lac objects may originate in an accretion disk. Using detailed calculations of accretion disk spectra, the best-measured ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectra of the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 are fitted, and the mass and accretion rate required is determined. The ultraviolet through soft X-ray continuum is well fitted by the spectrum of an accretion disk, but near-Eddington accretion rates are required to produce the soft X-ray excess. A hot disk or corona could Comptonize soft photons from the cool disk and produce the observed power-law spectrum in the 1-10 keV range. The dynamic time scale in the disk regions that contribute most of the observed ultraviolet and soft X-ray photons are consistent with the respective time scales for intensity variations observed in these two wave bands; the mass derived from fitting the continuum spectrum is consistent with the limit derived from the fastest hard X-ray variability. 37 refs

  12. Gas turbine electric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Masaaki; Yuhara, Tetsuo.

    1993-01-01

    When troubles are caused to a boundary of a gas turbine electric generator, there is a danger that water as an operation medium for secondary circuits leaks to primary circuits, to stop a plant and the plant itself can not resume. Then in the present invention, helium gases are used as the operation medium not only for the primary circuits but also for the secondary circuits, to provide so-called a direct cycle gas turbine system. Further, the operation media of the primary and secondary circuits are recycled by a compressor driven by a primary circuit gas turbine, and the turbine/compressor is supported by helium gas bearings. Then, problems of leakage of oil and water from the bearings or the secondary circuits can be solved, further, the cooling device in the secondary circuit is constituted as a triple-walled tube structure by way of helium gas, to prevent direct leakage of coolants into the reactor core even if cracks are formed to pipes. (N.H.)

  13. Wireless In-situ Nondestructive Inspection of Engine Rotor Disks with Ultrasonic Guided Waves, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The integrity of rotor disks in engine turbines or fans is vital to aviation safety. Cumulative cracks at critical loading and high stress areas, if not detected and...

  14. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Takizuka, Takakazu; Yan, Xing; Kosugiyama, Shinichi

    2003-01-01

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) started design and development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor with a gas turbine electric generation system, GTHTR300, in April 2001. Design originalities of the GTHTR300 are a horizontally mounted highly efficient gas turbine system and an ultimately simplified safety system such as no containment building and no active emergency core cooling. These design originalities are proposed based on design and operational experiences in conventional gas turbine systems and Japan's first high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTTR: High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) so that many R and Ds are not required for the development. Except these original design features, devised core design, fuel design and plant design are adopted to meet design requirements and attain a target cost. This paper describes the unique design features focusing on the safety design, reactor core design and gas turbine system design together with a preliminary result of the safety evaluation carried out for a typical severe event. This study is entrusted from Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  15. Application of additive laser technologies in the gas turbine blades design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, I. V.; Rogalev, A. N.; Osipov, S. K.; Bychkov, N. M.; Komarov, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    An emergence of modern innovative technologies requires delivering new and modernization existing design and production processes. It is especially relevant for designing the high-temperature turbines of gas turbine engines, development of which is characterized by a transition to higher parameters of working medium in order to improve their efficient performance. A design technique for gas turbine blades based on predictive verification of thermal and hydraulic models of their cooling systems by testing of a blade prototype fabricated using the selective laser melting technology was presented in this article. Technique was proven at the time of development of the first stage blade cooling system for the high-pressure turbine. An experimental procedure for verification of a thermal model of the blades with convective cooling systems based on the comparison of heat-flux density obtained from the numerical simulation data and results of tests in a liquid-metal thermostat was developed. The techniques makes it possible to obtain an experimentally tested blade version and to exclude its experimental adjustment after the start of mass production.

  16. CARBON ISOTOPE FRACTIONATION IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, Paul M.; Willacy, Karen

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry in the inner 30 AU of a typical protoplanetary disk (PPD) using a new model which calculates the gas temperature by solving the gas heating and cooling balance and which has an improved treatment of the UV radiation field. We discuss inner-disk chemistry in general, obtaining excellent agreement with recent observations which have probed the material in the inner regions of PPDs. We also apply our model to study the isotopic fractionation of carbon. Results show that the fractionation ratio, 12 C/ 13 C, of the system varies with radius and height in the disk. Different behavior is seen in the fractionation of different species. We compare our results with 12 C/ 13 C ratios in the solar system comets, and find a stark contrast, indicative of reprocessing.

  17. Accretion Disks Around Binary Black Holes of Unequal Mass: GRMHD Simulations Near Decoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Roman; Paschalidis, Vasileios; Etienne, Zachariah B.; Shapiro, Stuart L.; Pfeiffer, Harald, P.

    2013-01-01

    We report on simulations in general relativity of magnetized disks onto black hole binaries. We vary the binary mass ratio from 1:1 to 1:10 and evolve the systems when they orbit near the binary disk decoupling radius. We compare (surface) density profiles, accretion rates (relative to a single, non-spinning black hole), variability, effective alpha-stress levels and luminosities as functions of the mass ratio. We treat the disks in two limiting regimes: rapid radiative cooling and no radiative cooling. The magnetic field lines clearly reveal jets emerging from both black hole horizons and merging into one common jet at large distances. The magnetic fields give rise to much stronger shock heating than the pure hydrodynamic flows, completely alter the disk structure, and boost accretion rates and luminosities. Accretion streams near the horizons are among the densest structures; in fact, the 1:10 no-cooling evolution results in a refilling of the cavity. The typical effective temperature in the bulk of the disk is approx. 10(exp5) (M / 10(exp 8)M solar mass (exp -1/4(L/L(sub edd) (exp 1/4K) yielding characteristic thermal frequencies approx. 10 (exp 15) (M /10(exp 8)M solar mass) (exp -1/4(L/L (sub edd) (1+z) (exp -1)Hz. These systems are thus promising targets for many extragalactic optical surveys, such as LSST, WFIRST, and PanSTARRS.

  18. Film cooling adiabatic effectiveness measurements of pressure side trailing edge cooling configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Becchi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays total inlet temperature of gas turbine is far above the permissible metal temperature; as a consequence, advanced cooling techniques must be applied to protect from thermal stresses, oxidation and corrosion the components located in the high pressure stages, such as the blade trailing edge. A suitable design of the cooling system for the trailing edge has to cope with geometric constraints and aerodynamic demands; state-of-the-art of cooling concepts often use film cooling on blade pressure side: the air taken from last compressor stages is ejected through discrete holes or slots to provide a cold layer between hot mainstream and the blade surface. With the goal of ensuring a satisfactory lifetime of blades, the design of efficient trailing edge film cooling schemes and, moreover, the possibility to check carefully their behavior, are hence necessary to guarantee an appropriate metal temperature distribution. For this purpose an experimental survey was carried out to investigate the film covering performance of different pressure side trailing edge cooling systems for turbine blades. The experimental test section consists of a scaled-up trailing edge model installed in an open loop suction type test rig. Measurements of adiabatic effectiveness distributions were carried out on three trailing edge cooling system configurations. The baseline geometry is composed by inclined slots separated by elongated pedestals; the second geometry shares the same cutback configuration, with an additional row of circular film cooling holes located upstream; the third model is equipped with three rows of in-line film cooling holes. Experiments have been performed at nearly ambient conditions imposing several blowing ratio values and using carbon dioxide as coolant in order to reproduce a density ratio close to the engine conditions (DR=1.52. To extend the validity of the survey a comparison between adiabatic effectiveness measurements and a prediction by

  19. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States); Bons, Jeffrey [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness

  20. Self-gravity in Magnetized Neutrino-dominated Accretion Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahamat, Narjes; Abbassi, Shahram, E-mail: abbassi@um.ac.ir [Department of Physics, School of Science, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, P.O. Box 91775-1436 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-08-10

    In the present work we study self-gravity effects on the vertical structure of a magnetized neutrino-dominated accretion disk as a central engine for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some of the disk physical timescales that are supposed to play a pivotal role in the late-time evolutions of the disk, such as viscous, cooling, and diffusion timescales, have been studied. We are interested in investigating the possibility of the occurrence of X-ray flares, observed in late-time GRBs’ extended emission through the “magnetic barrier” and “fragmentation” processes in our model. The results lead us to interpret self-gravity as an amplifier for Blandford–Payne luminosity (BP power) and the generated magnetic field, but a suppressor for neutrino luminosity and magnetic barrier processes via highlighting the fragmentation mechanism in the outer disk, especially for the higher mass accretion rates.

  1. THE DIFFERENT EVOLUTION OF GAS AND DUST IN DISKS AROUND SUN-LIKE AND COOL STARS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pascucci, I.; Apai, D.; Luhman, K.; Henning, Th.; Bouwman, J.; Meyer, M. R.; Lahuis, F.; Natta, A.

    2009-01-01

    Planet formation is profoundly impacted by the properties of protoplanetary disks and their central star. However, how disk properties vary with stellar parameters remains poorly known. Here, we present the first comprehensive, comparative Spitzer/IRS study of the dust and gas properties of disks

  2. Airfoil for a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, George [Palm City, FL

    2011-01-18

    An airfoil is provided for a gas turbine comprising an outer structure comprising a first wall, an inner structure comprising a second wall spaced relative to the first wall such that a cooling gap is defined between at least portions of the first and second walls, and seal structure provided within the cooling gap between the first and second walls for separating the cooling gap into first and second cooling fluid impingement gaps. An inner surface of the second wall may define an inner cavity. The inner structure may further comprise a separating member for separating the inner cavity of the inner structure into a cooling fluid supply cavity and a cooling fluid collector cavity. The second wall may comprise at least one first impingement passage, at least one second impingement passage, and at least one bleed passage.

  3. Flow visualization system for wind turbines without blades applied to micro reactors; Sistema de visualização de escoamento para turbinas sem lâminas aplicada a microrreatores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, G.S.B., E-mail: siqueira.gsb@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Guimarães, L.N.F. [Instituto de Estudos Avançados (IEAv), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Aeroespacial; Placco, G.M. [Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica (PG/CTE/ITA), São José dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Ciência e Tecnologia Aeroespacial

    2017-07-01

    Flow visualization systems is a tool used in science and industry for characterization of projects that operate with drainage. This work presents the design and construction of a flow visualization system for passive turbines used in advanced fast micro reactors. In the system were generated images where it is possible to see the supersonic and transonic flow through the turbine disks. A test bench was assembled to generate images of the interior of the turbine where the flow is supersonic, allowing the study of the behavior of the boundary layer between disks. It is necessary to characterize the boundary layer of this type of turbine because its operation occurs in the transfer of kinetic energy between the fluid and the disks. The images generated, as well as their analyzes are presented as a result of this work.

  4. Nuclear steam turbines for power production in combination with heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frilund, B.; Knudsen, K.

    1977-01-01

    The general operating conditions for nuclear steam turbines in district heating system are briefly outlined. The turbine plant can consist of essentially the same types of machines as in conventional district heating systems. Some possible arrangements of back-pressure turbines, back-pressure turbines with condensing tails, or condensing turbines with heat extraction are considered for nuclear power and heat stations. Principles of control for hot water temperature and electrical output are described. Optimization of the plant, considering parallel variations during the year between heat load, cooling water temperature, and required outgoing temperature is discussed. (U.K.)

  5. N18, powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedou, J.Y.; Lautridou, J.C.; Honnorat, Y. (SNECMA, Evry (France). Materials and Processes Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appropriate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 C for long-term applications and approximately 750 C for short-term use because of microstructural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without significant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astrology and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk applications.

  6. Static and dynamic modelling of gas turbines in advanced cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Jan-Olof

    1998-12-01

    Gas turbines have been in operation for at least 50 years. The engine is used for propulsion of aircraft and high speed ships. It is used for power production in remote locations and for peak load and emergency situations. Gas turbines have been used in combined cycles for 20 to 30 years. Highly efficient power plants based on gas turbines are a competitive option for the power industry today. The thermal efficiency of the simple cycle gas turbine has increased due to higher turbine inlet temperatures and improved compressor and expander designs. Equally important are the improved cycles in which the gas turbine operates. One example is the combined cycle that uses steam for turbine cooling. Steam is extracted from the bottoming cycle, then used as airfoil coolant in a closed loop and returned to the bottoming cycle. The Evaporative Gas Turbine (EvGT), also known as the Humid Air Turbine (HAT), is another advanced cycle. A mixture of air and water vapour is used as working media. Air from the compressor outlet is humidified and then preheated in a recuperator prior to combustion. The static and dynamic performance is changed when the gas turbine is introduced in an evaporative cycle. The cycle is gaining in popularity, but so far it has not been demonstrated. A Swedish joint program to develop the cycle has been in operation since 1993. As part of the program, a small pilot plant is being erected at the Lund Institute of Technology (LTH). The plant is based on a 600 kW gas turbine, and demonstration of the EvGT cycle started autumn 1998 and will continue, in the present phase, for one year. This thesis presents static and dynamic models for traditional gas turbine components, such as, the compressor, combustor, expander and recuperator. A static model for the humidifier is presented, based on common knowledge for atmospheric humidification. All models were developed for the pilot plant at LTH with the objective to support evaluation of the process and individual

  7. Development of superalloys for 1700 C ultra-efficient gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, Hiroshi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). High Temperature Materials Center

    2010-07-01

    Mitigation of global warming is one of the most outstanding issues for the humankind. The Japanese government announced that it will reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 25% from the 1990 level by 2020 as a medium-term goal. One of the promising approaches to achieving this is to improve the efficiency of thermal power plants emitting one-third of total CO{sub 2} gas in Japan. The key to improving the thermal efficiency is high temperature materials with excellent temperature capabilities allowing higher inlet gas temperatures. In this context, new single crystal superalloys for turbine blades and vanes, new coatings and turbine disk superalloys have been successfully developed for various gas turbine applications, typically 1700 C ultra-efficient gas turbines for next generation combine cycle power plants. (orig.)

  8. A CFD code comparison of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Storey, R. C.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison is made between the EllipSys3D and SnS CFD codes. Both codes are used to perform Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of single wind turbine wakes, using the actuator disk method. The comparison shows that both LES models predict similar velocity deficits and stream-wise Reynolds-stresses fo...

  9. Effect of wind turbine wakes on summer-time wind profiles in the US Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M. E.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.

    2011-12-01

    Wind energy is steadily becoming a significant source of grid electricity in the United States, and the Midwestern United States provides one of the nation's richest wind resources. This study examines the effect of wind turbine wakes on the wind profile in central Iowa. Data were collected using a coherent Doppler LiDAR system located approximately 2.5 rotor diameters north of a row of modern multi-MW wind turbine generators. The prevailing wind direction was from the South allowing the LiDAR to capture wind turbine wake properties; however, a number of periods existed where the LiDAR captured undisturbed flow. The LiDAR system reliably obtained readings up to 200 m above ground level (AGL), spanning the entire rotor disk (~40 m to 120 m AGL) which far surpasses the information provided by traditional wind resource assessment instrumentation. We extract several relevant parameters from the lidar data including: horizontal wind speed, vertical velocity, horizontal turbulence intensity, wind shear, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Each time period at a particular LiDAR measurement height was labeled "wake" or "undisturbed" based on the wind direction at that height. Wake and undisturbed data were averaged separately to create a time-height cross-section averaged day for each parameter. Significant differences between wake and undisturbed data emerge. During the day, wake conditions experience larger values of TKE within the altitudes of the turbine rotor disk while TKE values above the rotor disk are similar between waked and undisturbed conditions. Furthermore, the morning transition of TKE in the atmospheric boundary layer commences earlier during wake conditions than in undisturbed conditions, and the evening decay of TKE persists longer during wake conditions. Waked wind shear is consistently greater than undisturbed periods at the edges of the wind turbine rotor disk (40m & 120m AGL), but especially so during the night where wind shear values during wake

  10. Promising Direction of Perfection of the Utilization Combine Cycle Gas Turbine Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabdullina Albina I.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Issues of improving the efficiency of combined cycle gas turbines (CCGT recovery type have been presented. Efficiency gas turbine plant reaches values of 45 % due to rise in temperature to a gas turbine to 1700 °C. Modern technologies for improving the cooling gas turbine components and reducing the excess air ratio leads to a further increase of the efficiency by 1-2 %. Based on research conducted at the Tomsk Polytechnic University, it shows that the CCGT efficiency can be increased by 2-3 % in the winter time due to the use of organic Rankine cycle, low-boiling substances, and air-cooled condensers (ACC. It is necessary to apply the waste heat recovery with condensation of water vapor from the flue gas, it will enhance the efficiency of the CCGT by 2-3 % to increase the efficiency of the heat recovery steam boiler (HRSB to 10-12 %. Replacing electric pumps gas turbine engine (GTE helps to reduce electricity consumption for auxiliary needs CCGT by 0.5-1.5 %. At the same time the heat of flue gas turbine engine may be useful used in HRSB, thus will increase the capacity and efficiency of the steam turbine.

  11. Cooling towers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korik, L.; Burger, R.

    1992-01-01

    What is the effect of 0.6C (1F) temperature rise across turbines, compressors, or evaporators? Enthalpy charts indicate for every 0.6C (1F) hotter water off the cooling tower will require an additional 2 1/2% more energy cost. Therefore, running 2.2C (4F) warmer due to substandard cooling towers could result in a 10% penalty for overcoming high heads and temperatures. If it costs $1,250,000.00 a year to operate the system, $125,000.00 is the energy penalty for hotter water. This paper investigates extra fuel costs involved in maintaining design electric production with cooling water 0.6C (1F) to 3C (5.5F) hotter than design. If design KWH cannot be maintained, paper will calculate dollar loss of saleable electricity. The presentation will conclude with examining the main causes of deficient cold water production. State-of-the-art upgrading and methodology available to retrofit existing cooling towers to optimize lower cooling water temperatures will be discussed

  12. Propulsion health monitoring of a turbine engine disk using spin test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark; Oza, Nikunj; Matthews, Bryan; Baakilini, George

    2010-03-01

    On line detection techniques to monitor the health of rotating engine components are becoming increasingly attractive options to aircraft engine companies in order to increase safety of operation and lower maintenance costs. Health monitoring remains a challenging feature to easily implement, especially, in the presence of scattered loading conditions, crack size, component geometry and materials properties. The current trend, however, is to utilize noninvasive types of health monitoring or nondestructive techniques to detect hidden flaws and mini cracks before any catastrophic event occurs. These techniques go further to evaluate materials' discontinuities and other anomalies that have grown to the level of critical defects which can lead to failure. Generally, health monitoring is highly dependent on sensor systems that are capable of performing in various engine environmental conditions and able to transmit a signal upon a predetermined crack length, while acting in a neutral form upon the overall performance of the engine system. Efforts are under way at NASA Glenn Research Center through support of the Intelligent Vehicle Health Management Project (IVHM) to develop and implement such sensor technology for a wide variety of applications. These efforts are focused on developing high temperature, wireless, low cost and durable products. Therefore, in an effort to address the technical issues concerning health monitoring of a rotor disk, this paper considers data collected from an experimental study using high frequency capacitive sensor technology to capture blade tip clearance and tip timing measurements in a rotating engine-like-disk-to predict the disk faults and assess its structural integrity. The experimental results collected at a range of rotational speeds from tests conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Rotordynamics Laboratory will be evaluated using multiple data-driven anomaly detection techniques to identify anomalies in the disk. This study

  13. Advanced technology for aero gas turbine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    The Symposium is aimed at highlighting the development of advanced components for new aero gas turbine propulsion systems in order to provide engineers and scientists with a forum to discuss recent progress in these technologies and to identify requirements for future research. Axial flow compressors, the operation of gas turbine engines in dust laden atmospheres, turbine engine design, blade cooling, unsteady gas flow through the stator and rotor of a turbomachine, gear systems for advanced turboprops, transonic blade design and the development of a plenum chamber burner system for an advanced VTOL engine are among the topics discussed.

  14. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2015-09-22

    A system including a vessel including a heat source and a flue; a turbine; a condenser; a fluid conduit circuit disposed between the vessel, the turbine and the condenser; and a diverter coupled to the flue to direct a portion of an exhaust from the flue to contact with a cooling medium for the condenser water. A method including diverting a portion of exhaust from a flue of a vessel; modifying the pH of a cooling medium for a condenser with the portion of exhaust; and condensing heated fluid from the vessel with the pH modified cooling medium.

  15. Using machine learning to predict wind turbine power output

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, A; Kilcher, L; Lundquist, J K; Fleming, P

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbine power output is known to be a strong function of wind speed, but is also affected by turbulence and shear. In this work, new aerostructural simulations of a generic 1.5 MW turbine are used to rank atmospheric influences on power output. Most significant is the hub height wind speed, followed by hub height turbulence intensity and then wind speed shear across the rotor disk. These simulation data are used to train regression trees that predict the turbine response for any combination of wind speed, turbulence intensity, and wind shear that might be expected at a turbine site. For a randomly selected atmospheric condition, the accuracy of the regression tree power predictions is three times higher than that from the traditional power curve methodology. The regression tree method can also be applied to turbine test data and used to predict turbine performance at a new site. No new data are required in comparison to the data that are usually collected for a wind resource assessment. Implementing the method requires turbine manufacturers to create a turbine regression tree model from test site data. Such an approach could significantly reduce bias in power predictions that arise because of the different turbulence and shear at the new site, compared to the test site. (letter)

  16. Design of the connection pieces between concrete and valves of the cooling water system in the Angra I NPP turbine building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, B.E.; Carvalho, L.J. de

    1988-01-01

    This work describes the design characteristics of the Transition Pieces between concrete galleries and valves of the Cooling Water System of the Turbine Building of the Angra NPP-Unit I. Design details concerning the structure and procedures for the structural analysis are presented. It is emphasized that the usual simplified design rules for the flange and bolts can not be used in the case of non existent polar symmetry for the structure and applied loads. A more sophisticated design based on finite elements models is required in these cases. (author) [pt

  17. Investigation of a Cross-Correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASA`s Fundamental Aeronautics Program is extremely interested in the development of novel measurement technologies, such as optical surface measurements in the internal parts of a flow path, for in situ health monitoring of gas turbine engines. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. In the present study, a cross-correlation imaging technique is investigated in a proof-of-concept study as a possible optical technique to measure the radial growth and strain field on an already cracked sub-scale turbine engine disk under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Center`s High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The optical strain measurement technique under investigation offers potential fault detection using an applied high-contrast random speckle pattern and imaging the pattern under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.0-im in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will be undistorted; however, during rotation the cracked region will grow radially, thus causing the applied particle pattern to be .shifted`. The resulting particle displacements between the two images will then be measured using the two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. In order to develop and validate this optical strain measurement technique an initial proof-of-concept experiment is carried out in a controlled environment. Using PIV optimization principles and guidelines, three potential speckle patterns, for future use on the rotating disk, are developed

  18. Microfabricated rankine cycle steam turbine for power generation and methods of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechette, Luc (Inventor); Muller, Norbert (Inventor); Lee, Changgu (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, an integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip has been provided. The integrated micro steam turbine power plant on-a-chip of the present invention comprises a miniature electric power generation system fabricated using silicon microfabrication technology and lithographic patterning. The present invention converts heat to electricity by implementing a thermodynamic power cycle on a chip. The steam turbine power plant on-a-chip generally comprises a turbine, a pump, an electric generator, an evaporator, and a condenser. The turbine is formed by a rotatable, disk-shaped rotor having a plurality of rotor blades disposed thereon and a plurality of stator blades. The plurality of stator blades are interdigitated with the plurality of rotor blades to form the turbine. The generator is driven by the turbine and converts mechanical energy into electrical energy.

  19. Development of a structure-dependent material model for complex, high-temperature environments and stresses. Example: turbine blades, turbine discs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, F.

    1988-01-01

    For the optimum use of new high-temperature superalloys for turbine discs and blades, it is necessary to develop new design concepts which, on the one hand, permit a quantitative allocation of the structural characteristics to the deformation behaviour and damage mechanisms and, on the other hand, take into account the real course of stress. It is planned to use PM-Udinet 700 as material for turbine discs and IN 738 LC with supplementary tests of IN 100 for turbine blades. For turbine discs, a probabilistic model is developed, for turbine blades, cooled at the interior, first a deterministic model is developed and then a probabilistic model is prepared. The concept for the development of the models is dealt with in detail. The project started in April 1987, therefore only first investigation results can be reported. (orig.) [de

  20. Design of SMART waste heat removal dry cooling tower using solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Jae; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The 85% of cooling system are once-through cooling system and closed cycle wet cooling system. However, many countries are trying to reduce the power plant water requirement due to the water shortage and water pollution. Dry cooling system is investigated for water saving advantage. There are two dry cooling system which are direct and indirect cooling system. In direct type, turbine exhaust is directly cooled by air-cooled condenser. In indirect system, turbine steam is cooled by recirculating intermediate cooling water loop, then the loop is cooled by air-cooled heat exchanger in cooling tower. In this paper, the purpose is to remove SMART waste heat, 200MW by using newly designed tower. The possibility of enhancing cooling performance by solar energy is analyzed. The simple cooling tower and solar energy cooling tower are presented and two design should meet the purpose of removing SMART waste heat, 200MW. In first design, when tower diameter is 70m, the height of tower should be 360m high. In second design, the chimney height decrease from 360m to 180m as collector radius increase from 100m to 500m due to collector temperature enhancement by solar energy, To analyze solar cooling tower further, consideration of solar energy performance at night should be analyzed

  1. Design of SMART waste heat removal dry cooling tower using solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong Jae; Jeong, Yong Hoon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The 85% of cooling system are once-through cooling system and closed cycle wet cooling system. However, many countries are trying to reduce the power plant water requirement due to the water shortage and water pollution. Dry cooling system is investigated for water saving advantage. There are two dry cooling system which are direct and indirect cooling system. In direct type, turbine exhaust is directly cooled by air-cooled condenser. In indirect system, turbine steam is cooled by recirculating intermediate cooling water loop, then the loop is cooled by air-cooled heat exchanger in cooling tower. In this paper, the purpose is to remove SMART waste heat, 200MW by using newly designed tower. The possibility of enhancing cooling performance by solar energy is analyzed. The simple cooling tower and solar energy cooling tower are presented and two design should meet the purpose of removing SMART waste heat, 200MW. In first design, when tower diameter is 70m, the height of tower should be 360m high. In second design, the chimney height decrease from 360m to 180m as collector radius increase from 100m to 500m due to collector temperature enhancement by solar energy, To analyze solar cooling tower further, consideration of solar energy performance at night should be analyzed.

  2. Optical monitoring system for a turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Dennis H; Smed, Jan P; Williams, James P; Jonnalagadda, Vinay

    2013-05-14

    The monitoring system for a gas turbine engine including a viewing tube assembly having an inner end and an outer end. The inner end is located adjacent to a hot gas flow path within the gas turbine engine and the outer end is located adjacent to an outer casing of the gas turbine engine. An aperture wall is located at the inner end of the viewing tube assembly and an optical element is located within the viewing tube assembly adjacent to the inner end and is spaced from the aperture wall to define a cooling and purge chamber therebetween. An aperture is defined in the aperture wall for passage of light from the hot gas flow path to the optical element. Swirl passages are defined in the viewing tube assembly between the aperture wall and the optical element for passage of cooling air from a location outside the viewing tube assembly into the chamber, wherein swirl passages effect a swirling movement of air in a circumferential direction within the chamber.

