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Sample records for tungsten trioxide thin

  1. Colour centres in amorphous tungsten trioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleperis, J.J.; Cikmach, P.D.; Lusis, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic, optical, and electrical properties of thin tungsten trioxide (a-WO 3 ) films obtained on substrates with different temperatures and annealed in air and vacuum are investigated. On the basis of these results and recent structural investigations a structure model of the a-WO 3 film is given: a spatial network of tightly bounded clusters which are built from hydrated WO 6 octahedra. These octahedra contain terminal oxygens and being axially distorted they are the sites for localization of injected electrons. The colour centres formed are paramagnetic (ESR signal from W 5+ ) and their optical absorption is satisfactorily described by the intervalence charge transfer between the localized states of W 5+ and W 6+ ions. (author)

  2. Electrodeposition-Based Fabrication and Characteristics of Tungsten Trioxide Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, tungsten trioxide (WO3 thin films were electrodeposited on indium tin oxide (ITO glass to form WO3-coated glass. The electrodeposition (ED time (tED and ED current (IED were varied to control the film thickness and morphology. Furthermore, the crystallization of the thin films was controlled by annealing them at 250°C, 500°C, and 700°C. The results showed that the thickness of the WO3 thin films increased with tED and IED. The as-deposited thin films and those annealed at 250°C were amorphous, whereas the WO3 thin films annealed at 500 and 700°C were in the anorthic phase. Moreover, the amorphous WO3-coated glass exhibited high transmittance in visible light and low transmittance in near-infrared light, whereas the anorthic WO3-coated glass had high transmittance in near-infrared light. An empirical formula for determining the thickness of WO3 thin films was derived through multiple regressions of the ED process parameters.

  3. Morphology-tailored synthesis of tungsten trioxide (hydrate) thin films and their photocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zhihui; Wang, Jinmin; Ke, Lin; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2011-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide hydrate (3WO(3)·H(2)O) films with different morphologies were directly grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrate via a facile crystal-seed-assisted hydrothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that 3WO(3)·H(2)O thin films composed of platelike, wedgelike, and sheetlike nanostructures could be selectively synthesized by adding Na(2)SO(4), (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and CH(3)COONH(4) as capping agents, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies indicated that these films were of orthorhombic structure. The as-prepared thin films after dehydration showed obvious photocatalytic activities. The best film grown using CH(3)COONH(4) as a capping agent generated anodic photocurrents of 1.16 mA/cm(2) for oxidization of methanol and 0.5 mA/cm(2) for water splitting with the highest photoconversion efficiency of about 0.3% under simulated solar illumination.

  4. Growth, structural, electrical and optical properties of the thermally evaporated tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, K.J. [Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India); Panchal, C.J. [Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India)], E-mail: cjpanchal_msu@yahoo.com; Kheraj, V.A.; Desai, M.S. [Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India)

    2009-03-15

    Tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films are of great interest due to their enormous and promising applications in various opto-electronic thin-film devices. We have investigated the structural, electrical, and optical properties of the WO{sub 3} thin films grown by thermal evaporation of WO{sub 3} powder and their dependence on growth condition. The WO{sub 3} thin films were grown on glass substrates at different substrate temperature varying from room temperature to 510 deg. C. The structural characterization and surface morphology were carried out using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy, respectively. The amorphous films were obtained at substrate temperatures below 450 deg. C whereas films grown above 450 deg. C were crystalline. The surface roughness and the grain size of the films increase on increasing the substrate temperature. The electrical characterization has been carried out using four-point-probe methods. The resistivity of the films decreases significantly while the carrier concentration and mobility increase with the substrate temperature. The transparency and optical energy band-gap, E{sub g}, of the films are found to decrease monotonically as the substrate temperature increases.

  5. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  6. Photoelectrocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid using immobilized tungsten trioxide photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohite, S.V.; Ganbavle, V.V.; Patil, V.V.; Rajpure, K.Y., E-mail: rajpure@yahoo.com

    2016-11-01

    The thin films of WO{sub 3} were deposited with different solution quantities using chemical spray pyrolysis technique. The WO{sub 3} film thickness effect on the photoelectrochemical, structural, morphological and optical properties is studied. Polycrystalline, monoclinic WO{sub 3} films possess photoelectrochemical performance having onset potentials around +0.3 V/SCE in 0.01 M HClO{sub 4}. The maximum photocurrent density (I{sub ph} = 635 μA/cm{sup 2}) is observed for the film deposited with 75 ml solution quantity. The FE-SEM image shows compact structure with petals like morphology. The estimated indirect band gap of WO{sub 3} films lies in the range of 2.60–2.65 eV. The photoelectrocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid is studied using WO{sub 3} photoelectrode under UV light illumination and 57 ± 3% removal of benzoic acid is achieved. The mineralization of benzoic acid in aqueous solution has been studied by measuring COD values. - Highlights: • The photoactivity of sprayed tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) thin film. • Structural analysis of WO{sub 3} thin films. • Photoelectrocatalytic and photocatalytic degradation of benzoic acid. • Reaction kinetics and mineralization of pollutants by COD.

  7. Programming voltage reduction in phase change memory cells with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Feng; Song Zhitang; Gong Yuefeng; Wu Liangcai; Feng Songlin; Chen, Bomy

    2008-01-01

    A phase change memory cell with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode is investigated. The crystalline tungsten trioxide heating layer promotes the temperature rise in the Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 layer which causes the reduction in the reset voltage compared to a conventional phase change memory cell. Theoretical thermal simulation and calculation for the reset process are applied to understand the thermal effect of the tungsten trioxide heating layer/electrode. The improvement in thermal efficiency of the PCM cell mainly originates from the low thermal conductivity of the crystalline tungsten trioxide material.

  8. Band gap engineering and optical properties of tungsten trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yuan; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a good photoanode material for water oxidation but it is not an efficient absorber of sunlight because of its large band gap (2.6 eV). Recently, stable clathrates of WO3 with interstitial N2 molecules were synthesized [1], which are isostructural to monoclinic WO3 but have a substantially smaller bang gap, 1.8 eV. We have studied the structural, electronic, an vibrational properties of N2-WO3 clathrates using ab-initio calculations and analyzed the physical origin of their gap reduction. We also studied the effect of atomic dopants, in particular rare gases. Substantial band gap reduction has been observed, especially in the case of doping with Xe, due to both electronic and structural effects. Absorption spectra have been computed by solving the Bethe-Salpeter Equation [2] to gain a thourough insight into the optical properties of pure and doped tungsten trioxide. [1] Q. Mi, Y. Ping, Y. Li., B.S. Brunschwig, G. Galli, H B. Gray, N S. Lewis (preprint) [2]D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164109 (2010)

  9. Electrical and optical properties of mixed phase tungsten trioxide films grown by laser pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser pyrolysis was chosen to synthesize tungsten trioxide starting with tungsten ethoxide precursor. The film was found to have a thickness that varied from 205 nm to 1 µm. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a...

  10. Gasochromic property of dehydrogenation-catalyst loaded tungsten trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Igarashi, Hidetoshi; Isozumi, Yukihiro; Yamamoto, Shunya; Aritani, Hirofumi; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2013-02-01

    The gasochromic property of dehydrogenation-catalyst loaded tungsten trioxide (M/WO3) powders was examined in exposure to gaseous cyclohexane under different kinds and contents of catalysts, catalyst temperatures, and cyclohexane concentrations. The change in the intensity of visible lights reflected from the M/WO3 powders was in situ obtained using a portable visible-light spectrometer associating with the analysis of dehydrogenation products when M/WO3 powders were exposed to cyclohexane gas. The catalyst of Pt was a catalyst initiating dehydrogenation and change of reflected light intensity at lower temperatures in comparison with the catalysts of Pd and Rh. Among 0.1, 0.5, and 1 wt% Pt/WO3 powders, 0.5 wt% Pt/WO3 powders demonstrated large change of reflected 640-nm lights, 5.4%, to visually detect their coloration at lower temperatures. The heating of 0.5 wt% Pt/WO3 powders at temperatures higher than 130 °C was required to visually detect cyclohexane at a concentration of 1 vol%, lower than the combustion lower limit (1.3 vol%). The quantitative analysis of hydrogen species such as hydrogen atoms and ions absorbed in 0.1-1 wt% Pt/WO3 powders demonstrated that Pt/WO3 powders would absorb the same amount of hydrogen species independent of loaded-Pt contents.

  11. Towards Near-Infrared Photosensitization of Tungsten Trioxide Nanostructured Films by Upconverting Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venne, Frederic

    Nanostructured metal oxides semiconductors are widely used in solar energy related applications, such as in dye-sensitized solar cells. Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is an electrochromic material, extensively investigated in solar energy conversion (e.g. photoelectrochemistry) and conservation (e.g. electrochromism). However, WO3, because of its wide bandgap (≈ 2.5 eV), is transparent to an important portion of the solar spectrum and can effectively absorb light only up to ca. 500 nm, which limits the power conversion efficiency of devices based thereon. Upconverting materials can absorb several low-energy photons to emit one high-energy photon. In particular, upconverting nanoparticles are widely studied in biomedical and solar energy applications, as they can transform two or several infrared photons in a visible photon. As the Sun contains important NIR and IR portion, UCNPs are interesting candidates to transform NIR or IR light into visible light to be absorbed by wide bandgap semiconductor, such as metal oxides. The work presented in this master's thesis consists in embedding NaGdF4:Er3+, Yb3+ UCNPs into a nanostructured WO3 matrix. The objective is to increase the power conversion efficiency of WO3 after solar light harvesting. The integration of two materials with nanostructured nature has the potential to lead to a good synergy between them. We include an article in this master's thesis. In this article, we report on the mixing of NaGdF4:Er3+, Yb 3+ UCNPs with WO3 in solution and on the deposition of the two-component solution on ITO-patterned electrodes. After engineering the fabrication and deposition of the thin nanocomposite films, they were systematically studied. Morphology was studied by atomic force microscopy, structure by X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence by fluorescence hyperspectral microscopy, and charge carrier transport under NIR irradiation by current-time measurements. Notably, we observed an increase in the value of the current with

  12. Determination of phosphorus and silicon in tungsten trioxide as reduced molybdotungsten complexes without matrix separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chkanikova, O.K.; Dorokhova, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    Studied are conditions of formation and reduction of molybdotungsten phosphorus (MTPC) and molybdotungsten silicon (MTSC) complexes at high excess of the ligand. It is established that MTPC are formed in a wide pH range, limited by aggregate stability of the solution (pH 4.5). Using the method of isomolar series it is shown that at pH 1.2 a complex with one Mo atom in coordination sphere is formed, at pH 3.2 - with two Mo atoms. Spectrophotometric method of phosphorus and silicon determination of tungsten trioxide without the base separation is developed. The method is based on silicon determination after MTPC decomposition in the presence of citric acid and determination of silicon and phosphorus sum under conditions of MTPC formation in the presence of oxalic acid. Phosphorus amount is determined according to the difference

  13. Photodecomposition Profile of Curcumin in the Existence of Tungsten Trioxide Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Zaen, R.; Oktiani, R.; Abdullah, A. G.

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the stability of curcumin solution in the existence of tungsten trioxide (WO3) particles under light illumination. In the experimental method, curcumin extracted from Indonesian local turmeric was added with WO3 microparticles and put into the photoreactor system. The photostability performance of curcumin was conducted for 22 hours using 100 W of Neon Lamp. The results showed that the curcumin solution was relatively stable. When curcumin without existence of WO3 was irradiated, no change in the curcumin concentration was found. However, when curcumin solution was mixed with WO3 particles, decreases in the concentration of curcumin was found. The concentration of curcumin with WO3 after light irradiation was about 73.58%. Based on the results, we concluded that the curcumin is relatively stable against light. However, its lightirradiation stability decreases with additional inorganic material.

  14. Photo-controllable thermoelectric properties with reversibility and photo-thermoelectric effects of tungsten trioxide accompanied by its photochromic phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azuma, Chiori; Kawano, Takuto; Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The addition of photo-controllable properties to tungsten trioxide (WO 3 ) is of interest for developing practical applications of WO 3 as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a sputtered crystalline WO 3 thin film generated thermoelectric power due to ultraviolet (UV) light-induced band-gap excitation and was accompanied by a photochromic reaction resulting from generating W 5+ ions. The thermoelectric properties (electrical conductivity (σ) and Seebeck coefficient (S)) and coloration of WO 3 could be reversibly switched by alternating the external stimulus between UV light irradiation and dark storage. After irradiating the film with UV light, σ increased, whereas the absolute value of S decreased, and the photochromic (coloration) reaction was detected. Notably, the opposite behavior was exhibited by WO 3 after dark storage, and this reversible cycle could be repeated at least three times. Moreover, photo-thermoelectric effects (photo-conductive effect (photo-conductivity, σ photo ) and photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S photo )) were also detected in response to visible-light irradiation of the colored WO 3 thin films. Under visible-light irradiation, σ photo and the absolute value of S photo increased and decreased, respectively. These effects are likely attributable to the excitation of electrons from the mid-gap visible light absorption band (W 5+ state) to the conduction band of WO 3 . Our findings demonstrate that the simultaneous, reversible switching of multiple properties of WO 3 thin film is achieved by the application of an external stimulus and that this material exhibits photo-thermoelectric effects when irradiated with visible-light.

  15. Solution-processed hybrid light emitting and photovoltaic devices comprising zinc oxide nanorod arrays and tungsten trioxide layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chi Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to prepare inverted optoelectronic devices with improved performance by combining zinc oxide (ZnO nanorod arrays and tungsten trioxide (WO3 layer. ZnO seed layers with thickness of 52 nm were established, followed by growth of ZnO nanorods with length of 300 nm vertical to the ITO substrates in the precursor bath. The ZnO nanorod arrays possess high transmittance up to 92% in the visible range. Inverted light-emitting devices with the configuration of ITO/ZnO nanorods/ionic PF/MEH-PPV/PEDOT:PSS/Au were constructed. The best device achieved a max brightness and current efficiency of 10,620 cd/m2 and 0.25 cd/A at 10 V, respectively, revealing much higher brightness compared with conventional devices using Ca/Al as cathode, or inverted devices based on ZnO thin film. By inserting a WO3 thin layer between PEDOT:PSS and Au electrode, the max brightness and current efficiency were further improved to 21,881 cd/m2 and 0.43 cd/A, respectively. Inverted polymer solar cells were also fabricated with the configuration of ITO/ZnO nanorods/ionic PF/P3HT:PC61BM/PEDOT/WO3/Au. The best device parameters, including the open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, fill factor, and power conversion efficiency, reached 0.54 V, 14.87 mA/cm2, 41%, and 3.31%, respectively

  16. Tungsten Trioxide/Zinc Tungstate Bilayers: Electrochromic Behaviors, Energy Storage and Electron Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Huige; Ding, Daowei; Yan, Xingru; Guo, Jiang; Shao, Lu; Chen, Haoran; Sun, Luyi; Colorado, Henry A.; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten oxide and zinc tungstate bilayers have been prepared via a facile sol-gel method for integrated applications of electrochromic behaviors and energy storage;. • Electron transfer behaviors between the semiconductor bilayer films have been found dependent on the bilayer assembly sequence;. • Methylene blue (MB) has been employed for the first time as an indicator to study the electron transfer phenomenon in the bilayer films. - Abstract: Pair-sequentially spin-coated tungsten trioxide (WO 3 ) and zinc tungstate (ZnWO 4 ) bilayer films onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass slides have been prepared via sol-gel methods followed by annealing. The bilayers (ZnWO 4 /WO 3 denoting the bilayer film with the inner layer of ZnWO 4 and the outer layer of WO 3 on the ITO while WO 3 /ZnWO 4 standing for the bilayer film with the inner layer of WO 3 and the outer layer of ZnWO 4 on the ITO) exhibit integrated functions of electrochromic and energy storage behaviors as indicated by the in situ spectroelectrochemistry and cyclic voltammetry (CV) results. Accordingly, blue color was observed for the bilayer films at -1 V in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 solution. An areal capacitance of 140 and 230 μF/cm 2 was obtained for the ZnWO 4 /WO 3 , and WO 3 /ZnWO 4 film, respectively, at a scan rate of 0.05 V/s in the CV measurements. The CV results also unveiled the electron transfer behavior between the semiconductor films in the oxidation process, suggesting a sequence-dependent electrochemical response in the bilayer films. Meanwhile, methylene blue (MB) was used as an indicator to study the electron transfer phenomenon during the reduction process at negative potentials of -0.4 and -0.8 V, in 0.5 M Na 2 SO 4 . The results indicated that the electrons transfer across the bilayers was enhanced at more negative potentials

  17. Photo- and gas-tuned, reversible thermoelectric properties and anomalous photo-thermoelectric effects of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kenta; Watanabe, Takuya [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Kakemoto, Hirofumi; Irie, Hiroshi, E-mail: hirie@yamanashi.ac.jp [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, 4-3-11 Takeda, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan)

    2016-06-28

    We report the photo- and gas-controllable properties of platinum-loaded tungsten trioxide (Pt/WO{sub 3}), which is of interest for developing practical applications of WO{sub 3} as well as for interpreting such phenomena from scientific viewpoints. Here, a Pt/WO{sub 3} thin film generated a thermoelectric power due to the ultraviolet-light-induced band-gap excitation (photochromic (PC) reaction) and/or dark storage in formic acid vapor (gaschromic (GC) reaction) in the absence of O{sub 2}, resulting from the generation of W{sup 5+} ions. After such chromic reactions, the electrical conductivity (σ) is increased, whereas the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient (S) is decreased. The changes in σ and S and their rate of change for consistency increased in the order of: during the PC reaction < during the GC reaction < during simultaneous PC and GC reactions. The opposite behaviors, a decrease in σ and an increase in S, were exhibited by Pt/WO{sub 3} in the presence of O{sub 2} after dark storage or visible-light irradiation. This reversible cycle could be repeated. Moreover, anomalous, nontrivial photo-thermoelectric effects (a photoconductive effect (photoconductivity, σ{sub photo}) and a photo-Seebeck effect (photo-Seebeck coefficient, S{sub photo})) were also detected in response to the visible-light irradiation of Pt/WO{sub 3} in the absence of O{sub 2} after chromic reactions. Under visible-light irradiation, both σ{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo} are increased. After the irradiation, both values were decreased, that is, σ and the absolute value of S were smaller than σ{sub photo} and the absolute value of S{sub photo}, respectively. These effects are likely to be due to the photoinduced charge carriers and the accumulated electrons in Pt contributing to the increase in σ{sub photo}. In addition, electrons are extracted from the W{sup 5+} state, decreasing the number of W{sup 5+} in H{sub x}WO{sub 3} and thus contributing to the

  18. Efficient degradation of methylene blue dye over tungsten trioxide/multi-walled carbon nanotube system as a novel photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinari, Mohammad; Momeni, Mohamad Mohsen; Ahangarpour, Marzieh [Isfahan University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Combination of acid-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube/tungsten trioxide (MWCNT/WO{sub 3}) with different MWCNT's weight percentages as visible light-induced photocatalysts for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye was synthesized. These photocatalysts were characterized by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Their photocatalytic activities were tested by using MB as a model compound. The results show that the MWCNT/WO{sub 3} hybrid nanostructures exhibit higher photocatalytic activity than pure WO{sub 3} or MWCNTs due to their higher absorption enhancement in visible light region and effective separation of electrons and holes. The stability of the hybrid was characterized through cyclic photocatalytic test. (orig.)

  19. Electrochemical properties of tungsten oxysulphide thin films as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Lithium microbattery; tungsten oxysulphide; thin film; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); sputtering. ... At the beginning of the intercalation, W6+ was first partially reduced into W5+, and then into W4+, but the important stage was the reduction of W4+ into W0. In W0, the electron binding energy was very ...

  20. Large-Scale Multifunctional Electrochromic-Energy Storage Device Based on Tungsten Trioxide Monohydrate Nanosheets and Prussian White.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhijie; Li, Xiaomin; Chen, Yongbo; He, Xiaoli; Xu, Xiaoke; Gao, Xiangdong

    2017-09-06

    A high-performance electrochromic-energy storage device (EESD) is developed, which successfully realizes the multifunctional combination of electrochromism and energy storage by constructing tungsten trioxide monohydrate (WO 3 ·H 2 O) nanosheets and Prussian white (PW) film as asymmetric electrodes. The EESD presents excellent electrochromic properties of broad optical modulation (61.7%), ultrafast response speed (1.84/1.95 s), and great coloration efficiency (139.4 cm 2 C -1 ). In particular, remarkable cyclic stability (sustaining 82.5% of its initial optical modulation after 2500 cycles as an electrochromic device, almost fully maintaining its capacitance after 1000 cycles as an energy storage device) is achieved. The EESD is also able to visually detect the energy storage level via reversible and fast color changes. Moreover, the EESD can be combined with commercial solar cells to constitute an intelligent operating system in the architectures, which would realize the adjustment of indoor sunlight and the improvement of physical comfort totally by the rational utilization of solar energy without additional electricity. Besides, a scaled-up EESD (10 × 11 cm 2 ) is further fabricated as a prototype. Such promising EESD shows huge potential in practically serving as electrochromic smart windows and energy storage devices.

  1. In situ polymerization synthesis of Z-scheme tungsten trioxide/polyimide photocatalyst with enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Pengcheng; Heng, Huimin; Sun, Yanhong; Liu, Xia

    2018-01-01

    A novel direct Z-scheme P-containing tungsten trioxide/polyimide (PWO/PI) photocatalyst was synthesized by an in-situ solid-state polymerization strategy to enhance the visible-light photocatalytic oxidation capacity of PI. The effects of polymerization temperature and PWO content on the physicochemical properties of PWO/PI composites and photocatalytic degradation efficiency of imidacloprid were investigated. The photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, UV-vis diffused reflection spectra and N2 adsorption-desorption isothermals. The results showed that the photocatalysts with visible-light photocatalytic activity can already be prepared at 300 °C. The PWO/PI composites exhibited a lamellar structure and PWO was wrapped by PI. After PWO was introduced, there was a significant interaction between PWO and PI, and the visible light response of photocatalysts was also improved. The visible-light photocatalytic degradation efficiency of imidacloprid on 3% PWO/PI-300 composite was about 3.2 times of commercial P25, and the corresponding pseudo-first-order rate constant was about 2.9 times of pristine PI. The Z-scheme photocatalytic system of PWO/PI composites was confirmed by the electron spin resonance technology, terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique, reactive species trapping experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and photoluminescence of PWO/PI composites and pristine photocatalysts.

  2. Polymer assisted deposition of electrochromic tungsten oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalagi, S.S. [Govindram Seksaria Science College, Belgaum 590006, Karnataka (India); Dalavi, D.S.; Pawar, R.C.; Tarwal, N.L.; Mali, S.S. [Thin Films Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416004, M.S. (India); Patil, P.S., E-mail: psp_phy@unishivaji.ac.i [Thin Films Materials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Shivaji University, Kolhapur 416004, M.S. (India)

    2010-03-18

    We report the synthesis of structurally and uniformly deposited porous tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films for the first time by the novel route of polymer assisted deposition (PAD) using ammonium tungstate as a precursor with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as an additive. The effect of deposition parameters on the morphological, optical and electrochemical performance of the thin films is investigated. WO{sub 3} thin films were characterized for their structural, morphological, optical and electrochromic properties. XRD result indicates monoclinic phase of WO{sub 2.92}. FT-Raman studies show high intensity peaks centered at 997 cm{sup -1}and 798 cm{sup -1}. SEM results indicate that there is uniform deposition of porous WO{sub 3}-PVA agglomerates on the transparent substrates. SEM data show low dense structure of an average grain size of about 1 {mu}m. Electrochromic studies reveal highly reversible and the stable nature of the thin films. Transmission data show an optical modulation density of 46.57% at 630 nm with an excellent reversibility of 89% and an electrochromic coloration efficiency of 36 cm{sup 2}/C.

  3. Nanoplate-like tungsten trioxide (hydrate) films prepared by crystal-seed-assisted hydrothermal reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Yang, L.; Dai, B.; Yang, Z.; Guo, S.; Zhu, J.

    2017-07-01

    Vertically-aligned WO3 nanoplates on transparent conducting fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) glass were prepared by a facile template-free crystal-seed-assisted hydrothermal method. The effects of the hydrothermal temperature and reaction time on the crystal structure and morphology of the products were investigated by XRD and SEM. The XRD results showed that the as-prepared thin films obtained below 150∘C comprised orthorhombic WO3 ṡ H2O and completely converted to monoclinic WO3 at 180∘C. It was also noted that there was a phase transformation from orthorhombic to monoclinic by increasing the reaction time from 1 to 12 h. SEM analysis revealed that WO3 thin films are composed of plate-like nanostructures.

  4. Crystallization kinetics of amorphous aluminum-tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Car, T.; Radic, N. [Rugjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia). Div. of Mater. Sci.; Ivkov, J. [Institute of Physics, Bijenicka 46, P.O.B. 304, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Babic, E.; Tonejc, A. [Faculty of Sciences, Physics Department, Bijenicka 32, P.O.B. 162, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    1999-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of the amorphous Al-W thin films under non-isothermal conditions was examined by continuous in situ electrical resistance measurements in vacuum. The estimated crystallization temperature of amorphous films in the composition series of the Al{sub 82}W{sub 18} to Al{sub 62}W{sub 38} compounds ranged from 800 K to 920 K. The activation energy for the crystallization and the Avrami exponent were determined. The results indicated that the crystallization mechanism in films with higher tungsten content was a diffusion-controlled process, whereas in films with the composition similar to the stoichiometric compound (Al{sub 4}W), the interface-controlled crystallization probably occurred. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 26 refs.

  5. Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    There is no substitute for tungsten in its main field of application so that the demand will not decrease, but there is a need for further important applications. If small variations are left out of account, a small but steady increase in the annual tungsten consumption can be expected. The amount of tungsten available will increase due to the exploritation of new deposits and the extension of existing mines. This tendency will probably be increased by the world-wide prospection. It is hard to make an assessment of the amount of tungsten are obtained in the People's Republic of china, the purchases of Eastern countries in the West, and the sales policy of the USA; pice forecasts are therefore hard to make. A rather interesting subject with regard to the tungsten cycle as a whole is the reprocessing of tungsten-containing wastes. (orig.) [de

  6. Electrochemical properties of tungsten oxysulphide thin films as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1⋅2 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed on different compounds in both inter- calated (Li1WO1⋅05S2 ... during the first discharge–charge cycle. The analysis of both the W4f and the S2p peaks has shown that the redox processes involve not only the tungsten atoms but also sulphur atoms.

  7. Gas-chromism in ultrasonic spray pyrolyzed tungsten oxide thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple and inexpensive ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) technique has been employed to deposit tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films by spraying 2.0 mM aqueous ammonium metatungstate solution onto the amorphous glass substrates kept at 250°C. The films were further annealed at 400°C for 4 h in air. X-ray diffraction ...

  8. Magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer at the multichannel surface scattering of conduction electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutsishin, P.P.; Nakhodkin, T.N.

    1982-01-01

    The magnetoresistance of tungsten thin wafer with the (110) surface was studied at the adsorption of tungsten dioxide. The method of low-energy electron diffraction was used to study the symmetry of ordered surface structures. Using the method of the magnetoresistance measurement the character of the scattering of conduction electrons was investigated. THe dependence of magnetoresistance on the surface concentration of tungsten dioxide correlated w1th the structure of the surface layer of atoms, what was explained with allowance for diffraction of conduction electrons at the metal boundary. The magnetoresistance maximum for the (2x2) structure, which characterised decrease in surface conduction under the conditions of static skin effect, was explained by multichannel mirror reflection with the recombinations of electron and ho.le sections of Fermi Surface

  9. Electrochromic properties of electrodeposited tungsten oxide (WO3) thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalavi, D. S.; Kalagi, S. S.; Mali, S. S.; More, A. J.; Patil, R. S.; Patil, P. S.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, we report on a potentiostatic electrochemical procedure employing an ethanolic solution of peroxotungstic acid yielded tungsten oxide (WO3) films specifically for transmissive electrochromic devices (ECDs) such as "smart windows". WO3 film was confirmed from the binding energy determination by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies. The diffusion coefficient during intercalation and deintercalation was found to be 2.59×10-10 and 2.40×10-10 cm2/C. Electrodeposited WO3 produce high color/bleach transmittance difference up to 74% at 630 nm. On reduction of WO3, the CIELAB 1931 2% color space coordinates show the transition from colorless to the deep blue state (L=95.18, a=2.12, b=0.3138, and L=57.78, a=-21.79, b=0.244) with steady decrease in relative luminance. The highest coloration efficiency (CE) of 92 cm2/C and good response time of 10.28 for coloration (reduction) and 3.2 s for bleaching (oxidation) was observed with an excellent reversibility of 89%.

  10. Residual stress determination in a 1000 A tungsten thin film by X-rays diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, K.F.; Declemy, A.; Naudon, A.; Goudeau, P.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have determined the complete residual stress tensor by X-rays diffraction, using the sin 2 ψ method, in a 1000 A tungsten thin film deposited on a silicon monocrystal. Stresses are tension wise of big magnitude (1.5 GPa). They are almost isotropic in the film plane. Shear stresses are low but not negligeable. After a bombardment by a 320 keV Xe ++ ion beam, the stresses became compressive (about -1.3 GPa). These results demonstrate the feasability of stress determination by the sin 2 ψ method in films as thin as 1000 A and open interesting areas for future research. (orig.)

  11. Tungsten oxide thin films grown by thermal evaporation with high resistance to leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Diogo S. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas (UFPel), RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Quimicas, Farmaceuticas e de Alimentos; Pazinato, Julia C.O.; Freitas, Mauricio A. de; Radtke, Claudio; Garcia, Irene T.S., E-mail: irene@iq.ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Dorneles, Lucio S. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM), RS (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Exatas

    2014-05-15

    Tungsten oxides show different stoichiometries, crystal lattices and morphologies. These characteristics are important mainly when they are used as photocatalysts. In this work tungsten oxide thin films were obtained by thermal evaporation on (100) silicon substrates covered with gold and heated at 350 and 600 °C, with different deposition times. The stoichiometry of the films, morphology, crystal structure and resistance to leaching were characterized through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and O{sup 16} (α,α')O{sup 16} resonant nuclear reaction. Films obtained at higher temperatures show well-defined spherical nanometric structure; they are composed of WO{sub 3.1} and the presence of hydrated tungsten oxide was also observed. The major crystal structure observed is the hexagonal. Thin films obtained through thermal evaporation present resistance to leaching in aqueous media and excellent performance as photocatalysts, evaluated through the degradation of the methyl orange dye. (author)

  12. Dataset on electro-optically tunable smart-supercapacitors based on oxygen-excess nanograin tungsten oxide thin film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar I. Inamdar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The dataset presented here is related to the research article entitled “Highly Efficient Electro-optically Tunable Smart-supercapacitors Using an Oxygen-excess Nanograin Tungsten Oxide Thin Film” (Akbar et al., 2017 [9] where we have presented a nanograin WO3 film as a bifunctional electrode for smart supercapacitor devices. In this article we provide additional information concerning nanograin tungsten oxide thin films such as atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy. Moreover, their electrochemical properties such as cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical supercapacitor properties, and electrochromic properties including coloration efficiency, optical modulation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are presented.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of Potentiostatically Electrodeposited Tungsten Oxide Thin Films for Smart Window Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, A. J.; Patil, R. S.; Dalavi, D. S.; Suryawanshi, M. P.; Burungale, V. V.; Kim, J. H.; Patil, P. S.

    2017-02-01

    Tungsten oxide (WO3) thin films have been synthesized using electrodeposition in potentiostatic mode and the effect of different deposition potentials on their structural, morphological, optical, and electrochromic (EC) properties investigated. The deposition potential versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE) was varied from -0.35 V to -0.50 V in steps of -0.05 V for 20 min each. The electrodeposited WO3 thin films were characterized using x-ray diffraction analysis, micro-Raman spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometry, revealing amorphous nature with nanograins having average size from 40 nm to 60 nm. The EC performance of the WO3 thin films exhibited response times of 1.35 s for bleaching ( t b) and 3.1 s for coloration ( t c) with excellent reversibility of 64.36%. The highest coloration efficiency of the electrodeposited WO3 thin films was found to be 87.95 cm2/C. The electrochemical reversibility and stability of the WO3 thin films obtained in this study make them promising for use in smart window applications.

  14. Simulation on Mechanical Properties of Tungsten Carbide Thin Films Using Monte Carlo Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam C. Agudelo-Morimitsu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to study the mechanical behavior of a system composed by substrate-coating using simulation methods. The contact stresses and the elastic deformation were analyzed by applying a normal load to the surface of the system consisting of a tungsten carbide (WC thin film, which is used as a wear resistant material and a stainless steel substrate. The analysis is based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Metropolis algorithm. The phenomenon was simulated from a fcc facecentered crystalline structure, for both, the coating and the substrate, assuming that the uniaxial strain is taken in the z-axis. Results were obtained for different values of normal applied load to the surface of the coating, obtaining the Strain-stress curves. From this curve, the Young´s modulus was obtained with a value of 600 Gpa, similar to the reports.

  15. Reactive pulsed laser deposition of thin molybdenum- and tungsten-nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, M. [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary)]. E-mail: bereznai@physx.u-szeged.hu; Toth, Z. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-6720 Szeged, Dom ter 9 (Hungary); Caricato, A.P. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Fernandez, M. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Luches, A. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Lecce, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Majni, G. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica ed Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Mengucci, P. [INFM and Dipartimento di Fisica ed Ingegneria dei Materiali e del Territorio, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Nagy, P.M. [Department of General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes University, H-1518 Budapest, POB 32 (Hungary); Juhasz, A. [Department of General Physics, Lorand Eoetvoes University, H-1518 Budapest, POB 32 (Hungary); Nanai, L. [Department of Physics, University of Szeged JGYTF, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary)

    2005-02-01

    In this work reactive pulsed laser deposition of molybdenum- and tungsten-nitride thin films is investigated. Metallic targets were ablated in low-pressure (1, 10 and 100 Pa) nitrogen atmosphere by KrF excimer laser pulses (fluence {approx}6.5 J/cm{sup 2}). Films were deposited on silicon wafers heated to {approx}25, 250 and 500 deg. C. The characteristics of the films strongly depend on the N{sub 2} pressure. By increasing N{sub 2} pressure, the nitrogen content increases in the films, which leads to a monotonous increase of the electrical resistivity. Deposition rate decreases at 100 Pa as indicated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. At this pressure, hardness of the films significantly decreases also, as shown by microhardness measurements. X-ray diffractometry shows that films crystallinity is improved by increasing the substrate temperature. In addition, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were applied for visualising the film surface.

  16. Enhanced properties of tungsten thin films deposited with a novel HiPIMS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velicu, Ioana-Laura; Tiron, Vasile; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Burducea, Ion; Lupu, Nicoleta; Stoian, George; Popa, Gheorghe; Munteanu, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    Despite the tremendous potential for industrial use of tungsten (W), very few studies have been reported so far on controlling and tailoring the properties of W thin films obtained by physical vapor deposition techniques and, even less, for those deposited by High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS). This study presents results on the deposition process and properties characterization of nanocrystalline W thin films deposited on silicon and molybdenum substrates (100 W average sputtering power) by conventional dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) and HiPIMS techniques. Topological, structural, mechanical and tribological properties of the deposited thin films were investigated. It was found that in HiPIMS, both deposition process and coatings properties may be optimized by using an appropriate magnetic field configuration and pulsing design. Compared to the other deposited samples, the W films grown in multi-pulse (5 × 3 μs) HiPIMS assisted by an additional magnetic field, created with a toroidal-shaped permanent magnet placed in front of the magnetron cathode, show significantly enhanced properties, such as: smoother surfaces, higher homogeneity and denser microstructure, higher hardness and Young's modulus values, better adhesion to the silicon substrate and lower coefficient of friction. Mechanical behaviour and structural changes are discussed based on plasma diagnostics results.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition based tungsten disulfide (WS2) thin film transistor

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2013-04-01

    Tungsten disulfide (WS2) is a layered transition metal dichalcogenide with a reported band gap of 1.8 eV in bulk and 1.32-1.4 eV in its thin film form. 2D atomic layers of metal dichalcogenides have shown changes in conductivity with applied electric field. This makes them an interesting option for channel material in field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, we show a highly manufacturable chemical vapor deposition (CVD) based simple process to grow WS2 directly on silicon oxide in a furnace and then its transistor action with back gated device with room temperature field effect mobility of 0.1003 cm2/V-s using the Schottky barrier contact model. We also show the semiconducting behavior of this WS2 thin film which is more promising than thermally unstable organic materials for thin film transistor application. Our direct growth method on silicon oxide also holds interesting opportunities for macro-electronics applications. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Pulsed Laser-Induced Effects in the Material Properties of Tungsten Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, BC, 22860 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, S [Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, BC, 22860 (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, M A [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Paseo Colon y Tollocan, Toluca Edo. de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico); Sanchez-Perez, C [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-186, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico); Esparza-GarcIa, A [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnologico, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 70-186, Mexico DF 04510 (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    In this work we present evidence of photo-induced effects on crystalline Tungsten (W) films. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG (5ns) laser was used in our experiments. The W thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by the DC-sputtering technique using W (Lesker, 99.95% purity) targets in an argon atmosphere. The crystalline phase of the deposited W films was determined by X-ray diffraction. Our experimental results show clear evidence that several events take place as a consequence of exposure of the W films to the laser nanosecond pulses. One of those events has a chemical effect that results in a significant degree of oxidation of the film; a second event affects the structural nature of the initial W material, resulting into a material phase change; and a third event changes the initially homogeneous morphology of the film into an unexpected porous material film. As it has been confirmed by the experiments, all of these effects are laser fluence dependent. A full post exposure analysis of the W thin films included Energy Dispersive Spectrometry to determine the degree of oxidation of the W film; a micro-Raman system was used to explore and to study the transition of the crystalline W to the amorphous-crystalline WO{sub 3} phase; further analysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy showed a definite laser-induced porosity which changes the initial homogeneous film into a highly porous film with small features in the range from 100 to 300 nm.

  19. Pulsed Laser-Induced Effects in the Material Properties of Tungsten Thin Films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R; Camacho-Lopez, S; Camacho-Lopez, M A; Sanchez-Perez, C; Esparza-GarcIa, A

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present evidence of photo-induced effects on crystalline Tungsten (W) films. A frequency doubled Nd:YAG (5ns) laser was used in our experiments. The W thin films were deposited on silicon substrates by the DC-sputtering technique using W (Lesker, 99.95% purity) targets in an argon atmosphere. The crystalline phase of the deposited W films was determined by X-ray diffraction. Our experimental results show clear evidence that several events take place as a consequence of exposure of the W films to the laser nanosecond pulses. One of those events has a chemical effect that results in a significant degree of oxidation of the film; a second event affects the structural nature of the initial W material, resulting into a material phase change; and a third event changes the initially homogeneous morphology of the film into an unexpected porous material film. As it has been confirmed by the experiments, all of these effects are laser fluence dependent. A full post exposure analysis of the W thin films included Energy Dispersive Spectrometry to determine the degree of oxidation of the W film; a micro-Raman system was used to explore and to study the transition of the crystalline W to the amorphous-crystalline WO 3 phase; further analysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy showed a definite laser-induced porosity which changes the initial homogeneous film into a highly porous film with small features in the range from 100 to 300 nm

  20. Chemical etching of Tungsten thin films for high-temperature surface acoustic wave-based sensor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spindler, M., E-mail: m.spindler@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany); Herold, S.; Acker, J. [BTU Cottbus – Senftenberg, Faculty of Sciences, P.O. Box 101548, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany); Brachmann, E.; Oswald, S.; Menzel, S.; Rane, G. [IFW Dresden, SAWLab Saxony, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2016-08-01

    Surface acoustic wave devices are widely used as wireless sensors in different application fields. Recent developments aimed to utilize those devices as temperature sensors even in the high temperature range (T > 300 °C) and in harsh environmental conditions. Therefore, conventional materials, which are used for the substrate and for the interdigital transducer finger electrodes such as multilayers or alloys based on Al or Cu have to be exchanged by materials, which fulfill some important criteria regarding temperature related effects. Electron beam evaporation as a standard fabrication method is not well applicable for depositing high temperature stable electrode materials because of their very high melting points. Magnetron sputtering is an alternative deposition process but is also not applicable for lift-off structuring without any further improvement of the structuring process. Due to a relatively high Ar gas pressure of about 10{sup −1} Pa, the sidewalls of the photoresist line structures are also covered by the metallization, which subsequently prevents a successful lift-off process. In this study, we investigate the chemical etching of thin tungsten films as an intermediate step between magnetron sputtering deposition of thin tungsten finger electrodes and the lift-off process to remove sidewall covering for a successful patterning process of interdigital transducers. - Highlights: • We fabricated Tungsten SAW Electrodes by magnetron sputtering technology. • An etching process removes sidewall covering of photoresist, which allows lift-off. • Tungsten etching rates based on a hydrogen peroxide solutions were determined.

  1. Electrochromism in tungsten oxide thin films prepared by chemical bath deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julijana Velevska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten oxide (WO3 thin films were prepared by a simple, economical, chemical bath deposition method onto fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO coated glass substrates. The electrochemical properties of the films were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The obtained films exhibited electrochromism, changing color from initially colorless to deep blue, and back to colorless. Visible transmittance spectra of (WO3 films were recorded in-situ in their both, bleached and colored states. From those spectra, absorption coefficient (a and the optical energy gaps were evaluated. The dependence of the optical density on the charge density was examined and the coloration efficiency (h was calculated to be 22.11 cm2 C-1. The response times of the coloring and bleaching to an abrupt potential change from -2.5 V to +2.5 V and reverse, were found to be 9.3 and 1.2 s respectively. The maximum light intensity modulation ability of the films, when the AM1.5 spectrum is taken as an input, was calculated to be about 50 %.

  2. HRTEM Microstructural Characterization of ?-WO3 Thin Films Deposited by Reactive RF Magnetron Sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Faudoa-Arzate, A.; Arteaga-Dur?n, A.; Saenz-Hern?ndez, R.J.; Botello-Zubiate, M.E.; Realyvazquez-Guevara, P.R.; Matutes-Aquino, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    Though tungsten trioxide (WO3) in bulk, nanosphere, and thin film samples has been extensively studied, few studies have been dedicated to the crystallographic structure of WO3 thin films. In this work, the evolution from amorphous WO3 thin films to crystalline WO3 thin films is discussed. WO3 thin films were fabricated on silicon substrates (Si/SiO2) by RF reactive magnetron sputtering. Once a thin film was deposited, two successive annealing treatments were made: an initial annealing at 400...

  3. Investigation of residual nuclei in spallation produced in lead and tungsten thin targets and in a thick lead target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducauze, Marie

    2001-01-01

    As spallation has a lot of potential applications, and aroused many theoretical works and phenomenological modelling, this research thesis deals with the measurement of residual nucleus cross sections in lead and tungsten targets irradiated by protons with intermediate energy level. Experiments have been performed on the SATURNE accelerator. With respect to spallation properties, two measurement types are addressed: measurements in thin targets to study the nucleon-nucleus reactions, and measurements in thick targets to study particle transport through matter. After a brief presentation of the experimental conditions, the author presents the method used to analyse gamma radiation spectra: spectrum deconvolution, time analysis, identification of created nuclei and extraction of residual production cross-sections. An overview of simulation code is given. Results of cross-section measurements are discussed and commented for the case of thin lead and tungsten targets. They are also compared with those obtained with the HETC code (High Energy Transport Code). Data obtained with a thick lead target are presented, interpreted and compared with those obtained with the TIERCE code

  4. Effect of the substrate temperature on the physical properties of molybdenum tri-oxide thin films obtained through the spray pyrolysis technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, H.M. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Torres, J., E-mail: njtorress@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Lopez Carreno, L.D. [Grupo de Materiales con Aplicaciones Tecnologicas, Departamento de Fisica Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Bogota (Colombia); Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E. [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., Mexico (Colombia)

    2013-01-15

    Polycrystalline molybdenum tri-oxide thin films were prepared using the spray pyrolysis technique; a 0.1 M solution of ammonium molybdate tetra-hydrated was used as a precursor. The samples were prepared on Corning glass substrates maintained at temperatures ranging between 423 and 673 K. The samples were characterized through micro Raman, X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance and DC electrical conductivity. The species MoO{sub 3} (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} was found in the sample prepared at a substrate temperature of 423 K. As the substrate temperature rises, the water disappears and the samples crystallize into {alpha}-MoO{sub 3}. The optical gap diminishes as the substrate temperature rises. Two electrical transport mechanisms were found: hopping under 200 K and intrinsic conduction over 200 K. The MoO{sub 3} films' sensitivity was analyzed for CO and H{sub 2}O in the temperature range 160 to 360 K; the results indicate that CO and H{sub 2}O have a reduction character. In all cases, it was found that the sensitivity to CO is lower than that to H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A low cost technique is used which produces good material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films are prepared using ammonium molybdate tetra hydrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the physical properties of the samples could be done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A calculation method is proposed to determine the material optical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MoO{sub 3} thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis could be used as gas sensor.

  5. Tungsten oxide proton conducting films for low-voltage transparent oxide-based thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Wan, Qing; Wan, Changjin; Wu, Guodong; Zhu, Liqiang

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten oxide (WO x ) electrolyte films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering showed a high room temperature proton conductivity of 1.38 × 10 −4 S/cm with a relative humidity of 60%. Low-voltage transparent W-doped indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors gated by WO x -based electrolytes were self-assembled on glass substrates by one mask diffraction method. Enhancement mode operation with a large current on/off ratio of 4.7 × 10 6 , a low subthreshold swing of 108 mV/decade, and a high field-effect mobility 42.6 cm 2 /V s was realized. Our results demonstrated that WO x -based proton conducting films were promising gate dielectric candidates for portable low-voltage oxide-based devices.

