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Sample records for tungsten tetragonal ttb

  1. Phase transitions and electrical characterizations of (K 0.5Na 0.5) 2x(Sr 0.6Ba 0.4) 5-xNb 10O 30 (KNSBN) ceramics with 'unfilled' and 'filled' tetragonal tungsten-bronze (TTB) crystal structure

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Yingbang

    2012-12-01

    Alkali-doped strontium barium niobate (K 0.5Na 0.5) 2x(Sr 0.6Ba 0.4) 5-xNb 10O 30 (KNSBN) ceramics has been prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction method. The alkali-dopant concentration x has been varied from 0.24 to 1.15 so that the crystal structure was transformed from \\'unfilled\\' to \\'filled\\' tetragonal tungsten-bronze (TTB) structure. Apart from the change in the structural properties, the effects of the alkali-dopants on the phase transition as well as ferroelectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties have also been investigated. Phase transitions have been studied in the temperature range of -200°C to 350°C. The origins of these phase transitions are discussed. The addition of the alkali-dopants enhances the ferroelectric, piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties of the KNSBN ceramics. Alkali-doping also favors abnormal grain growth and thus results in a porous microstructure, which might contribute to the enhancement of the pyroelectric performance. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Nonstoichiometric control of tunnel-filling order, thermal expansion, and dielectric relaxation in tetragonal tungsten Bronzes Ba0.5-xTaO3-x.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fengjuan; Li, Xiaohui; Lu, Fengqi; Wang, Xiaoming; Cao, Jiang; Kuang, Xiaojun; Véron, Emmanuel; Porcher, Florence; Suchomel, Matthew R; Wang, Jing; Allix, Mathieu

    2015-09-21

    Ordering of interpolated Ba(2+) chains and alternate Ta-O rows (TaO)(3+) in the pentagonal tunnels of tetragonal tungsten bronzes (TTB) is controlled by the nonstoichiometry in the highly nonstoichiometric Ba0.5-xTaO3-x system. In Ba0.22TaO2.72, the filling of Ba(2+) and (TaO)(3+) groups is partially ordered along the ab-plane of the simple TTB structure, resulting in a √2-type TTB superstructure (Pbmm), while in Ba0.175TaO2.675, the pentagonal tunnel filling is completely ordered along the b-axis of the simple TTB structure, leading to a triple TTB superstructure (P21212). Both superstructures show completely empty square tunnels favoring Ba(2+) conduction and feature unusual accommodation of Ta(5+) cations in the small triangular tunnels. In contrast with stoichiometric Ba6GaTa9O30, which shows linear thermal expansion of the cell parameters and monotonic decrease of permittivity with temperature within 100-800 K, these TTB superstructures and slightly nonstoichiometric simple TTB Ba0.4TaO2.9 display abnormally broad and frequency-dependent extrinsic dielectric relaxations in 10(3)-10(5) Hz above room temperature, a linear deviation of the c-axis thermal expansion around 600 K, and high dielectric permittivity ∼60-95 at 1 MHz at room temperature.

  3. High-pressure synthesis of fully occupied tetragonal and cubic tungsten bronze oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeuchi, Yuya; Takatsu, Hiroshi; Tassel, Cedric; Goto, Yoshihiro; Murakami, Taito; Kageyama, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    A high-pressure reaction yielded the fully occupied tetragonal tungsten bronze K{sub 3}W{sub 5}O{sub 15} (K{sub 0.6}WO{sub 3}). The terminal phase shows an unusual transport property featuring slightly negative temperature-dependence in resistivity (dρ/dT<0) and a large Wilson ratio of R{sub W}=3.2. Such anomalous metallic behavior possibly arises from the low-dimensional electronic structure with a van Hove singularity at the Fermi level and/or from enhanced magnetic fluctuations by geometrical frustration of the tungsten sublattice. The asymmetric nature of the tetragonal tungsten bronze K{sub x}WO{sub 3}-K{sub 0.6-y}Ba{sub y}WO{sub 3} phase diagram implies that superconductivity for x≤0.45 originates from the lattice instability because of potassium deficiency. A cubic perovskite KWO{sub 3} phase was also identified as a line phase - in marked contrast to Na{sub x}WO{sub 3} and Li{sub x}WO{sub 3} with varying quantities of x (<1). This study presents a versatile method by which the solubility limit of tungsten bronze oxides can be extended. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Síntese e caracterização estrutural do niobato de potássio e estrôncio com estrutura tipo Tetragonal Tungstênio Bronze TTB Synthesis and structural characterization of strontium potassium niobate oxide with tetragonal tungstenium bronze TTB type structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lanfredi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A fase nanoestruturada KSr2Nb5O15, foi sintetizada pelo método de mistura mecânica de óxidos por moagem de alta eficiência e por via química, utilizando o método dos precursores poliméricos, em forno tipo tubo sob atmosfera de O2 durante 10 h. A análise por difração de raios X dos pós calcinados a 1150 ºC foi realizada pelo método de Rietveld utilizando-se o software FullProf. A análise dos parâmetros estruturais obtidos via método de Rietveld mostrou um sistema tetragonal com estrutura tipo tetragonal tungstênio bronze. A partir das reflexões observadas, há apenas evidência da regra [(0kl k = 2n], a qual é compatível com o grupo espacial centrossimétrico P4bm, o qual foi utilizado para o refinamento. O volume da célula unitária obtido na análise dos pós de KSr2Nb5O15 obtidos por síntese química e por moagem de alta eficiência foi 611,90 ų e 611,95 ų, respectivamente.The nanostructured KSr2Nb5O15 phase was synthesized by both routes, the high efficiency milling and the polymeric precursor, in a furnace under O2 atmosphere during 10 h. The Rietveld X-ray diffraction analysis of the calcined powders at 1150 ºC was performed using the FullProf software. The XRD pattern analysis showed a tetragonal system with the tetragonal tungsten bronze structure. From the observed reflections, there is only evidence of the rule existence [(0kl k = 2n], which is compatible with the centrosymmetric space group P4bm, which was used for the refinement. The unit cell volume obtained for the KSr2Nb5O15 powders prepared by chemical synthesis and by high efficiency milling were equal to 611,90 ų and 611,95 ų, respectively.

  5. Superconductivity and crystal structural origins of the metal-insulator transition in Ba6 -xSrxNb10O30 tetragonal tungsten bronzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodiaznyi, Taras; Sakurai, Hiroya; Isobe, Masaaki; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Forbes, Scott; Mozharivskyj, Yurij; Munsie, Timothy J. S.; Luke, Graeme M.; Gurak, Mary; Clarke, David R.

    2015-12-01

    Ba6 -xSrxNb10O30 solid solution with 0 ≤ x ≤6 forms the filled tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB) structure. The Ba-end member crystallizes in the highest symmetry P 4 /m b m space group (a =b =12.5842 (18 )Å and c =3.9995 (8 )Å ) and so do all the compositions with 0 ≤ x ≤5 . The Sr-end member of the solid solution crystallizes in the tentatively assigned A m a m space group (a *=17.506 (4 )Å , b *=34.932 (7 )Å , and c *=7.7777 (2 )Å ). The latter space group is related to the parent P 4 /m b m TTB structure as a * ≈ √{2 }a ,b * ≈2 √{2 }a ,c *=2 c . Low-temperature specific heat measurements indicate that the Ba-rich compositions with x ≤2 are conventional BCS superconductors with TC ≤1.6 K and superconducting energy gaps of ≤0.38 meV. The values of the TC in the cation-filled Nb-based TTBs reported here are comparable with those of the unfilled KxWO3 and NaxWO3 TTBs having large alkali ion deficiency. As the unit cell volume decreases with increasing x , an unexpected metal-insulator transition (MIT) in Ba6 -xSrxNb10O30 occurs at x ≥3 . We discuss the possible origins of the MIT in terms of the carrier concentration, symmetry break, and Anderson localization.

  6. Relaxor nature in lead-free Sr5LaTi3Nb7O30 tetragonal tungsten bronze ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhu, Xiao; Li, Kun; Qiang Liu, Xiao; Ming Chen, Xiang; Asif Rafiq, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Lead-free tetragonal tungsten bronze Sr 5 LaTi 3 Nb 7 O 30 ceramics were prepared and the correlation of the relaxor nature and crystal structure was studied using dielectric spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. Three dielectric relaxations were observed below the deviation temperature T D ∼ 330 K. Relaxation I and II followed the Vogel-Fulcher law with the freezing temperatures of 189 K and ∼90 K. Low temperature relaxation III, which was first observed in filled tungsten bronze, followed well the Arrhenius law. Dielectric response becomes static below 50 K. Polarization-field (P-E) hysteresis loops were evaluated from 183 K to 298 K. P r value of 0.41μC/cm 2 was observed at 183 K. Deviation of lattice parameter c from the linear contraction and increasing of tetragonality (c/a ratio) were observed below T D , reflecting the structure change during the formation of polar nanoregions and the following freezing process. Opposite tendency was observed below 100 K for all the lattice parameters, corresponding to relaxation III. Generally, the main dielectric relaxation I and II were attributed to flipping and breathing of polar nanoregions along c axis, while the concerted rotations of the oxygen octahedra in the ab plane were suggested as the origin of relaxation III

  7. Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    There is no substitute for tungsten in its main field of application so that the demand will not decrease, but there is a need for further important applications. If small variations are left out of account, a small but steady increase in the annual tungsten consumption can be expected. The amount of tungsten available will increase due to the exploritation of new deposits and the extension of existing mines. This tendency will probably be increased by the world-wide prospection. It is hard to make an assessment of the amount of tungsten are obtained in the People's Republic of china, the purchases of Eastern countries in the West, and the sales policy of the USA; pice forecasts are therefore hard to make. A rather interesting subject with regard to the tungsten cycle as a whole is the reprocessing of tungsten-containing wastes. (orig.) [de

  8. On the nature of phase transitions in the tetragonal tungsten bronze GdK{sub 2}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15} ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagou, Y.; Lukyanchuk, I.; El Marssi, M., E-mail: mimoun.elmarssi@u-picardie.fr [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex (France); Amira, Y. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex (France); Laboratoire de la Matière Condensée et Nanostructures, FSTG, Université Cadi Ayyad Marrakech, Maroc (Morocco); Mezzane, D. [Laboratoire de la Matière Condensée et Nanostructures, FSTG, Université Cadi Ayyad Marrakech, Maroc (Morocco); Courty, M.; Masquelier, C. [Laboratoire de Réactivité et Chimie des Solides, UMR 7314, Université de Picardie Jules Verne, Pôle Scientifique, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 1 (France); Yuzyuk, Yu. I. [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, 5, Zorge Str. Rostov-on-Don 344090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-14

    Phase transitions in gadolinium potassium niobate GdK{sub 2}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15} (GKN) ceramics have been investigated by x-ray diffraction, dielectric susceptibility, differential scanning calorimetry, and Raman scattering. The results of our complementary studies show that GKN exhibits two phase transitions at T{sub c1} = 238 °C and T{sub c2} = 375 °C attributed to the ferroelectric-antiferroelectric-paraelectric (FE-AFE-PE) phase transitions. According to the x-ray diffraction analysis, the FE and PE phases were refined in the polar P4bm and centrosymmetric P4/mbm space groups. For the intermediate phase, the structure is refined in the space group P4nc with doubling of the c unit cell parameter, which is compatible with an AFE phase. This result was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy since new low-frequency lines are activated in the AFE phase due to the Brillouin zone-folding effect, typical for the modulated phases. The presence of the AFE phase between the FE and PE phases and the complex nature of tetragonal tungsten bronze crystal structure can explain the large thermal hysteresis observed at the FE-AFE transition between heating and cooling cycle and the strong depression of the Curie-Weiss temperature T{sub 0}. The semi-phenomenological Ising-like model based on the obtained experimental data is proposed to account for the observed FE-AFE-PE transition sequence.

  9. Synthesis and single crystal X-ray structure of the tetragonal tungsten bronze Pb{sub 0.91}K{sub 1.72}Li{sub 1.46}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitelli, F. [Institute of Crystallography - CNR, Via Salaria Km 29.300, 00016 Monterotondo Rome (Italy); Rossi, M. [Earth Sciences Department, Federico II University, Via Mezzocannone 8, 80134 Naples (Italy); Elaatmani, M.; Zegzouti, A. [Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide Mineral, Faculte des Sciences Semlalia, Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco)

    2010-11-15

    Crystals of Pb{sub 0.91}K{sub 1.72}Li{sub 1.46}Nb{sub 5}O{sub 15}, belonging to tetragonal tungsten bronze materials, were grown by the slow cooling technique, and characterized by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction: the structure was solved in the P4bm tetragonal space group, with the following unit cell parameters: a = 12.548(5), c = 4.042(5)A, V = 636.4(9)A{sup 3}. The three-dimensional framework can be described as a layered structure down crystallographic axis c, with arrays of NbO{sub 6} octahedra, whose corner sharing makes up the formation of tunnels filled up by Li, Pb and K displaying complex cation-oxygen coordinations. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Crystallography properties of solid solution of NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}s}tructure of tetragonal tungsten bronze; Propriedades cristalograficas da solucao de NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} de estrutura tetragonal tungstenio bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, C.; Dantas, S.A.; Mikaro, C.; Lima, A.R.F.; Nobre, M.A.L.; Lanfredi, S. [Universidade Estadual Paulista (LaCCeF/UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica, Quimica e Biologia. Lab. de Compositos e Ceramicas Funcionais

    2009-07-01

    In this work was investigated the crystallographic characterization of single phase and nanometric powders of sodium strontium niobate doped with nickel, with NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} stoichiometry, prepared by conventional route from mechanical mixture of oxides / carbonates using the high energy ball milling. The optimization of the parameters as time and calcination temperature for the preparation of the NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} solid solution were monitored by X-ray diffraction, using the Rietveld method. The NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} single phase powders with tetragonal tungsten bronze type structure were obtained with crystallite size at around 30 nm. From crystallographic parameters was constructed the unitary cellule of the NaSr{sub 2}(NiNb{sub 4})O{sub 15-{delta}} using the CaRIne Crystallography 3.1 program. The occupation of sites by the Na{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+} cations and the interatomic distances between nickel and niobium atoms were determined. Changes in structural parameters of sodium strontium niobate by addition of nickel are discussed. (author)

  11. 27 CFR 13.81 - Representation before TTB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Representation before TTB. 13.81 Section 13.81 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING PROCEEDINGS Miscellaneous § 13.81 Representation before TTB. An...

  12. On the TTB approximation for photon transport in MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohashi, Atuto

    2001-01-01

    Three dimensional and continuous energy monte carlo code system, MCNP 4 deals with electron transport in addition to neutron and gamma-ray transport. Benchmark experiments involved bremsstrahlung of secondary electron are analyzed by the code MCNP 4, in the following three cases: (1) without approximation for electron pair production, (2) with the TTB approximation (thick-target-bremsstrahlung) for electron pair production, and (3) with secondary electron transport. Bishop et al. measured photon spectrum of gamma-ray (6.1Mev) which is emitted from N-16 in reactor coolant, and penetrating through iron and lead. Johnson et al. measured scattering photon spectrum and doses of capture gamma-ray (∼8Mev) which is emitted from titan and nickel, and penetrating through iron, concrete and lead. Calculation results of MCNP 4 with the secondary electron transport give good agreement with the measured values obtained by these two benchmark experiments, although the TTB approximation calculations overestimate in penetration problem, and underestimate in backscattering problem. (M. Suetake)

  13. 27 CFR 73.32 - May I electronically sign forms I submit electronically to TTB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Filing of Documents with TTB § 73.32 May I electronically sign forms I submit electronically to TTB? You may electronically sign the electronic form you... use, that the electronic signatures or digital signatures in your system are intended to be the...

  14. 27 CFR 73.35 - Do I need to keep paper copies of forms I submit to TTB electronically?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Filing of Documents with TTB § 73... unless TTB otherwise authorizes you to maintain electronic copies of these documents through a general...

  15. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  16. 27 CFR 73.31 - May I submit forms electronically to TTB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Filing of Documents with TTB § 73.31 May I submit forms... Register and on our Web site as stated above; (c) You submit the electronic form to an electronic document...

  17. Stabilization of metastable tetragonal zirconia nanocrystallites by surface modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard; Almdal, Kristoffer; Lelieveld, A. van

    2011-01-01

    Metastable tetragonal zirconia nanocrystallites were studied in humid air and in water at room temperature (RT). A stabilizing effect of different surfactants on the tetragonal phase was observed. Furthermore, the phase stability of silanized metastable tetragonal zirconia nanocrystallites...

  18. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  19. Glass ceramic toughened with tetragonal zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Keith D.; Michalske, Terry A.

    1986-01-01

    A phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic and a process for making it are disclosed. A mixture of particulate network-forming oxide, network-modifying oxide, and zirconium oxide is heated to yield a homogeneous melt, and this melt is then heat-treated to precipitate an appreciable quantity of tetragonal zirconia, which is retained at ambient temperature to form a phase transformation-toughened glass ceramic. Nucleating agents and stabilizing agents may be added to the mixture to facilitate processing and improve the ceramic's properties. Preferably, the mixture is first melted at a temperature from 1200.degree. to 1700.degree. C. and is then heat-treated at a temperature within the range of 800.degree. to 1200.degree. C. in order to precipitate tetragonal ZrO.sub.2. The composition, as well as the length and temperature of the heat-treatment, must be carefully controlled to prevent solution of the precipitated tetragonal zirconia and subsequent conversion to the monoclinic phase.

  20. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  1. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  2. Structure Characterization calculation of Tetragonal Zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, J; Wang, X Y; Ren, X R; Huang, Z C; Pan, W [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China); Zhou, R, E-mail: fengj09@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: panw@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Precious-Nonferrous Metals, Education Ministry of China, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2011-10-29

    Structure characterization and elastic properties of tetragonal phase of zirconia have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT). The XRD spectrums and vibration properties of Raman active modes of T-ZrO{sub 2} were calculated and the results were compared with references. The calculated results have showed researchers may distinguish cubic and tetragonal phases used XRD spectrums in the 2 range of 72.5{sup 0}-75.5{sup 0}, 122{sup 0}-129{sup 0} and 138{sup 0}-148{sup 0}. The calculated vibrated properties of Raman active modes as follows: the modes of Zr-O stretching are 262.6, 486.2, and 641.6 cm{sup -1} the modes of Zr-O bending and O-O coupling are 344.4 and 606.9 cm{sup -1} and the modes of Zr-O-Zr or O-Zr-O bending is 141.2 cm{sup -1}.

  3. Atomic Origins of Monoclinic-Tetragonal (Rutile) Phase Transition in Doped VO2 Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti; Nie, Anmin; Marley, Peter M; Zhu, Yihan; Phillips, Patrick J; Singh, Sujay; Mashayek, Farzad; Sambandamurthy, Ganapathy; Low, Ke-Bin; Klie, Robert F; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Odegard, Gregory M; Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza

    2015-11-11

    There has been long-standing interest in tuning the metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO2) via the addition of chemical dopants. However, the underlying mechanisms by which doping elements regulate the phase transition in VO2 are poorly understood. Taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we reveal the atomistic origins by which tungsten (W) dopants influence the phase transition in single crystalline WxV1-xO2 nanowires. Our atomically resolved strain maps clearly show the localized strain normal to the (122̅) lattice planes of the low W-doped monoclinic structure (insulator). These strain maps demonstrate how anisotropic localized stress created by dopants in the monoclinic structure accelerates the phase transition and lead to relaxation of structure in tetragonal form. In contrast, the strain distribution in the high W-doped VO2 structure is relatively uniform as a result of transition to tetragonal (metallic) phase. The directional strain gradients are furthermore corroborated by density functional theory calculations that show the energetic consequences of distortions to the local structure. These findings pave the roadmap for lattice-stress engineering of the MIT behavior in strongly correlated materials for specific applications such as ultrafast electronic switches and electro-optical sensors.

  4. Atomic Origins of Monoclinic-Tetragonal (Rutile) Phase Transition in Doped VO 2 Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti

    2015-10-12

    There has been long-standing interest in tuning the metal-insulator phase transition in vanadium dioxide (VO) via the addition of chemical dopants. However, the underlying mechanisms by which doping elements regulate the phase transition in VO are poorly understood. Taking advantage of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, we reveal the atomistic origins by which tungsten (W) dopants influence the phase transition in single crystalline WVO nanowires. Our atomically resolved strain maps clearly show the localized strain normal to the (122¯) lattice planes of the low W-doped monoclinic structure (insulator). These strain maps demonstrate how anisotropic localized stress created by dopants in the monoclinic structure accelerates the phase transition and lead to relaxation of structure in tetragonal form. In contrast, the strain distribution in the high W-doped VO structure is relatively uniform as a result of transition to tetragonal (metallic) phase. The directional strain gradients are furthermore corroborated by density functional theory calculations that show the energetic consequences of distortions to the local structure. These findings pave the roadmap for lattice-stress engineering of the MIT behavior in strongly correlated materials for specific applications such as ultrafast electronic switches and electro-optical sensors.

  5. The cyst-dividing bacterium Ramlibacter tataouinensis TTB310 genome reveals a well-stocked toolbox for adaptation to a desert environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles De Luca

    Full Text Available Ramlibacter tataouinensis TTB310(T (strain TTB310, a betaproteobacterium isolated from a semi-arid region of South Tunisia (Tataouine, is characterized by the presence of both spherical and rod-shaped cells in pure culture. Cell division of strain TTB310 occurs by the binary fission of spherical "cyst-like" cells ("cyst-cyst" division. The rod-shaped cells formed at the periphery of a colony (consisting mainly of cysts are highly motile and colonize a new environment, where they form a new colony by reversion to cyst-like cells. This unique cell cycle of strain TTB310, with desiccation tolerant cyst-like cells capable of division and desiccation sensitive motile rods capable of dissemination, appears to be a novel adaptation for life in a hot and dry desert environment. In order to gain insights into strain TTB310's underlying genetic repertoire and possible mechanisms responsible for its unusual lifestyle, the genome of strain TTB310 was completely sequenced and subsequently annotated. The complete genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 4,070,194 bp with an average G+C content of 70.0%, the highest among the Betaproteobacteria sequenced to date, with total of 3,899 predicted coding sequences covering 92% of the genome. We found that strain TTB310 has developed a highly complex network of two-component systems, which may utilize responses to light and perhaps a rudimentary circadian hourglass to anticipate water availability at the dew time in the middle/end of the desert winter nights and thus direct the growth window to cyclic water availability times. Other interesting features of the strain TTB310 genome that appear to be important for desiccation tolerance, including intermediary metabolism compounds such as trehalose or polyhydroxyalkanoate, and signal transduction pathways, are presented and discussed.

  6. Making yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia translucent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to provide a design guideline for developing tetragonal yttria-stabilized zirconia with improved translucency. Methods The translucency, the in-line transmission in particular, of 3 mol.% yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (3Y-TZP) has been examined using the Rayleigh scattering model. The theory predicts that the in-line transmission of 3Y-TZP can be related to its thickness with grain size and birefringence the governing parameters. To achieve a threshold value of translucency, the critical grain size of 3Y-TZP was predicted for various thicknesses (0.3 – 2.0 mm). The threshold value was defined by a measured average in-line transmission value of a suite of dental porcelains with a common thickness of 1 mm. Our theoretical predictions were calibrated with one of the very few experimental data available in the literature. Results For a dense, high-purity zirconia, its in-line transmission increased with decreasing grain size and thickness. To achieve a translucency similar to that of dental porcelains, a nanocyrstalline 3Y-TZP structure was necessitated, due primarily to its large birefringence and high refractive index. Such a grain size dependence became more pronounced as the 3Y-TZP thickness increased. For example, at a thickness of 1.3 mm, the mean grain size of a translucent 3Y-TZP should be 82 nm. At 1.5 mm and 2 mm thicknesses, the mean grain size needed to be 77 nm and 70 nm, respectively. Significance A promising future for zirconia restorations, with combined translucency and mechanical properties, can be realized by reducing its grain size. PMID:25193781

  7. Point Defect Calculations in Tungsten

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Danilowicz, Ronald

    1968-01-01

    .... The vacancy migration energy for tungsten was calculated. The calculated value of 1.73 electron volts, together with experimental data, suggests that vacancies migrate in stage III recovery in tungsten...

  8. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  9. Gas tungsten arc welder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable axial grinder is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds.

  10. Origin of the Tetragonal Ground State of Heusler Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleev, Sergey V.; Ferrante, Yari; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Jones, Barbara; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-03-01

    We describe the general mechanism of tetragonal distortion in Heusler compounds X2Y Z . From 286 compounds studied using density-functional theory, 62% are found to be tetragonal at zero temperature. Such a large share of compounds with tetragonal distortions can be explained by the peak-and-valley character of the density of states (DOS) of these compounds in the cubic phase (arising from localized d bands and van Hove singularities) in conjunction with a smooth shift of peaky DOS structure relative to the Fermi energy, EF, when valence electrons are added to the system. A shift of the DOS in the Y or Z series leads to an alternation of stable and nonstable cubic phases that depends on the value of the DOS at EF in the cubic phase. Groups of compounds with a large share of tetragonal distortions are identified and explained.

  11. Selective formation of tungsten nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bien Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a process for fabricating self-aligned tungsten (W nanowires with polycrystalline silicon core. Tungsten nanowires as thin as 10 nm were formed by utilizing polysilicon sidewall transfer technology followed by selective deposition of tungsten by chemical vapor deposition (CVD using WF6 as the precursor. With selective CVD, the process is self-limiting whereby the tungsten formation is confined to the polysilicon regions; hence, the nanowires are formed without the need for lithography or for additional processing. The fabricated tungsten nanowires were observed to be perfectly aligned, showing 100% selectivity to polysilicon and can be made to be electrically isolated from one another. The electrical conductivity of the nanowires was characterized to determine the effect of its physical dimensions. The conductivity for the tungsten nanowires were found to be 40% higher when compared to doped polysilicon nanowires of similar dimensions.

  12. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  13. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  14. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  15. Pressure induced phase transitions in ceramic compounds containing tetragonal zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Pfeiffer, G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Stabilized tetragonal zirconia compounds exhibit a transformation toughening process in which stress applied to the material induces a crystallographic phase transition. The phase transition is accompanied by a volume expansion in the stressed region thereby dissipating stress and increasing the fracture strength of the material. The hydrostatic component of the stress required to induce the phase transition can be investigated by the use of a high pressure technique in combination with Micro-Raman spectroscopy. The intensity of Raman lines characteristic for the crystallographic phases can be used to calculate the amount of material that has undergone the transition as a function of pressure. It was found that pressures on the order of 2-5 kBar were sufficient to produce an almost complete transition from the original tetragonal to the less dense monoclinic phase; while a further increase in pressure caused a gradual reversal of the transition back to the original tetragonal structure.

  16. Light activated phase transformation of metastable tetragonal nanocrystalline zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard; Almdal, Kristoffer; van Lelieveld, A

    2012-01-01

    This study searches for small molecules, which can be generated by photoacid generators (PAGs) capable of inducing the tetragonal-to-monoclinic transformation in zirconia nanocrystals. Metastable tetragonal zirconia nanocrystals were exposed in alcohol suspension. X-ray diffraction analysis showed...... that water, HCl, HF, and NH3, all initiate phase transformation of tetragonal zirconia at room temperature, whereas NBu4Cl and NBu4OH do not. 2-(4-Methoxystyryl)-4,6-bis(trichloromethyl)-1,3,5-triazine) was the most efficient (monoclinic volume fraction reached 0.57) out of the four tested PAGs....... For dispersion in a dimethacrylate matrix together with zirconia crystals, a monoclinic volume fraction of 0.19 was observed after 2 min of exposure to light, increasing to 0.6 after 30 min....

  17. Thermodynamics of tetragonal zirconia formation in a nanolaminate film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, C. R.; Wiggins, M. D.; Whig, R.; Scanlan, C. M.; Gajdardziska-Josifovska, M.

    1996-01-01

    Zirconia-alumina transformation-toughening nanolaminates were fabricated by reactive sputter deposition. The average crystallite size and volume fraction of each zirconia polymorph were determined by x-ray diffraction. The volume fraction of tetragonal zirconia, the phase necessary for transformation toughening, was found to strongly depend upon the zirconia layer thickness. An end-point thermodynamics model involving hemispherical cap zirconia crystallites was developed to explain this phenomenon. In excellent agreement with experimental results, the model predicts that unity volume fraction of tetragonal zirconia is produced in the nanolaminate when the zirconia layer thickness is less than the radius at which a growing zirconia crystallite spontaneously transforms to the monoclinic phase.

  18. superplastic deep drawing of tetragonal zirconia ceramics at 1160 C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Boutz, M.M.R.; Boutz, M.M.R.

    1998-01-01

    Superplastic forming under biaxial tension of tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) is investigated by pushing a hemispherical punch (radius 6 mm) on Y-TZP which was placed on a ring with an inner diameter of 16·7 mm. Dense Y-TZP samples with a grain diameter of 125 nm could be elongated to a dome height of

  19. A genus six cyclic tetragonal reduction of the Benney equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, M; Gibbons, J

    2009-01-01

    A reduction of Benney's equations is constructed corresponding to Schwartz-Christoffel maps associated with a family of genus six cyclic tetragonal curves. The mapping function, a second kind Abelian integral on the associated Riemann surface, is constructed explicitly as a rational expression in derivatives of the Kleinian σ-function of the curve.

  20. The epitaxial Bain path of antiferromagnetic tetragonal Mn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, S. L.; Marcus, P. M.; Ma, Hong

    2000-03-01

    The epitaxial Bain path (EBP) of antiferromagnetic (AF) tetragonal Mn has been found by first-principles total-energy calculations using the full-potential linearized-augmented-plane-wave (FLAPW) method with two different potentials: (1) the local-spin-density-approximation without relativistic corrections (LSDA-NREL) and (2) the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof exchange-correlation potential in a generalized-gradient-approximation with relativistic corrections (GGA-REL). The EBP curve of AF Mn from the LSDA-NREL calculations shows a metastable tetragonal state at c/a = 0.68 (fct notation) and a stable tetragonal state at c/a = 0.99. The EBP curve from the GGA-REL calculations shows that these two states are at c/a = 0.60 and 0.96 respectively. Alloy measurements[1] find the stable tetragonal state at c/a = 0.95. The bcc state at c/a = 0.707 is inherently unstable from both LSDA and GGA calculations. The volume vs c/a curve shows that when grown epitaxially[2] on V and Pd, the AF Mn films are strained δ-Mn and γ-Mn respectively. [1] Y. Endoh and Y. Ishikawa, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn., 30 1614 (1971). [2] Y. Tian, F. Jona, and P. M. Marcus, Phys. Rev. B59, 12647 (1999).

  1. Preparation method of tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation of tungsten carbide in powder form from tungsten oxide powder in which the tungsten oxide is heated to 800-1,050 0 C, preferably to 850 0 C, and is reduced by the addition of carbon monoxide. The partial pressure of the CO 2 then formed must be kept below a necessary equilibrium value for the formation of the carbide. The waste gas (with max. 20 Vol% CO 2 ) is hardly reduced and is recycled in the circuit. (UWI) [de

  2. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    length of the sample. Density measurements were also taken before and after testing using Archimedes principle . Samples were also tested at room...commonly seen in body centered cubic (BCC) metals and can be attributed to dislocation mobility theories (8). The basic principles are that the...processing of nano-tungsten and nano-tungsten alloys to achieve superior strength, ductility, and fracture toughness for room temperature applications

  3. Micro creep mechanisms of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoy, R.; Hugon, I.; Burlet, H.; Baillin, X.; Guetaz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Due to its high melting point (3410 deg C), tungsten offers good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures for several applications in non-oxidizing environment. The creep behavior of tungsten is well known between 1200 and 2500 deg C and 10 -3 to 10 -1 strain. However, in some applications when dimensional stability of components is required, these strains are excessive and it is necessary to know the creep behavior of the material for micro-strains (between 10 -4 and 10 -6 ). Methods and devices used to measure creep micro-strains are presented, and creep equations (Norton and Chaboche laws) were developed for wrought, annealed and recrystallized tungsten. The main results obtained on tungsten under low stresses are: stress exponent 1, symmetry of micro-strains in creep-tension and creep-compression, inverse creep (threshold stress), etc. TEM, SEM and EBSD studies allow interpretation of the micro-creep mechanism of tungsten under low stresses and low temperature (∼0.3 K) like the Harper-Dorn creep. In Harper-Dorn creep, micro-strains are associated with the density and the distribution of dislocations existing in the crystals before creep. At 975 deg C, the initial dislocation structure moves differently whether or not a stress is applied. To improve the micro-creep behavior of tungsten, a heat treatment is proposed to create the optimum dislocation structure. (authors)

  4. Twin wall of proper cubic-tetragonal ferroelastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curnoe, S. H.; Jacobs, A. E.

    2000-11-01

    We derive solutions for the twin wall linking two tetragonal variants of proper cubic-tetragonal ferroelastics, including the dilatational and shear energies and strains. Our solutions satisfy the compatibility relations exactly and are obtained at all temperatures. They require four nonvanishing strains except at the Barsch-Krumhansl temperature TBK (where only the two deviatoric strains are needed). Between the critical temperature and TBK, material in the wall region is dilated, while below TBK it is compressed; we estimate a compression of ~1% for Fe-Pd alloys. In agreement with experiment and more general theory, the twin wall lies in a cubic 110-type plane. We obtain the wall energy numerically as a function of temperature and we derive a simple estimate which agrees well with these values.

  5. Location of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography had found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystal grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four of these sites corresponded to four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged, even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  6. Chemically ordered face-centred tetragonal Fe–Pt nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... Chemically ordered face-centred tetragonal (fct) Fe–Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) embedded SiO2 films were synthesized on ... Heat treatment of Fe/Pt co-doped films in air caused generation of Pt NPs first. At this stage, Fe ..... NPs (a small Fe metal peak is observed in figure 3a, curve 2) and most of the iron ...

  7. Effect of additives on densification and deformation of tetragonal zirconia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutz, M.M.R.; Boutz, M.M.R.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Hartgers, F.; Burggraaf, A.J.; Burggraaf, Anthonie

    1994-01-01

    The effect of additives (Bi2O3, Fe2O3) on densification and creep rates of tetragonal ZrO2-Y2O3 has been investigated. In Bi2O3-doped Y-TZP, a reactive liquid forms at temperatures above 800–900DaggerC, which leads to a strong enhancement of densification for concentrations of 1–2 mol % Bi2O3.

  8. Role of sintering time, crystalline phases and symmetry in the piezoelectric properties of lead-free KNN-modified ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubio-Marcos, F., E-mail: frmarcos@icv.csic.es [Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Marchet, P.; Merle-Mejean, T. [SPCTS, UMR 6638 CNRS, Universite de Limoges, 123, Av. A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Fernandez, J.F. [Electroceramic Department, Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, CSIC, Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-01

    Lead-free KNN-modified piezoceramics of the system (Li,Na,K)(Nb,Ta,Sb)O{sub 3} were prepared by conventional solid-state sintering. The X-ray diffraction patterns revealed a perovskite phase, together with some minor secondary phase, which was assigned to K{sub 3}LiNb{sub 6}O{sub 17}, tetragonal tungsten-bronze (TTB). A structural evolution toward a pure tetragonal structure with the increasing sintering time was observed, associated with the decrease of TTB phase. A correlation between higher tetragonality and higher piezoelectric response was clearly evidenced. Contrary to the case of the LiTaO{sub 3} modified KNN, very large abnormal grains with TTB structure were not detected. As a consequence, the simultaneous modification by tantalum and antimony seems to induce during sintering a different behaviour from the one of LiTaO{sub 3} modified KNN.