  3. On the thermal stability of radiation-dominated accretion disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Davis, Shane W. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, Toronto, ON M5S3H4 (Canada)

    2013-11-20

    We study the long-term thermal stability of radiation-dominated disks in which the vertical structure is determined self-consistently by the balance of heating due to the dissipation of MHD turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability (MRI) and cooling due to radiation emitted at the photosphere. The calculations adopt the local shearing box approximation and utilize the recently developed radiation transfer module in the Athena MHD code based on a variable Eddington tensor rather than an assumed local closure. After saturation of the MRI, in many cases the disk maintains a steady vertical structure for many thermal times. However, in every case in which the box size in the horizontal directions are at least one pressure scale height, fluctuations associated with MRI turbulence and dynamo action in the disk eventually trigger a thermal runaway that causes the disk to either expand or contract until the calculation must be terminated. During runaway, the dependence of the heating and cooling rates on total pressure satisfy the simplest criterion for classical thermal instability. We identify several physical reasons why the thermal runaway observed in our simulations differ from the standard α disk model; for example, the advection of radiation contributes a non-negligible fraction to the vertical energy flux at the largest radiation pressure, most of the dissipation does not happen in the disk mid-plane, and the change of dissipation scale height with mid-plane pressure is slower than the change of density scale height. We discuss how and why our results differ from those published previously. Such thermal runaway behavior might have important implications for interpreting temporal variability in observed systems, but fully global simulations are required to study the saturated state before detailed predictions can be made.

  4. The age of the galactic disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandage, A.

    1988-07-01

    The galactic disk is a dissipative structure and must, therefore be younger than the halo if galaxy formation generally proceeds by collapse. Just how much younger the oldest stars in the galactic disk are than the oldest halo stars remains an open question. A fast collapse (on a time scale no longer than the rotation period of the extended protogalaxy) permits an age gap of the order of approximately 10 to the 9th power years. A slow collapse, governed by the cooling rate of the partially pressure supported falling gas that formed into what is now the thick stellar disk, permits a longer age gap, claimed by some to be as long as 6 Gyr. Early methods of age dating the oldest components of the disk contain implicit assumptions concerning the details of the age-metallicity relation for stars in the solar neighborhood. The discovery that this relation for open clusters outside the solar circle is different that in the solar neighborhood (Geisler 1987), complicates the earlier arguments. The oldest stars in the galactic disk are at least as old as NGC 188. The new data by Janes on NGC 6791, shown first at this conference, suggest a disk age of at least 12.5 Gyr, as do data near the main sequence termination point of metal rich, high proper motion stars of low orbital eccentricity. Hence, a case can still be made that the oldest part of the galactic thick disk is similar in age to the halo globular clusters, if their ages are the same as 47 Tuc

  5. Diffuse interstellar gas in disk galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladilo, G.

    1989-01-01

    The physical properties of the diffuse gas in our Galaxy are reviewed and considered as a starting point for interstellar (IS) studies of disk galaxies. Attention is focussed on the atomic and ionic component, detected through radio, optical, ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray observations. The cooling and heating processes in the IS gas are briefly recalled in order to introduce current models of disk and halo gas. Observations of nearby galaxies critical to test IS models are considered, including 21-cm surveys, optical and UV absorptions of bright, extragalactic sources, and X-ray emission from hot halos. Finally, further steps necessary to develop a global model for the structure and evolution of the interstellar medium are indicated. (author)

  6. Hot accretion disks with electron-positron pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, T.R.; Lightman, A.P.

    1989-01-01

    The hot thermal accretion disks of the 1970s are studied and consideration is given to the effects of electron-positron pairs, which were originally neglected. It is found that disks cooled by internally produced photons have a critical accretion rate above which equilibrium is not possible in a radial annulus centered around r = 10 GM/c-squared, where M is the mass of the central object. This confirms and extends previous work by Kusunose and Takahara. Above the critical rate, pairs are created more rapidly than they can be destroyed. Below the critical rate, there are two solutions to the disk structure, one with a high pair density and one with a low pair density. Depending on the strength of the viscosity, the critical accretion rate corresponds to a critical luminosity of about 3-10 percent of the Eddington limit. 32 refs

  7. Pulsed Film Cooling on a Turbine Blade Leading Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Iota One controller were used to control the pulsed coolant. The solenoid i The water was encased...Turbine, Unsteady, Pulsed, Heat Transfer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF

  8. A debris disk around an isolated young neutron star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongxiang; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Kaplan, David L

    2006-04-06

    Pulsars are rotating, magnetized neutron stars that are born in supernova explosions following the collapse of the cores of massive stars. If some of the explosion ejecta fails to escape, it may fall back onto the neutron star or it may possess sufficient angular momentum to form a disk. Such 'fallback' is both a general prediction of current supernova models and, if the material pushes the neutron star over its stability limit, a possible mode of black hole formation. Fallback disks could dramatically affect the early evolution of pulsars, yet there are few observational constraints on whether significant fallback occurs or even the actual existence of such disks. Here we report the discovery of mid-infrared emission from a cool disk around an isolated young X-ray pulsar. The disk does not power the pulsar's X-ray emission but is passively illuminated by these X-rays. The estimated mass of the disk is of the order of 10 Earth masses, and its lifetime (> or = 10(6) years) significantly exceeds the spin-down age of the pulsar, supporting a supernova fallback origin. The disk resembles protoplanetary disks seen around ordinary young stars, suggesting the possibility of planet formation around young neutron stars.

  9. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Powder metallurgy Rene 95 rotating turbine engine parts, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbers, L. G.; Redden, T. K.

    1981-01-01

    A Rene 95 alloy as-HIP high pressure turbine aft shaft in the CF6-50 engine and a HIP plus forged Rene 95 compressor disk in the CFM56 engine were tested. The CF6-50 engine test was conducted for 1000 C cycles and the CFM56 test for 2000 C cycles. Post test evaluation and analysis of the CF6-50 shaft and the CFM56 compressor disk included visual, fluorescent penetrant, and dimensional inspections. No defects or otherwise discrepant conditions were found. These parts were judged to have performed satisfactorily.

  11. CO{sub 2} expansion work recovery by impulse turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toendell, Espen

    2006-07-01

    This study focuses on refrigeration processes with relatively low cooling capacities and hereby low circulation rates. The presented theory for turbines focuses on work extraction in impulse turbines. For an impulse turbine, the optimal rotational speed gives a turbine blade tip speed equal to half the nozzle jet velocity. With small volume flow rates, the turbine will have small dimensions, and hereby the rotational speed will be high. Together with principles for work extraction, the losses in the turbine were discussed. The main losses are nozzle losses (Friction and incomplete flashing), rotational losses, disc friction, windage, changing angles, non-rotational losses, fluid friction between jet and turbine blade, jet not hitting turbine blade, mechanical losses in bearings. A literature survey was made to show some examples on two-phase turbines and to create a theoretical basis for fluid expansion in a nozzle. The literature survey on two-phase expanders showed some examples on Helium expanders with small dimensions and good efficiencies. Compared to a helium expander, a CO{sub 2} expander will be working on a higher pressure, and hereby some extra losses must be expected. Some work on expander for R134a was also referred. That work was however focused on high cooling capacities, which means that the R134a expander will have much higher mass flow than the CO{sub 2} expander in this study. The literature survey on fluid expansion and nucleation showed that the critical radius is important in nucleation. The critical radius is dependent on the surface tension and the difference between the liquid saturation pressure and the local pressure. For the current study, understanding of nucleation will be important in order to understand the function of the nozzle. Finally some models for critical flow were presented (author) (ml)

  12. Survey on the feasibility of high-efficiency gas turbine power generation system; Kokoritsu gas turbine hatsuden system ni kansuru jitsuyo kanosei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For higher-efficiency power generation cycle plants with less restrained conditions for a location, the conceptual design of an inter-cooled regenerative two-fluid cycle plant (ISTIG) was attempted using a modified aircraft gas turbine. A high-performance turbo fan engine is used for middle-class power generation. The first stage combustion gas drives the first stage turbine, and its exhaust gas is used for the second stage combustion. Because of two-axial type of high and low pressure, improvement of thermal efficiency is expected by easy-to-install inter-cooler. ISTIG superior in operability is suitable for medium load or distributed power generation facilities, and aims at higher efficiency of a 60% level. ISTIG includes a large amount of water vapor in combustion air by adopting a diffusion type combustor eliminating back fire, and can reduce exergy loss by preheating fuel gas. Since load of the high-pressure turbine shifts toward low-pressure one by the inter-cooler, some considerations are necessary for low-pressure side cooling together with reheating cycle. Because of unnecessary steam turbine, the construction cost per kW can be reduced by 20%. 41 refs., 64 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. Prospective gas turbine and combined-cycle units for power engineering (a Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ol'khovskii, G. G.

    2013-02-01

    The modern state of technology for making gas turbines around the world and heat-recovery combined-cycle units constructed on their basis are considered. The progress achieved in this field by Siemens, Mitsubishi, General Electric, and Alstom is analyzed, and the objectives these companies set forth for themselves for the near and more distant future are discussed. The 375-MW gas turbine unit with an efficiency of 40% produced by Siemens, which is presently the largest one, is subjected to a detailed analysis. The main specific features of this turbine are that the gas turbine unit's hot-path components have purely air cooling, due to which the installation has enhanced maneuverability. The single-shaft combined-cycle plant constructed on the basis of this turbine has a capacity of 570 MW and efficiency higher than 60%. Programs adopted by different companies for development of new-generation gas turbine units firing synthesis gas and fitted with low-emission combustion chambers and new cooling systems are considered. Concepts of rotor blades for new gas turbine units with improved thermal barrier coatings and composite blades different parts of which are made of materials selected in accordance with the conditions of their operation are discussed.

  14. Effect of neck warming and cooling on thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B. A.; Chambers, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    The potential use of local neck cooling in an area superficial to the cerebral arteries was evaluated by circulating cold or hot water through two copper disks held firmly against the neck. Subjective responses indicated that neck cooling improves the thermal comfort in a hot environment.

  15. New gas turbine technology 2012-2014 - Gas Turbine Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genrup, Magnus; Thern, Marcus [LTH, Lund (Sweden)

    2013-03-15

    The last three years have certainly been a game changer with respect to combined cycle efficiency and operational flexibility. All major manufacturers are able to offer plants with efficiencies around 61 percent. Siemens has a TUV-certified performance of 60.75 percent at the Kraftwerke Ulrich Hartmann (formerly Irsching 4) site outside Berlin. The old paradigm that high performance meant advanced steam-cooled gas turbines and slow started bottoming cycles has definitely proven false. Both Siemens and General Electric are able to do a hot restart within 30 minutes to, more or less, full load. This is, by far, faster than possible with steam cooling and the only technology that is capable of meeting the future flexibility requirements due to high volatile renewable penetration. All major manufacturers have developed air-cooled engines for combined cycles with 61 percent efficiency. Steam cooling will most likely only be used for 1600 deg firing level since there will be an air shortage for both dry low emission combustion and turbine cooling. The increased combined cycle efficiency is a combination of better (or higher) performing gas turbines and improved bottoming cycles. The higher gas turbine performance has been achieved whilst maintaining a 60 deg high pressure admission temperature - hence the gain in combined cycle performance. The mentioned requirements of both high gas turbine performance and sufficient exhaust temperature, should impose both an increase in pressure ratio and increased firing level. The price level (2012) was on average 30-35 percent higher than the minimum level in 2004. The cost of ownership (or per produced unit of power) is strongly governed by the difference between the electricity and the fuel price. The importance of evaluating all factors (like degradation and de-icing operation) in the economic model cannot be stressed too much since it may have a profound impact on the analysis. The test code guarantee verification test is indeed

  16. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  17. Design study on evaluation for power conversion system concepts in high temperature gas cooled reactor with gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minatsuki, Isao; Mizokami, Yorikata

    2007-01-01

    The design studies on High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor with Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) have been performed, which were mainly promoted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and supported by fabricators in Japan. HTGR-GT plant feature is almost determined by selection of power conversion system concepts. Therefore, plant design philosophy is observed characteristically in selection of them. This paper describes the evaluation and analysis of the essential concepts of the HTGR-GT power conversion system through the investigations based on our experiences and engineering knowledge as a fabricator. As a result, the following concepts were evaluated that have advantages against other competitive one, such as the horizontal turbo machine rotor, the turbo machine in an individual vessel, the turbo machine with single shaft, the generator inside the power conversion vessel, and the power conversion system cycle with an intercooler. The results of the study can contribute as reference data when the concepts will be selected. Furthermore, we addressed reasonableness about the concept selection of the Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor GTHTR300 power conversion system, which has been promoted by JAEA. As a conclusion, we recognized the GTHTR300 would be one of the most promising concepts for commercialization in near future. (author)

  18. Design and Experimental Analysis of an Exhaust Air Energy Recovery Wind Turbine Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fazlizan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT was positioned at the discharge outlet of a cooling tower electricity generator. To avoid a negative impact on the performance of the cooling tower and to optimize the turbine performance, the determination of the VAWT position in the discharge wind stream was conducted by experiment. The preferable VAWT position is where the higher wind velocity matches the positive torque area of the turbine rotation. With the proper matching among the VAWT configurations (blade number, airfoil type, operating tip-speed-ratio, etc. and exhaust air profile, the turbine system was not only able to recover the wasted kinetic energy, it also reduced the fan motor power consumption by 4.5% and increased the cooling tower intake air flow-rate by 11%. The VAWT had a free running rotational speed of 479 rpm, power coefficient of 10.6%, and tip-speed-ratio of 1.88. The double multiple stream tube theory was used to explain the VAWT behavior in the non-uniform wind stream. For the actual size of a cooling tower with a 2.4 m outlet diameter and powered by a 7.5 kW fan motor, it was estimated that a system with two VAWTs (side-by-side can generate 1 kW of power which is equivalent to 13% of energy recovery.

  19. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  20. Effect of turbulence intensity on cross-injection film cooling at a stepped or smooth endwall of a gas turbine vane passage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pey-Shey; Tsai, Shen-Ta; Jhuo, Yue-Hua

    2014-01-01

    This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I. = 1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20 × 10(4), 1.24 × 10(5), and 1.50 × 10(5)), three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0), and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step). Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC) technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness.

  1. Effect of Turbulence Intensity on Cross-Injection Film Cooling at a Stepped or Smooth Endwall of a Gas Turbine Vane Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pey-Shey Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with a film cooling technique applicable to the protection of the endwalls of a gas turbine vane. In the experiments, cross-injection coolant flow from two-row, paired, inclined holes with nonintersecting centerlines was utilized. The test model is a scaled two-half vane. The levels of turbulence intensity used in the experiments are T.I.=1.8%, 7%, and 12%. Other parameters considered in the film cooling experiments include three inlet Reynolds numbers (9.20×104 , 1.24×105, and  1.50×105, three blowing ratios (0.5, 1.0, and 2.0, and three endwall conditions (smooth endwall and stepped endwall with forward-facing or backward-facing step. Thermochromic liquid crystal (TLC technique with steady-state heat transfer experiments was used to obtain the whole-field film cooling effectiveness. Results show that, at low turbulence intensity, increasing Reynolds number decreases the effectiveness in most of the vane passage. There is no monotonic trend of influence by Reynolds number at high turbulence intensity. The effect of blowing ratio on the effectiveness has opposite trends at low and high turbulence levels. Increasing turbulent intensity decreases the effectiveness, especially near the inlet of the vane passage. With a stepped endwall, turbulence intensity has only mild effect on the film cooling effectiveness.

  2. Dynamics and control modeling of the closed-cycle gas turbine (GT-HTGR) power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardia, A.

    1980-02-01

    The simulation if presented for the 800-MW(e) two-loop GT-HTGR plant design with the REALY2 transient analysis computer code, and the modeling of control strategies called for by the inherently unique operational requirements of a multiple loop GT-HTGR is described. Plant control of the GT-HTGR is constrained by the nature of its power conversion loops (PCLs) in which the core cooling flow and the turbine flow are directly related and thus changes in flow affect core cooling as well as turbine power. Additionally, the high thermal inertia of the reactor core precludes rapid changes in the temperature of the turbine inlet flow

  3. Analysis of power and cooling cogeneration using ammonia-water mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, Ricardo Vasquez; Demirkaya, Goekmen; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias; Rahman, Muhammad M.

    2010-01-01

    Development of innovative thermodynamic cycles is important for the efficient utilization of low-temperature heat sources such as solar, geothermal and waste heat sources. This paper presents a parametric analysis of a combined power/cooling cycle, which combines the Rankine and absorption refrigeration cycles, uses ammonia-water mixture as the working fluid and produces power and cooling simultaneously. This cycle, also known as the Goswami Cycle, can be used as a bottoming cycle using waste heat from a conventional power cycle or as an independent cycle using solar or geothermal energy. A thermodynamic study of power and cooling cogeneration is presented. The performance of the cycle for a range of boiler pressures, ammonia concentrations and isentropic turbine efficiencies are studied to find out the sensitivities of net work, amount of cooling and effective efficiencies. The roles of rectifier and superheater on the cycle performance are investigated. The cycle heat source temperature is varied between 90-170 o C and the maximum effective first law and exergy efficiencies for an absorber temperature of 30 o C are calculated as 20% and 72%, respectively. The turbine exit quality of the cycle for different boiler exit scenarios shows that turbine exit quality decreases when the absorber temperature decreases.

  4. Application of Powder Metallurgy Technologies for Gas Turbine Engine Wheel Production

    OpenAIRE

    Liubov Magerramova; Eugene Kratt; Pavel Presniakov

    2017-01-01

    A detailed analysis has been performed for several schemes of Gas Turbine Wheels production based on additive and powder technologies including metal, ceramic, and stereolithography 3-D printing. During the process of development and debugging of gas turbine engine components, different versions of these components must be manufactured and tested. Cooled blades of the turbine are among of these components. They are usually produced by traditional casting methods. This method requires long and...

  5. Multi-scale simulation of single crystal hollow turbine blade manufactured by liquid metal cooling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metal cooling (LMC process as a powerful directional solidification (DS technique is prospectively used to manufacture single crystal (SC turbine blades. An understanding of the temperature distribution and microstructure evolution in LMC process is required in order to improve the properties of the blades. For this reason, a multi-scale model coupling with the temperature field, grain growth and solute diffusion was established. The temperature distribution and mushy zone evolution of the hollow blade was simulated and discussed. According to the simulation results, the mushy zone might be convex and ahead of the ceramic beads at a lower withdrawal rate, while it will be concave and laggard at a higher withdrawal rate, and a uniform and horizontal mushy zone will be formed at a medium withdrawal rate. Grain growth of the blade at different withdrawal rates was also investigated. Single crystal structures were all selected out at three different withdrawal rates. Moreover, mis-orientation of the grains at 8 mm/min reached ~30°, while it was ~5° and ~15° at 10 mm/min and 12 mm/min, respectively. The model for predicting dendritic morphology was verified by corresponding experiment. Large scale for 2D dendritic distribution in the whole sections was investigated by experiment and simulation, and they presented a well agreement with each other. Keywords: Hollow blade, Single crystal, Multi-scale simulation, Liquid metal cooling

  6. New generation of compact high power disk lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuchtenbeiner, Stefanie; Zaske, Sebastian; Schad, Sven-Silvius; Gottwald, Tina; Kuhn, Vincent; Kumkar, Sören; Metzger, Bernd; Killi, Alexander; Haug, Patrick; Speker, Nicolai

    2018-02-01

    New technological developments in high power disk lasers emitting at 1030 nm are presented. These include the latest generation of TRUMPF's TruDisk product line offering high power disk lasers with up to 6 kW output power and beam qualities of up to 4 mm*mrad. With these compact devices a footprint reduction of 50% compared to the previous model could be achieved while at the same time improving robustness and increasing system efficiency. In the context of Industry 4.0, the new generation of TruDisk lasers features a synchronized data recording of all sensors, offering high-quality data for virtual analyses. The lasers therefore provide optimal hardware requirements for services like Condition Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance. We will also discuss its innovative and space-saving cooling architecture. It allows operation of the laser under very critical ambient conditions. Furthermore, an outlook on extending the new disk laser platform to higher power levels will be given. We will present a disk laser with 8 kW laser power out of a single disk with a beam quality of 5 mm*mrad using a 125 μm fiber, which makes it ideally suited for cutting and welding applications. The flexibility of the disk laser platform also enables the realization of a wide variety of beam guiding setups. As an example a new scheme called BrightLine Weld will be discussed. This technology allows for an almost spatter free laser welding process, even at high feed rates.

  7. Galaxy Formation by Cosmic Strings and Cooling of Baryonic Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Mizuo, IZAWA; Humitaka, SATO; Department of Physics, University of Tokyo; Department of Physics, Kyoto University

    1987-01-01

    Cooling and contraction of baryonic matter are investigated ina galaxy formation scenario by string loops. It is found that ~3% of virialized baryonic matter has cooled down and contracted. This virialized object may have a disk-halo structure and be considered a galaxy.

  8. Dual Microstructure Heat Treatment of a Nickel-Base Disk Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, John

    2001-01-01

    Existing Dual Microstructure Heat Treat (DMHT) technology was successfully applied to Alloy 10, a high strength, nickel-base disk alloy, to produce a disk with a fine grain bore and coarse grain rim. Specimens were extracted from the DMHT disk and tested in tension, creep, fatigue, and crack growth using conditions pertinent to disk applications. These data were then compared with data from "traditional" subsolvus and supersolvus heat treatments for Alloy 10. The results showed the DMHT disk to have a high strength, fatigue resistant bore comparable to that of subsolvus Alloy 10. Further, creep resistance of the DMHT rim was comparable to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. Crack growth resistance in the DMHT rim, while better than that for subsolvus, was inferior to that of supersolvus Alloy 10. The slow cool at the end of the DMHT conversion and/or the subsolvus resolution step are thought to be responsible for degrading rim DMHT crack growth resistance.

  9. Chemical Soups Around Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This artist's conception shows a young, hypothetical planet around a cool star. A soupy mix of potentially life-forming chemicals can be seen pooling around the base of the jagged rocks. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope hint that planets around cool stars the so-called M-dwarfs and brown dwarfs that are widespread throughout our galaxy might possess a different mix of life-forming, or prebiotic, chemicals than our young Earth. Life on our planet is thought to have arisen out of a pond-scum-like mix of chemicals. Some of these chemicals are thought to have come from a planet-forming disk of gas and dust that swirled around our young sun. Meteorites carrying the chemicals might have crash-landed on Earth. Astronomers don't know if these same life-generating processes are taking place around stars that are cooler than our sun, but the Spitzer observations show their disk chemistry is different. Spitzer detected a prebiotic molecule, called hydrogen cyanide, in the disks around yellow stars like our sun, but found none around cooler, less massive, reddish stars. Hydrogen cyanide is a carbon-containing, or organic compound. Five hydrogen cyanide molecules can join up to make adenine a chemical element of the DNA molecule found in all living organisms on Earth.

  10. Cosmic Rays and Non-thermal Emission Induced by Accretion of Cool Gas onto the Galactic Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Susumu; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Arakawa, Masanori; Renaud, Matthieu; Wada, Keiichi

    2017-11-01

    On both observational and theoretical grounds, the disk of our Galaxy should be accreting cool gas with temperature ≲ {10}5 K via the halo at a rate ˜1 {{M}⊙ {yr}}-1. At least some of this accretion is mediated by high-velocity clouds (HVCs), observed to be traveling in the halo with velocities of a few 100 km s-1 and occasionally impacting the disk at such velocities, especially in the outer regions of the Galaxy. We address the possibility of particle acceleration in shocks triggered by such HVC accretion events, and the detectability of consequent non-thermal emission in the radio to gamma-ray bands and high-energy neutrinos. For plausible shock velocities ˜ 300 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and magnetic field strengths ˜ 0.3{--}10 μ {{G}}, electrons and protons may be accelerated up to ˜1-10 TeV and ˜ 30{--}{10}3 TeV, respectively, in sufficiently strong adiabatic shocks during their lifetime of ˜ {10}6 {{yr}}. The resultant pion decay and inverse Compton gamma-rays may be the origin of some unidentified Galactic GeV-TeV sources, particularly the “dark” source HESS J1503-582 that is spatially coincident with the anomalous H I structure known as “forbidden-velocity wings.” Correlation of their locations with star-forming regions may be weak, absent, or even opposite. Non-thermal radio and X-ray emission from primary and/or secondary electrons may be detectable with deeper observations. The contribution of HVC accretion to Galactic cosmic rays is subdominant, but could be non-negligible in the outer Galaxy. As the thermal emission induced by HVC accretion is likely difficult to detect, observations of such phenomena may offer a unique perspective on probing gas accretion onto the Milky Way and other galaxies.

  11. Measures against the adverse impact of natural wind on air-cooled condensers in power plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The natural wind plays disadvantageous roles in the operation of air-cooled steam condensers in power plant.It is of use to take various measures against the adverse effect of wind for the performance improvement of air-cooled condensers.Based on representative 2×600 MW direct air-cooled power plant,three ways that can arrange and optimize the flow field of cooling air thus enhance the heat transfer of air-cooled condensers were proposed.The physical and mathematical models of air-cooled condensers with various flow leading measures were presented and the flow and temperature fields of cooling air were obtained by CFD simulation.The back pressures of turbine were calculated for different measures on the basis of the heat transfer model of air-cooled condensers.The results show that the performance of air-cooled condensers is improved thus the back pressure of turbine is lowered to some extent by taking measures against the adverse impact of natural wind.

  12. Contrastive experimental study on heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam cooled and air cooled rectangular channels with rib turbulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jianying; Li, Guojun; Gao, Tieyu [Xian Jiaotong University, Xian (China)

    2014-09-15

    The present experiment compares the heat transfer and friction characteristics in steam cooled and air cooled rectangular channels (simulating a gas turbine blade cooling passage) with two opposite rib-roughened walls. The Reynolds number (Re) whose length scale is the hydraulic diameter of the passage is set within the range of 10000-60000. The channel length is 1000 mm. The pitch-to-rib height ratio, the channel aspect ratio and the channel blockage ratio is 10, 0.5 and 0.047, respectively. It is found that the average Nu, the average friction coefficient, and the heat transfer performance of both steam and air in the ribbed channels show almost the same change trend with the increase of Re. Under the same test conditions, the average Nu of steam is 30.2% higher than that of air, the average friction coefficient is 18.4% higher, and the heat transfer performances of steam on the ribbed and the smooth walls are 8.4% and 7.3% higher than those of air, respectively. In addition, semi-empirical correlations for the two test channels are developed, which can predict the Nu under the given test condition. The correlations can be used in the design of the internal cooling passage of new generation steam cooled gas turbine blade/vane.