  6. Trace hydrogen sulfide gas sensor based on tungsten sulfide membrane-coated thin-core fiber modal interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dashen; Feng, Wenlin; Wei, Jianwei; Qin, Xiang; Chen, Rong

    2017-11-01

    A novel fiber-optic hydrogen sulfide sensor based on a thin-core Mach-Zehnder fiber modal interferometer (TMZFI) is demonstrated and fabricated. This in-line interferometer is composed of a short section of thin-core fiber sandwiched between two standard single mode fibers, and the fast response to hydrogen sulfide is achieved via the construction of tungsten sulfide film on the outside surface of the TMZFI using the dip-coating and calcination technique. The fabricated sensing nanofilm is characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectrometer, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and spectroscopic analysis technology, etc. Experimental results showed that the WS2 sensing film has a hexagonal structure with a compact and porous morphology. The XPS and FTIR indicate that the existence of two elements (W and S) is demonstrated. With the increasing concentration of hydrogen sulfide, the interference spectra appear blue shift. In addition, a high sensitivity of 18.37 pm/ppm and a good linear relationship are obtained within a measurement range from 0 to 80 ppm. In addition, there is an excellent selectivity for H2S, which has also been proved by the surface adsorption energy results of tungsten sulfide with four gases (H2S, N2, O2 and CO2) by using the density functional theory calculations. This interferometer has the advantages of simple structure, high sensitivity and easy manufacture, and could be used in the safety monitoring field of hydrogen sulfide gas.

  7. Relative SHG measurements of metal thin films: Gold, silver, aluminum, cobalt, chromium, germanium, nickel, antimony, titanium, titanium nitride, tungsten, zinc, silicon and indium tin oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Che

    Full Text Available We have experimentally measured the surface second-harmonic generation (SHG of sputtered gold, silver, aluminum, zinc, tungsten, copper, titanium, cobalt, nickel, chromium, germanium, antimony, titanium nitride, silicon and indium tin oxide thin films. The second-harmonic response was measured in reflection using a 150 fs p-polarized laser pulse at 1561 nm. We present a clear comparison of the SHG intensity of these films relative to each other. Our measured relative intensities compare favorably with the relative intensities of metals with published data. We also report for the first time to our knowledge the surface SHG intensity of tungsten and antimony relative to that of well known metallic thin films such as gold and silver. Keywords: Surface second-harmonic generation, Nonlinear optics, Metal thin films

  8. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  9. Structural and mechanical study of thermally annealed tungsten nitride thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.L. Moharana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten nitride films were deposited by RF reactive magnetron sputtering using Tungsten target. The films were subsequently annealed under high vacuum at different temperatures (700–850 °C for 2 h each. The phase of the films were obtained using X-ray diffraction. EDAX and Nano-indentation tests were carried out to obtain the elemental composition and hardness respectively. XRD results of the as prepared film show the formation of pure fcc W2N phase and it is stable up to 700 °C. Beyond 700 °C mixed phase of W and W2N were observed. Mechanical study shows almost stable hardness value up to 700 °C temperature and beyond that temperature, hardness value reduce drastically, due to transformation of W2N phase to pure W phase. Our preliminary study shows that these films were stable up to <800 °C.

  10. Atomically thin heterostructures based on single-layer tungsten diselenide and graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chuan; Chang, Chih-Yuan S; Ghosh, Ram Krishna; Li, Jie; Zhu, Hui; Addou, Rafik; Diaconescu, Bogdan; Ohta, Taisuke; Peng, Xin; Lu, Ning; Kim, Moon J; Robinson, Jeremy T; Wallace, Robert M; Mayer, Theresa S; Datta, Suman; Li, Lain-Jong; Robinson, Joshua A

    2014-12-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF).

  11. Atomically Thin Heterostructures Based on Single-Layer Tungsten Diselenide and Graphene

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2014-11-10

    Heterogeneous engineering of two-dimensional layered materials, including metallic graphene and semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides, presents an exciting opportunity to produce highly tunable electronic and optoelectronic systems. In order to engineer pristine layers and their interfaces, epitaxial growth of such heterostructures is required. We report the direct growth of crystalline, monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) on epitaxial graphene (EG) grown from silicon carbide. Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence, and scanning tunneling microscopy confirm high-quality WSe2 monolayers, whereas transmission electron microscopy shows an atomically sharp interface, and low energy electron diffraction confirms near perfect orientation between WSe2 and EG. Vertical transport measurements across the WSe2/EG heterostructure provides evidence that an additional barrier to carrier transport beyond the expected WSe2/EG band offset exists due to the interlayer gap, which is supported by theoretical local density of states (LDOS) calculations using self-consistent density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green\\'s function (NEGF).

  12. Results on the electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of vanadium doped tungsten oxide thin films prepared by reactive dc magnetron sputtering technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karuppasamy, K Muthu; Subrahmanyam, A

    2008-01-01

    In this investigation, vanadium doped tungsten oxide (V : WO 3 ) thin films are prepared at room temperature by reactive dc magnetron sputtering employing a tungsten-vanadium 'inlay' target. In comparison with pure sputtered tungsten oxide thin films, 11% vanadium doping is observed to decrease the optical band gap, enhance the colour neutral property, decrease the coloration efficiency (from 121 to 13 cm 2 C -1 ), increase the surface work function (4.68-4.83 eV) and significantly enhance the photocatalytic efficiency in WO 3 thin films. These observations suggest that (i) vanadium creates defect levels that are responsible for optical band gap reduction, (ii) multivalent vanadium bonding with terminal oxygen in the WO 3 lattice gives rise to localized covalent bonds and thus results in an increase in the work function, and (iii) a suitable work function of V : WO 3 with ITO results in an enhancement of the photocatalytic activity. These results on electrochromic and photocatalytic properties of V : WO 3 thin films show good promise in the low maintenance window application

  13. Collisions of low-energy ions Ar+ and N2 + with room-temperature and heated surfaces of tungsten, beryllium, and a mixed beryllium–tungsten thin film

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keim, A.; Harnish, M.; Scheier, P.; Herman, Zdeněk

    354-355, SI (2013), s. 78-86 ISSN 1387-3806 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ion–surface collisions * Mass spectra of product ions * Tungsten Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.227, year: 2013

  14. Nanogravimetric studies of tungsten oxide thin films obtained by the polymeric precursor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, V.C.; Santos, M.C.; Bulhoes, L.O.S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the intercalation/de-intercalation process of Li + ions in the tungsten oxide matrix was investigated. The reaction mechanism involved was also investigated. The WO 3 films, prepared by the polymeric precursor method, were deposited on a Pt covered quartz crystal using the dip-coating technique. The electrolyte was 0.1 mol L -1 LiClO 4 in acetonitrile. The morphology and structure of the deposit was accomplished by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. In the electrochemical quartz crystal nanobalance results, it was observed that the mass transport as well as the kinetic processes involved are facilitated in the films cycled at lower potential sweep-rates. The mass variation data as a function of the charge variations in the anodic and cathodic regions indicate the participation of solvent molecules (acetonitrile) during the Li + ion intercalation/de-intercalation process. This was confirmed by the development of a model of the species flux as a function of the potential

  15. Neutrons production during the interaction of monoenergetic electrons with a thin tungsten target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto B, T. G.; Medina C, D.; Baltazar R, A.; Vega C, H. R.

    2016-10-01

    When a linear accelerator for radiotherapy operates with acceleration voltages higher than 8 MV, neutrons are produced, as secondary radiation which deposits an undesirable and undesirable dose in the patient. Depending on the type of tumor, its location in the body and the characteristics of the patient, the cancer treatment with a Linac is performed with photon or electron beams, which produce neutrons through reactions (γ, n) and (e, e n) respectively. Because the effective section for the neutrons production by reactions (γ, n) is approximately two orders of magnitude larger than the effective section of the reactions (e, e n), studies on the effects of this secondary radiation have focused on photo neutrons. en a Linac operates with electron beams, the beam coming out of the magnetic deflector is impinged on the dispersion lamella in order to cause quasi-elastic interactions and to expand the spatial distribution of the electrons; the objective of this work is to determine the characteristics of the photons and neutrons that occur when a mono-energetic electron beam of 2 mm in diameter (pencil beam) is made to impinge on a tungsten lamella of 1 cm in diameter and 0.5 mm of thickness. The study was done using Monte Carlo methods with code MCNP6 for electron beams of 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 MeV. The spectra of photons and neutrons were estimated in 4 point detectors placed at different equidistant points from the center of the lamella. (Author)

  16. Electro-optical evaluation of tungsten oxide and vanadium pentoxide thin films for modeling an electrochromic device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Najafi Ashtiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, tungsten oxide and vanadium oxide electrochromic thin films were placed in vacuum and in a thickness of 200 nm on a transparent conductive substrate of SnO2:F using the physical method of thermal evaporation. Then they were studied for the optical characteristics in the wavelength range from 400 to 700 nm and for their electrical potentials in the range form +1.5 to -1.5 volts. The films were post heated in order to assess changes in energy gap with temperature, at temperatures120 , 300 and 500°C. Refractive and extinction coefficients and the transition type of films in the visible light range and in the thickness of 200 nm were determined and measured. X-ray diffraction pattern and SEM images and cyclic Voltammetry of layers were also studied. The results of this study due to the deposition of layers, the layer thickness selected, the type of substrate, the range of annealing temperatures and selected electrolyte were in full compliance with the works of other researchers [1,2,3]. Therefore, these layers with features such as crystal structure, refractive and even extinction coefficients in the range of visible light, the appropriate response of chromic switch in the replication potential, good adhesion to the substrate, and the high amount of optical transmition and so on, prove useful to be used in an electrochromic device

  17. Atomic layer deposited nanocrystalline tungsten carbides thin films as a metal gate and diffusion barrier for Cu metallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Beom; Kim, Soo-Hyun, E-mail: soohyun@ynu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan-si 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Won Seok [UP Chemical 576, Chilgoedong, Pyeongtaek-si, Gyeonggi-do 459-050 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Do-Joong [School of Engineering, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Tungsten carbides (WC{sub x}) thin films were deposited on thermally grown SiO{sub 2} substrates by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a fluorine- and nitrogen-free W metallorganic precursor, tungsten tris(3-hexyne) carbonyl [W(CO)(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}C ≡ CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 3}], and N{sub 2} + H{sub 2} plasma as the reactant at deposition temperatures between 150 and 350 °C. The present ALD-WC{sub x} system showed an ALD temperature window between 200 and 250 °C, where the growth rate was independent of the deposition temperature. Typical ALD characteristics, such as self-limited film growth and a linear dependency of the film grown on the number of ALD cycles, were observed, with a growth rate of 0.052 nm/cycle at a deposition temperature of 250 °C. The ALD-WC{sub x} films formed a nanocrystalline structure with grains, ∼2 nm in size, which consisted of hexagonal W{sub 2}C, WC, and nonstoichiometric cubic β-WC{sub 1−x} phase. Under typical deposition conditions at 250 °C, an ALD-WC{sub x} film with a resistivity of ∼510 μΩ cm was deposited and the resistivity of the ALD-WC{sub x} film could be reduced even further to ∼285 μΩ cm by further optimizing the reactant pulsing conditions, such as the plasma power. The step coverage of ALD-WC{sub x} film was ∼80% on very small sized and dual trenched structures (bottom width of 15 nm and aspect ratio of ∼6.3). From ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, the work function of the ALD-WC{sub x} film was determined to be 4.63 eV. Finally, the ultrathin (∼5 nm) ALD-WC{sub x} film blocked the diffusion of Cu, even up to 600 °C, which makes it a promising a diffusion barrier material for Cu interconnects.

  18. Arsenic Trioxide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenic trioxide comes as a solution (liquid) to be injected into a vein by a doctor or nurse in a medical office or clinic. Arsenic trioxide is ... high blood sugar): extreme thirst frequent urination extreme hunger weakness blurred vision If high blood sugar is ...

  19. HRTEM Microstructural Characterization of β-WO3 Thin Films Deposited by Reactive RF Magnetron Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faudoa-Arzate, A; Arteaga-Durán, A; Saenz-Hernández, R J; Botello-Zubiate, M E; Realyvazquez-Guevara, P R; Matutes-Aquino, J A

    2017-02-17

    Though tungsten trioxide (WO3) in bulk, nanosphere, and thin film samples has been extensively studied, few studies have been dedicated to the crystallographic structure of WO3 thin films. In this work, the evolution from amorphous WO3 thin films to crystalline WO3 thin films is discussed. WO3 thin films were fabricated on silicon substrates (Si/SiO2) by RF reactive magnetron sputtering. Once a thin film was deposited, two successive annealing treatments were made: an initial annealing at 400 °C for 6 h was followed by a second annealing at 350 °C for 1 h. Film characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution electron transmission microscopy (HRTEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The β-WO3 final phase grew in form of columnar crystals and its growth plane was determined by HRTEM.

  20. HRTEM Microstructural Characterization of β-WO3 Thin Films Deposited by Reactive RF Magnetron Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Faudoa-Arzate

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Though tungsten trioxide (WO3 in bulk, nanosphere, and thin film samples has been extensively studied, few studies have been dedicated to the crystallographic structure of WO3 thin films. In this work, the evolution from amorphous WO3 thin films to crystalline WO3 thin films is discussed. WO3 thin films were fabricated on silicon substrates (Si/SiO2 by RF reactive magnetron sputtering. Once a thin film was deposited, two successive annealing treatments were made: an initial annealing at 400 °C for 6 h was followed by a second annealing at 350 °C for 1 h. Film characterization was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD, high-resolution electron transmission microscopy (HRTEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and atomic force microscopy (AFM techniques. The β-WO3 final phase grew in form of columnar crystals and its growth plane was determined by HRTEM.

  1. Structural, morphological, gas sensing and photocatalytic characterization of MoO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3} thin films prepared by the thermal vacuum evaporation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arfaoui, A., E-mail: asma17687@gmail.com [Unité de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculté des sciences de Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Touihri, S.; Mhamdi, A. [Unité de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculté des sciences de Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Labidi, A. [Unité de Recherche de Physique des Semiconducteurs et Capteurs, IPEST, BP 51, La Marsa, 2070 Tunis (Tunisia); Manoubi, T. [Unité de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculté des sciences de Tunis, Tunis El Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Outlining adequacy an original combination of several characterization means. • Structural, morphological and gas sensing properties for both MoO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3} thin films have been studied. • These films had high sensitivity to ethanol, which made them as a good candidate for the ethanol sensor. • The photocatalytic activity of MoO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3} thin films has been studied. - Abstract: Thin films of molybdenum trioxide and tungsten trioxide were deposited on glass substrates using a simplified thermal evaporation under vacuum method monitored by heat treatment in flowing oxygen at 500 °C for 1 h. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the films of MoO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3} were well crystallized in orthorhombic and monoclinic phase respectively with the crystallites preferentially oriented toward (2 0 0) direction parallel a-axis for both samples. In literature, we have shown in previous papers that structural and surface morphology of metal thin films play an important role in the gas detection mechanism. In this article, we have studied the response evolution of MoO{sub 3} and WO{sub 3} thin films sensors ethanol versus time, working temperature and the concentration of the ethanol. It was found that these films had high sensitivity to ethanol, which made them as a good candidate for the ethanol sensor. Finally, the photocatalytic activity of the samples was evaluated with respect to the degradation reaction of a wastewater containing methylene blue (MB) under UV–visible light irradiation. The molybdenum trioxide exhibits a higher degradation rate than the tungsten trioxide thin films under similar experimental conditions.

  2. Selective formation of tungsten nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bien Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a process for fabricating self-aligned tungsten (W nanowires with polycrystalline silicon core. Tungsten nanowires as thin as 10 nm were formed by utilizing polysilicon sidewall transfer technology followed by selective deposition of tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD using WF6 as the precursor. With selective CVD, the process is self-limiting whereby the tungsten formation is confined to the polysilicon regions; hence, the nanowires are formed without the need for lithography or for additional processing. The fabricated tungsten nanowires were observed to be perfectly aligned, showing 100% selectivity to polysilicon and can be made to be electrically isolated from one another. The electrical conductivity of the nanowires was characterized to determine the effect of its physical dimensions. The conductivity for the tungsten nanowires were found to be 40% higher when compared to doped polysilicon nanowires of similar dimensions.

  3. Growth of carbon nanofiber coatings on nickel thin films on fused silica by catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition: On the use of titanium, titanium-tungsten and tantalum as adhesion layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakur, D.B.; Tiggelaar, Roald M.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2009-01-01

    Coatings of carbon nanofiber (CNF) layers were synthesized on fused silica substrates using a catalytic thermal chemical vapor deposition process (C-TCVD). The effects of various adhesion layers–titanium, titanium–tungsten and tantalum–under the nickel thin film on the attachment of carbon

  4. Fotocromismo em filmes finos de óxidos de tungstênio de diferentes composições Photochromism in tungsten oxide thin films of different compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José R. Galvão

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten oxide thin films with three different compositions were deposited by reactive sputtering in an oxygen-argon plasma. In a system composed of a home made photochemical reactor coupled with an optic fiber spectrophotometer, the photochromic effect was studied in these oxide films as function of UV irradiation time, in ethanol, methanol and formaldehyde atmospheres. It was observed that the photochromic efficiency depends on the vapor chemical nature where the film is irradiated as well as the film composition. Kinetic analysis suggest that two kinds of optical absorption centers should respond by the photochromic effect in these films, one generated at film surface and other inside it, which one presenting a different time constant.

  5. Performance and impedance studies of thin, porous molybdenum and tungsten electrodes for the alkali metal thermoelectric converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, B. L.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Lamb, J. L.; Loveland, M. E.; Bankston, C. P.; Cole, T.

    1988-01-01

    Columnar, porous, magnetron-sputtered molybdenum and tungsten films show optimum performance as alkali metal thermoelectric converter electrodes at thicknesses less than 1.0 micron when used with molybdenum or nickel current collector grids. Power densities of 0.40 W/sq cm for 0.5-micron molybdenum films at 1200 K and 0.35 W/sq cm for 0.5-micron tungsten films at 1180 K were obtained at electrode maturity after 40-90 h. Sheet resistances of magnetron sputter deposited films on sodium beta-double-prime-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) substrates were found to increase very steeply as thickness is decreased below about 0.3-double-prime 0.4-micron. The ac impedance data for these electrodes have been interpreted in terms of contributions from the bulk BASE and the porous electrode/BASE interface. Voltage profiles of operating electrodes show that the total electrode area, of electrodes with thickness less than 2.0 microns, is not utilized efficiently unless a fairly fine (about 1 x 1 mm) current collector grid is employed.

  6. Effect of tungsten on the phase-change properties of Ge8Sb2Te11 thin films for the phase-change device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol-Jin; Kong, Heon; Lee, Hyun-Yong; Yeo, Jong-Bin

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the electrical, optical, and structural properties of tungsten (W)-doped Ge8Sb2Te11 thin films were investigated. Previously, GeSbTe alloys were doped with various materials in an attempt to improve the thermal stability. Ge8Sb2Te11 and W-doped Ge8Sb2Te11 films with a thickness of 200 nm were fabricated by using an RF magnetron reactive co-sputtering system at room temperature on Si ( p-type, 100) and glass substrate. The fabricated thin films were annealed in a furnace in the 0 - 400 ° C temperature range. The optical properties were analyzed using a UV-Vis-IR spectrophotometer, and by using Beer's Law equation, the optical-energy band gap ( E op ), slope B 1/2, and slope 1/ F were calculated. For the crystalline materials, an increase in the slope B 1/2 and 1/ F was observed, exhibiting a good effect on the thermal stability in the amorphous state after the phase change. The structural properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and the result showed that the W-doped Ge8Sb2Te11 had a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structure increased crystallization temperature ( T c ). An increase in the T c increased the thermal stability in the amorphous state. The electrical properties were analyzed using a 4-point probe, exhibiting an increase in the sheet resistance ( R s ) in the amorphous and the crystalline states indicating a reduced programming current in the memory device.

  7. Effect of tungsten on the phase-change properties of Ge8Sb2Te11 Thin Films for the Phase-change device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol-Jin; Kong, Heon; Lee, Hyun-Yong; Yeo, Jong-Bin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the electrical, optical, and structural properties of tungsten (W)-doped Ge 8 Sb 2 Te 11 thin films were investigated. Previously, GeSbTe alloys were doped with various materials in an attempt to improve the thermal stability. Ge 8 Sb 2 Te 11 and W-doped Ge 8 Sb 2 Te 11 films with a thickness of 200 nm were fabricated by using an RF magnetron reactive co-sputtering system at room temperature on Si (p-type, 100) and glass substrate. The fabricated thin films were annealed in a furnace in the ∼ 0 - 400 ℃ temperature range. The optical properties were analyzed using a UV-Vis-IR spectrophotometer, and by using Beer’s Law equation, the optical-energy band gap (E op ), slope B 1/2 , and slope 1/F were calculated. For the crystalline materials, an increase in the slope B 1/2 and 1/F was observed, exhibiting a good effect on the thermal stability in the amorphous state after the phase change. The structural properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and the result showed that the W-doped Ge 8 Sb 2 Te 11 had a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structure increased crystallization temperature (T c ). An increase in the T c increased the thermal stability in the amorphous state. The electrical properties were analyzed using a 4-point probe, exhibiting an increase in the sheet resistance (R s ) in the amorphous and the crystalline states indicating a reduced programming current in the memory device.

  8. Codoping of zinc and tungsten for practical high-performance amorphous indium-based oxide thin film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kizu, Takio, E-mail: KIZU.Takio@nims.go.jp, E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp; Mitoma, Nobuhiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito, E-mail: KIZU.Takio@nims.go.jp, E-mail: TSUKAGOSHI.Kazuhito@nims.go.jp [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Miyanaga, Miki; Awata, Hideaki [Advanced Materials R& D Laboratories, Sumitomo Electric Industries, Ltd., 1-1-1 Koyakita, Itami, Hyogo 664-0016 (Japan); Nabatame, Toshihide [MANA Foundry and MANA Advanced Device Materials Group, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-09-28

    Using practical high-density sputtering targets, we investigated the effect of Zn and W codoping on the thermal stability of the amorphous film and the electrical characteristics in thin film transistors. zinc oxide is a potentially conductive component while W oxide is an oxygen vacancy suppressor in oxide films. The oxygen vacancy from In-O and Zn-O was suppressed by the W additive because of the high oxygen bond dissociation energy. With controlled codoping of W and Zn, we demonstrated a high mobility with a maximum mobility of 40 cm{sup 2}/V s with good stability under a negative bias stress in InWZnO thin film transistors.

  9. Electronic Structures of Magnetic Iron and Cobalt Thin Films on TUNGSTEN(001): a Spin-Polarized Inverse Photoemission Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing

    Electronic structure is a central question in metallic magnetism as well as in magnetic materials research. The electronic properties in a two-dimensional system such as thin films of a few atomic layers is an important issue in surface science. The epitaxial thin film preparation and morphology are of special technological interests. In this thesis, these questions are addressed. Spin-polarized inverse photoemission spectroscopy is used to study the unoccupied electron band states in magnetic thin film magnets of Fe and Co epitaxially grown on W(001) surface. The clean W(001) surface was studied by angle -resolved inverse photoemission spectroscopy and the bulk band dispersion was determined. Ultrathin Fe overlayers on W(001) show a square lateral crystal structure similar to the bcc-Fe(001) surface. The electronic structure develops into a structure that is close to that of bulk Fe at about four atomic layers. In the normal-incidence spin polarized inverse photoemission spectra, direct transitions to the majority and minority final states near the H^'_ {25} point are identified in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. One Fe monolayer, or multilayers less than four, showed behavior corresponding to a gradually reduced Curie temperature. When the film thickness is reduced, the spin-resolved spectral behavior show that the majority spin signal peak moves from near the Fermi energy to about 1.3 eV while the minority peak stays at about the same position near 1.3 eV. The results are used to examine the spatial correlation of the spin fluctuations in the system in comparison with a theoretical spectral calculation, and favors the disordered-local-moment picture in the contemporary theory of itinerant magnetism. The Co overlayer shows an overlayer structure that consists of equivalent, mutually rotated domains of distorted hexagonal lateral structure. For one atomic layer of Co in that structure, which has a nominal lateral atomic density twice that of the

  10. Method for preparing microstructure arrays on the surface of thin film material

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Peng

    2017-02-09

    Methods are provided for growing a thin film of a nanoscale material. Thin films of nanoscale materials are also provided. The films can be grown with microscale patterning. The method can include vacuum filtration of a solution containing the nanostructured material through a porous substrate. The porous substrate can have a pore size that is comparable to the size of the nanoscale material. By patterning the pores on the surface of the substrate, a film can be grown having the pattern on a surface of the thin film, including on the top surface opposite the substrate. The nanoscale material can be graphene, graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, molybdenum disulfide, hexagonal boron nitride, tungsten diselenide, molybdenum trioxide, or clays such as montmorillonite or lapnotie. The porous substrate can be a porous organic or inorganic membrane, a silicon stencil membrane, or similar membrane having pore sizes on the order of microns.

  11. Characterization of MAPLE deposited WO3 thin films for electrochromic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, S. I.; Stefan, N.; Szilágyi, I. M.; Mihailescu, N.; Visan, A.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Stan, G. E.; Besleaga, C.; Iliev, M. T.; Gesheva, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a widely studied material for electrochromic applications. The structure, morphology and optical properties of WO3 thin films, grown by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from monoclinic WO3 nano-sized particles, were investigated for their possible application as electrochromic layers. A KrF* excimer (λ=248 nm, ζFWHM=25 ns) laser source was used in all experiments. The MAPLE deposited WO3 thin films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Cyclic voltammetry measurements were also performed, and the coloring and bleaching were observed. The morpho-structural investigations disclosed the synthesis of single-phase monoclinic WO3 films consisting of crystalline nano-grains embedded in an amorphous matrix. All thin films showed good electrochromic properties, thus validating application of the MAPLE deposition technique for the further development of electrochromic devices.

  12. Synthesis of vanadium trioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankelevich, R.G.; Vinarov, I.V.; Sheka, I.A.; Pushek, N.G.

    1976-01-01

    There have been studied the conditions for production of vanadium trioxide in a single-stage process of V 2 O 5 reduction by gaseous ammonia. To determine the optimum conditions for V 2 O 5 reduction, there have been studied the temperature range of the reaction and the effect offered by the volumetric rate and time of ammonia injection. The following conditions have proved to be the optimum ones: temperature - 450 deg C, volumetric rate of NH 3 injection at a batch of 10 g - 4 l/h, time of recovery - 3 hours. In accordance with the adopted procedure there have been synthetized the samples containing 98 - 99% V 2 O 3 [ru

  13. Tungsten Oxide Photonic Crystals as Optical Transducer for Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Wu, Xia; Wagner, Thorsten

    2018-01-26

    Some metal oxide semiconductors, such as tungsten trioxide or tin dioxide, are well-known as resistive transducers for gas sensing and offer high sensitivities down to the part per billion level. Electrical signal read-out, however, limits the information obtained on the electronic properties of metal oxides to a certain frequency range and its application because of the required electrical contacts. Therefore, a novel approach for building an optical transducer for gas reactions utilizing metal oxide photonic crystals is presented here. By the rational design of the structure and composition it is possible to synthesize a functional material which allows one to obtain insight into its electronic properties in the optical frequency range with simple experimental measures. The concept is demonstrated by tungsten trioxide inverse opal structure as optical transducer material for hydrogen sensing. The sensing behavior is analyzed in a temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C and in a wide hydrogen concentration range (3000 ppm to 10%). The sensing mechanism is mainly the refractive index change resulting from hydrogen intercalation in tungsten trioxide, but the back reaction has also impact on the optical properties of this system. Detailed chemical reaction studies provide suggestions for specific sensing conditions.

  14. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  15. Tensile behaviour of drawn tungsten wire used in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Feichtmayer, A.; Fuhr, M.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Gietl, H.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2017-12-01

    In tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W) the brittleness problem of tungsten is solved by utilizing extrinsic toughening mechanisms. The properties of the composite are very much related to the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as fibre reinforcements. Its high strength and capability of ductile deformation are ideal properties facilitating toughening of Wf/W. Tensile tests have been used for determining mechanical properties and study the deformation and the fracture behaviour of the wire. Tests of as-fabricated and straightened drawn wires with a diameter between 16 and 150 μm as well as wire electrochemically thinned to a diameter of 5 μm have been performed. Engineering stress–strain curves and a microscopic analysis are presented with the focus on the ultimate strength. All fibres show a comparable stress–strain behaviour comprising necking followed by a ductile fracture. A reduction of the diameter by drawing leads to an increase of strength up to 4500 MPa as a consequence of a grain boundary hardening mechanism. Heat treatment during straightening decreases the strength whereas electrochemical thinning has no significant impact on the mechanical behaviour.

  16. An investigation of the insertion of the cations H{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +} on the electrochromic properties of the thermally evaporated WO{sub 3} thin films grown at different substrate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, K.J. [Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Kalabhavan, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India); Panchal, C.J., E-mail: cjpanchal_msu@yahoo.com [Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Kalabhavan, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India); Desai, M.S. [Applied Physics Department, Faculty of Technology and Engineering, M.S. University of Baroda, Kalabhavan, Vadodara 390001, Gujarat (India); Mehta, P.K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390002, Gujarat (India)

    2010-11-01

    The phenomenon of electrochromism in tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films has recently attained considerable interest due to their enormous applications in inorganic thin film electrochromic devices. We have investigated the compositional, optical, and electrochromic properties of the WO{sub 3} thin films grown at different substrate temperatures by the thermal evaporation of WO{sub 3} powder. The thin films were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical techniques. The XPS analysis suggested that the oxygen to tungsten (O/W) ratio decreases, i.e., the oxygen deficiency increases, on increasing the substrate temperature up to 500 deg. C. The electrochemical analysis provided a comparative study of the coloration efficiency (CE) of the WO{sub 3} thin films intercalated with three different ions viz. H{sup +}, Na{sup +}, and K{sup +}. The effect of the variation of the substrate temperature on the CE and the switching time have also been investigated for the WO{sub 3} thin films intercalated with H{sup +} ions; the thin films deposited at RT and intercalated with H{sup +} ions are found to possess adequate electrochromic properties viz. CE and switching time from device point of view.

  17. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  18. Nitrides and carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with high specific-surface area: their synthesis, structure, and catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, L.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reactions between trioxides of molybdenum or tungsten and ammonia provide a new method to synthesize dimolybdenum and ditungsten nitrides with specific surface areas to two-hundred-and-twenty and ninety-one square meters per gram, respectively. These are the highest values on record for any unsupported metallic powders. They correspond to three-four nonometer particles. The reaction of molybdenum trioxide with ammonia is topotactic in the sense that one-zero-zero planes of dimolybdenum nitride are parallel to zero-one-zero planes of molybdenum trioxide. As the trioxide transforms, it passes through an oxynitride intermediate with changing bulk structure and increasing surface area and extent of reduction. The nitride product consists of platelets, pseudomorphous with the original trioxide, which can be regarded as highly porous defect single crystals. By treating small particles of dimolybdenum or ditungsten nitride with methane-dihydrogen mixtures it is possible to replace interstitial nitrogen atoms by carbon atoms, without sintering, and thus to prepare carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with very high specific surface areas. Molybdenum nitride powders catalyze ammonia synthesis. A pronounced increase in the catalytic activity with increasing particle size confirms the structure-sensitive character of this reaction

  19. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. TiNi shape memory alloy coated with tungsten : A novel approach for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Huafang; Zheng, Yufeng; Pei, Y. T.; de Hosson, Jeff

    This study explores the use of DC magnetron sputtering tungsten thin films for surface modification of TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) targeting for biomedical applications. SEM, AFM and automatic contact angle meter instrument were used to determine the surface characteristics of the tungsten thin

  2. Neutrons production during the interaction of monoenergetic electrons with a thin tungsten target; Produccion de neutrones durante la interaccion de electrones monoenergeticos con un blanco delgado de tungsteno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto B, T. G.; Medina C, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Programa de Doctorado en Ciencias Basicas, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Baltazar R, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica, Programa de Doctorado en Ingenieria y Tecnologia Aplicada, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: tzinnia.soto@gmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    When a linear accelerator for radiotherapy operates with acceleration voltages higher than 8 MV, neutrons are produced, as secondary radiation which deposits an undesirable and undesirable dose in the patient. Depending on the type of tumor, its location in the body and the characteristics of the patient, the cancer treatment with a Linac is performed with photon or electron beams, which produce neutrons through reactions (γ, n) and (e, e n) respectively. Because the effective section for the neutrons production by reactions (γ, n) is approximately two orders of magnitude larger than the effective section of the reactions (e, e n), studies on the effects of this secondary radiation have focused on photo neutrons. en a Linac operates with electron beams, the beam coming out of the magnetic deflector is impinged on the dispersion lamella in order to cause quasi-elastic interactions and to expand the spatial distribution of the electrons; the objective of this work is to determine the characteristics of the photons and neutrons that occur when a mono-energetic electron beam of 2 mm in diameter (pencil beam) is made to impinge on a tungsten lamella of 1 cm in diameter and 0.5 mm of thickness. The study was done using Monte Carlo methods with code MCNP6 for electron beams of 8, 10, 12, 15 and 18 MeV. The spectra of photons and neutrons were estimated in 4 point detectors placed at different equidistant points from the center of the lamella. (Author)

  3. Effect of tungsten on the phase-change properties of Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11} Thin Films for the Phase-change device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol-Jin; Kong, Heon; Lee, Hyun-Yong; Yeo, Jong-Bin [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    In this study, the electrical, optical, and structural properties of tungsten (W)-doped Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11} thin films were investigated. Previously, GeSbTe alloys were doped with various materials in an attempt to improve the thermal stability. Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11} and W-doped Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11} films with a thickness of 200 nm were fabricated by using an RF magnetron reactive co-sputtering system at room temperature on Si (p-type, 100) and glass substrate. The fabricated thin films were annealed in a furnace in the ∼ 0 - 400 ℃ temperature range. The optical properties were analyzed using a UV-Vis-IR spectrophotometer, and by using Beer’s Law equation, the optical-energy band gap (E{sub op}), slope B{sup 1/2}, and slope 1/F were calculated. For the crystalline materials, an increase in the slope B{sup 1/2} and 1/F was observed, exhibiting a good effect on the thermal stability in the amorphous state after the phase change. The structural properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, and the result showed that the W-doped Ge{sub 8}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 11} had a face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structure increased crystallization temperature (T{sub c}). An increase in the T{sub c} increased the thermal stability in the amorphous state. The electrical properties were analyzed using a 4-point probe, exhibiting an increase in the sheet resistance (R{sub s}) in the amorphous and the crystalline states indicating a reduced programming current in the memory device.

  4. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  5. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  6. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  7. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  8. Point Defect Calculations in Tungsten

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danilowicz, Ronald

    1968-01-01

    .... The vacancy migration energy for tungsten was calculated. The calculated value of 1.73 electron volts, together with experimental data, suggests that vacancies migrate in stage III recovery in tungsten...

  9. On the effect of interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunin, V.M.; Karelin, A.I.; Solov'eva, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water was studied. It is shown that molybdenum trioxide forms consecutively magnesium molybdate, dimolybdate and magnesium polymolybdates with magnesium oxide

  10. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  11. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  12. Gasochromic performance of WO{sub 3}-nanorod thin films fabricated with an ArF excimer laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaacob, M. H. [RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor (Malaysia); Ou, J. Z.; Wlodarski, W. [RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Kim, C. S.; Lee, J. Y. [KAIST, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. H. [KIST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, C. M.; Dhakal, K. P.; Kim, J. Y.; Kang, J. H. [University of Incheon, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Thin films with tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) nanorods were fabricated by using an ArF pulsed laser deposition system. Because the ArF excimer laser operates at a very short wavelength of 193 nm, short enough to expect strong absorption of the photons in the semiconductor oxide targets, and because the clusters incoming to the substrates have high momentum, we could build thin films with good surface morphology. Highly homogeneous arrays of nanorods with sizes mostly in the range of 30 - 40 nm were observed. The absorbance response towards hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas was investigated for a WO{sub 3} film coated with 25-A-thick palladium (Pd). The Pd/WO{sub 3}-nanorod thin films exhibited excellent gasochromic response when measured in the visible-NIR range (400 - 1000 nm). As low as 0.06% H{sub 2} concentration was clearly sensed. A significant reversible absorbance change and fast recovery (<2 min) were observed when the films were exposed to H{sub 2} at different concentrations.

  13. Characterization of PLD grown WO3 thin films for gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyadjiev, Stefan I.; Georgieva, Velichka; Stefan, Nicolaie; Stan, George E.; Mihailescu, Natalia; Visan, Anita; Mihailescu, Ion N.; Besleaga, Cristina; Szilágyi, Imre M.

    2017-09-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films were grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with the aim to be applied in gas sensors. The films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and profilometry. To study the gas sensing behavior of these WO3 films, they were deposited on quartz resonators and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method was applied to analyze their gas sensitivity. Synthesis of tetragonal-WO3 films starting from a target with predominantly monoclinic WO3 phase was observed. The films deposited at 300 °C presented a surface topology favorable for the sorption properties, consisting of a film matrix with protruding craters/cavities. QCM prototype sensors with such films were tested for NO2 sensing. The PLD grown WO3 thin films show good sensitivity and fast reaction at room temperature, even in as-deposited state. With the presented technology, the manufacturing of QCM gas sensors is simple, fast and cost-effective, and it is also suitable for energy-effective portable equipment for on-line monitoring of environmental changes.

  14. Humidity sensing characteristics of hydrotungstite thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    variety of tungstate materials, such as thick-film manga- nese tungstate, have been applied as humidity sensors. (Qu and Mayer 1997). The humidity sensing characteristics of bulk metal oxide–tungsten oxide systems have also been studied in the literature (Ichinose 1993). Thin films of tungsten oxide have been prepared ...

  15. Couches minces electrochromiques d'oxyde de tungstene dense et poreux pour des applications de controle energetique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camirand, Hubert

    Nanotechnology has modified the landscape of energy generation, energy storage and energy saving devices. Architectural fenestration can extensively benefit from green nanotechnologies. Amongst them, active fenestration or "smart" windows are able to modify their coloration state upon the application of a small electrical voltage, when based on electrochromic materials. In fact, the amount of visible and near-infrared light that can penetrate through the window can be altered. Therefore, their implementation can allow for a significant reduction in energy consumption in buildings. Furthermore, the capability of optimizing indoor comfort is user-controlled, thus an additional degree of freedom is given by electrochromic-based technology. It is worth mentioning that such devices can be largely advantageous in countries with variable seasons, such as here in Canada. As a matter of fact, the large temperature difference between the hot and cold season influences the requirement of impeding or enabling visible and thermal radiation to pass through. This master's thesis is entirely devoted to tungsten trioxide (WO 3), which is the most widely studied electrochromic material. In the present case, WO3 thin films are synthesized by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering. By varying the deposition pressure and power, the porosity content/packing density of the films is modified. This work's main topic is the characterization of electrochromic samples by in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry simultaneously with the application of an electrical voltage in an aqueous electrolytic medium made of sulfuric acid (H2SO 4). The methodology developed here allows for an in-depth study of electro-active materials. To corroborate this, optical properties of WO3 are obtained for a wide range of coloration levels, and these are subsequently used to model the resulting coloration of electrochromic multilayer systems. However, the interface between the dense and porous films affects the coloration

  16. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  17. A comparative study of humidity sensing and photocatalytic applications of pure and nickel (Ni)-doped WO{sub 3} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramkumar, S. [Bannari Amman Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Erode, Tamilnadu (India); Rajarajan, G. [Vidhya Mandhir Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Erode, Tamilnadu (India)

    2017-06-15

    Nanocrystalline of pristine and nickel (Ni)-doped tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}) thin films was deposited by chemical bath deposition method. The concentrations of Ni ions were varied from 0 to 10 wt%. In order to improve the crystallinity of the films were annealed at 600 C for 2 h in the ambient atmosphere. X-ray diffraction results reveal that the WO{sub 3} doped with nickel crystallizes in monoclinic structure and the results are in good agreement with the standard JCPDS data (card no: 83-0951). AFM micrographs reveal that average grain size of about 27-39 nm for pure and Ni-doped WO{sub 3} thin films. In addition, the band gap of the Ni-doped WO{sub 3} nanostructures is facilely tunable by controlling the Ni contents. The humidity sensor setup was fabricated and measured for pure and Ni-doped WO{sub 3} thin film sensor with various level of RH (10-90%). The Ni-doped WO{sub 3} sensor showed fast response and high sensitivity than pure WO{sub 3}. The photocatalytic activities of the films were evaluated by degradation of methyl orange, methylene blue and phenol in an aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} nanostructures could be remarkably enhanced by doping the Ni impurity. (orig.)

  18. Growth and characterization of α and β-phase tungsten films on various substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Seop; Cho, Jaehun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The growth conditions of tungsten thin films were investigated using various substrates including Si, Si/SiO 2 , GaAs, MgO, and Al 2 O 3 , and recipes were discovered for the optimal growth conditions of thick metastable β-phase tungsten films on Si, GaAs, and Al 2 O 3 substrates, which is an important material in spin orbit torque studies. For the Si/SiO 2 substrate, the crystal phase of the tungsten films was different depending upon the tungsten film thickness, and the transport properties were found to dramatically change with the thickness owing to a change in phase from the α + β phase to the α-phase. It is shown that the crystal phase changes are associated with residual stress in the tungsten films and that the resistivity is closely related to the grain sizes

  19. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  20. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  1. Investigation on the structural and mechanical properties of anti-sticking sputtered tungsten chromium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tai-Nan [Chemical Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan, ROC (China); Han, Sheng [Department of Leisure and Recreation Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China); Weng, Ko-Wei, E-mail: kowei@nqu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Quemoy University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Chin-Tan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Quemoy University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-02-01

    Tungsten chromium nitride (WCrN) thin films are prepared by dual-gun co-sputter process. As the surface coatings on the molding die for glass forming, WCrN films show less deterioration at high temperature than the conventional CrN coating. WCrN thin films are deposited via the reactive co-sputtering of Cr/W targets. The working pressure is kept at 2.66 Pa and the argon/nitrogen ratio is 10. Applied power of chromium is fixed and the applied power of tungsten is varied. Experimental results indicate that the atomic ratio of tungsten in the films increases with the applied power of tungsten. The dominant crystalline phase is chromium nitride when the tungsten target power is below 100 W, while tungsten nitride dominates in the film structure when the tungsten target power is beyond 200 W. A dense structure with much finer particles is developed as the tungsten power is 200 W. As the power is increased to 300 W, the particles become coarser in size. The film roughness exhibits a decreasing trend at low tungsten power and then increases as the tungsten power increased up to 300 and 400 W, presumably due to the phase change from chromium nitrides to tungsten nitrides. Further annealing of the WCrN thin films is simulated as the glass molding condition to check the anti-sticking property which is a critical requirement in molding die surface coating application. The WCrN thin film coating shows good anti-sticking property at 400 °C annealing when the tungsten target power is 200 W. - Highlights: ► WCrN films are deposited by dual sputtering of pure Cr and W targets. ► The covalent bonding character of WCrN films explains the difference in hardness. ► WCrN (200 W W-target-power/400 °C-annealing) exhibits the best anti-sticking performance.

  2. Enhanced selective response to nitric oxide (NO) of Au-modified tungsten trioxide nanoplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Li [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chen, Deliang, E-mail: dlchen@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); UK–China Centre for Multi-functional Nanomaterials, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Fan, Bingbing; Lu, Hongxia; Wang, Hailong; Xu, Hongliang; Yang, Daoyuan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Shao, Guosheng [UK–China Centre for Multi-functional Nanomaterials, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Institute for Renewable Energy and Environmental Technology, University of Bolton, Bolton BL3 5AB (United Kingdom); Zhang, Rui, E-mail: zhangray@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Road, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Laboratory of Aeronautical Composites, Zhengzhou Institute of Aeronautical Industry Management, University Centre, Zhengdong New District, Zhengzhou 450046 (China)

    2013-12-16

    Au-modified WO{sub 3} nanoplates (Au@plate-WO{sub 3}) were synthesized by chemically reducing HAuCl{sub 4} on the surfaces of two-dimensional WO{sub 3} nanoplates, which were derived from an intercalation–topochemical process. XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS and UV–vis DR spectra were used to characterize the WO{sub 3} nanoplates and Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposites. The gas-sensing properties of the WO{sub 3} nanoplates and Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposites were comparatively investigated using inorganic gases and organic vapors as the target gases, with an emphasis on exploring the response and selectivity of NO gases with low concentrations (0.5–10 ppm) at low operating temperature (130−250 °C). The results indicated that Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) enhance the low-temperature sensitivity and selectivity of the Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors for NO detection when compared with the performance of the WO{sub 3} sensors. The Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposite with 1 wt.% Au NPs has the best NO-sensing performance at the optimum operating temperature of ∼170 °C. In addition, the Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors show highly selective to NO gas among various inorganic gases (i.e., H{sub 2}, SO{sub 2} and CO) and organic vapors (i.e., alcohol, acetone, methanal and benzene). The enhancement in sensitivity and selectivity for NO detection is probably due to the synergistic effect of Au NPs and the house-of-card structure of WO{sub 3} nanoplates. - Highlights: • Au@plate-WO{sub 3} nanocomposites were synthesized by a chemical process. • The Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors were highly selective to NO gases with low concentrations. • The Au@plate-WO{sub 3} sensors had the highest sensitivity operating at about 170 °C. • The optimum amount of Au nanoparticles was about 1 wt.%. • Au nanoparticles and the loose aggregates enhanced the NO-sensing performance.

  3. Effects of oxygen addition in reactive cluster beam deposition of tungsten by magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polášek, J., E-mail: xpolasekj@seznam.cz [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Mašek, K. [Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Faculty of Mathematics and Physic, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, Prague 8, CZ-18000 (Czech Republic); Marek, A.; Vyskočil, J. [HVM Plasma Ltd., Na Hutmance 2, Prague 5, CZ-158 00 (Czech Republic)

    2015-09-30

    In this work, we investigated the possibilities of tungsten and tungsten oxide nanoclusters generation by means of non-reactive and reactive magnetron sputtering with gas aggregation. It was found that in pure argon atmosphere, cluster aggregation proceeded in two regimes depending on argon pressure in the aggregation chamber. At the lower pressure, cluster generation was dominated by two-body collisions yielding larger clusters (about 5.5 nm in diameter) at lower rate. At higher pressures, cluster generation was dominated by three-body collisions yielding smaller clusters (3–4 nm in diameter) at higher rate. The small amount of oxygen admixture in the aggregation chamber had considerable influence on cluster aggregation process. At certain critical pressure, the presence of oxygen led to the raise of deposition rate and cluster size. Resulting clusters were composed mostly of tungsten trioxide. The oxygen pressure higher than critical led to the target poisoning and the decrease in the sputtering rate. Critical oxygen pressure decreased with increasing argon pressure, suggesting that cluster aggregation process was influenced by atomic oxygen species (namely, O{sup −} ion) generated by oxygen–argon collisions in the magnetron plasma. - Highlights: • Formation of tungsten and tungsten oxide clusters was observed. • Two modes of cluster aggregation in pure argon atmosphere were found. • Dependence of cluster deposition speed and size on oxygen admixture was observed. • Changes of dependence on oxygen with changing argon pressure were described.