  9. Tungsten contamination in ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Magni, D.; Mica, I.

    2016-06-15

    In this paper the tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes is studied by DLTS analysis both in typical operating conditions and after contamination of the implanter by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer. Of course the contaminant concentration is orders of magnitude higher after contamination of the implanter, but in addition our data show that different mechanisms are active in a not contaminated and in a contaminated implanter. A moderate tungsten contamination is observed also in a not contaminated implanter, however in that case contamination is completely not energetic and can be effectively screened by a very thin oxide. On the contrary, the contamination due to an implantation in a previously contaminated implanter is reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide. The comparison with SRIM calculations confirms that the observed deep penetration of the contaminant cannot be explained by a plain sputtering mechanism.

  10. 49 CFR 173.338 - Tungsten hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.338 Tungsten hexafluoride. (a) Tungsten... shipped in an overpack that meets the provisions of § 173.40. (b) In place of the volumetric expansion... expansion test, must be condemned if removed from tungsten hexafluoride service. [ 74 FR 16143, Apr. 9, 2009...

  11. Anodic oxide films on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paola, A.; Di Quarto, F.; Sunseri, C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphology of anodic oxide films on tungsten, obtained in various conditions of anodization. Studies were made of the growth of porous films, whose thickness increases with time and depends upon the current density. Temperature and electrolyte composition influence the film morphology. Gravimetric measurements of film dissolution at 70 0 C show that after a transient time, the rate of metal dissolution and that of film formation coincide. The porous films thicken because tungsten dissolves as WO 2 2+ and precipitates as WO 3 .H 2 O. (author)

  12. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  13. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  14. Modeling the growth rates of tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meirong; Nadarajah, Arunan; Pusey, Marc L.

    1995-11-01

    Although the faceted growth of tetragonal lysozyme crystals is known to occur by 2D nucleation and dislocation-led growth, the measured growth rates do not follow model predictions based on these mechanisms. One possible reason for this deviation is that these models ignore the highly aggregated state of lysozyme in supersaturated solutions. In this study a growth mechanism for tetragonal lysozyme crystals involving aggregation reactions leading to the formation of the growth unit, mass transport of the growth unit to the crystal interface and faceted crystal growth by growth unit addition, is proposed. The distribution of aggregates in lysozyme nutrient solutions were determined from the equilibrium aggregation reactions and comparisons were made with growth rates calculated from the model based on the proposed mechanism and the measured growth rate data. The results indicated than an octamer corresponding to the tetragonal crystal unit cell was the most likely growth unit for the process. Remarkably good fits were obtained with this model to the measured growth rate data for three sets of pH and salt concentrations, suggesting the validity of the proposed mechanism. The values of the kinetic coefficient for the step velocity was in the range for small molecule crystal growth and the heats of reaction compared well with that obtained from lysozyme solubility data. The results presented here suggest that the inorganic and protein crystal growth processes are quite similar in many ways. Lysozyme crystal growth differs primarily due to growth by an aggregate growth unit and in the effect of nutrient solution conditions on the protein aggregation process.

  15. Inhibition of surface bound carbonate stabilization of tetragonal zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Skovgaard; Almdal, Kristoffer; Lelieveld, A. van

    2011-01-01

    Water is known to initiate a tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia particles. Carbonates on the zirconia surface react with water molecules and hence reduce the transformation rate. This study investigates the possibility of inhibition of the reaction between surface carbonates...... and water in order to increase the transformation rate in the zirconia crystals. It was found possible to limit the reaction by reacting the surface carbonates with alcohols, a thiol and a primary amide prior to reaction with water. It was also concluded that di- and trialcohols are able to stabilize...

  16. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Huang, Yin-Yan

    1998-01-01

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  17. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  18. Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Todd, D. T.; Wooten, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    A two-year program investigated vacuum gas tungsten arc welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. After a vacuum chamber and GTAW power supply were modified, several difficult-to-weld materials were studied and key parameters developed. Finally, Incoloy 903 weld overlays were produced without microfissures.

  19. Phase field modelling of precipitate morphologies in systems with tetragonal interfacial free energy anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Arijit; Gururajan, M P

    2017-01-01

    A wide variety of morphologies arise due to the tetragonal anisotropy in interfacial free energy. In this paper, we report on a family of Extended Cahn-Hilliard (ECH) models for incorporating tetragonal anisotropy in interfacial free energy. We list the non-zero and independent parameters that are introduced in our model and list the constraints on them. For appropriate choice of these parameters, our model can produce a many of the morphologies seen in tetragonal systems such as di-pyramids,...

  20. Locations of Bromide Ions in Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kap; Nadarajah, Arunan; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Anions have been shown to play a dominant role in the crystallization of chicken egg-white lysozyme from salt solutions. Previous studies employing X-ray crystallography have found one chloride ion binding site in the tetragonal crystal form of the protein and four nitrate ion binding sites in the monoclinic form. In this study the anion positions in the tetragonal form were determined from the difference Fourier map obtained from lysozyme crystals grown in bromide and chloride solutions. Five possible anion-binding sites were found in this manner. Some of these sites were in pockets containing basic residues while others were near neutral, but polar, residues. The sole chloride ion binding site found in previous studies was confirmed, while four further sites were found which corresponded to the four binding sites found for nitrate ions in monoclinic crystals. The study suggests that most of the anion-binding sites in lysozyme remain unchanged even when different anions and different crystal forms of lysozyme are employed.

  1. Tensile behaviour of drawn tungsten wire used in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Feichtmayer, A.; Fuhr, M.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Gietl, H.; Höschen, T.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2017-12-01

    In tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W) the brittleness problem of tungsten is solved by utilizing extrinsic toughening mechanisms. The properties of the composite are very much related to the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as fibre reinforcements. Its high strength and capability of ductile deformation are ideal properties facilitating toughening of Wf/W. Tensile tests have been used for determining mechanical properties and study the deformation and the fracture behaviour of the wire. Tests of as-fabricated and straightened drawn wires with a diameter between 16 and 150 μm as well as wire electrochemically thinned to a diameter of 5 μm have been performed. Engineering stress–strain curves and a microscopic analysis are presented with the focus on the ultimate strength. All fibres show a comparable stress–strain behaviour comprising necking followed by a ductile fracture. A reduction of the diameter by drawing leads to an increase of strength up to 4500 MPa as a consequence of a grain boundary hardening mechanism. Heat treatment during straightening decreases the strength whereas electrochemical thinning has no significant impact on the mechanical behaviour.

  2. Structural study on cubic-tetragonal transition of CH3NH3PbI3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Yukihiko; Mashiyama, Hiroyuki; Hasebe, Katsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    The cubic-tetragonal phase transition of CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3 was investigated by single crystal X-ray diffractometry. The crystal structure was refined at five temperatures in the tetragonal phase. The PbI 6 octahedron rotates around the c-axis alternatively to construct the SrTiO 3 -type tetragonal structure. A methylammonium ion is partially ordered; 24 disordered states in the cubic phase are reduced to 8. With decreasing temperature, the rotation angle of the octahedron increases monotonically, which indicates it is an order parameter of the cubic-tetragonal transition. (author)

  3. Influence of synthesis methods on tungsten dispersion, structural deformation, and surface acidity in binary WO3-ZrO2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Jácome, M A; Toledo, J A; Angeles-Chavez, C; Aguilar, M; Wang, J A

    2005-12-08

    WO3-ZrO2 catalysts were synthesized by precipitating the aqueous solutions of zirconium oxynitrate and ammonium metatungstate with ammonium hydroxide. The white slurry precipitate was treated under three different conditions. In the as-made materials, the amorphous phase was formed in the aged and refluxed samples, while well-crystallized tetragonal and monoclinic phases were obtained in the hydrothermally treated sample. The real amount of tungsten loaded in the samples was similar for the three samples, independently of the treatments; however, the tungsten surface atomic density in the annealed WO3-ZrO2 samples varied between 6 and 9 W atoms/nm2. Two different contrast types of aggregates were determined by scanning electron microscopy, the white particles which are rich in W, and the gray ones which are rich in zirconium; both of them were formed in the calcined solids prepared under aging or reflux condition. A very high dispersion of tungsten species on the zirconia surface was achieved in the hydrothermally treated sample. The degree of the interaction between WO(x) and ZrO2 surface strongly modified the Zr-O bond lengths and bond angles in the structure of tetragonal zirconia as proved by X-ray diffraction analysis and the Rietveld refinement. The catalyst obtained under hydrothermal condition exhibited the highest dispersion of tungsten species in the zirconia, which in turn causes strong structural deformation of the tetragonal ZrO2 phase responsible of the strongest surface acidity and, consequently, the optimum catalytic activity for n-hexane isomerization.

  4. Magnetic antiskyrmions above room temperature in tetragonal Heusler materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Ajaya K.; Kumar, Vivek; Ma, Tianping; Werner, Peter; Pippel, Eckhard; Sahoo, Roshnee; Damay, Franoise; Rößler, Ulrich K.; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic skyrmions are topologically stable, vortex-like objects surrounded by chiral boundaries that separate a region of reversed magnetization from the surrounding magnetized material. They are closely related to nanoscopic chiral magnetic domain walls, which could be used as memory and logic elements for conventional and neuromorphic computing applications that go beyond Moore’s law. Of particular interest is ‘racetrack memory’, which is composed of vertical magnetic nanowires, each accommodating of the order of 100 domain walls, and that shows promise as a solid state, non-volatile memory with exceptional capacity and performance. Its performance is derived from the very high speeds (up to one kilometre per second) at which chiral domain walls can be moved with nanosecond current pulses in synthetic antiferromagnet racetracks. Because skyrmions are essentially composed of a pair of chiral domain walls closed in on themselves, but are, in principle, more stable to perturbations than the component domain walls themselves, they are attractive for use in spintronic applications, notably racetrack memory. Stabilization of skyrmions has generally been achieved in systems with broken inversion symmetry, in which the asymmetric Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction modifies the uniform magnetic state to a swirling state. Depending on the crystal symmetry, two distinct types of skyrmions have been observed experimentally, namely, Bloch and Néel skyrmions. Here we present the experimental manifestation of another type of skyrmion—the magnetic antiskyrmion—in acentric tetragonal Heusler compounds with D2d crystal symmetry. Antiskyrmions are characterized by boundary walls that have alternating Bloch and Néel type as one traces around the boundary. A spiral magnetic ground-state, which propagates in the tetragonal basal plane, is transformed into an antiskyrmion lattice state under magnetic fields applied along the tetragonal axis over a wide range of temperatures

  5. Tungsten monocrystal cutting without distortion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudkin, A.Yu.; Matveev, I.V.; Cheremisin, S.M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrolyte with high electric current localization, containing 1-3 % KOH and 2-10 % NH 3 , is suggested to use for electrochemical cutting of tungsten. A cutting device is described which includes a cathode feed mechanism based on electric heating and a circuit of automatic control of an interelectrode gap. Laue patterns obtained from a cut surface are practically the same as ones from the initial monocrystal

  6. Adsorption and condensation of bismuth on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon, T.; Sidorski, Z.

    1979-01-01

    The bismuth-tungsten system was studied by means of field emission microscopy. The average work function changes induced by the bismuth adsorption were measured for different amounts of adsorbed bismuth. It was found that the adsorption of bismuth changes the work function of tungsten only slightly. The penetration of bismuth into the tungsten substrate was observed. The growth of bismuth single crystals was studied when bismuth was deposited with a rate of about 6 monolayers per minute onto the tungsten substrate and kept at 470 K. Bismuth single crystals with two-fold symmetry occurred most often on the (100) tungsten planes. On the (111) tungsten plane bismuth crystals with three-fold symmetry were observed. An explanation of the observed phenomena is proposed. (Auth.)

  7. Inelastic neutron scattering in tetragonal KNbO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.D.; Dolling, G.; Kugel, G.E.; Carabatos, C.

    1979-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering experiments in tetragonal KNbO 3 show a high anisotropy in some regions of the phonon dispersion relation and the existence of strong one-dimensional intercell correlations between atomic motions along the [100] and [010] directions, in agreement with x-ray diffuse-scattering measurements in the same phase. The transverse phonon modes propagating normally to these directions of strong correlations, that is, with polarization vectors parallel to them, are relatively soft, not only near the zone center but all the way to the zone boundary. Comparison of these results with the Raman, neutron, and x-ray data obtained in the other phases suggests a description of the ferroelectric phase transition mechanism in KNbO 3 in terms of soft modes and dynamic correlations in each phase. (author)

  8. Tetragonal Chicken Egg White Lysozyme Solubility in Sodium Chloride Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    The solubility of chicken egg white lysozyme, crystallized in the tetragonal form was measured in sodium chloride solutions from 1.6 to 30.7 C, using a miniature column solubility apparatus. Sodium chloride solution concentrations ranged from 1 to 7% (w/v). The solutions were buffered with 0.1 M sodium acetate buffer with the solubility being measured at pH values in 0.2 pH unit increments in the range pH 4.0 to 5.4, with data also included at pH 4.5. Lysozyme solubility was found to increase with increases in temperature and decreasing salt concentration. Solution pH has a varied and unpredictable effect on solubility.

  9. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study Using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from currentless plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of W 24+ to W 33+ ions are very sensitive to electron temperature (Te) and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. Based on the first quantitative analysis of measured spatial profile of W 44+ ion, the tungsten concentration is determined to be n(W 44+ )/n e = 1.4x10 -4 and the total radiation loss is estimated as ∼4 MW, of which the value is roughly half the total NBI power. (author)

  10. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  11. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Effects on Flora & Fauna • Geochemistry • Soil microbial communities • Plants • Soil invertebrates • Higher order animals • Additional studies BUILDING...Bioaccumulation of Tungsten in Plants Natural Sources • Trees & shrubs in Rocky Mountain region, USA • Siberian pine, willows, mosses & lichen in tungsten

  12. Structures and transitions in tungsten grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhu, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marian, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-07

    The objective of this study is to develop a computational methodology to predict structure, energies of tungsten grain boundaries as a function of misorientation and inclination. The energies and the mobilities are the necessary input for thermomechanical model of recrystallization of tungsten for magnetic fusion applications being developed by the Marian Group at UCLA.

  13. International strategic mineral issues summary report: tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Antony B.T.; Sinclair, W. David; Amey, Earle B.

    1998-01-01

    Scheelite and wolframite are the principal minerals currently mined for tungsten. Both occur in hard-rock deposits; wolframite is also recovered from placer deposits. Most current mine production of tungsten is from vein/stockwork, skarn, porphyry, and strata-bound deposits. Minor amounts are produced from disseminated, pegmatite, breccia, and placer deposits.

  14. Quenching and recovery experiments on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasch, K.D.; Siegel, R.W.; Schultz, H.

    1976-01-01

    A short summary is given of new results concerning transmission electron microscopy and resistivity measurements on quenched tungsten. These results give evidence for the first time that the quenching and annealing of high purity tungsten leads to vacancy--defect clustering resulting in small voids observable in the electron microscope. 21 references

  15. Development of Tungsten Based Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-01

    CONTENTS Section Title Page 1 INTRODUCTION & SUMMARY .............................. 1 2 MATERIAL SELECTION .................................. 3 3...Metallographic Examination .. 41 - iv - 1. INTRODUCTION & SUMMARY This is the. Final Report on a Phase I SBIR Program entitled "Development of Tungsten Based...m = - -𔃺 S (l- 1- =11 = (t) 011CU ’a . 4) woj .- :2 01w c L .0 u .-. 0C 0 goa - L 0d MCDM . 3 -X - z 1 m- L. S.1 MCDM -z3-2: S - m 1 o. 01 In 0,10Lnw

  16. [Effects of colorants on yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals powder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jianfeng; Zhang, Yanchun; Wang, Ru

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of Fe2O3 and CeO2 as colorants on yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia poly-crystals (Y-TZP) powder. The spray granulation slurry of colored zirconia was prepared with different concentrations of Fe2O3 (0.15%) and CeO2 (4%), which were added in Y-TZP. Zirconia powder was made by spray granulation. The powder specimens were divided into three groups: uncolored zirconia, Fe2O3 (0.15%) zirconia, and CeO2 (4%) zirconia. The particle morphologies of the powder specimens were measured with a laser particle size analyzer and an optical microscope. The differences in D50 among the three groups were statistically significant (PCeO2 and uncolored zirconia (PCeO2 (P>0.05). Mostly spherical powder was observed in the three groups. Fe2O3 as a colorant can affect particles, whereas CeO2 has no effect.

  17. Thermal stability of simple tetragonal and hexagonal diamond germanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, L. Q.; Johnson, B. C.; Haberl, B.; Wong, S.; Williams, J. S.; Bradby, J. E.

    2017-11-01

    Exotic phases of germanium, that form under high pressure but persist under ambient conditions, are of technological interest due to their unique optical and electrical properties. The thermal evolution and stability of two of these exotic Ge phases, the simple tetragonal (st12) and hexagonal diamond (hd) phases, are investigated in detail. These metastable phases, formed by high pressure decompression in either a diamond anvil cell or by nanoindentation, are annealed at temperatures ranging from 280 to 320 °C for st12-Ge and 200 to 550 °C for hd-Ge. In both cases, the exotic phases originated from entirely pure Ge precursor materials. Raman microspectroscopy is used to monitor the phase changes ex situ following annealing. Our results show that hd-Ge synthesized via a pure form of a-Ge first undergoes a subtle change in structure and then an irreversible phase transformation to dc-Ge with an activation energy of (4.3 ± 0.2) eV at higher temperatures. St12-Ge was found to transform to dc-Ge with an activation energy of (1.44 ± 0.08) eV. Taken together with results from previous studies, this study allows for intriguing comparisons with silicon and suggests promising technological applications.

  18. Condensation of tetragonal zirconia polycrystals by reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, I-M. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Yeh, S.-W. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chiou, S.-Y. [Department of Mold and Die Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Science, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Gan Dershin [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: dgan@mail.nsysu.edu.tw; Shen Pouyan [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2005-11-22

    Reactive sputtering on metallic Zr target under various oxygen flow rates was employed to produce nanocrystalline zirconia condensates, which were collected on a carbon-coated collodion film for analytical electron microscopic observations. With an Ar flow rate of 28 sccm, the collected condensates are cubic and tetragonal (t-) zirconia less than 10 nm in size under 0-2 sccm oxygen flow rate and increased to 10-20 nm in size with partial t- to monoclinic (m-) zirconia transformation at 3 sccm. Between 4 and 4.5 sccm, t-zirconia polycrystals (TZP) about 20 nm in grain size were formed by coalescence of the t-zirconia condensates. Above 6 sccm, the (111) and {l_brace}100{r_brace} specific coalescence as well as random attachment prevailed to form larger (> 30 nm) individual condensates of m-zirconia as the critical size of martensitic t-m transformation is exceeded. The TZP formation can be accounted for by the small grain size, the presence of low-valence Zr cation and the lateral constraint of neighboring grains.

  19. Shock Response and Structure Of Yttria-Doped Tetragonal Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyavskiy, Vladimir; Savinykh, Andrey; Akopov, Felix; Borovkova, Leonora; Valiano, Georgy; Borodina, Tatiana; Lukin, Evgeny; Popova, Nelia; Ziborov, Vadim

    2011-06-01

    A new technology of ceramics manufacturing is proposed. The technology is based on zirconium dioxide, partially stabilized by yttria, obtained by a heterophased chemical deposition method. The main properties of the manufactured ceramics have been characterized by us: density of 5.79 g * cm-3 , bending strength of ~800 MPa, crack resistance of ~8 MPa *m 0 . 5 , microhardness of ~15 GPa. The microstructure and phase composition have been also investigated. The average size of sintered ceramic grains was 0.6 micron. It was established that the ceramics consisted of 93 mass % tetragonal and 7 mass % monoclinic phase and had X-ray density of 6.18 g * cm-3 . We have obtained longitudinal and transversal sonic speed relation to the frequency range of 1.25 -- 10 MHz. The measurements have shown dispersion occurrence. At dynamic loading the PSZD ceramics had shown high efficiency in Hugoniot elastic limit and spall strength. The work was supported by the Ministry of education and science of the Russian Federation (Contract No. 02.740.11.0200).

  20. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  1. Formation of metastable tetragonal zirconia nanoparticles: Competitive influence of the dopants and surface state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorban, Oksana, E-mail: matscidep@aim.com [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after A.A. Galkin of the NAS of Ukraine, Nauki av. 46, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Synyakina, Susanna; Volkova, Galina; Gorban, Sergey; Konstantiova, Tetyana [Donetsk Institute for Physics and Engineering named after A.A. Galkin of the NAS of Ukraine, Nauki av. 46, Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Lyubchik, Svetlana, E-mail: s_lyubchik@yahoo.com [REQUIMTE, Universida de Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2015-12-15

    The effect of the surface modification of the nanoparticles of amorphous and crystalline partially stabilized zirconia by fluoride ions on stability of the metastable tetragonal phase was investigated. Based on the DSC, titrimetry and FTIR spectroscopy data it was proven that surface modification of the xerogel resulted from an exchange of the fluoride ions with the basic OH groups. The effect of the powder pre-calcination temperature before modification on the formation of metastable tetragonal phase in partially stabilized zirconia was investigated. It was shown that the main factor of tetragonal zirconia stabilization is the state of nanoparticles surface at pre-crystallization temperatures.

  2. Lattice vibrations and cubic to tetragonal phase transition in ZrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negita, K.

    1989-01-01

    On the basis of analyses of phonon modes in ZrO 2 , it is suggested that condensation of a phonon X 2 - at the cubic Brillouin zone boundary X point, (0, 0, 2 π/a), is associated with the cubic to tetragonal phase transition in ZrO 2 . Free energy consideration shows that spontaneous volume and shear strains, e Alg = (e 1 +e 2 +e 3 ) and e Eg = (2e 3 - e 1 - e 2 )/ Λ3, are induced in the tetragonal phase as a result of indirect couplings of the X 2 - mode to homogeneous elastic strains; the tetragonal phase is improper ferroelastic

  3. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  4. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  5. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jay L. [Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755 (United States)], E-mail: Jay.L.Clausen@erdc.usace.army.mil; Korte, Nic [1946 Clover Ct., Grand Junction, Colorado, 81506 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use.

  6. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  7. Thin films sputtered from Ba{sub 2}NdFeNb{sub 4}O{sub 15} multiferroic targets on BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} coated substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodeux, Romain [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Michau, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.michau@icmcb.cnrs.fr [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Maglione, Mario; Josse, Michaël [CNRS, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France); Univ. Bordeaux, ICMCB, UPR 9048, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of Ba{sub 2}NdFeNb{sub 4}O{sub 15}/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (BaM) heterostructures by RF magnetron sputtering. • Growth of TTB layer were retained regardless of the underlayer (Pt bottom electrode or BaM). • Dielectric and magnetic properties were obtained from the Pt/TTB/BaM/Pt stacks. - Abstract: Ba{sub 2}NdFeNb{sub 4}O{sub 15} tetragonal tungsten bronze (TTB)/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (BaM) hexaferrite bilayers have been grown by RF magnetron sputtering on Pt/TiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si (PtS) substrates. The BaM layer is textured along (0 0 1) while the TTB layer is multioriented regardless of the PtS or BaM/PtS substrate. Dielectric properties of TTB films are similar to those of bulk, i.e., ε ∼ 150 and a magnetic hysteresis loop is obtained from TTB/BaM bilayers, thanks to the BaM component. This demonstrates the possibility of transferring to 2 dimensional structures the composite multiferroic system TTB/BaM previously identified in 3 dimensional bulk ceramics.

  8. Phase field modeling of tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation in zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamivand, Mahmood

    Zirconia based ceramics are strong, hard, inert, and smooth, with low thermal conductivity and good biocompatibility. Such properties made zirconia ceramics an ideal material for different applications form thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to biomedicine applications like femoral implants and dental bridges. However, this unusual versatility of excellent properties would be mediated by the metastable tetragonal (or cubic) transformation to the stable monoclinic phase after a certain exposure at service temperatures. This transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic, known as LTD (low temperature degradation) in biomedical application, proceeds by propagation of martensite, which corresponds to transformation twinning. As such, tetragonal to monoclinic transformation is highly sensitive to mechanical and chemomechanical stresses. It is known in fact that this transformation is the source of the fracture toughening in stabilized zirconia as it occurs at the stress concentration regions ahead of the crack tip. This dissertation is an attempt to provide a kinetic-based model for tetragonal to monoclinic transformation in zirconia. We used the phase field technique to capture the temporal and spatial evolution of monoclinic phase. In addition to morphological patterns, we were able to calculate the developed internal stresses during tetragonal to monoclinic transformation. The model was started form the two dimensional single crystal then was expanded to the two dimensional polycrystalline and finally to the three dimensional single crystal. The model is able to predict the most physical properties associated with tetragonal to monoclinic transformation in zirconia including: morphological patterns, transformation toughening, shape memory effect, pseudoelasticity, surface uplift, and variants impingement. The model was benched marked with several experimental works. The good agreements between simulation results and experimental data, make the model a reliable tool for

  9. Phase transition of tetragonal copper sulfide Cu2S at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, D.; Ruiz-Fuertes, J.; Bayarjargal, L.; Haussühl, E.; Winkler, B.; Zhang, J.; Jin, C. Q.; Milman, V.; Alig, E.; Fink, L.

    2017-08-01

    The low-temperature behavior of tetragonal copper sulfide, Cu2S , was investigated by powder and single-crystal x-ray diffraction, calorimetry, electrical resistance measurements, and ambient temperature optical absorption spectroscopy. The experiments were complemented by density-functional-theory-based calculations. High-quality, polycrystalline samples and single crystals of tetragonal copper sulfide were synthesized at 5 GPa and 700 K in a large volume multianvil press. Tetragonal Cu2S undergoes a temperature-induced phase transition to an orthorhombic structure at around 202 K with a hysteresis of ±21 K, an enthalpy of reaction of 1.3(2) kJ mol-1 , and an entropy of reaction of 6.5(2) J mol-1K-1 . The temperature dependence of the heat capacity at the transition temperature indicates that the transition from the tetragonal to the low-temperature polymorph is not a single process. The structure of the low-temperature polymorph at 100 K was solved in space group P n a 21 . The structure is based on a slightly distorted cubic close packing of sulfur with copper in threefold coordination similar to the structure of tetragonal copper sulfide. The electrical resistance changes several orders of magnitude at the transition following the temperature hysteresis. The activation energy of the conductivity for the tetragonal phase and the low-temperature polymorph are 0.15(2) and 0.22(1) eV, respectively. The direct band gap of the tetragonal polymorph is found to be 1.04(2) eV with the absorption spectrum following Urbach's law. The activation energies and the band gaps of both phases are discussed with respect to the results of the calculated electronic band structures.

  10. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  11. Extraction Factor Of Tungsten Sources From Tungsten Scraps By Zinc Decomposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition promoting factors and extraction process of tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders in the zinc decomposition process of tungsten scraps which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide and cobalt were evaluated. Zinc volatility was suppressed by the enclosed graphite crucible and zinc volatilization pressure was produced in the reaction graphite crucible inside an electric furnace for ZDP (Zinc Decomposition Process. Decomposition reaction was done for 2hours at 650°, which 100% decomposed the tungsten scraps that were over 30 mm thick. Decomposed scraps were pulverized under 75μm and were composed of tungsten carbide and cobalt identified by the XRD (X-ray Diffraction. To produce the WC(Tungsten Carbide powder directly from decomposed scraps, pulverized powders were reacted with hydrochloric acid to remove the cobalt binder. Also to produce the tungstic acid, pulverized powders were reacted with aqua regia to remove the cobalt binder and oxidize the tungsten carbide. Tungsten carbide and tungstic acid powders were identified by XRD and chemical composition analysis.

  12. Deuterium retention in tungsten and tungsten-tantalum alloys exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Hoen, M. H. J. 't; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2012-01-01

    A direct comparison of deuterium retention in samples of tungsten and two grades of tungsten-tantalum alloys-W-1% Ta and W-5% Ta, exposed to deuterium plasmas (ion flux similar to 10(24) m(-2) s(-1), ion energy at the biased target similar to 50 eV) at the plasma generator Pilot-PSI was performed

  13. Soliton twin boundaries of the cubic-tetragonal martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, A.; Bishop, A. R.

    Described here is one set of results from a comprehensive study of the cubic-tetragonal Martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials. The model being used is the soliton model of Barsch and Krumhansl which exhibits a first-order cubic-tetragonal martensitic phase transition. This is a nonlinear and nonlocal three-dimensional continuum model, with a two-component strain order parameter. The structure and the energy of the static (or traveling) soliton strain boundaries, associated with the minimal total free energy, is calculated at all temperatures. Insight is also gained of the corresponding type of trajectories in the order parameter space. Approaching the first-order transition temperature from below, the tetragonal-tetragonal soliton wall splits gradually into two cubic-tetragonal solitons of finite width. Their separation, however, diverges at the transition temperature. This temperature is the border point between two topologically different classes of domain walls, which apparently have also different time-dependence. Below the transition point the kink-like solutions are of traveling type, but above the transition temperature the pulse-like walls are not.

  14. Soliton twin boundaries of the cubic-tetragonal martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazor, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Described here is one set of results from a comprehensive study of the cubic-tetragonal Martensitic transformations in ferroelastic materials. The model being used is the soliton model of Barsch and Krumhansl which exhibits a first-order cubic-tetragonal martensitic phase transition. This is a nonlinear and nonlocal three-dimensional continuum model, with a two-component strain order parameter. The structure and the energy of the static (or traveling) soliton strain boundaries, associated with the minimal total free energy, is calculated at all temperatures. Insight is also gained of the corresponding type of trajectories in the order parameter space. Approaching the first-order transition temperature from below, the tetragonal-tetragonal soliton wall splits gradually into two cubic-tetragonal solitons of finite width. Their separation, however, diverges at the transition temperature. This temperature is the border point between two topologically different classes of domain walls, which apparently have also different time-dependence. Below the transition point the kink-like solutions are of traveling type, but above the transition temperature the pulse-like walls are not.

  15. Suppression of superconductivity and structural phase transitions under pressure in tetragonal FeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xiaofang; Liu, Ying; Lü, Xujie; Zhang, Sijia; Bu, Kejun; Jin, Changqing; Zhang, Hui; Lin, Jianhua; Huang, Fuqiang

    2016-08-08

    Pressure is a powerful tool to study iron-based superconductors. Here, we report systematic high-pressure transport and structural characterizations of the newly discovered superconductor FeS. It is found that superconductor FeS (tetragonal) partly transforms to a hexagonal structure at 0.4 GPa, and then completely transforms to an orthorhombic phase at 7.4 GPa and finally to a monoclinic phase above 9.0 GPa. The superconducting transition temperature of tetragonal FeS was gradually depressed by pressure, different from the case in tetragonal FeSe. With pressure increasing, the S-Fe-S angles only slightly change but the anion height deviates farther from 1.38 Å. This change of anion height, together with the structural instability under pressure, should be closely related to the suppression of superconductivity. We also observed an anomalous metal-semiconductor transition at 6.0 GPa and an unusual increased resistance with further compression above 9.6 GPa. The former can be ascribed to the tetragonal-orthorhombic structural phase transition, and the latter to the electronic structure changes of the high-pressure monoclinic phase. Finally, a phase diagram of tetragonal FeS as functions of pressure and temperature was mapped out for the first time, which will shed new light on understanding of the structure and physics of the superconducting FeS.

  16. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  17. Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties of Ba{sub 3}SrLn{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Nb{sub 8}O{sub 30} (Ln = La, Nd, Sm) filled tungsten bronze ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Wang [Laboratory of Dielectric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Yang, Wen Zhi [Laboratory of Dielectric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Ningbo Branch of China Academy of Ordnance Science, Ningbo, 315103 (China); Liu, Xiao Qiang [Laboratory of Dielectric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China); Chen, Xiang Ming, E-mail: xmchen59@zju.edu.cn [Laboratory of Dielectric Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Structural, dielectric and magnetic properties have been investigated for Ba{sub 3}SrLn{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Nb{sub 8}O{sub 30} (Ln = La, Nd, Sm) ceramics. The single phase tetragonal filled tungsten bronze structure in space group P4/mbm is obtained for Ba{sub 3}SrLa{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Nb{sub 8}O{sub 30}, while such tungsten bronze major phase is determined together with minor amount of secondary phases in Ba{sub 3}SrNd{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Nb{sub 8}O{sub 30} and Ba{sub 3}SrSm{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Nb{sub 8}O{sub 30}. The saturated magnetic hysteresis loops with enhanced M{sub r} are obtained in the present ceramics at room temperature comparing to the Ba{sub 4}Ln{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}Nb{sub 8}O{sub 30} (Ln = La, Nd, Sm) ceramics. Meanwhile, the typical relaxor behaviors are determined: a broad dielectric peak with strong frequency dispersion and the peak temperature following well with the Vogel–Fulcher relationship. - Highlights: • The tetragonal filled tungsten bronze structure in space group P4/mbm is obtained. • The typical relaxor behaviors are determined. • The magnetic hysteresis loops with enhanced Mr are obtained at room temperature.

  18. Nanostructured tetragonal barium titanate produced by the polyol and spark plasma sintering (SPS) route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Salas, Ulises; Breitwieser, Romain; Gaudisson, Thomas; Nowak, Sophie; Ammar, Souad; Valenzuela, Raúl

    2017-10-01

    There is a great interest to synthesize ferroelectric ceramics both with fine grain size and significant electric properties. Here, we report the preparation of nanostructured tetragonal barium titanate by combining forced hydrolysis of metallic salts in polyol, soft annealing and 650 °C spark plasma sintering under uniaxial pressure of 120 MPa for 5 min. The stabilization of highly dense (density of 90%), nanostructured (grains about 50 nm) tetragonal barium titanate ceramic was achieved. The produced ceramic exhibited ferroelectric behavior and a dielectric permittivity of 3600 at 1 kHz and room temperature.

  19. Direct synthesis of ultrafine tetragonal BaTiO3 nanoparticles at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Yong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A large quantity of ultrafine tetragonal barium titanate (BaTiO3 nanoparticles is directly synthesized at room temperature. The crystalline form and grain size are checked by both X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that the perovskite nanoparticles as fine as 7 nm have been synthesized. The phase transition of the as-prepared nanoparticles is investigated by the temperature-dependent Raman spectrum and shows the similar tendency to that of bulk BaTiO3 materials. It is confirmed that the nanoparticles have tetragonal phase at room temperature.