  13. Influence of the cooling circulation water on the efficiency of a thermonuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganan, J.; Rahman Al-Kassir, A.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Macias, A.; Diaz, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the feasibility of intercalating two cooling towers in the present circulation water system used at Almaraz Nuclear Power Plant, located at Campo Aranuelo district (SW Spain), has been technically evaluated in order to increase the efficiency of the thermodynamic cycle used at present. Thus, the working cycle has been analyzed, the power produced by the turbines being calculated as a function of the cooling circulation water temperature. Next, two natural convection counterflow cooling towers have been calculated in order to be installed in parallel with the present cooling system (Lake Arrocampo). The power obtained in the turbines provided with the new system has been estimated. Finally, a system combining both the cooling towers and the Lake Arrocampo has been proposed, the increment in power using one system or the other according to the weather conditions being calculated

  14. The Effectiveness of a NiCrY-Coating on a Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Miller, Robert A.; Nesbitt, James A.; Draper, Susan L.; Rogers, Richard B.; Telesman, Jack

    2018-01-01

    Protective ductile coatings could be necessary to mitigate oxidation and corrosion attack on superalloy disks in some turbine engine applications. However, the effects of coatings on fatigue life of the disk during service are an important concern. The objective of this study was to investigate how such a coating could perform after varied post-coating processing. Cylindrical gage fatigue specimens of powder metallurgy-processed disk superalloy LSHR were coated with a NiCrY coating, shot peened, preparation treated, exposed, and then subjected to fatigue at high temperature. The effects of varied shot peening, preparation treatment, and exposures on fatigue life with and without the coating were compared. Each of these variables and several of their interactions significantly influenced fatigue life.

  15. Cooling Performance of Additively Manufactured Microchannels and Film Cooling Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Curtis K.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) enables fabrication of components that cannot be made with any other manufacturing method. Significant advances in metal-based AM systems have made this technology feasible for building production parts to be used use in commercial products. In particular, the gas turbine industry benefits from AM as a manufacturing technique especially for development of components subjected to high heat flux. It has been shown that the use of microchannels in high heat flux components can lead to more efficient cooling designs than those that presently exist. The current manufacturing methods have prevented the use of microchannels in such parts, but AM now makes them manufacturable. However, before such designs can become a reality, much research must be done to characterize impacts on flow and heat transfer of AM parts. The current study considers the effect on flow and heat transfer through turbine cooling features made with AM. Specifically, the performance of microchannels and film cooling holes made with laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) is assessed. A number of test coupons containing microchannels were built from high temperature alloy powders on a commercially available L-PBF machine. Pressure drop and heat transfer experiments characterized the flow losses and convective heat transfer of air passing through the channels at various Reynolds numbers and Mach numbers. The roughness of the channels' surfaces was characterized in terms of statistical roughness parameters; the morphology of the roughness was examined qualitatively. Magnitude and morphology of surface roughness found on AM parts is unlike any form of roughness seen in the literature. It was found that the high levels of roughness on AM surfaces result in markedly augmented pressure loss and heat transfer at all Reynolds numbers, and conventional flow and heat transfer correlations produce erroneous estimates. The physical roughness measurements made in this study were correlated to

  16. Helium turbomachinery operating experience from gas turbine power plants and test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, Colin F.

    2012-01-01

    The closed-cycle gas turbine, pioneered and deployed in Europe, is not well known in the USA. Since nuclear power plant studies currently being conducted in several countries involve the coupling of a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor with a helium closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system, the experience gained from operated helium turbomachinery is the focus of this paper. A study done as early as 1945 foresaw the use of a helium closed-cycle gas turbine coupled with a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor, and some two decades later this was investigated but not implemented because of lack of technology readiness. However, the first practical use of helium as a gas turbine working fluid was recognized for cryogenic processes, and the first two small fossil-fired helium gas turbines to operate were in the USA for air liquefaction and nitrogen production facilities. In the 1970's a larger helium gas turbine plant and helium test facilities were built and operated in Germany to establish technology bases for a projected future high efficiency large nuclear gas turbine power plant concept. This review paper covers the experience gained, and the lessons learned from the operation of helium gas turbine plants and related test facilities, and puts these into perspective since over three decades have passed since they were deployed. An understanding of the many unexpected events encountered, and how the problems, some of them serious, were resolved is important to avoid them being replicated in future helium turbomachines. The valuable lessons learned in the past, in many cases the hard way, particularly from the operation in Germany of the Oberhausen II 50 MWe helium gas turbine plant, and the technical know-how gained from the formidable HHV helium turbine test facility, are viewed as being germane in the context of current helium turbomachine design work being done for future high efficiency nuclear gas turbine plant concepts. - Highlights:

  17. Low speed turbines for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugol'nikov, V.V.; Kosyak, Yu.F.; Virchenko, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    Work of the Kharkov turbine plant on planning and manufacture for nuclear power plants of low-speed (1500 rpm) turbines with a power of 500-1000 MW is described. The selection of a construction diagram for the turbine assembly, determined basically by the presence or absence of parts of average pressure, is considered. Special construction features of the condenser and turbine are described. Turbine K-500, with a rate of 1500 rpm, was calculated for operation in a two-loop nuclear power plant with saturated steam with intermediate separation and two-stage steam regeneration. On the base of this turbine, three models of 1000-MW turbines were developed. The first model has a cylinder of average pressure (TsSD) and a lateral condenser. The second has no TsSD but a low location of the condensers. The third has no TsSD and the condensers are located laterally. Calculations of the heat efficiency of the three types of turbines showed that several advantages are offered by the model with a TsSD. Better aerodynamic properties of the exhaust nozzles and condensers with lateral location allows decreasing the specific heat consumption to 0.5-1% or, at the same power, a 10-20% decrease in cooling water consumption

  18. Results of thermal test of metallic molybdenum disk target and fast-acting valve testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgo, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jonah, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, G. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This report describes the irradiation conditions for thermal testing of helium-cooled metallic disk targets that was conducted on March 9, 2016, at the Argonne National Laboratory electron linac. The four disks in this irradiation were pressed and sintered by Oak Ridge National Laboratory from molybdenum metal powder. Two of those disks were instrumented with thermocouples. Also reported are results of testing a fast-acting-valve system, which was designed to protect the accelerator in case of a target-window failure.

  19. On Shocks Driven by High-mass Planets in Radiatively Inefficient Disks. II. Three-dimensional Global Disk Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, Wladimir; Richert, Alexander J. W.; Boley, Aaron; Turner, Neal; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Flock, Mario

    2016-02-01

    Recent high-resolution, near-infrared images of protoplanetary disks have shown that these disks often present spiral features. Spiral arms are among the structures predicted by models of disk-planet interaction and thus it is tempting to suspect that planetary perturbers are responsible for these signatures. However, such interpretation is not free of problems. The observed spirals have large pitch angles, and in at least one case (HD 100546) it appears effectively unpolarized, implying thermal emission of the order of 1000 K (465 ± 40 K at closer inspection). We have recently shown in two-dimensional models that shock dissipation in the supersonic wake of high-mass planets can lead to significant heating if the disk is sufficiently adiabatic. Here we extend this analysis to three dimensions in thermodynamically evolving disks. We use the Pencil Code in spherical coordinates for our models, with a prescription for thermal cooling based on the optical depth of the local vertical gas column. We use a 5MJ planet, and show that shocks in the region around the planet where the Lindblad resonances occur heat the gas to substantially higher temperatures than the ambient gas. The gas is accelerated vertically away from the midplane to form shock bores, and the gas falling back toward the midplane breaks up into a turbulent surf. This turbulence, although localized, has high α values, reaching 0.05 in the inner Lindblad resonance, and 0.1 in the outer one. We find evidence that the disk regions heated up by the shocks become superadiabatic, generating convection far from the planet’s orbit.

  20. Vibration-Based Data Used to Detect Cracks in Rotating Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Martin, Richard E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2004-01-01

    Rotor health monitoring and online damage detection are increasingly gaining the interest of aircraft engine manufacturers. This is primarily due to the fact that there is a necessity for improved safety during operation as well as a need for lower maintenance costs. Applied techniques for the damage detection and health monitoring of rotors are essential for engine safety, reliability, and life prediction. Recently, the United States set the ambitious goal of reducing the fatal accident rate for commercial aviation by 80 percent within 10 years. In turn, NASA, in collaboration with the Federal Aviation Administration, other Federal agencies, universities, and the airline and aircraft industries, responded by developing the Aviation Safety Program. This program provides research and technology products needed to help the aerospace industry achieve their aviation safety goal. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group of the Optical Instrumentation Technology Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently developing propulsion-system-specific technologies to detect damage prior to catastrophe under the propulsion health management task. Currently, the NDE group is assessing the feasibility of utilizing real-time vibration data to detect cracks in turbine disks. The data are obtained from radial blade-tip clearance and shaft-clearance measurements made using capacitive or eddy-current probes. The concept is based on the fact that disk cracks distort the strain field within the component. This, in turn, causes a small deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a possible change in the system's center of mass. The geometric change and the center of mass shift can be indirectly characterized by monitoring the amplitude and phase of the first harmonic (i.e., the 1 component) of the vibration data. Spin pit experiments and full-scale engine tests have been conducted while monitoring for crack growth with this detection methodology. Even so, published data are

  1. 2D-FE throughflow method for multistage cooled turbines with subsonic and transonic flow. Final report; 2D-FE-Verfahren fuer die Kennfeldberechnung von vielstufigen Turbinen mit unter- und ueberkritischen Stufendruckverhaeltnissen mit variabler Kuehlluftzufuhr. Abschlussbericht zum Vorhaben 1.312

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, W.; Gehring, S.

    2000-07-01

    Throughflow calculations have proved to be useful tools for flow field analysis and performance prediction of multistage turbines during the design process. The advantages of this method are a very limited effort necessary for preparation and a short calculation time combined with sufficient accuracy. For the design of modern gas turbines it is necessary to consider the influence of modern cooling systems in these computations. The throughflow method presented here is based on the finite element method and includes extensions which consider radial transport processes and the influence of modern cooling systems. In order to calculate modern gas turbines with complex cooling systems the method considers arbitrary combinations of convection cooling, coolant ejection at the trailing edges, film cooling and coolant ejection at the end walls. The mixing of hot gas and coolant is calculated by simplified conservation laws. The raising mass flow due to coolant addition is considered by a modified definition of the stream function or in case of the coolant ejection at the end walls by modified boundary conditions. For a simpler application of the throughflow method the mass flow can be automatically adapted during the calculation in order to achieve a given pressure ratio. Due to the definition of the stream function in use, the mass flow can be corrected directly. Therefore the continuum equation is satisfied in the whole flow field during the calculation and the computing time is reduced. The reliability of the method is verified by calculations of a 1.5-stage turbine and the Siemens AG (KWU) high temperature gas turbine V84.3. In the 1.5-stage turbine coolant is ejected in front of the blading at different radii. The cooling system of the high temperature gas turbine consists of a combination of convective cooling and coolant ejection at the trailing edges. For both machines the calculations agree very well with the measurements. (orig.) [German

  2. Preliminary conceptual design of the secondary sodium circuit-eliminated JSFR (Japan Sodium Fast Reactor) adopting a supercritical CO2 turbine system (2). Turbine system and plant size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisohara, Naoyuki; Sakamoto, Yoshihiko; Kotake, Shoji

    2014-09-01

    Research and development of the supercritical CO 2 (S-CO 2 ) cycle turbine system is underway in various countries for further improvement of the safety and economy of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The Component Design and Balance-Of-Plant (CD and BOP) of the Generation IV International Nuclear Forum (Gen-IV) has addressed this study, and their analytical and experimental results have been discussed between the relevant countries. JAEA, who is a member of the CD and BOP, has performed a design study of an S-CO 2 gas turbine system applied to the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR). In this study, the S-CO 2 cycle turbine system was directly connected to the primary sodium system of the JSFR to eliminate the secondary sodium circuit, aiming for further economical improvement. This is because there is no risk of sodium-water reaction in the S-CO 2 cycle turbine system of SFRs. This report describes the system configuration, heat/mass balance, and main components of the S-CO 2 turbine system, based on the JSFR specifications. The layout of components and piping in the reactor and turbine buildings were examined and the dimensions of the buildings were estimated. The study has revealed that the reactor and turbine buildings could be reduced by 7% and 40%, respectively, in comparison with those in the existing JSFR design with the secondary sodium circuit employing the steam turbine. The cycle thermal was also calculated as 41.9-42.3%, which is nearly the same as that of the JSFR with the water/steam system. (author)

  3. Mechanical and thermal stresses in a functionally graded rotating disk with variable thickness due to radially symmetry loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayat, Mehdi; Saleem, M.; Sahari, B.B.; Hamouda, A.M.S.; Mahdi, E.

    2009-01-01

    Rotating disks have many applications in the aerospace industry such as gas turbines and gears. These disks normally work under thermo mechanical loads. Minimizing the weight of such components can help reduce the overall payload in aerospace industry. For this purpose, a rotating functionally graded (FG) disk with variable thickness under a steady temperature field is considered in this paper. Thermo elastic solutions and the weight of the disk are related to the material grading index and the geometry of the disk. It is found that a disk with parabolic or hyperbolic convergent thickness profile has smaller stresses and displacements compared to a uniform thickness disk. Maximum radial stress due to centrifugal load in the solid disk with parabolic thickness profile may not be at the center unlike uniform thickness disk. Functionally graded disk with variable thickness has smaller stresses due to thermal load compared to those with uniform thickness. It is seen that for a given value of grading index, the FG disk having concave thickness profile is the lightest in weight whereas the FG disk with uniform thickness profile is the heaviest. Also for any given thickness profile, the weight of the FG disk lies in between the weights of the all-metal and the all-ceramic disks.

  4. Core cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeppner, G.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor cooling system transports the heat liberated in the reactor core to the component - heat exchanger, steam generator or turbine - where the energy is removed. This basic task can be performed with a variety of coolants circulating in appropriately designed cooling systems. The choice of any one system is governed by principles of economics and natural policies, the design is determined by the laws of nuclear physics, thermal-hydraulics and by the requirement of reliability and public safety. PWR- and BWR- reactors today generate the bulk of nuclear energy. Their primary cooling systems are discussed under the following aspects: 1. General design, nuclear physics constraints, energy transfer, hydraulics, thermodynamics. 2. Design and performance under conditions of steady state and mild transients; control systems. 3. Design and performance under conditions of severe transients and loss of coolant accidents; safety systems. (orig./RW)

  5. Rotor Design for Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Hjort

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diffuser augmented wind turbines (DAWTs can increase mass flow through the rotor substantially, but have often failed to fulfill expectations. We address high-performance diffusers, and investigate the design requirements for a DAWT rotor to efficiently convert the available energy to shaft energy. Several factors can induce wake stall scenarios causing significant energy loss. The causality between these stall mechanisms and earlier DAWT failures is discussed. First, a swirled actuator disk CFD code is validated through comparison with results from a far wake swirl corrected blade-element momentum (BEM model, and horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT reference results. Then, power efficiency versus thrust is computed with the swirled actuator disk (AD code for low and high values of tip-speed ratios (TSR, for different centerbodies, and for different spanwise rotor thrust loading distributions. Three different configurations are studied: The bare propeller HAWT, the classical DAWT, and the high-performance multi-element DAWT. In total nearly 400 high-resolution AD runs are generated. These results are presented and discussed. It is concluded that dedicated DAWT rotors can successfully convert the available energy to shaft energy, provided the identified design requirements for swirl and axial loading distributions are satisfied.

  6. Performance of a single nutating disk engine in the 2 to 500 kW power range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korakianitis, T.; Boruta, M.; Jerovsek, J.; Meitner, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    A new type of internal combustion engine with distinct advantages over conventional piston-engines and gas turbines in small power ranges is presented. The engine has analogies with piston engine operation, but like gas turbines it has dedicated spaces and devices for compression, burning and expansion. The engine operates on a modified limited-pressure thermodynamic cycle. The core of the engine is a nutating non-rotating disk, with the center of its hub mounted in the middle of a Z-shaped shaft. The two ends of the shaft rotate, while the disk nutates. The motion of the disk circumference prescribes a portion of a sphere. In the single-disk configuration a portion of the surface area of the disk is used for intake and compression, a portion is used to seal against a center casing, and the remaining portion is used for expansion and exhaust. The compressed air is admitted to an external accumulator, and then into an external combustion chamber before it is admitted to the power side of the disk. The external combustion chamber enables the engine to operate on a variable compression ratio cycle. Variations in cycle temperature ratio and compression ratio during normal operation enable the engine to effectively become a variable-cycle engine, allowing significant flexibility for optimizing efficiency or power output. The thermal efficiency is similar to that of medium sized diesel engines. For the same engine volume and weight this engine produces approximately twice the power of a two-stroke engine and four times the power of a four-stroke engine. The computed sea-level engine performance at design and off-design conditions in the 2 to 500 kW power range is presented.

  7. Fabrication Of Hybird Gas Turbine Disk Material System By Additive Manufacturing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AM offers the potential to be revolutionary for GRC hybrid disk concept as it: i) bypasses joining through direct deposition or “building” of the PX bore...

  8. Evolution of the magnetized, neutrino-cooled accretion disk in the aftermath of a black hole-neutron star binary merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein Nouri, Fatemeh; Duez, Matthew D.; Foucart, Francois; Deaton, M. Brett; Haas, Roland; Haddadi, Milad; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Ott, Christian D.; Pfeiffer, Harald P.; Scheel, Mark A.; Szilagyi, Bela

    2018-04-01

    Black hole-torus systems from compact binary mergers are possible engines for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). During the early evolution of the postmerger remnant, the state of the torus is determined by a combination of neutrino cooling and magnetically driven heating processes, so realistic models must include both effects. In this paper, we study the postmerger evolution of a magnetized black hole-neutron star binary system using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) from an initial postmerger state provided by previous numerical relativity simulations. We use a finite-temperature nuclear equation of state and incorporate neutrino effects in a leakage approximation. To achieve the needed accuracy, we introduce improvements to SpEC's implementation of general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), including the use of cubed-sphere multipatch grids and an improved method for dealing with supersonic accretion flows where primitive variable recovery is difficult. We find that a seed magnetic field triggers a sustained source of heating, but its thermal effects are largely cancelled by the accretion and spreading of the torus from MHD-related angular momentum transport. The neutrino luminosity peaks at the start of the simulation, and then drops significantly over the first 20 ms but in roughly the same way for magnetized and nonmagnetized disks. The heating rate and disk's luminosity decrease much more slowly thereafter. These features of the evolution are insensitive to grid structure and resolution, formulation of the MHD equations, and seed field strength, although turbulent effects are not fully converged.

  9. Study on thermodynamic cycle of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Xinhe; Yang Xiaoyong; Wang Jie

    2017-01-01

    The development trend of the (very) High temperature gas-cooled reactor is to gradually increase the reactor outlet temperature. The different power conversion units are required at the different reactor outlet temperature. In this paper, for the helium turbine direct cycle and the combined cycle of the power conversion unit of the High temperature gas-cooled reactor, the mathematic models are established, and three cycle plans are designed. The helium turbine direct cycle is a Brayton cycle with recuperator, precooler and intercooler. In the combined cycle plan 1, the topping cycle is a simple Brayton cycle without recuperator, precooler and intercooler, and the bottoming cycle is based on the steam parameters (540deg, 6 MPa) recommended by Siemens. In the combined cycle plan 2, the topping cycle also is a simple Brayton cycle, and the bottoming cycle which is a Rankine cycle with reheating cycle is based on the steam parameters of conventional subcritical thermal power generation (540degC, 18 MPa). The optimization results showed that the cycle efficiency of the combined cycle plan 2 is the highest, the second is the helium turbine direct cycle, and the combined cycle plan 2 is the lowest. When the reactor outlet temperature is 900degC and the pressure ratio is 2.02, the cycle efficiency of the combined cycle plan 2 can reach 49.7%. The helium turbine direct cycle has a reactor inlet temperature above 500degC due to the regenerating cycle, so it requires a cooling circuit for the internal wall of the reactor pressure vessel. When the reactor outlet temperature increases, the increase of the pressure ratio required by the helium turbine direct cycle increases may bring some difficulties to the design and manufacture of the magnetic bearings. For the combined cycle, the reactor inlet temperature can be controlled below than 370degC, so the reactor pressure vessel can use SA533 steel without cooling the internal wall of the reactor pressure vessel. The pressure

  10. Model to calculate mass flow rate and other quantities of two-phase flow in a pipe with a densitometer, a drag disk, and a turbine meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aya, I.

    1975-11-01

    The proposed model was developed at ORNL to calculate mass flow rate and other quantities of two-phase flow in a pipe when the flow is dispersed with slip between the phases. The calculational model is based on assumptions concerning the characteristics of a turbine meter and a drag disk. The model should be validated with experimental data before being used in blowdown analysis. In order to compare dispersed flow and homogeneous flow, the ratio of readings from each flow regime for each device discussed is calculated for a given mass flow rate and steam quality. The sensitivity analysis shows that the calculated flow rate of a steam-water mixture (based on the measurements of a drag disk and a gamma densitometer in which the flow is assumed to be homogeneous even if there is some slip between phases) is very close to the real flow rate in the case of dispersed flow at a low quality. As the steam quality increases at a constant slip ratio, all models are prone to overestimate. At 20 percent quality the overestimates reach 8 percent in the proposed model, 15 percent in Rouhani's model, 38 percent in homogeneous model, and 75 percent in Popper's model

  11. THE FREQUENCY OF DEBRIS DISKS AT WHITE DWARFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Sara D.; Patterson, Adam J.; Kilic, Mukremin [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Leggett, S. K. [Gemini Observatory, 670 N. A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Dufour, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Bloom, J. S.; Starr, D. L., E-mail: barber@nhn.ou.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We present near- and mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy from PAIRITEL, IRTF, and Spitzer of a metallicity-unbiased sample of 117 cool, hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs (WDs) from the Palomar-Green survey and find five with excess radiation in the infrared, translating to a 4.3{sup +2.7} {sub -1.2}% frequency of debris disks. This is slightly higher than, but consistent with the results of previous surveys. Using an initial-final mass relation, we apply this result to the progenitor stars of our sample and conclude that 1-7 M {sub Sun} stars have at least a 4.3% chance of hosting planets; an indirect probe of the intermediate-mass regime eluding conventional exoplanetary detection methods. Alternatively, we interpret this result as a limit on accretion timescales as a fraction of WD cooling ages; WDs accrete debris from several generations of disks for {approx}10 Myr. The average total mass accreted by these stars ranges from that of 200 km asteroids to Ceres-sized objects, indicating that WDs accrete moons and dwarf planets as well as solar system asteroid analogs.

  12. THE FREQUENCY OF DEBRIS DISKS AT WHITE DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Sara D.; Patterson, Adam J.; Kilic, Mukremin; Leggett, S. K.; Dufour, P.; Bloom, J. S.; Starr, D. L.

    2012-01-01

    We present near- and mid-infrared photometry and spectroscopy from PAIRITEL, IRTF, and Spitzer of a metallicity-unbiased sample of 117 cool, hydrogen-atmosphere white dwarfs (WDs) from the Palomar-Green survey and find five with excess radiation in the infrared, translating to a 4.3 +2.7 –1.2 % frequency of debris disks. This is slightly higher than, but consistent with the results of previous surveys. Using an initial-final mass relation, we apply this result to the progenitor stars of our sample and conclude that 1-7 M ☉ stars have at least a 4.3% chance of hosting planets; an indirect probe of the intermediate-mass regime eluding conventional exoplanetary detection methods. Alternatively, we interpret this result as a limit on accretion timescales as a fraction of WD cooling ages; WDs accrete debris from several generations of disks for ∼10 Myr. The average total mass accreted by these stars ranges from that of 200 km asteroids to Ceres-sized objects, indicating that WDs accrete moons and dwarf planets as well as solar system asteroid analogs.

  13. Innovative technologies for powder metallurgy-based disk superalloys: Progress and proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong-Lin, Jia; Chang-Chun, Ge; Qing-Zhi, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Powder metallurgy (PM) superalloys are an important class of high temperature structural materials, key to the rotating components of aero engines. In the purview of the present challenges associated with PM superalloys, two novel approaches namely, powder preparation and the innovative spray-forming technique (for making turbine disk) are proposed and studied. Subsequently, advanced technologies like electrode-induction-melting gas atomization (EIGA), and spark-plasma discharge spheroidization (SPDS) are introduced, for ceramic-free superalloy powders. Presently, new processing routes are sought after for preparing finer and cleaner raw powders for disk superalloys. The progress of research in spray-formed PM superalloys is first summarized in detail. The spray-formed superalloy disks specifically exhibit excellent mechanical properties. This paper reviews the recent progress in innovative technologies for PM superalloys, with an emphasis on new ideas and approaches, central to the innovation driving techniques like powder processing and spray forming. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 50974016 and 50071014).

  14. 1000 MW steam turbine for Temelin nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drahy, J.

    1992-01-01

    Before the end 1991 the delivery was completed of the main parts (3 low-pressure sections and 1 high-pressure section, all of double-flow design) of the first full-speed (3000 r.p.m.) 1000 MW steam turbine for saturated admission steam for the Temelin nuclear power plant. Description of the turbine design and of new technologies and tools used in the manufacture are given. Basic technical parameters of the steam turbine are as follows: maximum output of steam generators 6060 th -1 ; maximum steam flow into turbine 5494.7 th -1 ; output of turbo-set 1024 MW; steam conditions before the turbine inlet: pressure 5.8 MPa, temperature 273.3 degC, steam wetness 0.5%; nominal temperature of cooling water 21 degC; temperature of feed water 220.8 degC; maximum consumption of heat from turbine for heating at 3-stage heating of heating water 60/150 degC. (Z.S.) 7 figs., 2 refs

  15. An Analytical Model for the Evolution of the Protoplanetary Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajenabi, Fazeleh; Kazrani, Kimia; Shadmehri, Mohsen, E-mail: f.khajenabi@gu.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Golestan University, Gorgan 49138-15739 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-01

    We obtain a new set of analytical solutions for the evolution of a self-gravitating accretion disk by holding the Toomre parameter close to its threshold and obtaining the stress parameter from the cooling rate. In agreement with the previous numerical solutions, furthermore, the accretion rate is assumed to be independent of the disk radius. Extreme situations where the entire disk is either optically thick or optically thin are studied independently, and the obtained solutions can be used for exploring the early or the final phases of a protoplanetary disk evolution. Our solutions exhibit decay of the accretion rate as a power-law function of the age of the system, with exponents −0.75 and −1.04 for optically thick and thin cases, respectively. Our calculations permit us to explore the evolution of the snow line analytically. The location of the snow line in the optically thick regime evolves as a power-law function of time with the exponent −0.16; however, when the disk is optically thin, the location of the snow line as a function of time with the exponent −0.7 has a stronger dependence on time. This means that in an optically thin disk inward migration of the snow line is faster than an optically thick disk.

  16. Numerical simulation of the aerodynamic field in complex terrain wind farm based on actuator disk model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chen Qi; Han, Xing Xing

    2015-01-01

    Study on the aerodynamic field in complex terrain is significant to wind farm micro-sitting and wind power prediction. This paper modeled the wind turbine through an actuator disk model, and solved the aerodynamic field by CFD to study the influence of meshing, boundary conditions and turbulence ...

  17. Numerical simulation of the unsteady and turbulent flow in a high-pressure turbine stage; Simulation numerique de l'ecoulement instationnaire et turbulent dans un etage de turbine haute pression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastin, G.