  4. Method of preparing high-temperature-stable thin-film resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, L.S.

    1983-01-01

    A chemical vapor deposition method is disclosed for manufacturing tungsten-silicide thin-film resistors of predetermined bulk resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR). Gaseous compounds of tungsten and silicon are decomposed on a hot substrate to deposit a thin-film of tungsten-silicide. The TCR of the film is determined by the crystallinity of the grain structure, which is controlled by the temperature of deposition and the tungsten to silicon ratio. The bulk resistivity is determined by the tungsten to silicon ratio. Manipulation of the fabrication parameters allows for sensitive control of the properties of the resistor

  5. Method of preparing high-temperature-stable thin-film resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L.S.

    1980-11-12

    A chemical vapor deposition method for manufacturing tungsten-silicide thin-film resistors of predetermined bulk resistivity and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) is disclosed. Gaseous compounds of tungsten and silicon are decomposed on a hot substrate to deposit a thin-film of tungsten-silicide. The TCR of the film is determined by the crystallinity of the grain structure, which is controlled by the temperature of deposition and the tungsten to silicon ratio. The bulk resistivity is determined by the tungsten to silicon ratio. Manipulation of the fabrication parameters allows for sensitive control of the properties of the resistor.

  6. Evaluation and Comparison of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Binimelis J, About I, Mercade M. Short‑term treatment outcome of pulpotomies in primary molars using mineral trioxide aggregate and Biodentine: A randomized clinical trial. Clin Oral. Investig 2015, Nov 18. Epub ahead of print. 25.

  7. Preparation method of tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of tungsten carbide in powder form from tungsten oxide powder in which the tungsten oxide is heated to 800-1,050 0 C, preferably to 850 0 C, and is reduced by the addition of carbon monoxide. The partial pressure of the CO 2 then formed must be kept below a necessary equilibrium value for the formation of the carbide. The waste gas (with max. 20 Vol% CO 2 ) is hardly reduced and is recycled in the circuit. (UWI) [de

  8. The chemical composition of mineral trioxide aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette

    2008-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is composed of Portland cement, with 4:1 addition of bismuth oxide added so that the material can be detected on a radiograph. The cement is made up of calcium, silicon and aluminium. The main constituent phases are tricalcium and dicalcium silicate and tricalcium aluminate. There are two commercial forms of MTA, namely the grey and the white. The difference between the grey and the white materials is the presence of iron in the grey material, which makes up the phase tetracalcium alumino-ferrite. This phase is absent in white MTA. Hydration of MTA occurs in two stages. The initial reaction between tricalcium aluminate and water in the presence of calcium sulphate results in the production of ettringite. Tricalcium and dicalcium silicate react with water to produce calcium silicate hydrate and calcium hydroxide, which is leached out of the cement with time. PMID:20351970

  9. Can MTA be: Miracle trioxide aggregate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Reshma M; Pudakalkatti, Pushpa S; Hattarki, Sanjeevini A

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used for more than 10 years in the dental community and has often been thought of as a material of choice for the endodontist. The dental pulp is closely related to periodontal tissues through apical foramina, accessory canals, and dentinal tubules. Due to this interrelationship, pulpal diseases may influence periodontal health and periodontal infections may affect pulpal integrity. It is estimated that pulpal and periodontal problems are responsible for more than 50% of tooth mortality. Thus, these associations recommend an interdisciplinary approach. MTA appears to exhibit significant results even in periodontal procedures as it is the first restorative material that consistently allows for over-growth of cementum and may facilitate periodontal tissue regeneration. Thus, in the present review, an attempt is made to discuss the clinical applications of MTA as an interdisciplinary approach. PMID:24744536

  10. Large-Batch Reduction of Molybdenum Trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiggans, Jr, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menchhofer, Paul A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nunn, Stephen D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryan, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Unconverted, isotopically-enriched molybdenum metal must be recovered from the spent radiopharmaceutical solution used in NorthStar’s Technetium-99m generator and reused. The recycle process begins by recovering the metal from the aqueous potassium molybdate (K2MoO4) solutions as molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) employing a process developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The MoO3 powder is subsequently reduced to molybdenum metal powder which can be blended with new powder and further processed into a flowable form to be used to produce target disks for irradiation. The molybdenum oxide reduction process has been examined and scaled to produce kilogram quantities of metal powder suitable for processing into a useable form employing spray drying or similar technique and ultimately used for target fabrication.

  11. Influences of Temperature on the Conversion of Ammonium Tungstate Pentahydrate to Tungsten Oxide Particles with Controllable Sizes, Crystallinities, and Physical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Bayu Dani Nandiyanto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate influences of temperature on the conversion of ammonium tungstate pentahydrate (ATP powder to tungsten trioxide (WO3 particles with controllable sizes, crystallinities, and physicochemical properties. In this study, we used a simple thermal decomposition method. In the experimental procedure, we explored the effect of temperature on the physicochemical properties of ATP by testing various heating temperatures (from 100 to 900 °C. The heated ATP samples were then characterized by a physical observation (i.e. color and various analysis methods (i.e. a thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, infrared spectroscopy, an X-ray diffraction, and a scanning electron microscope. Experimental results showed that increases in temperature had an impact to the decreases in particle size, the change in material crystallinity, and the change in physical properties (e.g. change of color from white, orange, to yellowish green. The relationships between the reaction temperatures and the physicochemical properties of the ATP were also investigated in detail along with the theoretical consideration and the proposal of the WO3 particle formation mechanism. In simplification, the phenomena can be described into three zones of temperatures. (1 Below 250 °C (release of water molecules and some ammonium ions.; (2 At 250-400 °C (release of water molecules and ammonium ions, restructurization of tungsten and oxygen elements, and formation of amorphous tungsten trioxide. (3 At higher than 400 °C (crystallization of tungsten trioxide. Since ATP possessed reactivity on temperature, its physicochemical properties changing could be observed easily, and the experimental procedure could be done easily. The present study will benefit not only for “chemistry and material science” but also potentially to be used as a model material for explaining the thermal behavior of material to undergraduate students (suitable

  12. Smart tungsten alloys as a material for the first wall of a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Du, H.; Mayer, J.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Calvo, A.; Ordas, N.

    2017-06-01

    Tungsten is currently deemed as a promising plasma-facing material (PFM) for the future power plant DEMO. In the case of an accident, air can get into contact with PFMs during the air ingress. The temperature of PFMs can rise up to 1200 °C due to nuclear decay heat in the case of damaged coolant supply. Heated neutron-activated tungsten forms a volatile radioactive oxide which can be mobilized into the atmosphere. New self-passivating ‘smart’ alloys can adjust their properties to the environment. During plasma operation the preferential sputtering of lighter alloying elements will leave an almost pure tungsten surface facing the plasma. During an accident the alloying elements in the bulk are forming oxides thus protecting tungsten from mobilization. Good plasma performance and the suppression of oxidation are required for smart alloys. Bulk tungsten (W)-chroimum (Cr)-titanium (Ti) alloys were exposed together with pure tungsten (W) samples to the steady-state deuterium plasma under identical conditions in the linear plasma device PSI 2. The temperature of the samples was ~576 °C-715 °C, the energy of impinging ions was 210 eV matching well the conditions expected at the first wall of DEMO. Weight loss measurements demonstrated similar mass decrease of smart alloys and pure tungsten samples. The oxidation of exposed samples has proven no effect of plasma exposure on the oxidation resistance. The W-Cr-Ti alloy demonstrated advantageous 3-fold lower mass gain due to oxidation than that of pure tungsten. New yttrium (Y)-containing thin film systems are demonstrating superior performance in comparison to that of W-Cr-Ti systems and of pure W. The oxidation rate constant of W-Cr-Y thin film is 105 times less than that of pure tungsten. However, the detected reactivity of the bulk smart alloy in humid atmosphere is calling for a further improvement.

  13. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    length of the sample. Density measurements were also taken before and after testing using Archimedes principle . Samples were also tested at room...commonly seen in body centered cubic (BCC) metals and can be attributed to dislocation mobility theories (8). The basic principles are that the...processing of nano-tungsten and nano-tungsten alloys to achieve superior strength, ductility, and fracture toughness for room temperature applications

  14. Micro creep mechanisms of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoy, R.; Hugon, I.; Burlet, H.; Baillin, X.; Guetaz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Due to its high melting point (3410 deg C), tungsten offers good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures for several applications in non-oxidizing environment. The creep behavior of tungsten is well known between 1200 and 2500 deg C and 10 -3 to 10 -1 strain. However, in some applications when dimensional stability of components is required, these strains are excessive and it is necessary to know the creep behavior of the material for micro-strains (between 10 -4 and 10 -6 ). Methods and devices used to measure creep micro-strains are presented, and creep equations (Norton and Chaboche laws) were developed for wrought, annealed and recrystallized tungsten. The main results obtained on tungsten under low stresses are: stress exponent 1, symmetry of micro-strains in creep-tension and creep-compression, inverse creep (threshold stress), etc. TEM, SEM and EBSD studies allow interpretation of the micro-creep mechanism of tungsten under low stresses and low temperature (∼0.3 K) like the Harper-Dorn creep. In Harper-Dorn creep, micro-strains are associated with the density and the distribution of dislocations existing in the crystals before creep. At 975 deg C, the initial dislocation structure moves differently whether or not a stress is applied. To improve the micro-creep behavior of tungsten, a heat treatment is proposed to create the optimum dislocation structure. (authors)

  15. Pyrolysis preparation of WO3 thin films using ammonium metatungstate DMF/water solution for efficient compact layers in planar perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jincheng, Zhang; Chengwu, Shi; Junjun, Chen; Chao, Ying; Ni, Wu; Mao, Wang

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten trioxide (WO3) thin films were firstly prepared by spin-coating-pyrolysis methods using the ammonium metatungstate ((NH4)6H2W12O40) DMF/water solution, and successfully applied as the efficient compact layers for the planar perovskite solar cells. The influence of the WO3 film thickness and the rinsing treatment of CH3NH3PbI3 thin film with isopropanol on the photovoltaic performance of the corresponding perovskite solar cells was systematically investigated. The results revealed that the perovskite solar cell with a 62 nm thick WO3 compact layer achieved a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 5.72%, with a short circuit photocurrent density of 17.39 mA/cm2, an open circuit voltage of 0.58 V and a fill factor of 0.57. The photoelectric conversion efficiency was improved from 5.72% to 7.04% by the isopropanol rinsing treatment. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51472071, 512720616, 51072043), and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CBA00700).

  16. Development of smart self-passivating tungsten alloys as passive safety measure for future fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegener, Tobias; Litnovsky, Andrey; Brinkmann, Jens; Linsmeier, Christian [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung - Plasmaphysik, 42425 Juelich (Germany); Koch, Freimut [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Due to its high melting point, low tritium retention and low erosion yield tungsten is a candidate material for the first wall of a future fusion reactor. In case of a so-called loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) wall temperatures of about 1200 C are predicted due to nuclear decay heat. The worst case scenario of the LOCA accompanied with air and water ingress, would lead to formation of highly volatile and radioactive tungsten trioxide (WO{sub 3}). A solution for this issue could be smart self-passivating tungsten alloys, which may prevent the formation of WO{sub 3}. Presently, ternary material systems with chromium and titanium are well characterized and show the best performance. In this contribution we show first results of new yttrium containing W-Cr-Y alloys produced by magnetron sputtering. These alloys are supposed to show oxidation rates similar to those of W-Cr-Ti, but with a higher content of W. First experiments of the new Ti-free alloy show an oxidation rate of k{sub p}=4.7.10{sup -6} mg{sup 2} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, which is about four orders of magnitude lower compared to those of pure W at 800 C. Experimental results and simulations of evaporated material in the case of LOCAs are presented.

  17. New oxidation-resistant tungsten alloys for use in the nuclear fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Mao, Y.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.; Bram, M.

    2017-12-01

    Smart tungsten-based alloys are under development as plasma-facing components for a future fusion power plant. Smart alloys are planned to adjust their properties depending on environmental conditions: acting as a sputter-resistant plasma-facing material during plasma operation and suppressing the sublimation of radioactive tungsten oxide in case of an accident on the power plant. New smart alloys containing yttrium are presently in the focus of research. Thin film smart alloys are featuring an remarkable 105-fold suppression of mass increase due to an oxidation as compared to that of pure tungsten at 1000 °C. Newly developed bulk smart tungsten alloys feature even better oxidation resistance compared to that of thin films. First plasma test of smart alloys under DEMO-relevant conditions revealed the same mass removal as for pure tungsten due to sputtering by plasma ions. Exposed smart alloy samples demonstrate the superior oxidation performance as compared to tungsten-chromium-titanium systems developed earlier.

  18. Pulp-Capping with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peycheva Kalina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two considerations for direct pulp capping - accidental mechanical pulp exposure and exposure caused by caries. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was used as pulp-capping material to preserve the vitality of the pulpal tissues. Follow-up examinations revealed that treatment was successful in preserving pulpal vitality and continued development of the tooth. On the basis of available information, it appears that MTA is the material of choice for some clinical applications. Material and methods: Cases 18 - 8 teeth with grey MTA, 10 teeth with white MTA; diagnose: Pulpitis chronica ulcerosa, Electro pulpal test (EOD - 30-35 μA, pre-clinical X-ray - without changes in the structures, follow ups for 4 years. Successful treatments: without clinical symptoms and changes in the X-rays: 5 teeth with grey MTA, 8 teeth with white MTA for period of 4 years. Unsuccessful treatments: Clinical symptoms and sometimes changes in the X-ray: 3 with grey MTA, 2 with white MTA. MTA is an appropriate material for pulp-capping and follow-up examinations revealed that the treatment was successful in preserving pulpal vitality.

  19. Mineral trioxide aggregate in paediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Vidya; Waterhouse, Paula; Whitworth, John

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to present a review of the reported literature on: (i) the physical and chemical properties; and (ii) clinical applications of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in the practice of paediatric dentistry. Electronic literature search of scientific papers from January 1993 to June 2008 was carried out on the MEDLINE, Embase, Entrez Pubmed, and Scopus databases using specific key words. The search yielded 448 papers, out of which 100 were identified as conforming to the applied criteria. These papers formed the basis of the review and the clinical scenarios presented which demonstrate the application of MTA in the practice of paediatric dentistry. Paediatric dentists have successfully employed MTA in a variety of endodontic/restorative applications since the late 1990s. Clinical impressions have generally been favourable and support the findings of laboratory and animal-based investigations. Very few clinical studies have been reported so far in humans, and although these have been positive, the body of research is currently insufficient to enable a meaningful systematic review and meta-analysis.

  20. Globins Scavenge Sulfur Trioxide Anion Radical*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Paul R.; Gardner, Daniel P.; Gardner, Alexander P.

    2015-01-01

    Ferrous myoglobin was oxidized by sulfur trioxide anion radical (STAR) during the free radical chain oxidation of sulfite. Oxidation was inhibited by the STAR scavenger GSH and by the heme ligand CO. Bimolecular rate constants for the reaction of STAR with several ferrous globins and biomolecules were determined by kinetic competition. Reaction rate constants for myoglobin, hemoglobin, neuroglobin, and flavohemoglobin are large at 38, 120, 2,600, and ≥ 7,500 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, and correlate with redox potentials. Measured rate constants for O2, GSH, ascorbate, and NAD(P)H are also large at ∼100, 10, 130, and 30 × 106 m−1 s−1, respectively, but nevertheless allow for favorable competition by globins and a capacity for STAR scavenging in vivo. Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking sulfite oxidase and deleted of flavohemoglobin showed an O2-dependent growth impairment with nonfermentable substrates that was exacerbated by sulfide, a precursor to mitochondrial sulfite formation. Higher O2 exposures inactivated the superoxide-sensitive mitochondrial aconitase in cells, and hypoxia elicited both aconitase and NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase activity losses. Roles for STAR-derived peroxysulfate radical, superoxide radical, and sulfo-NAD(P) in the mechanism of STAR toxicity and flavohemoglobin protection in yeast are suggested. PMID:26381408

  1. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... shipped in an overpack that meets the provisions of § 173.40. (b) In place of the volumetric expansion... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service. [ 74 FR 16143, Apr. 9, 2009...

  2. Anodic oxide films on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paola, A.; Di Quarto, F.; Sunseri, C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphology of anodic oxide films on tungsten, obtained in various conditions of anodization. Studies were made of the growth of porous films, whose thickness increases with time and depends upon the current density. Temperature and electrolyte composition influence the film morphology. Gravimetric measurements of film dissolution at 70 0 C show that after a transient time, the rate of metal dissolution and that of film formation coincide. The porous films thicken because tungsten dissolves as WO 2 2+ and precipitates as WO 3 .H 2 O. (author)

  3. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  4. Fuel Retention Improvement at High Temperatures in Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide Dispersion Fuel Elements by Plasma-Spray Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.; Caves, Robert M.

    1964-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the feasibility of depositing integrally bonded plasma-sprayed tungsten coatings onto 80-volume-percent tungsten - 20-volume-percent uranium dioxide composites. These composites were face clad with thin tungsten foil to inhibit uranium dioxide loss at elevated temperatures, but loss at the unclad edges was still significant. By preheating the composite substrates to approximately 3700 degrees F in a nitrogen environment, metallurgically bonded tungsten coatings could be obtained directly by plasma spraying. Furthermore, even though these coatings were thin and somewhat porous, they greatly inhibited the loss of uranium dioxide. For example, a specimen that was face clad but had no edge cladding lost 5.8 percent uranium dioxide after 2 hours at 4750 dgrees F in flowing hydrogen. A similar specimen with plasma-spray-coated edges, however, lost only 0.75 percent uranium dioxide under the same testing conditions.

  5. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  6. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  7. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  8. Hydration mechanisms of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, J

    2007-06-01

    To report the hydration mechanism of white mineral trioxide aggregate (White MTA, Dentsply, Tulsa Dental Products, Tulsa, OK, USA). The chemical constitution of white MTA was studied by viewing the powder in polished sections under the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The hydration of both white MTA and white Portland cement (PC) was studied by characterizing cement hydrates viewed under the SEM, plotting atomic ratios, performing quantitative energy dispersive analyses with X-ray (EDAX) and by calculation of the amount of anhydrous clinker minerals using the Bogue calculation. Un-hydrated MTA was composed of impure tri-calcium and di-calcium silicate and bismuth oxide. The aluminate phase was scarce. On hydration the white PC produced a dense structure made up of calcium silicate hydrate, calcium hydroxide, monosulphate and ettringite as the main hydration products. The un-reacted cement grain was coated with a layer of hydrated cement. In contrast MTA produced a porous structure on hydration. Levels of ettringite and monosulphate were low. Bismuth oxide was present as un-reacted powder but also incorporated with the calcium silicate hydrate. White MTA was deficient in alumina suggesting that the material was not prepared in a rotary kiln. On hydration this affected the production of ettringite and monosulphate usually formed on hydration of PC. The bismuth affected the hydration mechanism of MTA; it formed part of the structure of C-S-H and also affected the precipitation of calcium hydroxide in the hydrated paste. The microstructure of hydrated MTA would likely be weaker when compared with that of PC.

  9. Effect of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol pulpotomy on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective was to evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic response of FC and white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as pulpotomy materials on primary molars. Materials and Methods: Fifty primary molars, with deep carious lesion that exposed a vital but asymptomatic pulp, in 37 children aged ...

  10. Assessment of the Biocompatibility of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the tissue inflammation caused by three endodontic repair materials. Materials and Methods: The materials included micro mega‑mineral trioxide aggregate (MM‑MTA), bioaggregate (BA), and biodentine (BD), which were implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of rats.

  11. Comparison of apical sealing ability of resected mineral trioxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the case of limited access in endodontic surgery, an alternative approach includes obturation of the canal with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) prior to surgery. Following the setting of MTA, endodontic surgery is carried out by resecting the root-end and exposing the set MTA without cavity preparation. This may also be ...

  12. Evaluation and Comparison of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Pulpotomy is the common therapy for cariously exposed pulps in symptom-ree primary molar teeth. For many years, researchers have searched for an ideal material that allows regeneration of the residual pulp. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Biodentine ...

  13. Hypervelocity impact of tungsten cubes on spaced armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandel, Pradeep S; Sood, Dharmanshu; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Prince; Sewak, Bhupinder; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Athwal, Manoj; Mangla, Vikas; Biswas, Ipsita; Singh, Manjit

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarizes the experimental observations and simulation studies of damage potential of tungsten alloy cubes on relatively thin mild steel spaced armour target plates in the velocity regime 1300 – 4000 ms −1 using Two Stage Light Gas Gun technique. The cubes of size 9.5 mm and 12 mm having mass 15 g and 30 g respectively were made to impact normally on three target plates of size 300 mm × 300 mm of thickness 4, 4 and 10 mm at 100 mm distance apart. Flash radiography has been used to image the projectile-target interaction in the nitrogen environment at 300 mbar vacuum at room temperature. The results reveal clear perforation by 9.5 mm cube in all the three target plates up to impact velocity of about 2000 m/s. While 12 mm cube can perforate the spaced armour upto impact velocity of 4000 m/s. This shows that 9.5mm tungsten alloy cube is not effective beyond 2000 m/s while 12 mm tungsten alloy cube can defeat the spaced armour upto 4000 m/s. The simulation studies have been carried out using Autodyn 3D nonlinear code using Lagrange solver at velocities 1200 – 4000 m/s. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  14. Tungsten monocrystal cutting without distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudkin, A.Yu.; Matveev, I.V.; Cheremisin, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrolyte with high electric current localization, containing 1-3 % KOH and 2-10 % NH 3 , is suggested to use for electrochemical cutting of tungsten. A cutting device is described which includes a cathode feed mechanism based on electric heating and a circuit of automatic control of an interelectrode gap. Laue patterns obtained from a cut surface are practically the same as ones from the initial monocrystal

  15. Adsorption and condensation of bismuth on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, T.; Sidorski, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The bismuth-tungsten system was studied by means of field emission microscopy. The average work function changes induced by the bismuth adsorption were measured for different amounts of adsorbed bismuth. It was found that the adsorption of bismuth changes the work function of tungsten only slightly. The penetration of bismuth into the tungsten substrate was observed. The growth of bismuth single crystals was studied when bismuth was deposited with a rate of about 6 monolayers per minute onto the tungsten substrate and kept at 470 K. Bismuth single crystals with two-fold symmetry occurred most often on the (100) tungsten planes. On the (111) tungsten plane bismuth crystals with three-fold symmetry were observed. An explanation of the observed phenomena is proposed. (Auth.)

  16. Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zhao Yimin; Xia Yongde; Zhu Yanqiu; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-thin W 18 O 49 nanowires were initially obtained by a simple solvothermal method using tungsten chloride and cyclohexanol as precursors. Thermal processing of the resulting bundled nanowires has been carried out in air in a tube furnace. The morphology and phase transformation behavior of the as-synthesized nanowires as a function of annealing temperature have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The nanostructured bundles underwent a series of morphological evolution with increased annealing temperature, becoming straighter, larger in diameter, and smaller in aspect ratio, eventually becoming irregular particles with size up to 5 μm. At 500 deg. C, the monoclinic W 18 O 49 was completely transformed to monoclinic WO 3 phase, which remains stable at high processing temperature. After thermal processing at 400 deg. C and 450 deg. C, the specific surface areas of the resulting nanowires dropped to 110 m 2 g -1 and 66 m 2 g -1 respectively, compared with that of 151 m 2 g -1 for the as-prepared sample. This study may shed light on the understanding of the geometrical and structural evolution occurring in nanowires whose working environment may involve severe temperature variations

  17. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Seok-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyap...

  18. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA): its history, composition, and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawil, Peter Z; Duggan, Derek J; Galicia, Johnah C

    2015-04-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been a revolutionary material in endodontics. Since its introduction in the 1990s several studies have demonstrated its use in various clinical applications. MTA has been extensively studied and is currently used for perforation repairs, apexifications, regenerative procedures, apexogenesis, pulpotomies, and pulp capping. This article will review the history, composition, research findings, and clinical applications of this versatile endodontic material.

  19. Mineral trioxide aggregate induces osteoblastogenesis via Atf6

    OpenAIRE

    Maeda, Toyonobu; Suzuki, Atsuko; Yuzawa, Satoshi; Baba, Yuh; Kimura, Yuichi; Kato, Yasumasa

    2015-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been recommended for various uses in endodontics. To understand the effects of MTA on alveolar bone, we examined whether MTA induces osteoblastic differentiation using MC3T3-E1 cells. MTA enhanced mineralization concomitant with alkaline phosphatase activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MTA increased production of collagens (Type I and Type III) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-13), suggesting that MTA affects bone matrix remodeling. M...

  20. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study Using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from currentless plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of W 24+ to W 33+ ions are very sensitive to electron temperature (Te) and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. Based on the first quantitative analysis of measured spatial profile of W 44+ ion, the tungsten concentration is determined to be n(W 44+ )/n e = 1.4x10 -4 and the total radiation loss is estimated as ∼4 MW, of which the value is roughly half the total NBI power. (author)

  1. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  2. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-12-15

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  3. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  4. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Effects on Flora & Fauna • Geochemistry • Soil microbial communities • Plants • Soil invertebrates • Higher order animals • Additional studies BUILDING...Bioaccumulation of Tungsten in Plants Natural Sources • Trees & shrubs in Rocky Mountain region, USA • Siberian pine, willows, mosses & lichen in tungsten

  5. Structures and transitions in tungsten grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhu, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marian, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization of tungsten for magnetic fusion applications being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  6. International strategic mineral issues summary report: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Antony B.T.; Sinclair, W. David; Amey, Earle B.

    1998-01-01

    Scheelite and wolframite are the principal minerals currently mined for tungsten. Both occur in hard-rock deposits; wolframite is also recovered from placer deposits. Most current mine production of tungsten is from vein/stockwork, skarn, porphyry, and strata-bound deposits. Minor amounts are produced from disseminated, pegmatite, breccia, and placer deposits.

  7. Quenching and recovery experiments on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasch, K.D.; Siegel, R.W.; Schultz, H.

    1976-01-01

    A short summary is given of new results concerning transmission electron microscopy and resistivity measurements on quenched tungsten. These results give evidence for the first time that the quenching and annealing of high purity tungsten leads to vacancy--defect clustering resulting in small voids observable in the electron microscope. 21 references

  8. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 INTRODUCTION & SUMMARY .............................. 1 2 MATERIAL SELECTION .................................. 3 3...Metallographic Examination .. 41 - iv - 1. INTRODUCTION & SUMMARY This is the. Final Report on a Phase I SBIR Program entitled "Development of Tungsten Based...m = - -𔃺 S (l- 1- =11 = (t) 011CU ’a . 4) woj .- :2 01w c L .0 u .-. 0C 0 goa - L 0d MCDM . 3 -X - z 1 m- L. S.1 MCDM -z3-2: S - m 1 o. 01 In 0,10Lnw

  9. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škoro, G.P.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Edgecock, T.R.; Booth, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s −1 . The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  10. Dip-coated hydrotungstite thin films as humidity sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Dip-coated hydrotungstite thin films as humidity sensors. G V KUNTE, UJWALA AIL, S A SHIVASHANKAR and A M UMARJI*. Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India. MS received 6 December 2004; revised 28 February 2005. Abstract. Thin films of a hydrated phase of tungsten ...

  11. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  12. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  13. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  14. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jay L. [Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755 (United States)], E-mail: Jay.L.Clausen@erdc.usace.army.mil; Korte, Nic [1946 Clover Ct., Grand Junction, Colorado, 81506 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use.

  15. Compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of mineral trioxide aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsi Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA was one of most popular biomaterials for endodontic treatment in the past decade. Its superb biocompatibility, sealing ability and surface for tissue adhesion all make MTA a potential candidate for many dental applications, such as apexification, perforation repair, repair of root resorption, and as a root-end filling material. There are many review articles regarding the physical, chemical and biological properties of MTA. However, there are few reviews discussing the relationship between the composition and hydration behavior of MTA. The aim of this article was to provide a systematic review regarding the compositional characteristics and hydration behavior of MTA.

  16. Tungsten trioxide (WO3) as an actuator electrode material for ISFET-based coulometric sensor-actuator systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kerkhof, J.C.; van Kerkhof, J.C.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet; Bos, M.

    1991-01-01

    Acid or base concentrations can be determined by performing an acid-base titration with OH− or H+ ions, coulometrically generated by the electrolysis of water at a noble metal actuator electrode. This can be done very rapidly if the actuator electrode is in close proximity to an ISFET which is used

  17. High Performance All-Solid-State Flexible Micro-Pseudocapacitor Based on Hierarchically Nanostructured Tungsten Trioxide Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuezhen; Liu, Hewei; Zhang, Xi; Jiang, Hongrui

    2015-12-23

    Microsupercapacitors (MSCs) are promising energy storage devices to power miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. With the increasing attention on all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors, new strategies for high-performance flexible MSCs are highly desired. Here, we demonstrate all-solid-state, flexible micropseudocapacitors via direct laser patterning on crack-free, flexible WO3/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites containing high levels of porous hierarchically structured WO3 nanomaterials (up to 50 wt %) and limited binder (PVDF, <25 wt %). The work leads to an areal capacitance of 62.4 mF·cm(-2) and a volumetric capacitance of 10.4 F·cm(-3), exceeding that of graphene based flexible MSCs by a factor of 26 and 3, respectively. As a noncarbon based flexible MSC, hierarchically nanostructured WO3 in the narrow finger electrode is essential to such enhancement in energy density due to its pseudocapacitive property. The effects of WO3/PVDF/MWCNTs composite composition and the dimensions of interdigital structure on the performance of the flexible MSCs are investigated.

  18. Morphological characterization of tungsten trioxide nano powders synthesized by Sol-Gel modified Pechini's method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghasemi, Leila; Jafari, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Sol-gel modified Pechini's method was used to prepare WO 3 nano powders using dicarboxylic acid and polyethylene glycol as the chelating agent and polymeric source, respectively. WO 3 powders were first prepared by calcination of resin precursor at 550 deg C under various initial concentrations of metal ion (12.5-50 mmol), acid (125-500 mmol), a complexing agent (32-262 mmol), and polyethylene glycol (1-16.5 mmol) in the air atmosphere. The products were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results revealed that the WO 3 nano powders prepared with different amounts of chelating agent and polyethylene glycol, crystallized in monoclinic phase. The nano powders were impurity-free due to the presence of the complexing agent and polyethylene glycol as carbon sources. Morphological evolution indicated that the nano powders evolved from rod-like to regular and spherical shapes, depending on complexing agent and polyethylene glycol amounts. Nano powders with an average particle size of approximately 58 nm and a narrow size distribution were obtained. (author)

  19. High Performance All-Solid-State Flexible Micro-Pseudocapacitor Based on Hierarchically Nanostructured Tungsten Trioxide Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Microsupercapacitors (MSCs) are promising energy storage devices to power miniaturized portable electronics and microelectromechanical systems. With the increasing attention on all-solid-state flexible supercapacitors, new strategies for high-performance flexible MSCs are highly desired. Here, we demonstrate all-solid-state, flexible micropseudocapacitors via direct laser patterning on crack-free, flexible WO3/polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites containing high levels of porous hierarchically structured WO3 nanomaterials (up to 50 wt %) and limited binder (PVDF, nanostructured WO3 in the narrow finger electrode is essential to such enhancement in energy density due to its pseudocapacitive property. The effects of WO3/PVDF/MWCNTs composite composition and the dimensions of interdigital structure on the performance of the flexible MSCs are investigated. PMID:26618406

  20. Morphological characterization of tungsten trioxide nano powders synthesized by Sol-Gel modified Pechini's method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghasemi, Leila; Jafari, Hassan, E-mail: jafari_h@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Shahid Rajaee Teacher Training University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    Sol-gel modified Pechini's method was used to prepare WO{sub 3} nano powders using dicarboxylic acid and polyethylene glycol as the chelating agent and polymeric source, respectively. WO{sub 3} powders were first prepared by calcination of resin precursor at 550 deg C under various initial concentrations of metal ion (12.5-50 mmol), acid (125-500 mmol), a complexing agent (32-262 mmol), and polyethylene glycol (1-16.5 mmol) in the air atmosphere. The products were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results revealed that the WO{sub 3} nano powders prepared with different amounts of chelating agent and polyethylene glycol, crystallized in monoclinic phase. The nano powders were impurity-free due to the presence of the complexing agent and polyethylene glycol as carbon sources. Morphological evolution indicated that the nano powders evolved from rod-like to regular and spherical shapes, depending on complexing agent and polyethylene glycol amounts. Nano powders with an average particle size of approximately 58 nm and a narrow size distribution were obtained. (author)

  1. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  2. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  3. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide and cobalt were evaluated. Zinc volatility was suppressed by the enclosed graphite crucible and zinc volatilization pressure was produced in the reaction graphite crucible inside an electric furnace for ZDP (Zinc Decomposition Process. Decomposition reaction was done for 2hours at 650°, which 100% decomposed the tungsten scraps that were over 30 mm thick. Decomposed scraps were pulverized under 75μm and were composed of tungsten carbide and cobalt identified by the XRD (X-ray Diffraction. To produce the WC(Tungsten Carbide powder directly from decomposed scraps, pulverized powders were reacted with hydrochloric acid to remove the cobalt binder. Also to produce the tungstic acid, pulverized powders were reacted with aqua regia to remove the cobalt binder and oxidize the tungsten carbide. Tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders were identified by XRD and chemical composition analysis.

  4. Deuterium retention in tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2012-01-01

    A direct comparison of deuterium retention in samples of tungsten and two grades of tungsten-tantalum alloys-W-1% Ta and W-5% Ta, exposed to deuterium plasmas (ion flux similar to 10(24) m(-2) s(-1), ion energy at the biased target similar to 50 eV) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was performed

  5. Oxidation behaviour of silicon-free tungsten alloys for use as the first wall material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, F.; Brinkmann, J.; Lindig, S.; Mishra, T. P.; Linsmeier, Ch

    2011-12-01

    The use of self-passivating tungsten alloys as armour material of the first wall of a fusion power reactor may be advantageous concerning safety issues. In earlier studies good performance of the system W-Cr-Si was demonstrated. Thin films of such alloys showed a strongly reduced oxidation rate compared to pure tungsten. However, the formation of brittle tungsten silicides may be disadvantageous for the powder metallurgical production of bulk W-Cr-Si alloys if a good workability is needed. This paper shows the results of screening tests to identify suitable silicon-free alloys with distinguished self-passivation and a potentially good workability. Of all the tested systems W-Cr-Ti alloys showed the most promising results. The oxidation rate was even lower than the one of W-Cr-Si alloys, the reduction factor was about four orders of magnitude compared to pure tungsten. This performance could be conserved even if the content of alloying elements was reduced.

  6. Oxidation behaviour of silicon-free tungsten alloys for use as the first wall material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, F; Brinkmann, J; Lindig, S; Mishra, T P; Linsmeier, Ch

    2011-01-01

    The use of self-passivating tungsten alloys as armour material of the first wall of a fusion power reactor may be advantageous concerning safety issues. In earlier studies good performance of the system W-Cr-Si was demonstrated. Thin films of such alloys showed a strongly reduced oxidation rate compared to pure tungsten. However, the formation of brittle tungsten silicides may be disadvantageous for the powder metallurgical production of bulk W-Cr-Si alloys if a good workability is needed. This paper shows the results of screening tests to identify suitable silicon-free alloys with distinguished self-passivation and a potentially good workability. Of all the tested systems W-Cr-Ti alloys showed the most promising results. The oxidation rate was even lower than the one of W-Cr-Si alloys, the reduction factor was about four orders of magnitude compared to pure tungsten. This performance could be conserved even if the content of alloying elements was reduced.

  7. Fabrication of porous tungsten oxide via anodizing in an ammonium nitrate/ethylene glycol/water mixture for visible light-driven photocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Tatsuya; Kawashima, Jun; Natsui, Shungo; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2017-11-01

    Fabrication of a nanoporous tungsten oxide film via anodizing of tungsten in an ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3)/ethylene glycol (EG)/water (H2O) mixture is reported for use as a visible light-driven photocatalyst. Anodizing of tungsten in a 1.0 M NH4NO3/EG solution containing less than 0.1 vol% H2O resulted in active dissolution of the tungsten substrate. As the H2O concentration increased to more than 25 vol%, a thin barrier oxide film was formed on the tungsten substrate. A thick porous tungsten oxide with numerous nanopores measuring several tens of nanometer in diameter was fabricated via anodizing at a moderate H2O concentration of 1.0 vol%. The porous oxide consisted of a double-layered structure with an outer porous layer and an inner dense layer, and the outer porous layer became thinner as the NH4NO3 concentration decreased. A uniform porous oxide film from the top surface to the bottom interface was fabricated via anodizing at 20 V in a 0.02 M NH4NO3/EG solution containing 1.0 vol% H2O at 313 K. The porous tungsten oxide exhibited visible light-driven photocatalytic activity for the photocatalytic decomposition of methylene blue.

  8. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate—A Review of Properties and Testing Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, William N.; Nicholson, Timothy; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence J.

    2017-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) restoratives and MTA sealers are commonly used in endodontics. Commonly referenced standards for testing of MTA are ISO 6876, 9917-1 and 10993. A PubMed search was performed relating to the relevant tests within each ISO and “mineral trioxide aggregate”. MTA restoratives are typically tested with a mixture of tests from multiple standards. As the setting of MTA is dependent upon hydration, the results of various MTA restoratives and sealers are dependent upon ...

  9. Mineral trioxide aggregate and portland cement for direct pulp capping in dog: a histopathological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidar, Maryam; Naghavi, Neda; Mohtasham, Nooshin; Sheik-Nezami, Mahshid; Fallahrastegar, Amir; Afkhami, Farzaneh; Attaran Mashhadi, Negin; Nargesi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. Histopathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tissue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposed with a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Portland cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Although the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45%) and the least increase in fibrous tissue were observed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp capping in dog teeth.

  10. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Portland Cement for Direct Pulp Capping in Dog: A Histopathological Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Bidar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Mineral trioxide aggregate and calcium hydroxide are considered the gold standard pulp-capping materials. Recently, Portland cement has been introduced with properties similar to those of mineral trioxide aggregate. His-topathological effects of direct pulp capping using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements on dog dental pulp tis-sue were evaluated in the present study. Materials and methods. This histopatological study was carried out on 64 dog premolars. First, the pulp was exposedwith a sterile bur. Then, the exposed pulp was capped with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregates and white or gray Port-land cements in each quadrant and sealed with glass-ionomer. The specimens were evaluated under a light microscope after 6 months. Statistical analysis was carried out using Kruskal-Wallis test. Statistical significance was defined at α=5%. Results. There was no acute inflammation in any of the specimens. Chronic inflammation in white and gray mineral triox-ide aggregates and white and gray Portland cements was reported to be 45.5%, 27.3%, 57.1% and 34.1%, respectively. Al-though the differences were not statistically significant, severe inflammation was observed mostly adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate. The largest extent of increased vascularization (45% and the least increase in fibrous tissue were ob-served adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, with no significant differences. In addition, the least calcified tissue formed adjacent to white mineral trioxide aggregate, although the difference was not significant. Conclusion. The materials used in this study were equally effective as pulp protection materials following direct pulp cap-ping in dog teeth.

  11. Mineral trioxide aggregate: part 2 - a review of the material aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Agarwal, Antara; Mala, Kundabala

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this two-part series is to review the composition, properties, and products of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) materials. PubMed and MedLine electronic databases were used to identify scientific papers from January 1991 to May 2010. Based on the selected inclusion criteria, citations were referenced from the scientific peer-reviewed dental literature. Mineral trioxide aggregate is a refined form of the parent compound, Portland cement (PC), and demonstrates a strong biocompatibility due to the high pH level and the material's ability to form hydroxyapatite. Mineral trioxide aggregate materials provide better microleakage protection than traditional endodontic materials as observed in findings from dye-leakage, fluid-filtration, protein-leakage, and bacterial penetration-leakage studies and has been recognized as a bioactive material. Various MTA commercial products are available, including gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA), white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA), and mineral trioxide aggregate-Angelus (AMTA). Although these materials are indicated for various dental uses and applications, long-term in-vivo clinical studies are needed. Part 1 of this article highlighted and discussed the composition and characteristics of the material. Part 2 provides an overview of commercially available MTA materials.

  12. Mineral trioxide aggregate pulpotomy: patient selection and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musale, Prasad K; Kothare, Sneha S; Soni, Abhishek S

    2018-01-01

    This narrative aims at reviewing the available literature for mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) pulpotomy to understand the procedure better and eventually improve the clinical and radiographic outcomes. An electronic search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane, ScienceDirect and ClinicalKey databases with the following keywords: MTA pulpotomy, clinical outcomes, radiographic outcomes, primary teeth. No specific inclusion or exclusion criteria were applied as to what articles would be included in this review. The time period for the search began from 2001 with respect to MTA pulpotomy. However, this was not restrictive during the search. MTA pulpotomy has been a successful treatment modality in primary molars with proven success over the years. There is limited literature to support its success in primary incisors. PMID:29535557

  13. Clinical Applications of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: Report of Four Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battepati, Prashant M

    2010-01-01

    The greatest threats to developing teeth are dental caries and traumatic injuries. The primary goal of all restorative treatment is to maintain pulp vitality so that normal root development or apexogenesis can occur. If pulpal exposure occurs, then a pulpotomy procedure aims to preserve pulp vitality to allow for normal root development. Historically, calcium hydroxide has been the material of choice for pulpotomy procedures. Recently, an alternative material called mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has demonstrated the ability to induce hard-tissue formation in pulpal tissue. This article describes the clinical and radiographic outcome of a series of cases involving the use of MTA in pulpotomy, apexogenesis and apexification procedures and root perforations repair. PMID:27625556

  14. Chemical characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and its hydration reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed in early 1990s and has been successfully used for root perforation repair, root end filling, and one-visit apexification. MTA is composed mainly of tricalcium silicate and dicalcium silicate. When MTA is hydrated, calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) and calcium hydroxide is formed. Formed calcium hydroxide interacts with the phosphate ion in body fluid and form amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) which finally transforms into calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). These mineral precipitate were reported to form the MTA-dentin interfacial layer which enhances the sealing ability of MTA. Clinically, the use of zinc oxide euginol (ZOE) based materials may retard the setting of MTA. Also, the use of acids or contact with excessive blood should be avoided before complete set of MTA, because these conditions could adversely affect the hydration reaction of MTA. Further studies on the chemical nature of MTA hydration reaction are needed. PMID:23429542

  15. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)-like materials: an update review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Zahed; Shalavi, Sousan; Soltani, Mohammad Karim

    2014-09-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a multi-application material used in endodontics. It is a mixture of a refined Portland cement and bismuth oxide and trace amounts of SiO₂, CaO, MgO, K₂SO₄, and Na₂SO₄. MTA powder is mixed with supplied sterile water in a 3:1 powder/liquid. Hydrated MTA has an initial pH of 10.2, which rises to 12.5 three hours after mixing. There are several materials derived from MTA such as Endo-CPM Sealer, Ortho MTA, MTA-Fillapex, DiaRoot BioAggregate, MTA Bio, light-cured MTA, tricalcium silicate, and iRoot SP. The purpose of this article is to review MTA-like materials.

  16. Reactions of ethyl diazoacetate catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Z.; Espenson, H. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-11-03

    Methylrhenium trioxide (CH{sub 3}ReO{sub 3} or MTO) has found wise use in catalysis, including the epoxidation and metathesis of olefins, aldehyde olefination, and oxygen transfer. Extensive reports have now appeared in the area of MTO-catalyzed substrate oxidations with hydrogen peroxide. Certain catalytic applications of MTO for organic reactions that do not utilize peroxide have now been realized. In particular, a catalytic amount of MTO with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) will convert aromatic imines to aziridines and convert aldehydes and ketones to epoxides. The aziridine preparation proceeds in high yields under anaerobic conditions more conveniently than with existing methods. Compounds with a three-membered heterocyclic ring can be obtained with the EDA/MTO catalytic system. Aromatic imines undergo cycloaddition reactions to give aziridines under mild conditions.

  17. Aromatic sulfonation with sulfur trioxide: mechanism and kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moors, Samuel L C; Deraet, Xavier; Van Assche, Guy; Geerlings, Paul; De Proft, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Electrophilic aromatic sulfonation of benzene with sulfur trioxide is studied with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations in gas phase, and in explicit noncomplexing (CCl 3 F) and complexing (CH 3 NO 2 ) solvent models. We investigate different possible reaction pathways, the number of SO 3 molecules participating in the reaction, and the influence of the solvent. Our simulations confirm the existence of a low-energy concerted pathway with formation of a cyclic transition state with two SO 3 molecules. Based on the simulation results, we propose a sequence of elementary reaction steps and a kinetic model compatible with experimental data. Furthermore, a new alternative reaction pathway is proposed in complexing solvent, involving two SO 3 and one CH 3 NO 2 .