  20. Element 74, the Wolfram Versus Tungsten Controversy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden,N.E.

    2008-08-11

    Two and a quarter centuries ago, a heavy mineral ore was found which was thought to contain a new chemical element called heavy stone (or tungsten in Swedish). A few years later, the metal was separated from its oxide and the new element (Z=74) was called wolfram. Over the years since that time, both the names wolfram and tungsten were attached to this element in various countries. Sixty years ago, IUPAC chose wolfram as the official name for the element. A few years later, under pressure from the press in the USA, the alternative name tungsten was also allowed by IUPAC. Now the original, official name 'wolfram' has been deleted by IUPAC as one of the two alternate names for the element. The history of this controversy is described here.

  1. Electron work function of stepped tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahl-Urban, B.

    1976-03-01

    The electron work function of tungsten (110) vicinal faces was measured with the aid of thermionic emission, and its dependence on the crystallographic orientation and the surface structure was investigated. The thermionic measurements were evaluated with the aid of the Richardson plot. The real temperature of the emitting tungsten faces was determined with an accuracy of +- 0.5% in the range between 2,200 and 2,800 K. The vicinal faces under investigation have been prepared with an orientation exactness of +- 15'. In the tungsten (110) vicinal faces under investigation, a strong dependence of the temperature coefficient d PHI/dT of the work function on the crystallographic orientation was found. A strong influence of the edge structure as well as of the step density on the temperature coefficient was observed. (orig./HPOE) [de

  2. Processing by both classical and mechanosynthesis routes and characterization of a new solid solution of tungsten-bronze structure ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachane, M.; Moure, A.; Elaatmani, M.; Zegzouti, A.; Daoud, M.; Castro, A.

    2006-01-01

    A new family of ferroelectric compounds with Ba 2-x Na 1+x Li x Nb 5 O 15 composition (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) and tetragonal tungsten-bronze structure is processed for the first time. This new family of materials derived from Ba 2 NaNb 5 O 15 compound was processed by classical solid-state reaction and by mechanosynthesis. The powders prepared by these two routes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (at room and high temperature), differential thermal analysis, thermogravimetry and scanning electron microscopy. The results confirm the formation of the solid solution in the whole range of composition. The influence of Li addition on the dielectric permittivity and losses and on the ferro-paraelectric transition temperature is also studied

  3. Tetragonal-to-Tetragonal Phase Transition in Lead-Free (KxNa1−xNbO3 (x = 0.11 and 0.17 Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabin Lin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead free piezoelectric crystals of (KxNa1−xNbO3 (x = 0.11 and 0.17 have been grown by the modified Bridgman method. The structure and chemical composition of the obtained crystals were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA. The domain structure evolution with increasing temperature for (KxNa1−xNbO3 (x = 0.11 and 0.17 crystals was observed using polarized light microscopy (PLM, where distinguished changes of the domain structures were found to occur at 400 °C and 412 °C respectively, corresponding to the tetragonal to tetragonal phase transition temperatures. Dielectric measurements performed on (K0.11Na0.89NbO3 crystals exhibited tetragonal to tetragonal and tetragonal to cubic phase transitions temperatures at 405 °C and 496 °C, respectively.

  4. Tritium Decay Helium-3 Effects in Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Merrill, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A critical challenge for long-term operation of ITER and beyond to a Demonstration reactor (DEMO) and future fusion reactor will be the development of plasma-facing components (PFCs) that demonstrate erosion resistance to steady-state/transient heat fluxes and intense neutral/ion particle fluxes under the extreme fusion nuclear environment, while at the same time minimizing in-vessel tritium inventories and permeation fluxes into the PFC’s coolant. Tritium will diffuse in bulk tungsten at elevated temperatures, and can be trapped in radiation-induced trap site (up to 1 at. % T/W) in tungsten [1,2]. Tritium decay into helium-3 may also play a major role in microstructural evolution (e.g. helium embrittlement) in tungsten due to relatively low helium-4 production (e.g. He/dpa ratio of 0.4-0.7 appm [3]) in tungsten. Tritium-decay helium-3 effect on tungsten is hardly understood, and its database is very limited. Two tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) were exposed to high flux (ion flux of 1.0x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1.0x1026 m-2) 0.5%T2/D2 plasma at two different temperatures (200, and 500°C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory. Tritium implanted samples were stored at ambient temperature in air for more than 3 years to investigate tritium decay helium-3 effect in tungsten. The tritium distributions on plasma-exposed was monitored by a tritium imaging plate technique during storage period [4]. Thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed with a ramp rate of 10°C/min up to 900°C to outgas residual deuterium and tritium but keep helium-3 in tungsten. These helium-3 implanted samples were exposed to deuterium plasma in TPE to investigate helium-3 effect on deuterium behavior in tungsten. The results show that tritium surface concentration in 200°C sample decreased to 30 %, but tritium surface concentration in 500°C sample did not alter over the 3 years storage period, indicating possible tritium

  5. Zero-field splitting of 4T2 term for 3d3 ions in tetragonal symmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    orbit interactions, in addition to spin-orbit interaction, the zero-field splitting of 4T2 state for 3d3 ions at tetragonal symmetry has been studied. The convergence of the approximation perturbation formula of 4T2 state for 3d3 ions at tetragonal ...

  6. Ab initio and DFT benchmarking of tungsten nanoclusters and tungsten hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skoviera, J.; Novotny, M.; Cernusak, I.; Oda, T.; Louis, F.

    2015-01-01

    We present several benchmark calculations comparing wave-function based methods and density functional theory for model systems containing tungsten. They include W 4 cluster as well as W 2 , WH and WH 2 molecules. (authors)

  7. Evidence of tetragonal distortion as the origin of the ferromagnetic ground state in γ -Fe nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyns, V.; van Stiphout, K.; Joly, V.; Lima, T. A. L.; Lippertz, G.; Trekels, M.; Menéndez, E.; Kremer, F.; Wahl, U.; Costa, A. R. G.; Correia, J. G.; Banerjee, D.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; von Bardeleben, J.; Vickridge, I.; Van Bael, M. J.; Hadermann, J.; Araújo, J. P.; Temst, K.; Vantomme, A.; Pereira, L. M. C.

    2017-11-01

    γ -Fe and related alloys are model systems of the coupling between structure and magnetism in solids. Since different electronic states (with different volumes and magnetic ordering states) are closely spaced in energy, small perturbations can alter which one is the actual ground state. Here, we demonstrate that the ferromagnetic state of γ -Fe nanoparticles is associated with a tetragonal distortion of the fcc structure. Combining a wide range of complementary experimental techniques, including low-temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy, advanced transmission electron microscopy, and synchrotron radiation techniques, we unambiguously identify the tetragonally distorted ferromagnetic ground state, with lattice parameters a =3.76 (2 )Å and c =3.50 (2 )Å , and a magnetic moment of 2.45(5) μB per Fe atom. Our findings indicate that the ferromagnetic order in nanostructured γ -Fe is generally associated with a tetragonal distortion. This observation motivates a theoretical reassessment of the electronic structure of γ -Fe taking tetragonal distortion into account.

  8. Tetragonal zirconia quantum dots in silica matrix prepared by a modified sol-gel protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Surbhi; Rani, Saruchi; Kumar, Sushil

    2018-05-01

    Tetragonal zirconia quantum dots (t-ZrO2 QDs) in silica matrix with different compositions ( x)ZrO2-(100 - x)SiO2 were fabricated by a modified sol-gel protocol. Acetylacetone was added as a chelating agent to zirconium propoxide to avoid precipitation. The powders as well as thin films were given thermal treatment at 650, 875 and 1100 °C for 4 h. The silica matrix remained amorphous after thermal treatment and acted as an inert support for zirconia quantum dots. The tetragonal zirconia embedded in silica matrix transformed into monoclinic form due to thermal treatment ≥ 1100 °C. The stability of tetragonal phase of zirconia is found to enhance with increase in silica content. A homogenous dispersion of t-ZrO2 QDs in silica matrix was indicated by the mapping of Zr, Si and O elements obtained from scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analyser. The transmission electron images confirmed the formation of tetragonal zirconia quantum dots embedded in silica. The optical band gap of zirconia QDs (3.65-5.58 eV) was found to increase with increase in zirconia content in silica. The red shift of PL emission has been exhibited with increase in zirconia content in silica.

  9. Tetragonal CuO: End member of the 3d transition metal monoxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemons, W.; Koster, Gertjan; Blank, David H.A.; Hammond, Robert H.; Geballe, Theodore H.; Beasley, Malcolm R.

    2009-01-01

    Monoclinic CuO is anomalous both structurally as well as electronically in the 3d transition metal oxide series. All the others have the cubic rocksalt structure. Here we report the synthesis and electronic property determination of a tetragonal (elongated rocksalt) form of CuO created using an

  10. Linear electro-optical properties of tetragonal BaTiO 3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Linear optical susceptibility and clamped linear electro-optical tensor coefficients of tetragonal BaTiO3 are calculated using a formalism based on bond charge theory. Calculated values are in close agreement with experimental data. The covalent Ti–O bonds constituting distorted TiO6 octahedral groups are found to be ...

  11. Growth of silicon on tungsten diselenide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Qirong; van Bremen, Rik; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report a scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy study of the growth of silicon on a tungsten diselenide (WSe2) substrate. We have found convincing experimental evidence that silicon does not remain on the WSe2 substrate but rather intercalates between the top layers of WSe2. Upon

  12. Copper-Tungsten Composites Sprayed by HVOF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Zahálka, F.; Bensch, Jan; Chi, W.; Sedláček, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 2 (2008), s. 177-180 ISSN 1059-9630 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Thermally sprayed coatings * tungsten * copper * HVOF Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2008 http://www.springerlink.com/content/120439/

  13. Tungsten and refractory metals 3, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Tungsten and Refractory Metals was held in Greater Washington DC at the McLean Hilton, McLean Virginia, on November 15--16, 1995. This meeting was the third in a series of conferences held in the Washington DC area. The first meeting was in 1992 and was entitled ''International Conference on Tungsten and Tungsten Alloys.'' In 1994, the scope of the meeting was expanded to include other refractory metals such as molybdenum, iridium, rhenium, tantalum and niobium. The tremendous success of that meeting was the primary motivation for this Conference. The broader scope (the inclusion of other refractory metals and alloys) of the Conference was kept intact for this meeting. In fact, it was felt that the developments in the technology of these materials required a common forum for the interchange of current research information. The papers presented in this meeting examined the rapid advancements in the technology of refractory metals, with special emphasis on the processing, structure, and properties. Among the properties there was emphasis on both quasi-static and dynamic rates. Another topic that received considerable interest was the area of refractory carbides and tungsten-copper composites. One day of concurrent session was necessary to accommodate all of the presentations

  14. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John Scott O'Dell

    2006-01-01

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  15. Joining of Tungsten Armor Using Functional Gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Scott O' Dell

    2006-12-31

    The joining of low thermal expansion armor materials such as tungsten to high thermal expansion heat sink materials has been a major problem in plasma facing component (PFC) development. Conventional planar bonding techniques have been unable to withstand the high thermal induced stresses resulting from fabrication and high heat flux testing. During this investigation, innovative functional gradient joints produced using vacuum plasma spray forming techniques have been developed for joining tungsten armor to copper alloy heat sinks. A model was developed to select the optimum gradient architecture. Based on the modeling effort, a 2mm copper rich gradient was selected. Vacuum plasma pray parameters and procedures were then developed to produce the functional gradient joint. Using these techniques, dual cooling channel, medium scale mockups (32mm wide x 400mm length) were produced with vacuum plasma spray formed tungsten armor. The thickness of the tungsten armor was up to 5mm thick. No evidence of debonding at the interface between the heat sink and the vacuum plasma sprayed material was observed.

  16. CALICE silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  17. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity...

  18. Distribution of induced activity in tungsten targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donahue, R.J.; Nelson, W.R.

    1988-09-01

    Estimates are made of the induced activity created during high-energy electron showers in tungsten, using the EGS4 code. Photon track lengths, neutron yields and spatial profiles of the induced activity are presented. 8 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  19. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denisova, Yulia, E-mail: yukolubaeva@mail.ru; Shugurov, Vladimir, E-mail: shugurov@opee.hcei.tsc.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); Petrikova, Elizaveta, E-mail: elizmarkova@yahoo.com [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Seksenalina, Malika, E-mail: sportmiss@bk.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Ivanova, Olga, E-mail: ivaov@mail.ru; Ikonnikova, Irina, E-mail: irinaikonnikova@yandex.ru [Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Kunitsyna, Tatyana, E-mail: kma11061990@mail.ru; Vlasov, Victor, E-mail: rector@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Klopotov, Anatoliy, E-mail: klopotovaa@tsuab.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Architecture and Building, 2 Solyanaya Sq. Tomsk, 634003 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Yuriy, E-mail: yufi55@mail.ru [Institute of High-Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 634055, Russia, Tomsk, 2/3 Akademicheskiy Ave (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Str. Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties.

  20. Consolidation of tungsten disilicide by plasma spraying

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Matějíček, Jiří; Rohan, Pavel; Janča, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 3 (2007), s. 311-320 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Water stabilized plasma * tungsten disilicide * plasma deposition * thermal spray coatings Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials

  1. CALICE silicon–tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A highly granular electromagnetic calorimeter prototype based on tungsten absorber and sampling units equipped with silicon pads as sensitive devices for signal collection is under construction. The full prototype will have in total 30 layers and be read out by about 10000 Si cells of 1 × 1 cm2. A first module consisting of 14 ...

  2. Superhard Rhenium/Tungsten Diboride Solid Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Andrew T; Turner, Christopher L; Lei, Jialin; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2016-11-02

    Rhenium diboride (ReB 2 ), containing corrugated layers of covalently bonded boron, is a superhard metallic compound with a microhardness reaching as high as 40.5 GPa (under an applied load of 0.49 N). Tungsten diboride (WB 2 ), which takes a structural hybrid between that of ReB 2 and AlB 2 , where half of the boron layers are planar (as in AlB 2 ) and half are corrugated (as in ReB 2 ), has been shown not to be superhard. Here, we demonstrate that the ReB 2 -type structure can be maintained for solid solutions of tungsten in ReB 2 with tungsten content up to a surprisingly large limit of nearly 50 atom %. The lattice parameters for the solid solutions linearly increase along both the a- and c-axes with increasing tungsten content, as evaluated by powder X-ray and neutron diffraction. From micro- and nanoindentation hardness testing, all of the compositions within the range of 0-48 atom % W are superhard, and the bulk modulus of the 48 atom % solid solution is nearly identical to that of pure ReB 2 . These results further indicate that ReB 2 -structured compounds are superhard, as has been predicted from first-principles calculations, and may warrant further studies into additional solid solutions or ternary compounds taking this structure type.

  3. Electrospark doping of steel with tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denisova, Yulia; Shugurov, Vladimir; Petrikova, Elizaveta; Seksenalina, Malika; Ivanova, Olga; Ikonnikova, Irina; Kunitsyna, Tatyana; Vlasov, Victor; Klopotov, Anatoliy; Ivanov, Yuriy

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the numerical modeling of thermal processes and the analysis of the structure and properties of the surface layer of carbon steel subjected to electrospark doping with tungsten. The problem of finding the temperature field in the system film (tungsten) / substrate (iron) is reduced to the solution of the heat conductivity equation. A one-dimensional case of heating and cooling of a plate with the thickness d has been considered. Calculations of temperature fields formed in the system film / substrate synthesized using methods of electrospark doping have been carried out as a part of one-dimensional approximation. Calculations have been performed to select the mode of the subsequent treatment of the system film / substrate with a high-intensity pulsed electron beam. Authors revealed the conditions of irradiation allowing implementing processes of steel doping with tungsten. A thermodynamic analysis of phase transformations taking place during doping of iron with tungsten in equilibrium conditions has been performed. The studies have been carried out on the surface layer of the substrate modified using the method of electrospark doping. The results showed the formation in the surface layer of a structure with a highly developed relief and increased strength properties

  4. ITER tungsten divertor design development and qualification program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Kukushkin, A.; Merola, M.; Mitteau, R.; Pitts, R.A.; Shu, W.; Sugihara, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, F-13115 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [F4E, c/ Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain); Suzuki, S. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Villari, R. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via Enrico Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Detailed design development plan for the ITER tungsten divertor. • Latest status of the ITER tungsten divertor design. • Brief overview of qualification program for the ITER tungsten divertor and status of R and D activity. -- Abstract: In November 2011, the ITER Council has endorsed the recommendation that a period of up to 2 years be set to develop a full-tungsten divertor design and accelerate technology qualification in view of a possible decision to start operation with a divertor having a full-tungsten plasma-facing surface. To ensure a solid foundation for such a decision, a full tungsten divertor design, together with a demonstration of the necessary high performance tungsten monoblock technology should be completed within the required timescale. The status of both the design and technology R and D activity is summarized in this paper.

  5. Electrokinetic treatment of firing ranges containing tungsten-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braida, Washington; Christodoulatos, Christos; Ogundipe, Adebayo; Dermatas, Dimitris; O'Connor, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten-based alloys and composites are being used and new formulations are being considered for use in the manufacturing of different types of ammunition. The use of tungsten heavy alloys (WHA) in new munitions systems and tungsten composites in small caliber ammunition could potentially release substantial amounts of this element into the environment. Although tungsten is widely used in industrial and military applications, tungsten's potential environmental and health impacts have not been thoroughly addressed. This necessitates the research and development of remedial technologies to contain and/or remove tungsten from soils that may serve as a source for water contamination. The current work investigates the feasibility of using electrokinetics for the remediation of tungsten-contaminated soils in the presence of other heavy metals of concern such as Cu and Pb with aim to removing W from the soil while stabilizing in situ, Pb and Cu

  6. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-07-17

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO{sub 2}, as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a

  7. Computer simulations for thorium doped tungsten crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten has the highest melting point among all metals in the periodic table of elements. Furthermore, its equilibrium vapor pressure is by far the lowest at the temperature given. Thoria, ThO 2 , as a particle dopant, results in a high temperature creep resistant material. Moreover, thorium covered tungsten surfaces show a drastically reduced electronic work function. This results in a tremendous reduction of tip temperatures of cathodes in discharge lamps, and, therefore, in dramatically reduced tungsten vapor pressures. Thorium sublimates at temperatures below those of a typical operating cathode. For proper operation, a diffusional flow of thorium atoms towards the surface has to be maintained. This atomic flux responds very sensitively on the local microstructure, as grain boundaries as well as dislocation cores offer ''short circuit paths'' for thorium atoms. In this work, we address some open issues of thoriated tungsten. A molecular dynamics scheme (MD) is used to derive static as well as dynamic material properties which have their common origin in the atomistic behavior of tungsten and thorium atoms. The interatomic interactions between thorium and tungsten atoms are described within the embedded atom model (EAM). So far, in literature no W-Th interaction potentials on this basis are described. As there is no alloying system known between thorium and tungsten, we have determined material data for the fitting of these potentials using ab-initio methods. This is accomplished using the full potential augmented plane wave method (FLAPW), to get hypothetical, i.e. not occurring in nature, ''alloy'' data of W-Th. In order to circumvent the limitations of classical (NVE) MD schemes, we eventually couple our model systems to external heat baths or volume reservoirs (NVT, NPT). For the NPT ensemble, we implemented a generalization of the variable cell method in combination with the Langevin piston, which results in a set of Langevin equations, i.e. stochastic

  8. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.

    1993-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper

  9. Dielectric and piezoelectric studies of perovskite-tungsten bronze structured (1 - x)PLZT-xPBBiN nanoceramic composites by high-energy mechanical activation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramam, Koduri; Lopez, Marta; Chandramouli, K.

    2009-01-01

    Polycrystalline (1 - x)PLZT-xPBBiN ferroelectric complex ceramic nanocomposites were synthesized through high-energy mechanical activation technique. It is found that milling time has a significant impact on the phase formation, particle size and grain growth. The optimized compositions were subjected to XRD, SEM, dielectric and piezoelectric studies. Powder X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the nanocomposites consisted of both perovskite (tetragonal) and tungsten bronze (orthorhombic) structures whilst pure PLZT showed perovskite structure and pure PBBN showed tungsten bronze structure. As the PBBN content increased, the in situ prepared perovskite and tungsten bronze nanocomposites revealed a bi-phase formation. It is worth mentioning that crack-free nanoceramic composites were obtained. The maximum dielectric constant (ε RT = 2509), piezoelectric planar coupling coefficient (k p = 0.584) and the piezoelectric charge coefficient (d 33 = 596 pC/N) were observed for x = 0.6 nanoceramic composite. It has been observed that the dielectric and piezoelectric constants increased gradually with increasing x up to 0.6 and was found optimum, which could be ideal for electromechanical and energy harvesting applications.

  10. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L.M., E-mail: garrisonlm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Katoh, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Byun, T.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410–780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02–9.0 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039–1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile. - Highlights: • Fusion reactors need a tough, ductile tungsten plasma-facing material. • The unirradiated tungsten-copper laminate is more ductile than tungsten alone. • After neutron irradiation, the composite has significantly less ductility. • The tungsten behavior appears to dominate the overall composite behavior.

  11. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10 10 cm -2 ). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Detection and reduction of tungsten contamination in ion implantation processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Magni, D. [STMicroelectronics, Agrate Brianza (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    In this paper, we review the results of some studies addressing the problem of tungsten contamination in implantation processes. For some tests, the implanter was contaminated by implantation of wafers with an exposed tungsten layer, resulting in critical contamination conditions. First, DLTS (deep level transient spectroscopy) measurements were calibrated to measure tungsten contamination in ion-implanted samples. DLTS measurements of tungsten-implanted samples showed that the tungsten concentration increases linearly with the dose up to a rather low dose (5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}). Tungsten deactivation was observed when the dose was further increased. Under these conditions, ToF-SIMS revealed tungsten at the wafer surface, showing that deactivation was due to surface segregation. DLTS calibration could therefore be obtained in the linear dose regime only. This calibration was used to evaluate the tungsten contamination in arsenic implantations. Ordinary operating conditions and critical contamination conditions of the equipment were compared. A moderate tungsten contamination was observed in samples implanted under ordinary operating conditions. This contamination was easily suppressed by a thin screen oxide. On the contrary, implantations in critical conditions of the equipment resulted in a relevant tungsten contamination, which could be reduced but not suppressed even by a relatively thick screen oxide (up to 150 Aa). A decontamination process consisting of high dose implantations of dummy wafers was tested for its efficiency to remove tungsten and titanium contamination. This process was found to be much more effective for titanium than for tungsten. Finally, DLTS proved to be much more sensitive that TXRF (total reflection X-ray fluorescence) in detecting tungsten contamination. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Crystallographic properties of KSr2Nb5O15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanfredi, Silvania; Cardoso, Celso X.; Nobre, Marcos A.L.

    2004-01-01

    Nanostructured KSr 2 Nb 5 O 15 oxide was synthesized by the polymeric precursor method, a chemical synthesis route based on the Pechini's method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the calcined powder at 1150 deg. C were performed in the angular range 5 ≤ 2θ ≤ 120 deg. with a 0.02 deg. step and a fixed counting time of 30 s. The XRD data were analyzed by the Rietveld refinements using the FullProf software. The results showed a tetragonal system with the tetragonal tungsten bronze structure (TTB) type (a = 12.4585 (2) A and c 3.9423 (6) A, V = 611,90 (2) A 3 ). In this work, the sites occupancy by the K + and Sr 2+ cations on the TTB type structure were determined. The thermal parameters (B) were analyzed

  14. Enhancing the adhesion of diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrate using tungsten particles via MPCVD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Wen Chi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Wu, Yu-Shiang, E-mail: yswu@cc.cust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, 245, Sec. 3, Yen-Chiu-Yuan Road, Nankang, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hou-Cheng [Department of Electronic Engineering, China University of Science and Technology, Taipei 11581, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuan-Haun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2011-03-24

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: > Larger particles of tungsten led to larger diamond particles with improved crystallinity, covering the specimen with increased speed. > Adhesion was indicated to be a function of the gaps between the tungsten particles. > Diamond films pretreated with tungsten particles of 2.0 {mu}m showed the highest hardness of 27.78 GPa with good crystalline. - Abstract: To increase the adhesion of diamond films and avoid the negative effects of using cobalt, previous treatments have employed tungsten particles to cover the surface of the 6 wt.% cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate. The surface of the tungsten particles is transformed into W{sub 2}C and WC, which attracts and traps carbon. Through the process of nucleation, the carbon forms around the tungsten particles, thereby satisfying the conditions necessary for the formation of diamond film. Using Raman spectroscopy, we determined that diamond films of good quality with excellent adhesive properties and a hardness level as high as 27.78 GPa could be produced following pretreatment with 2.0 {mu}m tungsten particles. Rockwell indentation tests indicate that addition of tungsten particles promotes the interfacial adhesion of diamond films with WC-Co substrates. We determined that using smaller tungsten particles decreased the number of gaps and cavities on the surface of the substrate, thereby enhancing the adhesion of the diamond film.

  15. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  16. Nanosize stabilization of cubic and tetragonal phases in reactive plasma synthesized zirconia powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, S., E-mail: sjayakumar.physics@gmail.com [Research and Development Centre, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 014 (India); Department of Physics, Pollachi Institute of Engineering and Technology, Pollachi 642 205 (India); Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Thiyagarajan, T.K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, BARC, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Perumal, K. [Vision for Wisdom, Temple of Consciousness, Aliyar 642 101 (India); Mishra, S.C. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engg, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela 769 008 (India); Suresh, G. [Department of Physics, Park College of Engineering and Technology, Coimbatore 641 659 (India); Su, L.T.; Tok, A.I.Y. [School of Materials Science and Engg, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639 798 (Singapore)

    2013-06-15

    Pure zirconium oxide powders with particle size 2–33 nm are synthesized by reactive plasma processing. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of these particles revealed size dependent behavior for their phase stabilization. The monoclinic phase is found to be stable when particle size is ≥20 nm; Tetragonal is found to be stabilized in the range of 7–20 nm and as the particle size decreases to 6 nm and less, the cubic phase is stabilized. - Highlights: ► Direct conversion of micron-sized zirconium hydride powder to single crystal ZrO{sub 2} nanopowder. ► Size dependent stabilization of cubic, tetragonal and monoclinic phases in the reactive plasma synthesized ZrO{sub 2} nanopowder. ► Transmission electron microscopic investigation to identify particles of different sizes and their corresponding phase structure.

  17. Tetragonal BiFeO3 on yttria-stabilized zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Heng-Jui; Du, Yu-Hao; Gao, Peng; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Huang, Yen-Chin; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hsiang-Lin; He, Qing; Chu, Ying-Hao

    2015-01-01

    High structural susceptibility of multiferroic BiFeO 3 (BFO) makes it a potential replacement of current Pb-based piezoelectrics. In this study, a tetragonal phase is identified based on a combination of x-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electronic microscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy when BFO is grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. To distinguish the discrepancy between this tetragonal phase and common cases of monoclinic BFO, piezoelectric force microscopy images and optical property are also performed. It shows a lower electrostatic energy of ferroelectric domains and a large reduction of band gap for BFO grown on YSZ substrate comparing to the well-known one grown on LaAlO 3 substrate. Our findings in this work can provide more insights to understand the structural diversity of multiferroic BFO system for further applications

  18. Tetragonal BiFeO{sub 3} on yttria-stabilized zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heng-Jui [Department of Materials Science Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Du, Yu-Hao [Department of Materials Science Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Gao, Peng; Ikuhara, Yuichi [Institute of Engineering Innovation, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Huang, Yen-Chin; Chen, Yi-Chun [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hsiang-Lin [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); He, Qing [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Chu, Ying-Hao, E-mail: yhc@nctu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2015-11-01

    High structural susceptibility of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) makes it a potential replacement of current Pb-based piezoelectrics. In this study, a tetragonal phase is identified based on a combination of x-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electronic microscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy when BFO is grown on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates. To distinguish the discrepancy between this tetragonal phase and common cases of monoclinic BFO, piezoelectric force microscopy images and optical property are also performed. It shows a lower electrostatic energy of ferroelectric domains and a large reduction of band gap for BFO grown on YSZ substrate comparing to the well-known one grown on LaAlO{sub 3} substrate. Our findings in this work can provide more insights to understand the structural diversity of multiferroic BFO system for further applications.

  19. Observation of two superconducting domes under pressure in tetragonal FeS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Feng-Liang; Ying, Tian-Ping; Li, Na-Na; Xu, Yang; He, Lan-Po; Hong, Xiao-Chen; Yu, Yun-Jie; Wang, Ming-Xiang; Shen, Jian; Yang, Wen-Ge; Li, Shi-Yan

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the evolution of superconductivity and structure with pressure for the new superconductor FeS (Tc ≈ 4.5 K), a sulfide counterpart of FeSe. A rapid suppression of Tc and vanishing of superconductivity at 4.0 GPa are observed, followed by a second superconducting dome from 5.0 to 22.3 GPa with a 30% enhancement in maximum Tc. An onsite tetragonal to hexagonal phase transition occurs around 7.0 GPa, followed by a broad pressure range of phase coexistence. The residual deformed tetragonal phase is considered as the source of second superconducting dome. The observation of two superconducting domes in iron-based superconductors poses great challenges for understanding their pairing mechanism.

  20. Atomistic studies of cation transport in tetragonal ZrO2 during zirconium corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Xian-Ming; Zhang, Yongfeng; Tonks, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Zirconium alloys are the major fuel cladding materials in current reactors. The water-side corrosion is a significant degradation mechanism of these alloys. During corrosion, the transport of oxidizing species in zirconium dioxide (ZrO 2 ) determines the corrosion kinetics. Previously, it has been argued that the outward diffusion of cations is important for forming protective oxides. In this work, the migration of Zr defects in tetragonal ZrO 2 is studied with temperature accelerated dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Zr interstitials have anisotropic diffusion and migrate preferentially along the [001] or c direction in tetragonal ZrO 2 . The compressive stresses can increase the Zr interstitial migration barrier significantly. The migration of Zr interstitials at a grain boundary is much slower than in a bulk oxide. The implications of these atomistic simulation results in the Zr corrosion are discussed. (authors)

  1. Spectroscopic modeling for tungsten EUV spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Izumi; Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Suzuki, Chihiro; Morita, Shigeru; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Akira; Nakamura, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Norimasa; Koike, Fumihiro

    2014-01-01

    We have constructed an atomic model for tungsten extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectra to reconstruct characteristic spectral feature of unresolved transition array (UTA) observed at 4-7 nm for tungsten ions. In the tungsten atomic modeling, we considered fine-structure levels with the quantum principal number n up to 6 as the atomic structure and calculated the electron-impact collision cross sections by relativistic distorted-wave method, using HULLAC atomic code. We measured tungsten EUV spectra in Large Helical Device (LHD) and Compact Electron Beam Ion Trap device (CoBIT) and compared them with the model calculation. The model successfully explain series of emission peaks at 1.5-3.5 nm as n=5-4 and 6-4 transitions of W 24+ - W 32+ measured in CoBIT and LHD and the charge state distributions were estimated for LHD plasma. The UTA feature observed at 4-7 nm was also successfully reconstructed with our model. The peak at ∼5 nm is produced mainly by many 4f-4d transition of W 22+ - W 35+ ions, and the second peak at ∼6 nm is produced by 4f-4d transition of W 25+ - W 28+ ions, and 4d-4p inner-shell transitions, 4p 5 4d n+1 - 4p 6 4d n , of W 29+ - W 35+ ions. These 4d-4p inner-shell transitions become strong since we included higher excited states such as 4p 5 4d n 4f state, which ADAS atomic data set does not include for spectroscopic modeling with fine structure levels. (author)

  2. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  3. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  4. Contributions to the crystal growth and characterization of the ferroelectric tetragonal tungsten bronze potassium-lithium niobate (K3Li2Nb5O15-KLN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podlojenov, S.

    2003-01-01

    Undoped and Mg-doped KLN single crystals of optical quality were grown by the Czochralski technique. For decreasing temperature gradients in a growing single crystal an inductive afterheater was applied. The applicability for the frequency doubling of the KLN crystals was examined by using of powder SHG-tests. There was a clear correlation between the crystal composition (Nb-content) and the intensity of the second harmonic radiation. The niobium concentration of 49 mole % in the liquid phase can be appropriated as the boundary between the crystallization of paraelectric and ferroelectric KLN phase. All the grown KLTN crystals were paraelectric. The composition of the grown crystals was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis and the atomic absorption analysis. The axial and radial concentration profiles of K and Nb over single crystals were determined by means of electron microprobe analysis. The segregation of elements is negligibly small in the investigated KLN single crystals. But in the KLTN single crystals the segregation of Ta was estimated to be in the order of 1 mole % / 1 cm crystal length. The ferroelectric phase transition in KLN was investigated with several techniques. The ferroelectric phase transition was estimated to lie within the range of 470-480 C. The second-order phase transition was detected by temperature-dependent measurements of the dielectric constant and the birefringence. But the DTA measurements indicated small thermal effect at the same temperature region, what refers to a first-order phase transition. The refractive indices of the paraelectric and the ferroelectric KLN phase were measured with an accuracy of 4 x 10 -5 over the wavelength region of 404-1083 nm. The data indicate that second harmonic generation in ferroelectric KLN crystals is possible at the primary wavelength 910 nm with non-critical phase matching (type I). (orig.)

  5. Toughening of dental porcelain by tetragonal ZrO2 additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morena, R.; Lockwood, P.E.; Evans, A.L.; Fairhurst, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of mechanical behavior of ZrO 2 additions to a dental porcelain was investigated. The ZrO 2 was introduced into the glassy matrix phase of the porcelain by refritting the all-glass porcelain constituent. X-ray diffraction indicated that a sizeable fraction of the ZrO 2 was retained in the tetragonal from after the porcelain was fired. Zirconia additions to the porcelain produced substantial improvements in fracture toughness, strength, and thermal shock resistance

  6. Gap States at Low-Angle Grain Boundaries in Monolayer Tungsten Diselenide

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Yu Li

    2016-05-03

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have revealed many novel properties of interest to future device applications. In particular, the presence of grain boundaries (GBs) can significantly influence the material properties of 2D TMDs. However, direct characterization of the electronic properties of the GB defects at the atomic scale remains extremely challenging. In this study, we employ scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate the atomic and electronic structure of low-angle GBs of monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2) with misorientation angles of 3-6°. Butterfly features are observed along the GBs, with the periodicity depending on the misorientation angle. Density functional theory calculations show that these butterfly features correspond to gap states that arise in tetragonal dislocation cores and extend to distorted six-membered rings around the dislocation core. Understanding the nature of GB defects and their influence on transport and other device properties highlights the importance of defect engineering in future 2D device fabrication. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  7. Electronic state of europium atoms on surface of oxidized tungsten

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, S Y

    2001-01-01

    The energy scheme of the europium atoms adsorption system on the tungsten surface, coated with the oxygen monolayer, is considered. The evaluations of the europium adatoms charged state on the oxidized tungsten surface are performed. It is established, that europium, adsorbed at the oxidized tungsten surface, is a positive ion with the charge close to the unit. The zonal scheme of the Eu-O/W adsorption system for the europium low and high concentrations is proposed

  8. Transformation of Yttrium-Doped Hydrated Zirconium into Tetragonal and Cubic Nanocrystalline Zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhimi, X.; Morales, A.; García-Ruiz, A.; Xiao, T. D.; Chen, H.; Strutt, P. R.