    2004-09-15

    The aim of this study concerns the use of numerical methods for the resolution of the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations adapted to the simulation of the cooling of the trailing edge of a stator in a high pressure turbine. These methods, based on the elsA solver developed at ONERA, use a four steps Runge Kutta time discretization scheme and a Jameson centered space discretization scheme. The scheme is applied through a finite volume approach on control volume centered on the cells of a multi-block structured mesh. Turbulence is simulated either through the algebraic Michel model, or through the one-transport-equation Spalart-Allmaras model, or through the two-transport-equations k 1, k {omega} and k {epsilon} models, and through ASM model. A simulation of the flow in a bidimensional stator, without cooling, is carried out. The cooling, which is realized with trailing edge slots, is then simulated on a bidimensional stator. Because the slot is represented by meshes overlapping the mesh of the smooth blade, the Chimera method is chosen. This method makes it possible computations with overlapping meshes. The comparison with the experimental data, on these two first computations has validated this strategy to represent such slots. The tridimensional simulation of a single stator with taking account of the cooling is then realized. It showed the complex and tridimensional aspects of the main flow with focus on the influence of the cooling system. Finally two steady computations, without and with cooling, and an unsteady computation without cooling are carried out on a high pressure turbine stage. The comparison with the experimental data obtained in the frame of the European Brite-Euram program is made. These results make it possible to determine the effect of the cooling on the flow in a turbine stage. (authors)

  18. Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melese, G.; Katz, R.

    1984-01-01

    This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors

  19. Hot spot detection system for vanes or blades of a combustion turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twerdochlib, M.

    1999-02-02

    This invention includes a detection system that can determine if a turbine component, such as a turbine vane or blade, has exceeded a critical temperature, such as a melting point, along any point along the entire surface of the vane or blade. This system can be employed in a conventional combustion turbine having a compressor, a combustor and a turbine section. Included within this system is a chemical coating disposed along the entire interior surface of a vane or blade and a closed loop cooling system that circulates a coolant through the interior of the vane or blade. If the temperature of the vane or blade exceeds a critical temperature, the chemical coating will be expelled from the vane or blade into the coolant. Since while traversing the closed loop cooling system the coolant passes through a detector, the presence of the chemical coating in the coolant will be sensed by the system. If the chemical coating is detected, this indicates that the vane or blade has exceeded a critical temperature. 5 figs.

  20. Investigation of damping potential of strip damper on a real turbine blade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afzal, M.; Lopez Arteaga, I.; Kari, L.; Kharyton, V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the damping potential of strip dampers on a real turbine bladed disk. A 3D numerical friction contact model is used to compute the contact forces by means of the Alternate Frequency Time domain method. The Jacobian matrix required during the iterative solution is computed in

  1. Design of a propeller turbine with a variable revolution number; Entwicklung einer Propellerturbine mit variabler Drehzahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fella, G.; Wierer, C. [Fella GmbH Maschinen- und Apparatebau, Amorbach (Germany); Goede, E.; Batrekhy, S.; Ruprecht, A. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Stroemungsmechanik und Hydraulische Stroemungsmaschinen

    1997-12-31

    The small hydroelectric power station of Rupboden in the Oberfranken district was reactivated after having been decommissioned for 30 years. This new low pressure plant consists of an open-flume turbine with an adjustable diffusor and a firm rotor disk (propeller) with a vertical rod. A large range of operation at a constant height of fall is ensured by a variable revolution number. The profiles of the adjustable diffusor and rotor disk and the design of the draft tube were optimized using numerical flow calculation. First operating experience is very positive. The turbine runs extremely smoothly over the entire range. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Kleinwasserkraftwerk Rupboden in Oberfanken wurde nach 30 Jahren Stillstand reaktiviert. Die neue Niederdruckanlage besteht aus einer Schachtturbine mit verstellbarem Leitapparat, feststehendem Laufrad (Propeller) mit senkrechter Welle. Zum Erzielen eines grossen Betriebsbereiches bei gleichbleibender Fallhoehe wurde eine variable Drehzahl vorgesehen. Die Profilierung von Leitapparat und Laufrad sowie die Formgebung fuer das Saugrohr wurden mit numerischer Stroemungsberechnung optimiert. Erste Betriebserfahrungen sind sehr positiv. Die Turbine laeuft im gesamten Leistungsbereich ausserordentlich ruhig. (orig.)

  2. Open air-vapor compression refrigeration system for air conditioning and hot water cooled by cool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Shaobo; Li Huacong; Zhang Hefei

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an open air-vapor compression refrigeration system for air conditioning and hot water cooled by cool water and proves its feasibility through performance simulation. Pinch technology is used in analysis of heat exchange in the surface heat exchanger, and the temperature difference at the pinch point is selected as 6 o C. Its refrigeration depends mainly on both air and vapor, more efficient than a conventional air cycle, and the use of turbo-machinery makes this possible. This system could use the cool in the cool water, which could not be used to cool air directly. Also, the heat rejected from this system could be used to heat cool water to 33-40 o C. The sensitivity analysis of COP to η c and η t and the simulated results T 4 , T 7 , T 8 , q 1 , q 2 and W m of the cycle are given. The simulations show that the COP of this system depends mainly on T 7 , η c and η t and varies with T 3 or T wet and that this cycle is feasible in some regions, although the COP is sensitive to the efficiencies of the axial compressor and turbine. The optimum pressure ratio in this system could be lower, and this results in a fewer number of stages of the axial compressor. Adjusting the rotation speed of the axial compressor can easily control the pressure ratio, mass flow rate and the refrigerating capacity. The adoption of this cycle will make the air conditioned room more comfortable and reduce the initial investment cost because of the obtained very low temperature air. Humid air is a perfect working fluid for central air conditioning and no cost to the user. The system is more efficient because of using cool water to cool the air before the turbine. In addition, pinch technology is a good method to analyze the wet air heat exchange with water

  3. Use of a temperature-initiated passive cooling system (TIPACS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Conklin, J.; Reich, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    A new type of passive cooling system has been invented (Forsberg 1993): the Temperature-Initiated Passive Cooling System (TIPACS). The characteristics of the TIPACS potentially match requirements for an improved reactor-cavity-cooling system (RCCS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). This report is an initial evaluation of the TIPACS for the MHTGR with a Rankines (steam) power conversion cycle. Limited evaluations were made of applying the TIPACS to MHTGRs with reactor pressure vessel temperatures up to 450 C. These temperatures may occur in designs of Brayton cycle (gas turbine) and process heat MHTGRs. The report is structured as follows. Section 2 describes the containment cooling issues associated with the MHTGR and the requirements for such a cooling system. Section 3 describes TIPACS in nonmathematical terms. Section 4 describes TIPACS's heat-removal capabilities. Section 5 analyzes the operation of the temperature-control mechanism that determines under what conditions the TIPACS rejects heat to the environment. Section 6 addresses other design and operational issues. Section 7 identifies uncertainties, and Section 8 provides conclusions. The appendixes provide the detailed data and models used in the analysis

  4. Use of a temperature-initiated passive cooling system (TIPACS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Conklin, J.; Reich, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    A new type of passive cooling system has been invented (Forsberg 1993): the Temperature-Initiated Passive Cooling System (TIPACS). The characteristics of the TIPACS potentially match requirements for an improved reactor-cavity-cooling system (RCCS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). This report is an initial evaluation of the TIPACS for the MHTGR with a Rankines (steam) power conversion cycle. Limited evaluations were made of applying the TIPACS to MHTGRs with reactor pressure vessel temperatures up to 450 C. These temperatures may occur in designs of Brayton cycle (gas turbine) and process heat MHTGRs. The report is structured as follows. Section 2 describes the containment cooling issues associated with the MHTGR and the requirements for such a cooling system. Section 3 describes TIPACS in nonmathematical terms. Section 4 describes TIPACS`s heat-removal capabilities. Section 5 analyzes the operation of the temperature-control mechanism that determines under what conditions the TIPACS rejects heat to the environment. Section 6 addresses other design and operational issues. Section 7 identifies uncertainties, and Section 8 provides conclusions. The appendixes provide the detailed data and models used in the analysis.

  5. Experimental study of condensate subcooling with the use of a model of an air-cooled condenser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhanov, V. A.; Bezukhov, A. P.; Bogov, I. A.; Dontsov, N. Y.; Volkovitsky, I. D.; Tolmachev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    Water-supply deficit is now felt in many regions of the world. This hampers the construction of new steam-turbine and combined steam-and-gas thermal power plants. The use of dry cooling systems and, specifically, steam-turbine air-cooled condensers (ACCs) expands the choice of sites for the construction of such power plants. The significance of condensate subcooling Δ t as a parameter that negatively affects the engineering and economic performance of steam-turbine plants is thereby increased. The operation and design factors that influence the condensate subcooling in ACCs are revealed, and the research objective is, thus, formulated properly. The indicated research was conducted through physical modeling with the use of the Steam-Turbine Air-Cooled Condenser Unit specialized, multipurpose, laboratory bench. The design and the combined schematic and measurement diagram of this test bench are discussed. The experimental results are presented in the form of graphic dependences of the condensate subcooling value on cooling ratio m and relative weight content ɛ' of air in steam at the ACC inlet at different temperatures of cooling air t ca ' . The typical ranges of condensate subcooling variation (4 ≤ Δ t ≤ 6°C, 2 ≤ Δ t ≤ 4°C, and 0 ≤ Δ t ≤ 2°C) are identified based on the results of analysis of the attained Δ t levels in the ACC and numerous Δ t reduction estimates. The corresponding ranges of cooling ratio variation at different temperatures of cooling air at the ACC inlet are specified. The guidelines for choosing the adjusted ranges of cooling ratio variation with account of the results of experimental studies of the dependences of the absolute pressure of the steam-air mixture in the top header of the ACC and the heat flux density on the cooling ratio at different temperatures of cooling air at the ACC inlet are given.

  6. Modeling turbine-missile impacts using the HONDO finite-element code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuler, K.W.

    1981-11-01

    Calculations have been performed using the dynamic finite element code HONDO to simulate a full scale rocket sled test. In the test a rocket sled was used to launch at a velocity of 150 m/s (490 ft/s), a 1527 kg (3366 lb) fragment of a steam turbine rotor disk into a structure which was a simplified model of a steam turbine casing. In the calculations the material behavior of and boundary conditions on the target structure were varied to assess its energy absorbing characteristics. Comparisons are made between the calculations and observations of missile velocity and strain histories of various points of the target structure

  7. Enhancement of LNG plant propane cycle through waste heat powered absorption cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, P.; Mortazavi, A.; Eveloy, V.; Al-Hashimi, S.; Hwang, Y.; Radermacher, R.

    2012-01-01

    In liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants utilizing sea water for process cooling, both the efficiency and production capacity of the propane cycle decrease with increasing sea water temperature. To address this issue, several propane cycle enhancement approaches are investigated in this study, which require minimal modification of the existing plant configuration. These approaches rely on the use of gas turbine waste heat powered water/lithium bromide absorption cooling to either (i) subcool propane after the propane cycle condenser, or (ii) reduce propane cycle condensing pressure through pre-cooling of condenser cooling water. In the second approach, two alternative methods of pre-cooling condenser cooling water are considered, which consist of an open sea water loop, and a closed fresh water loop. In addition for all cases, three candidate absorption chiller configurations are evaluated, namely single-effect, double-effect, and cascaded double- and single-effect chillers. The thermodynamic performance of each propane cycle enhancement scheme, integrated in an actual LNG plant in the Persian Gulf, is evaluated using actual plant operating data. Subcooling propane after the propane cycle condenser is found to improve propane cycle total coefficient of performance (COP T ) and cooling capacity by 13% and 23%, respectively. The necessary cooling load could be provided by either a single-effect, double-effect or cascaded and single- and double-effect absorption refrigeration cycle recovering waste heat from a single gas turbine operated at full load. Reducing propane condensing pressure using a closed fresh water condenser cooling loop is found result in propane cycle COP T and cooling capacity enhancements of 63% and 22%, respectively, but would require substantially higher capital investment than for propane subcooling, due to higher cooling load and thus higher waste heat requirements. Considering the present trend of short process enhancement payback periods in the

  8. Cooling systems and hybrid A/C systems using an electromagnetic radiation-absorbing complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halas, Nancy J.; Nordlander, Peter; Neumann, Oara

    2015-05-19

    A method for powering a cooling unit. The method including applying electromagnetic (EM) radiation to a complex, where the complex absorbs the EM radiation to generate heat, transforming, using the heat generated by the complex, a fluid to vapor, and sending the vapor from the vessel to a turbine coupled to a generator by a shaft, where the vapor causes the turbine to rotate, which turns the shaft and causes the generator to generate the electric power, wherein the electric powers supplements the power needed to power the cooling unit

  9. DESAIN AWAL TURBIN UAP TIPE AKSIAL UNTUK KONSEP RGTT30 BERPENDINGIN HELIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Sudadiyo

    2016-06-01

    FOR HELIUM-COOLED RGTT30 CONCEPT. The concept of a nuclear power reactor, which evolves, is high temperature gas-cooled reactor type (HTGR. Gas that is used to cool the HTGR core, is helium. The HTGR concept used in this study can yield thermal power of 30 MWth so that named RGTT30. Helium temperature can reach 700 °C when come out from the RGTT30 core and it is used for heating the water within steam generator to achieve the temperature of 435 °C. The steam generator is connected to a steam turbine, which is coupled with an electricity generator, for generating electric power of 7.27 MWe. The steam that comes out from the turbine is flowed through condenser for changing the steam into water. The component train of steam generator, turbine, and condenser was given the name of steam turbine system. The turbine consists of blades that are intended to transform the steam power into mechanical power in the form of rotational speed. Turbine efficiency is a parameter that must be considered in this steam turbine system. The aims of this paper are to propose blade of axial type and to analyze the efficiency improvement of the turbine. The method used is the application of the thermodynamic principles associated with conservations of energy and mass. Cycle-Tempo software is used to obtain thermodynamic parameters and to simulate the steam turbine system based on RGTT30. Firstly, a scenario is created to model and simulate the steam turbine system for determining the efficiency and the mass flow rate of steam. The optimal values for the efficiency and the mass flow rates at the speed of 3000 rpm are 87.52 % and 8.759 kg/s, respectively. Then, the steam turbine was given the blade of axial type with a tip diameter of 1580 mm and a length of 150 mm. The results obtained are turbine efficiency increasing to 88.3% on constant speed (3000 rpm. Enhancement in the turbine efficiency value of 0.78% showed raising the overall performance of RGTT30. Keywords: Axial type, steam turbine

  10. Film Cooled Recession of SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Test Development, CFD Modeling and Experimental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Sakowski, Barbara A.; Fisher, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. However, the environmental stability of Si-based ceramics in high pressure, high velocity turbine engine combustion environment is of major concern. The water vapor containing combustion gas leads to accelerated oxidation and corrosion of the SiC based ceramics due to the water vapor reactions with silica (SiO2) scales forming non-protective volatile hydroxide species, resulting in recession of the ceramic components. Although environmental barrier coatings are being developed to help protect the CMC components, there is a need to better understand the fundamental recession behavior of in more realistic cooled engine component environments.In this paper, we describe a comprehensive film cooled high pressure burner rig based testing approach, by using standardized film cooled SiCSiC disc test specimen configurations. The SiCSiC specimens were designed for implementing the burner rig testing in turbine engine relevant combustion environments, obtaining generic film cooled recession rate data under the combustion water vapor conditions, and helping developing the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) film cooled models and performing model validation. Factors affecting the film cooled recession such as temperature, water vapor concentration, combustion gas velocity, and pressure are particularly investigated and modeled, and compared with impingement cooling only recession data in similar combustion flow environments. The experimental and modeling work will help predict the SiCSiC CMC recession behavior, and developing durable CMC systems in complex turbine engine operating conditions.

  11. Disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Boncz (Peter); L. Liu (Lei); M. Tamer Özsu

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractIn disk storage, data is recorded on planar, round and rotating surfaces (disks, discs, or platters). A disk drive is a peripheral device of a computer system, connected by some communication medium to a disk controller. The disk controller is a chip, typically connected to the CPU of

  12. Experimental convective heat transfer characterization of pulsating jet in cross flow: influence of Strouhal number excitation on film cooling effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalizel, Gildas; Sultan, Qaiser; Fénot, Matthieu; Dorignac, Eva

    2012-01-01

    In actual gas turbine system, unsteadiness of the mainstream flow influences heat transfer and surface pressure distribution on the blade. In order to simulate these conditions, an experimental film cooling study with externally imposed pulsation is performed with purpose of characterizing both effects of turbine unsteadiness on film cooling (with frequency ranges typical to actual turbine), and also to figure out the range of Strouhal number pulsation under various blowing conditions, which could possibly deliver a performance improvement in film cooling. Influence of injection flow pulsation on adiabatic effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficient are determined from IR-thermography of the wall for distances to the hole exit between 0 and 30 D.

  13. THE LATE STAGES OF PROTOPLANETARY DISK EVOLUTION: A MILLIMETER SURVEY OF UPPER SCORPIUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathews, Geoffrey S.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Ménard, Francois; Duchêne, Gaspard; Pinte, Christophe; Phillips, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present deep 1.2 mm photometry of 37 stars in the young (5 Myr) Upper Scorpius OB association, sensitive to ∼4 × 10 –3 M Jup of cool millimeter dust. Disks around four low- and solar-mass stars are detected, as well as one debris disk around an intermediate-mass star, with dust masses ranging from 3.6 × 10 –3 to 1.0 × 10 –1 M Jup . The source with the most massive disk exhibits a transition-disk spectral energy distribution. Combining our results with previous studies, we find that the millimeter-detection fraction of Class II sources has significantly decreased from younger ages, and comparison with near-infrared and Hα measurements indicates that the present disks have undergone significant evolution in composition or structure at all radii. The disks of Upper Scorpius represent the tail-end of the depletion of primordial disks; while a few near-solar-mass stars may still sustain giant planet formation, this process has finished around higher mass stars.

  14. ORTURB, HTGR Steam Turbine Dynamic for FSV Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conklin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: ORTURB was written specifically to calculate the dynamic behavior of the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) High- Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) steam turbines. The program is divided into three main parts: the driver subroutine; turbine subroutines to calculate the pressure-flow balance of the high-, intermediate-, and low-pressure turbines; and feedwater heater subroutines. 2 - Method of solution: The program uses a relationship derived for ideal gas flow in an iterative fashion that minimizes computational time to determine the pressure and flow in the FSV steam turbines as a function of plant transient operating conditions. An important computer modeling characteristic, unique to FSV, is that the high-pressure turbine exhaust steam is used to drive the reactor core coolant circulators prior to entering the reheater. A feedwater heater dynamic simulation model utilizing seven state variables for each of the five heaters is included in the ORTURB computer simulation of the regenerative Rankine cycle steam turbines. The seven temperature differential equations are solved at each time- step using a matrix exponential method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The turbine shaft is assumed to rotate at a constant (rated) speed of 3600 rpm. Energy and mass storage of steam in the high-, intermediate-, and low-pressure turbines is assumed to be negligible. These limitations exclude the use of ORTURB during a turbine transient such as startup from zero power or very low turbine flows

  15. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  16. Self-regulating star formation and disk structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopita, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Star formation processes determine the disk structure of galaxies. Stars heavier than about 1 solar mass determine the chemical evolution of the system and are produced at a rate which maintains (by the momentum input of the stars) the phase structure, pressure, and vertical velocity dispersion of the gas. Low mass stars are produced quiescently within molecular clouds, and their associated T-Tauri winds maintain the support of molecular clouds and regulate the star formation rate. Inefficient cooling suppresses this mode of star formation at low metallicity. Applied to the solar neighborhood, such a model can account for age/metallicity relationships, the increase in the O/Fe ratio at low metallicity, the paucity of metal-poor G and K dwarf stars, the missing mass in the disk and, possibly, the existence of a metal-poor thick disk. For other galaxies, it accounts for constant w-velocity dispersion of the gas, the relationship between gas content and specific rates of star formation, the surface brightness/metallicity relationship and for the shallow radial gradients in both star formation rates and HI content. 71 references

  17. Turbomachinery Design Quality Checks to Avoid Friction Induced Structural Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jerry H.

    1999-01-01

    A unique configuration of the P&W SSME Alternate Fuel Turbopump turbine disk/blade assembly, combined with a severe thermal environment, resulted in several structural anomalies that were driven by frictional contact forces. Understanding the mechanics of these problems provides new quality checks for future turbo machinery designs. During development testing in 1997 of the SSME alternate fuel turbopump at Stennis Space Center, several potentially serious problems surfaced with the turbine disk/blade assembly that had not been experienced in extensive earlier testing. Changes to the operational thermal environment were noted based on analytical prediction of modifications that affected performance and on stationary thermal measurements adjacent to the rotor assembly. A detailed structural investigation was required to reveal the mechanism of distress induced by the change. The turbine disk experienced cracking in several locations due to increased thermal gradient induced stress during start and shutdown transients. This was easily predictable using standard analysis procedures and expected once the thermal environment was characterized. What was not expected was the curling of a piston ring used for blade axial retention in the disk, indentation of the axial face of the blade attachment by a spacer separating the first and second stage blades, and most significantly, galling and cracking of the blade root attachment that could have resulted in blade release. Past experience, in gas turbine environments, set a precedent of never relying on friction for help and to evaluate it only in specific instances where it was obvious that it would degrade capability. In each of the three cases above, friction proved to be a determining factor that pushed the components into an unsatisfactory mode of operation. The higher than expected temperatures and rapid thermal transients combined with friction to move beyond past experience. The turbine disk/blade assembly configuration

  18. Microstructure Modeling of 3rd Generation Disk Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this initiative, funded by NASA's Aviation Safety Program, is to model, validate, and predict, with high fidelity, the microstructural evolution of third-generation high-refractory Ni-based disc superalloys during heat treating and service conditions. This initiative is a natural extension of the DARPA-AIM (Accelerated Insertion of Materials) initiative with GE/Pratt-Whitney and with other process simulation tools. Strong collaboration with the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is a key component of this initiative and the focus of this program is on industrially relevant disk alloys and heat treatment processes identified by GRC. Employing QuesTek s Computational Materials Dynamics technology and PrecipiCalc precipitation simulator, physics-based models are being used to achieve high predictive accuracy and precision. Combining these models with experimental data and probabilistic analysis, "virtual alloy design" can be performed. The predicted microstructures can be optimized to promote desirable features and concurrently eliminate nondesirable phases that can limit the reliability and durability of the alloys. The well-calibrated and well-integrated software tools that are being applied under the proposed program will help gas turbine disk alloy manufacturers, processing facilities, and NASA, to efficiently and effectively improve the performance of current and future disk materials.

  19. Control system for NPP powerfull turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipenko, V.D.; Rozhanskij, V.E.; Rokhlenko, V.Yu.

    1985-01-01

    A control system for NPP 1000 MW turbines safety is described. The turbine safety system has a hydraulic drive to actuate in case of increasipg of rotational speed of a turbine rotor and an electrohydraulic drce to operate in case of pressure reduction in the lubrication system, axial displacement deviation, etc. The system is highly reliable due to application of a safety system without slide valves and long-term operation of hydraulic controls in guarding conditions; the system epsures multifunctional control with high accuracy and speed due to application of the intricate electronic part, high speed of response with a limited use of high pressure oil due to application of two-pressure pumps, pneumohydraulic accumulators and oil discharge valves. Steady-state serviceability of the system is maintained by devices for valve cooling dawn. A shockless change from electrohydraulic to hydraulic control channels is provided

  20. X-ray Ionization of Heavy Elements Applied to Protoplanetary Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ádámkovics, Máté; Glassgold, Alfred E.; Meijerink, Rowin

    The consequences of the Auger effect on the population of heavy-element ions are analyzed for the case of relatively cool gas irradiated by keV X-rays with intended applications to the accretion disks of young stellar objects. Highly charged ions are rapidly reduced to the doubly charged state in

  1. Fall-Back Disks in Long and Short GRBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannizo, John K.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present numerical time-dependent calculations for fall-back disks relevant for GRBs in which the disk of material surrounding the black hole (BH) powering the GRB jet modulates the mass flow, and hence the strength of the jet. Given the initial existence of a small mass appr oximately less than 10(exp -4) M(solar) near the progenitor with a circularization radius approximately 10(exp 10) - 10(exp 11) cm, an una voidable consequence will be the formation of an "external disk" whose outer edge continually moves to larger radii due to angular momentum transport and lack of a confining torque. For long GRBs, if the mass distribution in the initial fall-back disk traces the progenitor envelope, then a radius approximates 10(exp 11) cm gives a time scale app roximately 10(exp 4) s for the X-ray plateau. For late times t > 10(exp 7) s a steepening due to a cooling front in the disk may have obser vational support in GRB 060729. For short GRBs, one expects most of t he mass initially to lie at small radii < 10(exp 8) cm; however the presence of even a trace amount approximately 10(exp -9) M(solar) of hi gh angular material can give a brief plateau in the light curve.

  2. RTOD- RADIAL TURBINE OFF-DESIGN PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The RTOD program was developed to accurately predict radial turbine off-design performance. The radial turbine has been used extensively in automotive turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. It is now being given serious consideration for primary powerplant applications. In applications where the turbine will operate over a wide range of power settings, accurate off-design performance prediction is essential for a successful design. RTOD predictions have already illustrated a potential improvement in off-design performance offered by rotor back-sweep for high-work-factor radial turbines. RTOD can be used to analyze other potential performance enhancing design features. RTOD predicts the performance of a radial turbine (with or without rotor blade sweep) as a function of pressure ratio, speed, and stator setting. The program models the flow with the following: 1) stator viscous and trailing edge losses; 2) a vaneless space loss between the stator and the rotor; and 3) rotor incidence, viscous, trailing-edge, clearance, and disk friction losses. The stator and rotor viscous losses each represent the combined effects of profile, endwall, and secondary flow losses. The stator inlet and exit and the rotor inlet flows are modeled by a mean-line analysis, but a sector analysis is used at the rotor exit. The leakage flow through the clearance gap in a pivoting stator is also considered. User input includes gas properties, turbine geometry, and the stator and rotor viscous losses at a reference performance point. RTOD output includes predicted turbine performance over a specified operating range and any user selected flow parameters. The RTOD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 100K of 8 bit bytes. The RTOD program was developed in 1983.

  3. Heat Transfer Measurements for a Film Cooled Turbine Vane Cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Performance of Turbine Airfoils. Journal of Turbomachinery 1998, 120, 522– 529. Arnone, A.; Liou, M.-S.; Povinelli , L. A. Multigrid Calculation of... Povinelli , L. A. Development of an Explicit Multiblock/Multigrid Flow Solver for Viscous Flows in Complex Geometries; AIAA-93-2380; 1993. Wilcox, D. C

  4. Assessment of gas cooled fast reactor with indirect supercritical CO2 cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejzlar, P.; Driscoll, M. J.; Dostal, V.; Dumaz, P.; Poullennec, G.; Alpy, N.