  18. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  19. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  20. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  1. Comparison of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol as pulp-capping agents in pulpotomized primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agamy, Hadeer A; Bakry, Niveen S; Mounir, Maha M F; Avery, David R

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use clinical, radiographic, and histologic examinations to compare the relative success of gray mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), white MTA, and formocresol as pulp dressings in pulpotomized primary teeth. Twenty-four children, each with at least 3 primary molars requiring pulpotomy, were selected for this study's clinical and radiographic portion. An additional 15 carious primary teeth planned for serial extraction were selected for this study's histologic portion. All selected teeth were evenly divided into 3 test groups and treated with pulpotomies. Gray MTA was used as the pulp dressing for one third of the teeth, white MTA was the dressing for one third, and the remaining one third were treated with formocresol. The treated teeth selected for the clinical and radiographic evaluations were monitored periodically for 12 months. The treated teeth selected for histologic study were monitored periodically and extracted 6 months postoperatively. Four children with 12 pulpotomized teeth failed to return for any follow-up evaluations in the clinical and radiographic study. Of the remaining 60 teeth in 20 patients, 1 tooth (gray MTA) exfoliated normally and 6 teeth (4 white MTA and 2 formocresol) failed due to abscesses. The remaining 53 teeth appeared to be clinically and radiographically successful 12 months postoperatively. Pulp canal obliteration was a radiographic finding in 11 teeth treated with gray MTA and 1 tooth treated with white MTA. In the histologic study, both types of MTA successfully induced thick dentin bridge formation at the amputation sites, while formocresol induced thin, poorly calcified dentin. Teeth treated with gray MTA demonstrated pulp architecture nearest to normal pulp by preserving the odontoblastic layer and delicate fibrocellular matrix, yet few inflammatory cells or isolated calcified bodies were seen. Teeth treated with white MTA showed a denser fibrotic pattern, with more isolated calcifications in the

  2. Tritium Decay Helium-3 Effects in Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Merrill, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a Demonstration reactor (DEMO) and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to steady-state/transient heat fluxes and intense neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while at the same time minimizing in-vessel tritium inventories and permeation fluxes into the PFC’s coolant. Tritium will diffuse in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [1,2]. Tritium decay into helium-3 may also play a major role in microstructural evolution (e.g. helium embrittlement) in tungsten due to relatively low helium-4 production (e.g. He/dpa ratio of 0.4-0.7 appm [3]) in tungsten. Tritium-decay helium-3 effect on tungsten is hardly understood, and its database is very limited. Two tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) were exposed to high flux (ion flux of 1.0x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1.0x1026 m-2) 0.5%T2/D2 plasma at two different temperatures (200, and 500°C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. Tritium implanted samples were stored at ambient temperature in air for more than 3 years to investigate tritium decay helium-3 effect in tungsten. The tritium distributions on plasma-exposed was monitored by a tritium imaging plate technique during storage period [4]. Thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10°C/min up to 900°C to outgas residual deuterium and tritium but keep helium-3 in tungsten. These helium-3 implanted samples were exposed to deuterium plasma in TPE to investigate helium-3 effect on deuterium behavior in tungsten. The results show that tritium surface concentration in 200°C sample decreased to 30 %, but tritium surface concentration in 500°C sample did not alter over the 3 years storage period, indicating possible tritium

  3. Ab initio and DFT benchmarking of tungsten nanoclusters and tungsten hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoviera, J.; Novotny, M.; Cernusak, I.; Oda, T.; Louis, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present several benchmark calculations comparing wave-function based methods and density functional theory for model systems containing tungsten. They include W 4 cluster as well as W 2 , WH and WH 2 molecules. (authors)

  4. Large grain gallium arsenide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, S. S.; Chu, T. L.; Firouzi, H.; Han, Y. X.; Chen, W. J.; Wang, Q. H.

    Polycrystalline gallium arsenide films deposited on tungsten/graphite substrates have been used for the fabrication of thin film solar cells. Gallium arsenide films deposited on foreign substrates of 10 microns or less thickness exhibit, in most cases, pronounced shunting effects due to grain boundaries. MOS solar cells of 9 sq cm area with an AM1 efficiency of 8.5 percent and p(+)/n/n(+) homojunction solar cells of 1 sq cm area with an AM1 efficiency of 8.8 percent have been prepared. However, in order to further improve the conversion efficiency before the development of effective passivation techniques, gallium arsenide films with large and uniform grain structure are necessary. The large grain gallium arsenide films have been prepared by using (1) the arsine treatment of a thin layer of molten gallium on the substrate surface and (2) the recrystallized germanium films on tungsten/graphite as substrates.

  5. Growth of silicon on tungsten diselenide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Qirong; van Bremen, Rik; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of the growth of silicon on a tungsten diselenide (WSe2) substrate. We have found convincing experimental evidence that silicon does not remain on the WSe2 substrate but rather intercalates between the top layers of WSe2. Upon

  6. Copper-Tungsten Composites Sprayed by HVOF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Zahálka, F.; Bensch, Jan; Chi, W.; Sedláček, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2008), s. 177-180 ISSN 1059-9630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermally sprayed coatings * tungsten * copper * HVOF Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2008 http://www.springerlink.com/content/120439/

  7. Tungsten and refractory metals 3, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Tungsten and Refractory Metals was held in Greater Washington DC at the McLean Hilton, McLean Virginia, on November 15--16, 1995. This meeting was the third in a series of conferences held in the Washington DC area. The first meeting was in 1992 and was entitled ''International Conference on Tungsten and Tungsten Alloys.'' In 1994, the scope of the meeting was expanded to include other refractory metals such as molybdenum, iridium, rhenium, tantalum and niobium. The tremendous success of that meeting was the primary motivation for this Conference. The broader scope (the inclusion of other refractory metals and alloys) of the Conference was kept intact for this meeting. In fact, it was felt that the developments in the technology of these materials required a common forum for the interchange of current research information. The papers presented in this meeting examined the rapid advancements in the technology of refractory metals, with special emphasis on the processing, structure, and properties. Among the properties there was emphasis on both quasi-static and dynamic rates. Another topic that received considerable interest was the area of refractory carbides and tungsten-copper composites. One day of concurrent session was necessary to accommodate all of the presentations

  8. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-01-01

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  9. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Scott O' Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  10. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  11. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity...

  12. Distribution of induced activity in tungsten targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-09-01

    Estimates are made of the induced activity created during high-energy electron showers in tungsten, using the EGS4 code. Photon track lengths, neutron yields and spatial profiles of the induced activity are presented. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  13. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, Yulia, E-mail: yukolubaeva@mail.ru; Shugurov, Vladimir, E-mail: shugurov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); Petrikova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elizmarkova@yahoo.com [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Seksenalina, Malika, E-mail: sportmiss@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, Olga, E-mail: ivaov@mail.ru; Ikonnikova, Irina, E-mail: irinaikonnikova@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Kunitsyna, Tatyana, E-mail: kma11061990@mail.ru; Vlasov, Victor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, Anatoliy, E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yuriy, E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  14. Consolidation of tungsten disilicide by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Matějíček, Jiří; Rohan, Pavel; Janča, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 311-320 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tungsten disilicide * plasma deposition * thermal spray coatings Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  15. CALICE silicon–tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  16. Superhard Rhenium/Tungsten Diboride Solid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew T; Turner, Christopher L; Lei, Jialin; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-11-02

    Rhenium diboride (ReB 2 ), containing corrugated layers of covalently bonded boron, is a superhard metallic compound with a microhardness reaching as high as 40.5 GPa (under an applied load of 0.49 N). Tungsten diboride (WB 2 ), which takes a structural hybrid between that of ReB 2 and AlB 2 , where half of the boron layers are planar (as in AlB 2 ) and half are corrugated (as in ReB 2 ), has been shown not to be superhard. Here, we demonstrate that the ReB 2 -type structure can be maintained for solid solutions of tungsten in ReB 2 with tungsten content up to a surprisingly large limit of nearly 50 atom %. The lattice parameters for the solid solutions linearly increase along both the a- and c-axes with increasing tungsten content, as evaluated by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction. From micro- and nanoindentation hardness testing, all of the compositions within the range of 0-48 atom % W are superhard, and the bulk modulus of the 48 atom % solid solution is nearly identical to that of pure ReB 2 . These results further indicate that ReB 2 -structured compounds are superhard, as has been predicted from first-principles calculations, and may warrant further studies into additional solid solutions or ternary compounds taking this structure type.

  17. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties

  18. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  19. Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu

  20. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  1. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO 2 , as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a set of Langevin equations, i.e. stochastic

  2. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.

    1993-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper

  3. Dip-coated hydrotungstite thin films as humidity sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thin films of a hydrated phase of tungsten oxide, viz. hydrotungstite, have been prepared on glass substrates by dip-coating method using ammonium tungstate precursor solution. X-ray diffraction shows the films to have a strong -axis orientation. The resistance of the films is observed to be sensitive to the humidity content ...

  4. Evaluation of a Porcine Model for Exploration of Endodontic Regeneration Strategies Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Biodentine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-14

    a Porcine Model for Exploration of Endodontic Regeneration Strategies Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Biodentine . ~ is appropriately... Biodentine . 1. Your request for Publication Clearance has been reviewed in accordance with established regulations and approved effective July 06, 2016...Other 6. Title: Evaluation of a Porcine Model for Exploration of Endodonlic Regeneration Strategies Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Biodentine

  5. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L.M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Byun, T.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410–780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02–9.0 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039–1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile. - Highlights: • Fusion reactors need a tough, ductile tungsten plasma-facing material. • The unirradiated tungsten-copper laminate is more ductile than tungsten alone. • After neutron irradiation, the composite has significantly less ductility. • The tungsten behavior appears to dominate the overall composite behavior.

  6. Measurement of quasiparticle transport in aluminum films using tungsten transition-edge sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, J. J.; Shank, B.; Cabrera, B.; Moffatt, R.; Redl, P.; Young, B. A.; Tortorici, E. C.; Brink, P. L.; Cherry, M.; Tomada, A.; Kreikebaum, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on experimental studies of phonon sensors which utilize quasiparticle diffusion in thin aluminum films connected to tungsten transition-edge-sensors (TESs) operated at 35 mK. We show that basic TES physics and a simple physical model of the overlap region between the W and Al films in our devices enables us to accurately reproduce the experimentally observed pulse shapes from x-rays absorbed in the Al films. We further estimate quasiparticle loss in Al films using a simple diffusion equation approach. These studies allow the design of phonon sensors with improved performance.

  7. Osteoblastic cytokine response to gray and white mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidar, Maryam; Zarrabi, Mohammad Hasan; Tavakol Afshari, Jalil; Aghasizadeh, Navid; Naghavi, Neda; Forghanirad, Maryam; Attaran, Niloufar

    2011-01-01

    The materials used for root-end filling and perforation repair are in direct contact with live tissues e.g. bone and connective tissue; their effects however, are uncertain. The aim of this ex vivostudy was to evaluate the osteoblastic secretory activity adjacent to gray and white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Intermediate Restorative Material (IRM). The studied materials were prepared and placed in 24-wells plate. Human MG-63 osteoblasts were introduced to materials after their initial set. The supernatant fluid was collected after 1, 3, and 7 days and the level of interleukin-1β was measured by ELISA test. A microscopic exam was also performed to assess proliferation and viability of the cells. Kruskal-Wallis and Tukey tests were used for analysis. T here were significant higher levels of interleukin-1β in the gray and white MTA groups compared to IRM group (P0.05).Morphologic appearance of osteoblasts adjacent to gray and white MTA was similar to normal osteoblasts in all observation periods, however cells adjacent to IRM were round, signifying cytotoxicity of the adjacent material. Human osteoblasts' has a favorable biologic response to white and gray MTA compared to IRM.

  8. Mineral trioxide aggregate induces osteoblastogenesis via Atf6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyonobu Maeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA has been recommended for various uses in endodontics. To understand the effects of MTA on alveolar bone, we examined whether MTA induces osteoblastic differentiation using MC3T3-E1 cells. MTA enhanced mineralization concomitant with alkaline phosphatase activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. MTA increased production of collagens (Type I and Type III and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-9 and MMP-13, suggesting that MTA affects bone matrix remodeling. MTA also induced Bglap (osteocalcin but not Bmp2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2 mRNA expression. We observed induction of Atf6 (activating transcription factor 6, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response transcription factor mRNA expression and activation of Atf6 by MTA treatment. Forced expression of p50Atf6 (active form of Atf6 markedly enhanced Bglap mRNA expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to investigate the increase in p50Atf6 binding to the Bglap promoter region by MTA treatment. Furthermore, knockdown of Atf6 gene expression by introduction of Tet-on Atf6 shRNA expression vector abrogated MTA-induced mineralization. These results suggest that MTA induces in vitro osteoblastogenesis through the Atf6–osteocalcin axis as ER stress signaling. Therefore, MTA in endodontic treatment may affect alveolar bone healing in the resorbed region caused by pulpal infection.

  9. The solubility of uranium trioxide simulated lung fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchiks, T.; Kol, R.; Prager, A.; German, U.; Oved, S.; Laichter, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Uranium trioxide is an important intermediate compound in the uranium production process. Inhalation of UO 3 aerosols can occur during this process. To assess the radiation dose from the intake of this compound it is necessary to know its transportability class, based on its dissolution rate in lung fluid. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has assigned UO 3 to Inhalation Class W (lung retention half-time of 10 to 100 days). A solubility study of UO 3 in a simulated lung fluid has been carried out using a batch/filter replacement method. Two tests were conducted over a 100-days period, during which 17 samples were collected and analyzed for their dissolved uranium content. The results show that about 40% of the total uranium was dissolved during the first days and nearly all was dissolved during 100 days. Expressed as the fraction of the total uranium remaining undissolved as a function of time, using a non-linear least squares regression fit, it was found that the solubility of UO 3 in simulated lung fluid could be expressed as a combination of two Inactions: about 25% of the UO 3 could be classified as type D (with lung retention half-time of several hours) and about 75% as type W (with half-time of 10-20 days). This classification is in agreement with recent investigations and indicates that UO 3 is more soluble than considered by ICRP. (authors)

  10. Treatment outcome of mineral trioxide aggregate: repair of root perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Hage, Nathalie; Pfefferle, Thorsten; Koch, Martin Jean; Geletneky, Beate; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Martin, Nicolas; Staehle, Hans Joerg

    2010-02-01

    The use of biocompatible materials like mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) may improve the prognosis of teeth with root perforations. The treatment outcome of root perforations repaired between 2000 and 2006 with MTA was investigated. Twenty-six patients received treatment with MTA in 26 teeth with root perforations. Treatment was performed by supervised undergraduate students (29%), general dentists (52%), or dentists who had focused on endodontics (19%). Perforation repair by all treatment providers was performed using a dental operating microscope. Calibrated examiners assessed clinical and radiographic outcome 12 to 65 months after treatment (median 33 months, 81% recall rate). Pre-, intra-, and postoperative information relating to potential prognostic factors was evaluated. Of 21 teeth examined, 18 teeth (86%) were classified as healed. None of the analyzed potential prognostic factors had a significant effect on the outcome. MTA appears to provide a biocompatible and long-term effective seal for root perforations in all parts of the root. Copyright 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Ultrasonication on Physical Properties of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Parashos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the effect on physical properties of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA of using direct hand compaction during placement and when using hand compaction with indirect ultrasonic activation with different application times. Methods. One hundred acrylic canals were obturated in 3 increments with MTA in sample sizes of 10. One group was obturated by hand with an endodontic plugger and the remainder obturated with indirect ultrasonic application, with times ranging from 2 seconds to 18 seconds per increment. Microhardness values, dye penetration depths, and radiographs of the samples were evaluated. Results. As ultrasonic application time per increment increased, microhardness values fell significantly (P<0.001 while dye penetration values increased (P<0.001. Microhardness of MTA ultrasonicated for 2 seconds was significantly higher than hand compaction (P=0.03. Most radiographic voids were visible in the hand-compacted group (P<0.001, which also had higher dye penetration depths than the 2-second ultrasonicated samples. Ultrasonication of MTA for 10–18 seconds resulted in significantly more voids than 2–8 seconds of ultrasonication (P=0.02. Conclusion. The use of ultrasonics with MTA improved the compaction and flow of MTA, but excessive ultrasonication adversely affected MTA properties. A time of 2 seconds of ultrasonication per increment presented the best compromise between microhardness values, dye penetration depths, and lack of radiographic voids.

  12. [Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) a success story in apical surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Arx, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The objective of apical surgery is to retain teeth with persistent apical pathosis following orthograde root canal treatment if endodontic non-surgical revision is difficult or associated with risks, or is even declined by the patient. Since the most frequent cause of recurrent apical disease is bacterial reinfection from the (remaining) root canal system, the bacteria-tight root-end filling is the most important step in apical surgery. In the early 1990s, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was developed at the Loma Linda University in California/USA. Preclinical studies clearly showed that MTA has a high sealing capability, a good material stability and an excellent biocompatbility. Multiple experimental studies in animals highlighted the mild tissue reactions observed adjacent to this material. Furthermore, histological analysis of the periapical regions demonstrated a frequent deposition of new cementum not only onto the resection plane (cut dentinal surface), but also directly onto MTA. For these reasons, MTA is considered a bioactive material. In 1997 MTA was cleared for clinical use in patients. Multiple prospective clinical and randomized studies have documented high and constant success rates of MTA-treated teeth in apical surgery. A recently published longitudinal study showed that MTA-treated teeth remained stable over five years; hence the high healed rates documented after one year are maintained during long-term observation.

  13. Superfast Set, Strong and Less Degradable Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alqedairi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Despite the good sealing ability and biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA, its slow setting, high degradation, and weakness limit its use in surgical endodontics and high stress-bearing areas. This study aimed to develop two new liquids to control these drawbacks. They were prepared from calcium chloride, fumed silica, and hydroxyapatite or calcium phosphate and coded “H” and “P,” respectively. Methods. Portland cement, Grey ProRoot® MTA, and white ProRoot MTA were mixed with distilled water (control or liquid “H” or “P.” The pH, setting time, degradation rate, leachant/precipitate’ composition, compressive strength, and morphology were assessed. Results. Both liquids maintained MTA’s high alkalinity and reduced the setting time by 1-2 orders of magnitude. Both liquids, H in particular, significantly reduced the degradation rate of Grey ProRoot and White ProRoot MTA®. Calcite has been identified as the main phase of the leachant or precipitate formed during the cement’s degradation. Calcium hydroxide or hydroxyapatite was also identified with Grey ProRoot MTA mixed with H liquid. These liquids also significantly increased the compressive strength with no statistical differences between them; this was associated with the production of dense, consolidated structures. Conclusions. The modified MTA could be used in surgical endodontics and high stress-bearing areas.

  14. Compressive Strength of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Propylene Glycol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Negin; Rahimi, Saeed; Shahi, Shahriar; Salem Milani, Amin; Rezaei, Yashar; Nobakht, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adding propylene glycol (PG) to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) liquid with volume ratio of 20% on the compressive strength (CS) of MTA in two time periods (4 and 21 days) after mixing. Four groups of steel cylinders ( n =15) with an internal diameter of 3 and a height of 6 mm were prepared and MTA (groups 1 and 2) and MTA+PG (80% MTA liquid+20% PG) (groups 3 and 4) were placed in to the cylinders. In groups 1 and 3 the CS was evaluated after 4 days and in groups 2 and 4 after 21 days. Data were calculated using the two-ways ANOVA. The level of significance was set at 0.05. The highest (52.22±18.92 MPa) and lowest (4.5±0.67 MPa) of CS was obtained in 21-day MTA samples and 4-day MTA+PG specimen, respectively. The effect of time and PG were significant on the CS ( P MTA with PG significantly reduced the CS; but passing the time from 4 to 21 days significantly increased the CS. Considering the limitations of this study, PG had a negative effect on CS of MTA.

  15. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Aggressive Dental Resorption: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AKM Bashar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to evaluate the clinical efficacy of Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA in arresting dental resorption and as a regenerative material especially for growth of bone and periodontal ligament. Tooth no 25 having Aggressive Dental Resorption (simultaneous presentation of apical and lateral perforating resorption with discharging sinus and co-existing oral communication through periodontal pocket was treated with MTA. After thorough debridement and disinfection of the root canal, complete obturation of the root canal system was done with MTA and evaluated thereafter. Follow up examinations up to a period of 1 year could not reveal resolution of any of the preoperative signs and symptoms i.e. discharging sinus, periodontal pocket healing and mobility; also did not show radiographic evidence of arrest of resorption and bone or periodontal tissue formation. Clinical efficacy of MTA in arresting dental resorption with subsequent repair found questionable. However, Shorter period of disinfection, co-existence of oral communication with the resorptive defects through periodontium and non surgical treatment approach all or any one of these may be the concern for the failure. Keywords: Resorption, Perforation, MTA.DOI: 10.3329/bsmmuj.v2i1.3711 BSMMU J 2009; 2(1: 42-46

  16. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate for Intruded Teeth with Incomplete Apex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T S Oliveira, Caroline; M A de Carvalho, Fredson; C O Gonçalves, Leonardo; M N de Souza, Jessyca; F R Garcia, Lucas; A F Marques, André; N de Souza, Samir

    2018-01-01

    The axial displacement of a tooth within the alveolar bone is called traumatic intrusive luxation. The treatment of immature permanent teeth with incomplete root formation is a challenging procedure, as the prognosis is uncertain. The objective of the present article is to report the successful treatment of traumatic intrusive luxation in teeth with incomplete root formation, where mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was used as an apical plug to induce apexification. A 10-year-old boy was referred to our department for emergency treatment of dentoalveolar trauma to the maxillary central incisors. After clinical and radiographic examination, the teeth were surgically repositioned and rigidly fixed. Three months later, a pulp vitality test of both teeth elicited a negative response. Endodontic therapy with an MTA plug was used to induce apexification as root formation was incomplete. The root canals were then filled. Clinical and radiographic examination was then performed again at 2 and 4 months later. The MTA apical plug was effective in inducing apexification and maintaining both teeth.

  17. Root perforations treatment using mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Neto, José Dias da; Brito, Rafael Horácio de; Schnaider, Taylor Brandão; Gragnani, Alfredo; Engelman, Mírian; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2010-12-01

    Clinical, radiological and histological evaluation of root perforations treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or Portland cements, and calcium sulfate barrier. One molar and 11 premolar teeth of a male mongrel dog received endodontic treatment and furcations were perforated with a high-speed round bur and treated with a calcium sulfate barrier. MTA, Portland cement type II (PCII) and type V (PCV), and white Portland cement (WPC) were used as obturation materials. The teeth were restored with composite resin and periapical radiographs were taken. The animal was euthanized 120 days post-surgery for treatment evaluation. Right lower first premolar (MTA), right lower third premolar (PCV), left lower second premolar (MTA), and right lower second premolar (WPC): clinically normal, slightly radio-transparent area on the furcation, little inflammatory infiltrate, and new-bone formation. Left lower third premolar (PCII), right upper first premolar (WPC), right upper third premolar (PCII), and left upper first molar (PCV): clinically normal, radiopaque area on the furcation, and new-bone formation. Right upper second premolar (MTA), left upper second premolar (WPC), left upper third premolar (PCII): presence of furcation lesion, large radiolucent area, and intense inflammatory infiltrate. All obturation materials used in this study induced new-bone formation.

  18. Enhancing the adhesion of diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrate using tungsten particles via MPCVD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Wen Chi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yu-Shiang, E-mail: yswu@cc.cust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, 245, Sec. 3, Yen-Chiu-Yuan Road, Nankang, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hou-Cheng [Department of Electronic Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Haun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-24

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > Larger particles of tungsten led to larger diamond particles with improved crystallinity, covering the specimen with increased speed. > Adhesion was indicated to be a function of the gaps between the tungsten particles. > Diamond films pretreated with tungsten particles of 2.0 {mu}m showed the highest hardness of 27.78 GPa with good crystalline. - Abstract: To increase the adhesion of diamond films and avoid the negative effects of using cobalt, previous treatments have employed tungsten particles to cover the surface of the 6 wt.% cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate. The surface of the tungsten particles is transformed into W{sub 2}C and WC, which attracts and traps carbon. Through the process of nucleation, the carbon forms around the tungsten particles, thereby satisfying the conditions necessary for the formation of diamond film. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that diamond films of good quality with excellent adhesive properties and a hardness level as high as 27.78 GPa could be produced following pretreatment with 2.0 {mu}m tungsten particles. Rockwell indentation tests indicate that addition of tungsten particles promotes the interfacial adhesion of diamond films with WC-Co substrates. We determined that using smaller tungsten particles decreased the number of gaps and cavities on the surface of the substrate, thereby enhancing the adhesion of the diamond film.

  19. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  20. MİNERAL TRiOXiDE AGGREGATE: LİTERATÜR DERLEMESİ

    OpenAIRE

    TUNÇ, Yrd. Doç. Dr. Emine ŞEN; ÇETİNER, Prof. Dr. Serap

    2014-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) di hekimli4ine yeni tan t lan materyallerden biridir. Mineral trioxide aggregate ba lang çta periapikal cerrahi uygulamalar nda kök kanal sistemi ile çevre dokular aras ndaki ili kiyi engellemede kullan lmak üzere, kök ucu dolgu maddesi olarak geli tirilmi tir. Materyal günümüzde kök ucu dolgusu, direkt pulpa kuafaj ,perforasyonlar n n tamiri ve apeksifikasyon gibi farklklinik uygulamalarda da kullan lmaktad r. Bu literatür derlemesinde, MTA’n n kimyasal, fizi...

  1. Spectroscopic modeling for tungsten EUV spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Koike, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed an atomic model for tungsten extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra to reconstruct characteristic spectral feature of unresolved transition array (UTA) observed at 4-7 nm for tungsten ions. In the tungsten atomic modeling, we considered fine-structure levels with the quantum principal number n up to 6 as the atomic structure and calculated the electron-impact collision cross sections by relativistic distorted-wave method, using HULLAC atomic code. We measured tungsten EUV spectra in Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact Electron Beam Ion Trap device (CoBIT) and compared them with the model calculation. The model successfully explain series of emission peaks at 1.5-3.5 nm as n=5-4 and 6-4 transitions of W 24+ - W 32+ measured in CoBIT and LHD and the charge state distributions were estimated for LHD plasma. The UTA feature observed at 4-7 nm was also successfully reconstructed with our model. The peak at ∼5 nm is produced mainly by many 4f-4d transition of W 22+ - W 35+ ions, and the second peak at ∼6 nm is produced by 4f-4d transition of W 25+ - W 28+ ions, and 4d-4p inner-shell transitions, 4p 5 4d n+1 - 4p 6 4d n , of W 29+ - W 35+ ions. These 4d-4p inner-shell transitions become strong since we included higher excited states such as 4p 5 4d n 4f state, which ADAS atomic data set does not include for spectroscopic modeling with fine structure levels. (author)

  2. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  3. Carbide formation in tungsten coatings on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasinski, M.; Maier, H.; Ruset, C.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten coatings with molybdenum interlayer deposited on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) substrates were selected as the first wall material for the divertor in the Wall Project at Joint European Torus (similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). For such a layered structure, diffusion of carbon from the CFC substrate towards the Mo and W deposits is expected during the operation of the reactor. As both molybdenum and tungsten form stable carbides, brittle compounds may form at the interface, thus strongly affecting the thermomechanical performance of the coated tiles. For the purpose of prediction of the operation time of such coated tiles, carbon diffusion and carbide formation kinetics need to be determined. In the present study, W/Mo/CFC samples were subjected to heat treatment at 1470 K for various annealing times. The Focused Ion Beam technique was used for sample preparation for electron microscopy examinations. Transmission electron microscopy observations supported with diffraction pattern analyses revealed the both W 2 C and WC carbides in the W coating, as well as that of Mo 2 C carbide in the Mo layer. The results were used to estimate the kinetics of coatings degradation. - Highlights: ► Thin Mo/W layers system on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon divertor tile ► Heat treatment at 1470 K results in two tungsten carbide creation — W 2 C and WC ► The total tungsten carbide creation is limited by carbon diffusion ► WC carbide creation is limited by W 2 C–WC reaction rate

  4. Electronic state of europium atoms on surface of oxidized tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The energy scheme of the europium atoms adsorption system on the tungsten surface, coated with the oxygen monolayer, is considered. The evaluations of the europium adatoms charged state on the oxidized tungsten surface are performed. It is established, that europium, adsorbed at the oxidized tungsten surface, is a positive ion with the charge close to the unit. The zonal scheme of the Eu-O/W adsorption system for the europium low and high concentrations is proposed

  5. Properties of MoO3 thin film polymorphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarron, E.M.; Carcia, P.F.

    1987-01-01

    Thin film polymorphs of molybdenum trioxide have been synthesized by RF sputtering. Films deposited on thermally floating substrates are polycrystalline and exhibit preferred orientation. Depending upon the oxygen partial pressure maintained during sputtering, the films can be made to crystallize in either the thermodynamically stable orthorhombic α MoO 3 form (unique 2D-layered structure) or the metastable monoclinic β MoO 3 phase (3D ReO 3 -related structure). Metastable β films can be converted thermally to the α phase and the transformation appears topotactic. Films deposited on the cooled substrates are amorphous. A correlation between the particular phase formed and adatom mobility is noted

  6. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  7. On tungsten technologies and qualification for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J. van der; Hegeman, H.; Wouters, O.; Luzginova, N.; Jonker, B.; Van der Marck, S.; Opschoor, J.; Wang, J.; Dowling, G.; Stuivenga, M.; Carton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are considered prime candidates for the in-vessel components directly facing the plasma. For example, in the HEMJ helium cooled divertor design tiles may be operated at temperatures up to 1700 deg. C, supported by a structure partially consisting of tungsten at temperatures from 600 to 1000 deg. C, and connected to a HT steel structure. The tungsten armoured primary wall is operated at 500-900 deg. C. Irradiation doses will be few tens dpa at minimum, but FPR requirements for plants availability will stretch these targets. Recently injection moulding technology was developed for pure tungsten and representative parts were manufactured for ITER monobloc divertors and DEMO HEMJ thimbles. The major advantages for this technology are the efficient use of material feedstock/resources and the intrinsic possibility to produce near-finished product, avoiding machining processes that are costly and may introduce surface defects deteriorating the component in service performance. It is well suited for mass-manufacturing of components as well known in e.g. lighting industries. To further qualify this material technology various specimen types were produced with processing parameters identical to the components, and tested successfully, showing the high potential for implementation in (fusion) devices. Furthermore, the engineering approach can clearly be tailored away from conventional design and manufacturing technologies based on bulk materials. The technology is suitable for shaping of new W-alloys and W-ODS variants as well. Basically this technology allows a particular qualification trajectory. There is no need to produce large batches of material during the material development and optimization stage. For the verification of irradiation behaviour in the specific neutron spectra, there is a further attractive feature to use e.g. isotope tailored powders to adjust to available irradiation facilities like MTR's. In addition the ingrowth of transmutation

  8. Bright monolayer tungsten disulfide via exciton and trion chemical modulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ye; Yu, Xuechao; Li, Jiewei; Liang, Houkun; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Wei; Wang, Qi Jie

    2018-04-05

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) with exceptional electrical and optical properties have drawn tremendous attention for use in novel optoelectronic applications as photodetectors, transistors, light emitters, etc. However, electron bound trions formed through the combination of neutral excitons and electrons significantly decrease the photoluminescence (PL) efficiency of TMDCs. In this study, we report a simple yet efficient chemical doping strategy to modulate the optical properties of monolayer tungsten disulfide (WS2). As a demonstrative example, a chemically doped monolayer of WS2 exhibits remarkable PL enhancement of about one order of magnitude higher than that of pristine WS2. This outstanding PL enhancement is attributed to the fact that excess electrons, which promote the formation of electron-bound trions, are reduced in number through charge transfer from WS2 to the chemical dopant. Furthermore, an improved degree of circular polarization from ∼9.0% to ∼41.5% was also observed in the chemically doped WS2 monolayer. This work describes a feasible strategy to manipulate the optical properties of TMDCs via exciton modulation, making TMDCs promising candidates for versatile semiconductor-based photonic devices.

  9. Particle size changes in unsealed mineral trioxide aggregate powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, William N; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2014-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is commonly supplied in 1-g packages of powder that are used by some clinicians across several treatments against the manufacturer's instructions. ProRoot MTA cannot be resealed after opening, whereas MTA Angelus has a resealable lid. This study assessed changes in particle size distribution once the packaging had been opened. Fresh ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus powder were analyzed by using laser diffraction and scanning electron microscopy and compared with powder from packages that had been opened once and kept in storage for 2 years. The ProRoot packet was folded over, whereas the MTA Angelus jar had the lid twisted back to its original position. After 2 years, ProRoot MTA powder showed a 6-fold increase in particle size (lower 10% from 1.13 to 4.37 μm, median particle size from 1.99 to 12.87 μm, and upper 10% from 4.30 to 34.67 μm), with an accompanying 50-fold change in particle surface area. MTA Angelus showed only a 2-fold increase in particle size (4.15 to 8.32 μm, 12.72 to 23.79 μm, and 42.66 to 47.91 μm, respectively) and a 2-fold change in particle size surface area. MTA reacts with atmospheric moisture, causing an increase in particle size that may adversely affect the properties and shelf life of the material. Smaller particles have a greater predisposition to absorb moisture. Single-use systems are advised. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement promote biomineralization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreger, Luonothar Antunes Schmitt; Felippe, Wilson Tadeu; Reyes-Carmona, Jessie Fabiola; Felippe, Gabriela Santos; Bortoluzzi, Eduardo Antunes; Felippe, Mara Cristina Santos

    2012-03-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement have been shown to be bioactive because of their ability to produce biologically compatible carbonated apatite. This study analyzed the interaction of MTA and white Portland cement with dentin in vivo. Seventy-two human dentin tubes were filled with MTA Branco, MTA BIO, and white Portland cement + 20% bismuth oxide (PC1) or PC1 + 10% of calcium chloride (PC2) and implanted subcutaneously in 18 rats at 4 sites from the dorsal area. Empty dentin tubes, implanted in rats of a pilot study, were used as control. After 30, 60, and 90 days, the animals were killed, and the dentin tubes were retrieved for scanning electron microscope analysis. In the periods of 30 and 60 days, the mineral deposition in the material-dentin interface (interfacial layer) and in the interior of dentinal tubules was detected in more tubes filled with MTA Branco and MTA BIO than in tubes filled with PC1 and PC2. After 90 days, the interfacial layer and intratubular mineralization were detected in all tubes except for 3 and 1 of the tubes filled with PC2, respectively. It was concluded that all the cements tested were bioactive. The cements released some of their components in the tissue capable of stimulating mineral deposition in the cement-dentin interface and in the interior of the dentinal tubules. MTA BIO and MTA Branco were more effective in promoting the biomineralization process than Portland cements, mainly after 30 and 60 days. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Chromium Trioxide Hole-Selective Heterocontacts for Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wenjie; Wu, Weiliang; Liu, Zongtao; Qiu, Kaifu; Cai, Lun; Yao, Zhirong; Ai, Bin; Liang, Zongcun; Shen, Hui

    2018-04-25

    A high recombination rate and high thermal budget for aluminum (Al) back surface field are found in the industrial p-type silicon solar cells. Direct metallization on lightly doped p-type silicon, however, exhibits a large Schottky barrier for the holes on the silicon surface because of Fermi-level pinning effect. As a result, low-temperature-deposited, dopant-free chromium trioxide (CrO x , x solar cell as a hole-selective contact at the rear surface. By using 4 nm CrO x between the p-type silicon and Ag, we achieve a reduction of the contact resistivity for the contact of Ag directly on p-type silicon. For further improvement, we utilize a CrO x (2 nm)/Ag (30 nm)/CrO x (2 nm) multilayer film on the contact between Ag and p-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) to achieve a lower contact resistance (40 mΩ·cm 2 ). The low-resistivity Ohmic contact is attributed to the high work function of the uniform CrO x film and the depinning of the Fermi level of the SiO x layer at the silicon interface. Implementing the advanced hole-selective contacts with CrO x /Ag/CrO x on the p-type silicon solar cell results in a power conversion efficiency of 20.3%, which is 0.1% higher than that of the cell utilizing 4 nm CrO x . Compared with the commercialized p-type solar cell, the novel CrO x -based hole-selective transport material opens up a new possibility for c-Si solar cells using high-efficiency, low-temperature, and dopant-free deposition techniques.

  12. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  13. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  14. Reaction of rat subcutaneous tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement: A secondary level biocompatibility test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Karanth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This secondary-level animal study was conducted to assess and compare the subcutaneous tissue reaction to implantation of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and white Portland cement. Study Design: Polyethylene tubes filled with either freshly mixed white MTA (Group I or white Portland cement (Group II were implanted subcutaneously into 12 Wistar Albino rats. Each animal also received an empty polyethylene tube as the control (Group III. After 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, the implants, together with surrounding tissues were excised. Two pathologists blinded to the experimental procedure, evaluated sections taken from the biopsy specimens for the severity of the inflammatory response, calcification and the presence and thickness of fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. Statistical analysis was performed using the Cross-tabs procedure, Univariate analysis of the variance two-way and the Pearson product moment correlation to assess inter-rater variability between the two evaluators. Results: At 7 days, there was no significant difference in the severity of inflammation between the control group, white MTA, and white Portland cement groups. In the 14 day, 21 day and 30 day test periods, control group had significantly less inflammation than white MTA and white Portland cement. There was no significant difference in the grading of inflammation between white MTA and white Portland cement. All materials exhibited thick capsule at 7 days and thin capsule by 30 days. Conclusion: Both white MTA and white Portland cement were not completely non-irritating at the end of 30 days as evidenced by the presence of mild inflammation. However, the presence of a thin capsule around the materials, similar to the control group, indicates good tissue tolerance. White MTA and white Portland cement seem to be materials of comparable biocompatibility.

  15. Reaction of rat subcutaneous tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cement: a secondary level biocompatibility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, P; Manjunath, M K; Kuriakose, E S

    2013-01-01

    This secondary-level animal study was conducted to assess and compare the subcutaneous tissue reaction to implantation of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and white Portland cement. Polyethylene tubes filled with either freshly mixed white MTA (Group I) or white Portland cement (Group II) were implanted subcutaneously into 12 Wistar Albino rats. Each animal also received an empty polyethylene tube as the control (Group III). After 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, the implants, together with surrounding tissues were excised. Two pathologists blinded to the experimental procedure, evaluated sections taken from the biopsy specimens for the severity of the inflammatory response, calcification and the presence and thickness of fibrous capsule surrounding the implant. Statistical analysis was performed using the Cross-tabs procedure, Univariate analysis of the variance two-way and the Pearson product moment correlation to assess inter-rater variability between the two evaluators. At 7 days, there was no significant difference in the severity of inflammation between the control group, white MTA, and white Portland cement groups. In the 14 day, 21 day and 30 day test periods, control group had significantly less inflammation than white MTA and white Portland cement. There was no significant difference in the grading of inflammation between white MTA and white Portland cement. All materials exhibited thick capsule at 7 days and thin capsule by 30 days. Both white MTA and white Portland cement were not completely non-irritating at the end of 30 days as evidenced by the presence of mild inflammation. However, the presence of a thin capsule around the materials, similar to the control group, indicates good tissue tolerance. White MTA and white Portland cement seem to be materials of comparable biocompatibility.

  16. Ab initio study on the paths of oxygen abstraction of hydrogen trioxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Ab initio calculations; atmospheric chemistry; hydrogen trioxide; acid rain. 1. Introduction. Processes such as volcanic eruptions, biogenic activi- ty, and the combustion of fossil fuels are resources for the emission of sulphur gases into the atmosphere. Sul- phur has been recognized as an important constituent of.

  17. Studying arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis of Colo-16 cells with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... induced apoptosis at the single cell level. Key words: Two-photon laser scanning microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, human skin squamous carcinoma cells (Colo-16 cells), arsenic trioxide, apoptosis. INTRODUCTION. Although arsenic is poisonous and chronic arsenic exposure from ...

  18. The potential DNA toxic changes among workers exposed to antimony trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shanawany, Safaa; Foda, Nermine; Hashad, Doaa I; Salama, Naglaa; Sobh, Zahraa

    2017-05-01

    Occupational exposure to antimony has gained much interest when specific toxic effects were noticed among workers processing antimony. Thus, the aim of the present work was to investigate the potential DNA oxidative damage occurring among Egyptian workers occupationally exposed to antimony trioxide. The study was conducted on 25 subjects exposed to antimony trioxide while working in the polymerization process of polyester in Misrayon and Polyester Fiber Company, KafrEldawwar, Beheira, Egypt. Urinary antimony levels were assessed using inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and considered as a biological exposure index. DNA damage and total oxidant capacity (TOC) were assessed using ELISA. DNA damage was detected in the form of increased apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites among antimony trioxide-exposed workers compared to control subjects, but it could not be explained by oxidative mechanisms due to lack of significant correlation between DNA damage and measured TOC. Antimony trioxide might have a genotoxic impact on occupationally exposed workers which could not be attributed to oxidative stress in the studied cases.

  19. Outcome of direct pulp capping with mineral trioxide aggregate: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marques, M.S.; Wesselink, P.R.; Shemesh, H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this experimental study was to assess the outcome of direct pulp capping with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after complete excavation of caries in permanent dentition with a 2-visit treatment protocol. Methods Sixty-four teeth with deep carious lesions were consecutively

  20. Use of a matrix for apexification procedure with mineral trioxide aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatavkar, Roheet A; Hegde, Vivek S

    2010-01-01

    This articles describes a technique for placement of a matrix barrier prior to use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as an artificial root-end barrier. The technique also demonstrates the use of a delivery system utilizing large-bore needles for the predictable and precise placement of the barrier materials at the apex of the tooth. PMID:20582221

  1. Studying arsenic trioxide-induced apoptosis of Colo-16 cells with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nj tonukari

    2011-10-10

    Oct 10, 2011 ... serious toxicity, arsenic has been used therapeutically for more than 2,400 years (Klaassen, 1996); in traditional. Chinese medicine, arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is used to treat syphilis, rheumatosis, and psoriasis (Shen et al.,. 1997). Recent researches demonstrate that As2O3 induces partial cytodifferentiation ...

  2. Development and characterization of powder metallurgically produced discontinuous tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Riesch, J.; Sistla, S.; Almanstötter, J.; Jasper, B.; Terra, A.; Höschen, T.; Gietl, H.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.; Linsmeier, Ch; Broeckmann, C.

    2017-12-01

    In future fusion reactors, tungsten is the prime candidate material for the plasma facing components. Nevertheless, tungsten is prone to develop cracks due to its intrinsic brittleness—a major concern under the extreme conditions of fusion environment. To overcome this drawback, tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten (Wf/W) composites are being developed. These composite materials rely on an extrinsic toughing principle, similar to those in ceramic matrix composite, using internal energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crack bridging and fiber pull-out, during crack propagation. This can help Wf/W to facilitate a pseudo-ductile behavior and allows an elevated damage resilience compared to pure W. For pseudo-ductility mechanisms to occur, the interface between the fiber and matrix is crucial. Recent developments in the area of powder-metallurgical Wf/W are presented. Two consolidation methods are compared. Field assisted sintering technology and hot isostatic pressing are chosen to manufacture the Wf/W composites. Initial mechanical tests and microstructural analyses are performed on the Wf/W composites with a 30% fiber volume fraction. The samples produced by both processes can give pseudo-ductile behavior at room temperature.

  3. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  4. Tritium decay helium-3 effects in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (T implanted by plasmas diffuses into bulk material, especially rapidly at elevated temperatures, and becomes trapped in neutron radiation-induced defects in materials that act as trapping sites for the tritium. The trapped tritium atoms will decay to produce helium-3 (3He atoms at a half-life of 12.3 years. 3He has a large cross section for absorbing thermal neutrons, which after absorbing a neutron produces hydrogen (H and tritium ions with a combined kinetic energy of 0.76 MeV through the 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the 3He produced in tungsten by tritium decay compared to the neutron-induced helium-4 (4He produced in tungsten. This is important given the fact that helium in materials not only creates microstructural damage in the bulk of the material but alters surface morphology of the material effecting plasma-surface interaction process (e.g. material evolution, erosion and tritium behavior of plasma-facing component materials. Effects of tritium decay 3He in tungsten are investigated here with a simple model that predicts quantity of 3He produced in a fusion DEMO FW based on a neutron energy spectrum found in literature. This study reveals that: (1 helium-3 concentration was equilibrated to ∼6% of initial/trapped tritium concentration, (2 tritium concentration remained approximately constant (94% of initial tritium concentration, and (3 displacement damage from 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction became >1 dpa/year in DEMO FW.

  5. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Cryogenic treatment; tungsten carbide–cobalt; SEM; XRD; microhardness. 1. Introduction. Tungsten carbide tools can machine metals at speeds that cause the cutting edge to become red hot, without losing its hardness or sharpness. It exhibits about 2–3 times the produc- tivity and 10 times the life of high-speed ...

  6. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  7. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  8. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A K; Ghosh, J; Choudhary, K K; Ghosh, S K

    2016-01-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m 2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS. (paper)

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of tungsten with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Z.C.

    1976-10-01

    The method comprises the complexation of tungsten with salicylic acid in concentrated sulphuric acid yielding a reddish color. The maximum absorbance of the complex lies within 410-420 nm, 420 nm being the chosen wavelenght. The final concentration of salicylic acid is 0,080 g/ml. The sensitivity is 0,13 μg W(%T) -1 ml -1 . Titanium, vanadium, rhenium, niobium and molybdenum interferes and must be separated, titanium being the strongest interferent. The separation procedures, advantages of the process, stoichiometric relations and equilibrium constant are discussed. (Author) [pt

  10. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity......, applicability to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of aligned CNT forests, and electrochemical performance are investigated. Experiments include culturing of NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells on TiW coated silicon scaffolds, CNT growth on TiW substrates with nickel catalyst, and cyclic...

  11. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  12. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Song, S.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 μm, 1 μm and 3 μm were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m 2 respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m 2 . Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 μm size at 0.33 GW/m 2 and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 μm size at 0.55 GW/m 2 . The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 μm size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m 2 . The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 μm size has the best performance. (authors)

  13. Treatment outcome of mineral trioxide aggregate in open apex teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Leo, Meltem; Panagidis, Dimos; Ohle, Marc; Schneider, Sven; Lorenzo Bermejo, Justo; Pfefferle, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    This cohort study is the second phase of a previously reported trial. The primary aim was to assess the outcome of the treatment of teeth with open apices managed by the orthograde placement of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apical plugs. The secondary goal was to identify potential outcome factors for this kind of treatment with a larger sample size and longer follow-up periods than in the first phase of the project. Two hundred twenty-one patients who had been treated between 2000 and 2010 were contacted for follow-up examination 12-128 months after treatment (median, 21 months). At the time of treatment, these patients presented a total of 252 teeth with open apices caused by apical root resorption or excessive apical enlargement or with immature apices. Treatment was performed by supervised undergraduate students (12% of teeth), general dentists (49%), and dentists whose practice was limited to endodontics (39%). The investigated outcome relied on clinical and radiographic criteria and was dichotomized as healed or diseased. Of 252 examined teeth (88% recall rate), 90% were healed. Teeth with and without preoperative periapical radiolucencies demonstrated healed rates of 85% and 96%, respectively. Forty-five percent of the teeth (113/252) were followed up at least 2 years later and 21% (53/252) at least 4 years later. Univariate survival analyses identified 4 prognostic factors: preoperative apical periodontitis, the experience of the treatment providers, the number of treatment sessions, and the apical extrusion of MTA. Multiple regression analyses confirmed an increased risk of disease for teeth with preoperative apical periodontitis (hazard ratio = 4.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.57-13.4; P = .005). In addition, the experience of the treatment provider was found to influence the outcome (hazard ratio = 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.75; P = .03). Orthograde placement of MTA apical plugs appears to be a promising treatment option for teeth with open

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine potentiates arsenic trioxide activity against HL-60 cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuni; Xu, Youhua; Shen, Yali; Wang, Cuicui; Guo, Gaili; Hu, Tiantian [Key Laboratory of Developmental Diseases in Childhood, Chongqing (China); Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing (China); Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) in combination with arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the proliferation and differentiation of HL-60 cells. The HL-60 cells were treated with 300 µg/mL TMP, 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 300 µg/mL TMP combined with 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. The proliferative inhibition rates were determined with MTT. Differentiation was detected by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test, Wright's staining and the distribution of CD11b and CD14. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle distribution. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were employed to detect the expressions of c-myc, p27, CDK2, and cyclin E1. Combination treatment had synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition rates. The rates were increased gradually after the combination treatment, much higher than those treated with the corresponding concentration of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} alone. The cells exhibited characteristics of mature granulocytes and a higher NBT-reducing ability, being a 2.6-fold increase in the rate of NBT-positive ratio of HL-60 cells within the As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment versus almost a 13-fold increase in the TMP + As{sub 2}O{sub 3} group. Cells treated with both TMP and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} expressed far more CD11b antigens, almost 2-fold compared with the control group. Small doses of TMP potentiate As{sub 2}O{sub 3}-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells, possibly by regulating the expression and activity of G0/G1 phase-arresting molecules. Combination treatment of TMP with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has significant synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition of HL-60 cells.