    1999-02-01

    Nanostructured yttrium-stabilized zirconia powders, with yttria concentrations between 0.0 and 10.0 mol%, were prepared via the hydrolysis of an aqueous solution of zirconyl and yttrium chloride, and ammonium hydroxide. Powder phases were characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction; their crystalline structures were refined with the Rietveld technique. When samples were annealed below 200°C, their diffraction patterns corresponded to an amorphous atom distribution and were independent of yttria concentration. The doped amorphous phases crystallized, at 400°C, into tetragonal or cubic nanocrystalline zirconia, which were stabilized by yttrium. These results suggest that yttrium atoms served as a substitute for zirconium atoms not only in the crystalline phases but also in the amorphous phases, which are determined by the fast condensation of zirconyl clusters. Nondoped samples contained a mixture of monoclinic and tetragonal nanocrystalline zirconia; those with 2.5 to 5.0 mol% yttria contained only the tetragonal zirconia nanophase, and those with 7.5 to 10.0 mol% had only the nanocrystalline cubic phase. The average crystallite size of the nanophases diminished when Y 2O 3concentration was increased.

  9. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  10. Radiative capture of slow electrons by tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Belkina, G.M.; Samarin, S.N.; Yakovlev, I.I.

    1987-01-01

    Isochromatic spectra of radiation capture of slow electrons by the surface of mono- and polycrystal tungsten recorded on 322 and 405 nm wave lengths are presented. The effect of oxygen adsorption on isochromates of the (110) face of tungsten monocrystal is investigated. The obtained isochromatic spectra are compared with energy band structure of tungsten. Based on the analysis of the obtained experimental results it is assumed that optical transition to the final state at the energy of 7.3 eV relatively to Fermi level is conditioned by surface states of the tungsten face (110)

  11. On tungsten technologies and qualification for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, J. van der; Hegeman, H.; Wouters, O.; Luzginova, N.; Jonker, B.; Van der Marck, S.; Opschoor, J.; Wang, J.; Dowling, G.; Stuivenga, M.; Carton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are considered prime candidates for the in-vessel components directly facing the plasma. For example, in the HEMJ helium cooled divertor design tiles may be operated at temperatures up to 1700 deg. C, supported by a structure partially consisting of tungsten at temperatures from 600 to 1000 deg. C, and connected to a HT steel structure. The tungsten armoured primary wall is operated at 500-900 deg. C. Irradiation doses will be few tens dpa at minimum, but FPR requirements for plants availability will stretch these targets. Recently injection moulding technology was developed for pure tungsten and representative parts were manufactured for ITER monobloc divertors and DEMO HEMJ thimbles. The major advantages for this technology are the efficient use of material feedstock/resources and the intrinsic possibility to produce near-finished product, avoiding machining processes that are costly and may introduce surface defects deteriorating the component in service performance. It is well suited for mass-manufacturing of components as well known in e.g. lighting industries. To further qualify this material technology various specimen types were produced with processing parameters identical to the components, and tested successfully, showing the high potential for implementation in (fusion) devices. Furthermore, the engineering approach can clearly be tailored away from conventional design and manufacturing technologies based on bulk materials. The technology is suitable for shaping of new W-alloys and W-ODS variants as well. Basically this technology allows a particular qualification trajectory. There is no need to produce large batches of material during the material development and optimization stage. For the verification of irradiation behaviour in the specific neutron spectra, there is a further attractive feature to use e.g. isotope tailored powders to adjust to available irradiation facilities like MTR's. In addition the ingrowth of transmutation

  12. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Buzhinskiy, O. I.; Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400-1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  13. Boron carbide coating deposition on tungsten and testing of tungsten layers and coating under intense plasma load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetov, A. A.; Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Buzhinskiy, O. I. [State Research Center Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Grunin, A. V.; Gordeev, A. A.; Zakharov, A. M.; Kalachev, A. M.; Sadovskiy, Ya. A.; Shigin, P. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A device intended for boron carbide coating deposition and material testing under high heat loads is presented. A boron carbide coating 5 μm thick was deposited on the tungsten substrate. These samples were subjected to thermocycling loads in the temperature range of 400–1500°C. Tungsten layers deposited on tungsten substrates were tested in similar conditions. Results of the surface analysis are presented.

  14. Development and characterization of powder metallurgically produced discontinuous tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Riesch, J.; Sistla, S.; Almanstötter, J.; Jasper, B.; Terra, A.; Höschen, T.; Gietl, H.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.; Linsmeier, Ch; Broeckmann, C.

    2017-12-01

    In future fusion reactors, tungsten is the prime candidate material for the plasma facing components. Nevertheless, tungsten is prone to develop cracks due to its intrinsic brittleness—a major concern under the extreme conditions of fusion environment. To overcome this drawback, tungsten fiber reinforced tungsten (Wf/W) composites are being developed. These composite materials rely on an extrinsic toughing principle, similar to those in ceramic matrix composite, using internal energy dissipation mechanisms, such as crack bridging and fiber pull-out, during crack propagation. This can help Wf/W to facilitate a pseudo-ductile behavior and allows an elevated damage resilience compared to pure W. For pseudo-ductility mechanisms to occur, the interface between the fiber and matrix is crucial. Recent developments in the area of powder-metallurgical Wf/W are presented. Two consolidation methods are compared. Field assisted sintering technology and hot isostatic pressing are chosen to manufacture the Wf/W composites. Initial mechanical tests and microstructural analyses are performed on the Wf/W composites with a 30% fiber volume fraction. The samples produced by both processes can give pseudo-ductile behavior at room temperature.

  15. Comparative Investigation of Tungsten Fibre Nets Reinforced Tungsten Composite Fabricated by Three Different Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhui Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibre nets reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W containing four net layers were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS, hot pressing (HP and cold rolling after HP (HPCR, with the weight fraction of fibres being 17.4%, 10.5% and 10.5%, respectively. The relative density of the HPCRed samples is the highest (99.8% while that of the HPed composites is the lowest (95.1%. Optical and scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattering diffraction were exploited to characterize the microstructure, while tensile and hardness tests were used to evaluate the mechanical properties of the samples. It was found that partial recrystallization of fibres occurred after the sintering at 1800 °C. The SPSed and HPed Wf/W composites begin to exhibit plastic deformation at 600 °C with tensile strength (TS of 536 and 425 MPa and total elongation at break (TE of 11.6% and 23.0%, respectively, while the HPCRed Wf/W composites exhibit plastic deformation at around 400 °C. The TS and TE of the HPCRed Wf/W composites at 400 °C are 784 MPa and 8.4%, respectively. The enhanced mechanical performance of the Wf/W composites over the pure tungsten can be attributed to the necking, cracking, and debonding of the tungsten fibres.

  16. Tritium decay helium-3 effects in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shimada

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Tritium (T implanted by plasmas diffuses into bulk material, especially rapidly at elevated temperatures, and becomes trapped in neutron radiation-induced defects in materials that act as trapping sites for the tritium. The trapped tritium atoms will decay to produce helium-3 (3He atoms at a half-life of 12.3 years. 3He has a large cross section for absorbing thermal neutrons, which after absorbing a neutron produces hydrogen (H and tritium ions with a combined kinetic energy of 0.76 MeV through the 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the 3He produced in tungsten by tritium decay compared to the neutron-induced helium-4 (4He produced in tungsten. This is important given the fact that helium in materials not only creates microstructural damage in the bulk of the material but alters surface morphology of the material effecting plasma-surface interaction process (e.g. material evolution, erosion and tritium behavior of plasma-facing component materials. Effects of tritium decay 3He in tungsten are investigated here with a simple model that predicts quantity of 3He produced in a fusion DEMO FW based on a neutron energy spectrum found in literature. This study reveals that: (1 helium-3 concentration was equilibrated to ∼6% of initial/trapped tritium concentration, (2 tritium concentration remained approximately constant (94% of initial tritium concentration, and (3 displacement damage from 3He(n,HT nuclear reaction became >1 dpa/year in DEMO FW.

  17. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Cryogenic treatment; tungsten carbide–cobalt; SEM; XRD; microhardness. 1. Introduction. Tungsten carbide tools can machine metals at speeds that cause the cutting edge to become red hot, without losing its hardness or sharpness. It exhibits about 2–3 times the produc- tivity and 10 times the life of high-speed ...

  18. Calibration and Temperature Profile of a Tungsten Filament Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Izarra, Charles; Gitton, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this work proposed for undergraduate students and teachers is the calibration of a tungsten filament lamp from electric measurements that are both simple and precise, allowing to determine the temperature of tungsten filament as a function of the current intensity. This calibration procedure was first applied to a conventional filament…

  19. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding. Welding Module 6. Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in gas tungsten arc welding. The module has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles involved in gas tungsten arc welding, supplies, and applications are covered. The materials included…

  20. Tungsten Deposition on Graphite using Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Uttam; Chauhan, Sachin S; Sharma, Jayshree; Sanyasi, A K; Ghosh, J; Choudhary, K K; Ghosh, S K

    2016-01-01

    The tokamak concept is the frontrunner for achieving controlled thermonuclear reaction on earth, an environment friendly way to solve future energy crisis. Although much progress has been made in controlling the heated fusion plasmas (temperature ∼ 150 million degrees) in tokamaks, technological issues related to plasma wall interaction topic still need focused attention. In future, reactor grade tokamak operational scenarios, the reactor wall and target plates are expected to experience a heat load of 10 MW/m 2 and even more during the unfortunate events of ELM's and disruptions. Tungsten remains a suitable choice for the wall and target plates. It can withstand high temperatures, its ductile to brittle temperature is fairly low and it has low sputtering yield and low fuel retention capabilities. However, it is difficult to machine tungsten and hence usages of tungsten coated surfaces are mostly desirable. To produce tungsten coated graphite tiles for the above-mentioned purpose, a coating reactor has been designed, developed and made operational at the SVITS, Indore. Tungsten coating on graphite has been attempted and successfully carried out by using radio frequency induced plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (rf -PECVD) for the first time in India. Tungsten hexa-fluoride has been used as a pre-cursor gas. Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) clearly showed the presence of tungsten coating on the graphite samples. This paper presents the details of successful operation and achievement of tungsten coating in the reactor at SVITS. (paper)

  1. Spectrophotometric determination of tungsten with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Z.C.

    1976-10-01

    The method comprises the complexation of tungsten with salicylic acid in concentrated sulphuric acid yielding a reddish color. The maximum absorbance of the complex lies within 410-420 nm, 420 nm being the chosen wavelenght. The final concentration of salicylic acid is 0,080 g/ml. The sensitivity is 0,13 μg W(%T) -1 ml -1 . Titanium, vanadium, rhenium, niobium and molybdenum interferes and must be separated, titanium being the strongest interferent. The separation procedures, advantages of the process, stoichiometric relations and equilibrium constant are discussed. (Author) [pt

  2. Titanium tungsten coatings for bioelectrochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Rafal; Amato, Letizia; Łopacińska, J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of titanium tungsten (TiW) coatings and their applicability as components of biosensing systems. The focus is put on using TiW as an electromechanical interface layer between carbon nanotube (CNT) forests and silicon nanograss (SiNG) cell scaffolds. Cytotoxicity......, applicability to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of aligned CNT forests, and electrochemical performance are investigated. Experiments include culturing of NIH3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells on TiW coated silicon scaffolds, CNT growth on TiW substrates with nickel catalyst, and cyclic...

  3. Characterization of a Cobalt-Tungsten Interconnect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Caspersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A ferritic steel interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell must be coated in order to prevent chromium evaporation from the steel substrate. The Technical University of Denmark and Topsoe Fuel Cell have developed an interconnect coating based on a cobalt-tungsten alloy. The purpose of the coating...... for 300 h at 800 °C. The coating was characterized with Glow Discharge Optical Spectroscopy (GDOES), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The oxidation properties were evaluated by measuring weight change of coated samples of Crofer 22 H and Crofer 22 APU as a function...

  4. High Heat Load Properties of Ultra Fine Grain Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Z.; Du, J.; Ge, C.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Song, S.X.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Tungsten is increasingly considered as a promising candidate armour materials facing the plasma in tokamaks for medium to high heat flux components (EAST, ASDEX, ITER). Fabrication tungsten with ultra fine grain size is considered as an effective way to ameliorate some disadvantages of tungsten, such as its brittleness at room temperature. But the research data on the performance of ultra fine grain tungsten is still very limit. In this work, high heat load properties of pure ultra-fine grain tungsten have been studied. The ultra fine grain tungsten samples with average grain size of 0.2 μm, 1 μm and 3 μm were fabricated by resistance sintering under ultra high pressure. The annealing experiments for the investigation of the material resistance against grain growth have been done by annealing samples in a vacuum furnace at different temperature holding for 2 hours respectively. It is found that recrystallization and grain growth occur at heating temperature of 1250 deg. c. The finer the initial grain sizes of tungsten, the smaller its grain growth grain. The effects of transient high thermal loads (off normal events like disruptions) on tungsten surface morphology have been performed in electron beam test facility JUDITH. The thermal loads tests have been carried out with 4 ms pulses at different power density of 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, 0.55 and 0.88 GW/m 2 respectively. Horizontal cracks formed for all tungsten samples at 0.44 GW/m 2 . Particle erosions occurred for tungsten with 3 μm size at 0.33 GW/m 2 and for tungsten with 0.2 and 1 μm size at 0.55 GW/m 2 . The weight loss of tungsten with 0.2, 1 and 3 μm size are 2,0.1,0.6 mg respectively at 0.88 GW/m 2 . The effects of a large number of very short transient repetitive thermal loads (ELM-like) on tungsten surface morphology also have been performed by using a fundamental wave of a YAG laser. It is found that tungsten with 0.2 μm size has the best performance. (authors)

  5. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Moore, B.T.

    1988-12-01

    The behaviour of four high-density sintered tungsten alloys has been evluated and compared with that of pure tungsten. Rates of corrosion during the cyclic humidity and the salt mist tests were ascertained from weight loss measurements. Insight into the corrosion mechanism was gained from the nature of the corrosion products and an examination of the corroded surfaces. In the tests, the alloy 95% W, 2.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe was the most corrosion resistant. The data showed that copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. Both attack on the tungsten particles and the binder phase were observed together with tungsten grain loss. 6 refs., 3 tabs.,

  6. New doped tungsten cathodes. Applications to power grid tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cachard, J. de; Cadoret, K; Martinez, L.; Veillet, D.; Millot, F.

    2001-01-01

    Thermionic emission behavior of tungsten/tungsten carbide modified with rare earth (La, Ce, Y) oxides is examined on account of suitability to deliver important current densities in a thermo-emissive set up and for long lifetime. Work functions of potential cathodes have been determined from Richardson plots for La 2 O 3 doped tungsten and for tungsten covered with variable compositions rare earth tungstates. The role of platinum layers covering the cathode was also examined. Given all cathodes containing mainly lanthanum oxides were good emitters, emphasis was put on service lifetime. Comparisons of lifetime in tungsten doped with rare earth oxides and with rare earth tungstates show that microstructure of the operating cathodes may play the major role in the research of very long lifetime cathodes. Based on these results, tests still running show lifetime compatible with power grid tubes applications. (author)

  7. Observation of the Structure of Tungsten Films Prepared by MOCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Weiliang; Yu, Lei; Li, Yujie; Guo, Shuangquan

    2013-09-01

    The tungsten films with ultra microstructure on CuCrZr alloy and China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel have been prepared by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The films were produced by pyrolysing the tungsten hexacarbonyl at air or argon atmosphere. When formed at or below 400 °C, they were poorly crystalized and the films showed low quality in thickness, density, bonding performance etc. While above this temperature, the properties of tungsten films have been improved, all the films consist of tungsten in the β-W. And β-W can change into α-W after heat treatment. As in other variations of pyrolysis, oxygen and carbon were observed. When filled with argon, the oxygen and carbon content would reduce apparently. Tungsten films prepared by MOCVD have stable chemical composition and microstructure. Besides, the properties of films on CuCrZr alloy are better than that on CLAM steel.

  8. Atomistic simulation of cubic and tetragonal phases of U-Mo alloy: Structure and thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikov, S. V.; Kolotova, L. N.; Kuksin, A. Yu.; Smirnova, D. E.; Tseplyaev, V. I.

    2018-02-01

    We studied structure and thermodynamic properties of cubic and tetragonal phases of pure uranium and U-Mo alloys using atomistic simulations: molecular dynamics and density functional theory. The main attention was paid to the metastable γ0 -phase that is formed in U-Mo alloys at low temperature. Structure of γ0 -phase is similar to body-centered tetragonal (bct) lattice with displacement of a central atom in the basic cell along [ 001 ] direction. Such displacements have opposite orientations for part of the neighbouring basic cells. In this case, such ordering of the displacements can be designated as antiferro-displacement. Formation of such complex structure may be interpreted through forming of short U-U bonds. At heating, the tetragonal structure transforms into cubic γs -phase, still showing ordering of central atom displacements. With rise in temperature, γs -phase transforms to γ-phase with a quasi body-centered cubic (q-bcc) lattice. The local positions of uranium atoms in γ-phase correspond to γs -phase, however, orientations of the central atom displacements become disordered. Transition from γ0 to γ can be considered as antiferro-to paraelastic transition of order-disorder type. This approach to the structure description of uranium alloy allows to explain a number of unusual features found in the experiments: anisotropy of lattice at low temperature; remarkably high self-diffusion mobility in γ-phase; decreasing of electrical resistivity at heating for some alloys. In addition, important part of this work is the development of new interatomic potential for U-Mo system made with taking into account details of studied structures.

  9. CeO2-stabilized tetragonal ZrO2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Nono, M.C. de.

    1990-12-01

    This work presents the development and the characterization of CeO 2 -stabilized tetragonal ZrO 2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different CeO 2 content prepared by conventional and nonconventional techniques. These powders and their resultant sintered ceramics were specified by chemical and physical characterization, compactation state and mechanical properties. The chemical characteristics were determined by chemical analysis and the physical characteristics were evaluated by phase content, particle and agglomerate size and aspect, and powder porosity. (author)

  10. Variational method of determining effective moduli of polycrystals with tetragonal symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, R.; Peselnick, L.

    1966-01-01

    Variational principles have been applied to aggregates of randomly oriented pure-phase polycrystals having tetragonal symmetry. The bounds of the effective elastic moduli obtained in this way show a substantial improvement over the bounds obtained by means of the Voigt and Reuss assumptions. The Hill average is found to be a good approximation in most cases when compared to the bounds found from the variational method. The new bounds reduce in their limits to the Voigt and Reuss values. ?? 1966 The American Institute of Physics.

  11. Cavity growth simulation for superplastic deformation of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, 3Y-TZP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harjo, S. [Research Center for Superplasticity, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, Hitachi (Japan); Kojima, N. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University (Japan); Motohashi, Y.

    2008-04-15

    A simulation based on cavity number - radius distribution obtained from a scanning electron microscopy analysis was made to consider cavity growth rate and its mechanism during superplastic deformation of a tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP). It is found that (1) newly formed cavities grow very rapidly in an early stage of their growth process and then the growth rate becomes gradually slow with the increase in cavity size, and (2) the cavity growth process in the 3Y-TZP is governed by the diffusion-controlled mechanism. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. Ce O2-Zr O2 tetragonal ceramics (Ce-TZP): mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nono, Maria do Carmo de Andrade

    1994-01-01

    This work presents the development and the characterization of Ce O 2 -stabilized tetragonal Zr O 2 polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics, an as substitute of some metallic materials. Ce-TZP ceramics attain remarkable increasing in strength and fracture toughness. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different Ce O 2 content prepared by conventional mechanical technique. It were adopted the bending strength, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness techniques to the determination of the mechanical parameters. These results were discussed and compared to those published in international literature. (author)

  13. First-principles comparison of the cubic and tetragonal phases of Mo3Sb7

    KAUST Repository

    Nazir, Safdar

    2011-03-01

    Using ab initio density functional based methods, we study the normal metal state properties of the ∼3 K Mo3Sb7 superconductor, in its high temperature cubic and low temperature tetragonal structures. Although the density of states at the Fermi energy is reasonably high in both structures, our calculations unequivocally show that there exists no long range magnetic ordering in this system. We also address the optical properties of the compound. The magnetism in Mo3Sb7 is studied by fixed spin moment calculations, which yield a shallow non-magnetic minimum, thus inferring propensity to a magnetic instability. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. High-pressure high-temperature synthesis and structure of α-tetragonal boron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A Ekimov and Igor P Zibrov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Microcrystals of α-tetragonal (α-t boron with unit cell parameters a=9.05077(6 and c=5.13409(6 Å and measured density 2.16–2.22 g cm−3 were obtained by pyrolysis of decaborane B10H14 at pressures of 8–9 GPa and temperatures of 1100–1600 C. The crystal structure is in good agreement with the model proposed by Hoard et al (1958 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 80 4507. However, compared to the original model, we found small deformations of icosahedra and changes in the interatomic

  15. Shape memory lifetime of CeO2-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhe Xiaoli; Li Bo; Meng Man

    1993-01-01

    Lifetime of shape memory effect (SME) of CeO 2 -stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals was studied by means of both tests of constraint stress and constraint strain mode during reverse martensite transformation. Up to 8th cycling of SME, the shape of sample entirely recovered except microcracks in the constraint stress mode and the accumulated strain reached 4.6% in the constraint strain mode. It was found that the yield stress decreased, however, the reverse transformation temperature of stress-induced martensite increased with times of the cycling. The reason of these phenomena are discussed in terms of microcracking and strain energy relaxation

  16. A NOVEL METHOD FOR SYNTHESIS OF METASTABLE TETRAGONAL ZIRCONIA NANOPOWDERS AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. KAZEMI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia (ZrO2 nanopowder was synthesized using sucrose and fructose as a chelating agent from zirconium hydroxide. The synthesized powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, simultaneously thermal analysis (STA, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The above-experimental results showed that the synthesized powders had particle sizes in the range 40-60 nm and mean crystallite sizes of 7-8 nm. Finally, in this research, chelating agents of sucrose and fructose were compared and the obtained results demonstrated that using fructose, nanopowder of zirconia with tetragonal phase was obtained.

  17. Tensile properties of irradiated TZM and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.

    1975-04-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the elevated temperature tensile properties of TZM and tungsten has been experimentally determined. Specimens were irradiated at a temperature of approximately 720 0 F to fluences of 0.4 and 0.9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Test parameters for both control and irradiated specimens included strain rates from 3 x 10 -4 to 1 s -1 and temperatures from 72 to 1700 0 F. The results of these tests were correlated with a rate-temperature parameter (T ln A/epsilon) to provide a concise description of material behavior over the range of deformation conditions of this study. The yield strength of the subject materials was significantly increased by decreasing temperature, increasing strain rate, and increasing fluence. Ductility was significantly reduced at any temperature or strain rate by increasing fluence. Cleavage fractures occurred in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens when the yield strength was elevated to the effective cleavage stress by temperature and/or strain rate. Neutron irradiation for the conditions of this study increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten by approximately 300 0 F and TZM by approximately 420 0 F. (U.S.)

  18. Tungsten tetraboride, an inexpensive superhard material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Reza; Lech, Andrew T.; Xie, Miao; Weaver, Beth E.; Yeung, Michael T.; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten tetraboride (WB4) is an interesting candidate as a less expensive member of the growing group of superhard transition metal borides. WB4 was successfully synthesized by arc melting from the elements. Characterization using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) indicates that the as-synthesized material is phase pure. The zero-pressure bulk modulus, as measured by high-pressure X-ray diffraction for WB4, is 339 GPa. Mechanical testing using microindentation gives a Vickers hardness of 43.3 ± 2.9 GPa under an applied load of 0.49 N. Various ratios of rhenium were added to WB4 in an attempt to increase hardness. With the addition of 1 at.% Re, the Vickers hardness increased to approximately 50 GPa at 0.49 N. Powders of tungsten tetraboride with and without 1 at.% Re addition are thermally stable up to approximately 400 °C in air as measured by thermal gravimetric analysis. PMID:21690363

  19. Vaccum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, J. L.; Krotz, P. D.; Todd, D. T.; Liaw, Y. K.

    1995-01-01

    This two year program will investigate Vacuum Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (VGTAW) as a method to modify or improve the weldability of normally difficult-to-weld materials. VGTAW appears to offer a significant improvement in weldability because of the clean environment and lower heat input needed. The overall objective of the program is to develop the VGTAW technology and implement it into a manufacturing environment that will result in lower cost, better quality and higher reliability aerospace components for the space shuttle and other NASA space systems. Phase 1 of this program was aimed at demonstrating the process's ability to weld normally difficult-to-weld materials. Phase 2 will focus on further evaluation, a hardware demonstration and a plan to implement VGTAW technology into a manufacturing environment. During Phase 1, the following tasks were performed: (1) Task 11000 Facility Modification - an existing vacuum chamber was modified and adapted to a GTAW power supply; (2) Task 12000 Materials Selection - four difficult-to-weld materials typically used in the construction of aerospace hardware were chosen for study; (3) Task 13000 VGTAW Experiments - welding experiments were conducted under vacuum using the hollow tungsten electrode and evaluation. As a result of this effort, two materials, NARloy Z and Incoloy 903, were downselected for further characterization in Phase 2; and (4) Task 13100 Aluminum-Lithium Weld Studies - this task was added to the original work statement to investigate the effects of vacuum welding and weld pool vibration on aluminum-lithium alloys.

  20. Tungsten - Yttrium Based Nuclear Structural Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Chessa, Jack; Martinenz, Gustavo

    2013-04-01

    The challenging problem currently facing the nuclear science community in this 21st century is design and development of novel structural materials, which will have an impact on the next-generation nuclear reactors. The materials available at present include reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels, dispersion strengthened reduced activation ferritic steels, and vanadium- or tungsten-based alloys. These materials exhibit one or more specific problems, which are either intrinsic or caused by reactors. This work is focussed towards tungsten-yttrium (W-Y) based alloys and oxide ceramics, which can be utilized in nuclear applications. The goal is to derive a fundamental scientific understanding of W-Y-based materials. In collaboration with University of Califonia -- Davis, the project is designated to demonstrate the W-Y based alloys, ceramics and composites with enhanced physical, mechanical, thermo-chemical properties and higher radiation resistance. Efforts are focussed on understanding the microstructure, manipulating materials behavior under charged-particle and neutron irradiation, and create a knowledge database of defects, elemental diffusion/segregation, and defect trapping along grain boundaries and interfaces. Preliminary results will be discussed.

  1. Proton beam induced dynamics of tungsten granules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; O'Dell, J.; Davenne, T.; Fitton, M.; Atherton, A.; Densham, C.; Charitonidis, N.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Guinchard, M.; Lacny, L. J.; Lindstrom, B.

    2018-03-01

    This paper reports the results from single-pulse experiments of a 440 GeV /c proton beam interacting with granular tungsten samples in both vacuum and helium environments. Remote high-speed photography and laser Doppler vibrometry were used to observe the effect of the beam on the sample grains. The majority of the results were derived from a trough containing ˜45 μ m diameter spheres (not compacted) reset between experiments to maintain the same initial conditions. Experiments were also carried out on other open and contained samples for the purposes of comparison both with the 45 μ m grain results and with a previous experiment carried out with sub-250 μ m mixed crystalline tungsten powder in helium [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 101005 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.17.101005]. The experiments demonstrate that a greater dynamic response is produced in a vacuum than in a helium environment and in smaller grains compared with larger grains. The examination of the dynamics of the grains after a beam impact leads to the hypothesis that the grain response is primarily the result of a charge interaction of the proton beam with the granular medium.

  2. Deuterium desorption from tungsten using laser heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H. Yu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Retention and desorption of hydrogenic species need to be accurately modeled to predict the tritium inventory of next generation fusion devices, which is needed both for tritium fuel recovery and for tritium safety concerns. In this paper, experiments on thermal desorption of deuterium from intrinsic polycrystalline tungsten defects using laser heating are compared to TMAP-7 modeling. The samples during deuterium plasma exposure were at a temperature of 373K for this benchmark study with ion fluence of 0.7–1.0 ×1024Dm−2. Following plasma exposure, a fiber laser (λ= 1100nm heated the samples to peak surface temperatures ranging from ∼500 to 1400K with pulse widths from 10ms to 1s, and 1 to 10 pulses applied to each sample. The remaining deuterium retention was measured using temperature programmed desorption (TPD. Results show that > 95% of deuterium is desorbed when the peak surface temperature reached ∼950K for > 1s. TMAP-7 is used to predict deuterium desorption from tungsten for a range of surface temperatures and heating durations, and is compared to previous work on desorption from beryllium codeposits.

  3. Internal stresses and stability of the tetragonal phase in zirconia thin layers deposited by OMCVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benali, B.; Huntz, A. M.; Andrieux, M.; Ignat, M.; Poissonnet, S.

    2008-07-01

    Zirconia thin films were deposited by OMCVD (organo-metallic chemical vapour deposition) at various temperatures and oxygen partial pressures on a AISI 301 stainless steel substrate with Zr(thd) 4 as precursor. The as deposited 250 nm thin zirconia films presented a structure consisting of two phases: the expected monoclinic one and also an unexpected tetragonal phase. According to the literature, the stabilization of the tetragonal phase (metastable in massive zirconia) can be related to the crystallite size and/or to the generated internal compressive stresses. To analyze the effect of internal and external stresses on the thin film behaviour, in-situ tensile experiments were performed at room temperature and at high temperature (500 °C). Depending on the process parameters, phase transformations and damage evolution of the films were observed. Our results, associated to XRD (X-ray diffraction) analyses, used to determine phase ratios and residual stresses within the films, before and after the mechanical experiments, are discussed with respect to their microstructural changes.

  4. Off-center Jahn-Teller ion: coupled polar and tetragonal deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhnin, V.S.; Sochava, L.S.

    1979-01-01

    Models of the off-center Jahn-Teller ions are considered, i.e. Ni + in SrO and Cu 27 in SrO studied earlier. Models of the off-center Jahn-Teller ion are proposed, in which mutual effect of dipole-active deformations conditioning off-centering and the Jahn-Teller tetragonal deformations takes place. Manifestations of a new type of multipit potential XY 24 of an off-center ion are considered. The Jahn-Teller effect (JTE) is studied for a duplicate in cubic environment, unharmonism of the fourth order being taken into account. In such a model of Exe of JTE, the position and quantity of minima of adiabatic potential are changed as compared with Exe of JTE taking account of unharmonism of the third order or the square Jahn-Teller interaction. While using models of the off-center Jahn-Teller ion which take account of the effect of two tetragonal Jahn-Teller deformations occurring in the Exe problem considering unharmonism of the fourth order produced on dipole-active deformations, it becomes possible to explain the experiment for SrO:Ni +

  5. Is there an ordered tetragonal phase in the Ti3Al-Nb system?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1994-01-01

    In a recent series of papers, describing aging transformations in plasma sprayed Ti-24Al-11Nb, Hsiung and co-workers proposed a new ordered tetragonal structure as the first metastable phase to form in a series of transformations from quenched-in B2 to the equilibrium phase. They describe this new phase as a ''DO 3 like tetragonal structure'' with a composition Ti 5 Al 2 Nb, and lattice parameters, a = 0.65 nm and c/a ≅ 1.02. Their unit cell is constituted by 8 bcc unit cells, and the atomic coordinates of their structure are given in Table 1 on this basis. The symmetry of this structure is P4/mm. Though it is not the smallest possible unit cell for the structure, comparison with other bcc binary derivative structures is easily possible on this basis. The atomic coordinates for the latter, for a ternary composition Ti 2 AlNb, are also given. They note that the site occupation for the Hsiung et al. structure is quite distinct from that for a ternary DO 3 phase or any of the other possible bcc derivative structures (neglecting 2 possibilities with 128 or 432 atoms per unit cell(8) and interstitial ordering)

  6. Synthesis, microstructure and mechanical properties of ceria stabilized tetragonal zirconia prepared by spray drying technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.C.; Gokhale, N.M.; Dayal, Rajiv; Lazl, Ramji

    2002-01-01

    Ceria stabilized zirconia powders with ceria concentration varying from 6 to 16 mol% were synthesized using spray drying technique. Powders were characterized for their particle size distribution and specific surface area. The dense sintered ceramics fabricated using these powders were characterized for their microstructure, crystallite size and phase composition. The flexural strength, fracture toughness and micro-hardness of sintered ceramics were measured. High fracture toughness and flexural strength were obtained for sintered bodies with 12 mol% of CeO 2 . Flexural strength and fracture toughness were dependent on CeO 2 concentration, crystallite size and phase composition of sintered bodies. Correlation of data has indicated that the transformable tetragonal phase is the key factor in controlling the fracture toughness and strength of ceramics. It has been demonstrated that the synthesis method is effective to prepare nanocrystalline tetragonal ceria stabilized zirconia powders with improved mechanical properties. Ce-ZrO 2 with 20 wt% alumina was also prepared with flexural strength, 1200 MPa and fracture toughness 9.2 MPa√m. (author)

  7. Spin-orbital model of stoichiometric LaMnO3 with tetragonal distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snamina, Mateusz; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2018-03-01

    The spin-orbital superexchange model is derived for the cubic (perovskite) symmetry of LaMnO3, whereas real crystal structure is strongly deformed. We identify and explain three a priori important physical effects arising from tetragonal deformation: (i) the splitting of eg orbitals ∝Ez , (ii) the directional renormalization of d -p hybridization tp d, and (iii) the directional renormalization of charge excitation energies. Using the example of LaMnO3 crystal we evaluate their magnitude. It is found that the major effects of deformation are an enhanced amplitude of x2-y2 orbitals induced in the orbital order by Ez≃300 meV and anisotropic tp d≃2.0 (2.35) eV along the a b (c ) cubic axis, in very good agreement with Harrison's law. We show that the improved tetragonal model analyzed within mean field approximation provides a surprisingly consistent picture of the ground state. Excellent agreement with the experimental data is obtained simultaneously for: (i) eg orbital mixing angle, (ii) spin exchange constants, and (iii) the temperatures of spin and orbital phase transition.

  8. Zr O2 TETRAGONAL OBTENIDO POR EL MÉTODO DE PRECIPITACIÓN CONTROLADA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIEGO A. CAMPO CEBALLOS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se utilizó el método de precipitación controlada para sintetizar ZrO2 tetragonal estabilizado con óxido de calcio, CaO. Los sólidos obtenidos se caracterizaron utilizando análisis térmico diferencial y gravimétrico (ATD/TG, Espectroscopia Infrarroja con transformada rápida de Fourier (FTIR, Difracción de Rayos X (DRX, y microscopia electrónica de transmisión (MET. Los resultados indican que al tratar el polvo cerámico a una temperatura de 600 ºC se obtiene ZrO2 con fase cristalina tetragonal; además las partículas de ZrO2 presentaron tamaño nanométrico (< 100 nm. Se prestó especial atención a los posibles mecanismos de formación de las partículas.