    2006-01-01

    Various indirect power cycle options for a helium cooled Gas cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) with particular focus on a supercritical CO 2 (SCO 2 ) indirect cycle are investigated as an alternative to a helium cooled direct cycle GFR. The Balance Of Plant (BOP) options include helium-nitrogen Brayton cycle, supercritical water Rankine cycle, and SCO 2 recompression Brayton power cycle in three versions: (1) basic design with turbine inlet temperature of 550 .deg. C, (2) advanced design with turbine inlet temperature of 650 .deg. C and (3) advanced design with the same turbine inlet temperature and reduced compressor inlet temperature. The indirect SCO 2 recompression cycle is found attractive since in addition to easier BOP maintenance it allows significant reduction of core outlet temperature, making design of the primary system easier while achieving very attractive efficiencies comparable to or slightly lower than, the efficiency of the reference GFR direct cycle design. In addition, the indirect cycle arrangement allows significant reduction of the GFR 'proximate-containment' and the BOP for the SCO 2 cycle is very compact. Both these factors will lead to reduced capital cost

  5. 900 MW CP1 nuclear steam turbine retrofit thermal effects on low pressure diaphragms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buguin, A.; Gruau, P.; Lamarque, F.; Huggett, J.

    2015-01-01

    The steam turbines of the Koeberg units 1 and 2 operated by ESKOM in South Africa have been retrofitted in order to mitigate the generic problems of stress corrosion cracking of the original shrunk-on disk rotor design. As already done in Belgium and France, the implementation of welded rotors improves the turbine reliability and availability. Moreover, the new technology implemented associated with a new steam path allows a significant performance improvement. With a wealth of experience in CP1 retrofit, ALSTOM has put in place new technical features in the steam path in order to further improve the heat rate. Among them, steam balance holes drilled in the rotor disks have exacerbated the thermal sensitivity of the LP diaphragms. During the commissioning of the Unit 1 LP turbines following the retrofit, the load increase led to unacceptable vibrations. An investigation program was launched to determine the root causes of the problem. This paper presents the findings following the turbine inspection, as well as the recommendations and modifications to allow a smooth return to service of the unit. In addition, the results of the root cause analysis of the vibration incident are explained. Based on finite element calculations and site measurements, ALSTOM has established that the diaphragm thermal behavior, intensified by the steam balance holes, has led to radial rubbing. It was also established that the phenomena had no effect on the diaphragms mechanical integrity. Design changes have been proposed to ensure a safe and reliable long term operation of the units. These modifications have been successfully implemented onto the Koeberg Unit 2 Nuclear Steam Turbine commissioned in November 2012. (authors)

  6. Relationship between turbine rotor and disk metallurgical characteristics and stress corrosion cracking behavior. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gayley, H.B.

    1986-09-01

    This report describes stress corrosion test results in which several heats of turbine rotor steels specially prepared to achieve different degrees of segregation to the grain boundaries were tested in concentrated laboratory and actual steam turbine environments. Grain boundary characteristics are considered important because turbine rotor failures in field service have been of an intergranular nature and because grain boundary segregation is known to affect the impact toughness of rotor steels (''temper embrittlement''). The laboratory stress corrosion testing results showed no differences between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces which differed greatly in impact toughness. All test specimens cracked, indicating the laboratory environments may have been too severe to allow differentiation between the various metallurgical conditions, if any differences exist. Test loops and autoclaves for chemical analysis and mechanical testing were designed, installed and are operating in the field testing portion of this program. No intergranular cracking has occurred to date; hence, no differentiation between heavily and lightly segregated test pieces has been possible in field testing. Instrumented crack propagation specimens, which permit measurement of cracking as it occurs, have been installed for the continuing field testing program. Correlation of such cracking with the continuously monitored chemical composition of the environment will increase understanding of the cracking process and may give the possibility of providing an early warning of the existence of conditions which might cause turbine rotor cracking

  7. Direct implementation of an axial-flow helium gas turbine tool in a system analysis tool for HTGRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Hwan; No, Hee Cheon; Kim, Hyeun Min; Lim, Hong Sik

    2008-01-01

    This study concerns the development of dynamic models for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) through direct implementation of a gas turbine analysis code with a transient analysis code. We have developed a streamline curvature analysis code based on the Newton-Raphson numerical application (SANA) to analyze the off-design performance of helium gas turbines under conditions of normal operation. The SANA code performs a detailed two-dimensional analysis by means of throughflow calculation with allowances for losses in axial-flow multistage compressors and turbines. To evaluate the performance in the steady-state and load transient of HTGRs, we developed GAMMA-T by implementing SANA in the transient system code, GAMMA, which is a multidimensional, multicomponent analysis tool for HTGRs. The reactor, heat exchangers, and connecting pipes were designed with a one-dimensional thermal-hydraulic model that uses the GAMMA code. We assessed GAMMA-T by comparing its results with the steady-state results of the GTHTR300 of JAEA. We concluded that the results are in good agreement, including the results of the vessel cooling bypass flow and the turbine cooling flow

  8. Progress of a Cross-Correlation Based Optical Strain Measurement Technique for Detecting Radial Growth on a Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Michelle M.; Woike, Mark R.; Abdul-Aziz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Aeronautical Sciences Project under NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program is interested in the development of novel measurement technologies, such as optical surface measurements for the in situ health monitoring of critical constituents of the internal flow path. In situ health monitoring has the potential to detect flaws, i.e. cracks in key components, such as engine turbine disks, before the flaws lead to catastrophic failure. The present study, aims to further validate and develop an optical strain measurement technique to measure the radial growth and strain field of an already cracked disk, mimicking the geometry of a sub-scale turbine engine disk, under loaded conditions in the NASA Glenn Research Center's High Precision Rotordynamics Laboratory. The technique offers potential fault detection by imaging an applied high-contrast random speckle pattern under unloaded and loaded conditions with a CCD camera. Spinning the cracked disk at high speeds (loaded conditions) induces an external load, resulting in a radial growth of the disk of approximately 50.0-µm in the flawed region and hence, a localized strain field. When imaging the cracked disk under static conditions, the disk will be undistorted; however, during rotation the cracked region will grow radially, thus causing the applied particle pattern to be 'shifted'. The resulting particle displacements between the two images is measured using the two-dimensional cross-correlation algorithms implemented in standard Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) software to track the disk growth, which facilitates calculation of the localized strain field. A random particle distribution is adhered onto the surface of the cracked disk and two bench top experiments are carried out to evaluate the technique's ability to measure the induced particle displacements. The disk is shifted manually using a translation stage equipped with a fine micrometer and a hotplate is used to induce thermal growth of the disk, causing the

  9. Risk-based and maintenance systems for steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyama, K.; Nagai, S.; Akikuni, Y.; Fujiwara, T.; Furuya, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Takagi, K.; Kawabata, T.

    2003-01-01

    The risk-based maintenance (RBM) system has been developed for steam turbine plants coupled with the quick inspection systems. The RBM system utilizes the field failure and inspection database accumulated over 30 years. The failure modes are determined for each component of steam turbines and the failure scenarios are described as event trees. The probability of failure is expressed in the form of unreliability functions of operation hours or start-up cycles through the cumulative hazard function method. The posterior unreliability is derived from the field data analysis according to the inspection information. Quick inspection can be conducted using air-cooled borescope and heat resistant ultrasonic sensors even if the turbine is not cooled down sufficiently. Another inspection information comes from degradation and damage measurement. The probabilistic life assessment using structural analysis and statistical material properties, the latter is estimated from hardness measurement, replica observation and embrittlement measurement. The risk function is calculated as the sum product of unreliability functions and expected monetary loss as the consequence of failure along event trees. The optimum maintenance plan is determined among simulated scenarios described through component breakdown trees, life cycle event trees and risk functions. Those methods are effective for total condition assessment and economical maintenance for operating plants. (orig.)

  10. Anti-freezing of air-cooled heat exchanger by switching off sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Weijia; Kong, Yanqiang; Huang, Xianwei; Yang, Lijun; Du, Xiaoze; Yang, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The anti-freezing of air-cooled heat exchanger by switching off sectors is studied. • The water side heat loads of various sectors are compared for different cases. • Anti-freezing turbine back pressure is proposed and obtained for various cases. • As wind speed increases, the energy efficiency can be clearly improved by sector off. • By switching frontal sector off, anti-freezing operation is most energy efficient. - Abstract: With the air side huge heat transfer surface, the air-cooled heat exchanger will take a serious freezing risk in cold winter. Therefore, it is of benefit to the safe operation of natural draft dry cooling system to propose the anti-freezing measures. In this work, the flow and heat transfer models of the cooling air coupling with the circulating water, are developed and numerically simulated for the anti-freezing by switching various sectors off. The local thermo-flow fields of cooling air are presented, and the water side heat loads of various sectors are compared for various cases. The anti-freezing turbine back pressure is proposed and obtained for the energy efficiency analysis. The results show that the sector switching off approach can effectively prevent the air-cooled heat exchanger from freezing and improve the energy efficiency of the cooling system, especially at high wind speeds. Moreover, with the frontal sector switching off, the most energy efficient anti-freezing operation of natural draft dry cooling system can be achieved.

  11. IR thermocycler for centrifugal microfluidic platform with direct on-disk wireless temperature measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, J.; Gross, A.; Mark, D.; Roth, G.; von Stetten, F.; Zengerle, R.

    2011-06-01

    The direct on-disk wireless temperature measurement system [1,2] presented at μTAS 2010 was further improved in its robustness. We apply it to an IR thermocycler as part of a centrifugal microfluidic analyzer for polymerase chain reactions (PCR). This IR thermocycler allows the very efficient direct heating of aqueous liquids in microfluidic cavities by an IR radiation source. The efficiency factor of this IR heating system depends on several parameters. First there is the efficiency of the IR radiator considering the transformation of electrical energy into radiation energy. This radiation energy needs to be focused by a reflector to the center of the cavity. Both, the reflectors shape and the quality of the reflecting layer affect the efficiency. On the way to the center of the cavity the radiation energy will be diminished by absorption in the surrounding air/humidity and especially in the cavity lid of the microfluidic disk. The transmission spectrum of the lid material and its thickness is of significant impact. We chose a COC polymer film with a thickness of 150 μm. At a peak frequency of the IR radiator of ~2 μm approximately 85 % of the incoming radiation energy passes the lid and is absorbed within the first 1.5 mm depth of liquid in the cavity. As we perform the thermocycling for a PCR, after heating to the denaturation temperature of ~ 92 °C we need to cool down rapidly to the primer annealing temperature of ~ 55 °C. Cooling is realized by 3 ventilators venting air of room temperature into the disk chamber. Due to the air flow itself and an additional rotation of the centrifugal microfluidic disk the PCR reagents in the cavities are cooled by forced air convection. Simulation studies based upon analogous electrical models enable to optimize the disk geometry and the optical path. Both the IR heater and the ventilators are controlled by the digital PID controller HAPRO 0135 [3]. The sampling frequency is set to 2 Hz. It could be further increased up

  12. Basic design of a rotating disk centrifugal atomizer for uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzari, Silvio

    2001-01-01

    One of the most used techniques to produce metallic powders is the centrifugal atomization with a rotating disk. This process is employ to fabricate ductile metallic particles of uranium-molybdenum alloys (typically U- 7 % Mo, by weight) for nuclear fuel elements for research and testing reactors. These alloys exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (γ phase) which is stable above 700 C degrees and can be retained at room temperature. The rotating disk centrifugal atomization allows a rapid solidification of spherical metallic droplets of about 40 to 100 μm, considered adequate to manufacture nuclear fuel elements. Besides the thermo-physical properties of both the alloy and the cooling gas, the main parameters of the process are the radius of the disk (R), the diameter of the atomization chamber (D), the disk rotation speed (ω), the liquid volume flow rate (Q) and the superheating of the liquid (ΔT). In this work, they were applied approximate analytical models to estimate the optimal geometrical and operative parameters to obtain spherical metallic powder of U- 7 % Mo alloy. Three physical phenomena were considerate: the liquid metal flow along the surface of the disk, the fragmentation and spheroidization of the droplets and the cooling and solidification of the droplets. The principal results are the more suitable gas is helium; R ≅ 20 mm; D ≥ 1 m; ≅ 20,000 - 50,000 rpm; Q ≅ 4 - 10 cm 3 /s; ΔT ≅ 100 - 200 C degrees. By applying the relevant non-dimensional parameters governing the main physical phenomena, the conclusion is that the more appropriate non-radioactive metal to simulate the atomization of U- 7 % Mo is gold [es

  13. Sealing apparatus for airfoils of gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R.B.

    1998-05-19

    An improved airfoil tip sealing apparatus is disclosed wherein brush seals are attached to airfoil tips with the distal ends of the brush seal fibers sealingly contacting opposing wall surfaces. Embodiments for variable vanes, stators and both cooled and uncooled turbine blade applications are disclosed. 17 figs.

  14. Dusty disks around central stars of planetary nebulae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Geoffrey C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); De Marco, Orsola [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Nordhaus, Jason [Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation, and National Technical Institute for the Deaf, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Green, Joel [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas, 1 University Station, C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Sand 1, D-72076 Tübingen (Germany); Chu, You-Hua, E-mail: gclayton@fenway.phys.lsu.edu, E-mail: orsola@science.mq.edu.au, E-mail: nordhaus@astro.rit.edu, E-mail: joel@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: rauch@astro.uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: werner@astro.uni-tuebingen.de, E-mail: chu@astro.uiuc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Only a few percent of cool, old white dwarfs (WDs) have infrared excesses interpreted as originating in small hot disks due to the infall and destruction of single asteroids that come within the star's Roche limit. Infrared excesses at 24 μm were also found to derive from the immediate vicinity of younger, hot WDs, most of which are still central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe). The incidence of CSPNe with this excess is 18%. The Helix CSPN, with a 24 μm excess, has been suggested to have a disk formed from collisions of Kuiper belt-like objects (KBOs). In this paper, we have analyzed an additional sample of CSPNe to look for similar infrared excesses. These CSPNe are all members of the PG 1159 class and were chosen because their immediate progenitors are known to often have dusty environments consistent with large dusty disks. We find that, overall, PG 1159 stars do not present such disks more often than other CSPNe, although the statistics (five objects) are poor. We then consider the entire sample of CSPNe with infrared excesses and compare it to the infrared properties of old WDs, as well as cooler post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We conclude with the suggestion that the infrared properties of CSPNe more plausibly derive from AGB-formed disks rather than disks formed via the collision of KBOs, although the latter scenario cannot be ruled out. Finally, there seems to be an association between CSPNe with a 24 μm excess and confirmed or possible binarity of the central star.

  15. ON SHOCKS DRIVEN BY HIGH-MASS PLANETS IN RADIATIVELY INEFFICIENT DISKS. II. THREE-DIMENSIONAL GLOBAL DISK SIMULATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyra, Wladimir; Richert, Alexander J. W.; Boley, Aaron; Turner, Neal; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Flock, Mario; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recent high-resolution, near-infrared images of protoplanetary disks have shown that these disks often present spiral features. Spiral arms are among the structures predicted by models of disk–planet interaction and thus it is tempting to suspect that planetary perturbers are responsible for these signatures. However, such interpretation is not free of problems. The observed spirals have large pitch angles, and in at least one case (HD 100546) it appears effectively unpolarized, implying thermal emission of the order of 1000 K (465 ± 40 K at closer inspection). We have recently shown in two-dimensional models that shock dissipation in the supersonic wake of high-mass planets can lead to significant heating if the disk is sufficiently adiabatic. Here we extend this analysis to three dimensions in thermodynamically evolving disks. We use the Pencil Code in spherical coordinates for our models, with a prescription for thermal cooling based on the optical depth of the local vertical gas column. We use a 5M J planet, and show that shocks in the region around the planet where the Lindblad resonances occur heat the gas to substantially higher temperatures than the ambient gas. The gas is accelerated vertically away from the midplane to form shock bores, and the gas falling back toward the midplane breaks up into a turbulent surf. This turbulence, although localized, has high α values, reaching 0.05 in the inner Lindblad resonance, and 0.1 in the outer one. We find evidence that the disk regions heated up by the shocks become superadiabatic, generating convection far from the planet’s orbit

  16. Power generation from wind turbines in a solar chimney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foote, Tudor [Graduate Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States); Agarwal, Ramesh K. [William Palm Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University in St. Louis, Jolley Hall, Campus Box 1185, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that shrouded wind turbines can generate greater power compared to bare turbines. A solar chimney generates an upward draft of wind inside a tower and a shroud around the wind turbine. There are numerous empty silos on farms in the U.S. that can be converted to solar chimneys with minor modifications at modest cost. The objective of this study is to determine the potential of these silos/chimneys for generating wind power. The study is conducted through analytical/computational approach by employing the commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. Computations are performed for five different geometric configurations consisting of a turbine, a cylindrical silo, and/or a venturi and/or a diffuser using the dimensions of typical silos and assuming Class 3 wind velocity. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with the Boussinesq approximation and a two equation realizable {kappa}-{epsilon} model are employed in the calculations, and the turbine is modeled as an actuator disk. The power coefficient (Cp) and generated power are calculated for the five cases. Consistent with recent literature, it was found that the silos with diffusers increase the Cp beyond Betz’s limit significantly and thus the generated power. It should be noted that Cp is calculated by normalizing it by the turbine area swept by the wind. This study shows the potential of using abandoned silos in the mid-west and other parts of the country for localized wind power generation.

  17. Inverse Design of Single- and Multi-Rotor Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Blades using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Moghadassian, Behnam; Sharma, Anupam

    2017-01-01

    A method for inverse design of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWTs) is presented in this paper. The direct solver for aerodynamic analysis solves the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) equations, where the effect of the turbine rotor is modeled as momentum sources using the actuator disk model (ADM); this approach is referred to as RANS/ADM. The inverse problem is posed as follows: for a given selection of airfoils, the objective is to find the blade geometry (described as blade twist an...

  18. Methods and apparatus for cooling wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamah, Samir A [Niskayuna, NY; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya [Rexford, NY; Garg, Jivtesh [Schenectady, NY; Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran [Niskayuna, NY; Jansen, Patrick Lee [Alplaus, NY; Carl, Jr., Ralph James

    2008-10-28

    A wind turbine generator includes a stator having a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis. A rotor is rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis, and the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to the rotor and cooperating with the stator windings. The magnetic elements are configured to generate a magnetic field and the stator windings are configured to interact with the magnetic field to generate a voltage in the stator windings. A heat pipe assembly thermally engaging one of the stator and the rotor to dissipate heat generated in the stator or rotor.

  19. The development of air cooled condensation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodas, J.

    1990-01-01

    EGI - Contracting/Engineering has had experience with the development of air cooled condensing systems since the 1950's. There are two accepted types of dry cooling systems,the direct and the indirect ones. Due to the fact that the indirect system has several advantages over the direct one, EGI's purpose was to develop an economic, reliable and efficient type of indirect cooling system, both for industrial and power station applications. Apart from system development, the main components of dry cooling plant have been developed as well. These are: the water-to-air heat exchangers; the direct contact (DC, or jet) condenser; the cooling water circulating pumps and recovery turbines; and the peak cooling/preheating units. As a result of this broad development work which was connected with intensive market activity, EGI has supplied about 50% of the dry cooling plants employed for large power stations all over the world. This means that today the cumulated capacity of power units using Heller type dry cooling systems supplied and contracted by EGI is over 6000 MW

  20. Progress in Protective Coatings for Aircraft Gas Turbines: A Review of NASA Sponsored Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merutka, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Problems associated with protective coatings for advanced aircraft gas turbines are reviewed. Metallic coatings for preventing titanium fires in compressors are identified. Coatings for turbine section are also considered, Ductile aluminide coatings for protecting internal turbine-blade cooling passage surface are also identified. Composite modified external overlay MCrAlY coatings deposited by low-pressure plasma spraying are found to be better in surface protection capability than vapor deposited MCrAlY coatings. Thermal barrier coating (TBC), studies are presented. The design of a turbine airfoil is integrated with a TBC, and computer-aided manufacturing technology is applied.

  1. Conceptual design of a commercial supercritical CO2 gas turbine for the fast reactor power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muto, Y.; Ishizuka, T.; Aritomi, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the design results of turbine and compressors of a supercritical CO 2 gas turbine connected to the commercial sodium cooled fast reactor. Power output of the gas turbine-generator system is 750 MWe. The system consists of turbine, main compressor and bypass compressor. Turbine is axial flow type. Both axial flow and centrifugal compressors were designed. Aerodynamic, blade strength and rotor dynamics calculations were conducted. Achievable adiabatic efficiencies and cross-sectional structures are given. For this design conditions, the axial flow compressor is superior to the centrifugal compressor due to the large mass flow rate. (authors)

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of a combined gas turbine, ORC cycle and absorption refrigeration for a CCHP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammadi, Amin; Kasaeian, Alibakhsh; Pourfayaz, Fathollah; Ahmadi, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermodynamic analysis of a hybrid CCHP system. • Sensitivity analysis is performed on the most important parameters of the system. • Pressure ratio and gas turbine inlet temperature are the most effective parameters. - Abstract: Hybrid power systems are gained more attention due to their better performance and higher efficiency. Widespread use of these systems improves environmental situation as they reduce the amount of fossil fuel consumption. In this paper a hybrid system composed of a gas turbine, an ORC cycle and an absorption refrigeration cycle is proposed as a combined cooling, heating and power system for residential usage. Thermodynamic analysis is applied on the system. Also a parametric analysis is carried out to investigate the effect of different parameters on the system performance and output cooling, heating and power. The results show that under design conditions, the proposed plant can produce 30 kW power, 8 kW cooling and almost 7.2 ton hot water with an efficiency of 67.6%. Moreover, parametric analysis shows that pressure ratio and gas turbine inlet temperature are the most important and influential parameters. After these two, ORC turbine inlet temperature is the most effective parameter as it can change both net output power and energy efficiency of the system.

  3. Energy efficient engine high pressure turbine test hardware detailed design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halila, E. E.; Lenahan, D. T.; Thomas, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    The high pressure turbine configuration for the Energy Efficient Engine is built around a two-stage design system. Moderate aerodynamic loading for both stages is used to achieve the high level of turbine efficiency. Flowpath components are designed for 18,000 hours of life, while the static and rotating structures are designed for 36,000 hours of engine operation. Both stages of turbine blades and vanes are air-cooled incorporating advanced state of the art in cooling technology. Direct solidification (DS) alloys are used for blades and one stage of vanes, and an oxide dispersion system (ODS) alloy is used for the Stage 1 nozzle airfoils. Ceramic shrouds are used as the material composition for the Stage 1 shroud. An active clearance control (ACC) system is used to control the blade tip to shroud clearances for both stages. Fan air is used to impinge on the shroud casing support rings, thereby controlling the growth rate of the shroud. This procedure allows close clearance control while minimizing blade tip to shroud rubs.

  4. FY 1998 annual report. Research and development on ceramic gas turbine (300kW class)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    Research and development have been made on a small ceramic gas turbine which is high in efficiency, low in pollutant emission, capable of corresponding to different fuels, and can be utilized in cogeneration and/or movable electric power generation systems. Fundamental researches in developing and researching heat resistant ceramic parts have been carried out on a method for fabricating turbine nozzles using heat resistant silicon nitride, improvement in accuracy in fabricating combustors using the heat resistant silicon nitride, and casting of turbine blades made from sialon. In developing the devices, researches were made on reliability of bond between a ceramic blade and a metallic disk, air-fuel ratio in a combustor, distribution of fuel concentrations, fuel injection methods, reduction of loss in a diffuser in a compressor, and matching of the diffuser with an impeller. In addition, research and development were performed on a single shaft ceramic gas turbine for cogeneration and a double shaft ceramic gas turbine. Researches were executed on reliability of ceramic materials. (NEDO)

  5. ABSENCE OF SIGNIFICANT COOL DISKS IN YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS EXHIBITING REPETITIVE OPTICAL OUTBURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Hirano, Naomi; Takami, Michihiro; Dong, Ruobing [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Carrasco-González, Carlos [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, A.P. 3-72, Xangari, Morelia, 58089 (Mexico); Vorobyov, Eduard I. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180, Vienna (Austria); Kóspál, Ágnes [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Dunham, Michael M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS 78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Henning, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie Königstuhl, 17 D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Hashimoto, Jun [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 Japan (Japan); Hasegawa, Yasuhiro, E-mail: baobabyoo@gmail.com [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    We report Submillimeter Array 1.3 mm high angular resolution observations toward the four EXor-type outbursting young stellar objects VY Tau, V1118 Ori, V1143 Ori, and NY Ori. The data mostly show low dust masses M{sub dust} in the associated circumstellar disks. Among the sources, NY Ori possesses a relatively massive disk with M{sub dust} ∼ 9 × 10{sup −4}M{sub ⊙}. V1118 Ori has a marginal detection equivalent to M{sub dust} ∼ 6 × 10{sup −5}M{sub ⊙}. V1143 Ori has a non-detection also equivalent to M{sub dust} < 6 × 10{sup −5}M{sub ⊙}. For the nearest source, VY Tau, we get a surprising non-detection that provides a stringent upper limit M{sub dust} < 6 × 10{sup −6}M{sub ⊙}. We interpret our findings as suggesting that the gas and dust reservoirs that feed the short-duration, repetitive optical outbursts seen in some EXors may be limited to the small-scale, innermost region of their circumstellar disks. This hot dust may have escaped our detection limits. Follow-up, more sensitive millimeter observations are needed to improve our understanding of the triggering mechanisms of EXor-type outbursts.

  6. Design and field operation of 1175 MW steam turbine for Ohi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Yoshio; Nakagami, Yasuo; Fujii, Hisashi; Shibanai, Hirooki.

    1980-01-01

    Two 1175 MW steam turbine and generator units have been successfully in commercial operation since March 1979 and December 1979 respectively at Ohi Nuclear Power Station of the Kansai Electric Power Company. Those units, the largest in their respective outputs in Japan, have also such remarkable design features as two-stage reheat, nozzle governing turbine, water cooled generator stator and turbine-driven feedwater pumps. This paper covers design features and some topics of various pre-operational tests of the above-mentioned units. (author)

  7. Chemistry in an evolving protoplanetary disk: Effects on terrestrial planet composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriarty, John; Fischer, Debra; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2014-01-01

    The composition of planets is largely determined by the chemical and dynamical evolution of the disk during planetesimal formation and growth. To predict the diversity of exoplanet compositions, previous works modeled planetesimal composition as the equilibrium chemical composition of a protoplanetary disk at a single time. However, planetesimals form over an extended period of time, during which elements sequentially condense out of the gas as the disk cools and are accreted onto planetesimals. To account for the evolution of the disk during planetesimal formation, we couple models of disk chemistry and dynamics with a prescription for planetesimal formation. We then follow the growth of these planetesimals into terrestrial planets with N-body simulations of late-stage planet formation to evaluate the effect of sequential condensation on the bulk composition of planets. We find that our model produces results similar to those of earlier models for disks with C/O ratios close to the solar value (0.54). However, in disks with C/O ratios greater than 0.8, carbon-rich planetesimals form throughout a much larger radial range of the disk. Furthermore, our model produces carbon-rich planetesimals in disks with C/O ratios as low as ∼0.65, which is not possible in the static equilibrium chemistry case. These results suggest that (1) there may be a large population of short-period carbon-rich planets around moderately carbon-enhanced stars (0.65 < C/O < 0.8) and (2) carbon-rich planets can form throughout the terrestrial planet region around carbon-rich stars (C/O > 0.8).