  15. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  16. New doped tungsten cathodes. Applications to power grid tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, J. de; Cadoret, K; Martinez, L.; Veillet, D.; Millot, F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermionic emission behavior of tungsten/tungsten carbide modified with rare earth (La, Ce, Y) oxides is examined on account of suitability to deliver important current densities in a thermo-emissive set up and for long lifetime. Work functions of potential cathodes have been determined from Richardson plots for La 2 O 3 doped tungsten and for tungsten covered with variable compositions rare earth tungstates. The role of platinum layers covering the cathode was also examined. Given all cathodes containing mainly lanthanum oxides were good emitters, emphasis was put on service lifetime. Comparisons of lifetime in tungsten doped with rare earth oxides and with rare earth tungstates show that microstructure of the operating cathodes may play the major role in the research of very long lifetime cathodes. Based on these results, tests still running show lifetime compatible with power grid tubes applications. (author)

  17. Observation of the Structure of Tungsten Films Prepared by MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Weiliang; Yu, Lei; Li, Yujie; Guo, Shuangquan

    2013-09-01

    The tungsten films with ultra microstructure on CuCrZr alloy and China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel have been prepared by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The films were produced by pyrolysing the tungsten hexacarbonyl at air or argon atmosphere. When formed at or below 400 °C, they were poorly crystalized and the films showed low quality in thickness, density, bonding performance etc. While above this temperature, the properties of tungsten films have been improved, all the films consist of tungsten in the β-W. And β-W can change into α-W after heat treatment. As in other variations of pyrolysis, oxygen and carbon were observed. When filled with argon, the oxygen and carbon content would reduce apparently. Tungsten films prepared by MOCVD have stable chemical composition and microstructure. Besides, the properties of films on CuCrZr alloy are better than that on CLAM steel.

  18. High-yield exfoliation of tungsten disulphide nanosheets by rational mixing of low-boiling-point solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajedi-Moghaddam, Ali; Saievar-Iranizad, Esmaiel

    2018-01-01

    Developing high-throughput, reliable, and facile approaches for producing atomically thin sheets of transition metal dichalcogenides is of great importance to pave the way for their use in real applications. Here, we report a highly promising route for exfoliating two-dimensional tungsten disulphide sheets by using binary combination of low-boiling-point solvents. Experimental results show significant dependence of exfoliation yield on the type of solvents as well as relative volume fraction of each solvent. The highest yield was found for appropriate combination of isopropanol/water (20 vol% isopropanol and 80 vol% water) which is approximately 7 times higher than that in pure isopropanol and 4 times higher than that in pure water. The dramatic increase in exfoliation yield can be attributed to perfect match between the surface tension of tungsten disulphide and binary solvent system. Furthermore, solvent molecular size also has a profound impact on the exfoliation efficiency, due to the steric repulsion.

  19. Tensile properties of irradiated TZM and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.

    1975-04-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the elevated temperature tensile properties of TZM and tungsten has been experimentally determined. Specimens were irradiated at a temperature of approximately 720 0 F to fluences of 0.4 and 0.9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Test parameters for both control and irradiated specimens included strain rates from 3 x 10 -4 to 1 s -1 and temperatures from 72 to 1700 0 F. The results of these tests were correlated with a rate-temperature parameter (T ln A/epsilon) to provide a concise description of material behavior over the range of deformation conditions of this study. The yield strength of the subject materials was significantly increased by decreasing temperature, increasing strain rate, and increasing fluence. Ductility was significantly reduced at any temperature or strain rate by increasing fluence. Cleavage fractures occurred in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens when the yield strength was elevated to the effective cleavage stress by temperature and/or strain rate. Neutron irradiation for the conditions of this study increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten by approximately 300 0 F and TZM by approximately 420 0 F. (U.S.)

  20. Tungsten tetraboride, an inexpensive superhard material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Reza; Lech, Andrew T.; Xie, Miao; Weaver, Beth E.; Yeung, Michael T.; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten tetraboride (WB4) is an interesting candidate as a less expensive member of the growing group of superhard transition metal borides. WB4 was successfully synthesized by arc melting from the elements. Characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) indicates that the as-synthesized material is phase pure. The zero-pressure bulk modulus, as measured by high-pressure X-ray diffraction for WB4, is 339 GPa. Mechanical testing using microindentation gives a Vickers hardness of 43.3 ± 2.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N. Various ratios of rhenium were added to WB4 in an attempt to increase hardness. With the addition of 1 at.% Re, the Vickers hardness increased to approximately 50 GPa at 0.49 N. Powders of tungsten tetraboride with and without 1 at.% Re addition are thermally stable up to approximately 400 °C in air as measured by thermal gravimetric analysis. PMID:21690363

  1. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  2. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  3. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  4. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  5. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  6. Microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys due to neutron irradiation in HFIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira; Tanaka, Teruya

    2014-12-01

    The microstructural development of pure tungsten (W) and tungsten-rhenium (Re) alloys due to neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA, was investigated in this work. The irradiation conditions were ∼1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 and 800 °C. After the neutron irradiation, microstructural observations were performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Large amounts of precipitates identified as sigma- and chi-phases were observed in not only the W-Re alloys but also in the pure W after the neutron irradiation. The precipitates observed in the pure W were coarse and larger than those in the W-Re alloys. This was considered to be caused by the transmutation products of W and Re, namely, Re and osmium (Os), respectively, under irradiation in the HFIR with a higher contents of thermal neutron flux.

  7. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  8. Advanced solutions for beryllium and tungsten plasma-facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibbott, C.; Jakeman, R.; Ando, T.; Chiocchio, S.; Federici, G.; Heidl, H.; Tivey, R.; Falter, H.; Ciric, D.; Merola, M.; Vieider, G.; Ploechl, L.; Roedig, M.

    1998-01-01

    Beryllium and tungsten are candidate plasma-facing armour materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These armours are proposed for areas with low heat flux (≤5 MW m -2 ); however, in the divertor, surface melting during abnormal events may occur. This paper reports the progress made in developing novel approaches to solving the difficulties posed in designing with these armours. A Be monoblock brazed to an OFHC 10 mm ID Cu tube using InCuSil 'ABA' braze alloy has survived 130 cycles of 10-11 MW m -2 for 6 s, with surface temperatures of 1250 C. No visible surface cracking occurred. The same monoblock was then exposed to several cycles of 20-22 MW m -2 for 8 s, creating a 2 mm deep molten layer. High cycle fatigue was then performed. The test results are detailed in this paper. Comparison between experimental and theoretical results are made. W and Cu have a large mismatch in their thermal expansion coefficients and two designs are proposed that minimise the interface stresses. These are: a 'brush'-like structure with rectangular fibres set in a Cu substrate using the 'active metal casting' (AMC) technique; and thin monoblocks (or lamellae) brazed or active metal cast onto a Cu tube. Analyses of the lamellae concept for steady-state heat loads of 5 MW m -2 are presented. Fatigue analyses show that both solutions are theoretically viable (∝10 4 cycles). A 'brush' mock-up has been manufactured and progress on its testing is reported. Results of all tests and their relevance to the ITER design are discussed. (orig.)

  9. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  10. Tungsten as First Wall Material in Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the PLT tokamak with a tungsten limiter strong cooling of the central plasma was observed. Since then mostly graphite has been used as limiter or target plate material. Only a few tokamaks (limiter: FTU, TEXTOR; divertor: Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX Upgrade) gained experience with high-Z-materials. With the observed strong co- deposition of tritium together with carbon in JET and as a result of design studies of fusion reactors, it became clear that in the long run tungsten is the favourite for the first-wall material. Tungsten as a plasma facing material requires intensive research in all areas, i.e. in plasma physics, plasma wall-interaction and material development. Tungsten as an impurity in the confined plasma reveals considerable differences to carbon. Strong radiation at high temperatures, in connection with mostly a pronounced inward drift forms a particular challenge. Turbulent transport plays a beneficial role in this regard. The inward drift is an additional problem in the pedestal region of H-mode plasmas in ITER-like configurations. The erosion by low energy hydrogen atoms is in contrast to carbon small. However, erosion by fast particles from heating measures and impurity ions, accelerated in the sheath potential, play an important role in the case of tungsten. Radiation by carbon in the plasma boundary reduces the load to the target plates. Neon or Argon as substitutes will increase the erosion of tungsten. So far experiments have demonstrated that in most scenarios the tungsten content in the central plasma can be kept sufficiently small. The material development is directed to the specific needs of existing or future devices. In ASDEX Upgrade, which will soon be a divertor experiment with a complete tungsten first-wall, graphite tiles are coated with tungsten layers. In ITER, the solid tungsten armour of the target plates has to be castellated because of its difference in thermal expansion compared to the cooling structure. In a reactor the technical

  11. Investigation of Tungsten and Beryllium Behaviour under Short Transient Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintsuk, G.; Kuehnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Roedig, M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam facility JUDITH is a rather versatile test facility for the simulation of high heat fluxes. One key issue is the simulation of the material performance under short transient events. The study of melting behaviour and crack formation, which occurs even for heat pulses below the melting threshold of the metals, is of huge importance for the qualification of materials for future nuclear devices. Heat load simulations at RT with a pulse length of 5 ms have been performed on beryllium (S65C), the ITER candidate material for the first wall, at power loads of 0.5 - 2 GW/m 2 . Crack formation, surface roughening and melt layer motion has been studied. Similar conditions during single and multiple shots below and above the melting threshold (∼50 MW·m-2·s 1 /2) have been applied to tungsten. Since its material properties are dependent on grain size and shape, 3 different grades have been tested in an as-delivered state: 1) deformed tungsten aligned in deformation direction, which corresponds to the actual ITER specification for tungsten used in the divertor; 2) deformed tungsten aligned perpendicular to the deformation direction; 3) sintered tungsten. Significant differences in the crack resistance and the crack pattern of the various tungsten grades below the melting threshold have been determined and further material degradation has been found after multiple shots. This is of importance also in regard to expected ELM loads in ITER, in which power densities below the melting threshold are applied at a high repetition rate (∼ 1 Hz). Crack formation for sintered tungsten starts at ∼20 MW·m -2 ·s -1 /2. The cracks are located across the loaded area and increase in number, length and width with increasing power load. In comparison to that for deformed tungsten cracking was first detected at ∼35 MW·m -2 ·s -1 /2. Whereas for tungsten aligned in deformation direction a crack pattern comparable to those of sintered tungsten was formed, tungsten

  12. Classification of tungsten powder by fluidization method and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Khan-Guan'.

    1989-01-01

    Search for accessible in practice, the technological method to increase the level of control of the granulometric composition of tungsten powder and to increase quality of products and to prepare new materials is carried out. It is shown that the method of fluidization is effective and accessible in practice for tungsten powder (and other refractory metals and compounds) classification, that increases the level of control of the granulometric composition of the powder and thus - its quality, and that improves control of properties of tungsten and other refractory metal products

  13. Dense Pure Tungsten Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianzheng Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing using tungsten, a brittle material, is difficult because of its high melting point, thermal conductivity, and oxidation tendency. In this study, pure tungsten parts with densities of up to 18.53 g/cm3 (i.e., 96.0% of the theoretical density were fabricated by selective laser melting. In order to minimize balling effects, the raw polyhedral tungsten powders underwent a spheroidization process before laser consolidation. Compared with polyhedral powders, the spherical powders showed increased laser absorptivity and packing density, which helped in the formation of a continuous molten track and promoted densification.

  14. [Periapical regeneration. About one case of necrotic immature tooth treated with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaimy, S; Lahlou, K; Karami, M; Elmerini, H; Elouazzani, A

    2013-09-01

    Therapeutic of apexification with calcium hydroxide has been extensively used in clinical practice, but this technique has some drawbacks (long duration of treatment, weakening of the radicular walls). Different studies have proposed to close the apex opened with MTA (Mineral trioxide Aggregate) which is biocompatible, bacteriostatic, this material induces regeneration of the periapical region through the formation of cementum, bone and periodontal ligament (1, 2). This case report describes the technique of setting up in a single step of the Mineral trioxide Aggregate as an apical barrier for immature permanent roots. This method has allowed us an immediate apical sealing and a root canal filling and a coronary restore permanently as soon as possible. The radiological control confirmed that this type of apexification could be successful with periapical regeneration ad-integrum.

  15. High precision tungsten cutting for optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.; Clemente, G.; Sanz-Tudanca, C.; Lopez, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The results obtained during the INTEGRAL masks development program an implementing the HURA and MURA codes on tungsten plates of different thickness are presented. Hard scientific requirements on pixels size and location tolerances (tenths of microns over large areas -1 m 2 - and thickness from 0.5 mm to 60 mm) required the set up of a dedicated program for testing cutting technologies: laser, photochemical milling, spark machining and electro discharge wire cutting. After a very intensive test campaign the wire cutting process was selected as the optimum technology for code manufacturing . Accuracies achieved an the code cutting fulfill scientific requirements. In fact, they are 5 times better than required. Pixel size and centroids location accuracies of 0.01 mm over a 1 m 2 area have been obtained for the 10,000 pixels on IBIS, 100 pixels on SPI and 24000 pixels on JEM-X masks. Comparative results among different cutting technologies are also discussed. (author)

  16. Modification of tungsten layers by arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, M.; Schneider, W.; Juettner, B.; Lindig, S.; Mayer, M.; Balden, M.; Beilis, I.; Djakov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous traces of arcs have been found on W-covered graphite tiles of ASDEX Upgrade after exposure. The distributions of number density, lengths and orientation are calculated and compared to pure graphite tiles at comparable locations. It was established that arcs perforate a 1 μm tungsten layer down to the carbon substrate. The amount of removal should rise with arc current, but a surface fraction of about 8% is eroded at 10 A already. At tiles of the divertor baffle the layer is continuously removed along the entire track pointing to higher currents. The carbon of the stripped parts is subject to subsequent erosion processes. The distribution of materials in and around arc tracks was investigated by sputter depth profiling (SIMS and AES) and the characteristic geometry was studied using an electron microscope. Observations are interpreted using results from laboratory vacuum arcs on the same material

  17. The movement of screw dislocations in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Xiaogeng; Woo Chungho

    2004-03-25

    Using Acland potential for tungsten, the movement of 1/2a<1 1 1> screw dislocation under shear stress was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrated core structure was obtained by relaxation of screw dislocation with proper boundary conditions. We found that the equilibrium dislocation core has three-fold symmetry and spread out in three <1 1 2> direction on {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} planes. The screw dislocation core could not keep the original shape when the shear stress applied. The dislocation could not move until the shear stress became large enough. The dislocation moved in zigzag when the shear stress neared the Peierls stress. When the shear stress became larger, the dislocation moved in zigzag at the beginning and than moved almost in straight line in [2-bar11] direction. The large shear stress applied, the long distance moved before the dislocation stilled in z-direction and the large velocity in y-direction.

  18. Electronic structure and Compton profiles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal Ahuja, Babu; Rathor, Ashish; Sharma, Vinit; Sharma, Yamini; Ramniklal Jani, Ashvin; Sharma, Balkrishna

    2008-01-01

    The energy bands, density of states and Compton profiles of tungsten have been computed using band structure methods, namely the spin-polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (SPR-KKR) approach as well as the linear combination of atomic orbitals with Hartree-Fock scheme and density functional theory. The full potential linearized augmented plane wave scheme to calculate these properties and the Fermi surface topology(except the momentum densities) have also been used to analyze the theoretical data on the electron momentum densities. The directional Compton profiles have been measured using a 100 mCi 241 Am Compton spectrometer. From the comparison, the measured anisotropies are found to be in good agreement with the SPR-KKR calculations. The band structure calculations are also compared with the available data. (orig.)

  19. Hydrogen generation from steam reaction with tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolik, G. R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Petti, D. A.; Coates, K.

    1998-10-01

    A LOCA in a fusion reactor involving an ingress of steam presents a safety concern due to hydrogen generated from steam reactions with plasma facing components. Hydrogen concentrations must be maintained below explosive levels. To support safety evaluations we have experimentally determined hydrogen generation rates when a tungsten alloy is exposed to steam from 400°C to 1200°C. We studied effects of steam pressure between 2.8 × 10 4 and 8.5 × 10 4 Pa, i.e., (0.28-0.84 atm) and gas velocity between 0.011 and 0.063 m/s. We present relationships for the reaction rates, oxidation phases, and mechanisms associated with the hydrogen generation.

  20. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  1. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, T.J., E-mail: tjpetty@liv.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Khan, A. [Pariser Building-G11, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Heil, T. [NiCaL, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL (United Kingdom); Bradley, J.W., E-mail: j.w.bradley@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10{sup 23}–3.0 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ{sup 1/2} relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  2. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, T.J.; Khan, A.; Heil, T.; Bradley, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10 23 –3.0 × 10 24  m −2 , the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10 24  m −2 , and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ 1/2 relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  3. Curvature aided efficient axial field emission from carbon nanofiber–reduced graphene oxide superstructures on tungsten wire substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Arunava [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Roy, Rajarshi; Sen, Dipayan [Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chattopadhyay, Kalyan K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India); Thin Film and Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Efficient axial field emitter was fabricated through deposition of thin RGO layer by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • Tungsten wire substrate was used. • The CNF–RGO superstructure produced better field emission characteristics compared to bare CNF. - Abstract: Field emission characteristics found in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and RGO based composite systems have always been an area of research interest mainly due to presence of prolific quasi aligned edges working as emitter sites. However, the specific role and extent of edge curvature geometry in RGO systems in regards to the enhancement of field emission has not discussed thoroughly prior to this work. In this work we demonstrate enhanced axial field emission due to top assembly of thin RGO layer over a quasi-vertically aligned carbon nanofiber thin film supported on a tungsten wire substrate. Furthermore, simulation analysis for our RGO based hybrid system using finite element modeling showed that two-stage local field amplification in RGO is responsible for the overall improvement of field emission characteristics. In support of our findings, a tentative explanation has been proposed based on the additional emission from RGO edges in between the CNF network resulting to the enhancement of axial field emission in the nanocomposite superstructure.

  4. Electrodeposition of tungsten coatings on molybdenum substrates and deuterium irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Ziwei; Fang, Xianqin; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Wang, Zhanlei; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were successfully electroplated on molybdenum substrates. • The current density affected the performance of tungsten coatings. • Deuterium irradiation property of tungsten coatings was investigated. • Deuterium retention in the tungsten coating was less than that in the bulk tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings were prepared using pulse electrodeposition on the molybdenum substrates. Effects of variations in current density on surface morphology, thickness distribution and crystal orientation of the coatings were investigated. The results indicate that with the current density increasing, the grain size of tungsten coatings first decreases, then increases; while the deposited thickness increases all the time. And all of tungsten coatings exhibit the preferred orientation of (200) plane. Moreover, the polished tungsten coating and bulk tungsten were exposed to low energy (80 eV) and high flux (7.2 × 10 20 D/m 2 /s) deuterium plasma in a linear plasma device (Simulator of Tokamak Edge Plasma, STEP). Deuterium (D) retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It is found that blisters on the tungsten coating are much fewer than that on the bulk tungsten. TDS spectroscopy of the tungsten coating reveals one D 2 release peak at 740 K, while the bulk tungsten has two D 2 release peaks at 500 K and 660 K. The amount of deuterium retention in the tungsten coating is lower.

  5. Success Rate of Formocresol Pulpotomy versus Mineral Trioxide Aggregate in Human Primary Molar Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S E Jabbarifar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of long time and broad use of formaldehyde derivates (Fixation agent in primary tooth pulp treatment, There is some concerns about these derivates such as variability, inconsistency success rate, mutagenicity, cytotoxicity, alergenicity, and some other potential health hazards of them. Therefore other alternative pulpotomy procedures like Bioactive glass (BAG, Glutaraldehyde (2%, Hydroxyappetite (HA, Bone dried freezed (BDF, ferric sulfate (15%, laser, Electrosurgery (ES, Bone Morphogenic proteins (BMP, recombinant protein-1 (RP1, and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA have been compared. The purpose of this clinical trial is to assess radiographic and clinical success rate of Formocresol (FC pulpotomy in compare with MTA in human primary molar teeth. Methods: 64 molars were pulpotomized equally and randomly with mineral trioxide Aggregate and Formocresol. Prior to trial, we defined a case as failure, when one or more of the events such as external root resorption, internal root resorption, periapical and furca lucency, pain, swelling, mobility, dental abscess, or early extraction appeared. Every treated tooth was defined as successful, if any noted evident was not shown. Results: Totally, 60 teeth treatment (92.2 percent were successful and 7.8 percent were failed. Failure and success rates for MTA group were 6.3 and 93.7 percent, respectively. Failure and success rates in FC group were 8.4 and 90.2 percent respectively. The difference between MTA and FC treatment methods was not significant (Fisher Exact test. Conclusion: Findings of this study show that mineral trioxide aggregate can be an alternative procedure for FC pulpotomy of primary tooth. Keywords: Mineral trioxide aggregate, formocresol, pulpotomy, success and failure rate.

  6. The antitumor effect of arsenic trioxide on hepatocellular carcinoma is enhanced by andrographolide

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Xuhua; Li, Tengfei; Han, Xinwei; Ren, Jianzhuang; Chen, Pengfei; Li, Hao; Gong, Shaojun

    2017-01-01

    High concentrations of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) are used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia and solid tumors, with negative side effects to normal cells. Andrographolide is a traditional Chinese medicine that exerts anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-virus, and anti-diabetic effects. Here, we tested the effects of combined andrographolide with As2O3 against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We found that by increasing apoptosis, andrographolide synergistically enhanced the anti-tumor effec...

  7. Treatment of the pulp of the immature tooth apexification with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    Velásquez Reyes, Víctor; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Pediatrica.; Álvarez Páucar, María; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Pediatrica.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews main publications about Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) for its use and application in dental pulp treatments for young permanent teeth (immature apices) such as apexification. First, MTA cement was used to resolve a complication of root perforations, as well as retrograde fillings. Besides, it has features that differentiate it from Portland cement. For choosing treatment for pulpa1 injury in non-vital and vital teeth, we review root formation process from embryological...

  8. Clinical use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) in periapical lesions and the treatment of root perforations

    OpenAIRE

    Pineda Mejía, Martha Elena; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Silva Infantes, Manuel; Departamento Académico Medico Quirúrgico, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Salcedo Moncada, Doris; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Castro Rodríguez, Antonia; Departamento Académico de Estomatologia Biosocial, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Terán Casafranca, Liliana; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Ortiz Cárdenas, Eduardo; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Ochoa Tataje, Julio; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Gaitán Velásquez, Jorge; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.; Watanabe Velásquez, Romel; Departamento Académico Estomatología Rehabilitadora, Facultad Odontología, UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    The use of MTA cement (mineral trioxide aggregate) to solve endodontics treatment complications, like pulpar floor camera perforations during root canal treatment, as well as a retrograde obturation material of apicectomy treatment, was the purpose of this investigation. White MTA Angelus, (Industria de productos odontologicos Ltda. Londrina-PR-Brazil) was used wich has 10 – 15 minutes as initial and final hardening time. The radiopacity showed by the material was somewhat superior to that of...

  9. Surgical management of iatrogenic perforation in maxillary central incisor using mineral trioxide aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Rajni; Manuja, Naveen; Pandit, I K; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Root perforations are undesired complications of endodontic treatment. The repair of root perforation can be accomplished using different materials and techniques. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is widely used to seal perforations because of its biocompatibility and sealability. This article describes a case report where an iatrogenic root perforation was repaired successfully with MTA in maxillary right central incisor of a 13-year-old boy. PMID:23845686

  10. Expression of mineralization markers during pulp response to biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate.

    OpenAIRE

    Dalto é, Mariana O.; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley G.; Faccioli, Lucia H.; Gatón Hernández, Patrícia; Rossi, Andiara de; Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra da

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare the cell viability of dental pulp cells treated with Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur, France) and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and the in vitro and in vivo expression of mineralization markers induced by the 2 materials. METHODS: Human dental pulp cells isolated from 6 permanent teeth were stimulated with Biodentine and MTA extracts. Cell viability was determined using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromid...

  11. [Detection of gene expression alteration of myeloma cells treated with arsenic trioxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cui-Lian; Chen, Shi-Lun; Chen, Wen-Ming; Liu, Jing-Zhong; Xiao, Bai; Zhang, Hai-Bo

    2005-04-01

    To investigate the effect of arsenic trioxide on multiple myeloma (MM) cell gene expression and explore the molecular mechanism of arsenic trioxide therapy for MM. U266 cells were divided into two groups, group A as control group and group B as test group. Cells were cultured for 48 hours, and total RNA and mRNA were extracted. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSHs) was performed to distinguish the differentially expressed genes. The products were cloned into pGEM-T Easy Vector, and transfected into the competent host JM109 to construct two subtractive libraries. Positive colonies were selected by blue-white screening, and the plasmids were extracted. Homologous comparison was conducted in GenBank. Five downregulated clones were isolated in the first SSH: (1) Aminopeptidase N, (2) Homosapiens tumor translationally-controlled protein 1, (3) Human ATP synthetase A chain, (4) Signal recognition particle A10, (5) Mitochondrial ATP synthetase/ATPase subunit 6. Four upregulated clones were isolated in the second SSH: (1) Calcium-binding protein A10, (2) Keratin 6A, (3) 45 kD MIP repetitive element containing splicing factor and (4) poly(A)-binding protein. Arsenic trioxide exerts proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction on MM cells by regulating genes expression.

  12. Effects of various mixing techniques on physical properties of white mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Gutmann, James L; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Asatourian, Armen

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three different mixing techniques on surface microhardness, initial setting time, and phase formation of white mineral trioxide aggregate. Twenty-one cylindrical glass tubes were selected and divided into three groups of seven in each (n = 7). White mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) in groups A, B, and C were mixed by conventional, trituration, and ultrasonic techniques, respectively. Cements were mixed and packed into the glass tubes and incubated at 37°C for 3 days. After incubation, samples were subjected to microhardness evaluation, and four specimens from each group were prepared and observed under a scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. For setting time assessment, WMTA was mixed in three parts again, and Gilmore needle test was performed until the initial setting time of cement. Data were analyzed by one-way anova and post hoc Tukey's test. Samples mixed by trituration technique significantly showed the highest microhardness (P mineral trioxide aggregate in comparison with ultrasonic technique. Trituration resulted in better hydration and crystallization, which prevents clustering of powder and reduces voids and setting time of mixed cement. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Understanding metal–insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARPES) and spectro- microscopy studies to understand the metal–insulator transition (MIT) observed in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxWO3. The experimentally determined band structure is compared with the theoretical calculation based on ...

  14. A Compact Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact gas/tungsten-arc welding torch delivers 100-A current, yet used in confined spaces inaccessible to even smallest commercially available torch. Despite its extremely small size, torch contains all usual components and delivers high current.

  15. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  16. Thermal radiation characteristics and direct evidence of tungsten cooling on the way to nanostructure formation on its surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, S.; Miyamoto, T.; Ohno, N.

    2013-01-01

    The physical properties of tungsten with nanostructure on its surface are investigated focusing on the thermal radiation and cooling characteristics. First, direct evidence of substantial W surface cooling has been clearly shown with use of a very thin thermocouple inserted into W target, which solves an uncertainty associated with a radiation thermometer. Second, the above measurements of W surface temperature make it possible to estimate quantitatively the total emissivity from which we may evaluate the radiative power through the Stefan–Boltzmann equation, which is very important for mitigation evaluation of a serious plasma heat load to the plasma-facing component

  17. Process optimization for diffusion bonding of tungsten with EUROFER97 using a vanadium interlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basuki, Widodo Widjaja; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state diffusion bonding is a selected joining technology to bond divertor components consisting of tungsten and EUROFER97 for application in fusion power plants. Due to the large mismatch in their coefficient of thermal expansions, which leads to serious thermally induced residual stresses after bonding, a thin vanadium plate is introduced as an interlayer. However, the diffusion of carbon originated from EUROFER97 in the vanadium interlayer during the bonding process can form a vanadium carbide layer, which has detrimental influences on the mechanical properties of the joint. For optimal bonding results, the thickness of this layer and the residual stresses has to be decreased sufficiently without a significant reduction of material transport especially at the vanadium/tungsten interface, which can be achieved by varying the diffusion bonding temperature and duration. The investigation results show that at a sufficiently low bonding temperature of 700 °C and a bonding duration of 4 h, the joint reaches a reasonable high ductility and toughness especially at elevated test temperature of 550 °C with elongation to fracture of 20% and mean absorbed Charpy impact energy of 2 J (using miniaturized Charpy impact specimens). The strength of the bonded materials is about 332 MPa at RT and 291 MPa at 550 °C. Furthermore, a low bonding temperature of 700 °C can also help to avoid the grain coarsening and the alteration of the grain structure especially of the EUROFER97 close to the bond interface.

  18. Process optimization for diffusion bonding of tungsten with EUROFER97 using a vanadium interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basuki, Widodo Widjaja; Aktaa, Jarir

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state diffusion bonding is a selected joining technology to bond divertor components consisting of tungsten and EUROFER97 for application in fusion power plants. Due to the large mismatch in their coefficient of thermal expansions, which leads to serious thermally induced residual stresses after bonding, a thin vanadium plate is introduced as an interlayer. However, the diffusion of carbon originated from EUROFER97 in the vanadium interlayer during the bonding process can form a vanadium carbide layer, which has detrimental influences on the mechanical properties of the joint. For optimal bonding results, the thickness of this layer and the residual stresses has to be decreased sufficiently without a significant reduction of material transport especially at the vanadium/tungsten interface, which can be achieved by varying the diffusion bonding temperature and duration. The investigation results show that at a sufficiently low bonding temperature of 700 °C and a bonding duration of 4 h, the joint reaches a reasonable high ductility and toughness especially at elevated test temperature of 550 °C with elongation to fracture of 20% and mean absorbed Charpy impact energy of 2 J (using miniaturized Charpy impact specimens). The strength of the bonded materials is about 332 MPa at RT and 291 MPa at 550 °C. Furthermore, a low bonding temperature of 700 °C can also help to avoid the grain coarsening and the alteration of the grain structure especially of the EUROFER97 close to the bond interface.

  19. Synthesis of wo3 nanogranular thin films by hot-wire CVD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houweling, Z.S.; Geus, J.W.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    By resistively heating tungsten filaments in a constant air flow under a reduced pressure, nanogranular amorphous WO3 thin films are deposited on glassy carbon substrates. The substrate surface temperature is monitored by a thermocouple. For deposition times of 15 min and longer, the films show

  20. Operation of ASDEX Upgrade with tungsten coated walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, V.; Neu, R.; Dux, R.; Geier, A.; Gong, X.; Kallenbach, A.; Krieger, K.; Lindig, S.; Maier, H.; Mueller, W.; Pugno, R.; Schneider, W.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1998 a step by step approach to investigate high-Z material at the main chamber walls of the ASDEX Upgrade divertor tokamak was followed, resulting in 7.1 m 2 of tungsten coated tiles at the central column during the 2001-02 campaign. Despite this large area, plasma operation was not hampered in any way by tungsten radiation. Results obtained from a variety of confinement regimes indicate that the core tungsten concentration depends mostly on core transport rather than on the tungsten erosion source. For medium density H-mode discharges tungsten concentration ∼ 1·10 -6 are found. Higher concentrations are observed only under discharge conditions where neoclassical accumulation becomes dominant as in case of strong background plasma peaking. On the other hand, core accumulation can be effectively controlled without noticeable confinement degradation by applying central heating. Unexpected high average tungsten erosion due to ions could be attributed to transient limiter phases, especially during plasma ramp-down. (author)

  1. Development of Low Thermal Expansion Tungsten UO 2 Cermet Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M O; Kaznoff, A I

    1970-03-31

    An attempt was made to develop a tungsten-uranium dioxide cermet of high fue 1 loading with thermal expansion approaching that of tungsten and with good dimensional stability on thermal cycling. These goals were sought through the use of tungsten-coated uranium dioxide particles with sufficient locally available void volume to accommodate the difference in thermal expansion between the uranium dioxide and the tungsten matrix and through limitation of plastic deformation in the particles during fabrication to avoid mechanical keying of the particles and the matrix. The particles were vibratorily compacted prior to hot pressing. The thermal expansion of the cermets was determined and they were thermal cycle tested. The thermal expansion of the cermets was considerably closer to that of tungsten than was observed with previously reported specimens of similar composition. However, the thermal cycling of the cermets resulted in intolerable growth. This growth could be accounted for by the agglomeration of gases trapped in the uranium dioxide particles during deposition of the tungsten coating.

  2. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  3. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780°C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0×1025 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22°C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22°C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  4. Formation of tungsten oxide nanowires by ion irradiation and vacuum annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xu-Dong; Ren, Feng; Wu, Heng-Yi; Qin, Wen-Jing; Jiang, Chang-Zhong

    2018-04-01

    Here we reported the fabrication of tungsten oxide (WO3-x ) nanowires by Ar+ ion irradiation of WO3 thin films followed by annealing in vacuum. The nanowire length increases with increasing irradiation fluence and with decreasing ion energy. We propose that the stress-driven diffusion of the irradiation-induced W interstitial atoms is responsible for the formation of the nanowires. Comparing to the pristine film, the fabricated nanowire film shows a 106-fold enhancement in electrical conductivity, resulting from the high-density irradiation-induced vacancies on the oxygen sublattice. The nanostructure exhibits largely enhanced surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect due to the oxygen vacancy. Thus, ion irradiation provides a powerful approach for fabricating and tailoring the surface nanostructures of semiconductors.

  5. Three-terminal nanoelectromechanical switch based on tungsten nitride—an amorphous metallic material

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2015-12-04

    © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd. Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switches inherently have zero off-state leakage current and nearly ideal sub-threshold swing due to their mechanical nature of operation, in contrast to semiconductor switches. A challenge for NEM switches to be practical for low-power digital logic application is their relatively large operation voltage which can result in higher dynamic power consumption. Herein we report a three-terminal laterally actuated NEM switch fabricated with an amorphous metallic material: tungsten nitride (WNx). As-deposited WNx thin films have high Young\\'s modulus (300 GPa) and reasonably high hardness (3 GPa), which are advantageous for high wear resistance. The first prototype WNx switches are demonstrated to operate with relatively low control voltage, down to 0.8 V for an air gap thickness of 150 nm.

  6. Characteristics of deposited boron doping diamond on tungsten carbide insert by MPECVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Seok; Park, Yeong Min; Kim, Jeong Wan; Tulugan, Kelimu; Kim, Tae Gyu

    2015-03-01

    Diamond-coated cutting tools are used primarily for machining non-ferrous materials such as aluminum-silicon alloys, copper alloys, fiber-reinforced polymers, green ceramics and graphite. Because the tool life of cemented carbide cutting tool is greatly improved by diamond coating, and typically more than 10 times of the tool life is obtained. However, research of boron-doped diamond (BDD) coating tool has not been fully researched yet. In this study, we have succeeded to make boron-doped microcrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond-coated Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) inserts. Microcrystalline BDD thin film is deposited on WC-Co insert by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPECVD) method. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the as-deposited diamond films.1,2

  7. Relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in a hemodialysis-dependent patient treated with arsenic trioxide: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmons Gregory S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In the relapsed setting, arsenic trioxide remains the backbone of treatment. Scant literature exists regarding treatment of relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with renal failure. To the best of our knowledge we are the first to report a safe and effective means of treatment for relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia in the setting of advanced renal failure, employing titration of arsenic trioxide based on clinical parameters rather than arsenic trioxide levels. Case presentation A 33-year-old Caucasian man with a history of acute promyelocytic leukemia in remission for 3 years, as well as dialysis-dependent chronic renal failure secondary to a solitary kidney and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection, receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy presented to our hospital with bone marrow biopsy-confirmed relapsed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Arsenic trioxide was begun at a low dose with dose escalation based only on side effect profile monitoring and not laboratory testing for induction as well as maintenance without undue toxicity. Our patient achieved and remains in complete hematologic and molecular remission as of this writing. Conclusion Arsenic trioxide can be used safely and effectively to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia in patients with advanced renal failure using careful monitoring of side effects rather than blood levels of arsenic to guide therapeutic dosing.

  8. Toxicity of tungsten carbide and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide nanoparticles in mammalian cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meissner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-04-01

    Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendrocyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Chemical-physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect.

  9. Toxicity of Tungsten Carbide and Cobalt-Doped Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles in Mammalian Cells in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meißner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. Objective We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobaltdoped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. Methods We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendro cyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Results Chemical–physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect. PMID:19440490

  10. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  11. Electrochromism in surface modified crystalline WO3 thin films grown by reactive DC magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppasamy, A.

    2013-10-01

    In the present work, tungsten oxide thin films were deposited at various oxygen chamber pressures (1.0-5.0 × 10-3 mbar) by maintaining the sputtering power density and argon pressure constant at 3.0 W/cm2 and 1.2 × 10-2 mbar, respectively. The role of surface morphology and porosity on the electrochromic properties of crystalline tungsten oxide thin films has been investigated. XRD and Raman studies reveal that all the samples post annealed at 450 ̊C in air for 3.0 h settle in monoclinic crystal system of tungsten oxide (W18O49). Though the phase of material is indifferent to oxygen pressure variations (PO2), morphology and film density shows a striking dependence on PO2. A systematic study on plasma (OES), morphology, optical and electrochromic properties of crystalline tungsten oxide reveal that the films deposited at PO2 of 2.0 × 10-3 mbar exhibit better coloration efficiency (58 cm2/C), electron/ion capacity (Qc: -25 mC/cm2), and reversibility (92%). This is attributed to the enhanced surface properties like high density of pores and fine particulates (100 nm) and to lesser bulk density of the film (ρ/ρo = 0.84) which facilitates the process of intercalation/de-intercalation of protons and electrons. These results show good promise toward stable and efficient crystalline tungsten oxide based electrochromic device applications.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of isothiocyanato complexes of dioxotungsten(VI with mannich base ligands: Precursors for the preparation of pure phase nanosized tungsten(VI trioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimpy Gupta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Six isothiocyanato complexes of dioxotungsten(VI with Mannich base ligands having the formula [WO2(NCS2L-L] (where L-L = N-[1-morpholinobenzyl] acetamide (MBA, N-[1-piperidinobenzyl] acetamide (PBA, N-[1-morpholino(-4-nitrobenzyl] benzamide (MPNBB, N-[1-piperidino(-3-nitrobenzyl] benzamide (PMNBB, N-[1-morpholino(-2-nitrobenzyl] acetamide (MONBA and N-[1-morpholino(-3-nitrobenzyl] acetamide (MMNBA have been synthesized by the reaction of tetraisothiocyanatodioxotungsten(VI anion with the ethanolic solution of the corresponding ligand in aqueous medium in the presence of HCl. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analyses, FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT, ESI mass spectra, TGA/DTA, molar conductivity measurements, electronic spectra, magnetic moment measurements, SEM and XRD. Finally, the ligands and the corresponding complexes have been tested against Agrobacterium sp BN-2A and it has been observed that complexes show enhanced activity as compared to the ligands. The complexes on calcination give rod-like WO3 nanoparticles.

  13. Phonon-mediated particle detection using superconducting tungsten transition-edge sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, Kent David [Stanford U.

    1995-02-01

    This thesis describes the development of several superconducting tungsten thin film based particle detector technologies. The initial motivation for this work was the construction of detectors sensitive to dark matter and neutrino scattering events. These technologies also show promise in other applications, including high resolution x-ray spectroscopy. The detectors described here consist of a tungsten thin film deposited on a silicon substrate. When an incident particle scatters in the silicon crystal, it deposits energy in the form of phonons which propagate to the surface of the crystal where they are absorbed in the tungsten thin film. The superconducting film is biased at or near its transition temperature. Changes in the resistance of the film are measured. The superconducting titanium transition-edge sensors previously developed by our group exhibit a threshold phonon energy density below which no signal is detectable. This threshold density poses severe restrictions on resolution, energy threshold, and absorber mass. In order to overcome these limitations, several new technologies were developed. In each case, a superconducting film with a sharp transition well below that of titanium (~ 380 mK) is necessary. To this end superconducting W films were developed with ~ 1 mK wide transitions at 70 mK. Before this work W thin films always exhibited transition temperatures > 600 mK. The first technology described here consists of a W thin film patterned into a 1 μm wide line 1.6 m long in a meander pattern. The line is biased at a constant current, and is temperature biased near the middle of its superconducting transition. When an event deposits energy in the W film, the resulting voltage pulse is measured with a cryogenic FET. A quantum efficient sensor is also described in which the heat capacity of individual, thermally isolated film segments biased just below their transition have heat capacities small enough that individual phonons drive them normal. The

  14. Growth and structure analysis of tungsten oxide nanorods using environmental TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Kawamoto, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakamura, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Kuroda, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-01-25

    WO3 nanorods targeted for applications in electric devices were grown from a tungsten wire heated in an oxygen atmosphere inside an environmental transmission electron microscope, which allowed the growth process to be observed to reveal the growth mechanism of the WO3 nanorods. The initial growth of the nanorods did not consist of tungsten oxide but rather crystal tungsten. The formed crystal tungsten nanorods were then oxidized, resulting in the formation of the tungsten oxide nanorods. Furthermore, it is expected that the nanorods grew through cracks in the natural surface oxide layer on the tungsten wire.

  15. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  16. The DAMPE silicon–tungsten tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarello, P., E-mail: philipp.azzarello@unige.ch [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Ambrosi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Asfandiyarov, R. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cadoux, F. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Caprai, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Domenjoz, M. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Dong, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Duranti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Fan, R. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV–10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon–tungsten tracker–converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m{sup 2}. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  17. Spectrophotometric analysis of tooth discolouration induced by mineral trioxide aggregate after final irrigation with sodium hypochlorite: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voveraityte, Valdone; Gleizniene, Simona; Lodiene, Greta; Grabliauskiene, Zivile; Machiulskiene, Vita

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate specific chromatic alterations induced by white mineral trioxide aggregate after final irrigation with sodium hypochlorite. Sixty specimens were prepared mechanically and filled with mineral trioxide aggregate after different final irrigation protocols: Group 1 - distilled water, Group 2 - sodium hypochlorite followed by distilled water, Group 3 - sodium hypochlorite, only. Colour changes were recorded with a spectrophotometer at baseline, and then after 1, 2 and 4 months. The Commision Internationale de l'éclairage colour system was used and the total colour changes ΔE were calculated. In groups where sodium hypochlorite was used, parameter L* decreased significantly after the first month (Group 2 (P mineral trioxide aggregate can lead to tooth discolouration by contact with sodium hypochlorite residues in dentinal tubules. © 2016 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  18. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Mica, I., E-mail: isabella.mica@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Barbarossa, F., E-mail: fbarbarossa87@gmail.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Galbiati, A., E-mail: amos.galbiati@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Grasso, S., E-mail: salvatore.grasso-r2@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Soncini, V., E-mail: vsoncini@micron.com [Micron, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF{sub 2} implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF{sub 2} implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  19. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Soncini, V.

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF2 implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF2 implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  20. Vaporization of tungsten-metal in steam at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  1. Chemically deposited tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten – The way to a mock-up for divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Riesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced materials is essential for sophisticated energy systems like a future fusion reactor. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W utilize extrinsic toughening mechanisms and therefore overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and its sensitivity to operational embrittlement. This material has been successfully produced and tested during the last years and the focus is now put on the technological realisation for the use in plasma facing components of fusion devices. In this contribution, we present a way to utilize Wf/W composites for divertor applications by a fabrication route based on the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of tungsten. Mock-ups based on the ITER typical design can be realized by the implementation of Wf/W tiles. A concept based on a layered deposition approach allows the production of such tiles in the required geometry. One fibre layer after the other is positioned and ingrown into the W-matrix until the final sample size is reached. Charpy impact tests on these samples showed an increased fracture energy mainly due to the ductile deformation of the tungsten fibres. The use of Wf/W could broaden the operation temperature window of tungsten significantly and mitigate problems of deep cracking occurring typically in cyclic high heat flux loading. Textile techniques are utilized to optimise the tungsten wire positioning and process speed of preform production. A new device dedicated to the chemical deposition of W enhances significantly, the available machine time for processing and optimisation. Modelling shows that good deposition results are achievable by the use of a convectional flow and a directed temperature profile in an infiltration process.

  2. Monoblock Obturation Technique for Non-Vital Immature Permanent Maxillary Incisors Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: Results from Case Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Z.; Qureshi, A. H.