  9. The detailed orbital-decomposed electronic structures of tetragonal ZrO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yan; Ji, Vincent; Xu, Ke-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The detailed orbital-decomposed electronic structures of the tetragonal zirconia have been investigated by using the first-principles projector augmented wave (PAW) potential within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) as well as taking into account the on-site Coulomb repulsive interaction (GGA+U). The deviation of the minimization energy from d z =0 to d z =±0.032 for experimental lattice constants (a=3.605 Å and c=5.180 Å) confirms the alternating displacement of the oxygen atoms, which causes half of the Zr---O bonds stronger and the other half weaker compared with the bonds in symmetric (d z =0) zirconia. The distorted tetragonal environment of the eight oxygen anions around Zr site splits the five-fold degenerate d states of a free Zr atom into triply degenerate t 2g (d xy , d yz and d zx ) states and doubly degenerate e g (d z 2 and d x 2 -y 2 ) states. The additional covalent character upon Zr-O ionic bonds are resulted from the hybridization between the O(2s), O(2p) and Zr(5s), triply degenerate t 2g (d xy , d yz and d zx ) states of Zr(4d). The O(2s) and O(2p) states are clearly separated and no hybrid bonding states are formed

  10. Critical behavior in tetragonal antiperovskite GeNFe3with a frustrated ferromagnetic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, X C; Wang, B S; Zhang, L; Zu, L; Lin, S; Lin, J C; Tong, P; Song, W H; Sun, Y P

    2017-05-31

    Tetragonal GeNFe 3 has a second-order ferromagnetic (FM) to paramagnetic transition at 76 K. Our integrated investigations indicate that the ground FM state is frustrated and the tetragonal symmetry is retained below 550 K based on the results of variable temperature X-ray diffraction. Critical behavior was analyzed by a systematic bulk magnetization study. The estimated critical exponents by three different methods (modified Arrott plot, the Kouvel-Fisher method, and critical isotherm analysis) conformably suggest that long-range magnetic coupling described by mean-field (MF) theoretical model is dominant in GeNFe 3 . The experimental M-T-H data collapse into two independent branches according to the scaling equations m = f ± (h) with the renormalized magnetization m = ε -β M(H, ε) and the magnetic field h = Hε -(β+γ) . The exchange distance is estimated as J(r) ∼ r -4.8 on the basis of the β and γ values, which lies between the long-range MF model (r -4.5 ) and the short-range 3D Heisenberg (3DH) model (r -5 ). Our results indicate that the competition between local magnetic moments of iron 3d electronic state and itinerant covalent interactions of N-Fe bonds should be responsible for critical behavior in this system.

  11. Effect of microscale shear stresses on the martensitic phase transformation of nanocrystalline tetragonal zirconia powders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Mette; Ahniyaz, Anwar; Sørensen, Bent F.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time, the effect of microscale shear stress induced by both mechanical compression and ball-milling on the phase stability of nanocrystalline tetragonal zirconia (t-ZrO2) powders was studied in water free, inert atmosphere. It was found that nanocrystalline t-ZrO2 powders are extrem......For the first time, the effect of microscale shear stress induced by both mechanical compression and ball-milling on the phase stability of nanocrystalline tetragonal zirconia (t-ZrO2) powders was studied in water free, inert atmosphere. It was found that nanocrystalline t-ZrO2 powders...... was observed. Ball-milling induced microscale stress has a similar effect on the t → m phase transformation. Furthermore, it was found that even very mild milling condition, such as 120 rpm, 1 h (0.5 mm balls) was enough to induce phase transformation. Surfactant assisted ball-milling was found to be very...... effective in de-agglomeration of our nanocrystalline porous ZrO2 particles into discrete nanocrystals. However, the t → m phase transformation could not be avoided totally even at very mild milling condition. This suggests that the metastable t-ZrO2 is extreme sensitive to microscale shear stress induced...

  12. Long-term studies on tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown in quiescent and forced convection environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, M. L.; Saville, D. A.

    The growth of tetragonal hen lysozyme crystals in the size range 150-300 μm was studied using digital microscopy; the size and orientation of the growing crystals were estimated from the geometry of the ideal tetragonal lysozyme crystal. At a confidence level above 99%, statistical analyses indicate the (110) face growth rates of crystals grown in quiescent conditions are not inhibited by weak buoyancy-driven natural convection. Yet similar analyses of crystals subjected to a weak forced flow of the same magnitude indicate a statistically significant decrease in growth rate with time. This apparent paradox probably results from mass transport limitations within the crystal growth cell. Mathematical models of fluid mixing inside the growth chamber suggest that crystal growth is limited by the rate at which protein molecules are transported to crystals growing on the walls of the chamber. Our experiments also reveal a large variation in the growth rates of crystals within a nominally homogeneous population. The local environment of the crystal may account for some of the variation, but the mechanisms are not understood.

  13. AFM Studies of Salt Concentration Effects on the (110) Surface Structure of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusey, Marc Lee; Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth; Konnert, John

    2002-01-01

    Previous high resolution AFM studies of the (110) surface of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals had shown that only one of two possible molecular surfaces is present, those constituting the completed 43 helices. These suggested that the crystal growth process was by the solution-phase assembly of the growth units, which then attach to the surface. However, the best fit for the imaged surfaces, vs. those predicted based upon the bulk crystallographic coordinates, were obtained when the packing about the 43 helices was "tightened up", while maintaining the underlying crystallographic unit cell spacing. This results in a widening of the gap between adjacent helices, and the top- most layer(s) may no longer be in contact. We postulated that the tightened packing about the helices is a result of the high salt concentrations in the bulk solution, used to crystallize the protein, driving hydrophobic interactions. Once the crystal surface is sufficiently buried by subsequent growth layers the ratio of salt to protein molecules decreases and the helices relax to their bulk crystallographic coordinates. The crystal surface helix structure is thus a reflection of the solution structure, and the tightness of the packing about the 43 helices would be a function of the bulk salt concentration. AFM images of the (110) surface of tetragonal lysozyme crystals grown under low (2%) and high (5%) NaCl concentrations reveal differences in the packing about the 43 helices consistent with the above proposal.

  14. The Effect of Solution Conditions on the Nucleation Kinetics of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Baird, James K.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    An understanding of protein crystal nucleation rates and the effect of solution conditions upon them, is fundamental to the preparation of protein crystals of the desired size and shape for X-ray diffraction analysis. The ability to predict the effect of supersaturation, temperature, pH and precipitant concentration on the number and size of crystals formed is of great benefit in the pursuit of protein structure analysis. In this study we experimentally examine the effect of supersaturation, temperature, pH and sodium chloride concentration on the nucleation rate of tetragonal chicken egg white lysozyme crystals. In order to do this batch crystallization plates were prepared at given solution concentrations and incubated at three different temperatures over the period of one week. The number of crystals per well with their size and dimensions were recorded and correlated against solution conditions. Duplicate experiments indicate the reproducibility of the technique. Although it is well known that crystal numbers increase with increasing supersaturation, large changes in crystal number were also correlated against solution conditions of temperature, pH and salt concentration over the same supersaturation ranges. Analysis of these results enhance our understanding of the effect of solution conditions such as the dramatic effect that small changes in charge and ionic strength can have on the number of tetragonal lysozyme crystals that form and grow in solution.

  15. Tungsten transport in the plasma edge at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janzer, Michael Arthur

    2015-04-30

    The Plasma Facing Components (PFC) will play a crucial role in future deuterium-tritium magnetically confined fusion power plants, since they will be subject to high energy and particle loads, but at the same time have to ensure long lifetimes and a low tritium retention. These requirements will most probably necessitate the use of high-Z materials such as tungsten for the wall materials, since their erosion properties are very benign and, unlike carbon, capture only little tritium. The drawback with high-Z materials is, that they emit strong line radiation in the core plasma, which acts as a powerful energy loss mechanism. Thus, the concentration of these high-Z materials has to be controlled and kept at low levels in order to achieve a burning plasma. Understanding the transport processes in the plasma edge is essential for applying the proper impurity control mechanisms. This control can be exerted either by enhancing the outflux, e.g. by Edge Localized Modes (ELM), since they are known to expel impurities from the main plasma, or by reducing the influx, e.g. minimizing the tungsten erosion or increasing the shielding effect of the Scrape Off Layer (SOL). ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) has been successfully operating with a full tungsten wall for several years now and offers the possibility to investigate these edge transport processes for tungsten. This study focused on the disentanglement of the frequency of type-I ELMs and the main chamber gas injection rate, two parameters which are usually linked in H-mode discharges. Such a separation allowed for the first time the direct assessment of the impact of each parameter on the tungsten concentration. The control of the ELM frequency was performed by adjusting the shape of the plasma, i.e. the upper triangularity. The radial tungsten transport was investigated by implementing a modulated tungsten source. To create this modulated source, the linear dependence of the tungsten erosion rate at the Ion Cyclotron Resonance

  16. Advanced smart tungsten alloys for a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Tan, X.; Schmitz, J.; Mao, Y.; Coenen, J. W.; Bram, M.; Gonzalez-Julian, J.

    2017-06-01

    The severe particle, radiation and neutron environment in a future fusion power plant requires the development of advanced plasma-facing materials. At the same time, the highest level of safety needs to be ensured. The so-called loss-of-coolant accident combined with air ingress in the vacuum vessel represents a severe safety challenge. In the absence of a coolant the temperature of the tungsten first wall may reach 1200 °C. At such a temperature, the neutron-activated radioactive tungsten forms volatile oxide which can be mobilized into atmosphere. Smart tungsten alloys are being developed to address this safety issue. Smart alloys should combine an acceptable plasma performance with the suppressed oxidation during an accident. New thin film tungsten-chromium-yttrium smart alloys feature an impressive 105 fold suppression of oxidation compared to that of pure tungsten at temperatures of up to 1000 °C. Oxidation behavior at temperatures up to 1200 °C, and reactivity of alloys in humid atmosphere along with a manufacturing of reactor-relevant bulk samples, impose an additional challenge in smart alloy development. First exposures of smart alloys in steady-state deuterium plasma were made. Smart tungsten-chroimium-titanium alloys demonstrated a sputtering resistance which is similar to that of pure tungsten. Expected preferential sputtering of alloying elements by plasma ions was confirmed experimentally. The subsequent isothermal oxidation of exposed samples did not reveal any influence of plasma exposure on the passivation of alloys.

  17. Microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys due to neutron irradiation in HFIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira; Tanaka, Teruya

    2014-12-01

    The microstructural development of pure tungsten (W) and tungsten-rhenium (Re) alloys due to neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA, was investigated in this work. The irradiation conditions were ∼1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 and 800 °C. After the neutron irradiation, microstructural observations were performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Large amounts of precipitates identified as sigma- and chi-phases were observed in not only the W-Re alloys but also in the pure W after the neutron irradiation. The precipitates observed in the pure W were coarse and larger than those in the W-Re alloys. This was considered to be caused by the transmutation products of W and Re, namely, Re and osmium (Os), respectively, under irradiation in the HFIR with a higher contents of thermal neutron flux.

  18. High Purity Tungsten Spherical Particle Preparation From WC-Co Spent Hard Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Chulwoong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was recycled to obtain high purity spherical tungsten powder by a combined hydrometallurgy and physical metallurgy pathway. Selective leaching of tungsten element from hard metal scrap occurs at solid / liquid interface and therefore enlargement of effective surface area is advantageous. Linear oxidation behavior of Tungsten carbide-cobalt and the oxidized scrap is friable to be pulverized by milling process. In this regard, isothermally oxidized Tungsten carbide-cobalt hard metal scrap was mechanically broken into particles and then tungsten trioxide particle was recovered by hydrometallurgical method. Recovered tungsten trioxide was reduced to tungsten particle in a hydrogen environment. After that, tungsten particle was melted and solidified to make a spherical one by RF (Ratio Frequency thermal plasma process. Well spherical tungsten micro-particle was successfully obtained from spent scrap. In addition to the morphological change, thermal plasma process showed an advantage for the purification of feedstock particle.

  19. Tungsten Stable Isotope Compositions of Ferromanganese Crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, K.; Barling, J.; Hein, J. R.; Schauble, E. A.; Halliday, A. N.

    2014-12-01

    We report the first accurate and precise data for mass-dependent fractionation of tungsten (W) stable isotopes, using a double spike technique and MC-ICPMS. Results are expressed relative to the NIST 3136 W isotope standard as per mil deviations in 186W/184W (δ186W). Although heavy element mass-dependent fractionations are expected to be small, Tl and U both display significant low temperature isotopic fractionations. Theoretical calculations indicate that W nuclear volume isotopic effects should be smaller than mass-dependent fractionations at low temperatures. Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts precipitate directly from seawater and have been used as paleoceanographic recorders of temporal changes in seawater chemistry. Crusts are strongly enriched in W and other metals, and are a promising medium for exploring W isotopic variability. Tungsten has a relatively long residence time in seawater of ~61,000 years, mainly as the tungstate ion (WO42-). Water depth profiles show conservative behaviour. During adsorption on Fe-Mn crusts, W species form inner-sphere complexes in the hexavalent (W6+) state. The major host phase is thought to be Mn oxides and the lighter W isotope is expected to be absorbed preferentially. Surface scrapings of 13 globally distributed hydrogenetic Fe-Mn crusts display δ186W from -0.08 to -0.22‰ (±0.03‰, 2sd). A trend toward lighter W isotope composition exists with increasing water depth (~1500 to ~5200m) and W concentration. One hydrothermal Mn-oxide sample is anomalously light and Mn nodules are both heavy and light relative to Fe-Mn crusts. Tungsten speciation depends on concentration, pH, and time in solution and is not well understood because of the extremely slow kinetics of the reactions. In addition, speciation of aqueous and/or adsorbed species might be sensitive to pressure, showing similar thermodynamic stability but different effective volumes. Thus, W stable isotopes might be used as a water-depth barometer in

  20. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  1. Tungsten as First Wall Material in Fusion Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, M.

    2006-01-01

    In the PLT tokamak with a tungsten limiter strong cooling of the central plasma was observed. Since then mostly graphite has been used as limiter or target plate material. Only a few tokamaks (limiter: FTU, TEXTOR; divertor: Alcator C-Mod, ASDEX Upgrade) gained experience with high-Z-materials. With the observed strong co- deposition of tritium together with carbon in JET and as a result of design studies of fusion reactors, it became clear that in the long run tungsten is the favourite for the first-wall material. Tungsten as a plasma facing material requires intensive research in all areas, i.e. in plasma physics, plasma wall-interaction and material development. Tungsten as an impurity in the confined plasma reveals considerable differences to carbon. Strong radiation at high temperatures, in connection with mostly a pronounced inward drift forms a particular challenge. Turbulent transport plays a beneficial role in this regard. The inward drift is an additional problem in the pedestal region of H-mode plasmas in ITER-like configurations. The erosion by low energy hydrogen atoms is in contrast to carbon small. However, erosion by fast particles from heating measures and impurity ions, accelerated in the sheath potential, play an important role in the case of tungsten. Radiation by carbon in the plasma boundary reduces the load to the target plates. Neon or Argon as substitutes will increase the erosion of tungsten. So far experiments have demonstrated that in most scenarios the tungsten content in the central plasma can be kept sufficiently small. The material development is directed to the specific needs of existing or future devices. In ASDEX Upgrade, which will soon be a divertor experiment with a complete tungsten first-wall, graphite tiles are coated with tungsten layers. In ITER, the solid tungsten armour of the target plates has to be castellated because of its difference in thermal expansion compared to the cooling structure. In a reactor the technical

  2. Investigation of Tungsten and Beryllium Behaviour under Short Transient Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintsuk, G.; Kuehnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Roedig, M.

    2006-01-01

    The electron beam facility JUDITH is a rather versatile test facility for the simulation of high heat fluxes. One key issue is the simulation of the material performance under short transient events. The study of melting behaviour and crack formation, which occurs even for heat pulses below the melting threshold of the metals, is of huge importance for the qualification of materials for future nuclear devices. Heat load simulations at RT with a pulse length of 5 ms have been performed on beryllium (S65C), the ITER candidate material for the first wall, at power loads of 0.5 - 2 GW/m 2 . Crack formation, surface roughening and melt layer motion has been studied. Similar conditions during single and multiple shots below and above the melting threshold (∼50 MW·m-2·s 1 /2) have been applied to tungsten. Since its material properties are dependent on grain size and shape, 3 different grades have been tested in an as-delivered state: 1) deformed tungsten aligned in deformation direction, which corresponds to the actual ITER specification for tungsten used in the divertor; 2) deformed tungsten aligned perpendicular to the deformation direction; 3) sintered tungsten. Significant differences in the crack resistance and the crack pattern of the various tungsten grades below the melting threshold have been determined and further material degradation has been found after multiple shots. This is of importance also in regard to expected ELM loads in ITER, in which power densities below the melting threshold are applied at a high repetition rate (∼ 1 Hz). Crack formation for sintered tungsten starts at ∼20 MW·m -2 ·s -1 /2. The cracks are located across the loaded area and increase in number, length and width with increasing power load. In comparison to that for deformed tungsten cracking was first detected at ∼35 MW·m -2 ·s -1 /2. Whereas for tungsten aligned in deformation direction a crack pattern comparable to those of sintered tungsten was formed, tungsten

  3. Classification of tungsten powder by fluidization method and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Khan-Guan'.

    1989-01-01

    Search for accessible in practice, the technological method to increase the level of control of the granulometric composition of tungsten powder and to increase quality of products and to prepare new materials is carried out. It is shown that the method of fluidization is effective and accessible in practice for tungsten powder (and other refractory metals and compounds) classification, that increases the level of control of the granulometric composition of the powder and thus - its quality, and that improves control of properties of tungsten and other refractory metal products

  4. Dense Pure Tungsten Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianzheng Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Additive manufacturing using tungsten, a brittle material, is difficult because of its high melting point, thermal conductivity, and oxidation tendency. In this study, pure tungsten parts with densities of up to 18.53 g/cm3 (i.e., 96.0% of the theoretical density were fabricated by selective laser melting. In order to minimize balling effects, the raw polyhedral tungsten powders underwent a spheroidization process before laser consolidation. Compared with polyhedral powders, the spherical powders showed increased laser absorptivity and packing density, which helped in the formation of a continuous molten track and promoted densification.

  5. High precision tungsten cutting for optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.; Clemente, G.; Sanz-Tudanca, C.; Lopez, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The results obtained during the INTEGRAL masks development program an implementing the HURA and MURA codes on tungsten plates of different thickness are presented. Hard scientific requirements on pixels size and location tolerances (tenths of microns over large areas -1 m 2 - and thickness from 0.5 mm to 60 mm) required the set up of a dedicated program for testing cutting technologies: laser, photochemical milling, spark machining and electro discharge wire cutting. After a very intensive test campaign the wire cutting process was selected as the optimum technology for code manufacturing . Accuracies achieved an the code cutting fulfill scientific requirements. In fact, they are 5 times better than required. Pixel size and centroids location accuracies of 0.01 mm over a 1 m 2 area have been obtained for the 10,000 pixels on IBIS, 100 pixels on SPI and 24000 pixels on JEM-X masks. Comparative results among different cutting technologies are also discussed. (author)

  6. Modification of tungsten layers by arcing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laux, M.; Schneider, W.; Juettner, B.; Lindig, S.; Mayer, M.; Balden, M.; Beilis, I.; Djakov, B.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous traces of arcs have been found on W-covered graphite tiles of ASDEX Upgrade after exposure. The distributions of number density, lengths and orientation are calculated and compared to pure graphite tiles at comparable locations. It was established that arcs perforate a 1 μm tungsten layer down to the carbon substrate. The amount of removal should rise with arc current, but a surface fraction of about 8% is eroded at 10 A already. At tiles of the divertor baffle the layer is continuously removed along the entire track pointing to higher currents. The carbon of the stripped parts is subject to subsequent erosion processes. The distribution of materials in and around arc tracks was investigated by sputter depth profiling (SIMS and AES) and the characteristic geometry was studied using an electron microscope. Observations are interpreted using results from laboratory vacuum arcs on the same material

  7. The movement of screw dislocations in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian Xiaogeng; Woo Chungho

    2004-03-25

    Using Acland potential for tungsten, the movement of 1/2a<1 1 1> screw dislocation under shear stress was investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Equilibrated core structure was obtained by relaxation of screw dislocation with proper boundary conditions. We found that the equilibrium dislocation core has three-fold symmetry and spread out in three <1 1 2> direction on {l_brace}1 1 0{r_brace} planes. The screw dislocation core could not keep the original shape when the shear stress applied. The dislocation could not move until the shear stress became large enough. The dislocation moved in zigzag when the shear stress neared the Peierls stress. When the shear stress became larger, the dislocation moved in zigzag at the beginning and than moved almost in straight line in [2-bar11] direction. The large shear stress applied, the long distance moved before the dislocation stilled in z-direction and the large velocity in y-direction.

  8. Electronic structure and Compton profiles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal Ahuja, Babu; Rathor, Ashish; Sharma, Vinit; Sharma, Yamini; Ramniklal Jani, Ashvin; Sharma, Balkrishna

    2008-01-01

    The energy bands, density of states and Compton profiles of tungsten have been computed using band structure methods, namely the spin-polarized relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (SPR-KKR) approach as well as the linear combination of atomic orbitals with Hartree-Fock scheme and density functional theory. The full potential linearized augmented plane wave scheme to calculate these properties and the Fermi surface topology(except the momentum densities) have also been used to analyze the theoretical data on the electron momentum densities. The directional Compton profiles have been measured using a 100 mCi 241 Am Compton spectrometer. From the comparison, the measured anisotropies are found to be in good agreement with the SPR-KKR calculations. The band structure calculations are also compared with the available data. (orig.)

  9. Hydrogen generation from steam reaction with tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolik, G. R.; McCarthy, K. A.; Petti, D. A.; Coates, K.

    1998-10-01

    A LOCA in a fusion reactor involving an ingress of steam presents a safety concern due to hydrogen generated from steam reactions with plasma facing components. Hydrogen concentrations must be maintained below explosive levels. To support safety evaluations we have experimentally determined hydrogen generation rates when a tungsten alloy is exposed to steam from 400°C to 1200°C. We studied effects of steam pressure between 2.8 × 10 4 and 8.5 × 10 4 Pa, i.e., (0.28-0.84 atm) and gas velocity between 0.011 and 0.063 m/s. We present relationships for the reaction rates, oxidation phases, and mechanisms associated with the hydrogen generation.

  10. Laser irradiation of carbon–tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcu, A; Lungu, C P; Ursescu, D; Porosnicu, C; Grigoriu, C; Avotina, L; Kizane, G; Marin, A; Osiceanu, P; Grigorescu, C E A; Demitri, N

    2014-01-01

    Carbon–tungsten layers deposited on graphite by thermionic vacuum arc (TVA) were directly irradiated with a femtosecond terawatt laser. The morphological and structural changes produced in the irradiated area by different numbers of pulses were systematically explored, both along the spots and in their depths. Although micro-Raman and Synchrotron-x-ray diffraction investigations have shown no carbide formation, they have shown the unexpected presence of embedded nano-diamonds in the areas irradiated with high fluencies. Scanning electron microscopy images show a cumulative effect of the laser pulses on the morphology through the ablation process. The micro-Raman spatial mapping signalled an increased percentage of sp 3 carbon bonding in the areas irradiated with laser fluencies around the ablation threshold. In-depth x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations suggested a weak cumulative effect on the percentage increase of the sp 2 -sp 3 transitions with the number of laser pulses just for nanometric layer thicknesses. (paper)

  11. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, T.J., E-mail: tjpetty@liv.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Khan, A. [Pariser Building-G11, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Heil, T. [NiCaL, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL (United Kingdom); Bradley, J.W., E-mail: j.w.bradley@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10{sup 23}–3.0 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10{sup 24} m{sup −2}, and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ{sup 1/2} relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  12. Fuzzy tungsten in a magnetron sputtering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, T.J.; Khan, A.; Heil, T.; Bradley, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion induced tungsten nanostructure (tungsten fuzz) has been studied in a magnetron sputtering device. Three parameters were varied, the fluence from 3.4 × 10 23 –3.0 × 10 24  m −2 , the He ion energy from 25 to 70 eV, and the surface temperature from 900 to 1200 K. For each sample, SEM images were captured, and measurements of the fuzz layer thickness, surface roughness, reflectivity, and average structure widths are provided. A cross-over point from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is found at 2.4 ± 0.4 × 10 24  m −2 , and a temperature of 1080 ± 60 K. No significant change was observed in the energy sweep. The fuzz is compared to low fluence fuzz created in the PISCES-A linear plasma device. Magnetron fuzz is less uniform than fuzz created by PISCES-A and with generally larger structure widths. The thicknesses of the magnetron samples follow the original Φ 1/2 relation as opposed to the incubation fluence fit. - Highlights: • Fuzz has been created in a magnetron sputtering device. • Three parameters for fuzz formation have been swept. • A cross-over from pre-fuzz to fully formed fuzz is seen. • Evidence for annealing out at lower temperatures than has been seen before. • Evidence to suggest that fuzz grown in discrete exposures is not consistent with fuzz grown in one long exposure.

  13. Electrodeposition of tungsten coatings on molybdenum substrates and deuterium irradiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lian, Ziwei; Fang, Xianqin; Han, Wenjia; Yu, Jiangang; Wang, Zhanlei; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Kaigui

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were successfully electroplated on molybdenum substrates. • The current density affected the performance of tungsten coatings. • Deuterium irradiation property of tungsten coatings was investigated. • Deuterium retention in the tungsten coating was less than that in the bulk tungsten. - Abstract: Tungsten coatings were prepared using pulse electrodeposition on the molybdenum substrates. Effects of variations in current density on surface morphology, thickness distribution and crystal orientation of the coatings were investigated. The results indicate that with the current density increasing, the grain size of tungsten coatings first decreases, then increases; while the deposited thickness increases all the time. And all of tungsten coatings exhibit the preferred orientation of (200) plane. Moreover, the polished tungsten coating and bulk tungsten were exposed to low energy (80 eV) and high flux (7.2 × 10 20 D/m 2 /s) deuterium plasma in a linear plasma device (Simulator of Tokamak Edge Plasma, STEP). Deuterium (D) retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). It is found that blisters on the tungsten coating are much fewer than that on the bulk tungsten. TDS spectroscopy of the tungsten coating reveals one D 2 release peak at 740 K, while the bulk tungsten has two D 2 release peaks at 500 K and 660 K. The amount of deuterium retention in the tungsten coating is lower.

  14. Understanding metal–insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ARPES) and spectro- microscopy studies to understand the metal–insulator transition (MIT) observed in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaxWO3. The experimentally determined band structure is compared with the theoretical calculation based on ...

  15. A Compact Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding Torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, Gene E.

    1991-01-01

    Compact gas/tungsten-arc welding torch delivers 100-A current, yet used in confined spaces inaccessible to even smallest commercially available torch. Despite its extremely small size, torch contains all usual components and delivers high current.

  16. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding; Le soudage TIG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2010-09-15

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  17. Structural investigations on the tetragonal to cubic phase transformations in zirconia induced by progressive yttrium additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthavel, S.; Kannan, S.

    2018-01-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is inevitable in many industrial applications. Yttrium additions in ZrO2 system induces either tetragonal (t-ZrO2) or cubic (c-ZrO2) phase stabilization that predominantly depends on the yttrium content. Here, the structural changes in ZrO2 system upon a wide range of yttrium additions are investigated. Powder synthesis is carried out through citrate-nitrate assisted sol-gel technique and analytical techniques involving XRD, Raman spectra and structural analysis through Rietveld refinement were utilized to investigate the structural changes in ZrO2 upon progressive yttrium additions. The critical limit of yttrium content to retain unique t-ZrO2, mixtures of t-ZrO2 and c-ZrO2 and discrete c-ZrO2 is determined.

  18. Cubic to tetragonal phase transition of Tm3+ doped nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yiming; Fu, Yuting; Shi, Yahui; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hua; Zhao, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Tm 3+ ions doped β-PbF 2 nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics with different doping concentrations and thermal temperatures are prepared by a traditional melt-quenching and thermal treatment method to investigate the structure and the phase transition of Tm 3+ doped nanocrystals. The structures are characterized by X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis and confirmed with numerical simulation. The phase transitions are proved further by the emission spectra. Both of the doping concentration and thermal temperature can induce an O h to D 4h site symmetry distortion and a cubic to tetragonal phase transition. The luminescence of Tm 3+ doped nanocrystals at 800 nm was modulated by the phase transition of the surrounding crystal field

  19. Hydrothermal degradation of tetragonal ZrO2 ceramic components used in dental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukaeda, L.E.; Robin, A.; Taguchi, S.P.

    2009-01-01

    With the evolution of the dental restoration techniques, a considerable growth in the demand of ceramic products occurred. These materials present good strength associated to reliability. In this work, micrometric and nanometric scale tetragonal ZrO 2 blocks were sintered at 1500 deg C-2h and 1350 deg C-2h, respectively, ground and polished. Ceramics with relative density higher than 98% were obtained. The specimens were immersed in hot water (150 deg C), for times ranging from 10h to 30h. The mass variation of the samples was measured and the crystalline phases present before and after the degradation tests were identified by X-ray diffractometry, in order to evaluate the capacity of these ceramics in resisting to aqueous medium exposure. Materials with nanometric structure present higher resistance to degradation than those with micrometric scale, and this interferes in structural stability after the test, and reduces the martensitic transformation. (author)

  20. Czochralski growth and topographic study of tetragonal (La,Sr)(Al,Ta)O 3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jingzhong; Shao, Manjun; Tian, Yulian; Huang, Wanxia; Wang, Aihua; Yin, Shaotang

    2002-03-01

    Large tetragonal phase (La,Sr)(Al,Ta)O 3 (LSAT) crystals used as substrates for growing functional thin-film materials were successfully grown by the Czochralski method using [0 0 1] LaAlO 3 rod as seed. The crystal phase was determined by the method of powder X-ray diffraction analysis and the transmission spectrum indicates that the absorption edge of the crystal is at 270 nm while no apparent absorption peaks were found. Through the technique of environmental scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron radiation white-beam topography, the surface topography and defects were characterized, and clear and stable images of twins, micro-cracks, inclusions, grain boundaries, dislocation etch pits, and growth striations in the as-grown LSAT crystals were obtained.

  1. High-pressure phase in tetragonal two-dimensional polymeric C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meletov, K.P.; Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Chernogolovka; Arvanitidis, J.; Ves, S.; Kourouklis, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    The pressure behavior of the phonon modes of tetragonal two-dimensional polymeric C 60 has been studied at pressure up to 27.5 GPa and room temperature by means of Raman spectroscopy. Gradual transformation of the material to a new phase was observed in the pressure region 18.0-22.0 GPa. The Raman spectrum characteristics of the high-pressure phase provide a strong indication that the fullerene molecular cage is retained and the material may be related to a three-dimensionally polymerized C 60 . The new phase remains stable upon pressure decrease down to 9 GPa. Further release of pressure leads to its transformation to a highly disordered structure whose broad features in the Raman spectrum resemble those of amorphous carbon. (orig.)

  2. Mechanical and magnetic properties of nickel-dispersed tetragonal zirconia nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, H; Sekino, T; Choa, Y H; Kusunose, T; Nakayama, T; Wada, M; Adachi, T; Niihara, K

    2002-10-01

    Effects of Ni dispersions on microstructure and mechanical properties have been studied for Y2O3-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP)/Ni nanocomposites with Ni dispersion up to 10 vol%. Composites were successfully fabricated by reducing and hot-pressing Y-TZP/NiO powder mixtures. Fracture strength was significantly improved from 1.5 GPa for monolithic Y-TZP to 1.9 GPa for nanocomposites with a small addition of Ni (1-2 vol%). Magnetic properties of Y-TZP/Ni nanocomposites were also investigated. Magnetization curves of Y-TZP/Ni nanocomposites showed typical hysteresis loops of soft magnetic materials, whereas coercivity was much larger than that of pure Ni metal. A new function arising from magnetomechanical effects of metallic Ni is also discussed for the present nanocomposites.

  3. Sm/Ti co-substituted bismuth ferrite multiferroics: reciprocity between tetragonality and piezoelectricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Pardeep K; Jha, Priyanka A; Singh, Prabhakar; Ranjan, Rajeev; Dwivedi, R K

    2017-10-04

    BiFeO 3 (BFO) systems co-modified with Ti, Sm and Sm-Ti have been investigated for piezoelectricity together with dielectric and multiferroic properties. Structural studies revealed the coexistence of orthorhombic and rhombohedral (R3c) phases for x > 0.12. Impurity phases were shown to have hardly any effect on the remanent magnetization, which rather depends on the Fe-O-Fe bond angle. The dielectric loss was reduced considerably by substitution. A correlation between the piezoelectric coefficient and tetragonality was observed in these samples. BFO co-substituted with Sm-Ti exhibited a high piezoelectric coefficient with better ferroic properties, which revealed a unique combination of green piezoelectricity and multiferroicity.

  4. Determination of the structure of a new tetragonal U2FeAl20 phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meshi, L.; Munitz, A.; Talianker, M.

    2008-01-01

    The atomic structure of a new ternary U 2 FeAl 20 phase appearing in the Al-rich corner of a U-Fe-Al system was solved using electron crystallography and X-ray powder diffraction techniques (XRD). The positions of U atoms were determined from crystallographically processed high-resolution electron microscopy (HRTEM) images. These positions were used as a starting set for determining the coordinates of Fe and Al atoms by difference-Fourier synthesis technique. The U 2 FeAl 20 phase is tetragonal and belongs to the I4-bar 2m space group. Its unit cell contains 80 Al, 4 Fe, and 8 U atoms. The lattice parameters obtained after Rietveld refinement are: a = 12.4138 A, c = 10.3014 A. The reliability factors characterizing the Rietveld refinement procedure are: R p = 8.65%, R wp = 11.2% and R b = 5.93%

  5. Structure of tetragonal martensite in the In95.42Cd4.58 cast alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Rodionov, D. P.; Kazantsev, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    The structure of martensite in the In95.42Cd4.58 alloy has been studied by metallography, X-ray diffraction, dilatometry, and transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that a massive structure built of colonies of tetragonal lamellar plates divided by a twin boundary {101}FCT is formed in the alloy under cooling below the martensite FCC → FCT transition temperature. The alloy recrystallizes after a cycle of FCT → FCC → FCT transitions with a decrease in the grain size by several times compared with the initial structure such fashion that the size of massifs and individual martensite lamella in the massif correlates with the change in the size of the alloy grain. Using thermal cycling, it has been revealed that the alloy tends to stabilize the high-temperature phase.

  6. Stable tetragonal phase and magnetic properties of Fe-doped HfO2 nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. N. Sales

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the effect in structural and magnetic properties of iron doping with concentration of 20% in hafnium dioxide (HfO2 nanoparticles is investigated. HfO2 is a wide band gap oxide with great potential to be used as high-permittivity gate dielectrics, which can be improved by doping. Nanoparticle samples were prepared by sol-gel chemical method and had their structure, morphology, and magnetic properties, respectively, investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM with electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD, and magnetization measurements. TEM and SEM results show size distribution of particles in the range from 30 nm to 40 nm with small dispersion. Magnetization measurements show the blocking temperature at around 90 K with a strong paramagnetic contribution. XRD results show a major tetragonal phase (94%.