  8. DID FOMALHAUT, HR 8799, AND HL TAURI FORM PLANETS VIA THE GRAVITATIONAL INSTABILITY? PLACING LIMITS ON THE REQUIRED DISK MASSES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, D.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Disk fragmentation resulting from the gravitational instability has been proposed as an efficient mechanism for forming giant planets. We use the planet Fomalhaut b, the triple-planetary system HR 8799, and the potential protoplanet associated with HL Tau to test the viability of this mechanism. We choose the above systems since they harbor planets with masses and orbital characteristics favored by the fragmentation mechanism. We do not claim that these planets must have formed as the result of fragmentation, rather the reverse: if planets can form from disk fragmentation, then these systems are consistent with what we should expect to see. We use the orbital characteristics of these recently discovered planets, along with a new technique to more accurately determine the disk cooling times, to place both lower and upper limits on the disk surface density-and thus mass-required to form these objects by disk fragmentation. Our cooling times are over an order of magnitude shorter than those of Rafikov, which makes disk fragmentation more feasible for these objects. We find that the required mass interior to the planet's orbital radius is ∼0.1 M sun for Fomalhaut b, the protoplanet orbiting HL Tau, and the outermost planet of HR 8799. The two inner planets of HR 8799 probably could not have formed in situ by disk fragmentation.

  9. Film Cooling Optimization Using Numerical Computation of the Compressible Viscous Flow Equations and Simplex Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Elsayed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Film cooling is vital to gas turbine blades to protect them from high temperatures and hence high thermal stresses. In the current work, optimization of film cooling parameters on a flat plate is investigated numerically. The effect of film cooling parameters such as inlet velocity direction, lateral and forward diffusion angles, blowing ratio, and streamwise angle on the cooling effectiveness is studied, and optimum cooling parameters are selected. The numerical simulation of the coolant flow through flat plate hole system is carried out using the “CFDRC package” coupled with the optimization algorithm “simplex” to maximize overall film cooling effectiveness. Unstructured finite volume technique is used to solve the steady, three-dimensional and compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The results are compared with the published numerical and experimental data of a cylindrically round-simple hole, and the results show good agreement. In addition, the results indicate that the average overall film cooling effectiveness is enhanced by decreasing the streamwise angle for high blowing ratio and by increasing the lateral and forward diffusion angles. Optimum geometry of the cooling hole on a flat plate is determined. In addition, numerical simulations of film cooling on actual turbine blade are performed using the flat plate optimal hole geometry.

  10. Experimental Evaluation of Cermet Turbine Stator Blades for Use at Elevated Gas Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarito, Patrick T.; Johnston, James R.

    1959-01-01

    The suitability of cermets for turbine stator blades of a modified turbojet engine was determined at an average turbine-inlet-gas temperature of 2000 F. Such an increase in temperature would yield a premium in thrust from a service engine. Because the cermet blades require no cooling, all the available compressor bleed air could be used to cool a turbine made from conventional ductile alloys. Cermet blades were first run in 100-hour endurance tests at normal gas temperatures in order to evaluate two methods for mounting them. The elevated gas-temperature test was then run using the method of support considered best for high-temperature operation. After 52 hours at 2000 F, one of the group of four cermet blades fractured probably because of end loads resulting from thermal distortion of the spacer band of the nozzle diaphragm. Improved design of a service engine would preclude this cause of premature failure.

  11. Computer optimization of dry and wet/dry cooling tower systems for large fossil and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, M.; Glicksman, L.R.

    1979-02-01

    This study determined the cost of dry cooling compared to the conventional cooling methods. Also, the savings by using wet/dry instead of all-dry cooling were determined. A total optimization was performed for power plants with dry cooling tower systems using metal-finned-tube heat exchangers and surface condensers. The optimization minimizes the power production cost. The program optimizes the design of the heat exchanger and its air and water flow rates. In the base case study, the method of replacing lost capacity assumes the use of gas turbines. As a result of using dry cooling towers in an 800 MWe fossil plant, the incremental costs with the use of high back pressure turbine and conventional turbine over all-wet cooling are 11 and 15%, respectively. For a 1200 MWe nuclear plant, these are 22 and 25%, respectively. Since the method of making up lost capacity depends on the situation of a utility, considerable effort has been placed on testing the effects of using different methods of replacing lost capacity at high ambient temperatures by purchased energy. The results indicate that the optimization is very sensitive to the method of making up lost capacity. It is, therefore, important to do an accurate representation of all possible methods of making up capacity loss when optimizating power plants with dry cooling towers. A solution for the problem of losing generation capability by a power plant due to the use of a dry cooling tower is to supplement the dry tower during the hours of peak ambient temperatures by a wet tower. A separate wet/dry cooling tower system with series tower arrangement was considered in this study, and proved to be an economic choice over all-dry cooling where some water is available but supplies are insufficient for a totally evaporative cooling tower

  12. Gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration; Turbina de gas reactor modular con helio en cogeneracion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon de los Santos, G. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Division de Ingenieria Electrica, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: tesgleon@gmail.com

    2009-10-15

    This work carries out the thermal evaluation from the conversion of nuclear energy to electric power and process heat, through to implement an outline gas turbine modular helium reactor in cogeneration. Modeling and simulating with software Thermo flex of Thermo flow the performance parameters, based on a nuclear power plant constituted by an helium cooled reactor and helium gas turbine with three compression stages, two of inter cooling and one regeneration stage; more four heat recovery process, generating two pressure levels of overheat vapor, a pressure level of saturated vapor and one of hot water, with energetic characteristics to be able to give supply to a very wide gamma of industrial processes. Obtaining a relationship heat electricity of 0.52 and efficiency of net cogeneration of 54.28%, 70.2 MW net electric, 36.6 MW net thermal with 35% of condensed return to 30 C; for a supplied power by reactor of 196.7 MW; and with conditions in advanced gas turbine of 850 C and 7.06 Mpa, assembly in a shaft, inter cooling and heat recovery in cogeneration. (Author)

  13. Feasibility of Ericsson type isothermal expansion/compression gas turbine cycle for nuclear energy use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Akihiko

    2007-01-01

    A gas turbine with potential demand for the next generation nuclear energy use such as HTGR power plants, a gas cooled FBR, a gas cooled nuclear fusion reactor uses helium as working gas and with a closed cycle. Materials constituting a cycle must be set lower than allowable temperature in terms of mechanical strength and radioactivity containment performance and so expansion inlet temperature is remarkably limited. For thermal efficiency improvement, isothermal expansion/isothermal compression Ericsson type gas turbine cycle should be developed using wet surface of an expansion/compressor casing and a duct between stators without depending on an outside heat exchanger performing multistage re-heat/multistage intermediate cooling. Feasibility of an Ericsson cycle in comparison with a Brayton cycle and multi-stage compression/expansion cycle was studied and technologies to be developed were clarified. (author)

  14. Development of High-Powered Steam Turbines by OAO NPO Central Research and Design Institute for Boilers and Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V. E.; Khomenok, L. A.; Kovalev, I. A.

    2018-01-01

    The article provides an overview of the developments by OAO NPO TsKTI aimed at improvement of components and assemblies of new-generation turbine plants for ultra-supercritical steam parameters to be installed at the power-generating facilities in service. The list of the assemblies under development includes cylinder shells, the cylinder's flow paths and rotors, seals, bearings, and rotor cooling systems. The authors consider variants of the shafting-cylinder configurations for which advanced high-pressure and intermediate-pressure cylinders with reactive blading and low-pressure cylinders of conventional design and with counter-current steam flows are proposed and high-pressure rotors, which can increase the economic efficiency and reduce the overall turbine plant dimensions. Materials intended for the equipment components that operate at high temperatures and a steam cooling technique that allows the use of cheaper steel grades owing to the reduction in the metal's working temperature are proposed. A new promising material for the bearing surfaces is described that enables the operation at higher unit pressures. The material was tested on a full-scale test bench at OAO NPO TsKTI and a turbine in operation. Ways of controlling the erosion of the blades in the moisture-steam turbine compartments by the steam heating of the hollow guide blades are considered. To ensure the dynamic stability of the shafting, shroud and diaphragm seals that prevent the development of the destabilizing circulatory forces of the steam flow were devised and trialed. Advanced instrumentation and software are proposed to monitor the condition of the blading and thermal stresses under transient conditions, to diagnose the vibration processes, and to archive the obtained data. Attention is paid to the normalization of the electromagnetic state of the plant in order to prevent the electrolytic erosion of the plant components. The instrumentation intended for monitoring the relevant electric

  15. Disk brake design for cooling improvement using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munisamy, Kannan M; Shafik, Ramel

    2013-01-01

    The car disk brake design is improved with two different blade designs compared to the baseline blade design. The two designs were simulated in Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain heat transfer properties such as Nusselt number and Heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer property is compared against the baseline design. The improved shape has the highest heat transfer performance. The curved design is inferior to baseline design in heat transfer performance.

  16. Disk brake design for cooling improvement using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munisamy, Kannan M.; Shafik, Ramel

    2013-06-01

    The car disk brake design is improved with two different blade designs compared to the baseline blade design. The two designs were simulated in Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to obtain heat transfer properties such as Nusselt number and Heat transfer coefficient. The heat transfer property is compared against the baseline design. The improved shape has the highest heat transfer performance. The curved design is inferior to baseline design in heat transfer performance.

  17. Performance Analysis of an Updraft Tower System for Dry Cooling in Large-Scale Power Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haotian Liu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An updraft tower cooling system is assessed for elimination of water use associated with power plant heat rejection. Heat rejected from the power plant condenser is used to warm the air at the base of an updraft tower; buoyancy-driven air flows through a recuperative turbine inside the tower. The secondary loop, which couples the power plant condenser to a heat exchanger at the tower base, can be configured either as a constant-pressure pump cycle or a vapor compression cycle. The novel use of a compressor can elevate the air temperature in the tower base to increases the turbine power recovery and decrease the power plant condensing temperature. The system feasibility is evaluated by comparing the net power needed to operate the system versus alternative dry cooling schemes. A thermodynamic model coupling all system components is developed for parametric studies and system performance evaluation. The model predicts that constant-pressure pump cycle consumes less power than using a compressor; the extra compression power required for temperature lift is much larger than the gain in turbine power output. The updraft tower system with a pumped secondary loop can allow dry cooling with less power plant efficiency penalty compared to air-cooled condensers.

  18. Design and field operation of 1175 MW steam turbine for Ohi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Y.; Nakagami, Y.; Fujii, H.; Shibanai, H.

    1980-01-01

    Two 1,175 MW steam turbine and generator units have been successfully in commercial operation since March 1979 and December 1979 respectively at Ohi Nuclear Power Station of the Kansai Electric Power Company. Those units, the largest in their respective outputs in Japan, have also such remarkable design features as two-stage reheat, nozzle governing turbine, water cooled generator stator and turbine-driven feedwater pumps. This paper covers design features and some topics of various pre-operational tests of the above-mentioned units. (author)

  19. Risk-based inspection and maintenance systems for steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiyama, Kazunari; Nagai, Satoshi; Akikuni, Yasunari; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Furuya, Kenichiro; Matsumoto, Shigeru; Takagi, Kentaro; Kawabata, Taro

    2004-01-01

    The risk-based maintenance (RBM) system has been developed for steam turbine plants coupled with the quick inspection systems. The RBM system utilizes the field failure and inspection database accumulated over 30 years. The failure modes are determined for each component of steam turbines and the failure scenarios are described as event trees. The probability of failure is expressed in the form of unreliability functions of operation hours or start-up cycles through the cumulative hazard function method. The posterior unreliability is derived from the field data analysis according to the inspection information. Quick inspection can be conducted using air-cooled borescope and heat resistant ultrasonic sensors even if the turbine is not cooled down sufficiently. Another inspection information comes from degradation and damage measurement. The probabilistic life assessment using structural analysis and statistical material properties, the latter is estimated from hardness measurement, replica observation and embrittlement measurement. The risk function is calculated as the sum product of unreliability functions and expected monetary loss as the consequence of failure along event trees. The optimum maintenance plan is determined among simulated scenarios described through component breakdown trees, life cycle event trees and risk functions. Those methods are effective for total condition assessment and economical maintenance for operating plants

  20. PATCHY ACCRETION DISKS IN ULTRA-LUMINOUS X-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042 (United States); Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Webb, N. A. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F- 31100 Toulouse (France); Harrison, F. A.; Walton, D. J.; Rana, V. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fabian, A. C., E-mail: jonmm@umich.edu [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-10

    The X-ray spectra of the most extreme ultra-luminous X-ray sources—those with L ≥ 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1}—remain something of a mystery. Spectral roll-over in the 5-10 keV band was originally detected in the deepest XMM-Newton observations of the brightest sources; this is confirmed in subsequent NuSTAR spectra. This emission can be modeled via Comptonization, but with low electron temperatures (kT{sub e} ≅ 2 keV) and high optical depths (τ ≅ 10) that pose numerous difficulties. Moreover, evidence of cooler thermal emission that can be fit with thin disk models persists, even in fits to joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations. Using NGC 1313 X-1 as a test case, we show that a patchy disk with a multiple temperature profile may provide an excellent description of such spectra. In principle, a number of patches within a cool disk might emit over a range of temperatures, but the data only require a two-temperature profile plus standard Comptonization, or three distinct blackbody components. A mechanism such as the photon bubble instability may naturally give rise to a patchy disk profile, and could give rise to super-Eddington luminosities. It is possible, then, that a patchy disk (rather than a disk with a standard single-temperature profile) might be a hallmark of accretion disks close to or above the Eddington limit. We discuss further tests of this picture and potential implications for sources such as narrow-line Seyfert-1 galaxies and other low-mass active galactic nuclei.

  1. The Effect of Wind-Turbine Wakes on Summertime US Midwest Atmospheric Wind Profiles as Observed with Ground-Based Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Michael E.; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2013-07-01

    We examine the influence of a modern multi-megawatt wind turbine on wind and turbulence profiles three rotor diameters (D) downwind of the turbine. Light detection and ranging (lidar) wind-profile observations were collected during summer 2011 in an operating wind farm in central Iowa at 20-m vertical intervals from 40 to 220 m above the surface. After a calibration period during which two lidars were operated next to each other, one lidar was located approximately 2D directly south of a wind turbine; the other lidar was moved approximately 3D north of the same wind turbine. Data from the two lidars during southerly flow conditions enabled the simultaneous capture of inflow and wake conditions. The inflow wind and turbulence profiles exhibit strong variability with atmospheric stability: daytime profiles are well-mixed with little shear and strong turbulence, while nighttime profiles exhibit minimal turbulence and considerable shear across the rotor disk region and above. Consistent with the observations available from other studies and with wind-tunnel and large-eddy simulation studies, measurable reductions in wake wind-speeds occur at heights spanning the wind turbine rotor (43-117 m), and turbulent quantities increase in the wake. In generalizing these results as a function of inflow wind speed, we find the wind-speed deficit in the wake is largest at hub height or just above, and the maximum deficit occurs when wind speeds are below the rated speed for the turbine. Similarly, the maximum enhancement of turbulence kinetic energy and turbulence intensity occurs at hub height, although observations at the top of the rotor disk do not allow assessment of turbulence in that region. The wind shear below turbine hub height (quantified here with the power-law coefficient) is found to be a useful parameter to identify whether a downwind lidar observes turbine wake or free-flow conditions. These field observations provide data for validating turbine-wake models and wind

  2. A truncated accretion disk in the galactic black hole candidate source H1743-322

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Kandulapati; Agrawal, Vivek Kumar; Rao, Arikkala Raghurama

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the geometry of the accretion disk in the source H1743-322, we have carried out a detailed X-ray temporal and spectral study using RXTE pointed observations. We have selected all data pertaining to the Steep Power Law (SPL) state during the 2003 outburst of this source. We find anti-correlated hard X-ray lags in three of the observations and the changes in the spectral and timing parameters (like the QPO frequency) confirm the idea of a truncated accretion disk in this source. Compiling data from similar observations of other sources, we find a correlation between the fractional change in the QPO frequency and the observed delay. We suggest that these observations indicate a definite size scale in the inner accretion disk (the radius of the truncated disk) and we explain the observed correlation using various disk parameters like Compton cooling time scale, viscous time scale etc. (research papers)

  3. Investigations of thermal barrier coatings of turbine parts using gas flame heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeshkin, A. R.; Bichkov, N. G.; Ilinskaja, O. I.; Nazarov, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    The development of methods for the calculated and experimental investigations thermal barrier coatings and thermal state of gas-turbine engine parts with a thermal barrier coatings is actual work. The gas flame heating was demonstrated to be effectively used during investigations of a thermal ceramic barrier coatings and thermal state of such gas-turbine engine parts with a TBC as the cooled turbine blades and vanes and combustion liner components. The gas-flame heating is considered to be preferable when investigating the gas-turbine engine parts with a TBC in the special cases when both the convective and radiant components of thermal flow are of great importance. The small-size rig with gas-flame flow made it possible to conduct the comparison investigations with the purpose of evaluating the efficiency of thermal protection of the ceramic deposited thermal barrier coatings on APS and EB techniques. The developed design-experiment method was introduced in bench tests of turbine blades and combustion liner components of gas turbine engines.

  4. Modeling and characteristics analysis of hybrid cooling-tower-solar-chimney system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Zheng; He, Suoying

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A 3-D model for hybrid cooling-tower-solar-chimney system is developed. • The inclusion of heat exchangers into solar chimney boosts the power output. • The huge jump in power output is at the expense of heat dissipation capacity. • The heat exchanger as second heat source has greater impact on system performance. - Abstract: The hybrid cooling-tower-solar-chimney system (HCTSC), combining solar chimney with natural draft dry cooling tower, generates electricity and dissipates waste heat for the coupled geothermal power plant simultaneously. Based on a developed 3-D model, performance comparisons between the HCTSC system, solar chimney and natural draft dry cooling tower were performed in terms of power output of turbine and heat dissipation capacity. Results show that compared to the traditional solar chimney with similar geometric dimensions, HCTSC system can achieve over 20 times increase in the power output of turbine. However, this huge jump in power output is at the expense of heat dissipation capacity, which may lead to the malfunction of the coupled thermal power plant. By increasing the heat transfer area of the heat exchanger, the HCTSC system can manage to recover its heat dissipation capacity

  5. Prospects of power conversion technology of direct-cycle helium gas turbine for MHTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yong; Zhang Zuoyi

    1999-01-01

    The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor (MHTGR) is a modern passively safe reactor. The reactor and helium gas turbine may be combined for high efficiency's power conversion, because MHTGR has high outlet temperature up to 950 degree C. Two different schemes are planed separately by USA and South Africa. the helium gas turbine methodologies adopted by them are mainly based on the developed heavy duty industrial and aviation gas turbine technology. The author introduces the differences of two technologies and some design issues in the design and manufacture. Moreover, the author conclude that directly coupling a closed Brayton cycle gas turbine concept to the passively safe MHTGR is the developing direction of MHTGR due to its efficiency which is much higher than that of using steam turbine

  6. MONTE CARLO NEUTRINO TRANSPORT THROUGH REMNANT DISKS FROM NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D. [TAPIR, Mailcode 350-17, Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kasen, Daniel; Fernández, Rodrigo [Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); O’Connor, Evan [Department of Physics, Campus Code 8202, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 10{sup 46} erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 10{sup 48} erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet.

  7. MONTE CARLO NEUTRINO TRANSPORT THROUGH REMNANT DISKS FROM NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richers, Sherwood; Ott, Christian D.; Kasen, Daniel; Fernández, Rodrigo; O’Connor, Evan

    2015-01-01

    We present Sedonu, a new open source, steady-state, special relativistic Monte Carlo (MC) neutrino transport code, available at bitbucket.org/srichers/sedonu. The code calculates the energy- and angle-dependent neutrino distribution function on fluid backgrounds of any number of spatial dimensions, calculates the rates of change of fluid internal energy and electron fraction, and solves for the equilibrium fluid temperature and electron fraction. We apply this method to snapshots from two-dimensional simulations of accretion disks left behind by binary neutron star mergers, varying the input physics and comparing to the results obtained with a leakage scheme for the cases of a central black hole and a central hypermassive neutron star. Neutrinos are guided away from the densest regions of the disk and escape preferentially around 45° from the equatorial plane. Neutrino heating is strengthened by MC transport a few scale heights above the disk midplane near the innermost stable circular orbit, potentially leading to a stronger neutrino-driven wind. Neutrino cooling in the dense midplane of the disk is stronger when using MC transport, leading to a globally higher cooling rate by a factor of a few and a larger leptonization rate by an order of magnitude. We calculate neutrino pair annihilation rates and estimate that an energy of 2.8 × 10 46 erg is deposited within 45° of the symmetry axis over 300 ms when a central BH is present. Similarly, 1.9 × 10 48 erg is deposited over 3 s when an HMNS sits at the center, but neither estimate is likely to be sufficient to drive a gamma-ray burst jet

  8. Vertical Structure of Radiation-pressure-dominated Thin Disks: Link between Vertical Advection and Convective Stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Hong-Yu; Gu, Wei-Min

    2017-01-01

    In the classic picture of standard thin accretion disks, viscous heating is balanced by radiative cooling through the diffusion process, and the radiation-pressure-dominated inner disk suffers convective instability. However, recent simulations have shown that, owing to the magnetic buoyancy, the vertical advection process can significantly contribute to energy transport. In addition, in comparing the simulation results with the local convective stability criterion, no convective instability has been found. In this work, following on from simulations, we revisit the vertical structure of radiation-pressure-dominated thin disks and include the vertical advection process. Our study indicates a link between the additional energy transport and the convectively stable property. Thus, the vertical advection not only significantly contributes to the energy transport, but it also plays an important role in making the disk convectively stable. Our analyses may help to explain the discrepancy between classic theory and simulations on standard thin disks.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis and economical evaluation of two 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configurations for helium refrigeration and liquefaction cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z. G.; Zhuang, M.; Jiang, Q. F.; Y Zhang, Q.; Feng, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    In 310-80 K pre-cooling stage, the temperature of the HP helium stream reduces to about 80 K where nearly 73% of the enthalpy drop from room temperature to 4.5 K occurs. Apart from the most common liquid nitrogen pre-cooling, another 310-80 K pre-cooling configuration with turbine is employed in some helium cryoplants. In this paper, thermodynamic and economical performance of these two kinds of 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configurations has been studied at different operating conditions taking discharge pressure, isentropic efficiency of turbines and liquefaction rate as independent parameters. The exergy efficiency, total UA of heat exchangers and operating cost of two configurations are computed. This work will provide a reference for choosing 310-80 K pre-cooling stage configuration during design.

  10. Analysis of Dust and Fission Products in PBMR Turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stempniewicz, M.M.; Wessels, D.

    2014-01-01

    A 400 MWth direct cycle Pebble Bed Modular reactor was under development in South Africa. The work performed included design and safety analyses. In HTR/PBMR, graphite dust is generated during normal reactor operation due to pebble-to-pebble scratching. This dust will be deposited throughout the primary system. Furthermore, the dust will become radioactive due to sorption of fission products released, although in very small quantities, during normal operation. This paper presents a model and analyses of the PBMR turbine with the SPECTRA code. The purpose of the present work was to estimate the amount and distribution of deposited dust and the fission products, namely cesium, iodine, and silver, during plant life-time, which was assumed to be 40 full-power years. The performed work showed that after 40 years of plant life-time deposited layers are very small. The largest deposition is of course observed on the dust filters. Apart from the dust filters, the largest dust deposition is observed on the: • Outer Casing (inner walls) • Turbine Rotor Cooling Cavity (inner walls) • HPC Cold Cooling Gas Header (inner walls) This is caused by relatively low gas velocities in these volumes. The low velocities allow a continuous build-up of the dust layer. About 90% of cesium, 40% of iodine, and 99.9% of silver is adsorbed on the metallic structures of the turbine. The sorption rate increases along the turbine due to decreasing temperatures. In case of cesium and iodine the highest concentrations are observed in the last stage (stage 12) of the turbine. In the case of silver the sorption is so large that the silver vapor is significantly depleted in the last stages of the turbine. This is a reason for having a maximum in silver concentration in the stage 10. In the following stages the concentration decreases due to very small silver vapor fraction in the gas. (author)

  11. Aerodynamics and Heat Transfer Studies of Parameters Specific to the IGCC-Requirements: Endwall Contouring, Leading Edge and Blade Tip Ejection under Rotating Turbine Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobeiri, Meinhard; Han, Je-Chin

    2014-09-30

    This report deals with the specific aerodynamics and heat transfer problematic inherent to high pressure (HP) turbine sections of IGCC-gas turbines. Issues of primary relevance to a turbine stage operating in an IGCC-environment are: (1) decreasing the strength of the secondary flow vortices at the hub and tip regions to reduce (a), the secondary flow losses and (b), the potential for end wall deposition, erosion and corrosion due to secondary flow driven migration of gas flow particles to the hub and tip regions, (2) providing a robust film cooling technology at the hub and that sustains high cooling effectiveness less sensitive to deposition, (3) investigating the impact of blade tip geometry on film cooling effectiveness. The document includes numerical and experimental investigations of above issues. The experimental investigations were performed in the three-stage multi-purpose turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL), Texas A&M University. For the numerical investigations a commercial Navier-Stokes solver was utilized.

  12. Experimental investigation of cross-over jets in a rib-roughened trailing-edge cooling channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Fei

    Increasing the rotor inlet temperature can dramatically increase the efficiency and power output of the gas turbine engine. However, the melting point of turbine blade material limits the realistic upper bound of the rotor inlet temperature. As a result, the development of high temperature turbine blade material and advanced turbine blade cooling technology determines the future of turbine blade engine. Adding impingement jet holes and rib turbulators in the inner cooling channel of the gas turbine blades are two effective ways to enhance the cooling effects. The purpose of this study is to figure out the influence of different combinations of jet holes and rib turbulators on the heat transfer efficiency. A tabletop scale test model is used in the study to simulate the cooling cavity of trailing edge and its feed channel in a real gas turbine blade. The Dimensional Analysis Theory is used in the study to eliminate the influence of scaling. Two different crossover slots are tested with 5 different rib arrangements, and each of the test geometries is tested for 6 jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 10,000 to 36,000. The two different crossover slots are the crossover slots with 0 and 5 degree tilt angles. The four different rib arrangements are ribs with 0 degree, 45 degree, 90 degree and 135 degree angles of attack with respect to the flow direction. Furthermore, a smooth test section (no ribs) was also tested. The steady state liquid crystal thermography is used to quantify the heat transfer performance of the target areas. The variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number is plotted for each of the 10 geometries. Also, the variation of Nusselt number versus Reynolds number are compared for different rib angles of attack with the same crossover slot tilt angle, and between different crossover slots tilt angles with the same rib angle. The results show that, the area-weighted average Nusselt number increases monotonically with the Reynolds number; the target

  13. Study of design and technology factors influencing gas turbine blade cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, I. V.; Garanin, I. V.; Rogalev, A. N.; Kindra, V. O.; Khudyakova, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    The knowledge of aerodynamic and thermal parameters of turbulators used in order to design an efficient blade cooling system. However, all experimental tests of the hydraulic and thermal characteristics of the turbulators were conducted on the rectangular shape channels with a strongly defined air flow direction. The actual blades have geometry of the channels that essentially differs from the rectangular shape. Specifically, the air flow in the back cavity of a blade with one and half-pass cooling channel changes its direction throughout the feather height. In most cases the ribs and pins are made with a tilt to the channel walls, which is determined by the moving element design of a mould for the ceramic rod element fabrication. All of the factors described above may result in the blade thermohydraulic model being developed failing to fully simulate the air flow and the heat exchange processes in some sections of the cooling path. Hence, the design temperature field will differ from the temperature field of an actual blade. This article studied the numerical data of design and technology factors influencing heat transfer in the cooling channels. The results obtained showed their substantial impact on the blade cooling efficiency.