    2014-01-01

    Ten patients presented with non-vital immature teeth for root canal treatment. In all these cases the pre-operative clinical examination revealed apical periodontitis with a buccal sinus tract of endodontic origin. These cases were treated by a mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) monoblock obturation technique. Follow-up evaluations were performed at 1 - 2 years after treatment. Eight out of 10 cases were associated with periradicular healing at follow-up evaluation. Mineral trioxide aggregate Monoblock obturation technique appears to be a valid material to obtain periradicular healing in teeth with open apices and necrotic pulps. (author)

  3. Development and optimisation of tungsten armour geometry for ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Safronov, V.; Yablokov, N.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma facing components (PFC) of the future thermonuclear reactor in great extend determine the time of non-stop operation of the reactor. In current ITER project the most of the divertor PFC surfaces are covered by tungsten armour. Therefore selection of tungsten grade and attachment scheme for joining the tungsten armour to heat sink is a matter of great importance. Two attachment schemes for highly loaded components (up to 20 MW/m 2 ) are described in this paper. The small size mock-ups were manufactured and successfully tested at heat fluxes up to 30 MW/m 2 in screening test and up to 20 MW/m 2 at thermal fatigue test. One mock-up with four different tungsten grades was tested by consequent thermal shock (15 MJ/m 2 at 50 μs) and thermal cycling loading (15 MW/m 2 ). The damages that could lead to mock-up failure were not found but the behaviour of tungsten grades was quite different. (author)

  4. Experimental study of tungsten transport properties in T-10 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Nemets, A. R.; Zemtsov, I. A.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Sarychev, D. V.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurygin, V. A.; Leontiev, D. S.; Borschegovskij, A. A.; Grashin, S. A.; Ryjakov, D. V.; Sergeev, D. S.; Mustafin, N. A.; Trukhin, V. M.; Solomatin, R. Yu.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    First experimental results of tungsten transport investigation in OH and ECRH plasmas in the T-10 tokamak with W-limiter and movable Li-limiter are presented. It is shown that tungsten tends to accumulate (a joint process of cumulation and peaking) near the plasma axis in ohmic regimes. The cumulation of W is enhanced in discharges with high values of the parameter γ ={{\\bar{n}}\\text{e}}\\centerdot {{\\bar{Z}}\\text{eff}}\\centerdot I\\text{pl}-1.5 that coincides with accumulation conditions of light and medium impurities in T-10 plasmas. Experiments with Li-limiter show the immeasurable level of Li3+ (0.3-0.5% of n e) of T-10 CXRS diagnostics because of the low inflow of Li with respect to other light impurities. Nevertheless, the strong influence of lithium on inflow of light and tungsten impurities is observed. In discharges with lithized walls, vanishing of light impurities occurs and values of {{Z}\\text{eff}}≈ 1 are obtained. It is also shown that the tungsten density in the plasma center decreases by 15 to 20 times while the W inflow reduces only by 2 to 4 times. In lithized discharges with high γ, the flattening of the tungsten density profile occurs and its central concentration decreases up to 10 times during the on-axis ECRH. This effect is observed together with the increase of the W inflow by 3 to 4 times at the ECRH stage.

  5. Early stage damage of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials exposed to low energy helium ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, S.; Suslov, S.; Efe, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T.; Bystrov, K.; Hattar, K.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten is considered as a plasma facing component in the divertor region of the International Thermonuclear Experiment Reactor (ITER). High flux, high fluence helium (He) exposure of tungsten surfaces induces severe morphology changes and nanostructure formation, which may eventually erode

  6. Thin Places

    OpenAIRE

    Lockwood, Sandra Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This inquiry into the three great quests of the twentieth century–the South Pole, Mount Everest, and the Moon–examines our motivations to venture into these sublime, yet life-taking places. The Thin Place was once the destination of the religious pilgrim seeking transcendence in an extreme environment. In our age, the Thin Place quest has morphed into a challenge to evolve beyond the confines of our own physiology; through human ingenuity and invention, we reach places not meant to accommod...

  7. Study of Tungsten effect on CFETR performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengyu; Xiang Gao Collaboration; Guoqiang Li Collaboration; Nan Shi Collaboration; Vincent Chan Collaboration; Xiang Jian Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    An integrated modeling workflow using OMFIT/TGYRO is constructed to evaluate W impurity effects on China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) performance. Self-consistent modeling of tungsten(W) core density profile, accounting for turbulence and neoclassical transport, is performed based on the CFETR steady-state scenario developed by D.Zhao (ZhaoDeng, APS, 2016). It's found that the fusion performance degraded in a limited level with increasing W concentration. The main challenge arises in sustainment of H-mode with significant W radiation. Assuming the power threshold of H-L back transition is approximately the same as that of L-H transition, using the scaling law of Takizuka (Takizuka etc, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 2004), it is found that the fractional W concentration should not exceed 3e-5 to stay in H-mode for CFETR phase I. A future step is to connect this requirement to W wall erosion modeling. We are grateful to Dr. Emiliano Fable and Dr. Thomas Pütterich and Ms. Emily Belli for very helpful discussions and comments. We also would like to express our thanks to all the members of the CFETR Physics Group, and we appreciate the General Atomic Theory Group for permission to use the OMFIT framework and GA code suite, and for their valuable technical support. Numerical computations were performed on the ShenMa High Performance Computing Cluster in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This work was mainly supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB110001, 2014GB110002, 2014GB110003) and supported in part by the National ITER Plans Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013GB106001, 2013GB111002, 2015GB110001).

  8. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) apexification: a novel approach for traumatised young immature permanent teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayran, Manisha; Chaudhary, Seema; Manuja, Naveen; Kulkarni, Adwait Uday

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report a case of 9-year-old boy who came with a chief complaint of pain and fractured upper front teeth. Significant history of trauma was revealed 6 months before reporting, during playing at his school time. Proper diagnosis was made with the help of radiological investigations. The available treatment options were discussed with the patient's parents and root canal therapy, using mineral trioxide aggregate, as an apical barrier was carried out in his upper right front teeth. However, later on, the boy was aesthetically rehabilitated in relation to his fractured upper front teeth with the help of post and core and acrylic crown. PMID:23314456

  9. Thin films of molecular materials synthesized from fisher's carbene ferrocenyl: Film formation and electrical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Vergara, M.E.; Ortiz, A.; Alvarez-Toledano, C.; Moreno, A.; Alvarez, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of materials from Fisher's carbene ferrocenyl of the elements chromium, molybdenum and tungsten was carried out. The Fisher's compounds that were synthesized included the following combinations of two different metallic atoms: iron with chromium, iron with molybdenum and iron with tungsten. The molecular solids' preparation was done in electro-synthesis cells with platinum electrodes. Thin films were prepared by vacuum thermal evaporation on quartz substrates and crystalline silicon wafers. Pellets and thin films from these compounds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. The powder and thin films synthesized from these materials show the same intra-molecular bonds shown by infrared spectroscopy results, suggesting that thermal evaporation does not alter these bonds in spite of the thin films being amorphous, in contrast with other bimetallic complexes where material decomposition occurs. The differences in the conductivity values of the prepared films are very small, so they may be attributed to the different metallic ions employed in each case. The tungsten complex exhibits a higher conductivity than the molybdenum and chromium complexes at room temperature. Electrical conductivity values found for thin films are higher than for pellets made of the same molecular materials

  10. Synthesis of bundled tungsten oxide nanowires with controllable morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2009-01-01

    Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires with controllable morphology were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method with tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) as precursor and cyclohexanol as solvent. The as-synthesized products were systematically characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transition electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller gas-sorption measurements were also employed. Accompanied by an apparent drop of specific surface area from 151 m 2 g -1 for the longer nanowires synthesized using a lower concentration of WCl 6 to 106 m 2 g -1 for the shorter nanowires synthesized using a higher concentration of WCl 6 , a dramatically morphological evolution was also observed. With increasing concentration of tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) in cyclohexanol, the nanostructured bundles became larger, shorter and straighter, and finally a block-shape product occurred

  11. 3D-microscopy of hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeper, K., E-mail: katrin.peeper@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Moser, M.; Reichart, P. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Markina, E.; Mayer, M.; Lindig, S.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The mapping of hydrogen distributions in 3 dimensions and its correlation with structural features allow further insight into mechanisms of hydrogen trapping in tungsten. We studied hydrogen distributions in 25 μm thick polycrystalline tungsten foils by 3D hydrogen microscopy using a proton–proton-scattering method. Two types of tungsten samples were prepared: (i) at 1200 K annealed foils and using 1.8 MeV implantation energy (ii) at 2000 K annealed foils using 200 eV implantation energy. It has been found that large variations of surface hydrogen contamination occur within different samples. Nevertheless, a statistically significant variation of the hydrogen content across grain boundaries has been observed.

  12. Displacement disorder and reconstruction of the (001) face of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorushkin, V.E.; Kul'ment'ev, A.I.; Savushkin, E.V.

    1992-01-01

    The reconstruction of the (001) border of tungsten is examined taking into consideration random static displacements of surface atoms in the high-temperature (1 x 1) phase. A microscopic model is proposed, in which the creation of c(2 x 2) phase is described as a transition of the Jahn-Teller type and an ordering of static displacements. It is shown that displacement disorder induces instability of (001) tungsten with respect to reconstruction. The effect of a uniform electric field on a disordered reconstructing surface is examined. A possible reason is given for pronounced differences in the results of investigations of the structural conversion of the (001) face in tungsten when different experimental methods are used

  13. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Moore, B.T.; Silva, V.M.

    1988-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four tungsten alloys has been evaluated through weight loss measurements after total immersion in both distilled water insight into the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by an examination of the and 5% sodium chloride solutions. Some insight the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy and through an analysis of the corrosion products. Pure tungsten and all the alloys studied underwent corrosion during the tests, and in each case the rare of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilled water. A 95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe alloy was found to be the most corrosion resistant of the alloys under the experimental conditions. Examination of the data shows that for each of the tests, copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. 9 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  14. Hypoeutectic Silumin to Pressure Die Casting with Vanadium and Tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymczak T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of this study is to investigate the effect of vanadium and tungsten on the crystallization process, microstructure and mechanical properties of silumin grade EN-AC 46000. The research involved a derivative thermal analysis DTA of the crystallization process, the metallographic analysis as well as the mechanical properties. The metallographic analysis was carried out on pressure die castings and made in the DTA probe. Vanadium and tungsten were added simultaneously to silumin in amount of approximately 0.1; 0.2; 0.3 and 0.4%. The DTA studies have shown the similar shape of all crystallization curves. It has been shown the additives of vanadium and tungsten in pressure die cast silumin can significantly increase its tensile strength as an well as elongation.

  15. Volatility from copper and tungsten alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, G.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Piet, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Accident scenarios for fusion power plants present the potential for release and transport of activated constituents volatilized from first wall and structural materials. The extent of possible mobilization and transport of these activated species, many of which are ''oxidation driven'', is being addressed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report presents experimental measurements of volatilization from a copper alloy in air and steam and from a tungsten alloy in air. The major elements released included zinc from the copper alloy and rhenium and tungsten from the tungsten alloy. Volatilization rates of several constituents of these alloys over temperatures ranging from 400 to 1200 degree C are presented. These values represent release rates recommended for use in accident assessment calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  16. Positron simulations of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen and helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troev, T.; Popov, E.; Staikov, P.; Nankov, N.; Yoshiie, T.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the behavior of defects containing hydrogen or helium in tungsten is an important issue. Here the properties of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen or helium atoms have been investigated by model positron lifetime quantum-mechanical simulations. The electron and positron wave functions have been obtained in the local density approximation to the two-component density-functional theory. The calculated values of the positron lifetime correlate with the magnitude of the electron density. The vacancy-clusters without hydrogen or helium are active positron traps. The lattice relaxation of atoms around vacancy reduces the effective vacancy volume and decrease the positron lifetime at a vacancy. The hydrogen and helium atoms are trapped in tungsten by lattice vacancies and nano-voids. It was established that positron lifetime depends on the density of gas atoms inside the nano-void. Hydrogen and helium presence in the larger nano-voids considerably decrease the positron lifetime.

  17. Synthesis of Tungsten Diselenide Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Condensation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Tolochko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline tungsten diselenide (WSe2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a gas phase reaction using tungsten hexacarbonyl and elemental selenium as precursors. The WSe2 nanoparticle morphology varies from the spherical shape to flake-like layered structures. Mean size in smaller dimension are less than 5 nm and the number of layers decreased linearly with decreasing of reaction time and concentration of carbonyl in the gas phase. The mean value of interlayer distance in <0001> direction is comparable with the microscopic values. The selenium-to-tungsten atomic ratios of 2.07, 2.19 and 2.19 were determined respectively, approach to the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1. Main impurities are oxygen and carbon and strongly interrelated with carbonyl concentration in the gas phase.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7356

  18. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  19. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  20. Thin book

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    En lille bog om teater og organisationer, med bidrag fra 19 teoretikere og praktikere, der deltog i en "Thin Book Summit" i Danmark i 2005. Bogen bidrager med en state-of-the-art antologi om forskellige former for samarbejde imellem teater og organisationer. Bogen fokuserer både på muligheder og...

  1. Thin Film

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    organic substances. KEY WORDS: Photoelectrocatalysis, Titanium dioxide, Cuprous oxide, Composite thin film, Photo electrode. INTRODUCTION ... reddish p-type semiconductor with a direct band gap of 2.0-2.2 eV [18, 19]. ... Photoelectrocatalytic removal of color from water using TiO2 and TiO2/Cu2O electrodes. Bull.

  2. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  3. A high energy density all solid-state tungsten-air battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Xu, Nansheng; Romito, Kevin; Huang, Kevin

    2013-06-14

    An all solid-state tungsten-air battery is reported here, which is based on a new metal-air chemistry, featuring decoupled design of electrodes and energy storage. Benefited from higher specific density and better redox kinetics of tungsten, the new tungsten-air battery exhibits roughly higher energy density (W h L(-1)) than the previously reported iron-air battery.

  4. Thermal outgassing studies on machinable tungsten and TZM molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Nielsen, R.W.; Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Machinable tungsten and molybdenum alloys are extensively used as safety shutters and optical slits at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) front ends. These materials may present a vacuum problem because of their porosity. Also, an environmentally hazard-free cleaning procedure has to be developed for these materials. We have chosen specially heat-treated machinable tungsten with a density of 18 g/cm 3 for safety shutters and TZM (a molybdenum alloy containing 0.5% titanium and ∼0.1% zirconium) for optical slits. Thermal outgassing tests have been performed for a machinable tungsten set with a total surface area of 4500 cm 2 and a 2.8 x 4.6 x 32.6 cm 3 piece of TZM. A cleaning procedure using alkaline detergent ultrasonic washes and vacuum furnace baking was used before outgassing measurements. Outgassing rates 10 hours after initial pump down at room temperature are 1.6 x 10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for machinable tungsten and 6.0 x 10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for TZM. The outgassing rates 24 hours after an in situ bake at 160 degrees C for two days decreased to 2.2 x 10 -12 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for machinable tungsten and 2.2 x 10 -11 Torr·l·s -1 · -2 for TZM. Optical studies confirmed that the TZM sample is more porous than the machinable tungsten sample. Further studies of a denser TZM sample show that the outgassing rate decreases as the porosity decreases. The outgassing rate 24 hours after a 48-h bake at 160 degree C reached 7.4 x 10 -12 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for the denser TZM sample

  5. Tungsten versus depleted uranium for armour-piercing penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have been widely used in the production of armour-piercing (AP) penetrators for defense purposes for the past 40 years. In recent years, however, depleted uranium (DU) has also been utilised for this application. Both materials exhibit high density and strength, two properties necessary for kinetic-energy projectiles to penetrate armour on tanks and other vehicles. The facts, however, support the view that tungsten can and should be utilised as the primary material for most armour-defeating ordnance applications. (author)

  6. Helium effects on tungsten surface morphology and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Peng, H.Y.; Lee, H.T.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yoshida, N.; Doerner, R.; De Temmerman, G.; Alimov, V.; Wright, G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental results on tungsten surface morphology, especially nano-structure (fuzz), induced by helium plasma exposure at temperatures between 1000 K and 2000 K are reviewed. This structure was firstly reported in 2006. In this review, most of experimental results reported so far including characteristics and formation conditions of the nano-structure in both linear plasma devices and magnetic confinement devices, erosion and arcing by steady-state plasma exposure and ELM-like pulsed heat or pulsed plasma exposure by a laser and a plasma gun are summarized. In addition, He effects on D retention under simultaneous D/He irradiation on tungsten are presented

  7. Engineered Surface Properties of Porous Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Julius Malte

    Porous tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements involves the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) porous tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of porous tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of porous tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of porous tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting

  8. Tool life of ceramic wedges during precise turning of tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legutko Stanislaw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties, application and machinability of tungsten and its alloys have been demonstrated. The comparison of the tool life and wear of the wedges made of SiAlON and whisker ceramics during the precise turning at different cutting parameters have been presented. The CNC lathe DMG CTX 310 Ecoline and tungsten of 99.7 % purity were used during the experiments. Only the wedge of whisker ceramics has proved to be sufficiently suitable and only for relatively low cutting speeds.

  9. Quantum-Accurate Molecular Dynamics Potential for Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Mitchell; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this short contribution is to report on the development of a Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP) for tungsten. We have focused on the characterization of elastic and defect properties of the pure material in order to support molecular dynamics simulations of plasma-facing materials in fusion reactors. A parallel genetic algorithm approach was used to efficiently search for fitting parameters optimized against a large number of objective functions. In addition, we have shown that this many-body tungsten potential can be used in conjunction with a simple helium pair potential1 to produce accurate defect formation energies for the W-He binary system.

  10. Comparative study of the mechanical properties of nanostructured thin films on stretchable substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djaziri, S.; Renault, P.-O.; Le Bourhis, E.; Goudeau, Ph.; Faurie, D.; Geandier, G.; Mocuta, C.; Thiaudière, D.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative studies of the mechanical behavior between copper, tungsten, and W/Cu nanocomposite based on copper dispersoïd thin films were performed under in-situ controlled tensile equi-biaxial loadings using both synchrotron X-ray diffraction and digital image correlation techniques. The films first deform elastically with the lattice strain equal to the true strain given by digital image correlation measurements. The Cu single thin film intrinsic elastic limit of 0.27% is determined below the apparent elastic limit of W and W/Cu nanocomposite thin films, 0.30% and 0.49%, respectively. This difference is found to be driven by the existence of as-deposited residual stresses. Above the elastic limit on the lattice strain-true strain curves, we discriminate two different behaviors presumably footprints of plasticity and fracture. The Cu thin film shows a large transition domain (0.60% true strain range) to a plateau with a smooth evolution of the curve which is associated to peak broadening. In contrast, W and W/Cu nanocomposite thin films show a less smooth and reduced transition domain (0.30% true strain range) to a plateau with no peak broadening. These observations indicate that copper thin film shows some ductility while tungsten/copper nanocomposites thin films are brittle. Fracture resistance of W/Cu nanocomposite thin film is improved thanks to the high compressive residual stress and the elimination of the metastable β-W phase

  11. Simulation of cracks in tungsten under ITER specific heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschany, S.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of high tritium retention in co-deposited carbon layers on the walls of ITER vacuum chamber motivates investigation of materials for the divertor armour others than carbon fibre composite (CFC). Tungsten is most probable material for CFC replacement as the divertor armour because of high vaporisation temperature and heat conductivity. In the modern ITER design tungsten is a reference material for the divertor cover, except for the separatrix strike point armoured with CFC. As divertor armour, tungsten should withstand severe heat loads at off-normal ITER events like disruptions, ELMs and vertical displacement events. Experiments on tungsten heating with plasma streams and e-beams have shown an intense crack formation at the surface of irradiated sample [ V.I. Tereshin, A.N. Bandura, O.V. Byrka et al. Repetitive plasma loads typical for ITER type-I ELMs: Simulation at QSPA Kh-50.PLASMA 2005. ed. By Sadowski M.J., AIP Conference Proceedings, American Institute of Physics, 2006, V 812, p. 128-135., J. Linke. Private communications.]. The reason for tungsten cracking under severe heat loads is thermo stress. It appears as due to temperature gradient in solid tungsten as in resolidified layer after cooling down. Both thermo stresses are of the same value, but the gradiental stress is compressive and the stress in the resolidified layer is tensile. The last one is most dangerous for crack formation and it was investigated in this work. The thermo stress in tungsten that develops during cooling from the melting temperature down to room temperature is ∼ 8-16 GPa. Tensile strength of tungsten is much lower, < 1 GPa at room temperature, and at high temperatures it drops at least for one order of magnitude. As a consequence, various cracks of different characteristic scales appear at the heated surface of the resolidified layer. For simulation of the cracks in tungsten the numeric code PEGASUS-3D [Pestchanyi and I. Landman. Improvement of the CFC structure to

  12. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate—A Review of Properties and Testing Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William N. Ha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA restoratives and MTA sealers are commonly used in endodontics. Commonly referenced standards for testing of MTA are ISO 6876, 9917-1 and 10993. A PubMed search was performed relating to the relevant tests within each ISO and “mineral trioxide aggregate”. MTA restoratives are typically tested with a mixture of tests from multiple standards. As the setting of MTA is dependent upon hydration, the results of various MTA restoratives and sealers are dependent upon the curing methodology. This includes physical properties after mixing, physical properties after setting and biocompatibility. The tests of flow, film thickness, working time and setting time can be superseded by rheology as it details how MTA hydrates. Physical property tests should replicate physiological conditions, i.e. 37 °C and submerged in physiological solution. Biocompatibility tests should involve immediate placement of samples immediately after mixing rather than being cured prior to placement as this does not replicate clinical usage. Biocompatibility tests should seek to replicate physiological conditions with MTA tested immediately after mixing.

  13. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate-A Review of Properties and Testing Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, William N; Nicholson, Timothy; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence J

    2017-11-02

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) restoratives and MTA sealers are commonly used in endodontics. Commonly referenced standards for testing of MTA are ISO 6876, 9917-1 and 10993. A PubMed search was performed relating to the relevant tests within each ISO and "mineral trioxide aggregate". MTA restoratives are typically tested with a mixture of tests from multiple standards. As the setting of MTA is dependent upon hydration, the results of various MTA restoratives and sealers are dependent upon the curing methodology. This includes physical properties after mixing, physical properties after setting and biocompatibility. The tests of flow, film thickness, working time and setting time can be superseded by rheology as it details how MTA hydrates. Physical property tests should replicate physiological conditions, i.e. 37 °C and submerged in physiological solution. Biocompatibility tests should involve immediate placement of samples immediately after mixing rather than being cured prior to placement as this does not replicate clinical usage. Biocompatibility tests should seek to replicate physiological conditions with MTA tested immediately after mixing.

  14. Antimony trioxide-induced apoptosis is dependent on SEK1/JNK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Koren K; Davison, Kelly; Colombo, Myrian; Colosimo, April L; Diaz, Zuanel; Padovani, Alessandra M S; Guo, Qi; Scrivens, P James; Gao, Wenli; Mader, Sylvie; Miller, Wilson H

    2006-01-05

    Very little is known concerning the toxicity of antimony, despite its commercial use as a flame retardant and medical use as a treatment for parasitic infections. Our previous studies show that antimony trioxide (Sb(2)O(3)) induces growth inhibition in patient-derived acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines, a disease in which a related metal, arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)), is used clinically. However, signaling pathways initiated by Sb(2)O(3) treatment remain undefined. Here, we show that Sb(2)O(3) treatment of APL cells is associated with increased apoptosis as well as differentiation markers. Sb(2)O(3)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) correlated with increased apoptosis. In addition, when we decreased the buffering capacity of the cell by depleting glutathione, ROS production and apoptosis was enhanced. Arsenic-resistant APL cells with increased glutathione levels exhibited increased cross-resistance to Sb(2)O(3). Based on studies implicating c-jun kinase (JNK) in the mediation of the response to As(2)O(3), we investigated the role for JNK in Sb(2)O(3)-induced apoptosis. Sb(2)O(3) activates JNK and its downstream target, AP-1. In fibroblasts with a genetic deletion in SEK1, an upstream regulator of JNK, Sb(2)O(3)-induced growth inhibition as well as JNK activation was decreased. These data suggest roles for ROS and the SEK1/JNK pathway in the cytotoxicity associated with Sb(2)O(3) exposure.

  15. Mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol pulpotomy of primary teeth: a 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, G; Ranjpour, M

    2010-05-01

    To compare the clinical and radiographic response of primary teeth to vital pulpotomy using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or formocresol (FC). A group of 17 children aged 4-9 were selected from those referred to the Paedodontic Department at Shahid Beheshti University, Dental School. Cases with at least two matching teeth were selected (40 teeth), showing signs of pulp involvement. A pulpotomy procedure was carried out in all cases with FC in control teeth whilst MTA was placed in experimental teeth. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1-, 6-, 12- and 24-month recall. Statistical analysis using a Fischer exact test was performed on the data to determine significant differences between the groups. Overall, 22 second and 18 first primary molars were included. The gender ratio was one male to three female. No significant difference was found between the clinical and radiographic outcomes of the two groups at 6-, 12- and 24-month follow-up (P > 0.05). Internal resorption was seen significantly more often in FC cases after 12 months than MTA cases. Overall radiographic appearance of normal structures at 24th month was seen in more than 95% of the cases in MTA and 90% in the FC-treated group (P > 0.05). Mineral trioxide aggregate for pulp treatment of primary teeth can be considered a replacement for FC.

  16. 5-year results comparing mineral trioxide aggregate and adhesive resin composite for root-end sealing in apical surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Arx, Thomas; Hänni, Stefan; Jensen, Simon Storgård

    2014-01-01

    observers). Two different methods of root-end preparation and filling (primary study parameters) were to be compared (mineral trioxide aggregate [MTA] vs adhesive resin composite [COMP]) without randomization. RESULTS: A total of 271 patients and teeth from a 1-year follow-up sample of 339 could be re...

  17. Clinical and radiographic comparison of biodentine, mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol as pulpotomy agents in primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juneja, P; Kulkarni, S

    2017-08-01

    To compare the clinical and radiographic success rates of three different pulpotomy agents in primary molars after 18 months. The study was carried out with 51 primary molars of children aged 5-9 years old. The teeth were randomly assigned to the experimental or control groups. After coronal pulp removal and haemostasis, the remaining pulp tissue was covered with Biodentine ® or mineral trioxide aggregate in the experimental groups. In the control group, formocresol was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp tissue for 5 min and after removal the pulp tissue was covered with zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) paste. All teeth were immediately restored with reinforced ZOE base and resin modified glass-ionomer cement, and later with pre-formed metal crowns. Follow-up assessments were carried out after 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Forty-five teeth were available for follow up at the end of 18 months. All of the available teeth for mineral trioxide aggregate and Biodentine ® were clinically successful, as were 73.3% of the FC group. Radiographic success rate for the formocresol group at 18 months follow up was 73.3, 100% for mineral trioxide aggregate and 86.6% for Biodentine ® group. Mineral Trioxide aggregate and Biodentine ® showed more favourable results than formocresol.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of grain boundary diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Toussaint, U; Gori, S; Manhard, A; Höschen, T; Höschen, C

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the influence of the microstructure of tungsten on hydrogen transport is crucial for the use of tungsten as first-wall material in fusion reactors. Here, we report the results of molecular dynamics and transition state studies on the influence of grain boundaries in tungsten on the transport of hydrogen. An exhaustive mapping of possible minimum activation energy migration trajectories for hydrogen as the trace impurity reveals a strongly modified activation energy distribution in the neighborhood of grain boundaries together with an altered connectivity matrix. The results indicate that grain boundaries in polycrystalline tungsten may provide an important transport channel, especially for neutron-damaged tungsten.

  19. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brozek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibers have high tensile strength but a poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Using this first characteristic and to prevent oxidation of tungsten coated composite materials in which the primary requirement: reinforcement against destruction or deformation, was studied on tungsten fibers and tungsten wires which were coated by applying the metal and ceramic powders via plasma spraying device in plasma generator WSP®. Deposition took place in an atmosphere of Ar + 7 % H2, sufficient to reduce the oxidized trace amounts of tungsten.

  20. Thin melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, David E

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma is increasing and a preponderance of the melanomas diagnosed today are "thin in terms of Breslow criteria. Although thin melanomas, as a group, are associated with a very good prognosis, a subset of these tumors may metastasize and cause death. These cases can be identified by using prognostic models, including the "standard" American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria, and other attributes identified in follow-up studies. To review the history of concepts of prognostic modeling in melanoma, focusing on thin melanomas. Selected literature. About 40 years ago, it was realized that malignant melanoma, once almost uniformly fatal, could be divided into categories with better or worse prognosis through the use of prognostic models. The first simple models, Clark levels of invasion and Breslow thickness, are still in use. Thickness remains the single most useful variable. Breslow recognized that melanomas less than 0.76 mm in thickness were associated with a very good prognosis, with no metastases in his limited initial study. The American Joint Committee on Cancer selected a cutoff of 1.0 mm, which achieves a similar result, with stage modifiers, although some metastases and deaths do occur with stage I lesions. Clark demonstrated an almost equally good prognosis for his level II invasive melanomas and recognized that most of these lesions, although invasive, lacked the ability to form tumors or to undergo mitosis in the dermis and were therefore "nontumorigenic" and "nonmitogenic" and lacked competence for metastasis. Studies of these low-risk melanomas have led to the development of criteria for earlier diagnosis and a steady, but still inadequate, improvement in prognosis for melanoma overall. Multivariable models currently can identify groups of patients within the "thin melanoma" category whose prognosis varies, from a disease-free survival of close to 100% to about 70%. Prognosis declines more or less linearly with increasing

  1. thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The anionic precursor was 1% H2O2 solution. Both the cationic and anionic precursors were kept at room temperature (∼300 K). One SILAR cycle consists of two steps: (i) adsorption of Sn4+ ions on the substrate surface for 20 s and (ii) reaction with H2O2 solution for 40 s to form stable SnO2:H2O thin film on the substrate.

  2. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp 2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  3. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  4. Hollow microspheres with a tungsten carbide kernel for PEMFC application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Arbigny, Julien Bernard; Taillades, Gilles; Marrony, Mathieu; Jones, Deborah J; Rozière, Jacques

    2011-07-28

    Tungsten carbide microspheres comprising an outer shell and a compact kernel prepared by a simple hydrothermal method exhibit very high surface area promoting a high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles, and an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) stability compared to the usual Pt/C electrocatalysts used for PEMFC application.

  5. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the ...

  6. Thermal Neutron Capture onto the Stable Tungsten Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal neutron-capture measurements of the stable tungsten isotopes have been carried out using the guided thermal-neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. Prompt singles spectra were collected and analyzed using the HYPERMET γ-ray analysis software package for the compound tungsten systems 183W, 184W, and 187W, prepared from isotopically-enriched samples of 182W, 183W, and 186W, respectively. These new data provide both confirmation and new insights into the decay schemes and structure of the tungsten isotopes reported in the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File based upon previous elemental analysis. The experimental data have also been compared to Monte Carlo simulations of γ-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process using the statistical-decay code DICEBOX. Together, the experimental cross sections and modeledfeeding contribution from the quasi continuum, have been used to determine the total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the tungsten isotopes and provide improved decay-scheme information for the structural- and neutron-data libraries.

  7. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences.

  8. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences. Component

  9. Tasmanian tin and tungsten granites - their radiometric characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeates, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    A radiometric survey of Tasmanian granites has shown, with one exception, that tin and tungsten-bearing granites have high radioactivity, largely owing to increased uranium. Many have a high uranium/thorium ratio as well. Radiometric measurements can also delineate different granite types within composite bodies

  10. Features of simultaneous discharge of tungsten with nickel and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.L.; Krivtsov, A.K.; Pavel'eva, L.A.; Zajtsev, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    Specific features of the kinetics of electrolytic codeposition of tungsten alloys with nickel and cobalt were investigated. Experiments were conducted with ammonia-citrate electrolytes having the following composition in g/1: (1)CoSO 4 x7H 2 O-60, Na 2 WO 4 x2H 2 O -70, citric acid-60, NH 4 OH to pH=6-7; (2) NiSO 4 x7H 2 O - from 1 to 20, Na 2 WO 4 x2H 2 O-50, citric acid-66, NH 4 OH, to pH=6-7. Dependences of tungsten content in the alloy on the concentration of citric acid and current densities are investigated. It is shown that intermediate tungsten oxides of lower oxidation degrees can be formed in the electrolyte. Experimental proofs are obtained of tungsten discharge into the alloy with cobalt and nickel from citrate solutions through the film of intermediate compounds, which forms in the near-cathode space

  11. Understanding metal–insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-20

    May 20, 2015 ... We have carried out angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spectromicroscopy studies to understand the metal–insulator transition (MIT) observed in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaWO3. The experimentally determined band structure is compared with the theoretical calculation based ...

  12. Thermal Cycling of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

    1969-12-08

    In phase I tungsten clad cermet fuel specimens were thermal cycled, to study the effects of fuel loading, fuel particle size, stablized fuel, duplex coatings, and fabrication techniques on dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In phase II the best combination of the factors studies in phase I were combined in one specimen for evaluation.

  13. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  14. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cryogenic treatment is a recent advancement in the field of machining to improve the properties of cutting tool materials. Tungsten carbide is the most commonly used cutting tool material in the industry and the technique can also be extended to it. Although the importance of tempering after cryogenic treatment has been ...

  15. Dioxobridged complexes of molybdenum (IV) and tungsten (IV) with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The molar conductance values measured in DMF indicate the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes (table 2). Ion-exchange studies show that the complexes are neutral. .... molydbenum and tungsten complexes respectively. The second step consists of the decomposition of the organic moiety and the formation of MO3.

  16. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity of sodium tungsten ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Studies of dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity have been made on three samples of sodium tungsten phosphate glasses over a temperature range of 77–420 K. Complex relative permit- tivity data have been analyzed using dielectric modulus approach. Conductivity relaxation frequency increases with the ...

  17. Understanding the surface and structural characteristics of tungsten ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Tungsten oxide; tin oxide; etherification; glycerol; tert-butanol; glycerol ethers. 1. Introduction. Biodiesel, an eco-friendly biofuel is being chosen as an alternative to fossil fuels. Biodiesel has been produced in large quantities by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats.1 During the production of biodiesel.

  18. Hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition of Tungsten films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to establish a novel technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the future ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) of microelectronics. We developed a hot-wire assisted ALD (HWALD), where a heated tungsten (W) filament is utilized instead of a plasma to generate radicals. HWALD is

  19. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. II. Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerbacher, B.; Egede Christensen, N.

    1974-01-01

    Energy-distribution spectra of photoelectrons emitted normal to three single-crystal faces of tungsten have been measured for photon energies between 7.7 and 21.2 eV. The results are interpreted in terms of one-dimensional electronic properties along the symmetry lines in k space that correspond ...

  20. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding pro- cesses to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively ...

  1. Refining waste hardmetals into tungsten oxide nanosheets via facile method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhifei; Zheng, Guangwei; Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hongyi; Wu, Junshu; Du, Yucheng

    2016-04-01

    A new hydrothermal system has been designed to recycle waste WC-Co hardmetal with low cobalt (Co) content (3 %). In the solution system, nitric acid was designed to dissolve Co, H2O2 served as oxidant to accelerate the oxidation of the WC-Co hardmetals, and fluorine (F-) was designed to dissolve and recrystallize generated tungsten oxides, which were found to possess a layered structure using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The obtained tungsten oxides were identified as WO3·0.33H2O by X-ray diffraction and their specific surface area was measured as 89.2 m2 g-1 via N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. The present layered structure tungsten oxides exhibited a promising capability for removing lead ion (Pb2+) and organic species, such as methyl blue. The adsorption model was found to be in agreement with Langmuir isotherm model. Given the facile synthesis procedure and promising properties of final products, this new approach should have great potential for refining some other waste hardmetals or tungsten products.

  2. Low temperature processing of tungsten-fibre high-strength composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A tungsten nickel/iron compound with a high tungsten content up to over 90 percent by volume of tungsten and an ideal distribution of the nickel-iron multilayer-matrix avoiding tungsten - tungsten interfaces, has been processed without the use of any sintering process and thus resulted in avoiding temperatures of above 700 o C during the entire manufacturing process. An electrochemical coating of coarse tungsten powder with alternating layers of nickel and iron and a forging process at temperatures not exceeding 650 o C resulted in a high strength compound, which easily could be altered into a tungsten fiber compound with a fiber-length to fiber-diameter ratio of more than 10 3 . From the viewpoint of the metallurgist, easier handling systems are obtained when both a liquid phase and high temperatures with their risks for grain structures and grain boundaries are lacking. (author)

  3. The high temperature impact response of tungsten and chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves has been studied in pure polycrystalline tungsten and chromium at room and elevated temperatures over propagation distances ranging from 0.05 to 3 mm (tungsten) and from 0.1 to 2 mm (chromium). The use of fused silica windows in all but one experiment with chromium and in several high temperature experiments with tungsten led to the need for performing shock and optic characterization of these windows over the 300-1200 K temperature interval. Experiments with tungsten and chromium samples showed that annealing of the metals transforms the initial ramping elastic wave into a jump-like wave, substantially increasing the Hugoniot elastic limits of the metals. With increased annealing time, the spall strength of the two metals slightly increases. Both at room and at high temperatures, the elastic precursor in the two metals decays in two distinct regimes. At propagation distances smaller than ˜1 mm (tungsten) or ˜0.5 mm (chromium), decay is fast, with the dislocation motion and multiplication being controlled by phonon viscous drag. At greater distances, the rate of decay becomes much lower, with control of the plastic deformation being passed to the thermally activated generation and motion of dislocation double-kinks. The stress at which this transition takes place virtually coincides with the Peierls stress τP of the active glide system. Analysis of the annealing effects in both presently and previously studied BCC metals (i.e., Ta, V, Nb, Mo, W, and Cr) and of the dependencies of their normalized Peierls stresses τP(θ) /τP(0 ) on the normalized temperature θ=T /Tm allows one to conclude that the non-planar, split into several glide planes, structure of the dislocation core in these metals is mainly responsible for their plastic deformation features.

  4. A New Method for Low-Temperature Decomposition of Chromites and Dichromium Trioxide using Bromic Acid Evaluated by Chromium Isotope Measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chrastný, V.; Rohovec, Jan; Čadková, E.; Pašava, J.; Farkaš, J.; Novák, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 1 (2014), s. 103-110 ISSN 1639-4488 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : chromites * dichromium trioxide * decomposition * chromium isotopes * bromic acid Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.792, year: 2013

  5. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  6. Synthesis of high purity tungsten nanoparticles from tungsten heavy alloy scrap by selective precipitation and reduction route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, S.S. Kalyan, E-mail: kalyanchem03@rediffmail.com; Sahoo, P.K.; Vimala, J.; Shanker, B.; Ghosal, P.; Durai, L.

    2016-09-05

    In this paper we report synthesis of tungsten nanoparticles of high purity >99.7 wt% from heavy alloy scrap using a novel chemical route of selective precipitation and reduction. The effect of Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer on controlling the particle size is established through FTIR spectra and corroborated with TEM images, wherein the average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g under different experimental conditions. This process is economical as raw material is a scrap and the efficiency of the reaction is >95%. - Highlights: • Tungsten nanoparticles were synthesized from tungsten heavy alloy scrap. • A novel chemical route of precipitation and reduction with Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer as stabilizer is reported. • The average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g. • High pure tungsten nanoparticles of >99.7% purity could be synthesized using this route. • Efficiency of the reaction is >95%.

  7. Stability of the tungsten diselenide and silicon carbide heterostructure against high energy proton exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Roger C.; Shi, Tan; Jariwala, Bhakti; Jovanovic, Igor; Robinson, Joshua A.

    2017-10-01

    Single layers of tungsten diselenide (WSe2) can be used to construct ultra-thin, high-performance electronics. Additionally, there has been considerable progress in controlled and direct growth of single layers on various substrates. Based on these results, high-quality WSe2-based devices that approach the limit of physical thickness are now possible. Such devices could be useful for space applications, but understanding how high-energy radiation impacts the properties of WSe2 and the WSe2/substrate interface has been lacking. In this work, we compare the stability against high energy proton radiation of WSe2 and silicon carbide (SiC) heterostructures generated by mechanical exfoliation of WSe2 flakes and by direct growth of WSe2 via metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). These two techniques produce WSe2/SiC heterostructures with distinct differences due to interface states generated during the MOCVD growth process. This difference carries over to differences in band alignment from interface states and the ultra-thin nature of the MOCVD-grown material. Both heterostructures are not susceptible to proton-induced charging up to a dose of 1016 protons/cm2, as measured via shifts in the binding energy of core shell electrons and a decrease in the valence band offset. Furthermore, the MOCVD-grown material is less affected by the proton exposure due to its ultra-thin nature and a greater interaction with the substrate. These combined effects show that the directly grown material is suitable for multi-year use in space, provided that high quality devices can be fabricated from it.

  8. Analysis of six heavy metals in Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Kee-Yeon; Zhu, Qiang; Safavi, Kamran; Gu, Yu; Bae, Kwang-Shik; Chang, Seok Woo

    2013-12-01

    Ortho mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a mineral aggregate newly developed for perforation repair, root end filling and pulp capping. The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in Ortho MTA and ProRoot MTA. A total of 0.2 g of each MTA was digested using a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids and filtered. Six heavy metals in the resulting filtrates were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (n = 5). The results were statistically analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in Ortho MTA were 0.10, 7.73, 49.51, 2.58, 0.82 and 10.09 p.p.m., respectively. The concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn in ProRoot MTA were 0.16, 9.38, 1438.11, 74.51, 18.98 and 4.05 p.p.m., respectively. In conclusion, Ortho MTA had lower levels of Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Ni than ProRoot MTA. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Endodontic Journal © 2012 Australian Society of Endodontology.

  9. In Vitro Cytotoxicity and Setting Time Assessment of Calcium-Enriched Mixture Cement, Retro Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornamazeh, Tahereh; Yadegari, Zahra; Ghasemi, Amir; Sheykh-Al-Eslamian, Seyedeh Mahsa; Shojaeian, Shiva

    2017-01-01

    The present study sought to evaluate and compare biocompatibility and setting time of Retro mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) and Angelus MTA. CEM cement, Angelus MTA and Retro MTA were assessed in set and fresh states. Extracts transformed to each cavity of three 24-well plates in which 1×10 4 cell were seeded into each well 24 h earlier. All specimens were incubated in a humidified incubator with 5% CO2 at 37 ° C. Mosmann's tetrazolium toxicity (MTT) assay was used to determine in vitro cytotoxicity on L929 mouse fibroblast cell line. Cell viability was determined at 1, 24, and 72 h after exposure. The initial setting time was measured by 113.4 g Gilmore needle testing. Then, final setting times were assessed by the 456.5 g Gilmore needle. Data comparisons were performed using the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's post hoc test ( α =0.05). All groups in both forms indicated higher cell vitality compared to positive control group ( P MTA showed better biocompatibility compared to set CEM and set Angelus MTA ( P MTA showed significantly lower initial and final setting time compared to CEM and Angelus MTA ( P MTA and relatively short period of setting time. It seems a promising alternative material in clinical situations where accelerated setting is required. However, more clinical and in vivo investigations are needed for a clear decision making.

  10. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10 4 Bq cm -3 at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10 6 Bq cm -3 after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase due to 179 Ta with

  11. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm -2 at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced damages

  12. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  13. Thermal reaction of SiC films with tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y. [Univ Bordeaux 1, Lab Composites Thermostruct, CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1, UMR 5801, F-33600 Pessac, (France); Roger, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LTEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Solid-state reactions between SiC films and W-xRe (x = 0, 5 and 25 at%) substrates on thermal annealing between 1673 K and 1873 K for various durations have been investigated. SiC coatings were deposited on metallic wires by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) from a gas mixture of tetramethyl-silane (TMS) and hydrogen at 1373 K under normal pressure. The interface zones were characterized using scanning electron and optical microscopies, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe microanalysis. All analyses reveal that SiC reacts with substrates. Various metal silicides and carbides were formed in layered reaction and the presence of these phases was confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. The effects of rhenium on the reactivity were established by the determination of growth kinetics deducted from the thicknesses of reaction zones as a function of annealing time. It has been found that an increase in the diffusion kinetics and activation energy with the quantity of rhenium in the tungsten wire. (authors)

  14. Treatment of inflammatory root resorption using mineral trioxide aggregate: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roohollah Sharifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This report presents a case to show inflammatory root resorption can be successfully treated by using mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Case Report: A central maxillary incisor of an eight-year-old boy was avulsed associated with crown fracture secondary to a fall. The tooth was stored in ice. Early attempts at pulpal revascularization of the replanted tooth proved unsuccessful. To stop inflammatory root resorption, long-term calcium hydroxide therapy was employed. Despite the use of calcium hydroxide, resorption continued. Subsequent to the failure of that treatment, MTA was used as a root canal filling material. At 20-month follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic and had clinical signs of ankylosis but external inflammatory root resorption had stopped. Discussion: MTA may be considered as an alternative option for the treatment of continuous external inflammatory root resorption.

  15. The antitumor effect of arsenic trioxide on hepatocellular carcinoma is enhanced by andrographolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xuhua; Li, Tengfei; Han, Xinwei; Ren, Jianzhuang; Chen, Pengfei; Li, Hao; Gong, Shaojun

    2017-10-31

    High concentrations of arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) are used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia and solid tumors, with negative side effects to normal cells. Andrographolide is a traditional Chinese medicine that exerts anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-virus, and anti-diabetic effects. Here, we tested the effects of combined andrographolide with As 2 O 3 against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We found that by increasing apoptosis, andrographolide synergistically enhanced the anti-tumor effects of As2O3 in HepG2 cells in vitro and in vivo . Furthermore, results from our microarray assays and experiments with mouse xenografts showed that EphB4 was downregulated by the combination of As 2 O 3 plus andrographolide. These findings suggest that the combination of andrographolide and As 2 O 3 could yield therapeutic benefits in the treatment of HCC.

  16. Nonsurgical Endodontic Retreatment of Advanced Inflammatory External Root Resorption Using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Obturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Utneja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory external root resorption is one of the major complications after traumatic dental injury. In this case report, we describe treatment of a maxillary central incisor affected by severe, perforating external root resorption. An 18-year-old patient presented with a previously traumatized, root-filled maxillary central incisor associated with pain and sinus tract. Radiographic examination revealed periradicular lesion involving pathologic resorption of the apical region of the root and lateral root surface both mesially and distally. After removal of the root canal filling, the tooth was disinfected with intracanal triple antibiotic paste for 2 weeks. The antibiotic dressing was then removed, and the entire root canal was filled with mineral trioxide aggregate. The endodontic access cavity was restored with composite resin. After 18 months, significant osseous healing of the periradicular region and lateral periodontium had occurred with arrest of external root resorption, and no clinical symptoms were apparent.