  7. Fine structure of spectra of a bound exciton in tetragonal zinc diphosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrbu, N.N.; Morozova, V.I.; Stratan, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    Investigation into the low-temperature luminescence spectra recorded in different crystal geometry relative to the direction of incident radiation wave vector, has demonstrated the existence of saddle-shaped valent zone ceiling near k=0 in zinc tetragonal diphosphide monocrystals. Binding energies of free (2.2085 eV) and bound (A(2.1943eV)B(2.1765eV), C(2.1447eV)) excitons as well as the phonon energy value are determined by investigations into absorption spectrum and radiative recombination. Phonon-free lines of bound A 0 and C 0 excitons are splitted into 2.2 and 0.3 MeV respectively. The band exciton singlet-triplet state splittings in a magnetic field and their field dependences are obtained. The spectroscopic splitting factor g=1.9 is determined

  8. Operation of ASDEX Upgrade with tungsten coated walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, V.; Neu, R.; Dux, R.; Geier, A.; Gong, X.; Kallenbach, A.; Krieger, K.; Lindig, S.; Maier, H.; Mueller, W.; Pugno, R.; Schneider, W.

    2003-01-01

    Since 1998 a step by step approach to investigate high-Z material at the main chamber walls of the ASDEX Upgrade divertor tokamak was followed, resulting in 7.1 m 2 of tungsten coated tiles at the central column during the 2001-02 campaign. Despite this large area, plasma operation was not hampered in any way by tungsten radiation. Results obtained from a variety of confinement regimes indicate that the core tungsten concentration depends mostly on core transport rather than on the tungsten erosion source. For medium density H-mode discharges tungsten concentration ∼ 1·10 -6 are found. Higher concentrations are observed only under discharge conditions where neoclassical accumulation becomes dominant as in case of strong background plasma peaking. On the other hand, core accumulation can be effectively controlled without noticeable confinement degradation by applying central heating. Unexpected high average tungsten erosion due to ions could be attributed to transient limiter phases, especially during plasma ramp-down. (author)

  9. Development of Low Thermal Expansion Tungsten UO 2 Cermet Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marlowe, M O; Kaznoff, A I

    1970-03-31

    An attempt was made to develop a tungsten-uranium dioxide cermet of high fue 1 loading with thermal expansion approaching that of tungsten and with good dimensional stability on thermal cycling. These goals were sought through the use of tungsten-coated uranium dioxide particles with sufficient locally available void volume to accommodate the difference in thermal expansion between the uranium dioxide and the tungsten matrix and through limitation of plastic deformation in the particles during fabrication to avoid mechanical keying of the particles and the matrix. The particles were vibratorily compacted prior to hot pressing. The thermal expansion of the cermets was determined and they were thermal cycle tested. The thermal expansion of the cermets was considerably closer to that of tungsten than was observed with previously reported specimens of similar composition. However, the thermal cycling of the cermets resulted in intolerable growth. This growth could be accounted for by the agglomeration of gases trapped in the uranium dioxide particles during deposition of the tungsten coating.

  10. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780 °C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0 × 1025 n/m2, E > 0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22 °C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22 °C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  11. Irradiation effects in tungsten-copper laminate composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, L. M.; Katoh, Y.; Snead, L. L.; Byun, T. S.; Reiser, J.; Rieth, M.

    2016-12-01

    Tungsten-copper laminate composite has shown promise as a structural plasma-facing component as compared to tungsten rod or plate. The present study evaluated the tungsten-copper composite after irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at temperatures of 410-780°C and fast neutron fluences of 0.02-9.0×1025 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV, 0.0039-1.76 displacements per atom (dpa) in tungsten. Tensile tests were performed on the composites, and the fracture surfaces were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy. Before irradiation, the tungsten layers had brittle cleavage failure, but the overall composite had 15.5% elongation at 22°C. After only 0.0039 dpa this was reduced to 7.7% elongation, and no ductility was observed after 0.2 dpa at all irradiation temperatures when tensile tested at 22°C. For elevated temperature tensile tests after irradiation, the composite only had ductile failure at temperatures where the tungsten was delaminating or ductile.

  12. Superconductivity in an anomalously tetragonal YB2C3O6.62 single crystal: A possible singularity in the structural phase diagram

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frello, T.; Andersen, N.H.; Baziljevich, M.

    2003-01-01

    superconducting. This makes the sample highly anomalous in two respects: with a stoichiometry of YBa2Cu3O6.62 the sample should have an orthorhombic symmetry, and a tetragonal undoped sample should not be superconducting at all. Our results corroborate previous findings of Topnikov [JETP Lett. 46, 577 (1987......)] of a tetragonal superconducting YBCO crystal with x=0.62....

  13. Correlation between tetragonal zinc-blende structure and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of MnGa epilayers on GaAs(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arins, A.W.; Jurca, H.F. [Laboratório de Superfícies e Interfaces, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Zarpellon, J. [Laboratório de Superfícies e Interfaces, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste-Campus Irati, PR 153km 7, CEP 84500-000, Irati, Paraná (Brazil); Fabrim, Z.E.; Fichtner, P.F.P. [Departamento de Metalurgia e Laboratório de Implantação Iônica-Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Varalda, J; Schreiner, W.H.; Mosca, D.H [Laboratório de Superfícies e Interfaces, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Caixa Postal 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil)

    2015-05-01

    MnGa films of few nanometer thickness with tetragonal zinc-blende (TZB) structure were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs(111) substrates. These ultrathin films have high magnetization at room temperature with magnetic moment as high as 3.2 μ{sub B} per formula unit. A strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) comparable to that reported to δ-MnGa films with body-centered tetragonal (BCT) structure with similar c/a=1.1 is observed. Electronic structure calculations using density functional theory (DFT) reveal a robust ferrimagnetic ground state at room temperature and confirm that zinc-blende structure with tetragonal distortion has a metastable character. The strong MAE is associated with anisotropy of orbital magnetic moment which is described by the symmetry of the spin-polarized charge density along the crystallographic axes. - Highlights: • MnGa epilayers with tetragonal zinc-blende structure were grown. • Density functional theory calculations reveal a robust ferrimagnetic ground state at room temperature. • Substantial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is associated with the symmetry of the spin-polarized charge density of Mn 4d sites. • MnGa alloy films are promising for spintronics applications.

  14. On the effective mass in tetragonal semiconductors in the presence of an arbitrarily oriented quantizing magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, M.; Ghatak, K.P.

    1984-01-01

    A generalized expression of the effective mass of charge carriers in tetragonal semiconductors (taking n-Cd 3 As 2 as an example) in the presence of arbitrary magnetic quantization has been derived considering the generalized dispersion relation of the conduction electrons and taking into account only the effective mass of the electrons at the Fermi surface

  15. Effects of specimen size and yttria concentration on mechanical properties of single crystalline yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia nanopillars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Asle Zaeem, Mohsen

    2017-07-01

    The nanoscale plastic deformation of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (YSTZ) is highly dependent on the crystallographic orientations, i.e., dislocation is induced when the loading direction is 45° tilted to {111} and {101} slip planes, while tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation dominates the plastic deformation when loading direction is perpendicular to the slip planes. This study investigates the effects of specimen size and yttria concentration on the mechanical response of single crystalline YSTZ nanopillars. Through uniaxial compression test, the smaller-is-stronger phenomenon is revealed in nanopillars deformed through a dislocation motion mechanism. Serrated stacking faults are observed in the smallest nanopillar, while neat primary slip plane forms in the largest nanopillar. In contrast, the larger-is-stronger relation is observed in nanopillars in which deformation is mediated by tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation. It is noted that the ratio of transformed monoclinic phase to the remaining tetragonal phase is the highest in the smallest nanopillar. The strength of nanopillars is identified to decrease by increasing the amount of yttria due to the creation of more oxygen vacancies that act as weak points to facilitate dislocation motion and accelerate phase transformation.

  16. Low Friction in CuO-Doped Yttria-Stabilized Tetragonal Zirconia Ceramics: A Complementary Macro- and Nanotribology Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tocha, E.; Pasaribu, H.R.; Schipper, Dirk J.; Schönherr, Holger; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2008-01-01

    The tribological behavior of CuO-doped yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (3Y-TZP) ceramics in the absence of additional lubricants was characterized by macroscale pin-on-disk measurements and nanoscale atomic force microscopy (AFM) for a broad range of velocities. The previously observed low

  17. A tetragonal polymorph of SrMn2P2 made under high pressure - theory and experiment in harmony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Weiwei; Winiarski, Michał J; Klimczuk, Tomasz; Cava, R J

    2017-05-30

    Following the predictions of total energy calculations, a tetragonal SrMn 2 P 2 phase is proposed and successfully formed under high pressure. At ambient pressure, SrMn 2 P 2 adopts the primitive trigonal La 2 O 3 structure type (space group P3[combining macron]m1). However, the results of total energy calculations indicate that SrMn 2 P 2 should be more stable in the tetragonal ThCr 2 Si 2 structure type (space group I4/mmm) than in its known trigonal structure, thus motivating our synthetic experiments. Guided by these calculations, a new tetragonal polymorph of SrMn 2 P 2 was found under the relatively mild conditions of 5 GPa applied pressure at a temperature of 900 °C through the transformation of the ambient pressure trigonal form. The new polymorph has the body centered tetragonal ThCr 2 Si 2 structure type, as predicted. The electronic structure calculations indicate the likelihood of antiferromagnetic, semiconducting properties for the high pressure SrMn 2 P 2 phase.

  18. Atomic resolution imaging of precipitate transformation from cubic TaN to tetragonal CrTaN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Hald, John; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2012-01-01

    in the matrix. Using atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy, the current work demonstrates that metastable cubic TaN precipitates in a complex steel gradually transform compositionally and crystallographically into stable tetragonal CrTaN precipitates under the influence of Cr indiffusion from...

  19. Effect of superconductivity on the cubic to tetragonal structural transition due to a two-fold degenerate electronic band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghatak, S.K.; Khanra, B.C.; Ray, D.K.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of the BCS superconductivity on the cubic to tetragonal structural transition arising from a two-fold degenerate electronic band is investigated within the mean field approximation. The phase diagram of the two transitions is given for a half filled esub(g)-band. Modification of the two transitions when they are close together is also discussed. (author)

  20. Tetragonal phase of cylinders self-assembled from binary blends of AB diblock and (A'B)nstar copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenbo; Qiang, Yicheng; Liu, Meijiao; Li, Weihua; Qiu, Feng; Shi, An-Chang

    2017-09-27

    The phase behavior of binary blends composed of AB diblock and (A'B) n star copolymers is studied using the polymeric self-consistent field theory, focusing on the formation and stability of the stable tetragonal phase of cylinders. In general, cylindrical domains self-assembled from AB-type block copolymers are packed into a hexagonal array, although a tetragonal array of cylinders could be more favourable for lithography applications in microelectronics. The polymer blends are designed such that there is an attractive interaction between the A and A' blocks, which increases the compatibility between the two copolymers and thus suppresses the macroscopic phase separation of the blends. With an appropriate choice of system parameters, a considerable stability window for the targeted tetragonal phase is identified in the blends. Importantly, the transition mechanism between the hexagonal and tetragonal phases is elucidated by examining the distribution of the two types of copolymers in the unit cell of the structure. The results reveal that the short (A'B) n star copolymers are preferentially located in the bonding area connecting two neighboring domains in order to reduce extra stretching, whereas the long AB diblock copolymers are extended to further space of the unit cell.

  1. Toxicity of tungsten carbide and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide nanoparticles in mammalian cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meissner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-04-01

    Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt-doped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendrocyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Chemical-physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect.

  2. Toxicity of Tungsten Carbide and Cobalt-Doped Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles in Mammalian Cells in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Susanne; Busch, Wibke; Kühnel, Dana; Springer, Armin; Meißner, Tobias; Holke, Roland; Scholz, Stefan; Iwe, Maria; Pompe, Wolfgang; Gelinsky, Michael; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Ikonomidou, Chrysanthy; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-01-01

    Background Tungsten carbide nanoparticles are being explored for their use in the manufacture of hard metals. To develop nanoparticles for broad applications, potential risks to human health and the environment should be evaluated and taken into consideration. Objective We aimed to assess the toxicity of well-characterized tungsten carbide (WC) and cobaltdoped tungsten carbide (WC-Co) nanoparticle suspensions in an array of mammalian cells. Methods We examined acute toxicity of WC and of WC-Co (10% weight content Co) nanoparticles in different human cell lines (lung, skin, and colon) as well as in rat neuronal and glial cells (i.e., primary neuronal and astroglial cultures and the oligodendro cyte precursor cell line OLN-93). Furthermore, using electron microscopy, we assessed whether nanoparticles can be taken up by living cells. We chose these in vitro systems in order to evaluate for potential toxicity of the nanoparticles in different mammalian organs (i.e., lung, skin, intestine, and brain). Results Chemical–physical characterization confirmed that WC as well as WC-Co nanoparticles with a mean particle size of 145 nm form stable suspensions in serum-containing cell culture media. WC nanoparticles were not acutely toxic to the studied cell lines. However, cytotoxicity became apparent when particles were doped with Co. The most sensitive were astrocytes and colon epithelial cells. Cytotoxicity of WC-Co nanoparticles was higher than expected based on the ionic Co content of the particles. Analysis by electron microscopy demonstrated presence of WC nanoparticles within mammalian cells. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that doping of WC nanoparticles with Co markedly increases their cytotoxic effect and that the presence of WC-Co in particulate form is essential to elicit this combinatorial effect. PMID:19440490

  3. Mechanistic, kinetic, and processing aspects of tungsten chemical mechanical polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, David

    This dissertation presents an investigation into tungsten chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). CMP is the industrially predominant unit operation that removes excess tungsten after non-selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) during sub-micron integrated circuit (IC) manufacture. This work explores the CMP process from process engineering and fundamental mechanistic perspectives. The process engineering study optimized an existing CMP process to address issues of polish pad and wafer carrier life. Polish rates, post-CMP metrology of patterned wafers, electrical test data, and synergy with a thermal endpoint technique were used to determine the optimal process. The oxidation rate of tungsten during CMP is significantly lower than the removal rate under identical conditions. Tungsten polished without inhibition during cathodic potentiostatic control. Hertzian indenter model calculations preclude colloids of the size used in tungsten CMP slurries from indenting the tungsten surface. AFM surface topography maps and TEM images of post-CMP tungsten do not show evidence of plow marks or intergranular fracture. Polish rate is dependent on potassium iodate concentration; process temperature is not. The colloid species significantly affects the polish rate and process temperature. Process temperature is not a predictor of polish rate. A process energy balance indicates that the process temperature is predominantly due to shaft work, and that any heat of reaction evolved during the CMP process is negligible. Friction and adhesion between alumina and tungsten were studied using modified AFM techniques. Friction was constant with potassium iodate concentration, but varied with applied pressure. This corroborates the results from the energy balance. Adhesion between the alumina and the tungsten was proportional to the potassium iodate concentration. A heuristic mechanism, which captures the relationship between polish rate, pressure, velocity, and slurry chemistry, is presented

  4. Growth and structure analysis of tungsten oxide nanorods using environmental TEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Tomoharu; Kawamoto, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kenta; Nakamura, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Kuroda, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2012-01-25

    WO3 nanorods targeted for applications in electric devices were grown from a tungsten wire heated in an oxygen atmosphere inside an environmental transmission electron microscope, which allowed the growth process to be observed to reveal the growth mechanism of the WO3 nanorods. The initial growth of the nanorods did not consist of tungsten oxide but rather crystal tungsten. The formed crystal tungsten nanorods were then oxidized, resulting in the formation of the tungsten oxide nanorods. Furthermore, it is expected that the nanorods grew through cracks in the natural surface oxide layer on the tungsten wire.

  5. Study on effect of cubic- and tetragonal phased BaTiO{sub 3} on the electrical and thermal properties of polymeric nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanki, A.A.; Goyal, R.K., E-mail: rkgoyal72@yahoo.co.in

    2016-11-01

    Polymer matrix nanocomposites based on polycarbonate (PC) and nanosized-cubic/tetragonal phases of barium titanate (BaTiO{sub 3}) were fabricated using a solution method followed by hot pressing. The content of both cubic- and tetragonal phased BaTiO{sub 3} was varied from 0 to 50 wt%. For a given weight fraction, the dielectric constant of the nanocomposites containing tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3} is more than those of cubic BaTiO{sub 3} filled nanocomposites. Moreover, cubic BaTiO{sub 3}/PC nanocomposites showed significantly lower dissipation factor than those of tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3}/PC nanocomposites. The dielectric constant of the nanocomposites was found to be frequency-independent. The microhardness of the nanocomposites increased with increase in the BaTiO{sub 3} content (both cubic- and tetragonal-phased) compared to the pure matrix. Scanning electron microscopy showed better dispersion and good interaction of the tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles in the matrix. The addition of cubic BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles significantly reduced the thermal stability of the nanocomposites compared to matrix while the addition of tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles decreased it slightly. The glass transition temperature of the cubic BaTiO{sub 3}/PC nanocomposites decreased significantly, whereas it reduced slightly for the tetragonal BaTiO{sub 3}/PC nanocomposites. - Highlights: • The effect of cubic-BaTiO{sub 3} and tetragonal-BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles were studied. • Cubic-BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles showed better microhardness. • Tetragonal-BaTiO{sub 3} nanoparticles showed better dielectric and thermal properties. • Frequency independent dielectric constants of the nanocomposites were observed.

  6. Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zhao Yimin; Xia Yongde; Zhu Yanqiu; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-thin W 18 O 49 nanowires were initially obtained by a simple solvothermal method using tungsten chloride and cyclohexanol as precursors. Thermal processing of the resulting bundled nanowires has been carried out in air in a tube furnace. The morphology and phase transformation behavior of the as-synthesized nanowires as a function of annealing temperature have been characterized by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The nanostructured bundles underwent a series of morphological evolution with increased annealing temperature, becoming straighter, larger in diameter, and smaller in aspect ratio, eventually becoming irregular particles with size up to 5 μm. At 500 deg. C, the monoclinic W 18 O 49 was completely transformed to monoclinic WO 3 phase, which remains stable at high processing temperature. After thermal processing at 400 deg. C and 450 deg. C, the specific surface areas of the resulting nanowires dropped to 110 m 2 g -1 and 66 m 2 g -1 respectively, compared with that of 151 m 2 g -1 for the as-prepared sample. This study may shed light on the understanding of the geometrical and structural evolution occurring in nanowires whose working environment may involve severe temperature variations

  7. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  8. The DAMPE silicon–tungsten tracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzarello, P., E-mail: philipp.azzarello@unige.ch [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Ambrosi, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Asfandiyarov, R. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Bernardini, P. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Bertucci, B.; Bolognini, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Cadoux, F. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Caprai, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); De Mitri, I. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica “E. De Giorgi”, Università del Salento, Lecce (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Lecce, Lecce (Italy); Domenjoz, M. [Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, University of Geneva, Geneva (Switzerland); Dong, Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Duranti, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Università di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Fan, R. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); and others

    2016-09-21

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) is a spaceborne astroparticle physics experiment, launched on 17 December 2015. DAMPE will identify possible dark matter signatures by detecting electrons and photons in the 5 GeV–10 TeV energy range. It will also measure the flux of nuclei up to 100 TeV, for the study of the high energy cosmic ray origin and propagation mechanisms. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon–tungsten tracker–converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is composed of six tracking planes of 2 orthogonal layers of single-sided micro-strip detectors, for a total detector surface of ca. 7 m{sup 2}. The STK has been extensively tested for space qualification. Also, numerous beam tests at CERN have been done to study particle detection at silicon module level, and at full detector level. After description of the DAMPE payload and its scientific mission, we will describe the STK characteristics and assembly. We will then focus on some results of single ladder performance tests done with particle beams at CERN.

  9. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polignano, M.L., E-mail: maria.polignano@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Mica, I., E-mail: isabella.mica@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Barbarossa, F., E-mail: fbarbarossa87@gmail.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Galbiati, A., E-mail: amos.galbiati@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Grasso, S., E-mail: salvatore.grasso-r2@st.com [ST Microelectronics, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Soncini, V., E-mail: vsoncini@micron.com [Micron, via Olivetti, 2, 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF{sub 2} implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF{sub 2} implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  10. Contamination by slow diffusers in ion implantation processes: The examples of molybdenum and tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polignano, M. L.; Mica, I.; Barbarossa, F.; Galbiati, A.; Grasso, S.; Soncini, V.

    2015-08-01

    A procedure to measure molybdenum and tungsten contamination in implantation processes by DLTS (Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy) is defined and calibrated for the evaluation of molybdenum and tungsten contaminant dose. The obtained calibrations are used to study molybdenum contamination in BF2 implantations and tungsten contamination by sputtering from a previously contaminated wafer holder. In molybdenum-implanted samples, the molybdenum level located 0.3 eV above valence band is revealed only. In tungsten-implanted samples, two levels are revealed. One of these levels is the tungsten-related hole trap located 0.4 eV above valence band. The other level does not correspond to any tungsten-related level, however it is related to the presence of tungsten and to the sample preparation process. The SPV (Surface Photovoltage) measurement sensitivity to tungsten contamination was also tested, and it was found much lower than the DLTS sensitivity, due to the low tungsten diffusivity. This procedure was used to evaluate contamination in implantation processes. In BF2 implantations, in addition to molybdenum, tungsten contamination is found. Molybdenum and tungsten contamination is found in boron implantation too. The tungsten contamination induced by implantation in a previously contaminated implanter was quantified, and the efficiency of arsenic implantation as a decontamination process was tested. Finally, it was shown that TXRF (Total reflection X-ray Fluorescence) is much less sensitive than DLTS for monitoring tungsten contamination.

  11. Structure and properties of quarternary and tetragonal Heusler compounds for spintronics and spin transver torque applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamani, Vajiheh Alijani

    2012-03-07

    shown that the series Mn{sub 3-x}Co{sub x}Ga crystallizes in the inverse tetragonal structure, for x=0.1-0.4 and in the cubic inverse Heusler structure, for x=0.6-1. In this series, while the tetragonal alloys, hard magnets, exhibit the features typically attractive for STT applications, the cubic systems, soft magnets, present 100% spin polarized materials obeying the Slater-Pauling rule. In Mn{sub 2-x}Rh{sub 1+x}Sn series, Mn{sub 2}RhSn crystallizes in the inverse tetragonal structure, shows a hard-magnetic hysteresis loop and does not follow the Slater-Pauling rule. With substituting Mn by Rh, the inverse cubic structure is observed. All cubic samples show perfect Slater-Pauling behavior and a soft hysteresis loop.

  12. Vaporization of tungsten-metal in steam at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.C.

    2000-01-01

    The vaporization of tungsten from the APT spallation target dominates the radiological source term for unmitigated target overheating accidents. Chemical reactions of tungsten with steam which persist to tungsten temperatures as low as 800 C result in the formation of a hydrated tungsten-oxide which has a high vapor pressure and is readily convected in a flowing atmosphere. This low-temperature vaporization reaction essentially removes the oxide film that forms on the tungsten-metal surface as soon as it forms, leaving behind a fresh metallic surface for continued oxidation and vaporization. Experiments were conducted to measure the oxidative vaporization rates of tungsten in steam as part of the effort to quantify the MT radiological source term for severe target accidents. Tests were conducted with tungsten rods (1/8 inch diameter, six inches long) heated to temperatures from approximately 700 C to 1350 C in flowing steam which was superheated to 140 C. A total of 19 experiments was conducted. Fifteen tests were conducted by RF induction heating of single tungsten rods held vertical in a quartz glass retort. Four tests were conducted in a vertically-mounted tube furnace for the low temperature range of the test series. The aerosol which was generated and transported downstream from the tungsten rods was collected by passing the discharged steam through a condenser. This procedure insured total collection of the steam along with the aerosol from the vaporization of the rods. The results of these experiments revealed a threshold temperature for tungsten vaporization in steam. For the two tests at the lowest temperatures which were tested, approximately 700 C, the tungsten rods were observed to oxidize without vaporization. The remainder of the tests was conducted over the temperature range of 800 C to 1350 C. In these tests, the rods were found to have lost weight due to vaporization of the tungsten and the missing weight was collected in the downstream condensate

  13. Chemically deposited tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten – The way to a mock-up for divertor applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Riesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of advanced materials is essential for sophisticated energy systems like a future fusion reactor. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (Wf/W utilize extrinsic toughening mechanisms and therefore overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten at low temperature and its sensitivity to operational embrittlement. This material has been successfully produced and tested during the last years and the focus is now put on the technological realisation for the use in plasma facing components of fusion devices. In this contribution, we present a way to utilize Wf/W composites for divertor applications by a fabrication route based on the chemical vapour deposition (CVD of tungsten. Mock-ups based on the ITER typical design can be realized by the implementation of Wf/W tiles. A concept based on a layered deposition approach allows the production of such tiles in the required geometry. One fibre layer after the other is positioned and ingrown into the W-matrix until the final sample size is reached. Charpy impact tests on these samples showed an increased fracture energy mainly due to the ductile deformation of the tungsten fibres. The use of Wf/W could broaden the operation temperature window of tungsten significantly and mitigate problems of deep cracking occurring typically in cyclic high heat flux loading. Textile techniques are utilized to optimise the tungsten wire positioning and process speed of preform production. A new device dedicated to the chemical deposition of W enhances significantly, the available machine time for processing and optimisation. Modelling shows that good deposition results are achievable by the use of a convectional flow and a directed temperature profile in an infiltration process.

  14. Development and optimisation of tungsten armour geometry for ITER divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Safronov, V.; Yablokov, N.

    1998-01-01

    The plasma facing components (PFC) of the future thermonuclear reactor in great extend determine the time of non-stop operation of the reactor. In current ITER project the most of the divertor PFC surfaces are covered by tungsten armour. Therefore selection of tungsten grade and attachment scheme for joining the tungsten armour to heat sink is a matter of great importance. Two attachment schemes for highly loaded components (up to 20 MW/m 2 ) are described in this paper. The small size mock-ups were manufactured and successfully tested at heat fluxes up to 30 MW/m 2 in screening test and up to 20 MW/m 2 at thermal fatigue test. One mock-up with four different tungsten grades was tested by consequent thermal shock (15 MJ/m 2 at 50 μs) and thermal cycling loading (15 MW/m 2 ). The damages that could lead to mock-up failure were not found but the behaviour of tungsten grades was quite different. (author)

  15. Experimental study of tungsten transport properties in T-10 plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupin, V. A.; Nurgaliev, M. R.; Klyuchnikov, L. A.; Nemets, A. R.; Zemtsov, I. A.; Dnestrovskij, A. Yu.; Sarychev, D. V.; Lisitsa, V. S.; Shurygin, V. A.; Leontiev, D. S.; Borschegovskij, A. A.; Grashin, S. A.; Ryjakov, D. V.; Sergeev, D. S.; Mustafin, N. A.; Trukhin, V. M.; Solomatin, R. Yu.; Tugarinov, S. N.; Naumenko, N. N.

    2017-06-01

    First experimental results of tungsten transport investigation in OH and ECRH plasmas in the T-10 tokamak with W-limiter and movable Li-limiter are presented. It is shown that tungsten tends to accumulate (a joint process of cumulation and peaking) near the plasma axis in ohmic regimes. The cumulation of W is enhanced in discharges with high values of the parameter γ ={{\\bar{n}}\\text{e}}\\centerdot {{\\bar{Z}}\\text{eff}}\\centerdot I\\text{pl}-1.5 that coincides with accumulation conditions of light and medium impurities in T-10 plasmas. Experiments with Li-limiter show the immeasurable level of Li3+ (0.3-0.5% of n e) of T-10 CXRS diagnostics because of the low inflow of Li with respect to other light impurities. Nevertheless, the strong influence of lithium on inflow of light and tungsten impurities is observed. In discharges with lithized walls, vanishing of light impurities occurs and values of {{Z}\\text{eff}}≈ 1 are obtained. It is also shown that the tungsten density in the plasma center decreases by 15 to 20 times while the W inflow reduces only by 2 to 4 times. In lithized discharges with high γ, the flattening of the tungsten density profile occurs and its central concentration decreases up to 10 times during the on-axis ECRH. This effect is observed together with the increase of the W inflow by 3 to 4 times at the ECRH stage.

  16. Early stage damage of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials exposed to low energy helium ion irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, S.; Suslov, S.; Efe, M.; De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T.; Bystrov, K.; Hattar, K.; Allain, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten is considered as a plasma facing component in the divertor region of the International Thermonuclear Experiment Reactor (ITER). High flux, high fluence helium (He) exposure of tungsten surfaces induces severe morphology changes and nanostructure formation, which may eventually erode

  17. Study of Tungsten effect on CFETR performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shengyu; Xiang Gao Collaboration; Guoqiang Li Collaboration; Nan Shi Collaboration; Vincent Chan Collaboration; Xiang Jian Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    An integrated modeling workflow using OMFIT/TGYRO is constructed to evaluate W impurity effects on China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) performance. Self-consistent modeling of tungsten(W) core density profile, accounting for turbulence and neoclassical transport, is performed based on the CFETR steady-state scenario developed by D.Zhao (ZhaoDeng, APS, 2016). It's found that the fusion performance degraded in a limited level with increasing W concentration. The main challenge arises in sustainment of H-mode with significant W radiation. Assuming the power threshold of H-L back transition is approximately the same as that of L-H transition, using the scaling law of Takizuka (Takizuka etc, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion, 2004), it is found that the fractional W concentration should not exceed 3e-5 to stay in H-mode for CFETR phase I. A future step is to connect this requirement to W wall erosion modeling. We are grateful to Dr. Emiliano Fable and Dr. Thomas Pütterich and Ms. Emily Belli for very helpful discussions and comments. We also would like to express our thanks to all the members of the CFETR Physics Group, and we appreciate the General Atomic Theory Group for permission to use the OMFIT framework and GA code suite, and for their valuable technical support. Numerical computations were performed on the ShenMa High Performance Computing Cluster in the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. This work was mainly supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB110001, 2014GB110002, 2014GB110003) and supported in part by the National ITER Plans Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013GB106001, 2013GB111002, 2015GB110001).

  18. Search for magnetism in transition metal atoms doped tetragonal graphene: A DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Suman; Majumdar, Arnab; Jana, Debnarayan

    2017-11-01

    The discovery of different two-dimensional (2D) materials both theoretically and experimentally, can change the scenario of the current electronic industry because of their intriguing properties. Among the 2D materials, the first one which was discovered experimentally was graphene. In this work we have studied the electronic and magnetic properties of a new allotrope of disordered graphene, which is not hexagonal, rather possesses tetragonal symmetry known as T-graphene (TG). Density functional theory (DFT) has been thoroughly employed to study the relevant electronic properties. In previous works, it has been reported that pristine TG is non-magnetic. It is also known that, introducing transition metal (TM) atoms is a feasible way to control the electronic and magnetic properties. Here we have reported the relevant properties of four TM atoms i.e. Sc, V, Cr and Mn doped TG. From the defect formation energy study, it has been noticed that all the structures are endothermic in nature. For each case, we have found appreciable amount of magnetic moment. With increasing atomic weight of the dopant atom, the magnitude of the magnetic moment also increases. We have tried to explain this magnetic ordering with the help of spin-polarized partial density of states (PDOS). Controlling spin degrees of freedom is important for building spintronic devices. From that point of view, we hope this study will be useful to build TG based spintronic devices.

  19. Frustrated magnetism in the tetragonal CoSe analog of superconducting FeSe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilfong, Brandon; Zhou, Xiuquan; Vivanco, Hector; Campbell, Daniel J.; Wang, Kefeng; Graf, Dave; Paglione, Johnpierre; Rodriguez, Efrain

    2018-03-01

    Recently synthesized metastable tetragonal CoSe, isostructural to the FeSe superconductor, offers a new avenue for investigating systems in close proximity to the iron-based superconductors. We present magnetic and transport property measurements on powders and single crystals of CoSe. High field magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate a suppression of the previously reported 10 K ferromagnetic transition with the magnetic susceptibility, exhibiting time dependence below the proposed transition. Dynamic scaling analysis of the time dependence yields a critical relaxation time of τ*=0.064 ±0.008 s which in turn yields activation energy Ea*=14.84 ±0.59 K and an ideal glass temperature T0*=8.91 ±0.09 K from Vogel-Fulcher analysis. No transition is observed in resistivity and specific heat measurements, but both measurements indicate that CoSe is metallic. These results are interpreted on the basis of CoSe exhibiting frustrated magnetic ordering arising from competing magnetic interactions. Arrott analysis of single crystal magnetic susceptibility has indicated the transition temperature occurs in close proximity to previous reports and that the magnetic moment lies solely in the a b plane. The results have implications for understanding the relationship between magnetism and transport properties in the iron chalcogenide superconductors.

  20. Wear behavior of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal versus titanium and titanium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbara, Tsunemichi; Yajima, Yasutomo [Department of Oral Implantology, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 (Japan); Yoshinari, Masao, E-mail: yosinari@tdc.ac.jp [Division of Oral Implant Research, Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo Dental College, 1-2-2 Masago, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8502 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the influence of tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) on the two-body wear behavior of titanium (Ti). Two-body wear tests were performed using TZP, two grades of cp-Ti or Ti alloy in distilled water, and the cross-sectional area of worn surfaces was measured to evaluate the wear behavior. In addition, the surface hardness and coefficient of friction were determined and an electron probe microanalysis performed to investigate the underlying mechanism of wear. The hardness of TZP was much greater than that of Ti. The coefficient of friction between Ti and Ti showed a higher value than the Ti/TZP combination. Ti was more susceptible to wear by both TZP and Ti than TZP, indicating that the mechanism of wear between TZP and Ti was abrasive wear, whereas that between Ti and Ti was adhesive wear. No remarkable difference in the amount of wear in Ti was observed between TZP and Ti as the opposite material, despite the hardness value of Ti being much smaller than that of TZP. (communication)

  1. Changes in X-ray photoelectron spectra of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal by ion sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Eiko; Yoshinari, Masao [Tokyo Dental College, Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo, Chiyoda-ku (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    This paper reports changes in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) brought about by Ar ion sputtering. The changes in the core-level spectra of Y-TZP suggest that preferential sputtering of oxygen occurred. A new peak was observed near 0 eV binding energy accompanied with changes in the core-level spectra by the sputtering. After 18 h in a high vacuum following the sputtering, the spectra changed by the sputtering were returned to their original shapes. In contrast, the color of Y-TZP was changed from white to pale brown by X-ray irradiation and was changed from pale brown to dark gray by ion sputtering. However, when the new peak near 0 eV decreased after 18 h, no color change was observed. Therefore, it is thought that the new peak was mainly derived from electrons trapped in various kinds of oxygen vacancies created by the sputtering in other than color centers. (orig.)