  14. The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor: A Promising Option for Near Term Deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaBar, Malcolm P.

    2002-01-01

    The Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) is an advanced nuclear power system that offers unparalleled safety, high thermal efficiency, environmental advantages, and competitive electricity generation costs. The GT-MHR module couples a gas-cooled modular helium reactor (MHR) with a high efficiency modular Brayton cycle gas turbine (GT) energy conversion system. The reactor and power conversion systems are located in a below grade concrete silo that provides protection against sabotage. The GT-MHR safety is achieved through a combination of inherent safety characteristics and design selections that take maximum advantage of the gas-cooled reactor coated particle fuel, helium coolant and graphite moderator. The GT-MHR is projected to be economically competitive with alternative electricity generation technologies due to the high operating temperature of the gas-cooled reactor, high thermal efficiency of the Brayton cycle power conversion system, high fuel burnup (>100,000 MWd/MT), and low operation and maintenance requirements. (author)

  15. Evaporative gas turbine cycles. A thermodynamic evaluation of their potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, P M

    1993-03-01

    The report presents a systematic method of thermodynamically evaluating different gas turbine cycles, treating the working fluids as ideal gases (c{sub p}=c{sub p}(T)). All models used to simulate different components in the cycles are presented in the report in detail and then connected in a computer program fully developed by the author. The report focuses on the theme of evaporative gas turbine cycles, in which low level heat is used to evaporate water into the compressed air stream between the compressor and recuperator. This leads to efficiency levels close to a comparable combined cycle but without the steam bottoming cycle. A parametric analysis has been conducted with the aim of deciding the best configuration of an evaporative cycle both for an uncooled expander and for a cooled expander. The model proposed to simulate the cooled expander is a combination between two existing models. (121 refs., 35 figs.,).

  16. Comparing different CFD wind turbine modelling approaches with wind tunnel measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalvig, Siri; Hjertager, Bjørn; Manger, Eirik

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a model wind turbine is simulated with three different CFD methods: actuator disk, actuator line and a fully resolved rotor. The simulations are compared with each other and with measurements from a wind tunnel experiment. The actuator disk is the least accurate and most cost-efficient, and the fully resolved rotor is the most accurate and least cost-efficient. The actuator line method is believed to lie in between the two ends of the scale. The fully resolved rotor produces superior wake velocity results compared to the actuator models. On average it also produces better results for the force predictions, although the actuator line method had a slightly better match for the design tip speed. The open source CFD tool box, OpenFOAM, was used for the actuator disk and actuator line calculations, whereas the market leading commercial CFD code, ANSYS/FLUENT, was used for the fully resolved rotor approach

  17. Mathematical Modeling – The Impact of Cooling Water Temperature Upsurge on Combined Cycle Power Plant Performance and Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra Siswantara, Ahmad; Pujowidodo, Hariyotejo; Darius, Asyari; Ramdlan Gunadi, Gun Gun

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents the mathematical modeling analysis on cooling system in a combined cycle power plant. The objective of this study is to get the impact of cooling water upsurge on plant performance and operation, using Engineering Equation Solver (EES™) tools. Power plant installed with total power capacity of block#1 is 505.95 MWe and block#2 is 720.8 MWe, where sea water consumed as cooling media at two unit condensers. Basic principle of analysis is heat balance calculation from steam turbine and condenser, concern to vacuum condition and heat rate values. Based on the result shown graphically, there were impact the upsurge of cooling water to increase plant heat rate and vacuum pressure in condenser so ensued decreasing plant efficiency and causing possibility steam turbine trip as back pressure raised from condenser.

  18. Dry-type cooling systems in electric power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.W.

    1973-01-01

    This study indicates that the dry-type cooling tower could be adopted in this country as an alternative method for removing waste heat from power plants. The use of dry cooling towers would not only lead to a change of cooling system design, but also to a change of overall thermal design in a power generating system. The principal drawbacks to using dry cooling towers in a large steam-turbine plant are the generating capacity loss, increased fuel consumption and the high capital cost of the dry cooling towers. These economic penalties must be evaluated in each specific case against the benefits that may result from the use of dry cooling towers. The benefits are principally these: (1) Fewer constraints in the selection of power plant sites, (2) No thermal discharge to the natural water bodies, (3) Elimination of vapor plumes and water evaporation loss, and (4) Freedom of adding new units to an existing facility where inadequate water supply may otherwise rule out this possibility

  19. Oxidation of Alumina-Forming MAX Phases in Turbine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James; Garg, Anita; Harder, Bryan; Nesbitt, James; Gabb, Timothy; Gray, SImon

    2017-01-01

    Protective coatings for high temperature turbine components are based on YSZ thermal barriers and oxidation resistant, alumina-forming NiAl or NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Ti2AlC and Cr2AlC MAX phases are thus of special interest because of good oxidation resistance and CTE that can match Al2O3 and YSZ. Their alumina scales grow according to cubic kinetics due to grain growth in the scale, with initial heating dominated by fast TiO2 growth. Protective cubic kinetics are also found in high pressure burner rig tests of MAXthal 211 Ti2AlC, but with reduced rates due to volatile TiO(OH)2 formation in water vapor. YSZ-coatings on bulk Ti2AlC exhibit remarkable durability up to 1300C in furnace tests and at least a 25x life advantage compared to superalloys. At another extreme, Cr2AlC is resistant to low temperature Na2SO4 hot corrosion and exhibits thermal cycling stability bonded to a superalloy disk material. Accordingly, sputtered Cr2AlC coatings on disk specimens prevented hot corrosion detriments on LCF. Breakaway oxidation (Ti2AlC), scale spallation (Cr2AlC), interdiffusion, and processing as coatings still present serious challenges. However the basic properties of MAX phases provide some unusual opportunities for use in high temperature turbines.

  20. Three-Dimensional General-Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Remnant Accretion Disks from Neutron Star Mergers: Outflows and r-Process Nucleosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Daniel M; Metzger, Brian D

    2017-12-08

    The merger of binary neutron stars, or of a neutron star and a stellar-mass black hole, can result in the formation of a massive rotating torus around a spinning black hole. In addition to providing collimating media for γ-ray burst jets, unbound outflows from these disks are an important source of mass ejection and rapid neutron capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis. We present the first three-dimensional general-relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (GRMHD) simulations of neutrino-cooled accretion disks in neutron star mergers, including a realistic equation of state valid at low densities and temperatures, self-consistent evolution of the electron fraction, and neutrino cooling through an approximate leakage scheme. After initial magnetic field amplification by magnetic winding, we witness the vigorous onset of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). The disk quickly reaches a balance between heating from MRI-driven turbulence and neutrino cooling, which regulates the midplane electron fraction to a low equilibrium value Y_{e}≈0.1. Over the 380-ms duration of the simulation, we find that a fraction ≈20% of the initial torus mass is unbound in powerful outflows with asymptotic velocities v≈0.1c and electron fractions Y_{e}≈0.1-0.25. Postprocessing the outflows through a nuclear reaction network shows the production of a robust second- and third-peak r process. Though broadly consistent with the results of previous axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations, extrapolation of our results to late times suggests that the total ejecta mass from GRMHD disks is significantly higher. Our results provide strong evidence that postmerger disk outflows are an important site for the r process.

  1. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, Thomas F.; Parsons, Jr., Edward J.

    1992-01-01

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  2. MINERAL PROCESSING BY SHORT CIRCUITS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, Colin P. [Niels Bohr International Academy, Niels Bohr Institute, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Hubbard, Alexander; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Ebel, Denton S. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); D' Alessio, Paola, E-mail: cmcnally@nbi.dk, E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org, E-mail: debel@amnh.org, E-mail: p.dalessio@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 58089 Morelia, MICH (Mexico)

    2013-04-10

    Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks, as evidenced by observations of spectra characteristic of crystalline silicates. One possible environment for this process is the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow thought to drive accretion in these disks. Such flows generally form thin current sheets, which are sites of magnetic reconnection, and dissipate the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including the effects of radiative cooling, taking into account the temperature dependence of the opacity; and by examining current sheet geometry in three-dimensional, global models of magnetorotational instability. We find that temperatures above 1600 K can be reached for favorable parameters that match the ideal global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from chondrule-matrix complementarity, chondrule-chondrule complementarity, the occurrence of igneous rims, and compound chondrules. The same short-circuit mechanism may perform other high-temperature mineral processing in protoplanetary disks such as the production of crystalline silicates and CAIs.

  3. The WFCAM transit survey and cool white dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinfield D.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present results from our search for cool white dwarfs in the WTS (WFCAM Transit Survey. Repeat observations starting in 2007 allowed to produce deep stacked images in J and measure proper motions. We combine this with deep optical imaging to select cool white dwarf candidates (Teff < 5000 K. About 27 cool white dwarf candidates with proper motions above 0.10 arcsec/yr were identified in one of the fields representing 1/8th of the survey area. Follow-up spectroscopy with the 10.2 m GTC telescope at La Palma confirmed the white dwarf status for all observed candidates. On-going work is being carried out to increase the sample of cool white dwarfs that will allow a more comprehensive study of the thick disk/halo white dwarf population.

  4. Vibrations of beams with a variable cross-section fixed on rotational rigid disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Zolkiewski

    Full Text Available The work is focused on the problem of vibrating beams with a variable cross-section fixed on a rotational rigid disk. The beam is loaded by a transversal time varying force orthogonal to an axis of the beam and simultaneously parallel to the disk's plane. There are many ways of usage of the technical moveable systems composed of elements with the variable cross-sections. The main applications are used in numerous types of turbines and pumps. The paper is a kind of introduction to the dynamic analysis of above mentioned beam systems. The equations of motion of rotational beams fixed on the rigid disks were derived. After introducing the Coriolis forces and the centrifugal forces, the transportation effect in the mathematical model was considered. This particular project is the first stage research, where there were proposed certain solutions of problems connected with the linear variable cross-sections systems. The further investigation considering the nonlinear systems has been proceeding. The results, analysis and comparison will be presented in the future works.

  5. Numerical simulations of flow fields through conventionally controlled wind turbines and wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, Ali Emre; Meyers, Johan

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, an Actuator-Line Model (ALM) is implemented in our in-house pseudo-spectral LES solver SP-WIND, including a turbine controller. Below rated wind speed, turbines are controlled by a standard-torque-controller aiming at maximum power extraction from the wind. Above rated wind speed, the extracted power is limited by a blade pitch controller which is based on a proportional-integral type control algorithm. This model is used to perform a series of single turbine and wind farm simulations using the NREL 5MW turbine. First of all, we focus on below-rated wind speed, and investigate the effect of the farm layout on the controller calibration curves. These calibration curves are expressed in terms of nondimensional torque and rotational speed, using the mean turbine-disk velocity as reference. We show that this normalization leads to calibration curves that are independent of wind speed, but the calibration curves do depend on the farm layout, in particular for tightly spaced farms. Compared to turbines in a lone-standing set-up, turbines in a farm experience a different wind distribution over the rotor due to the farm boundary-layer interaction. We demonstrate this for fully developed wind-farm boundary layers with aligned turbine arrangements at different spacings (5D, 7D, 9D). Further we also compare calibration curves obtained from full farm simulations with calibration curves that can be obtained at a much lower cost using a minimal flow unit

  6. The experimental study on the wind turbine’s guide-vanes and diffuser of an exhaust air energy recovery system integrated with the cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong, W.T.; Hew, W.P.; Yip, S.Y.; Fazlizan, A.; Poh, S.C.; Tan, C.J.; Ong, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • On-site exhaust air energy recovery turbine generator mounted above cooling tower. • Energy from wasted wind resources is re-used for electricity generation. • Optimum angle arrangement of guide-vanes and diffusers help to improve wind-flow. • Enclosure solves conventional wind turbine problems. • 13.3% reduction in CO 2 emission is expected to be achieved from this system. - Abstract: An assembly of two vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) and an enclosure is installed above a cooling tower to harness the discharged wind for electricity generation. The enclosure consists of guide-vanes and diffuser-plates, is used to enhance the rotational speed of the turbines for power augmentation. The angle of the guide-vanes is optimized to ensure the oncoming wind stream impinges the rotor blades of the turbine at an optimum angle. The diffuser-plates are tilted at an optimum angle to increase the discharged airflow rate. The performance of the system is tested in the laboratory followed by a field test on an actual size cooling tower. The VAWT performance is increased in the range of 7–8% with the integration of enclosure. There is no significant difference in the current consumption of the fan motor between the bare cooling tower and the one with installed VAWTs. With the presence of this system, approximately 17.5 GW h/year is expected to be recovered from 3000 units of cooling towers at commercial areas, assuming the cooling tower is driven by a 7.5 kW fan motor and operates 16 h/day. This amount of recovered energy can also be translated into 13% reduction in CO 2 emission

  7. Rotordynamic Analysis and Feasibility Study of a Disk Spin Test Facility for Rotor Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) initiated a program to achieve the significant improvement in aviation safety. One of the technical challenges is the design and development of accelerated experiments that mimic critical damage cases encountered in engine components. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is currently addressing the goal concerning propulsion health management and the development of propulsion system specific technologies intended to detect potential failures prior to catastrophe. For this goal the unique disk spin simulation system was assembled at NASA GRC, which allows testing of rotors with the spinning speeds up to 10K RPM, and at the elevated temperature environment reaching 540 C (1000 F). It is anticipated that the facility can be employed for detection of Low Cycle Fatigue disk cracking and further High Cycle Fatigue blade vibration. The controlled crack growth studies at room and elevated temperatures can be conducted on the turbine wheels, and various NDE techniques can be integrated and assessed as in-situ damage monitoring tools. Critical rotating parts in advanced gas turbine engines such as turbine disks frequently operate at high temperature and stress for long periods of time. The integrity of these parts must be proven by non-destructive evaluation (NDE) during various machining steps ranging from forging blank to finished shape, and also during the systematic overhaul inspections. Conventional NDE methods, however, have unacceptable limits. Some of these techniques are time-consuming and inconvenient for service aircraft testing. Almost all of these techniques require that the vicinity of the damage is known in advance. These experimental techniques can provide only local information and no indication of the structural strength at a component and/or system level. The shortcomings of currently available NDE methods lead to the requirement of new damage

  8. Rotational effects on impingement cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, A. H.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Koo, J. J.; Preiser, U. Z.

    1987-01-01

    The present consideration of rotation effects on heat transfer in a radially exhausted, impingement-cooled turbine blade model gives attention to experimental results for Reynolds and Rossby numbers and blade/coolant temperature ratio values that are representative of small gas turbine engines. On the basis of a model that encompasses the effects of Coriolis force and buoyancy on heat transfer, bouyancy is identified as the cause of an average Nusselt number that is 20-30 percent lower than expected from previous nonrotating data. A heuristic model is proposed which predicts that the impingement jets nearest the blade roots should deflect inward, due to a centripetal force generated by their tangential velocity counter to the blade motion. Potentially serious thermal stresses must be anticipated from rotation effects in the course of blade design.

  9. COOL WHITE DWARFS IDENTIFIED IN THE SECOND DATA RELEASE OF THE UKIRT INFRARED DEEP SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodieu, N.; Leggett, S. K.; Nitta, A.; Bergeron, P.

    2009-01-01

    We have paired the second data release of the Large Area Survey of the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey with the fifth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to identify 10 cool white dwarf candidates, from their photometry and astrometry. Of these 10, one was previously known to be a very cool white dwarf. We have obtained optical spectroscopy for seven of the candidates using the GMOS-N spectrograph on Gemini North, and have confirmed all seven as white dwarfs. Our photometry and astrometry indicate that the remaining two objects are also white dwarfs. The model analysis of the photometry and available spectroscopy shows that the seven confirmed new white dwarfs, and the two new likely white dwarfs, have effective temperatures in the range of T eff = 5400-6600 K. Our analysis of the previously known white dwarf confirms that it is cool, with T eff = 3800 K. The cooling age for this dwarf is 8.7 Gyr, while that for the nine ∼ 6000 K white dwarfs is 1.8-3.6 Gyr. We are unable to determine the masses of the white dwarfs from the existing data, and therefore we cannot constrain the total ages of the white dwarfs. The large cooling age for the coolest white dwarf in the sample, combined with its low estimated tangential velocity, suggests that it is an old member of the thin disk, or a member of the thick disk of the Galaxy, with an age of 10-11 Gyr. The warmer white dwarfs appear to have velocities typical of the thick disk or even halo; these may be very old remnants of low-mass stars, or they may be relatively young thin-disk objects with unusually high space motion.

  10. The gas turbine: Present technology and future developments; La turbina a gas: Tecnologie attuali e gli sviluppi futuri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minghetti, E [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy)

    1997-03-01

    The gas turbine is the most widely used prime mover all over the world for either power generation or mechanical drive applications. The above fact is due to the recent great improvements that have been done especially in terms of efficiency, availability and reliability. The future for gas turbine technological development looks very promising. In fact, although tremendous growth has already taken place, there is still the potential for dramatic improvements in performance. Compared with the competitive prime movers (conventional steam power plants and reciprocating piston engines) the gas turbine technology is younger and still following a strong growth curve. The coming decades will witness the continued increasing in turbine inlet temperature, the development of new materials and refrigeration systems and the commercialization of inter cooled system and steam cooled turbines. With the very soon introduction of the {sup G }and {sup H }technology, expected single and combined cycle efficiencies for heavy duty machines are respectively 40% and 60%, while maintaining single digit levels in pollutant emissions. In this report are given wide information on gas turbine present technology (Thermodynamics, features, design, performances, emission control, applications) and are discussed the main lines for the future developments. Finally are presented the research and technological development activities on gas turbine of Italian National Agency for new Technology Energy and the Environment Energy Department.

  11. Effect of Microstructure on Time Dependent Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior In a P/M Turbine Disk Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, Ignacy J.; Gabb, T. P.; Bonacuse, P.; Gayda, J.

    2008-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the processes which govern hold time crack growth behavior in the LSHR disk P/M superalloy. Nineteen different heat treatments of this alloy were evaluated by systematically controlling the cooling rate from the supersolvus solutioning step and applying various single and double step aging treatments. The resulting hold time crack growth rates varied by more than two orders of magnitude. It was shown that the associated stress relaxation behavior for these heat treatments was closely correlated with the crack growth behavior. As stress relaxation increased, the hold time crack growth resistance was also increased. The size of the tertiary gamma' in the general microstructure was found to be the key microstructural variable controlling both the hold time crack growth behavior and stress relaxation. No relationship between the presence of grain boundary M23C6 carbides and hold time crack growth was identified which further brings into question the importance of the grain boundary phases in determining hold time crack growth behavior. The linear elastic fracture mechanics parameter, Kmax, is unable to account for visco-plastic redistribution of the crack tip stress field during hold times and thus is inadequate for correlating time dependent crack growth data. A novel methodology was developed which captures the intrinsic crack driving force and was able to collapse hold time crack growth data onto a single curve.

  12. Turbine design and application volumes 1, 2, and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA has an interest in turbines related primarily to aeronautics and space applications. Airbreathing turbine engines provide jet and turboshaft propulsion, as well as auxiliary power for aircraft. Propellant-driven turbines provide rocket propulsion and auxiliary power for spacecraft. Closed-cycle turbine engines using inert gases, organic fluids, and metal fluids have been studied for providing long-duration electric power for spacecraft. Other applications of interest for turbine engines include land-vehicle (cars, trucks, buses, trains, etc.) propulsion power and ground-based electrical power. In view of the turbine-system interest and efforts at Lewis Research Center, a course entitled 'Turbine Design and Application' was presented during 1968-69 as part of the In-house Graduate Study Program. The course was somewhat revised and again presented in 1972-73. Various aspects of turbine technology were covered including thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic concepts, fundamental turbine concepts, velocity diagrams, losses, blade aerodynamic design, blade cooling, mechanical design, operation, and performance. The notes written and used for the course have been revised and edited for publication. Such a publication can serve as a foundation for an introductory turbine course, a means for self-study, or a reference for selected topics. Any consistent set of units will satisfy the equations presented. Two commonly used consistent sets of units and constant values are given after the symbol definitions. These are the SI units and the U.S. customary units. A single set of equations covers both sets of units by including all constants required for the U.S. customary units and defining as unity those not required for the SI units. Three volumes are compiled into one.

  13. Development of superconducting wind turbine generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the commercial activities in the field of superconducting machines, particularly superconducting wind turbine generators, are reviewed and presented. Superconducting generators have the potential to provide a compact and light weight drive train at high torques and slow rotational...... speeds, because high magnetic fields can be produced by coils with very little loss. Three different superconducting wind turbine generator topologies have been proposed by three different companies. One is based on low temperature superconductors; one is based on high temperature superconductors......; and one is a fully superconducting generator based on MgB2. It is concluded that there is large commercial interest in superconducting machines, with an increasing patenting activity. Such generators are, however, not without their challenges. The superconductors have to be cooled down to somewhere...

  14. Development of Superconducting Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Abrahamsen, Asger Bech

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the commercial activities in the field of superconducting machines, particularly superconducting wind turbine generators, are reviewed and presented. Superconducting generators have the potential to provide a compact and light weight drive train at high torques and slow rotational...... speeds, because high magnetic fields can be produced by coils with very little loss. Three different superconducting wind turbine generator topologies have been proposed by three different companies. One is based on low temperature superconductors (LTS); one is based on high temperature superconductors...... (HTS); and one is a fully superconducting generator based on MgB2. It is concluded that there is large commercial interest in superconducting machines, with an increasing patenting activity. Such generators are however not without their challenges. The superconductors have to be cooled down...

  15. Structure and properties of a splat cooled 2024 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, M.; Grant, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the investigation the alloy was melted, heated to 750 C, and atomized into fine droplets. The droplets were rapidly quenched against a heavy copper disk rotating at 1725 rpm. The resultant splat cooled flakes were screened. Three flake sizes were finally separated. Flakes of each size were separately processed. The characteristics of the splat cooling process and the properties of the obtained products are discussed. Splat cooling against a metallic substrate permits cooling rates up to about 1,000,000 deg C/sec. Increases in yield strength and tensile strength of 14 to 19% are observed for the splat products. Other improvements are connected with increases in fatigue life and stress rupture performance.

  16. Probabilistic analysis of bladed turbine disks and the effect of mistuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ashwin; Nagpal, V. K.; Chamis, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Probabilistic assessment of the maximum blade response on a mistuned rotor disk is performed using the computer code NESSUS. The uncertainties in natural frequency, excitation frequency, amplitude of excitation and damping have been included to obtain the cumulative distribution function (CDF) of blade responses. Advanced mean value first order analysis is used to compute CDF. The sensitivities of different random variables are identified. Effect of the number of blades on a rotor on mistuning is evaluated. It is shown that the uncertainties associated with the forcing function parameters have significant effect on the response distribution of the bladed rotor.

  17. The correlation between HCN/H2O flux ratios and disk mass: evidence for protoplanet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Caitlin; Salyk, Colette

    2017-01-01

    We analyze hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and water vapor flux ratios in protoplanetary disks as a way to trace planet formation. Analyzing only disks in the Taurus molecular cloud, Najita et al. (2013) found a tentative correlation between protoplanetary disk mass and the HCN/H2O line flux ratio in Spitzer-IRS emission spectra. They interpret this correlation to be a consequence of more massive disks forming planetesimals more efficiently than smaller disks, as the formation of large planetesimals may lock up water ice in the cool outer disk region and prevent it from migrating, drying out the inner disk. The sequestering of water (and therefore oxygen) in the outer disk may also increase the carbon-to- oxygen ratio in the inner disk, leading to enhanced organic molecule (e.g. HCN) emission. To confirm this trend, we expand the Najita et al. sample by calculating HCN/H2O line flux ratios for 8 more sources with known disk masses from clusters besides Taurus. We find agreement with the Najita et al. trend, suggesting that this is a widespread phenomenon. In addition, we find HCN/H2O line flux ratios for 17 more sources that await disk mass measurements, which should become commonplace in the ALMA era. Finally, we investigate linear fits and outliers to this trend, and discuss possible causes.

  18. Radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the formation of hot accretion disk coronae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Davis, Shane W. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics. Toronto, ON M5S3H4 (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    A new mechanism to form a magnetic pressure supported, high temperature corona above the photosphere of an accretion disk is explored using three dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. The thermal properties of the disk are calculated self-consistently by balancing radiative cooling through the surfaces of the disk with heating due to dissipation of turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability (MRI). As has been noted in previous work, we find the dissipation rate per unit mass increases dramatically with height above the mid-plane, in stark contrast to the α-disk model which assumes this quantity is a constant. Thus, we find that in simulations with a low surface density (and therefore a shallow photosphere), the fraction of energy dissipated above the photosphere is significant (about 3.4% in our lowest surface density model), and this fraction increases as surface density decreases. When a significant fraction of the accretion energy is dissipated in the optically thin photosphere, the gas temperature increases substantially and a high temperature, magnetic pressure supported corona is formed. The volume-averaged temperature in the disk corona is more than 10 times larger than at the disk mid-plane. Moreover, gas temperature in the corona is strongly anti-correlated with gas density, which implies the corona formed by MRI turbulence is patchy. This mechanism to form an accretion disk corona may help explain the observed relation between the spectral index and luminosity from active galactic nucleus (AGNs), and the soft X-ray excess from some AGNs. It may also be relevant to spectral state changes in X-ray binaries.

  19. MEANS 2: Microstructure- and Micromechanism-Sensitive Property Models for Advanced Turbine Disk and Blade Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pollock, Tresa M; Mills, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    This effort has focused on verification and refinement of the mechanism transitions at intermediate temperatures in the disk alloy Rene 104, with the observation of microtwinning, continuous faulting...

  20. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  1. PLANETARY SYSTEM FORMATION IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND HL TAURI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Masahiko; Iguchi, Satoru, E-mail: eiji.akiyama@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: yasuhiro.hasegawa@nao.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    We reprocess the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) long-baseline science verification data taken toward HL Tauri. Assuming the observed gaps are opened up by currently forming, unseen bodies, we estimate the mass of such hypothetical bodies based on the following two approaches: the Hill radius analysis and a more elaborate approach developed from the angular momentum transfer analysis in gas disks. For the former, the measured gap widths are used for estimating the mass of the bodies, while for the latter, the measured gap depths are utilized. We show that their masses are comparable to or less than the mass of Jovian planets. By evaluating Toomre’s gravitational instability (GI) condition and cooling effect, we find that the GI might be a mechanism to form the bodies in the outer region of the disk. As the disk might be gravitationally unstable only in the outer region of the disk, inward planetary migration would be needed to construct the current architecture of the observed disk. We estimate the gap-opening mass and show that type II migration might be able to play such a role. Combining GIs with inward migration, we conjecture that all of the observed gaps may be a consequence of bodies that might have originally formed at the outer part of the disk, and have subsequently migrated to the current locations. While ALMA’s unprecedented high spatial resolution observations can revolutionize our picture of planet formation, more dedicated observational and theoretical studies are needed to fully understand the HL Tauri images.