  17. Advances in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia and other hematologic malignancies with arsenic trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, James L; Waxman, Samuel; Tricot, Guido; Tallman, Martin S; Bloomfield, Clara D

    2002-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), once considered the most devastating subtype of acute myeloid leukemia, is now the most treatable of all subtypes as a result of intensive research into its molecular pathogenesis. This research has led to a rational approach to treatment in which the use of the differentiating agent all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) has proven to be effective first-line treatment for inducing complete remission. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is currently used to treat relapsed disease, further enhancing survival rates in a patient population for which limited salvage options exist. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms responsible for development of APL and the evolution of treatment options over the last three decades, including the major advances using ATRA and ATO in the last 12 years. The mechanism of action of ATO is also described in view of this agent's potential for broader therapeutic application in a variety of hematologic malignancies.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopy in the region X-Ray Diffraction and the mineral trioxide aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, C.M.B.; Oliveira, S.V.; Silva, M.C.; Cartaxo, J.M.; Fook, M.V.L.

    2011-01-01

    In the nineties was introduced into the search field of biomaterials to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is a derivative of Portland cement with similar chemical properties and was initially developed as a root filling material in dentistry. This material is presented characteristics of mechanical, physical and biological meaningful when applied to biological environment. It was used to search a commercial MTA manipulated with distilled water and propylene glycol in order to verify chemical composition, infrared absorption bands and stages in the samples. The MTA has been characterized by XRF, XRD and FTIR. In X-ray fluorescence was found that the MTA has a characteristic composition of hydraulic cement. Through FTIR MTA mixed with water presents an enlargement in the absorption bands in the region 1467 and 873 cm-1. By means of XRD showed that there is no presence of toxic materials in the majority and secondary phases. (author)

  19. Mineral trioxide aggregate-induced apical closure in nonvital immature permanent maxillary incisor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenu Bhola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of nonvital immature permanent teeth with calcium hydroxide is associated with few difficulties such as weakened tooth root, root canal reinfection, and long treatment time. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA apical plug method is an alternative treatment method for open apices and has gained popularity in the recent times. This case report describes the management of a late-referral case of periapically involved, traumatized immature permanent incisor by endodontic treatment and the use of MTA apical plug. After preparing the access cavity, the working length was determined. The root canals were irrigated with 3% sodium hypochlorite and disinfected with metapex for 2 weeks. MTA was then placed in the apical 3 mm of the root canal. The remaining part of the root canal was filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha, and the coronal restoration was finished with composite resin. After 1-year follow-up, radiograph showed successful healing of periradicular radiolucency.

  20. Management of immature teeth with apical infections using mineral trioxide aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic injuries to the young permanent teeth lead to devitalization of the pulp with concomitant arrest in further development of the immature root of the involved tooth. Hermetic seal of the root canal system during obturation is not possible in such cases, due to the lack of an apical constriction. The traditional management technique in such cases has been apexification involving induction of a calcific barrier at the apex using calcium hydroxide, which in turn facilitates obturation of the root canal. However this becomes complicated when there is persistent infection leading to periapical changes. This case report describes the use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA for management of a periapically compromised immature tooth.

  1. Evaluation of Properties of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with Methyl Cellulose as Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dianat, Omid; Naseri, Mandana; Tabatabaei, Seyedeh Farnaz

    2017-01-01

    Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is extensively used in endodontics. However, MTA is difficult to handle because of its granular consistency, low mechanical properties and initial looseness. The objective of this study was to assess the compressive strength (CS), diametral tensile strength (DTS), and pH of set MTA using methyl cellulose as liquid. White ProRoot MTA was used as the control group; modified MTA cement was prepared by mixing Portland cement, bismuth oxide and calcium sulfate (75%, 20% and 5%, respectively) as the experiment group. Methyl cellulose was used as hydrating liquid and compared with distilled water. The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA. The pH values of modified MTA cement set using deionized water and methyl cellulose were slightly, but not significantly, different (P>0.05). The DTS and CS tests for modified MTA cement hydrated with methyl cellulose showed a significant difference at one day and one week (PMTA.

  2. The effect of using propylene glycol as a vehicle on the microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem Milani, Amin; Banifatemeh, Alireza; Rahimi, Saeed; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari

    2015-01-01

    While it has been proven that the handling properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) are improved upon mixing it with propylene glycol (PG), this study sought to evaluate how PG affects the microhardness of MTA in terms of setting quality. MTA was mixed with different proportions of distilled water (DW) and PG to prepare 5 groups (n = 30). The DW/PG percent proportions used in Groups 1-5 were 100/0, 80/20, 50/50, 20/80, and 0/100, respectively. The mixed MTA was condensed into acrylic molds. Half of the samples of each group were evaluated on Day 4, the other half on Day 28. The results indicated that PG reduces the microhardness of MTA, thus adversely affecting its setting process. Group 2 (80% DW/20% PG) best improved the handling of MTA without a significant reduction in setting quality.

  3. Evaluation of the rat tissue reaction to experimental new resin cement and mineral trioxide aggregate cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Won-Kyung; Ko, Hyun-Jung

    2012-01-01

    Objectives New resin cement (NRC) has been developed as a root repairing material and the material is composed of organic resin matrix and inorganic powders. The aim of this study was to compare the rat subcutaneous tissue response to NRC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cement and to investigate the tissue toxicity of both materials. Materials and Methods Sixty rats received two polyethylene tube-implants in dorsal subcutaneous regions, MTA and NRC specimens. Twenty rats were sacrificed respectively at 1, 4 and 8 wk after implantation and sectioned to 5 µm thickness and stained with Hematoxylin-Eosin (H-E) or von-Kossa staining. The condition of tissue adjacent to the implanted materials and the extent of inflammation to each implant were evaluated by two examiners who were unaware of the type of implanted materials in the tissues. Data were statistically analyzed with paired t-test (p mineralization of the tissues. PMID:23429672

  4. Chemical and morphological characteristics of mineral trioxide aggregate and Portland cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shahbaz; Kaleem, Muhammad; Fareed, Muhammad Amber; Habib, Amir; Iqbal, Kefi; Aslam, Ayesha; Ud Din, Shahab

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition and particle morphology of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) and two white Portland cements (CEM 1 and CEM 2). Compositional analysis was performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and X-ray diffraction whereas, morphological characteristics were analyzed by scanning electron microscope and Laser scattering particle size distribution analyzer. The elemental composition of WMTA, CEM 1 and CEM 2 were similar except for the presence of higher amounts of bismuth in WMTA. Calcium oxide and silicon oxide constitute the major portion of the three materials whereas, tricalcium silicate was detected as the major mineral phase. The particle size distribution and morphology of WMTA was finer compared to CEM 1 and CEM 2. The three tested materials had relatively similar chemical composition and irregular particle morphologies.

  5. Management of External Invasive Cervical Resorption Tooth with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuja Ikhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive cervical resorption is entirely uncommon entities and the etiology is poorly understood. A 19 year old patient presented with fractured upper left central incisor and sinus tract opening on the distobuccal aspect in cervical region. Radiographic examination shows irregular radiolucency over the coronal one-third and it extended externally towards the external invasive resorption. After sectional obturation, the defect was accessed surgically. The resorption area was chemomechanically debrided using irrigant solution. Fibre post placement using flowable composite resin and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA was used to fill the resorptive defect, and the coronal access was temporarily sealed. Composite restoration was subsequently replaced with ceramic crown after 4 years. Radiographs at 1 and 4 years showed adequate repair of the resorption and endodontic success. Clinically and radiographically the tooth was asymptomatic, and no periodontal pocket was found after a 4-year followup.

  6. Study and characterization of ammonium diuranate and uranium trioxide by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dantas, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Thermogravimetry (TG), Differential Thermogravimetry (DTG) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) were used to characterize the thermal behavior of ammonium diuranate (ADU) and uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) produced at IPEN'S Chemical Enginnering Department. Compounds characterization was done using the molar ratios among the compounds and the oxides resulting from thermal decomposition. The TG and DTG curves registered for each sample were used for the determination of the following temperatures: - temperature of water evolution (free and crystallized water); - ammonia evolution and oxidation temperature; - ocluded ammonium nitrate decomposition temperature and - oxygen release temperature. The intermediate phases and their thermal stabilities were also identified by TG and DTG and confirmed by DSC curves, DSC curves showed also the exothermic and endothermic behavior of the processes involved. Finally, the great amount of data collected in this study can be handed as a guide by the professionals responsible for the operation of ADU,UO 3 and UF 4 pilot plants. (Author) [pt

  7. Comparing gray mineral trioxide aggregate and diluted formocresol in pulpotomized human primary molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zealand, Cameron M; Briskie, Daniel M; Botero, Tatiana M; Boynton, James R; Hu, Jan C C

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this multisite, multioperator, prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the 6-month outcomes of diluted formocresol (DFC) compared to gray mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) as pulpotomy medicament. Determined by a power analysis, 252 molars of 152 children were recruited. The teeth were randomly assigned to receive GMTA or DFC. At the 6-month follow-up, 118 children with 203 treated teeth were evaluated. Four blinded and calibrated evaluators scored each radiograph for pathologies. Clinical success was similar for DFC (97%) and GMTA (100%), (P<.09). Radiographic success differed significantly (P<.04) for DFC (86%) and GMTA (95%). Pulp canal obliteration was radiographically observed in 25% of the DFC group and in 37% of the GMTA group (P=.07). Dentin bridging was observed in 22% of the GMTA group but was not found in the DFC group (P<.01). Teeth treated with GMTA showed more favorable radiographic outcomes than DFC at 6 months post-treatment.

  8. Dissolution of a mineral trioxide aggregate sealer in endodontic solvents compared to conventional sealers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan ALZRAIKAT

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study is to evaluate the solubility of a Mineral Trioxide Aggregate sealer (MTA-Fillapex compared with five other sealers, calcium hydroxide (Sealapex, resin (Realseal, zinc oxide-eugenol (Tubli-Seal, and two epoxy resins (AH-26 and AH-Plus, in chloroform and eucalyptoil in static and ultrasonic environments. Samples of each sealer were prepared (n = 180 and then divided into 12 groups that were immersed in solvents for 5 and 10 min in static and ultrasonic environments. The mean weight loss was determined, and the values were compared using Student’s t-test, One-way ANOVA, and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test (p 0.05. In conclusion, MTA-Fillapex was not sufficiently dissolved in either solvent. Ultrasonic activation had limited effectiveness on MTA-Fillapex dissolution, whereas it significantly increased the efficiency of solvents in dissolving a number of endodontic sealers.

  9. Outcome of orthograde retreatment after failed apicoectomy: use of a mineral trioxide aggregate apical plug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Leo, Meltem; Michel, Annemarie; Gehrig, Holger; Saure, Daniel; Pfefferle, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    This controlled, single-center historic cohort study project evaluates treatment outcomes of a nonsurgical treatment approach after failed apicoectomy. The treatment outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment after a failed apicoectomy were evaluated clinically and radiographically. The study cohort consisted of teeth that had received primary root canal treatment and subsequent apicoectomy elsewhere before the patients presented with post-treatment disease. Orthograde retreatment and obturation using an apical mineral trioxide aggregate plug was performed by postgraduate students and endodontic specialists in 25 cases between 2004 and 2012. Pre-, intra-, and postoperative information and the potential effect on the retreatment outcome were evaluated and statistically analyzed using the chi-square test. Twenty-two patients with 23 teeth attended the follow-up examinations (recall rate = 92%). The follow-up periods ranged from 12 to 102 months (median = 35 months). Twenty teeth (87%) were classified as "success," and 3 teeth were considered (17%) "failure." The chi-square test confirmed that the preoperative factor "number of roots" had a statistically significant effect on treatment outcome (odds ratio = 0.08; 95% confidence interval, 0-1.76; P = .03). The factor "tooth location" was of borderline significance (odds ratio = 0.1; 95% confidence interval, 0-2.14; P = .05). The results of the present study suggest that orthograde retreatment combined with orthograde placement of an apical mineral trioxide aggregate plug is a promising long-term treatment option for teeth with postsurgical pathosis. The success rates were higher for single-rooted teeth. The use of cone-beam computed tomographic imaging in cases of inconclusive periapical radiographs is recommended to minimize the risk of misinterpretation when assessing treatment outcome. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mineral trioxide aggregate or calcium hydroxide direct pulp capping: an analysis of the clinical treatment outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Johannes; Geletneky, Beate; Ohle, Marc; Koch, Martin Jean; Friedrich Ding, Paul Georg; Wolff, Diana; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Martin, Nicolas; Staehle, Hans Joerg; Pfefferle, Thorsten

    2010-05-01

    The use of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) might improve the prognosis of teeth after pulp exposure. The treatment outcome of teeth after direct pulp capping, either with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) or calcium hydroxide (controls), was investigated, taking into account possible confounding factors. One hundred forty-nine patients treated between 2001 and 2006 who received direct pulp capping treatment in 167 teeth met the inclusion criteria. Treatment was performed by supervised undergraduate students (72%) and dentists (28%). Assessment of clinical and radiographic outcomes was performed by calibrated examiners 12-80 months after treatment (median, 27 months). One hundred eight patients (122 treated teeth) were available for follow-up (72.5% recall rate). A successful outcome was recorded for 78% of teeth (54 of 69) in the MTA group and for 60% of teeth (32 of 53) in the the calcium hydroxide group. The univariate analysis (generalized estimation equations model [GEE model] showed a significant difference in the success rate (odds ratio [OR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-5.32; P = .04). In the multiple analysis (GEE model), the OR is marginally inside the nonsignificant range (OR, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.19-1.02; P = .05) when conspicuous confounding factors are stabilized (univariate analysis). Multiple analysis showed that teeth that were permanently restored >or=2 days after capping had a significantly worse prognosis in both groups (OR, 0.24; 95% CI, 0.09-0.66; P = .01). MTA appears to be more effective than calcium hydroxide for maintaining long-term pulp vitality after direct pulp capping. The immediate and definitive restoration of teeth after direct pulp capping should always be aimed for. Copyright (c) 2010 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the bioactivity of fluoride-enriched mineral trioxide aggregate on osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, S; Brossart, J; Vach, K; Hellwig, E; Altenburger, M J; Karygianni, L

    2018-02-03

    To investigate whether a combination of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and fluoride compounds affects bone cells. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) discs (ProRoot ® , Dentsply Sirona, Ballaigues, Switzerland) with and without the addition of 0.1%, 0.25% and 0.5% sodium fluoride were characterized for their surface roughness by laser scanning microscopy and for the adhesion of human alveolar osteoblasts by scanning electron microscopy. Using eluates from fluoride-enriched MTA discs, the cell proliferation was measured by monitoring the DNA incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine. Further, gene expression was evaluated by qPCR arrays, extracellular matrix mineralization was quantified by absorption measurement of Alizarin red stains, and effects were calculated with repeated measures analysis and post hoc P-value adjustment. Irrespective of fluoride addition, cell adhesion was similar on MTA discs, of which the surface roughness was comparable. Control osteoblasts had a curvilinear proliferation pattern peaking at d5, which was levelled out by incubation with MTA. The addition of fluoride partly restored the MTA-related reduction in the cellular proliferation rate in a dose-dependent manner. At the mRNA level, both fluoride and MTA modulated a number of genes involved in osteogenesis, bone mineral metabolism and extracellular matrix formation. Although MTA significantly impaired extracellular matrix mineralization, the addition of fluoride supported the formation of mineralized nodules in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of fluoride modulated the biocompatibility of MTA in terms of supporting bone cell proliferation and hard tissue formation. Hence, fluoride enrichment is a trend-setting advancement for MTA-based endodontic therapies. © 2018 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Radiopacity of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate with and without Inclusion of Silver Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Mariana Ss; Resende, Leonardo D; Pinto, Cláudia A; Raldi, Denise P; Cardoso, Flavia Gr; Habitante, Sandra M

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inclusion of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) in the mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) composition to know which changes will result in the radiopacity of the material. The experiment was performed according to the American National Standard Institute/American Dental Association specification no. 57/2000 and ISO 6876/2001. Five plates with five holes measuring 1 mm in depth and 5 mm in internal diameter were filled according to the different experimental groups as follows: white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) + NP50 - W MTA with liquid Ag NP 50 ppm, WMTA + NP30 - W MTA with liquid Ag NP 30 ppm, WMTA + NP22 - W MTA with liquid Ag NP 22 ppm, WMTA + NPP - white MTA with liquid Ag NP and powder 1%, WMTA (control). After filling the plates, they were kept in an incubator at 37°C in relative humidity for setting. Each sample was positioned along an aluminum step-wedge placed above the Opteo digital sensor system. The image was divided into four quadrants, and three readings were made for each quadrant to render the average of each quadrant. The resulting data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's tests. The results showed statistically significant differences between WMTA + NP30, WMTA + NP22, and WMTA + NPP interactions compared with WMTA (control) (p MTA + NP50, and WMTA. Silver NPs changed the radiopacity of WMTA, being more evident in WMTA + NP powder at 1% weight. The low radiopacity of MTA makes it difficult for any radiographic observation. The Ag NPs appear as an alternative, being an excellent radiopacifier as they have excellent antimicrobial property and relatively low toxicity.

  13. Effect of temperature on the setting time of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, R; Araghid, A; Ghanem, S; Fatahi, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has numerous applications in dentistry due to various advantages. However, its long setting time has still remained a problem. The current study was conducted to investigate the effect of temperature (ambient and distilled water temperature) on the setting time of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Materials and methods: This experimental study comprised of two parts. In the first part, MTA and distilled water samples were kept at ambient temperature for 24 hours (before mixing: effect of distilled water temperature on the setting time of MTA and after mixing: effect of distilled water and ambient temperature on the setting time of MTA), and analyzed and divided into three groups: group 1 (4°C), group 2 (37°C) and group 3 (90°C). The mixed samples were placed in the glass cylinders with an internal diameter of 8 mm and a height of 10 mm, and kept at 37°C temperature and 100% humidity. In the second part, the samples were prepared the same as those of the first part and divided into three groups according to the terms of maintenance: group 1 (4°C), group 2 (37°C) and group 3 (75°C). The mixed samples were then put in glass cylinders with an internal diameter of 8 mm and a height of 10 mm and the samples of groups 1, 2 and 3 were kept at 4, 37 and 75 °C, respectively. At the end of each part, the primary and final setting times were measured by Gilmore needle. Data were analyzed by SPSS using Kruskal-Wallis test (pMTA for the samples of both parts of the study with an increase in ambient temperature (pMTA.

  14. Bond strength of mineral trioxide aggregate to root dentin after exposure to different irrigation solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagas, Emre; Cehreli, Zafer C; Uyanik, Mehmet Ozgur; Durmaz, Veli; Vallittu, Pekka K; Lassila, Lippo V J

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the regional push-out bond strength of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) after exposure to sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA), and peracetic acid (PAA) irrigation solutions. 1-mm-thick longitudinal slabs of root dentin were obtained from freshly extracted human canine teeth (n = 80). Simulated root perforation defects, 1 mm in diameter, were prepared in the coronal, middle, and apical thirds of radicular dentin. Mineral trioxide aggregate was placed into the cavities, and the specimens were stored for 1 week at 37°C. Thereafter, the specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the irrigation solution applied over the repair sites: Group 1-10 ml of 5.25% NaOCl for 10 min; Group 2-10 ml of 5.25% NaOCl for 10 min, followed by 5 ml 17% EDTA for 5 min; Group 3-10 ml of 5.25% NaOCl for 10 min, followed by application of 5 ml 1% PAA for 5 min; and Group 4-no irrigation. Push-out test was performed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Debonding values were compared statistically using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (P < 0.05). The push-out bond strength of MTA was not affected by the type of irrigation solution or location of the perforation defects (both P < 0.05). Stereomicroscopic inspection of the samples showed that the bond failure was predominantly adhesive. Exposure of repaired root perforations to 5.25% NaOCl, 17% EDTA, or 1% PAA does not alter the dislocation resistance of MTA at different locations of root dentin. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparison of two histopathologic methods for evaluating subcutaneous reaction to mineral trioxide aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Moradzadeh, Monir; Aghbali, Amirala; Rahimi, Saeed; Saghiri, Mohammadali; Zand, Vahid; Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Ranjkesh, Bahram; Doosti, Sirvan

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: One of the most important factors for suitable materials for pulp therapy is biocompatibility. Two histopathologic methods of Cox and Federation Dentaire International (FDI) were used to evaluate inflammation. In Cox method, density of inflammatory cells, tissue reactions like fibrosis, vascular responses like congestion and fibrin extravasation have been used to evaluate inflammatory reactions. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of pathologists’ interpretations using two different methods. Study design: Three pathologists observed the degree of inflammation in 225 histopathologic sections. These sections showed inflammation in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats adjacent to polyethylene tubes, filled with white or gray mineral trioxide aggregate. Empty tubes served as controls. Samples were harvested after 7-, 15-, 30-, 60-, and 90-days. All pathologists examined the sections under a light microscope (Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, Germany) at ×400 magnifications. Chi-Square test was used to evaluate the difference between inflammation grades when one pathologist used two methods. Cohen’s Kappa value was used to measure agreement of three pathologists to recognize the degrees of inflammations when using one of the methods. Results: There were no significant differences between the two methods when one of the pathologist used these methods to report the degree of inflammation (p=0.054). However, two other pathologists reported significant differences between two methods (p=0.005, p=0.001). In the FDI method, there was an acceptable agreement between first and second, and first and third pathologist in terms of the degree of inflammation, and intermediate agreement existed between the second and third pathologist. With the Cox method, no agreement among the pathologists could be found. Conclusion: The results of three pathologists in terms of rating inflammation with the FDI method showed better agreement than with the Cox method

  16. The effectiveness of mineral trioxide aggregate, calcium hydroxide and formocresol for pulpotomies in primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, A B S; Sakai, V T; Oliveira, T M; Fornetti, A P C; Santos, C F; Machado, M A A M; Abdo, R C C

    2008-07-01

    To compare the effectiveness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), calcium hydroxide (CH) and formocresol (FC) as pulp dressing agents in carious primary teeth. Forty-five primary mandibular molars with dental caries in 23 children [AUTHOR QUERY: How many children?] between 5 and 9 years old were treated by a conventional pulpotomy technique. The teeth were randomly assigned to the experimental (CH or MTA) or control (FC) groups. After coronal pulp removal and haemostasis, remaining pulp tissue was covered with MTA paste or CH powder in the experimental groups. In the control group, diluted FC was placed with a cotton pellet over the pulp tissue for 5 min and removed; the pulp tissue was then covered with zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) paste. All teeth were restored with reinforced ZOE base and resin modified glass-ionomer cement. Clinical and radiographic successes and failures were recorded at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 month follow-up. Forty-three teeth were available for follow-up. In the FC and MTA groups, 100% of the available teeth were clinically and radiographically successful at all follow-up appointments; dentine bridge formation could be detected in 29% of the teeth treated with MTA. In the CH group, 64% of the teeth presented clinical and radiographic failures detected throughout the follow-up period, and internal resorption was a frequent radiographic finding. Mineral trioxide aggregate was superior to CH and equally as effective as FC as a pulpotomy dressing in primary mandibular molars. Internal resorption was the most common radiographic finding up to 24 month after pulpotomies performed with CH.

  17. Scattering of elastic waves by thin inclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    A solution is derived for the elastic waves scattered by a thin inclusion. The solution is asymptotically valid as inclusion thickness tends to zero with the other dimensions and the frequency fixed. The method entails first approximating the total field in the inclusion in terms of the incident wave by enforcing the appropriate continuity conditions on traction and displacement across the interface, then using these displacements and strains in the volume integral that gives the scattered field. Expressions are derived for the far-field angular distributions of P and S waves due to an incident plane P wave, and plots are given for normalized differential cross sections of an oblate spheroidal tungsten carbide inclusion in a titanium matrix

  18. Gas-chromism in ultrasonic spray pyrolyzed tungsten oxide thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are more resistive than W or WO2 (Rogers et al 1969). Additionally, the variable amount of hydration content in the films is responsible for these discrepancies. The resistance drop in the presence of hydrogen is asso- ciated with the colouration while increase in resistance after the introduction of oxygen is associated with ...

  19. Investigation of the helium effects on deuterium retention in thin film lithium coatings on tungsten substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, A. L.; Allain, J. P.; Morgan, T. W.

    2017-10-01

    In a burning fusion plasma, the materials on the walls of the plasma vessel will have a significant effect on the performance of the plasma. Any amount of high Z wall material that is eroded will contaminate and cool the plasma and may lead to a disruption. Additionally, if the material retains or reflects fuel it can affect the stability of the plasma. A high recycling wall that retains minimal fuel will allow better control of the fuel inventory, especially tritium, in the walls. In contrast, a low recycling wall leads to improved plasma performance by preventing instabilities in the plasma. We have observed that when 5% He is added to D ions during low flux (1017 m-2s-1) dual ion beam irradiation the amount of D retained in the Li film diminishes. This conclusion is based on the reduction of a XPS peak (at 533 eV) associated with D retention in Li films. To further investigate this phenomenon, we have continued the dual beam studies in IGNIS (Ion-Gas-Neutral Interactions with Surfaces) by varying the energy and concentration of He to D. Additionally, we exposed lithiated W to sequential D and He plasmas (1024 m-2s-1 flux) in Magnum PSI at DIFFER. With XPS, we analyzed the chemistry of the Li films and determined changes in retention. These results will be presented. Work supported by DOE contract DE-SC0010719.

  20. Gas-chromism in ultrasonic spray pyrolyzed tungsten oxide thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amorphous glass substrates kept at 250°C. The films were further annealed at 400°C for 4 h in air. X-ray diffrac- tion (XRD) technique ... The gas-induced electrical and optical properties of Pt/WO3/glass samples were studied and results reported. .... from coloured W5+ states, and can occupy the oxygen vacancy. Thereby ...

  1. Ferroelectric Tungsten Bronze Bulk Crystals and Epitaxial Thin Films for Electro-Optic Device Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-01

    system PKN-BNN 44 Fig. 14 Different size and shape SBN:60 crystals used for photo- refractive studies 49 Fig, 15 Diffraction pattern ...shown in Fig. 3, the striae pattern of crystals sectioned and polished parallel to the growth axis (001) clearly show that the growth under rapidly...field En applied orthogonal to the c axis, the change in the principal birefringence is given by An^ B 1 "\\lh ( 4) Using the conoscopic figure for

  2. Thin films of molecular materials synthesized from fisher's carbene ferrocenyl: Film formation and electrical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Vergara, M.E. [Coordinacion de Ingenieria Mecatronica. Escuela de Ingenieria, Universidad Anahuac del Norte. Avenida Lomas de la Anahuac s/n, Col. Lomas Anahuac, 52786, Huixquilucan (Mexico)], E-mail: elena.sanchez@anahuac.mx; Ortiz, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. A. P. 70-360, 04510, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Alvarez-Toledano, C.; Moreno, A. [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Alvarez, J.R. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Ciudad de Mexico. Calle del Puente 222, Col. Ejidos de Huipulco, 14380, Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2008-07-31

    The synthesis of materials from Fisher's carbene ferrocenyl of the elements chromium, molybdenum and tungsten was carried out. The Fisher's compounds that were synthesized included the following combinations of two different metallic atoms: iron with chromium, iron with molybdenum and iron with tungsten. The molecular solids' preparation was done in electro-synthesis cells with platinum electrodes. Thin films were prepared by vacuum thermal evaporation on quartz substrates and crystalline silicon wafers. Pellets and thin films from these compounds were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry. The powder and thin films synthesized from these materials show the same intra-molecular bonds shown by infrared spectroscopy results, suggesting that thermal evaporation does not alter these bonds in spite of the thin films being amorphous, in contrast with other bimetallic complexes where material decomposition occurs. The differences in the conductivity values of the prepared films are very small, so they may be attributed to the different metallic ions employed in each case. The tungsten complex exhibits a higher conductivity than the molybdenum and chromium complexes at room temperature. Electrical conductivity values found for thin films are higher than for pellets made of the same molecular materials.

  3. Complexes of molybdenum (6) and tungsten (6) with ethanolamines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgin, S.V.; Felin, M.G.; Subbotina, N.A.; Spitsyn, V.I. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1982-05-01

    The compounds, containing the coordination amino alcohol molecules are prepared by interaction of molybdic and tungstic acids with mono-, di- and triethanolamines. The composition and the structure of the separated complexes are proposed on the base of the data of element analysis, infrated spectroscopy, thermography. All the prepared products are non-soluble in the organic solvents, but dissolve in the water, except the product of tungstic acid and triethanolamine interaction. On the base of thermal analysis data, the all substances, with exception of MEAN/sub 2/(WO/sub 3/MEA), have similar thermogramms, on which the initial endoeffect, which concern removal of the NH/sub 3/ molecule, clearly defines. Then the decomposition of organic part of the molecule with the formation of complex products (if the decomposition takes place in nitrogen flow), takes place. At the decomposition in the air the final product is the corresponding trioxide.

  4. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Li, J.-F.; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2001-01-01

    Since the cold neutron source intensity of KENS (the spallation neutron source at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) was decreased into about a third of the designed value because a cadmium liner at the cold neutron source deformed and obstructed the neutron beam line, the target-moderator-and-reflector assembly (TMRA) has been replaced by a new one aimed at improving the neutron performance and recovering the cold neutron source. The tantalum target has also been replaced by a tantalum-clad tungsten one. In order to bond the tantalum-clad with the tungsten block, a hot isostatic press (HIP) process was applied and optimized. It was found that gaseous interstitial impurity elements severely attacked tantalum and embrittled, and that the getter materials such as zirconium and tantalum were effective to reduce the embrittlement

  5. Field electron emission from dense array of microneedles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Aoyagi, M.; Kitai, T.; Ishikawa, K.

    1978-01-01

    Characteristics of field electron emission from the dense array of microneedles of tungsten prepared on a 10-μm tungsten filament were measured at an environmental pressure of approx.1 x 10 -8 Torr (1.33 x 10 -6 Pa). Electron emission was not uniform over the filament surface, but the variation of emission current with applied voltage explicitly obeyed the Fowler-Nordheim relationship. At an emission current of approx.10 -4 A, a vacuum arc was induced that led to a permanent change in current-voltage characteristic. Current fluctuation was dependent on emitter temperature and applied voltage, and the lowest fluctuation of about 4% was routinely obtained at approx.550 K and at applied voltages several percent lower than the arc-inducing voltage. Macroscopic current density amounted to approx.20-80 mA/cm 2 at the best stability

  6. First-principles study on migration of vacancy in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhiro; Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    We calculated di-vacancy binding energies and migration energies of mono-vacancy and di-vacancy in tungsten material using DFT calculation. The mono-vacancy diffuses in [111] direction easily rather than in [001] direction. The migration energies of di-vacancies are almost the same value of the mono-vacancy. The migration of di-vacancy is approximately the same as the migration of mono-vacancy. The di-vacancy binding energies are almost zero or negative. The interactions between two vacancies in tungsten material are repulsive from the second to fifth nearest-neighbor. The vacancies are difficult to aggregate since di-vacancy is less stable than mono-vacancy. (author)

  7. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  8. Characterization of tungsten silicides formed by rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, M.; Santiago, J.J.; VanDerSpiegel, J.

    1986-01-01

    Tungsten silicide samples were formed by sputter depositing 80 nm W metal onto (100) oriented, 5 ohm-cm Si wafers. After deposition, the samples were fast radiatively processed in an RTA system using quartz-halogen tungsten lamps as radiation sources for time intervals ranging from 20 to 60s under high vacuum. Films processed at 22-25 W/cm 2 radiation with the film side of the samples oriented away from the lamps result in films which are metallic or cloudy in color, and have mixed composition as evidenced by x-ray diffraction (W, W 5 Si 3 and WSi 2 ). Films processed with the film side oriented toward the lamps show the occurrence of a phase transformation clearly nucleated at the film edge

  9. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.N. Taylor; M. Shimada; D.W. Akers; M.W. Drigert; B.J. Merrill; Y. Hatano

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter, 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in the tritium plasma experiment (TPE) at 100, 200 and 500ºC to a total fluence of 1 x 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize damage and retention. We present the first known results of neutron damaged tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ~58 µm and through the entire 200 µm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and the calibration of DB-PAS to NRA data are presented.

  10. Tungsten-182 heterogeneity in modern ocean island basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundl, Andrea; Touboul, Mathieu; Jackson, Matthew G.; Day, James M. D.; Kurz, Mark D.; Lekic, Vedran; Helz, Rosalind T.; Walker, Richard J.

    2017-04-01

    New tungsten isotope data for modern ocean island basalts (OIB) from Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland reveal variable 182W/184W, ranging from that of the ambient upper mantle to ratios as much as 18 parts per million lower. The tungsten isotopic data negatively correlate with 3He/4He. These data indicate that each OIB system accesses domains within Earth that formed within the first 60 million years of solar system history. Combined isotopic and chemical characteristics projected for these ancient domains indicate that they contain metal and are repositories of noble gases. We suggest that the most likely source candidates are mega-ultralow-velocity zones, which lie beneath Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland but not beneath hot spots whose OIB yield normal 182W and homogeneously low 3He/4He.

  11. High-temperature brazing for reliable tungsten-CFC joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppitz, Th; Pintsuk, G; Reisgen, U; Remmel, J; Hirai, T; Sievering, R; Rojas, Y; Casalegno, V

    2007-01-01

    The joining of tungsten and carbon-based materials is demanding due to the incompatibility of their chemical and thermophysical properties. Direct joining is unfeasible by the reason of brittle tungsten carbide formation. High-temperature brazing has been investigated in order to find a suitable brazing filler metal (BFM) which successfully acts as an intermediary between the incompatible properties of the base materials. So far only low Cr-alloyed Cu-based BFMs provide the preferential combination of good wetting action on both materials, tolerable interface reactions, and a precipitation free braze joint. Attempts to implement a higher melting metal (e.g. Pd, Ti, Zr) as a BFM have failed up to now, because the formation of brittle precipitations and pores in the seam were inevitable. But the wide metallurgical complexity of this issue is regarded to offer further joining potential

  12. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer (μM) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 μm W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 μm W powder blends; 10μm W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W

  13. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin, E-mail: shuxlin@buaa.edu.cn; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-15

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  14. R&D of the CEPC scintillator-tungsten ECAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, M. Y.

    2018-03-01

    The circular electron and positron collider (CEPC) was proposed as a future Higgs factory. To meet the physics requirements, a particle flow algorithm-oriented calorimeter system with high energy resolution and precise reconstruction is considered. A sampling calorimeter with scintillator-tungsten sandwich structure is selected as one of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) options due to its good performance and relatively low cost. We present the design, the test and the optimization of the scintillator module read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), including the design and the development of the electronics. To estimate the performance of the scintillator and SiPM module for particles with different energy, the beam test of a mini detector prototype without tungsten shower material was performed at the E3 beams in Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP). The results are consistent with the expectation. These studies provide a reference and promote the development of particle flow electromagnetic calorimeter for the CEPC.

  15. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He+ implanted into tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhang; Yoshida, N.; Iwakiri, H.; Xu Zengyu

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten divertor plates in fusion reactors will be subject to helium bombardment. Helium retention and thermal desorption is a concerned issue in controlling helium ash. In the present study, fluence dependence of thermal desorption behavior of helium in tungsten was studied at different irradiation temperatures and ion energies. Results showed that helium desorption could start at ∼400 K with increasing fluence, while no noticeable peaks were detected at low fluence. Total helium desorption reached a saturation value at high fluence range, which was not sensitive to irradiation temperature or ion energy for the conditions evaluated. Surface modifications caused by either ion irradiation or thermal desorption were observed by SEM. The relationship of surface modifications and helium desorption behavior was discussed. Some special features of elevated irradiation temperature and lower ion energy were also indicated

  16. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  17. Reflectivity modulation with LixWO3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arntz, F.O.; Berera, G.; Goldner, R.B; Haas, T.E.; Moprel, B.

    1990-01-01

    One potentially improtant application for electrochromic (and other solid-state ionic)thin films is as the electrochemically-controlled reflectivity-modulated layer in smart window glass (or smart windows). In principle, smart windows can be operated in either of two modes: absorptivity modulation or reflectivity modulation. The feasibility of utilizing polycrystalline (pc) tungsten bronze films, M x WO 3 (M = H, Li), to obtain spectrally selective reflectivity modulation has been previously demonstrated. The question addressed in this paper is to determine the upper bound for the near infrared reflectivity modulation of pc-Li x WO 3 films

  18. Structural, mechanical, and tribological characterization of sol-gel layers with inbedded anorganic fullerene-like tungsten-disulphide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattermann, Hilke

    2010-01-01

    The preparation of composite coatings consisting of different materials with improved properties has been an intensively studied area of thin film technology in recent years. One method to prepare such composite coatings is the incorporation of nano or micro particles into a matrix of a different material. In this thesis, such composite coatings are investigated which have been prepared via a sol-gel route und contain up to about 30 wt.-% tungsten disulfide particles. These inorganic fullerenes have typical particle sizes of about 100 nm to 200 nm. Two different types of composite coatings with a thickness of up to a few micrometers and with embedded tungsten disulfide particles are prepared: First, coatings with a relatively stiff alumina matrix, and second, coatings with a matrix made of organically modified silica. Different analytical methods are used for the structural characterization of the coatings. The crystal structure and the chemical composition of the coatings are determined via X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence measurements and via energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Through scanning and transmission electron microscopy the incorporation and the distribution of the tungsten disulfide particles in the respective matrix are analysed. Furthermore, the roughness and the adhesion of the coatings on the substrate are investigated. The influence of the embedded particles and of the temperature of the final heat treatment during the sample preparation on the mechanical properties, like elastic modulus and hardness, of the composite coatings are measured through nanoindentation testing. These experimental results are compared with theoretical values determined via different analytical models for effective materials. Finally, the tribological behavior of the composite coatings is investigated in comparison to pure coatings made of alumina or organically modified silica. With ball-on-disc tests the coefficient of friction of the coatings is measured

  19. A study of structural and mechanical properties of nano-crystalline tungsten nitride film synthesis by plasma focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussnain, Ali; Singh Rawat, Rajdeep; Ahmad, Riaz; Hussain, Tousif; Umar, Z. A.; Ikhlaq, Uzma; Chen, Zhong; Shen, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Nano-crystalline tungsten nitride thin films are synthesized on AISI-304 steel at room temperature using Mather-type plasma focus system. The surface properties of the exposed substrate against different deposition shots are examined for crystal structure, surface morphology and mechanical properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope, field emission scanning electron microscope and nano-indenter. The XRD results show the growth of WN and WN2 phases and the development of strain/stress in the deposited films by varying the number of deposition shots. Morphology of deposited films shows the significant change in the surface structure with different ion energy doses (number of deposition shots). Due to the effect of different ion energy doses, the strain/stress developed in the deposited film leads to an improvement of hardness of deposited films.

  20. Erosion of nanostructured tungsten by laser ablation, sputtering and arcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogyun Hwangbo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss of nanostructured tungsten, which was formed by helium plasma irradiation, due to laser ablation, sputtering, and arcing was investigated. Below the helium sputtering energy threshold (200eV. Reduction in sputtering on nanostructured surface was observed. Arcing was initiated using laser pulses, and the erosion rate by arcing was measured. The erosion rate increased with arc current, while the erosion per Coulomb was not affected by arc current.

  1. Width of electromagnetic wave instability spectrum in tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkevich, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of high-frequency signal modulation and spectrum analysis of the envelope a measurement of spectrum width for electromagnetic wave instability was carried out under conditions of current pulse action on tungsten plate in magnetic field. The existence of amplitude-frequency wave modulation was revealed. The width of current disturbance spectrum in a specimen was evaluated. Current disturbances are shown to cause the instability of electromagnetic wave. 11 refs.; 6 figs

  2. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Copper and Mild Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel T; Timotius P; Maziar R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, copper and mild steel were welded using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. To determine the weldablity factor, tests are needed to provide information on mechanical strength, potential defects in structure, and nature of failure. Mechanical testing included transverse tensile tests, micro hardness tests, and bend tests. The results for the transverse tensile test revealed failure occurred at the copper heat affected zone (HAZ) with an ultimate tensile strength of 220MPa...

  3. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Neu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux component asks for an increase of their operational range towards higher temperature in case of Cu/CuCrZr and lower temperatures for W. A remedy for both issues- brittleness of W and degrading strength of CuCrZr- could be the use of W fibres (Wf in W and Cu based composites. Fibre preforms could be manufactured with industrially viable textile techniques. Flat textiles with a combination of 150/70 µm W wires have been chosen for layered deposition of tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten (Wf/W samples and tubular multi-layered braidings with W wire thickness of 50 µm were produced as a preform for tungsten-fibre reinforced copper (Wf /Cu tubes. Cu melt infiltration was performed together with an industrial partner resulting in sample tubes without any blowholes. Property estimation by mean field homogenisation predicts strongly enhanced strength of the Wf/CuCrZr composite compared to its pure CuCrZr counterpart. Wf /W composites show very high toughness and damage tolerance even at room temperature. Cyclic load tests reveal that the extrinsic toughening mechanisms counteracting the crack growth are active and stable. FEM simulations of the Wf/W composite suggest that the influence of fibre debonding, which is an integral part of the toughening mechanisms, and reduced thermal conductivity of the fibre due to the necessary interlayers do not strongly influence the thermal properties of future components.

  4. Far-infrared spectroscopy of thermally annealed tungsten silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiotti, M.; Borghesi, A.; Guizzetti, G.; Nava, F.; Santoro, G.

    1991-01-01

    The far-infrared transmittance spectrum of tungsten silicide has been observed for the first time. WSi 2 polycrystalline films were prepared by coevaporation and chemical-vapour deposition on silicon wafers, and subsequently thermally annealed at different temperatures. The observed structures are interpreted, on the basis of the symmetry properties of the crystal, such as infrared-active vibrational modes. Moreover, the marked lineshape dependence on annealing temperature enables this technique to analyse the formation of the solid silicide phases

  5. Hydroxyaromatic compounds of tantalum, tungsten, and the lighter actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfaller, H.

    1980-01-01

    Some hydroxyaromatic compounds of the elements tantalum, tungsten, thorium and uranium were prepared as well as the basic materials for these synthesis processes, i.e. metal halides and metal alkoxides. The hydroxyaromatic compounds were studied by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1 H-NMR spectroscopy (if soluble in suitable solvents) and, in some cases, by X-ray fine structure analysis. (orig./EF) [de

  6. Refining waste hardmetals into tungsten oxide nanosheets via facile method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhifei; Zheng, Guangwei; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Li, Hongyi, E-mail: lhy06@bjut.edu.cn; Wu, Junshu; Du, Yucheng [Beijing University of Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-04-15

    A new hydrothermal system has been designed to recycle waste WC–Co hardmetal with low cobalt (Co) content (3 %). In the solution system, nitric acid was designed to dissolve Co, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} served as oxidant to accelerate the oxidation of the WC–Co hardmetals, and fluorine (F{sup −}) was designed to dissolve and recrystallize generated tungsten oxides, which were found to possess a layered structure using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The obtained tungsten oxides were identified as WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O by X-ray diffraction and their specific surface area was measured as 89.2 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} via N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption techniques. The present layered structure tungsten oxides exhibited a promising capability for removing lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}) and organic species, such as methyl blue. The adsorption model was found to be in agreement with Langmuir isotherm model. Given the facile synthesis procedure and promising properties of final products, this new approach should have great potential for refining some other waste hardmetals or tungsten products.Graphical AbstractA new hydrothermal system was designed to recycle waste hardmetal with low cobalt content. Through this method, waste hardmetal was refined into WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O nanosheets which shows excellent adsorption capacities toward methylene blue and lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}).

  7. USE OF TITANIUM AND TUNGSTEN AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO GOLD IN JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Y.R. Surnam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study the use titanium and tungsten as alternatives to the noble metals in the jewellery industry was investigated. The degradation of titanium and tungsten were compared to that of gold, used as reference. Alternate immersion tests were performed in 3.5% sodium chloride and artificial perspiration. The metals’ abrasion resistance with respect to textile fabrics was determined. In general, there is around 30% difference in pit density for titanium and tungsten as compared to that of gold. Pit depth and pit diameter showed a similar trend. From the abrasive test performed, it was observed that titanium and tungsten had insignificant changes in the surface reflectivity with time. Hence, it was deduced that titanium and tungsten products would have longer maintenance intervals than that of gold. New tools and techniques, however, would be required by jewellers to work with titanium and tungsten.  

  8. Arsenic trioxide: impact on the growth and differentiation of cancer cells and possible use in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Hoffman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic trioxide (As2O3 has recently been identified as an effective drug in different types of cancer therapy. It is a useful pharmacological agent in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL treatment, especially the form that is resistant to conventional chemotherapy with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA. What is more, laboratory data suggest that As2O3 is also active when it comes to several solid tumor cell lines. However, the mechanism of action is not fully understood. As2O3 in high doses triggers apoptosis, while in lower concentrations it induces partial differentiation. The As2O3 mechanism of action involves effects on mitochondrial transmembrane potential which lead to apoptosis. It also acts on the activity of JNK kinase, glutathione, caspases, NF-ĸB nuclear factor or pro- and antiapoptotic proteins. This publication presents the current knowledge about the influence of arsenic trioxide in cancer cells.

  9. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A; Donaldson, N

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its 'inertness' and 'stability' common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W 6+ , typically represented by the orthotungstate [Formula: see text] (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal's unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  10. Flow behaviour of a heat treated tungsten heavy alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Jiten; Sarkar, R.; Rao, G. Appa; Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K.; Pabi, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An Arrhenius type of constitutive equation is proposed for the investigated alloy. ► Peierl's controlled dislocation motion is observed at low temperature. ► Transition from Peierl's to forest controlled mechanism is observed at 673 K. ► At room temperature predominantly tungsten grain, cleavage fracture is observed. ► At elevated temperature predominantly intergranular fracture is observed. - Abstract: Flow behaviour of a tungsten heavy alloy was studied in the strain rate-temperature range of 10 −5 –1/s and 298–973 K, respectively. It was observed in this study that the dislocation motion in tungsten heavy alloy was controlled by a Peierl's mechanism at low temperatures (up to 573 K). This was confirmed by the magnitude of apparent activation volume and apparent activation enthalpy as well as TEM observations. Apparent activation enthalpy in the Peierls regime, determined by several methods, was found to vary in between 22 and 37 kJ/mol. An Arrhenius type of constitutive equation was also proposed in the Peierls controlled regime for predicting flow stress as a function of temperature and strain rate. Transition temperature of rate controlling mechanism—from Peierl's mechanism to forest mechanism—was determined from the strain rate sensitivity and apparent activation volume estimation at several temperatures. The transition temperature was found to be about 673 K.