  2. Antiferromagnetic transitions in `tetragonal-like' BiFeO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDougall, Gregory J [ORNL; Christen, Hans M [ORNL; Siemons, Wolter [ORNL; Biegalski, Michael D [ORNL; Zarestky, Jerel L [ORNL; Liang, Shuhua [ORNL; Dagotto, Elbio R [ORNL; Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported the existence of an epitaxially-stabilized tetragonal-like (`T-like') monoclinic phase in BiFeO3 thin-films with high levels of compressive strain. Though there is abundant evidence that structural and ferroelectric properties are di erent than in rhombohedral-like (`R-like') films with lower levels of strain, little information exists on magnetic properties. Here,we report a detailed neutron scattering study of a nearly phase-pure film of T-like BiFeO3. By tracking the temperature dependence and relative intensity of several superstructure peaks in the reciprocal lattice cell, we confirm antiferromagnetism with largely G-type character and T_N = 324 K. A minority magnetic phase with C-type character is also reported with T_N= 260 K. The co-existence of the two phases in T-like BiFeO3 and the difference in ordering temperatures between R-like and T-like systems is explained through simple Fe-O-Fe bond distance considerations.

  3. The Effect of Temperature and Solution pH on Tetragonal Lysozyme Nucleation Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Russell A.; Jacobs, Randolph S.; Frazier, Tyralynn; Snell, Edward H.; Pusey, Marc L.

    1998-01-01

    Part of the challenge of macromolecular crystal growth for structure determination is obtaining an appropriate number of crystals with a crystal volume suitable for x-ray analysis. In this respect an understanding of the effect of solution conditions on macromolecule nucleation rates is advantageous. This study investigated the effects of supersaturation, temperature and pH on the nucleation rate of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Batch crystallization plates were prepared at given solution concentrations and incubated at set temperatures over one week. The number of crystals per well with their size and axial ratios were recorded and correlated with solution conditions, Duplicate experiments indicate the reproducibility of the technique, Crystal numbers were found to increase with increasing supersaturation and temperature. The most significant variable however, was pH, where crystal numbers changed by two orders of magnitude over the pH range 4.0 to 5.2. Crystal size varied also with solution conditions, with the largest crystals being obtained at pH 5.2. Having optimized the crystallization conditions, a batch of crystals were prepared under exactly the same conditions and fifty of these crystals were analyzed by x-ray techniques. The results indicate that even under the same crystallization conditions, a marked variation in crystal properties exists.

  4. The covalent effect on the energy levels of d2 ions in tetragonal crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dong-yang; Du, Mao-lu

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the traditional method which is unsuitable for the prediction of optical for the transition metal ion in covalence and low-symmetry crystal, this paper reports a new method to investigate the optical properties of d 2 ions in covalent and tetragonal crystals and provides a new energy matrix. By using the energy matrix, the variation of energy levels and of the energy-level splitting as the parameter ε are studied; the energy-levels calculated by energy matrix taking no account of crystal-field parameter B 00 0 and by energy matrix taking account of B 00 0 are compared. It was found that the effect of the difference of covalence factors N t and N e on the energy levels and the energy-level splitting is very important and cannot be neglected when the optical properties of d 2 ions in strong covalent crystals are investigated; B 00 0 has an important contribution to the energy levels and should not be neglected; the different covalence of t 2 and e orbitals should be considered not only in the electrostatic repulsions part of the energy matrix but also in the crystal-field potential part of the energy matrix. The complete matrix is applied to calculate the energy-levels of GaP:V 3+ semiconductor. The calculated results are in agreement with the experiment data

  5. Thermally activated charge transport in modified tetragonal zirconia thin films prepared by sol-gel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulkacem, Khiali; Abdelkader, Ammari; Bediaf, Benrabah; Amar, Bouaza; Abdelmalek, Kharoubi; Hadj, Benhebal

    2018-04-01

    Films of Sn-doped ZrO2 were prepared using the sol-gel based dip-coating technique. The X-ray diffraction patterns showed a tetragonal structure with a preferential orientation along the (111) plane. The average grain size of the samples varies from 9.53 to 12.64 nm. Thermal analysis revealed endothermic peaks in the range 84-90 °C and exothermic peaks appearing in the range 489-531 °C. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra depicted bands located at 612 and 736 cm-1, which are attributed to stretching mode and asymmetric vibrations of Zr-O and O-Zr-O bonds respectively. All films exhibited high transmittance in the visible range above 60% and the optical band gap (E g) decreases from 4.085 to 4.061 eV. The impedance measurements show that the equivalent circuit of the samples is an R p C p where C p is the capacitance of the layer and R p its resistance. The electrical conductivity was found to follows an Arrhenius law with two activation energies.

  6. Interdiffusion-driven synthesis of tetragonal chromium (III) oxide on BaTi O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, M.; Vinai, G.; Hart, J. L.; Autieri, C.; Rinaldi, C.; Torelli, P.; Panaccione, G.; Taheri, M. L.; Picozzi, S.; Cantoni, M.

    2018-03-01

    Interfaces play a crucial role in the study of novel phenomena emerging at heterostructures comprising metals and functional oxides. For this reason, attention should be paid to the interface chemistry, which can favor the interdiffusion of atomic species and, under certain conditions, lead to the formation of radically different compounds with respect to the original constituents. In this work, we consider Cr/BaTi O3 heterostructures grown on SrTi O3 (100) substrates. Chromium thin films (1-2 nm thickness) are deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on the BaTi O3 layer, and subsequently annealed in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 473 to 773 K. A disordered metallic layer is detected for annealing temperatures up to 573 K, whereas, at higher temperatures, we observe a progressive oxidation of chromium, which we relate to the thermally activated migration of oxygen from the substrate. The chromium oxidation state is +3 and the film shows a defective rocksalt structure, which grows lattice matched on the underlying BaTi O3 layer. One out of every three atoms of chromium is missing, producing an uncommon tetragonal phase with C r2O3 stoichiometry. Despite the structural difference with respect to the ordinary corundum α-C r2O3 phase, we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that the electronic properties of the two phases are, to a large extent, equivalent.

  7. Calzirtite after tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} studied by transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jing-Shi; Shen, Pouyan [National Sun Yat-sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-11-01

    Reactive sintering of CaO, ZrO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2}(2:5:2 in molar ratio) powders at 1320{degrees}C for 2 weeks caused the topotaxial formation of calzirite (Ca{sub 2}Zr{sub 5}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 16}, a 3 x 3 x 2 fluorite superstructure denoted as czt) after ZrO{sub 2} nuclei, presumably of tetragonal (t-) symmetry with an orientational relationship [100]{sub t}//[100]{sub czt}; [001]{sub t}//[001]{sub czt}. To maintain a t-ZrO{sub 2} precursor for the subsequent calzirtite formation, it was essential to have Ti{sup 4+} dissolved faster than Ca{sup 2+} in the ZrO{sub 2} lattice. The calzirtite grains thus formed have no twin variants but have ordered domains and a new supercell which can be indexed as an 6 x 3 x 4 array of the fluorite subcell, due to ordering of two closely spaced M(1) positions (0.93Ti + 0.07Zr, determined by Rossell). The 6 x 3 x 4 supercell appeared as disk-like variants in the calzirite matrix.

  8. Controllable Photovoltaic Effect of Microarray Derived from Epitaxial Tetragonal BiFeO3Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zengxing; Li, Peilian; Wan, Jian-Guo; Huang, Zhifeng; Tian, Guo; Pan, Danfeng; Fan, Zhen; Gao, Xingsen; Liu, Jun-Ming

    2017-08-16

    Recently, the ferroelectric photovoltaic (FePV) effect has attracted great interest due to its potential in developing optoelectronic devices such as solar cell and electric-optical sensors. It is important for actual applications to realize a controllable photovoltaic process in ferroelectric-based materials. In this work, we prepared well-ordered microarrays based on epitaxially tetragonal BiFeO 3 (T-BFO) films by the pulsed laser deposition technique. The polarization-dependent photocurrent image was directly observed by a conductive atomic force microscope under ultraviolet illumination. By choosing a suitable buffer electrode layer and controlling the ferroelectric polarization in the T-BFO layer, we realized the manipulation of the photovoltaic process. Moreover, based on the analysis of the band structure, we revealed the mechanism of manipulating the photovoltaic process and attributed it to the competition between two key factors, i.e., the internal electric field caused by energy band alignments at interfaces and the depolarization field induced by the ferroelectric polarization in T-BFO. This work is very meaningful for deeply understanding the photovoltaic process of BiFeO 3 -based devices at the microscale and provides us a feasible avenue for developing data storage or logic switching microdevices based on the FePV effect.

  9. Unique Optical Properties of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Nanocrystals Below the Bulk Tetragonal-Orthorhombic Phase Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Guo, Peijun; Schaller, Richard D

    2018-02-14

    Methylammonium (MA) and formamidinium (FA) lead halides are widely studied for their potential as low-cost, high-performance optoelectronic materials. Here, we present measurements of visible and IR absorption, steady state, and time-resolved photoluminescence from 300 K to cryogenic temperatures. Whereas FAPbI 3 nanocrystals (NCs) are found to behave in a very similar manner to reported bulk behavior, colloidal nanocrystals of MAPbI 3 show a departure from the low-temperature optical behavior of the bulk material. Using photoluminescence, visible, and infrared absorption measurements, we demonstrate that unlike single crystals and polycrystalline films NCs of MAPbI 3 do not undergo optical changes associated with the bulk tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition, which occurs near 160 K. We find no evidence of frozen organic cation rotation to as low as 80 K or altered exciton binding energy to as low as 3 K in MAPbI 3 NCs. Similar results are obtained in MAPbI 3 NCs ranging from 20 to over 100 nm and in morphologies including cubes and plates. Colloidal MAPbI 3 NCs therefore offer a window into the properties of the solar-relevant, room-temperature phase of MAPbI 3 at temperatures inaccessible with single crystals or polycrystalline samples. Exploiting this phenomenon, these measurements reveal the existence of an optically passive photoexcited state close to the band edge and persistent slow Auger recombination at low temperature.

  10. Phenomenological Equations Relating Various Critical Anomalies above a Cubic-to-Tetragonal Phase Transition Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Katsumi; Hirotsu, Shunsuke

    1980-01-01

    Phenomenological equations are derived which interrelate the anomalies in various thermodynamic quantities above the transition point of a cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition caused by an instability of a triply degenerate soft mode. The anomalous part of the Gibbs free energy is assumed to be a simple sum of the three parts which represent the contributions from the three fluctuation components. A cylindrical approximation is adopted to each of the three contributions by taking into account the symmetry of the fluctuations. The theory predicts that the adiabatic elastic compliances, s11s, s12s, and also s11s-s12s should exhibit anomalies proportional to the anomaly in the specific heat at constant pressure. This is in marked contrast with the result of the generalized Pippard equations derived by Garland, and by Janovec. The new equations are successfully tested for KMnF3, CsPbCl3, and CsPbBr3. The β-γ transition of NH4Br is also discussed.

  11. Synthesis of bundled tungsten oxide nanowires with controllable morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Shibin; Zou Zengda; Min Guanghui

    2009-01-01

    Bundled tungsten oxide nanowires with controllable morphology were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method with tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) as precursor and cyclohexanol as solvent. The as-synthesized products were systematically characterized by using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and transition electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller gas-sorption measurements were also employed. Accompanied by an apparent drop of specific surface area from 151 m 2 g -1 for the longer nanowires synthesized using a lower concentration of WCl 6 to 106 m 2 g -1 for the shorter nanowires synthesized using a higher concentration of WCl 6 , a dramatically morphological evolution was also observed. With increasing concentration of tungsten hexachloride (WCl 6 ) in cyclohexanol, the nanostructured bundles became larger, shorter and straighter, and finally a block-shape product occurred

  12. 3D-microscopy of hydrogen in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeper, K., E-mail: katrin.peeper@unibw.de [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Moser, M.; Reichart, P. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany); Markina, E.; Mayer, M.; Lindig, S.; Balden, M. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstraße 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Universität der Bundeswehr München, Werner-Heisenberg-Weg 39, D-85577 München (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    The mapping of hydrogen distributions in 3 dimensions and its correlation with structural features allow further insight into mechanisms of hydrogen trapping in tungsten. We studied hydrogen distributions in 25 μm thick polycrystalline tungsten foils by 3D hydrogen microscopy using a proton–proton-scattering method. Two types of tungsten samples were prepared: (i) at 1200 K annealed foils and using 1.8 MeV implantation energy (ii) at 2000 K annealed foils using 200 eV implantation energy. It has been found that large variations of surface hydrogen contamination occur within different samples. Nevertheless, a statistically significant variation of the hydrogen content across grain boundaries has been observed.

  13. Displacement disorder and reconstruction of the (001) face of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorushkin, V.E.; Kul'ment'ev, A.I.; Savushkin, E.V.

    1992-01-01

    The reconstruction of the (001) border of tungsten is examined taking into consideration random static displacements of surface atoms in the high-temperature (1 x 1) phase. A microscopic model is proposed, in which the creation of c(2 x 2) phase is described as a transition of the Jahn-Teller type and an ordering of static displacements. It is shown that displacement disorder induces instability of (001) tungsten with respect to reconstruction. The effect of a uniform electric field on a disordered reconstructing surface is examined. A possible reason is given for pronounced differences in the results of investigations of the structural conversion of the (001) face in tungsten when different experimental methods are used

  14. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; McDonald, I.G.; Moore, B.T.; Silva, V.M.

    1988-10-01

    The corrosion behaviour of four tungsten alloys has been evaluated through weight loss measurements after total immersion in both distilled water insight into the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by an examination of the and 5% sodium chloride solutions. Some insight the mechanism of corrosion was afforded by using the Scanning Electron Microscopy and through an analysis of the corrosion products. Pure tungsten and all the alloys studied underwent corrosion during the tests, and in each case the rare of corrosion in sodium chloride solution was markedly less than that in distilled water. A 95% W, 3.5% Ni, 1.5% Fe alloy was found to be the most corrosion resistant of the alloys under the experimental conditions. Examination of the data shows that for each of the tests, copper as an alloying element accelerates corrosion of tungsten alloys. 9 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  15. Hypoeutectic Silumin to Pressure Die Casting with Vanadium and Tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymczak T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The basic aim of this study is to investigate the effect of vanadium and tungsten on the crystallization process, microstructure and mechanical properties of silumin grade EN-AC 46000. The research involved a derivative thermal analysis DTA of the crystallization process, the metallographic analysis as well as the mechanical properties. The metallographic analysis was carried out on pressure die castings and made in the DTA probe. Vanadium and tungsten were added simultaneously to silumin in amount of approximately 0.1; 0.2; 0.3 and 0.4%. The DTA studies have shown the similar shape of all crystallization curves. It has been shown the additives of vanadium and tungsten in pressure die cast silumin can significantly increase its tensile strength as an well as elongation.

  16. Volatility from copper and tungsten alloys for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik, G.R.; Neilson, R.M. Jr.; Piet, S.J.

    1989-01-01

    Accident scenarios for fusion power plants present the potential for release and transport of activated constituents volatilized from first wall and structural materials. The extent of possible mobilization and transport of these activated species, many of which are ''oxidation driven'', is being addressed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). This report presents experimental measurements of volatilization from a copper alloy in air and steam and from a tungsten alloy in air. The major elements released included zinc from the copper alloy and rhenium and tungsten from the tungsten alloy. Volatilization rates of several constituents of these alloys over temperatures ranging from 400 to 1200 degree C are presented. These values represent release rates recommended for use in accident assessment calculations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  17. Positron simulations of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen and helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troev, T.; Popov, E.; Staikov, P.; Nankov, N.; Yoshiie, T.

    2009-01-01

    An understanding of the behavior of defects containing hydrogen or helium in tungsten is an important issue. Here the properties of defects in tungsten containing hydrogen or helium atoms have been investigated by model positron lifetime quantum-mechanical simulations. The electron and positron wave functions have been obtained in the local density approximation to the two-component density-functional theory. The calculated values of the positron lifetime correlate with the magnitude of the electron density. The vacancy-clusters without hydrogen or helium are active positron traps. The lattice relaxation of atoms around vacancy reduces the effective vacancy volume and decrease the positron lifetime at a vacancy. The hydrogen and helium atoms are trapped in tungsten by lattice vacancies and nano-voids. It was established that positron lifetime depends on the density of gas atoms inside the nano-void. Hydrogen and helium presence in the larger nano-voids considerably decrease the positron lifetime.

  18. Synthesis of Tungsten Diselenide Nanoparticles by Chemical Vapor Condensation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg V. Tolochko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline tungsten diselenide (WSe2 nanoparticles have been synthesized by a gas phase reaction using tungsten hexacarbonyl and elemental selenium as precursors. The WSe2 nanoparticle morphology varies from the spherical shape to flake-like layered structures. Mean size in smaller dimension are less than 5 nm and the number of layers decreased linearly with decreasing of reaction time and concentration of carbonyl in the gas phase. The mean value of interlayer distance in <0001> direction is comparable with the microscopic values. The selenium-to-tungsten atomic ratios of 2.07, 2.19 and 2.19 were determined respectively, approach to the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1. Main impurities are oxygen and carbon and strongly interrelated with carbonyl concentration in the gas phase.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7356

  19. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  20. Irradiation hardening of pure tungsten exposed to neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Kumar, N. A. P. Kiran; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-11-01

    Pure tungsten samples have been neutron irradiated in HFIR at 90-850 °C to 0.03-2.2 dpa. A dispersed barrier hardening model informed by the available microstructure data has been used to predict the hardness. Comparison of the model predictions and the measured Vickers hardness reveals the dominant hardening contribution at various irradiation conditions. For tungsten samples irradiated in HFIR, the results indicate that voids and dislocation loops contributed to the hardness increase in the low dose region (0.6 dpa). The precipitate contribution is most pronounced for the HFIR irradiations, whereas the radiation-induced defect cluster microstructure can rationalize the entirety of the hardness increase observed in tungsten irradiated in the fast neutron spectrum of Joyo and the mixed neutron spectrum of JMTR.

  1. 40 CFR 421.310 - Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. 421.310 Section 421.310 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Secondary Tungsten and Cobalt Subcategory § 421.310 Applicability: Description of the secondary tungsten and cobalt subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting from...

  2. A high energy density all solid-state tungsten-air battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan; Li, Xue; Gong, Yunhui; Xu, Nansheng; Romito, Kevin; Huang, Kevin

    2013-06-14

    An all solid-state tungsten-air battery is reported here, which is based on a new metal-air chemistry, featuring decoupled design of electrodes and energy storage. Benefited from higher specific density and better redox kinetics of tungsten, the new tungsten-air battery exhibits roughly higher energy density (W h L(-1)) than the previously reported iron-air battery.

  3. Thermal outgassing studies on machinable tungsten and TZM molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.; Nielsen, R.W.; Li, Y.; Ryding, D.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Machinable tungsten and molybdenum alloys are extensively used as safety shutters and optical slits at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) front ends. These materials may present a vacuum problem because of their porosity. Also, an environmentally hazard-free cleaning procedure has to be developed for these materials. We have chosen specially heat-treated machinable tungsten with a density of 18 g/cm 3 for safety shutters and TZM (a molybdenum alloy containing 0.5% titanium and ∼0.1% zirconium) for optical slits. Thermal outgassing tests have been performed for a machinable tungsten set with a total surface area of 4500 cm 2 and a 2.8 x 4.6 x 32.6 cm 3 piece of TZM. A cleaning procedure using alkaline detergent ultrasonic washes and vacuum furnace baking was used before outgassing measurements. Outgassing rates 10 hours after initial pump down at room temperature are 1.6 x 10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for machinable tungsten and 6.0 x 10 -10 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for TZM. The outgassing rates 24 hours after an in situ bake at 160 degrees C for two days decreased to 2.2 x 10 -12 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for machinable tungsten and 2.2 x 10 -11 Torr·l·s -1 · -2 for TZM. Optical studies confirmed that the TZM sample is more porous than the machinable tungsten sample. Further studies of a denser TZM sample show that the outgassing rate decreases as the porosity decreases. The outgassing rate 24 hours after a 48-h bake at 160 degree C reached 7.4 x 10 -12 Torr·l·s -1 ·cm -2 for the denser TZM sample

  4. Tetragonal magnetic phase in Ba1 -xKxFe2As2 from x-ray and neutron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, J. M.; Avci, S.; Chung, D. Y.; Claus, H.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Manuel, P.; Taddei, K. M.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Rosenkranz, S.; Osborn, R.; Chmaissem, O.

    2015-09-01

    Combined neutron and x-ray diffraction experiments demonstrate the formation of a low-temperature minority magnetic tetragonal phase in Ba0.76K0.24Fe2As2 in addition to the majority magnetic, orthorhombic phase. The coincident enhancement in the magnetic (1/2 1/2 1) peaks shows that this minority phase is of the same type that was observed in Ba1 -xNaxFe2As2 (0.24 ≤x ≤0.28 ), in which the magnetic moments reorient along the c axis. This is evidence that the tetragonal magnetic phase is a universal feature of the hole-doped iron-based superconductors. The observations suggest that in this regime the energy levels of the C2 and C4 symmetric magnetic phases are very close.

  5. Mechanism of the monoclinic-to-tetragonal phase transition induced in zirconia and hafnia by swift heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benyagoub, Abdenacer

    2005-01-01

    Recent results demonstrated that defect formation or amorphization are not the only structural changes induced by swift heavy ions in crystalline materials and that under certain circumstances crystalline-to-crystalline phase transitions can also occur. For instance, it was found that both zirconia and hafnia transform from the monoclinic to the tetragonal phase with a kinetics involving a double ion impact process. In order to understand the origin of this ion-beam induced phase transition, the behavior of these twin oxides was analyzed and compared. In fact, the likeness of these materials offered the unique opportunity to impose drastic constraints on the possible models proposed to explain the creation of atomic displacements in the wake of swift heavy ions. This comparison clearly suggests that the thermal spike is the most appropriate process which governs the transition from the monoclinic to the tetragonal phase in zirconia and hafnia

  6. Tungsten versus depleted uranium for armour-piercing penetrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have been widely used in the production of armour-piercing (AP) penetrators for defense purposes for the past 40 years. In recent years, however, depleted uranium (DU) has also been utilised for this application. Both materials exhibit high density and strength, two properties necessary for kinetic-energy projectiles to penetrate armour on tanks and other vehicles. The facts, however, support the view that tungsten can and should be utilised as the primary material for most armour-defeating ordnance applications. (author)

  7. Helium effects on tungsten surface morphology and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Y.; Peng, H.Y.; Lee, H.T.; Ohno, N.; Kajita, S.; Yoshida, N.; Doerner, R.; De Temmerman, G.; Alimov, V.; Wright, G.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental results on tungsten surface morphology, especially nano-structure (fuzz), induced by helium plasma exposure at temperatures between 1000 K and 2000 K are reviewed. This structure was firstly reported in 2006. In this review, most of experimental results reported so far including characteristics and formation conditions of the nano-structure in both linear plasma devices and magnetic confinement devices, erosion and arcing by steady-state plasma exposure and ELM-like pulsed heat or pulsed plasma exposure by a laser and a plasma gun are summarized. In addition, He effects on D retention under simultaneous D/He irradiation on tungsten are presented

  8. Engineered Surface Properties of Porous Tungsten from Cryogenic Machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoop, Julius Malte

    Porous tungsten is used to manufacture dispenser cathodes due to it refractory properties. Surface porosity is critical to functional performance of dispenser cathodes because it allows for an impregnated ceramic compound to migrate to the emitting surface, lowering its work function. Likewise, surface roughness is important because it is necessary to ensure uniform wetting of the molten impregnate during high temperature service. Current industry practice to achieve surface roughness and surface porosity requirements involves the use of a plastic infiltrant during machining. After machining, the infiltrant is baked and the cathode pellet is impregnated. In this context, cryogenic machining is investigated as a substitutionary process for the current plastic infiltration process. Along with significant reductions in cycle time and resource use, surface quality of cryogenically machined un-infiltrated (as-sintered) porous tungsten has been shown to significantly outperform dry machining. The present study is focused on examining the relationship between machining parameters and cooling condition on the as-machined surface integrity of porous tungsten. The effects of cryogenic pre-cooling, rake angle, cutting speed, depth of cut and feed are all taken into consideration with respect to machining-induced surface morphology. Cermet and Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) cutting tools are used to develop high performance cryogenic machining of porous tungsten. Dry and pre-heated machining were investigated as a means to allow for ductile mode machining, yet severe tool-wear and undesirable smearing limited the feasibility of these approaches. By using modified PCD cutting tools, high speed machining of porous tungsten at cutting speeds up to 400 m/min is achieved for the first time. Beyond a critical speed, brittle fracture and built-up edge are eliminated as the result of a brittle to ductile transition. A model of critical chip thickness ( hc ) effects based on cutting

  9. Tool life of ceramic wedges during precise turning of tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legutko Stanislaw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties, application and machinability of tungsten and its alloys have been demonstrated. The comparison of the tool life and wear of the wedges made of SiAlON and whisker ceramics during the precise turning at different cutting parameters have been presented. The CNC lathe DMG CTX 310 Ecoline and tungsten of 99.7 % purity were used during the experiments. Only the wedge of whisker ceramics has proved to be sufficiently suitable and only for relatively low cutting speeds.

  10. Quantum-Accurate Molecular Dynamics Potential for Tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Mitchell; Thompson, Aidan P.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this short contribution is to report on the development of a Spectral Neighbor Analysis Potential (SNAP) for tungsten. We have focused on the characterization of elastic and defect properties of the pure material in order to support molecular dynamics simulations of plasma-facing materials in fusion reactors. A parallel genetic algorithm approach was used to efficiently search for fitting parameters optimized against a large number of objective functions. In addition, we have shown that this many-body tungsten potential can be used in conjunction with a simple helium pair potential1 to produce accurate defect formation energies for the W-He binary system.

  11. Clarification of the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on the effective elastic moduli of polycrystals with hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, J.P.; Peselnick, L.

    1980-01-01

    Bounds on the effective elastic moduli of randomly oriented aggregates of hexagonal, trigonal, and tetragonal crystals are derived using the variational principles of Hashin and Shtrikman. The bounds are considerably narrower than the widely used Voigt and Reuss bounds. The Voigt-Reuss-Hill average lies within the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds in nearly all cases. Previous bounds of Peselnick and Meister are shown to be special cases of the present results.

  12. Zero-field splitting of 4T2 term for 3d3 ions in tetragonal symmetry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. By taking into account slight interactions, i.e. spin-spin, spin-other-orbit and orbit-orbit interactions, in addition to spin-orbit interaction, the zero-field splitting of 4T2 state for 3d3 ions at tetragonal symmetry has been studied. The convergence of the approximation perturbation formula of 4T2 state for 3d3 ions at ...

  13. The Effects of Thermal History on Nucleation of Tetragonal Lysozyme Crystals, or Hot Protein and Cold Nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael; Judge, Russell; Pusey, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Chicken egg white lysozyme has a well characterized thermally driven phase transition. Between pH 4.2 and 5.2, the transition temperature, as defined by the point where the tetragonal and orthorhombic solubilities are equal, is a function of the pH, salt (precipitant) type and concentration, and most likely of the buffer concentration as well. This phase transition can be carried out with protein solution alone, prior to addition of precipitant solution. Warming a lysozyme solution above the phase transition point, then cooling it back below this point, has been shown to affect the subsequent nucleation rate, as determined by the numbers and size of crystals formed, but not the growth rate for the tetragonal crystal form . We have now measured the kinetics of this process and investigated its reversibility. The transition effects are progressive with temperature, having a half time of about 1 hour at 37C at pH 4.8. After holding a lysozyme solution at 37C (prior to addition of precipitant) for 16 hours, then cooling it back to 4C no return to the pre-warmed nucleation kinetics are observed after at least 4 weeks. Orthorhombic lysozyme crystals apparently do not undergo the flow-induced growth cessation of tetragonal lysozyme crystals. Putting the protein in the orthorhombic form does not affect the averaged face growth kinetics, only nucleation, for tetragonal crystals. This differential behaviour may be exploited to elucidate how and where flow affects the lysozyme crystal growth process. The presentation will focus on the results of these and ongoing studies in this area.

  14. Selective orbital reconstruction in tetragonal FeS: A density functional dynamical mean-field theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craco, Luis; Leoni, Stefano

    2017-04-18

    Transport properties of tetragonal iron monosulfide, mackinawite, show a range of complex features. Semiconductive behavior and proximity to metallic states with nodal superconductivity mark this d-band system as unconventional quantum material. Here, we use the density functional dynamical mean-field theory (DFDMFT) scheme to comprehensively explain why tetragonal FeS shows both semiconducting and metallic responses in contrast to tetragonal FeSe which is a pseudogaped metal above the superconducting transition temperature. Within local-density-approximation plus dynamical mean-field theory (LDA+DMFT) we characterize its paramagnetic insulating and metallic phases, showing the proximity of mackinawite to selective Mott localization. We report the coexistence of pseudogaped and anisotropic Dirac-like electronic dispersion at the border of the Mott transition. These findings announce a new understanding of many-particle physics in quantum materials with coexisting Dirac-fermions and pseudogaped electronic states at low energies. Based on our results we propose that in electron-doped FeS substantial changes would be seen when the metallic regime was tuned towards an electronic state that hosts unconventional superconductivity.

  15. Influence of gadolinium content on the tetragonal to cubic phase transition in zirconia-silica binary oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behera, Pallavi Suhasinee; Vasanthavel, S.; Ponnilavan, V.; Kannan, S., E-mail: para_kanna@yahoo.com

    2015-05-15

    The present study reports the effect of gadolinium (Gd{sup 3+}) in zirconia-silica (ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2}) binary oxides. The pure ZrO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} synthesized at 1100 °C was tetragonal. The addition of Gd{sup 3+} in the concentration range of 5%–10% resulted in the formation of t-ZrO{sub 2}, whereas higher contents of Gd{sup 3+} led to the formation of cubic ZrO{sub 2} (c-ZrO{sub 2}). The presence of Gd{sup 3+} also affected the lattice parameters of both t-ZrO{sub 2} and c-ZrO{sub 2}. Magnetic studies confirmed a steady increase in the paramagnetic behaviour with increasing content of Gd{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: t-ZrO{sub 2} to c-ZrO{sub 2} phase transition influenced by Gd{sup 3+} content. - Highlights: • Sol-gel synthesis of Gd{sup 3+} added SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} binary oxides. • Significant role of Gd{sup 3+} content in the tetragonal and cubic stabilization of ZrO{sub 2}. • Phase stability of either tetragonal or cubic stabilization till 1100 °C. • Gd{sup 3+} additions ensured additional paramagnetic behaviour in SiO{sub 2}-ZrO{sub 2} binary oxide.

  16. Synthesis of highly disperse tetragonal BaTiO3 nanoparticles with core–shell by a hydrothermal method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to synthesize of high-dispersion and tetragonal BaTiO3 (BT nanoparticle, a hydrothermal method is used in a mixture of chloride metal sources and KOH with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The properties of BT–PVPs prepared by different reaction temperature and time are investigated via XRD, FE-SEM, DLS, FT-IR, and TEM to clarify the changes of the crystal phase, dispersion, and particle structure. The reaction is finished at 230 °C for 24 h and the critical reaction condition for that the crystal phase of the obtained BT particle changed from the cubic to the tetragonal is found to be 190 °C fixed in reaction time 24 h, and 9 h. During reaction the PVP on the BT surface decomposed to different form, and the PVP plays the role of dispersant in aqueous solution. By the hydrothermal condition of 230 °C for 24 h almost monodisperse BT–PVP with sizes of 83 nm and tetragonality (c/a of 1.0062 were synthesized. The structure of nanoparticle, core (BT–shell (PVP was investigated by FT-IR and direct observed by TEM and the mechanism of particle growth and dispersion was discussed.

  17. Simulation of cracks in tungsten under ITER specific heat loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschany, S.

    2006-01-01

    The problem of high tritium retention in co-deposited carbon layers on the walls of ITER vacuum chamber motivates investigation of materials for the divertor armour others than carbon fibre composite (CFC). Tungsten is most probable material for CFC replacement as the divertor armour because of high vaporisation temperature and heat conductivity. In the modern ITER design tungsten is a reference material for the divertor cover, except for the separatrix strike point armoured with CFC. As divertor armour, tungsten should withstand severe heat loads at off-normal ITER events like disruptions, ELMs and vertical displacement events. Experiments on tungsten heating with plasma streams and e-beams have shown an intense crack formation at the surface of irradiated sample [ V.I. Tereshin, A.N. Bandura, O.V. Byrka et al. Repetitive plasma loads typical for ITER type-I ELMs: Simulation at QSPA Kh-50.PLASMA 2005. ed. By Sadowski M.J., AIP Conference Proceedings, American Institute of Physics, 2006, V 812, p. 128-135., J. Linke. Private communications.]. The reason for tungsten cracking under severe heat loads is thermo stress. It appears as due to temperature gradient in solid tungsten as in resolidified layer after cooling down. Both thermo stresses are of the same value, but the gradiental stress is compressive and the stress in the resolidified layer is tensile. The last one is most dangerous for crack formation and it was investigated in this work. The thermo stress in tungsten that develops during cooling from the melting temperature down to room temperature is ∼ 8-16 GPa. Tensile strength of tungsten is much lower, < 1 GPa at room temperature, and at high temperatures it drops at least for one order of magnitude. As a consequence, various cracks of different characteristic scales appear at the heated surface of the resolidified layer. For simulation of the cracks in tungsten the numeric code PEGASUS-3D [Pestchanyi and I. Landman. Improvement of the CFC structure to

  18. Thermodynamic theory of intrinsic finite-size effects in PbTiO3 nanocrystals. I. Nanoparticle size-dependent tetragonal phase stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Safari, A.

    2007-03-01

    We propose a phenomenological intrinsic finite-size effect model for single domain, mechanically free, and surface charge compensated ΔG-P ⃗s-ξ space, which describes the decrease in tetragonal phase stability with decreasing ξ rigorously.

  19. Molecular dynamics study of grain boundary diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Toussaint, U; Gori, S; Manhard, A; Höschen, T; Höschen, C

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the influence of the microstructure of tungsten on hydrogen transport is crucial for the use of tungsten as first-wall material in fusion reactors. Here, we report the results of molecular dynamics and transition state studies on the influence of grain boundaries in tungsten on the transport of hydrogen. An exhaustive mapping of possible minimum activation energy migration trajectories for hydrogen as the trace impurity reveals a strongly modified activation energy distribution in the neighborhood of grain boundaries together with an altered connectivity matrix. The results indicate that grain boundaries in polycrystalline tungsten may provide an important transport channel, especially for neutron-damaged tungsten.

  20. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Brozek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten fibers have high tensile strength but a poor oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Using this first characteristic and to prevent oxidation of tungsten coated composite materials in which the primary requirement: reinforcement against destruction or deformation, was studied on tungsten fibers and tungsten wires which were coated by applying the metal and ceramic powders via plasma spraying device in plasma generator WSP®. Deposition took place in an atmosphere of Ar + 7 % H2, sufficient to reduce the oxidized trace amounts of tungsten.