  2. PLANETARY SYSTEM FORMATION IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK AROUND HL TAURI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Eiji; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Masahiko; Iguchi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We reprocess the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) long-baseline science verification data taken toward HL Tauri. Assuming the observed gaps are opened up by currently forming, unseen bodies, we estimate the mass of such hypothetical bodies based on the following two approaches: the Hill radius analysis and a more elaborate approach developed from the angular momentum transfer analysis in gas disks. For the former, the measured gap widths are used for estimating the mass of the bodies, while for the latter, the measured gap depths are utilized. We show that their masses are comparable to or less than the mass of Jovian planets. By evaluating Toomre’s gravitational instability (GI) condition and cooling effect, we find that the GI might be a mechanism to form the bodies in the outer region of the disk. As the disk might be gravitationally unstable only in the outer region of the disk, inward planetary migration would be needed to construct the current architecture of the observed disk. We estimate the gap-opening mass and show that type II migration might be able to play such a role. Combining GIs with inward migration, we conjecture that all of the observed gaps may be a consequence of bodies that might have originally formed at the outer part of the disk, and have subsequently migrated to the current locations. While ALMA’s unprecedented high spatial resolution observations can revolutionize our picture of planet formation, more dedicated observational and theoretical studies are needed to fully understand the HL Tauri images

  3. Study on fundamental features of helium turbomachine for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jie; Gu Yihua

    2004-01-01

    The High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) coupled with helium turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidates for future nuclear power plants. The HTGR helium turbine cycle was analyzed and optimized. Then the focal point of investigation was concentrated on the fundamental thermodynamic and aerodynamic features of helium turbomachine. As a result, a helium turbomachine is different from a general combustion gas turbine in two main design features, that is a helium turbomachine has more blade stages and shorter blade length, which are caused by the helium property and the high pressure of a closed cycle, respectively. (authors)

  4. Numerical Modeling of Hydrokinetic Turbines and their Environmental Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherchi, T.; Seydel, J.; Aliseda, A.

    2010-12-01

    The search for predictable renewable energy has led research into marine hydrokinetic energy. Electricity can be generated from tidally-induced currents through turbines located in regions of high current speed and relatively low secondary flow intensity. Although significant technological challenges exist, the main obstacle in the development and commercial deployment of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is the uncertainty in the environmental effect of devices. The velocity deficit in the turbulent wake of the turbine might enhance the sedimentation process of suspended particles in the water column and lead to deposition into artificial patterns that alter the benthic ecosystem. Pressure fluctuations across turbine blades and in blade tip vortices can damage internal organs of marine species as they swim through the device. These are just a few examples of the important potential environmental effects of MHK turbines that need to be addressed and investigated a priori before pilot and large scale deployment. We have developed a hierarchy of numerical models to simulate the turbulent wake behind a well characterized two bladed turbine. The results from these models (Sliding Mesh, Rotating Reference Frame, Virtual Blade Model and Actuator Disk Model) have been validated and are been used to investigate the efficiency and physical changes introduced in the environment by single or multiple MHK turbines. We will present results from sedimenting particles and model juvenile fish, with relative densities of 1.2 and 0.95, respectively. The settling velocity and terminal location on the bottom of the tidal channel is computed and compared to the simulated flow in a channel without turbines. We have observed an enhanced sedimentation, and we will quantify the degree of enhancement and the parameter range within which it is significant. For the slightly buoyant particles representing fish, the pressure history is studied statistically with particular attention to the

  5. Modeling and Finite Element Analysis of Load-Carrying Performance of a Wind Turbine Considering the Influence of Assembly Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmei Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a wind turbine shrink disk is used as the research object to investigate load-carrying performance of a multi-layer interference fit, and the theoretical model and finite element model are constructed. According to those models, a MW-level turbine shrink disk is designed, and a test device is developed to apply torque to this turbine shrink disk by hydraulic jack. Then, the circumferential slip between the contact surfaces is monitored and the slip of all contact surfaces is zero. This conclusion verifies the reasonability of the proposed models. The effect of the key influencing factors, such as machining deviation, assembly clearance and propel stroke, were analyzed. The contact pressure and load torque of the mating surfaces were obtained by building typical models with different parameters using finite element analysis (FEA. The results show that the minimum assembly clearance and the machining deviation within the machining range have little influence on load-carrying performance of multi-layer interference fit, while having a greater influence on the maximum assembly clearance and the propel stroke. The results also show that the load-carrying performance of a multiple-layer interference fit can be ensured only if the key factors are set within a reasonable design range. To avoid the abnormal operation of equipment caused by insufficient load torque, the propel stroke during practical assembly should be at least 0.95 times the designed propel stroke, which is significant in guiding the design and assembly of the multi-layer interference fit.

  6. Cross-flow turbines: physical and numerical model studies towards improved array simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.

    2015-12-01

    Cross-flow, or vertical-axis turbines, show potential in marine hydrokinetic (MHK) and wind energy applications. As turbine designs mature, the research focus is shifting from individual devices towards improving turbine array layouts for maximizing overall power output, i.e., minimizing wake interference for axial-flow turbines, or taking advantage of constructive wake interaction for cross-flow turbines. Numerical simulations are generally better suited to explore the turbine array design parameter space, as physical model studies of large arrays at large model scale would be expensive. However, since the computing power available today is not sufficient to conduct simulations of the flow in and around large arrays of turbines with fully resolved turbine geometries, the turbines' interaction with the energy resource needs to be parameterized, or modeled. Most models in use today, e.g. actuator disk, are not able to predict the unique wake structure generated by cross-flow turbines. Experiments were carried out using a high-resolution turbine test bed in a large cross-section tow tank, designed to achieve sufficiently high Reynolds numbers for the results to be Reynolds number independent with respect to turbine performance and wake statistics, such that they can be reliably extrapolated to full scale and used for model validation. To improve parameterization in array simulations, an actuator line model (ALM) was developed to provide a computationally feasible method for simulating full turbine arrays inside Navier--Stokes models. The ALM predicts turbine loading with the blade element method combined with sub-models for dynamic stall and flow curvature. The open-source software is written as an extension library for the OpenFOAM CFD package, which allows the ALM body force to be applied to their standard RANS and LES solvers. Turbine forcing is also applied to volume of fluid (VOF) models, e.g., for predicting free surface effects on submerged MHK devices. An

  7. Preliminary analysis of combined cycle of modular high-temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baogang, Z.; Xiaoyong, Y.; Jie, W.; Gang, Z.; Qian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Modular high-temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is known as one of the most advanced nuclear reactors because of its inherent safety and high efficiency. The power conversion system of HTGR can be steam turbine based on Rankine cycle or gas turbine based on Brayton cycle respectively. The steam turbine system is mature and the gas turbine system has high efficiency but under development. The Brayton-Rankine combined cycle is an effective way to further promote the efficiency. This paper investigated the performance of combined cycle from the viewpoint of thermodynamics. The effect of non-dimensional parameters on combined cycle’s efficiency, such as temperature ratio, compression ratio, efficiency of compressor, efficiency of turbine, was analyzed. Furthermore, the optimal parameters to achieve highest efficiency was also given by this analysis under engineering constraints. The conclusions could be helpful to the design and development of combined cycle of HTGR. (author)

  8. Study for Determining the Testing Condition of Compressor and Turbine System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Sudadiyo

    2009-01-01

    Study for Determining the Testing Condition of Compressor and Turbine System. From the viewpoint of energy system and environment, the concept for nuclear reactors of the generation IV have good potential for electricity and heat generation devices in producing hydrogen. These gas cooled nuclear reactors employ turbine cycle in transferring the heat. To analyses that coolant system, it is proposed a model of compressor and turbine system with power 3 kW. The used working fluid was hydrogen that be burnt with air within combustion chamber, then be expanded through a turbine for getting shaft work that will be used in driving compressor and generator. This study is aimed to determine the optimum testing conditions of gas turbine system. The used method is by applying the balance equations of energy, mass, and momentum. Gas turbine and compressor were placed at the single shaft, in which it was about 55 percent of power output for running the compressor. Under the testing condition for the speed of 20305 rpm, it was obtained thermal efficiency of the turbine cycle approximate 18 % (equal to the Carnot efficiency ratio 65 %), so that it is properly developed for the development of nuclear power installation in supporting the electricity energy demand and it will be very promising for the future facility. (author)

  9. Description and cost analysis of a deluge dry/wet cooling system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiles, L.E.; Bamberger, J.A.; Braun, D.J.; Braun, D.J.; Faletti, D.W.; Willingham, C.E.

    1978-06-01

    The use of combined dry/wet cooling systems for large base-load power plants offers the potential for significant water savings as compared to evaporatively cooled power plants and significant cost savings in comparison to dry cooled power plants. The results of a detailed engineering and cost study of one type of dry/wet cooling system are described. In the ''deluge'' dry/wet cooling method, a finned-tube heat exchanger is designed to operate in the dry mode up to a given ambient temperature. To avoid the degradation of performance for higher ambient temperatures, water (the delugeate) is distributed over a portion of the heat exchanger surface to enhance the cooling process by evaporation. The deluge system used in this study is termed the HOETERV system. The HOETERV deluge system uses a horizontal-tube, vertical-plate-finned heat exchanger. The delugeate is distributed at the top of the heat exchanger and is allowed to fall by gravity in a thin film on the face of the plate fin. Ammonia is used as the indirect heat transfer medium between the turbine exhaust steam and the ambient air. Steam is condensed by boiling ammonia in a condenser/reboiler. The ammonia is condensed in the heat exchanger by inducing airflow over the plate fins. Various design parameters of the cooling system have been studied to evaluate their impact on the optimum cooling system design and the power-plant/utility-system interface. Annual water availability was the most significant design parameter. Others included site meteorology, heat exchanger configuration and air flow, number and size of towers, fan system design, and turbine operation. It was concluded from this study that the HOETERV deluge system of dry/wet cooling, using ammonia as an intermediate heat transfer medium, offers the potential for significant cost savings compared with all-dry cooling, while achieving substantially reduced water consumption as compared to an evaporatively cooled power plant. (LCL)

  10. Development history of the gas turbine modular high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    2001-01-01

    The development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) as an environmentally agreeable and efficient power source to support the generation of electricity and achieve a broad range of high temperature industrial applications has been an evolutionary process spanning over four decades. This process has included ongoing major development in both the HTGR as a nuclear energy source and associated power conversion systems from the steam cycle to the gas turbine. This paper follows the development process progressively through individual plant designs from early research of the 1950s to the present focus on the gas turbine modular HTGR. (author)

  11. Annual Report: Turbine Thermal Management (30 September 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, Mary Anne; Richards, George

    2014-04-10

    The FY13 NETL-RUA Turbine Thermal Management effort supported the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Hydrogen Turbine Program through conduct of novel, fundamental, basic, and applied research in the areas of aerothermal heat transfer, coatings development, and secondary flow control. This research project utilized the extensive expertise and facilities readily available at NETL and the participating universities. The research approach included explorative studies based on scaled models and prototype coupon tests conducted under realistic high-temperature, pressurized, turbine operating conditions. This research is expected to render measurable outcomes that will meet DOE’s advanced turbine development goals of a 3- to 5-point increase in power island efficiency and a 30 percent power increase above the hydrogen-fired combined cycle baseline. In addition, knowledge gained from this project will further advance the aerothermal cooling and TBC technologies in the general turbine community. This project has been structured to address: • Development and design of aerothermal and materials concepts in FY12-13. • Design and manufacturing of these advanced concepts in FY13. • Bench-scale/proof-of-concept testing of these concepts in FY13-14 and beyond. In addition to a Project Management task, the Turbine Thermal Management project consists of four tasks that focus on a critical technology development in the areas of heat transfer, materials development, and secondary flow control. These include: • Aerothermal and Heat Transfer • Coatings and Materials Development • Design Integration and Testing • Secondary Flow Rotating Rig.

  12. Identifying Likely Disk-hosting M dwarfs with Disk Detective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Steven; Wisniewski, John; Kuchner, Marc J.; Disk Detective Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    M dwarfs are critical targets for exoplanet searches. Debris disks often provide key information as to the formation and evolution of planetary systems around higher-mass stars, alongside the planet themselves. However, less than 300 M dwarf debris disks are known, despite M dwarfs making up 70% of the local neighborhood. The Disk Detective citizen science project has identified over 6000 new potential disk host stars from the AllWISE catalog over the past three years. Here, we present preliminary results of our search for new disk-hosting M dwarfs in the survey. Based on near-infrared color cuts and fitting stellar models to photometry, we have identified over 500 potential new M dwarf disk hosts, nearly doubling the known number of such systems. In this talk, we present our methodology, and outline our ongoing work to confirm systems as M dwarf disks.

  13. Rotating disk atomization of Gd and Gd-Y for hydrogen liquefaction via magnetocaloric cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slinger, Tyler [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2016-12-17

    In order to enable liquid hydrogen fuel cell technologies for vehicles the cost of hydrogen liquefaction should be lowered. The current method of hydrogen liquefaction is the Claude cycle that has a figure of merit (FOM) of 0.3-0.35. New magnetocaloric hydrogen liquefaction devices have been proposed with a FOM>0.5, which is a significant improvement. A significant hurdle to realizing these devices is the synthesis of spherical rare earth based alloy powders of 200μm in diameter. In this study a centrifugal atomization method that used a rotating disk with a rotating oil quench bath was developed to make gadolinium and gadolinium-yttrium spheres. The composition of the spherical powders included pure Gd and Gd0.91Y0.09. The effect of atomization parameters, such as superheat, melt properties, disk shape, disk speed, and melt system materials and design, were investigated on the size distribution and morphology of the resulting spheres. The carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen impurity levels also were analyzed and compared with the magnetic performance of the alloys. The magnetic properties of the charge material as well as the resulting powders were measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The saturation magnetization and Curie temperature were the target properties for the resulting spheres. These values were compared with measurements taken on the charge material in order to investigate the effect of atomization processing on the alloys.

  14. Modelling of an air-cooled two-stage Rankine cycle for electricity production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This work considers a two stage Rankine cycle architecture slightly different from a standard Rankine cycle for electricity generation. Instead of expanding the steam to extremely low pressure, the vapor leaves the turbine at a higher pressure then having a much smaller specific volume. It is thus possible to greatly reduce the size of the steam turbine. The remaining energy is recovered by a bottoming cycle using a working fluid which has a much higher density than the water steam. Thus, the turbines and heat exchangers are more compact; the turbine exhaust velocity loss is lower. This configuration enables to largely reduce the global size of the steam water turbine and facilitate the use of a dry cooling system. The main advantage of such an air cooled two stage Rankine cycle is the possibility to choose the installation site of a large or medium power plant without the need of a large and constantly available water source; in addition, as compared to water cooled cycles, the risk regarding future operations is reduced (climate conditions may affect water availability or temperature, and imply changes in the water supply regulatory rules). The concept has been investigated by EDF R and D. A 22 MW prototype was developed in the 1970's using ammonia as the working fluid of the bottoming cycle for its high density and high latent heat. However, this fluid is toxic. In order to search more suitable working fluids for the two stage Rankine cycle application and to identify the optimal cycle configuration, we have established a working fluid selection methodology. Some potential candidates have been identified. We have evaluated the performances of the two stage Rankine cycles operating with different working fluids in both design and off design conditions. For the most acceptable working fluids, components of the cycle have been sized. The power plant concept can then be evaluated on a life cycle cost basis. (author)

  15. Effect of Reynolds number, turbulence level and periodic wake flow on heat transfer on low pressure turbine blades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suslov, D; Schulz, A; Wittig, S

    2001-05-01

    The development of effective cooling methods is of major importance for the design of new gas turbines blades. The conception of optimal cooling schemes requires a detailed knowledge of the heat transfer processes on the blade's surfaces. The thermal load of turbine blades is predominantly determined by convective heat transfer which is described by the local heat transfer coefficient. Heat transfer is closely related to the boundary layer development along the blade surface and hence depends on various flow conditions and geometrical parameters. Particularly Reynolds number, pressures gradient and turbulence level have great impact on the boundary layer development and the according heat transfer. Therefore, in the present study, the influence of Reynolds number, turbulence intensity, and periodic unsteady inflow on the local heat transfer of a typical low pressure turbine airfoil is experimentally examined in a plane cascade.

  16. Cast Alloys for Advanced Ultra Supercritical Steam Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. R. Holcomb, P. Wang, P. D. Jablonski, and J. A. Hawk,

    2010-05-01

    The proposed steam inlet temperature in the Advanced Ultra Supercritical (A-USC) steam turbine is high enough (760 °C) that traditional turbine casing and valve body materials such as ferritic/martensitic steels will not suffice due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Cast versions of several traditionally wrought Ni-based superalloys were evaluated for use as casing or valve components for the next generation of industrial steam turbines. The full size castings are substantial: 2-5,000 kg each half and on the order of 100 cm thick. Experimental castings were quite a bit smaller, but section size was retained and cooling rate controlled to produce equivalent microstructures. A multi-step homogenization heat treatment was developed to better deploy the alloy constituents. The most successful of these cast alloys in terms of creep strength (Haynes 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105) were subsequently evaluated by characterizing their microstructure as well as their steam oxidation resistance (at 760 and 800 °C).

  17. IMPER: Characterization of the wind field over a large wind turbine rotor - final report; Improved performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt Paulsen, U.; Wagner, R.

    2012-01-15

    A modern wind turbine rotor with a contemporary rotor size would easily with the tips penetrate the air between 116 m and 30 m and herby experience effects of different wind. With current rules on power performance measurements such as IEC 61400-121 the reference wind speed is measured at hub height, an oversimplification of the wind energy power over the rotor disk area is carried out. The project comprised a number of innovative and coordinated measurements on a full scale turbine with remote sensing technology and simulations on a 500 kW wind turbine for the effects of wind field characterization. The objective with the present report is to give a short overview of the different experiments carried out and results obtained within the final phase of this project. (Author)

  18. The feasibility of water injection into the turbine coolant to permit gas turbine contingency power for helicopter application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fossen, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    It is pointed out that in certain emergency situations it may be desirable to obtain power from a helicopter engine at levels greater than the maximum rating. Yost (1976) has reported studies concerning methods of power augmentation in the one engine inoperative (OEI) case. It was found that a combination of water/alcohol injection into the inlet and overtemperature/overspeed could provide adequate emergency power. The present investigation is concerned with the results of a feasibility study which analytically investigated the maximum possible level of augmentation with constant gas generator turbine stress rupture life as a constraint. In the proposed scheme, the increased engine output is obtained by turbine overtemperature, however, the temperature of the compressor bleed air used for hot section cooling is lowered by injecting and evaporating water.

  19. Analysis of Turbine Load Rejection for APR1400 using SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Chan Eok; Choi, Jong Ho; Lee, Gyu Cheon [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Turbine Load Rejection event is one of the Performance Related Design Basis Event (PRDBE) that can be stabilized using plant control systems without any safety system actuation. The initiation of the event is turbine load rejection from 100% to 5% in 0.019 seconds. The NSSS control systems of APR1400 is composed of the Power Control System (PCS) and the Process-Component Control System (P-CCS). The PCS includes Reactor Regulating System (RRS), Reactor Power Cutback System (RPCS) and Digital Rod Control System (DRCS). The P-CCS includes the Pressurizer Pressure Control System (PPCS), the Pressurizer Level Control System (PLCS), the Feedwater Control System (FWCS) and the Steam Bypass Control System (SBCS). Turbine load rejection results in the increase of secondary pressure due to sudden blocking of steam flow to turbine. Then the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) cooling through steam generators is decreased rapidly and the RCS temperature will be increased. Turbine load rejection is a typical event to test NSSS control systems since it requires the automatic response of all major NSSS control systems. It is shown that the NSSS control systems of APR1400 have the capability to stabilize the plant without any safety system actuation for turbine load rejection event. This analysis results show that SPACE code has the capability to analyze the turbine load rejection event. However, further validation is necessary for other PRDBEs such as Two Main Feedwater Pumps Trip, Turbine Load Step Change and Turbine Load Ramp Down (5%/min) to verify the capability of SPACE for the full range of performance analyses.

  20. Analysis of Turbine Load Rejection for APR1400 using SPACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Chan Eok; Choi, Jong Ho; Lee, Gyu Cheon

    2016-01-01

    Turbine Load Rejection event is one of the Performance Related Design Basis Event (PRDBE) that can be stabilized using plant control systems without any safety system actuation. The initiation of the event is turbine load rejection from 100% to 5% in 0.019 seconds. The NSSS control systems of APR1400 is composed of the Power Control System (PCS) and the Process-Component Control System (P-CCS). The PCS includes Reactor Regulating System (RRS), Reactor Power Cutback System (RPCS) and Digital Rod Control System (DRCS). The P-CCS includes the Pressurizer Pressure Control System (PPCS), the Pressurizer Level Control System (PLCS), the Feedwater Control System (FWCS) and the Steam Bypass Control System (SBCS). Turbine load rejection results in the increase of secondary pressure due to sudden blocking of steam flow to turbine. Then the Reactor Coolant System (RCS) cooling through steam generators is decreased rapidly and the RCS temperature will be increased. Turbine load rejection is a typical event to test NSSS control systems since it requires the automatic response of all major NSSS control systems. It is shown that the NSSS control systems of APR1400 have the capability to stabilize the plant without any safety system actuation for turbine load rejection event. This analysis results show that SPACE code has the capability to analyze the turbine load rejection event. However, further validation is necessary for other PRDBEs such as Two Main Feedwater Pumps Trip, Turbine Load Step Change and Turbine Load Ramp Down (5%/min) to verify the capability of SPACE for the full range of performance analyses

  1. Experimentally aided development of a turbine heat transfer prediction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, A.E.; White, A.J.; Lai, C.C.; Guo, S.M.; Oldfield, M.L.G.; Lock, G.D.

    2004-01-01

    In the design of cooled turbomachinery blading a central role is played by the computer methods used to optimise the aerodynamic and thermal performance of the turbine aerofoils. Estimates of the heat load on the turbine blading should be as accurate as possible, in order that adequate life may be obtained with the minimum cooling air requirement. Computer methods are required which are able to model transonic flows, which are a mixture of high temperature combustion gases and relatively cool air injected through holes in the aerofoil surface. These holes may be of complex geometry, devised after empirical studies of the optimum shape and the most cost effective manufacturing technology. The method used here is a further development of the heat transfer design code (HTDC), originally written by Rolls-Royce plc under subcontract to Rolls-Royce Inc for the United States Air Force. The physical principles of the modelling employed in the code are explained without extensive mathematical details. The paper describes the calibration of the code in conjunction with a series of experimental measurements on a scale model of a high-pressure nozzle guide vane at non-dimensionally correct engine conditions. The results are encouraging, although indicating that some further work is required in modelling highly accelerated pressure surface flow

  2. DARWIN-HC: A Tool to Predict Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Based Turbine Disks, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hot Corrosion of turbine engine components has been studied for many years. The underlying mechan-isms of Type I Hot Corrosion and Type II Hot Corrosion are...

  3. DARWIN-HC: A Tool to Predict Hot Corrosion of Nickel-Based Turbine Disks, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hot Corrosion of turbine engine components has been studied for many years. The underlying mechan-isms of Type I Hot Corrosion and Type II Hot Corrosion are...

  4. Medium temperature carbon dioxide gas turbine reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yasuyoshi; Nitawaki, Takeshi; Muto, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) gas turbine reactor with a partial pre-cooling cycle attains comparable cycle efficiencies of 45.8% at medium temperature of 650 deg. C and pressure of 7 MPa with a typical helium (He) gas turbine reactor of GT-MHR (47.7%) at high temperature of 850 deg. C. This higher efficiency is ascribed to: reduced compression work around the critical point of CO 2 ; and consideration of variation in CO 2 specific heat at constant pressure, C p , with pressure and temperature into cycle configuration. Lowering temperature to 650 deg. C provides flexibility in choosing materials and eases maintenance through the lower diffusion leak rate of fission products from coated particle fuel by about two orders of magnitude. At medium temperature of 650 deg. C, less expensive corrosion resistant materials such as type 316 stainless steel are applicable and their performance in CO 2 have been proven during extensive operation in AGRs. In the previous study, the CO 2 cycle gas turbomachinery weight was estimated to be about one-fifth compared with He cycles. The proposed medium temperature CO 2 gas turbine reactor is expected to be an alternative solution to current high-temperature He gas turbine reactors

  5. ORCENT-2, Full Load Steam Turbine Cycle Thermodynamics for LWR Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: ORCENT-2 performs heat and mass balance calculations at valves-wide-open design conditions, maximum guaranteed rating conditions, and an approximation of part-load conditions for steam turbine cycles supplied with throttle steam, characteristic of contemporary light-water reactors. The program handles both condensing and back-pressure turbine exhaust arrangements. Turbine performance calculations are based on the General Electric Company method for 1800-rpm large steam turbine- generators operating with light-water-cooled nuclear reactors. Output includes all information normally shown on a turbine-cycle heat balance diagram. 2 - Method of solution: The turbine performance calculations follow the procedures outlined in General Electric report GET-6020. ORCENT-2 utilizes the 1967 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) formulations and procedures for calculating the properties of steam, adapted for ORNL use by D.W. Altom. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of: 12 feed-water heaters, 5 moisture removal stages in the low-pressure turbine section. ORCENT-2 is limited to 1800-rpm tandem-compound turbine-generators with single- or double-flow high pressure sections and one, two, or three double-flow low-pressure turbine sections. Steam supply for LWR cycles should be between 900 and 1100 psia and slightly wet to 100 degrees F of initial superheat. Generator rating should be greater than 100 MVA

  6. Feasibility improvement project for the gas turbine power plant in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Investigations and discussions have been given on measures to improve energy conservation and efficiency at a power plant of Kish Water and Power Company (KWPC) in Iran. The site has high ambient temperature throughout a year, making the gas turbine power plant capable of generating power only at about 70% of the rated output, with the power generation efficiency decreasing. The project has analyzed the current situation at the plant, and evaluated different means that appear effective in improving the efficiency, including the gas turbine absorbed air cooling system, the steam injection system, and the combined cycle. As a result of the discussions, it was revealed that energy saving effect can be obtained at 145 TJ with the gas turbine absorbed air cooling system, 224 TJ with the steam injection system, and 1017 TJ with the combined cycle. The annual reduction of greenhouse gas emission due to the above energy conservation would be about 11 thousand tons, 16.5 thousand tons, and 75 thousand tons, respectively. However, the investment payback period would be about 2.45 years, 8.31 years, and 14.21 years, respectively. Therefore, the profitability does not appear very attractive because of low fuel unit cost. (NEDO)

  7. Experimentally-determined external heat loss of automotive gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, P. R.; Wulf, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    An external heat balance was conducted on a 150 HP two-shaft automotive gas turbine engine. The engine was enclosed in a calorimeter box and the temperature change of cooling air passing through the box was measured. Cooling airflow ranges of 1.6 to 2.1 lb-per-second and 0.8 to 1.1 lb-per-second were used. The engine housing heat loss increased as the cooling airflow through the calorimeter box was increased, as would be the case in a moving automobile. The heat balance between the total energy input and the sum of shaft power output and various l