  11. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Bombaci, S.A.; Garrard, W.N.C.; Moore, B.T.; Smith, B.S.

    1988-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of tungsten and high-density tungsten alloys (W ≥ 90 weight %) has been examined electrochemically through anodic polarization measurements, instantaneous corrosion rate measurements, galvanic coupling, and surface potential mapping. In the anodic polarization tests, pure tungsten and the four alloys studied underwent transitions from an active state to a state where any further increase in potential produced no further increase in current. The presence of chloride ions increased corrosion rates. Predictions of likely trends in corrosion rates from the above electrochemical tests were not in complete agreement with those obtained by the long-term immersion tests. Similarly, a consistent prediction of the likely nature of the corrosion products that would result from long-term immersion testing was not obtained from the above studies. Predictions about which alloys would be susceptible to a crevice effect were in agreement with the immersion testing results, namely those alloys not containing Cu would be the most susceptible. Some insight into the nature of the corrosion mechanism is afforded by the work on galvanic coupling and surface potential mapping. This supported the view that galvanic corrosion plays a part in the corrosion process. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 19 figs

  12. Deuterium retention in tungsten films after different heat treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Jacob, W.; Elgeti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten films deposited by magnetron sputtering on polycrystalline tungsten substrates were used as a model system to study the influence of the film microstructure on deuterium retention behavior. Different microstructures were produced by annealing the films up to recrystallization temperature and the corresponding structural changes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning. The influence of the induced structural changes on D retention was investigated by both nuclear reaction analysis and temperature-programmed desorption. D concentration in the investigated W films is higher than in polycrystalline bulk tungsten by a factor of 3. D retention in the films decreases as a function of annealing temperature. After annealing at 2000 K, FIB cross-section images reveal that cavities appeared at the grain boundaries within the film and at the initial interface between the W film and W substrate. This new microstructure strongly affects the D depth profile and leads to the increase of D retention. Although a further increase of the holding time at 2000 K or an increase of the annealing temperature to 2150 K lead to the reduction of the retained D amount, the D concentration in the recrystallized W films cannot be reduced to a level as low as that of bulk W recrystallized at 2000 K for 30 min.

  13. Extraction Factor Of Pure Ammonium Paratungstate From Tungsten Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical oxidation process of tungsten scraps was modified by the rotary kiln with oxygen burner to increase the oxidation rate of tungsten scraps. Also to accelerate the solubility of solid oxidized products, the hydrothermal reflux method was adapted. By heating tungsten scraps in rotary kiln with oxygen burner at around 900° for 2hrs, the scraps was oxidized completely. Then oxidized products (WO3 and CoWO4 was fully dissolved in the solution of NaOH by hydrothermal reflux method at 150° for 2hrs. The dissolution rate of oxidized products was increased with increasing the reaction temperature and concentration of NaOH. And then CaWO4 and H2WO4 could be generated from the aqueous sodium tungstate solution. Ammonium paratungstate (APT also could be produced from tungstic acid using by aqueous ammonium solution. The morphologies (cubic and plate types of APT was controlled by the stirring process of purified solution of ammonium paratungstate.

  14. Closed-cage tungsten oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D M David Jeba; Pradeep, T; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2010-05-06

    During the course of a study on the clustering of W-Se and W-S mixtures in the gas phase using laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, we observed several anionic W-O clusters. Three distinct species, W(6)O(19)(-), W(13)O(29)(-), and W(14)O(32)(-), stand out as intense peaks in the regular mass spectral pattern of tungsten oxide clusters suggesting unusual stabilities for them. Moreover, these clusters do not fragment in the postsource decay analysis. While trying to understand the precursor material, which produced these clusters, we found the presence of nanoscale forms of tungsten oxide. The structure and thermodynamic parameters of tungsten clusters have been explored using relativistic quantum chemical methods. Our computed results of atomization energy are consistent with the observed LDI mass spectra. The computational results suggest that the clusters observed have closed-cage structure. These distinct W(13) and W(14) clusters were observed for the first time in the gas phase.

  15. Brazing molybdenum and tungsten for high temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Turner, W.C.; Hoffman, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to develop vacuum brazes for molybdenum and tungsten which can be used in seal joint applications up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F). Joints were attempted in molybdenum, tungsten and tungsten--molybdenum. The braze materials included: Ti--10Cr powder, Ti--30V wire, Ti--65V wire, V wire, Ni electroplate, MoB--50MoC powder mixture, V--50Mo powder mixture, Mo--15MoB 2 powder mixture and Mo--49V--15MoB 2 powder mixture. Braze temperature ranged from 1900 K (1627 C, 2961 F) to 2530 K, (2257 C, 4095 F), and leak-tight joints were made with all braze materials except Ti--10Cr. After heat treatments up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F) Kirkendall voiding was found to cause leakage of some of the joints made with only substitutional alloying elements. However, adding base metal powders to the braze or narrowing the root opening eliminated this problem. Kirkendall voiding was not a problem when interstitial elements were a major ingredient in the braze material. Shear testing of Ti--65V, V, MoB--50MoC and V--50Mo brazed molybdenum at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) indicated strengths equal to or better than the base metal. Ti--65V, V--50Mo and MoB--50MoC brazed joints were exposed to basalt at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) for 3 h without developing leaks

  16. The thermal accommodation of helium and argon on hot tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments are described in which the momentum flux of gas atoms, remitted normal to the surface of a hot clean tungsten ribbon immersed in a low pressure of helium or argon, is measured with a torsion balance and the thermal accommodation coefficient deduced. Data are presented in which the tungsten temperature range was 700 to 1900 K for helium and 1100 to 1700 K for argon. A model is proposed which assumes that atoms impinging on and remitted from the hot tungsten ribbon conserve momentum in directions parallel to the surface. This results in a remitted flux, in the direction of the normal, greater than the cosine emission relation would predict. The resulting accommodation coefficients are then of the same order as those found using the total heat loss method. The accuracy of the reported method increases with the temperature of the hot solid. Measurement of translational thermal accommodation is possible without relying on the temperature coefficient of resistance of the solid and hence is applicable to alloys and to non-metals. For metals, which have a normal temperature coefficient of resistance, the method allows translational accommodation to be measured and internal energy accommodation to be deduced. (U.K.)

  17. Extractive separation and spectrophotometric determination of tungsten as phosphotungsten blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatirajam, V.; Dhamija, S.

    1977-01-01

    Phosphotungsten blue is produced by tin(II) reduction of tungstate solution complexed with phosphate at a w/w ratio of W/P = 5, in 4M hydrochloric acid medium, and extracted with isoamyl alcohol; thus tungsten is separated from Fe(III), Ni, Co, Cr(III), V(V), As(V), Sb(III), Bi, Si, U(VI), Ca and Cu(II). In presence of bismuth (0.5 mg/ml), >= 99.7% W is separated in a single extraction. After alkaline back-extraction, tungsten is determined spectrophotometrically as phosphotungsten blue; it is measured at 930 nm in aqueous solution or at 900 to 960 nm after isoamyl alcohol extraction, the Beer's law ranges being 0.08 to 0.6 and 0.16 to 0.72 mg/ml respectively. The methods are shown to give satisfactory results in the analysis of practical samples containing some milligrams of tungsten. (author)

  18. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A.; Donaldson, N.

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its ‘inertness’ and ‘stability’ common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W6+, typically represented by the orthotungstate WO42- (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal’s unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  19. Comparative investigation of clinical/radiographical signs of mineral trioxide aggregate and formocresol on pulpotomized primary molars

    OpenAIRE

    Hugar, Shivayogi M.; Deshpande, Shobha D.

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) to evaluate clinically and radiographically the effects of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as a pulp dressing after coronal pulp amputation (pulpotomy) in primary molars, (2) to compare the effects of MTA and formocresol in pulpotomized primary teeth. Sixty primary mandibular molars of thirty healthy children aged between 5-8 years were treated by conventional pulpotomy technique. The teeth on the right side are assigned to MTA (Group A) and the left sid...

  20. Effect of Biomineralization Ability on Push-out Strength of Proroot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Branco, and Calcium Phosphate Cement on Dentin: An In vitro Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vanita D; Prathap, M S; Shetty, K Harish Kumar; Shahul, Azmin; Sahana, K

    2017-11-01

    Biomineralization is a process which leads to the formation of an interfacial layer with tag-like structures at the cement-dentin interface. It is due to interaction of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and Portland cement with dentin in phosphate-buffered solution (PBS). This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of influence of biomineralization process on push-out bond strength of ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK, USA), MTA Branco (Angelus Soluc¸o˜es Odontolo´gicas, Londrina, PR, Brazil) and calcium phosphate cement (BioGraft CPC). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of biomineralization process on the push-out strength of ProRoot MTA, MTA Branco, and CPC after mixing with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate solution (0.2% CHX) and 2% lidocaine solution (2% LA) on the bond strength of MTA-dentin. Dentin discs with uniform cavities were restored with ProRoot MTA, MTA Branco, and calcium phosphate cement after mixing with 0.2% CHX solution and 2% lidocaine solution. The samples were uniformly distributed into two groups. Experimental group being immersed in PBS solution and control group being immersed in saline for 2 months. Instron testing machine (Model 4444; Instron Corp., Canton, MA, USA) was used to determine the bond strength. A two-way analysis of variance and post hoc analysis by Bonferroni test. All samples immersed in experimental group displayed a significantly greater resistance to displacement than that observed for the samples in control group ( P MTA groups, was positively influenced by the biomineralization process.

  1. An ex-vivo comparative study of root-end marginal adaptation using grey mineral trioxide aggregate, white mineral trioxide aggregate, and Portland cement under scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Akash Kumar; Paul, Mohan L; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Adhikari, Haridas Das; Vyavahare, Nishant K; Jhajharia, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Where nonsurgical endodontic intervention is not possible, or it will not solve the problem, surgical endodontic treatment must be considered. A major cause of surgical endodontic failures is an inadequate apical seal, so the use of the suitable substance as root-end filling material that prevents egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue is very critical. The aim of the present ex-vivo study was to compare and evaluate the three root-end filling materials of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) family (white MTA [WMTA], grey MTA [GMTA] and Portland cement [PC]) for their marginal adaptation at the root-end dentinal wall using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Sixty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated, instrumented, and obturated with Gutta-percha. After the root-end resection and apical cavity preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into three-experimental groups (each containing 20 teeth) and each group was filled with their respective experimental materials. After longitudinal sectioning of root, SEM examination was done to determine the overall gap between retrograde materials and cavity walls in terms of length and width of the gap (maximum) at the interface. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to calculate the means with corresponding standard errors, median and ranges along with an analysis of variance and Tukey's test. The least overall gap was observed in GMTA followed by PC and WMTA. While after statistically analyzing the various data obtained from different groups, there was no significant difference among these three groups in terms of marginal adaptation. GMTA showed the best overall adaptation to root dentinal wall compared to PC and WMTA. Being biocompatible and cheaper, the PC may be an alternative but not a substitute for MTA.

  2. Effect of biomineralization ability on push-out strength of proroot mineral trioxide aggregate, mineral trioxide aggregate branco, and calcium phosphate cement on dentin: An In vitro evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita D Revankar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Biomineralization is a process which leads to the formation of an interfacial layer with tag-like structures at the cement-dentin interface. It is due to interaction of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA and Portland cement with dentin in phosphate-buffered solution (PBS. This study is aimed to evaluate the effect of influence of biomineralization process on push-out bond strength of ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Tulsa, OK, USA, MTA Branco (Angelus Soluc¸o˜es Odontolo´gicas, Londrina, PR, Brazil and calcium phosphate cement (BioGraft CPC. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of biomineralization process on the push-out strength of ProRoot MTA, MTA Branco, and CPC after mixing with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate solution (0.2% CHX and 2% lidocaine solution (2% LA on the bond strength of MTA-dentin. Materials and Methods: Dentin discs with uniform cavities were restored with ProRoot MTA, MTA Branco, and calcium phosphate cement after mixing with 0.2% CHX solution and 2% lidocaine solution. The samples were uniformly distributed into two groups. Experimental group being immersed in PBS solution and control group being immersed in saline for 2 months. Instron testing machine (Model 4444; Instron Corp., Canton, MA, USA was used to determine the bond strength. Statistical Analysis Used: A two-way analysis of variance and post hoc analysis by Bonferroni test. Results: All samples immersed in experimental group displayed a significantly greater resistance to displacement than that observed for the samples in control group (P < 0.05. MTAs displayed a significantly greater resistance to displacement than calcium phosphate cements. Conclusion: The main conclusion of this study was that the push-out bond strength of the cements, mainly the MTA groups, was positively influenced by the biomineralization process.

  3. A fracture mechanics study of tungsten failure under high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices is highly dependent on plasma-facing components. Tungsten is the most promising candidate material for armors in plasma-facing components in ITER and DEMO. However, the brittleness of tungsten below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is very critical to the reliability of plasma-facing components. In this work, thermo-mechanical and fracture behaviors of tungsten are predicted numerically under fusion relevant thermal loadings.

  4. [Construction of subtractive cDNA library of apoptosis-related genes in NB4 cells treated by arsenic trioxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Chunhong; Gu, Shaohua; Tan, Xiaohua; Xian, Lingling; Wu, Qihan; Yang, Lei

    2009-02-01

    Construct the gene library of apoptosis related genes in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell line NB4 cells treated by arsenic trioxide to clarify the apoptotic mechanism of NB4 cells. APL cell line NB4 cells treated with or without arsenic trioxide for 24 hours. Total RNA was extracted and suppress subtractive hybridization (SSH) was conducted according to the manual. With the cDNA of the apoptosis cells as the tester and that of control cells as the driver, forward and reverse hybridization was performed. Differentially expressed genes were linked with pGEM-Teasy cloning vector and transformed into E. coli DH5alpha. The positive clones were screened by blue and white spot. PCR were used to amplify these genes. The subtractive cDNA libraries related with apoptosis of NB4 cells were successfully constructed. The constructed subtractive libraries are suitable for further study on the functional genes associated with apoptosis ofNB4 cells induced by arsenic trioxide.

  5. Effect of Synthetic Tissue Fluid on Microleakage of Grey and White Mineral Trioxide Aggregate as Root-End Filling Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Mehrdad; Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Rahimi, Saeed; Zand, Vahid; Reyhani, Mohammad Forough; Samiei, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Negin; Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Azimi, Shahram; Shokohinejad, Noushin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The success of endodontic surgery has been shown to depend partly on the apical seal. Grey mineral trioxide aggregate (GMTA) produces hydroxyapatite twice as often as white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) when suspended in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the microleakage phenomenon of gray and white mineral trioxide aggregates as root-end filling materials after immersion in synthetic tissue fluid (STF). Methods: 55 single-rooted extracted maxillary anterior human teeth were divided into two experimental groups of 20 teeth each, plus 3 groups of 5 teeth each as two negative and one positive control groups. The root canals were cleaned, shaped, and laterally compacted with gutta-percha. The root ends were resected and 3 mm deep cavities were prepared. The root-end preparations were filled with GMTA or WMTA in the experimental groups. Leakage was determined using a dye penetration method. Data were analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) at the 0.05 level of significance. Results: The mean dye leakage was 0.40 ± 0.1 mm for GMTA and 0.50±0.1 mm for WMTA groups, respectively. There was no significant difference between the two experimental groups (P = 0.14). Conclusion: Despite the different properties and behaviours of GMTA and WMTA in STF, there were no significant differences in microleakage when using GMTA or WMTA. PMID:22912925

  6. 75 FR 75694 - Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-648] Certain Semiconductor Integration... semiconductor integrated circuits using tungsten metallization and products containing the same by reason of...

  7. Tissue distribution patterns of solubilized metals from internalized tungsten alloy in the F344 rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernieda B. Vergara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of its unique physical and chemical properties, tungsten has been increasingly utilized in a variety of civilian and military applications. This expanded use also raises the risk of human exposure through internalization by various routes. In most cases the toxicological and carcinogenic properties of these tungsten-based compounds are not known nor are the dissolution biokinetics and ultimate fate of the associated metals. Using a laboratory rodent model system designed to assess the health effects of embedded metals, and a tungsten alloy comprised of tungsten (91.1%, nickel (6.0%, and cobalt (2.9%, we investigated the tissue distribution patterns of the metals over a six month period. Despite its perceived insolubility, tungsten rapidly solubilized from the implanted metal fragments, as did nickel and cobalt. All three metals distributed systemically over time with extremely elevated levels of all three metals found in kidney, liver, and spleen. Unexpectedly, tungsten was found to cross the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers and localize in those tissues. These results, along with recent reports suggesting that tungsten is a tumor promoter, raises serious concerns as to the long-term health effects of exposure to tungsten and tungsten-based compounds.

  8. An update to the toxicological profile for water-soluble and sparingly soluble tungsten substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Ranulfo; Venezia, Carmen F

    2015-05-01

    Tungsten is a relatively rare metal with numerous applications, most notably in machine tools, catalysts, and superalloys. In 2003, tungsten was nominated for study under the National Toxicology Program, and in 2011, it was nominated for human health assessment under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System. In 2005, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) issued a toxicological profile for tungsten, identifying several data gaps in the hazard assessment of tungsten. By filling the data gaps identified by the ATSDR, this review serves as an update to the toxicological profile for tungsten and tungsten substances. A PubMed literature search was conducted to identify reports published during the period 2004-2014, in order to gather relevant information related to tungsten toxicity. Additional information was also obtained directly from unpublished studies from within the tungsten industry. A systematic approach to evaluate the quality of data was conducted according to published criteria. This comprehensive review has gathered new toxicokinetic information and summarizes the details of acute and repeated-exposure studies that include reproductive, developmental, neurotoxicological, and immunotoxicological endpoints. Such new evidence involves several relevant studies that must be considered when regulators estimate and propose a tungsten reference or concentration dose.

  9. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  10. Spin coated versus dip coated electrochromic tungsten oxide films: Structure, morphology, optical and electrochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, M.; Saxena, T.K.; Singh, D.P.; Sood, K.N.; Agnihotry, S.A.

    2006-01-01

    A sol-gel derived acetylated peroxotungstic acid sol encompassing 4 wt.% of oxalic acid dihydrate (OAD) has been employed for the deposition of tungsten oxide (WO 3 ) films by spin coating and dip coating techniques, in view of smart window applications. The morphological and structural evolution of the as-deposited spin and dip coated films as a function of annealing temperature (250 and 500 o C) has been examined and compared by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A conspicuous feature of the dip coated film (annealed at 250 o C) is that its electrochromic and electrochemical properties ameliorate with cycling without degradation in contrast to the spin coated film for which these properties deteriorate under repetitive cycling. A comparative study of spin and dip coated nanostructured thin films (annealed at 250 o C) revealed a superior performance for the cycled dip coated film in terms of higher transmission modulation and coloration efficiency in solar and photopic regions, faster switching speed, higher electrochemical activity as well as charge storage capacity. While the dip coated film could endure 2500 color-bleach cycles, the spin coated film could sustain only a 1000 cycles. The better cycling stability of the dip coated film which is a repercussion of a balance between optimal water content, porosity and grain size hints at its potential for electrochromic window applications

  11. Sputtered tungsten-based ternary and quaternary layers for nanocrystalline diamond deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael J; Rahil, Issam; Zou, Yujiao; Imhoff, Luc; Catledge, Shane A; Nouveau, Corinne; Stanishevsky, Andrei V

    2012-06-01

    Many of today's demanding applications require thin-film coatings with high hardness, toughness, and thermal stability. In many cases, coating thickness in the range 2-20 microm and low surface roughness are required. Diamond films meet many of the stated requirements, but their crystalline nature leads to a high surface roughness. Nanocrystalline diamond offers a smoother surface, but significant surface modification of the substrate is necessary for successful nanocrystalline diamond deposition and adhesion. A hybrid hard and tough material may be required for either the desired applications, or as a basis for nanocrystalline diamond film growth. One possibility is a composite system based on carbides or nitrides. Many binary carbides and nitrides offer one or more mentioned properties. By combining these binary compounds in a ternary or quaternary nanocrystalline system, we can tailor the material for a desired combination of properties. Here, we describe the results on the structural and mechanical properties of the coating systems composed of tungsten-chromium-carbide and/or nitride. These WC-Cr-(N) coatings are deposited using magnetron sputtering. The growth of adherent nanocrystalline diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition has been demonstrated on these coatings. The WC-Cr-(N) and WC-Cr-(N)-NCD coatings are characterized with atomic force microscopy and SEM, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation.

  12. Performance enhancement of graphene-coated surface plasmon resonance biosensor using tungsten disulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anower, M. Shamim; Rahman, M. Saifur; Rikta, Khaleda Akter

    2018-01-01

    An improved performance of graphene-coated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor using tungsten disulfide (WS2) for sensing deoxyribonucleicacid (DNA) hybridization is investigated. This biosensor structure consisted of prism (SF10 glass), gold (Au), WS2, graphene, and sensing medium. Highly enhanced overall performances are achieved using a thin layer of WS2 between metal and graphene layer and are provided in terms of sensitivity, detection accuracy (DA), and quality factor (QF). Concurrent improvement of all performance parameters is depicted by adding a WS2 layer instead of another graphene layer with the existing graphene layer. This overcomes the limitation of graphene-only sensors where addition of a graphene layer increases the sensitivity but decreases the DA and QF. Analysis of Au thickness effect and limit of detection are also investigated. Numerical study demonstrates that the deviation of SPR angle for mismatched DNA strands is relatively insignificant while that for complementary DNA strands is noticeably reckonable. Thus, the proposed biosensor offers a window for detecting DNA hybridization.

  13. Thermomechanical analysis of diffusion-bonded tungsten/EUROFER97 with a vanadium interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basuki, Widodo Widjaja; Dahm, Ralf; Aktaa, Jarir

    2014-01-01

    Earlier basic investigations revealed that diffusion bonding between tungsten and RAFM-steel at a relatively low temperature using a thin low-activation vanadium interlayer having a CTE between that of the parent materials can significantly reduce the residual stresses and produce defect-free bond interfaces. The joint has a high strength as well as sufficient ductility and toughness especially at the test temperature of about 550 °C. To apply this knowledge in fusion power plants, particularly in divertors, an acceptable lifetime of such structural joints is required, since they are exposed to high thermomechanical cyclic loading. To simulate the possible operational conditions of a He-cooled divertor, diffusion-bonded specimens are loaded by thermal cycling in a temperature range between 350 °C and 500 °C and a constant tensile stress based on the calculation of the internal pressure of the divertor thimble. The aim of this experimental work is to check the resistance of the diffusion-bonded W/EUROFER97 against ratcheting during thermomechanical loading and analyze the evolution of microstructures of the joint especially along the bond interfaces

  14. Construction and test of a tungsten/Sci-Fi imaging calorimeter for the CREAM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchesi, P S; Bagliesi, M G; Basti, A; Bigongiari, G; Castellina, A; Ganel, O; Lee, M H; Lomtadze, T A; Lutz, L; Maestro, P; Malinine, A; Meucci, M; Millucci, V; Morsani, F; Seo, E S; Zinn, S Y

    2004-01-01

    Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) is a balloon-borne experiment designed to perform direct measurements of cosmic ray composition over the elemental range from proton to iron to the supernova energy scale of 10 **1**5eV in a series of balloon flights using the new Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) capability under development by NASA. The first flight of CREAM will take place at the end of 2004 from Antarctica. The instrument includes a sampling tungsten /scintillating fiber calorimeter preceded by a graphite target with scintillating fiber hodoscopes, a pixelated silicon charge detector, a transition radiation detector and a segmented timing-based particle-charge detector. The thin ionization calorimeter has been designed to operate in the range of energies from a few hundred GeV to 1 PeV providing imaging capability in the reconstruction of the showers originating from the interaction of primary nuclei in the carbon target. A twin calorimeter for the second CREAM payload has been built and tested at C...

  15. Selectively Plasmon-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation from Monolayer Tungsten Diselenide on Flexible Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhuo

    2018-01-04

    Monolayer two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (2D TMDCs) exhibit promising characteristics in miniaturized nonlinear optical frequency converters, due to their inversion asymmetry and large second-order nonlinear susceptibility. However, these materials usually have a very short light interaction lengths with the pump laser because they are atomically thin, such that second-harmonic generation (SHG) is generally inefficient. In this paper, we fabricate a judiciously structured 150-nm-thick planar surface consisting of monolayer tungsten diselenide and sub-20-nm-wide gold trenches on flexible substrates, reporting ~7000-fold SHG enhancement without peak broadening or background in the spectra as compared to WSe2 on as-grown sapphire substrates. Our proof-of-concept experiment yields effective second-order nonlinear susceptibility of 2.1 × 104 pm/V. Three orders of magnitude enhancement is maintained with pump wavelength ranging from 800 nm to 900 nm, breaking the limitation of narrow pump wavelength range for cavity-enhanced SHG. In addition, SHG amplitude can be dynamically controlled via selective excitation of the lateral gap plasmon by rotating the laser polarization. Such fully open, flat and ultrathin profile enables a great variety of functional samples with high SHG from one patterned silicon substrate, favoring scalable production of nonlinear converters. The surface accessibility also enables integration with other optical components for information processing in an ultrathin and flexible form.

  16. Structural properties of reactively sputtered W-Si-N thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vomiero, A.; Boscolo Marchi, E.; Quaranta, A.; Della Mea, G.; Brusa, R. S.; Mariotto, G.; Felisari, L.; Frabboni, S.; Tonini, R.; Ottaviani, G.; Mattei, G.; Scandurra, A.; Puglisi, O.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten-silicon-nitrogen, W-Si-N, ternary thin films have been reactively sputter deposited from W 5 Si 3 and WSi 2 targets using several nitrogen partial pressures. The films have been thermal annealed in the 600-1000 deg. C temperature range and a wide region of the W-Si-N ternary phase diagram has been explored by changing the N 2 /Ar ratio during the deposition. Multitechnique approach was adopted for the analysis of the samples. Composition has been determined via ion beam analysis; chemical states were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); crystalline structure was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) and surface morphology by scanning electron microscope. The films deposited in pure argon atmosphere are tungsten rich and approach the target contents as N 2 /Ar ratio is varied during deposition. Tungsten enrichment in the films is caused by resputtering of silicon which can be inhibited by the formation of silicon nitride, allowing films with Si/W ratio closer to the target compositions. The higher capability to form nitrides with silicon than with tungsten favors enhancement of nitrogen content in samples deposited from the silicon rich target (WSi 2 ). The samples with excess nitrogen content have shown losses of this element after thermal treatment. XPS measurements show a break of W-N bonds caused by thermal instability of tungsten nitrides. TEM and XRD revealed the segregation of tungsten in form of metallic or silicide nanoclusters in samples with low nitrogen content (W 58 Si 21 N 21 and W 24 Si 42 N 34 ). High amounts of nitrogen were revealed to be highly effective in inhibiting metallic cluster coalescence. Measurements of electrical resistivity of as deposited films were performed using four point probe technique. They were found to lie in the range between 0.4 and 79 mΩ cm depending on sample composition

  17. Tungsten oxides as interfacial layers for improved performance in hybrid optoelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilopoulou, M., E-mail: mariva@imel.demokritos.gr [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR Demokritos, Terma Patriarchou Grigoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Palilis, L.C.; Georgiadou, D.G.; Argitis, P. [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR Demokritos, Terma Patriarchou Grigoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Kennou, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 26500, Patras (Greece); Kostis, I. [Department of Electronics, Technological and Educational Institute of Pireaus, 12244 Aegaleo (Greece); Department of Information and Communication Systems Engineering, University of the Aegean, 83200 Karlovassi (Greece); Papadimitropoulos, G. [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR Demokritos, Terma Patriarchou Grigoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Stathopoulos, N.A. [Department of Electronics, Technological and Educational Institute of Pireaus, 12244 Aegaleo (Greece); Iliadis, A.A. [Department of Information and Communication Systems Engineering, University of the Aegean, 83200 Karlovassi (Greece); Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Konofaos, N. [Department of Information and Communication Systems Engineering, University of the Aegean, 83200 Karlovassi (Greece); Davazoglou, D. [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR Demokritos, Terma Patriarchou Grigoriou, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Sygellou, L. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, 26500, Patras (Greece)

    2011-06-30

    Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) films with thicknesses ranging from 30 to 100 nm were grown by Hot Filament Vapor Deposition (HFVD). Films were studied by X-Ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS) and were found to be stoichiometric. The surface morphology of the films was characterized by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Samples had a granular form with grains in the order of 100 nm. The surface roughness was found to increase with film thickness. HFVD WO{sub 3} films were used as conducting interfacial layers in advanced hybrid organic-inorganic optoelectronic devices. Hybrid-Organic Light Emitting Diodes (Hy-OLEDs) and Organic Photovoltaics (Hy-OPVs) were fabricated with these films as anode and/or as cathode interfacial conducting layers. The Hy-OLEDs showed significantly higher current density and a lower turn-on voltage when a thin WO{sub 3} layer was inserted at the anode/polymer interface, while when inserted at the cathode/polymer interface the device performance was found to deteriorate. The improvement was attributed to a more efficient hole injection and transport from the Fermi level of the anode to the Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital (HOMO) of a yellow emitting copolymer (YEP). On the other hand, the insertion of a thin WO{sub 3} layer at the cathode/polymer interface of Hy-OPV devices based on a polythiophene-fullerene bulk-heterojunction blend photoactive layer resulted in an increase of the produced photogenerated current, more likely due to improved electron extraction at the Al cathode.

  18. The development of the physical and electrical characteristics of multi-layer TiO{sub 2}-W-TiO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Cheng-Fu [National University of Kaohsiung, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Kaohsiung (China); Huang, Hong-Hsin; Chen, Cheng-Yi [Cheng-Shiu University, Department of Electrical Engineering, Kaohsiung (China); Huang, Ping-Chih [Cheng-Shiu University, Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Kaohsiung (China); Diao, Chien-Chen [Kao Yuan University, Department of Electronic Engineering, Kaohsiung (China)

    2009-01-15

    In this study, two different thin films, TiO{sub 2} thin film and TiO{sub 2}-W-TiO{sub 2} multi-layer thin films (W, tungsten), are prepared by RF magnetron sputtering onto glass substrates. The crystal structure, morphology, and transmittance of TiO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}-W-TiO{sub 2} multi-layer thin films are investigated by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and UV-Vis spectrometer, respectively. The amorphous, rutile, and anatase TiO{sub 2} phases are observed in the TiO{sub 2} thin film and in the TiO{sub 2}-W-TiO{sub 2} multi-layer thin films. The deposition of tungsten as the inter-layer will have large effect on the transmittance and phase ratios of rutile and anatase phases in the TiO{sub 2}-W-TiO{sub 2} multi-layer thin films. The crystal intensities of amorphous TiO{sub 2} will decrease as the tungsten is used as the middle layer in the multi-layer structure. The band gap energy values of TiO{sub 2} thin film and TiO{sub 2}-W-TiO{sub 2} multi-layer thin films are evaluated from ({alpha}h{nu}){sup 1/2} versus energy plots, and the calculated results show that the energy gap decreases from 3.21 eV (TiO{sub 2} thin film) to 3.08{proportional_to}3.03 eV (TiO{sub 2}-W-TiO{sub 2} multi-layer thin films). (orig.)

  19. Atomically thin resonant tunnel diodes built from synthetic van der Waals heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2015-06-19

    Vertical integration of two-dimensional van der Waals materials is predicted to lead to novel electronic and optical properties not found in the constituent layers. Here, we present the direct synthesis of two unique, atomically thin, multi-junction heterostructures by combining graphene with the monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides: molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) and tungsten diselenide (WSe2). The realization of MoS2–WSe2–graphene and WSe2–MoS2–graphene heterostructures leads to resonant tunnelling in an atomically thin stack with spectrally narrow, room temperature negative differential resistance characteristics.

  20. Thin Film Electrodes with an Integral Current Collection Grid for Use with Solid Electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Kisor, A.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; O'Connor, D.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film, high performance electrodes which can operate in high temperature environments are necessary for many devices which use a solid electrolyte. Electrodes of rhodium-tungsten alloy have been deposited on solid electrolyte using photolytic chemical vapor deposition (PCVD). A technique for depositing electrodes and current collection grids simultaneously has been developed using the prenucleation characteristics of PCVD. This technique makes it possible to fabricate electrodes which allow vapor transport through the thin (micro)m) portions of the electrode while integral thick grid lines improve the electronic conductivity of the electrode, thus improving overall performance.

  1. Preparation of highly (001)-oriented photoactive tungsten diselenide (WSe{sub 2}) films by an amorphous solid-liquid-crystalline solid (aSLcS) rapid-crystallization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozheyev, Farabi; Friedrich, Dennis; Nie, Man; Rengachari, Mythili; Ellmer, Klaus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highly (001)-textured tungsten diselenide WSe{sub 2} thin films have been prepared by a two-step process on quartz glass and TiN metallic back contacts, respectively. At first, X-ray amorphous, selenium-rich WSe{sub 2+x} films were deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering at room temperature onto a thin metal promoter film (Ni or Pd) and afterwards annealed in an H{sub 2}Se/Ar atmosphere. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show that highly (001)-oriented WSe{sub 2} films can be grown, which is caused by the formation of liquid promoter-metal selenide droplets which dissolve tungsten or tungsten selenide at temperatures, higher than the eutectic temperature in the promoter metal-selenium system, followed by oversaturation and eventually crystallization of WSe{sub 2} platelets. Time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements show that the films are photoactive. The sum of the carrier mobilities of the best films μ{sub e} + μ{sub h} is in the range of 1-7 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  3. All 2D, high mobility, flexible, transparent thin film transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saptarshi; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Roelofs, Andreas

    2017-01-17

    A two-dimensional thin film transistor and a method for manufacturing a two-dimensional thin film transistor includes layering a semiconducting channel material on a substrate, providing a first electrode material on top of the semiconducting channel material, patterning a source metal electrode and a drain metal electrode at opposite ends of the semiconducting channel material from the first electrode material, opening a window between the source metal electrode and the drain metal electrode, removing the first electrode material from the window located above the semiconducting channel material providing a gate dielectric above the semiconducting channel material, and providing a top gate above the gate dielectric, the top gate formed from a second electrode material. The semiconducting channel material is made of tungsten diselenide, the first electrode material and the second electrode material are made of graphene, and the gate dielectric is made of hexagonal boron nitride.

  4. Magnetic Field Enhanced Superconductivity in Epitaxial Thin Film WTe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaba, Tomoya; Wang, Yongjie; Li, Gang; Xiang, Ziji; Tinsman, Colin; Chen, Lu; Zhou, Shangnan; Zhao, Songrui; Laleyan, David; Li, Yi; Mi, Zetian; Li, Lu

    2018-04-25

    In conventional superconductors an external magnetic field generally suppresses superconductivity. This results from a simple thermodynamic competition of the superconducting and magnetic free energies. In this study, we report the unconventional features in the superconducting epitaxial thin film tungsten telluride (WTe 2 ). Measuring the electrical transport properties of Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) grown WTe 2 thin films with a high precision rotation stage, we map the upper critical field H c2 at different temperatures T. We observe the superconducting transition temperature T c is enhanced by in-plane magnetic fields. The upper critical field H c2 is observed to establish an unconventional non-monotonic dependence on temperature. We suggest that this unconventional feature is due to the lifting of inversion symmetry, which leads to the enhancement of H c2 in Ising superconductors.

  5. Potential irradiation of Cu alloys and tungsten samples in DONES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, F.; Palermo, I.; Laces, S.; Molla, J.; Ibarra, A.

    2017-12-01

    Tungsten and Cu alloys are currently proposed as reference candidate material for ITER and DEMO first wall and divertor. Tungsten is proposed for its high fusion temperature and CuCrZr alloys for their high thermal conductivity together with good mechanical properties. However its behaviour under the extreme irradiation conditions as expected in ITER or DEMO fusion reactors is still unknown. Due to the determinant role of H and He played in the material behaviour any irradiation experiment must take into account the amount of these gases produced during the irradiation in Fusion reactors with high-energy neutrons. DONES (DEMO oriented neutron source) has been conceived as a simplified IFMIF (International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility) like plant to provide in a reduced time scale and with a reduced budget—both compared to IFMIF—the basic information on materials damage. The objective of DONES-IFMIF in its first stage will be to test structural materials under similar neutron irradiation nuclear fusion conditions as expected in fusion reactors. These tests will be carried out with specimens irradiated in the so called high flux test module (HFTM). The objective of this paper is to assess on the potential use of DONES to irradiate copper (Cu) alloys and tungsten (W) in the HFTM together with reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel like for example EUROFER (9%-Cr-steel). The presence of Cu alloys or W specimens may have an effect in the irradiation parameters of the EUROFER samples placed also in the HFTM and in the samples of the creep fatigue test module (CFTM). McDeLicious code is used for neutron transport calculations. Damage dose rate and H and He production are analysed in the different locations and compared with the irradiation conditions in first wall and divertor in fusion machines.

  6. Helium segregation on surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroudas, Dimitrios; Blondel, Sophie; Hu, Lin; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-02-01

    We report a hierarchical multi-scale modeling study of implanted helium segregation on surfaces of tungsten, considered as a plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors. We employ a hierarchy of atomic-scale simulations based on a reliable interatomic interaction potential, including molecular-statics simulations to understand the origin of helium surface segregation, targeted molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of near-surface cluster reactions, and large-scale MD simulations of implanted helium evolution in plasma-exposed tungsten. We find that small, mobile He n (1  ⩽  n  ⩽  7) clusters in the near-surface region are attracted to the surface due to an elastic interaction force that provides the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. This elastic interaction force induces drift fluxes of these mobile He n clusters, which increase substantially as the migrating clusters approach the surface, facilitating helium segregation on the surface. Moreover, the clusters’ drift toward the surface enables cluster reactions, most importantly trap mutation, in the near-surface region at rates much higher than in the bulk material. These near-surface cluster dynamics have significant effects on the surface morphology, near-surface defect structures, and the amount of helium retained in the material upon plasma exposure. We integrate the findings of such atomic-scale simulations into a properly parameterized and validated spatially dependent, continuum-scale reaction-diffusion cluster dynamics model, capable of predicting implanted helium evolution, surface segregation, and its near-surface effects in tungsten. This cluster-dynamics model sets the stage for development of fully atomistically informed coarse-grained models for computationally efficient simulation predictions of helium surface segregation, as well as helium retention and surface morphological evolution, toward optimal design of plasma facing components.

  7. Pipe bend wear - is tungsten carbide the answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freinkel, D.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to compare the relative wear resistance of various grades of sintered tungsten carbide liners against a mild steel standard in a full-scale pneumatic conveying testing rig. Speciments ranging in cobalt content from 6 to 30 per cent and in grain size from 0,56 to 2,98 microns, including a mild steel standard, were placed on a specially designed holder which fitted into a tee type 100 mm diameter bend. The specimens were tested under various operating conditions, ie air velocity ranging from 28m/s to 52m/s, impact angles of 30 0 to 70 0 mass flow rates of 35kg/min to 83kg/min and phase densities of 1,2 to 2,9, using a 4 mm nominal size crushed granite rock. The experimental results show that the ultrafine-grained, low cobalt (6 per cent) tungsten carbide displays little sensitivity to varying velocities, impact angles, mass flow rates or phase densities, and consistently gave the best wear resistance under all testing conditions. It consistently showed the least wear resistance under all testing conditions and performed only slightly better than mild steel. The effect of the carbide grain size was found to be small, although the finer grain sizes displayed greater wear resistance than the coarse grains. The effect of cobalt content was such that the lower cobalt specimens (6 per cent range) consistently performed better than the higher cobalt contents (10 per cent, 15 per cent, 30 per cent) under all testing conditions; the wear resistance decreasing with increasing cobalt content. An empirical model for the prediction of wear for each type of material tested has been proposed, given the particular operating conditions. Microstructurally it has been shown that there is a definite relationship between erosion resistance and the inverse of the magnetic coercivity of the tungsten carbide alloys

  8. Antimicrobial and anti-biofilm properties of polypropylene meshes coated with metal-containing DLC thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazalini, Elisa M; Miyakawa, Walter; Teodoro, Guilherme R; Sobrinho, Argemiro S S; Matieli, José E; Massi, Marcos; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Y

    2017-06-01

    A promising strategy to reduce nosocomial infections related to prosthetic meshes is the prevention of microbial colonization. To this aim, prosthetic meshes coated with antimicrobial thin films are proposed. Commercial polypropylene meshes were coated with metal-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC) thin films by the magnetron sputtering technique. Several dissimilar metals (silver, cobalt, indium, tungsten, tin, aluminum, chromium, zinc, manganese, tantalum, and titanium) were tested and compositional analyses of each Me-DLC were performed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Antimicrobial activities of the films against five microbial species (Candida albicans, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis) were also investigated by a modified Kirby-Bauer test. Results showed that films containing silver and cobalt have inhibited the growth of all microbial species. Tungsten-DLC, tin-DLC, aluminum-DLC, zinc-DLC, manganese-DLC, and tantalum-DLC inhibited the growth of some strains, while chromium- and titanium-DLC weakly inhibited the growth of only one tested strain. In-DLC film showed no antimicrobial activity. The effects of tungsten-DLC and cobalt-DLC on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation were also assessed. Tungsten-DLC was able to significantly reduce biofilm formation. Overall, the experimental results in the present study have shown new approaches to coating polymeric biomaterials aiming antimicrobial effect.

  9. Durability of adhesive bonds to uranium alloys, tungsten, tantalum, and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Long-term durability of epoxy bonds to alloys of uranium (U-Nb and Mulberry), nickel-plated uranium, thorium, tungsten, tantalum, tantalum--10 percent tungsten, and aluminum was evaluated. Significant strengths remain after ten years of aging; however, there is some evidence of bond deterioration with uranium alloys and thorium stored in ambient laboratory air

  10. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Vokáč, M.; Kolísko, J.; Pokorný, P.; Kubatík, Tomáš František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, 1-2 (2017), s. 79-82 ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tungsten wires * tungsten fibers * plasma spraying * metallic coatings * ceramic coatings Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics http://hrcak.srce.hr/168890

  11. Electrodeposition mechanism and corrosion behavior of multilayer nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allahyarzadeh, M.H.; Aliofkhazraei, M.; Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer nickel-tungsten coatings were deposited on carbon steel using the pulse reverse current technique. Nickel-tungsten layered structure coatings were developed using the continuous and alternative variation of pulse duty cycle at two specific and fixed values. In these coatings, the multi...

  12. Binary-collision-approximation-based simulation of noble gas irradiation to tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    To reveal the possibility of fuzz formation of tungsten material under noble gas irradiation, helium, neon, and argon atom injections into tungsten materials are performed by binary-collision-approximation-based simulation. The penetration depth is strongly depends on the structure of the target material. Therefore, the penetration depth for amorphous and bcc crystalline structure is carefully investigated in this paper

  13. Phase II Tungsten Fate-and Transport Study for Camp Edwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    cubic meters degrees Fahrenheit (oF-32)/1.8 degrees Celsius (oC) feet 0.3048 meters gallons (U.S. liquid) 3.785412 E-03 liters inches 0.0254 meters...1 Desorption/dissolution of tungsten 451 39 8.1 2 Sorption of sodium tungstate and desorption/dissolution of tungsten and sodium tungstate 124

  14. Deepening of floating potential for tungsten target plate on the way to nanostructure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Miyamoto, Takanori; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2010-01-01

    Deepening of floating potential has been observed on the tungsten target plate immersed in high-density helium plasma with hot electron component on the way to nanostructure formation. The physical mechanism is thought to be a reduction of secondary electron emission from such a complex nano fiber-form structure on the tungsten surface. (author)

  15. Thermal shock behaviour of tungsten after high flux H-plasma loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Wright, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transient thermal shock loads induce crack networks on tungsten samples especially at low base temperatures. To achieve test conditions which are more relevant for the performance of tungsten-armoured plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices

  16. On-chip microplasma reactors using carbon nanofibres and tungsten oxide nanowires as electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agiral, A.; Groenland, A.W.; Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Kumar Chinthaginjala, J.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and tungsten oxide (W18O49) nanowires have been incorporated into a continuous flow type microplasma reactor to increase the reactivity and efficiency of the barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure. CNFs and tungsten oxide nanowires were characterized by high-resolution

  17. Tungsten determination in heat resistant nickel-base-alloys by the method of atomic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorczyk, S.; Wycislik, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of atomic absorption was developed. It allows for the tungsten to be determined in heatresistant nickel-base-alloys within the range 0.01 to 7%. It consists in precipitating tungsten acid in the presence of alkaloids with its following decomposition by hydrofluoric acid in the teflon bomb. (author)

  18. Molybdenum and tungsten enzymes: the xanthine oxidase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Carlos D; Romão, Maria João; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2006-04-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum and tungsten are found in the active site of a diverse group of enzymes that, in general, catalyze oxygen atom transfer reactions. Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are the best-characterized mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes. Several 3D structures of diverse members of this family are known. Recently, the structures of substrate-bound and arsenite-inhibited forms of two members of this family have also been reported. In addition, spectroscopic studies have been utilized to elucidate fine details that complement the structural information. Altogether, these studies have provided an important amount of information on the characteristics of the active site and the electron transfer pathways.

  19. Tungsten based anisotropic metamaterial as an ultra-broadband absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yinyue; Cui, Yanxia; Ding, Fei

    2017-01-01

    : We show theoretically that an array of tungsten/germanium anisotropic nano-cones placed on top of a reflective substrate can absorb light at the wavelength range from 0.3 μm to 9 μm with an average absorption efficiency approaching 98%. It is found that the excitation of multiple orders of slow...... of the nano-cones and the interaction between neighboring nano-cones is quite weak. Our proposal has some potential applications in the areas of solar energy harvesting and thermal emitters....

  20. Femtosecond laser fabrication of microspike-arrays on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tomokazu; Yanai, Masato; Ohmura, Etsuji; Nomura, Yasumitsu; Miyamoto, Isamu; Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2005-01-01

    Microspike-arrays were fabricated by irradiating a femtosecond laser on a tungsten surface through a mask opening in air. The natural logarithms of the calculated intensity distributions diffracted at the edge of the mask opening were qualitatively consistent with the experimental results of the shape and arrays of microspikes fabricated. The shape and the array of microspikes depend on the intensity distribution diffracted at the edge of the mask opening. This microspike-array has the potential to be used as a source of micro emitter tips