  1. Tungsten Bronze Barium Neodymium Titanate (Ba(6-3n)Nd(8+2n)Ti(18)O(54)): An Intrinsic Nanostructured Material and Its Defect Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azough, Feridoon; Cernik, Robert Joseph; Schaffer, Bernhard; Kepaptsoglou, Demie; Ramasse, Quentin Mathieu; Bigatti, Marco; Ali, Amir; MacLaren, Ian; Barthel, Juri; Molinari, Marco; Baran, Jakub Dominik; Parker, Stephen Charles; Freer, Robert

    2016-04-04

    We investigated the structure of the tungsten bronze barium neodymium titanates Ba(6-3n)Nd(8+2n)Ti(18)O(54), which are exploited as microwave dielectric ceramics. They form a complex nanostructure, which resembles a nanofilm with stacking layers of ∼12 Å thickness. The synthesized samples of Ba(6-3n)Nd(8+2n)Ti(18)O(54) (n = 0, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) are characterized by pentagonal and tetragonal columns, where the A cations are distributed in three symmetrically inequivalent sites. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy allowed for quantitative analysis of the site occupancy, which determines the defect distribution. This is corroborated by density functional theory calculations. Pentagonal columns are dominated by Ba, and tetragonal columns are dominated by Nd, although specific Nd sites exhibit significant concentrations of Ba. The data indicated significant elongation of the Ba columns in the pentagonal positions and of the Nd columns in tetragonal positions involving a zigzag arrangement of atoms along the b lattice direction. We found that the preferred Ba substitution occurs at Nd[3]/[4] followed by Nd[2] and Nd[1]/[5] sites, which is significantly different to that proposed in earlier studies. Our results on the Ba(6-3n)Nd(8+2n)Ti(18)O(54) "perovskite" superstructure and its defect distribution are particularly valuable in those applications where the optimization of material properties of oxides is imperative; these include not only microwave ceramics but also thermoelectric materials, where the nanostructure and the distribution of the dopants will reduce the thermal conductivity.

  2. Preparation and properties of yttria doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal/Sr-doped barium hexaferrite ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Chao; Guo, Ruisong, E-mail: rsguo@tju.edu.cn; Liu, Lan; Yang, Yuexia; Li, Kehang

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The 3Y-TZP/Sr-doped barium ferrite composites were prepared. • The saturation magnetization was improved by 15% with Sr-doping. • The dispersion coefficient p could reflect the microscopic lattice variation. • The composite with x = 0.5 had the maximum fracture toughness of 8.3 MPa m{sup 1/2}. - Abstract: The effects of substitution of Ba{sup 2+} by Sr{sup 2+} on the magnetic property of barium ferrite and addition barium ferrite secondary phase to the 3 mol% yttria-doped tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (3Y-TZP) matrix on the mechanical property of composites were investigated. The Sr-doped barium ferrite (Ba{sub 1−x}Sr{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19}, x = 0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) was synthesized by solid-state reaction in advance. Then 3Y-TZP/20 wt% Sr-doped barium ferrite composites were prepared by means of conventional ceramic method. It was found that a moderate amount of Sr added to barium ferrite could boost the saturation magnetization by 15% compared with the composites without Sr-doping. Besides, the composite with x = 0.50 possessed the best mechanical properties, such as 11.5 GPa for Vickers hardness and 8.3 MPa m{sup 1/2} for fracture toughness, respectively. It was demonstrated that magnetic and mechanical properties of the composites could be harmonized by the incorporation of barium ferrite secondary phase.

  3. Crystallization behavior of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} prepared in a silica bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Moo-Chin, E-mail: mcwang@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China); Huang, Hung-Jui [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-10

    Highlights: ► The activation energy of t-ZrO{sub 2} crystallization calculated by the JMA equation is 643.0 ± 13.9 kJ·mol{sup −1}. ► The growth morphology parameter (n) and crystallization mechanism index (m) are approximated as 3.0. ► Bulk nucleation is dominant in the t-ZrO{sub 2} crystallization process, and has a spherical-like morphology. ► The TEM microstructure reveals that the t-ZrO{sub 2} crystallites have a spherical-like morphology. - Abstract: The synthesis of zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) precursor powders by a co-precipitation process is studied in this work, using a silica bath prepared at 348 K and pH = 7, with 10 min mixing using zirconium (IV) nitrate and tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS, Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}) as the starting materials. The XRD result show that only a single phase of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} (t-ZrO{sub 2}) appears when the freeze dried precursor powders are calcined between 1173 and 1473 K for 120 min. The activation energy of t-ZrO{sub 2} crystallization, as calculated by the Johnson–Mehl–Avrami (JMA) equation, is 643.0 ± 13.9 kJ/mol. The growth morphology parameter (n) and crystallization mechanism index (m) are approximated as 3.0, which indicates that bulk nucleation is dominant in the t-ZrO{sub 2} crystallization process, and that the material has a plate-like morphology.

  4. Effects of superplastic deformations on thermophysical properties of tetragonal zirconia polycrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motohashi, Y.; Wan, C.; Sakuma, T.; Harjo, S.; Shibata, T.; Ishihara, M.; Baba, S.; Hoshiya, T.

    2004-01-01

    Neutron irradiation studies on superplastic zirconia-based ceramics are now in progress as an innovative basic project using the High-temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan. The characteristics of the zirconia-based engineering components, made through the formation of superplastic, may be strongly affected by their response to transient or steady-state heat flow. Reliable thermophysical properties such as the coefficients of thermal expansion and thermal conductivity are, therefore, needed to estimate and predict the influence of a high-temperature environment. Accordingly, one of this project's targets is to study the thermophysical properties of superplastic zirconia-based ceramics. The first stage of the research addresses the effects of superplastic deformations on the thermophysical properties of a typical superplastic ceramic, 3 mol% yttria-stabilised tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP), in its un-irradiated state. First, superplastic tensile deformations were conducted on 3Y-TZP specimens under different conditions in order to obtain specimens with different microstructural characteristics. Afterwards, the following actions were taken: - Specific heat measurements were conducted on the specimens at temperatures ranging from 473 K to 1273 K. - The thermal diffusivity was measured using a laser flash method. The thermal conductivity was then calculated from the measured thermal diffusivity, specific heat and density. - The linear thermal expansion was measured by a push-rod type dilatometer from 300 K to 1473 K. The coefficient of linear thermal expansion (CTE) was estimated from the thermal expansion data. The results obtained from the above measurements are discussed, as is the microstructural evolution caused by the superplastic deformations. It was found that the specific heat was almost independent of microstructural evolution, whereas the thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion were quite sensitive to

  5. Effects of whitening dentifrice on yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal surfaces after simulating brushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Lígia Antunes Pereira; Gimenes Olbera, Amanda Caroline; Candido, Lucas Miguel; Miotto, Larissa Natiele; Antonio, Selma Gutierrez; Fais, Laiza Maria Grassi

    2017-01-01

    The changes that occur after brushing yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) are unknown. These changes may favor the retention of microorganisms and chemisorption of water, impairing its longevity. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of a whitening dentifrice on Y-TZP surfaces after simulating 10 years of brushing. Seventy-two bar-shaped specimens (20×4×1.2 mm) were divided into 4 groups: storage in distilled water (SW, control), brushing with distilled water (BW), brushing with dentifrice (BD), and brushing with whitening dentifrice (BWD). Brushing was conducted using a linear brushing machine (878400 cycles, 0.98 N, soft toothbrush). The mean roughness (Ra) was analyzed with a profilometer and the superficial topography with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at baseline and after treatment. Crystalline phases were characterized using x-ray diffraction. Baseline and posttreatment Ra were analyzed using the 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD multiple comparison test; the paired t test was used for intragroup comparison (all α=.05). The Ra (μm) means (before/after treatment) were SW 0.28/0.28; BW 0.32/0.31; BD 0.28/0.36; BWD 0.30/0.20. No statistically significant difference was found for Ra at baseline (P=.108) than for posttreatment results (P<.001); the BD group had higher Ra values when compared with baseline (P=.019); the BWD group had the lowest values (P<.001). The BD surfaces showed pronounced scratches and detachment of the surface, while BWD showed smoother surfaces; similar crystallographic results among groups were observed. Brushing Y-TZP with conventional dentifrice increased roughness, while brushing with whitening dentifrice reduced roughness. Neither dentifrice changed the crystallographic phases after brushing. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Crystal structure refinements of tetragonal (OH,F)-rich spessartine and henritermierite garnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antao, Sytle M.; Cruickshank, Laura A.

    2018-01-30

    Cubic garnet (space group Ia\\overline 3 d) has the general formulaX3Y2Z3O12, whereX,YandZare cation sites. In the tetragonal garnet (space groupI41/acd), the corresponding cation sites areX1 andX2,Y, andZ1 andZ2. In both space groups only theYsite is the same. The crystal chemistry of a tetragonal (OH,F)-rich spessartine sample from Tongbei, near Yunxiao, Fujian Province, China, with compositionX(Mn2.82Fe^{2+}_{0.14}Ca0.04)Σ3Y{Al1.95Fe^{3+}_{0.05}}Σ2Z[(SiO4)2.61(O4H4)0.28(F4)0.11]Σ3(Sps94Alm5Grs1) was studied with single-crystal X-ray diffraction and space groupI41/acd. The deviation of the unit-cell parameters from cubic symmetry is small [a= 11.64463(1),c= 11.65481 (2) Å,c/a= 1.0009]. Point analyses and back-scattered electron images, obtained by electron-probe microanalysis, indicate a homogeneous composition. TheZ2 site is fully occupied, but theZ1 site contains vacancies. The occupiedZ1 andZ2 sites with Si atoms are surrounded by four O atoms, as in anhydrous cubic garnets. Pairs of split sites are O1 with F11 and O2 with O22. When theZ1 site is vacant, a larger [(O2H2)F2] tetrahedron is formed by two OH and two F anions in the O22 and F11 sites, respectively. This [(O2

  7. Shape and phase evolution from CsPbBr3 perovskite nanocubes to tetragonal CsPb2Br5 nanosheets with an indirect bandgap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guopeng; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Zhifeng; Chang, Yajing; Zhang, Ting; Song, Zihang; Jiang, Yang

    2016-09-13

    Tetragonal CsPb 2 Br 5 nanosheets were obtained by an oriented attachment of orthorhombic CsPbBr 3 nanocubes, involving a lateral shape evolution from octagonal to square. Meanwhile, the experimental results, together with DFT simulation results, indicated that the tetragonal CsPb 2 Br 5 is an indirect bandgap semiconductor that is PL-inactive with a bandgap of 2.979 eV.

  8. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  9. Hollow microspheres with a tungsten carbide kernel for PEMFC application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Arbigny, Julien Bernard; Taillades, Gilles; Marrony, Mathieu; Jones, Deborah J; Rozière, Jacques

    2011-07-28

    Tungsten carbide microspheres comprising an outer shell and a compact kernel prepared by a simple hydrothermal method exhibit very high surface area promoting a high dispersion of platinum nanoparticles, and an exceptionally high electrochemically active surface area (EAS) stability compared to the usual Pt/C electrocatalysts used for PEMFC application.

  10. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding processes to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively reduced the ...

  11. Thermal Neutron Capture onto the Stable Tungsten Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichols A.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal neutron-capture measurements of the stable tungsten isotopes have been carried out using the guided thermal-neutron beam at the Budapest Reactor. Prompt singles spectra were collected and analyzed using the HYPERMET γ-ray analysis software package for the compound tungsten systems 183W, 184W, and 187W, prepared from isotopically-enriched samples of 182W, 183W, and 186W, respectively. These new data provide both confirmation and new insights into the decay schemes and structure of the tungsten isotopes reported in the Evaluated Gamma-ray Activation File based upon previous elemental analysis. The experimental data have also been compared to Monte Carlo simulations of γ-ray emission following the thermal neutron-capture process using the statistical-decay code DICEBOX. Together, the experimental cross sections and modeledfeeding contribution from the quasi continuum, have been used to determine the total radiative thermal neutron-capture cross sections for the tungsten isotopes and provide improved decay-scheme information for the structural- and neutron-data libraries.

  12. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences.

  13. Geochemistry of the Panasqueira tungsten-tin deposit, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bussink, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Major tin-tungsten deposits in Portugal are related to intrusions of the Younger Series (300-280 Ma) of Hercynian granitoids. Mineralized granites are 'specialized' by a specific increase or decrease of major, minor and trace element contents in comparison with non-mineralized occurrences. Component

  14. Tasmanian tin and tungsten granites - their radiometric characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeates, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    A radiometric survey of Tasmanian granites has shown, with one exception, that tin and tungsten-bearing granites have high radioactivity, largely owing to increased uranium. Many have a high uranium/thorium ratio as well. Radiometric measurements can also delineate different granite types within composite bodies

  15. Features of simultaneous discharge of tungsten with nickel and cobalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.L.; Krivtsov, A.K.; Pavel'eva, L.A.; Zajtsev, A.L.

    1977-01-01

    Specific features of the kinetics of electrolytic codeposition of tungsten alloys with nickel and cobalt were investigated. Experiments were conducted with ammonia-citrate electrolytes having the following composition in g/1: (1)CoSO 4 x7H 2 O-60, Na 2 WO 4 x2H 2 O -70, citric acid-60, NH 4 OH to pH=6-7; (2) NiSO 4 x7H 2 O - from 1 to 20, Na 2 WO 4 x2H 2 O-50, citric acid-66, NH 4 OH, to pH=6-7. Dependences of tungsten content in the alloy on the concentration of citric acid and current densities are investigated. It is shown that intermediate tungsten oxides of lower oxidation degrees can be formed in the electrolyte. Experimental proofs are obtained of tungsten discharge into the alloy with cobalt and nickel from citrate solutions through the film of intermediate compounds, which forms in the near-cathode space

  16. Understanding metal–insulator transition in sodium tungsten bronze

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-20

    May 20, 2015 ... We have carried out angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and spectromicroscopy studies to understand the metal–insulator transition (MIT) observed in sodium tungsten bronzes, NaWO3. The experimentally determined band structure is compared with the theoretical calculation based ...

  17. Thermal Cycling of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

    1969-12-08

    In phase I tungsten clad cermet fuel specimens were thermal cycled, to study the effects of fuel loading, fuel particle size, stablized fuel, duplex coatings, and fabrication techniques on dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In phase II the best combination of the factors studies in phase I were combined in one specimen for evaluation.

  18. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  19. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cryogenic treatment is a recent advancement in the field of machining to improve the properties of cutting tool materials. Tungsten carbide is the most commonly used cutting tool material in the industry and the technique can also be extended to it. Although the importance of tempering after cryogenic treatment has been ...

  20. Dioxobridged complexes of molybdenum (IV) and tungsten (IV) with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The molar conductance values measured in DMF indicate the non-electrolytic nature of the complexes (table 2). Ion-exchange studies show that the complexes are neutral. .... molydbenum and tungsten complexes respectively. The second step consists of the decomposition of the organic moiety and the formation of MO3.

  1. Dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity of sodium tungsten ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Studies of dielectric relaxation and ac conductivity have been made on three samples of sodium tungsten phosphate glasses over a temperature range of 77–420 K. Complex relative permit- tivity data have been analyzed using dielectric modulus approach. Conductivity relaxation frequency increases with the ...

  2. Electrochemical properties of tungsten oxysulphide thin films as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Lithium microbattery; tungsten oxysulphide; thin film; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS); sputtering. ... At the beginning of the intercalation, W6+ was first partially reduced into W5+, and then into W4+, but the important stage was the reduction of W4+ into W0. In W0, the electron binding energy was very ...

  3. Understanding the surface and structural characteristics of tungsten ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Tungsten oxide; tin oxide; etherification; glycerol; tert-butanol; glycerol ethers. 1. Introduction. Biodiesel, an eco-friendly biofuel is being chosen as an alternative to fossil fuels. Biodiesel has been produced in large quantities by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats.1 During the production of biodiesel.

  4. Hot-wire assisted atomic layer deposition of Tungsten films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Mengdi

    2018-01-01

    This thesis aims to establish a novel technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) for the future ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) of microelectronics. We developed a hot-wire assisted ALD (HWALD), where a heated tungsten (W) filament is utilized instead of a plasma to generate radicals. HWALD is

  5. Volume and surface photoemission from tungsten. II. Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerbacher, B.; Egede Christensen, N.

    1974-01-01

    Energy-distribution spectra of photoelectrons emitted normal to three single-crystal faces of tungsten have been measured for photon energies between 7.7 and 21.2 eV. The results are interpreted in terms of one-dimensional electronic properties along the symmetry lines in k space that correspond ...

  6. Electrochemical properties of tungsten oxysulphide thin films as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1⋅2 V. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were performed on different compounds in both inter- calated (Li1WO1⋅05S2 ... during the first discharge–charge cycle. The analysis of both the W4f and the S2p peaks has shown that the redox processes involve not only the tungsten atoms but also sulphur atoms.

  7. Comparative evaluation of tungsten inert gas and laser beam ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this study, the bead-on-plate welds were made on AA5083-H321 alloy plates using both tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding and laser beam (LB) welding pro- cesses to study the enhancement of mechanical properties such as weld yield strength and hardness. The low heat input of laser beam welding effectively ...

  8. Refining waste hardmetals into tungsten oxide nanosheets via facile method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhifei; Zheng, Guangwei; Wang, Jinshu; Li, Hongyi; Wu, Junshu; Du, Yucheng

    2016-04-01

    A new hydrothermal system has been designed to recycle waste WC-Co hardmetal with low cobalt (Co) content (3 %). In the solution system, nitric acid was designed to dissolve Co, H2O2 served as oxidant to accelerate the oxidation of the WC-Co hardmetals, and fluorine (F-) was designed to dissolve and recrystallize generated tungsten oxides, which were found to possess a layered structure using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The obtained tungsten oxides were identified as WO3·0.33H2O by X-ray diffraction and their specific surface area was measured as 89.2 m2 g-1 via N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. The present layered structure tungsten oxides exhibited a promising capability for removing lead ion (Pb2+) and organic species, such as methyl blue. The adsorption model was found to be in agreement with Langmuir isotherm model. Given the facile synthesis procedure and promising properties of final products, this new approach should have great potential for refining some other waste hardmetals or tungsten products.

  9. Low temperature processing of tungsten-fibre high-strength composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semrau, W.M.

    2001-01-01

    A tungsten nickel/iron compound with a high tungsten content up to over 90 percent by volume of tungsten and an ideal distribution of the nickel-iron multilayer-matrix avoiding tungsten - tungsten interfaces, has been processed without the use of any sintering process and thus resulted in avoiding temperatures of above 700 o C during the entire manufacturing process. An electrochemical coating of coarse tungsten powder with alternating layers of nickel and iron and a forging process at temperatures not exceeding 650 o C resulted in a high strength compound, which easily could be altered into a tungsten fiber compound with a fiber-length to fiber-diameter ratio of more than 10 3 . From the viewpoint of the metallurgist, easier handling systems are obtained when both a liquid phase and high temperatures with their risks for grain structures and grain boundaries are lacking. (author)

  10. The high temperature impact response of tungsten and chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretsky, E. B.; Kanel, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of elastic-plastic shock waves has been studied in pure polycrystalline tungsten and chromium at room and elevated temperatures over propagation distances ranging from 0.05 to 3 mm (tungsten) and from 0.1 to 2 mm (chromium). The use of fused silica windows in all but one experiment with chromium and in several high temperature experiments with tungsten led to the need for performing shock and optic characterization of these windows over the 300-1200 K temperature interval. Experiments with tungsten and chromium samples showed that annealing of the metals transforms the initial ramping elastic wave into a jump-like wave, substantially increasing the Hugoniot elastic limits of the metals. With increased annealing time, the spall strength of the two metals slightly increases. Both at room and at high temperatures, the elastic precursor in the two metals decays in two distinct regimes. At propagation distances smaller than ˜1 mm (tungsten) or ˜0.5 mm (chromium), decay is fast, with the dislocation motion and multiplication being controlled by phonon viscous drag. At greater distances, the rate of decay becomes much lower, with control of the plastic deformation being passed to the thermally activated generation and motion of dislocation double-kinks. The stress at which this transition takes place virtually coincides with the Peierls stress τP of the active glide system. Analysis of the annealing effects in both presently and previously studied BCC metals (i.e., Ta, V, Nb, Mo, W, and Cr) and of the dependencies of their normalized Peierls stresses τP(θ) /τP(0 ) on the normalized temperature θ=T /Tm allows one to conclude that the non-planar, split into several glide planes, structure of the dislocation core in these metals is mainly responsible for their plastic deformation features.

  11. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  12. Synthesis of high purity tungsten nanoparticles from tungsten heavy alloy scrap by selective precipitation and reduction route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, S.S. Kalyan, E-mail: kalyanchem03@rediffmail.com; Sahoo, P.K.; Vimala, J.; Shanker, B.; Ghosal, P.; Durai, L.

    2016-09-05

    In this paper we report synthesis of tungsten nanoparticles of high purity >99.7 wt% from heavy alloy scrap using a novel chemical route of selective precipitation and reduction. The effect of Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer on controlling the particle size is established through FTIR spectra and corroborated with TEM images, wherein the average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g under different experimental conditions. This process is economical as raw material is a scrap and the efficiency of the reaction is >95%. - Highlights: • Tungsten nanoparticles were synthesized from tungsten heavy alloy scrap. • A novel chemical route of precipitation and reduction with Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) polymer as stabilizer is reported. • The average size decreased form 210 to 45 nm with increasing PVP content from zero to 2 g. • High pure tungsten nanoparticles of >99.7% purity could be synthesized using this route. • Efficiency of the reaction is >95%.

  13. Pitfalls of tungsten multileaf collimator in proton beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskvin, Vadim; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Particle beam therapy is associated with significant startup and operational cost. Multileaf collimator (MLC) provides an attractive option to improve the efficiency and reduce the treatment cost. A direct transfer of the MLC technology from external beam radiation therapy is intuitively straightforward to proton therapy. However, activation, neutron production, and the associated secondary cancer risk in proton beam should be an important consideration which is evaluated. Methods: Monte Carlo simulation with FLUKA particle transport code was applied in this study for a number of treatment models. The authors have performed a detailed study of the neutron generation, ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)], and activation of a typical tungsten MLC and compared with those obtained from a brass aperture used in a typical proton therapy system. Brass aperture and tungsten MLC were modeled by absorber blocks in this study, representing worst-case scenario of a fully closed collimator. Results: With a tungsten MLC, the secondary neutron dose to the patient is at least 1.5 times higher than that from a brass aperture. The H*(10) from a tungsten MLC at 10 cm downstream is about 22.3 mSv/Gy delivered to water phantom by noncollimated 200 MeV beam of 20 cm diameter compared to 14 mSv/Gy for the brass aperture. For a 30-fraction treatment course, the activity per unit volume in brass aperture reaches 5.3 x 10 4 Bq cm -3 at the end of the last treatment. The activity in brass decreases by a factor of 380 after 24 h, additional 6.2 times after 40 days of cooling, and is reduced to background level after 1 yr. Initial activity in tungsten after 30 days of treating 30 patients per day is about 3.4 times higher than in brass that decreases only by a factor of 2 after 40 days and accumulates to 1.2 x 10 6 Bq cm -3 after a full year of operation. The daily utilization of the MLC leads to buildup of activity with time. The overall activity continues to increase due to 179 Ta with

  14. Step velocity in tetragonal lysozyme growth as a function of impurity concentration and mass transport conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dold, P.; Ono, E.; Tsukamoto, K.; Sazaki, G.

    2006-07-01

    The step velocity on {1 1 0} faces of tetragonal lysozyme crystals has been measured in situ by high-resolution phase contrast microscopy. The movement of the steps shows a distinct anisotropy with respect to the growth velocity and the interaction with impurities. Under high-purity conditions (using lysozyme of 99.99% purity), the step velocity vstep in the direction exceeds the one in the direction by a factor of 6. Spiral hillocks as well as 2D islands show an elongated, lens shaped morphology with pronounced tips in the direction. The ratio of vstep/ vstep is reduced to ≈2-4 when commercial grade lysozyme (purity: 98.5%) is used. The morphology of the hillocks/islands changes from the lens-shaped one to a rounded one. The step velocity into the fast growing direction is significantly more affected by impurities than the growth into the direction. The step velocity of monolayer islands (5.6 nm in height), of multilayer islands and of growth spirals is similar within the accuracy of the measurements. On the topside, the crystal is exposed to protein solution of ≈0.5 mm width. This results in convective mass transport conditions. On the backside of the crystal, there is a small gap of a few hundred nanometers. Within this gap, the crystal is growing under diffusive transport conditions. Changing the focus position from the topside of the crystal to the backside, the growth can be observed on the same crystal under convective as well as under diffusive conditions. Using commercial grade lysozyme, the growth velocity is higher under diffusive conditions than under convectively dominated ones. The morphology of the islands grown from a commercial grade solution under diffusive mass transport conditions is similar to the island morphology obtained otherwise only from high-purity solutions. Using high-purity solution, the step velocity and the island morphology does not differ as a function of the mass transport conditions. These results prove the extension of the

  15. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm -2 at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced damages

  16. Thermal shock behaviour of different tungsten grades under varying conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirtz, Oliver Marius

    2012-07-19

    Thermonuclear fusion power plants are a promising option to ensure the energy supply for future generations, but in many fields of research enormous challenges have to be faced. A major step on the way to the prototype fusion reactor DEMO will be ITER which is build in Cadarache, southern France. One of the most critical issues is the field of in-vessel materials and components, in particular the plasma facing materials (PFM). PFMs that will be used in a device like ITER have to withstand severe environmental conditions in terms of steady state and transient thermal loads as well as high particle fluxes such as hydrogen, helium and neutrons. Candidate wall materials are beryllium, tungsten and carbon based materials like CFC (carbon fibre composite). Tungsten is the most promising material for an application in the divertor region with very severe loading conditions and it will most probably also be used as PFM for DEMO. Hence, this work focuses on the investigation of the thermal shock response of different tungsten grades in order to understand the damage mechanisms and to identify material parameters which influence this behaviour under ITER and DEMO relevant operation conditions. Therefore the microstructure and the mechanical and thermal properties of five industrially manufactured tungsten grades were characterised. All five tungsten grades were exposed to transient thermal events with very high power densities of up to 1.27 GWm{sup -2} at varying base temperatures between RT and 600 C in the electron beam device JUDITH 1. The pulse numbers were limited to a maximum of 1000 in order to avoid immoderate workload on the test facility and to have enough time to cover a wide range of loading conditions. The results of this damage mapping enable to define different damage and cracking thresholds for the investigated tungsten grades and to identify certain material parameters which influence the location of these thresholds and the distinction of the induced

  17. Thermal reaction of SiC films with tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roger, J.; Le Petitcorps, Y. [Univ Bordeaux 1, Lab Composites Thermostruct, CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1, UMR 5801, F-33600 Pessac, (France); Roger, J.; Audubert, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA/LTEC, F-13108 St Paul Les Durance, (France)

    2008-07-01

    Solid-state reactions between SiC films and W-xRe (x = 0, 5 and 25 at%) substrates on thermal annealing between 1673 K and 1873 K for various durations have been investigated. SiC coatings were deposited on metallic wires by hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) from a gas mixture of tetramethyl-silane (TMS) and hydrogen at 1373 K under normal pressure. The interface zones were characterized using scanning electron and optical microscopies, X-ray diffraction and electron microprobe microanalysis. All analyses reveal that SiC reacts with substrates. Various metal silicides and carbides were formed in layered reaction and the presence of these phases was confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. The effects of rhenium on the reactivity were established by the determination of growth kinetics deducted from the thicknesses of reaction zones as a function of annealing time. It has been found that an increase in the diffusion kinetics and activation energy with the quantity of rhenium in the tungsten wire. (authors)

  18. Direct observation of the core/double-shell architecture of intense dual-mode luminescent tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Yeon; Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Jang, Ho Seong

    2016-05-21

    Highly efficient downconversion (DC) green-emitting LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors have been synthesized for bright dual-mode upconversion (UC) and DC green-emitting core/double-shell (C/D-S) nanophosphors-Li(Gd,Y)F4:Yb(18%),Er(2%)/LiYF4:Ce(15%),Tb(15%)/LiYF4-and the C/D-S structure has been proved by extensive scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) analysis. Colloidal LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors with a tetragonal bipyramidal shape are synthesized for the first time and they show intense DC green light via energy transfer from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) under illumination with ultraviolet (UV) light. The LiYF4:Ce,Tb nanophosphors show 65 times higher photoluminescence intensity than LiYF4:Tb nanophosphors under illumination with UV light and the LiYF4:Ce,Tb is adapted into a luminescent shell of the tetragonal bipyramidal C/D-S nanophosphors. The formation of the DC shell on the core significantly enhances UC luminescence from the UC core under irradiation of near infrared light and concurrently generates DC luminescence from the core/shell nanophosphors under UV light. Coating with an inert inorganic shell further enhances the UC-DC dual-mode luminescence by suppressing the surface quenching effect. The C/D-S nanophosphors show 3.8% UC quantum efficiency (QE) at 239 W cm(-2) and 73.0 ± 0.1% DC QE. The designed C/D-S architecture in tetragonal bipyramidal nanophosphors is rigorously verified by an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis, with the assistance of line profile simulation, using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a high-efficiency EDX. The feasibility of these C/D-S nanophosphors for transparent display devices is also considered.

  19. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Li, J.-F.; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2001-01-01

    Since the cold neutron source intensity of KENS (the spallation neutron source at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) was decreased into about a third of the designed value because a cadmium liner at the cold neutron source deformed and obstructed the neutron beam line, the target-moderator-and-reflector assembly (TMRA) has been replaced by a new one aimed at improving the neutron performance and recovering the cold neutron source. The tantalum target has also been replaced by a tantalum-clad tungsten one. In order to bond the tantalum-clad with the tungsten block, a hot isostatic press (HIP) process was applied and optimized. It was found that gaseous interstitial impurity elements severely attacked tantalum and embrittled, and that the getter materials such as zirconium and tantalum were effective to reduce the embrittlement

  20. Field electron emission from dense array of microneedles of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuyama, F.; Aoyagi, M.; Kitai, T.; Ishikawa, K.

    1978-01-01

    Characteristics of field electron emission from the dense array of microneedles of tungsten prepared on a 10-μm tungsten filament were measured at an environmental pressure of approx.1 x 10 -8 Torr (1.33 x 10 -6 Pa). Electron emission was not uniform over the filament surface, but the variation of emission current with applied voltage explicitly obeyed the Fowler-Nordheim relationship. At an emission current of approx.10 -4 A, a vacuum arc was induced that led to a permanent change in current-voltage characteristic. Current fluctuation was dependent on emitter temperature and applied voltage, and the lowest fluctuation of about 4% was routinely obtained at approx.550 K and at applied voltages several percent lower than the arc-inducing voltage. Macroscopic current density amounted to approx.20-80 mA/cm 2 at the best stability

  1. First-principles study on migration of vacancy in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Yasuhiro; Ito, Atsushi M.; Takayama, Arimichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2014-03-01

    We calculated di-vacancy binding energies and migration energies of mono-vacancy and di-vacancy in tungsten material using DFT calculation. The mono-vacancy diffuses in [111] direction easily rather than in [001] direction. The migration energies of di-vacancies are almost the same value of the mono-vacancy. The migration of di-vacancy is approximately the same as the migration of mono-vacancy. The di-vacancy binding energies are almost zero or negative. The interactions between two vacancies in tungsten material are repulsive from the second to fifth nearest-neighbor. The vacancies are difficult to aggregate since di-vacancy is less stable than mono-vacancy. (author)

  2. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  3. Characterization of tungsten silicides formed by rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegal, M.; Santiago, J.J.; VanDerSpiegel, J.

    1986-01-01

    Tungsten silicide samples were formed by sputter depositing 80 nm W metal onto (100) oriented, 5 ohm-cm Si wafers. After deposition, the samples were fast radiatively processed in an RTA system using quartz-halogen tungsten lamps as radiation sources for time intervals ranging from 20 to 60s under high vacuum. Films processed at 22-25 W/cm 2 radiation with the film side of the samples oriented away from the lamps result in films which are metallic or cloudy in color, and have mixed composition as evidenced by x-ray diffraction (W, W 5 Si 3 and WSi 2 ). Films processed with the film side oriented toward the lamps show the occurrence of a phase transformation clearly nucleated at the film edge

  4. Development of positron annihilation spectroscopy for characterizing neutron irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.N. Taylor; M. Shimada; D.W. Akers; M.W. Drigert; B.J. Merrill; Y. Hatano

    2013-05-01

    Tungsten samples (6 mm diameter, 0.2 mm thick) were irradiated to 0.025 and 0.3 dpa with neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Samples were then exposed to deuterium plasma in the tritium plasma experiment (TPE) at 100, 200 and 500ºC to a total fluence of 1 x 1026 m-2. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Doppler broadening positron annihilation spectroscopy (DB-PAS) were performed at various stages to characterize damage and retention. We present the first known results of neutron damaged tungsten characterized by DB-PAS in order to study defect concentration. Two positron sources, 22Na and 68Ge, probe ~58 µm and through the entire 200 µm thick samples, respectively. DB-PAS results reveal clear differences between the various irradiated samples. These results, and the calibration of DB-PAS to NRA data are presented.

  5. Tungsten-182 heterogeneity in modern ocean island basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundl, Andrea; Touboul, Mathieu; Jackson, Matthew G.; Day, James M. D.; Kurz, Mark D.; Lekic, Vedran; Helz, Rosalind T.; Walker, Richard J.

    2017-04-01

    New tungsten isotope data for modern ocean island basalts (OIB) from Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland reveal variable 182W/184W, ranging from that of the ambient upper mantle to ratios as much as 18 parts per million lower. The tungsten isotopic data negatively correlate with 3He/4He. These data indicate that each OIB system accesses domains within Earth that formed within the first 60 million years of solar system history. Combined isotopic and chemical characteristics projected for these ancient domains indicate that they contain metal and are repositories of noble gases. We suggest that the most likely source candidates are mega-ultralow-velocity zones, which lie beneath Hawaii, Samoa, and Iceland but not beneath hot spots whose OIB yield normal 182W and homogeneously low 3He/4He.

  6. High-temperature brazing for reliable tungsten-CFC joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koppitz, Th; Pintsuk, G; Reisgen, U; Remmel, J; Hirai, T; Sievering, R; Rojas, Y; Casalegno, V

    2007-01-01

    The joining of tungsten and carbon-based materials is demanding due to the incompatibility of their chemical and thermophysical properties. Direct joining is unfeasible by the reason of brittle tungsten carbide formation. High-temperature brazing has been investigated in order to find a suitable brazing filler metal (BFM) which successfully acts as an intermediary between the incompatible properties of the base materials. So far only low Cr-alloyed Cu-based BFMs provide the preferential combination of good wetting action on both materials, tolerable interface reactions, and a precipitation free braze joint. Attempts to implement a higher melting metal (e.g. Pd, Ti, Zr) as a BFM have failed up to now, because the formation of brittle precipitations and pores in the seam were inevitable. But the wide metallurgical complexity of this issue is regarded to offer further joining potential

  7. Solid-state sintering of tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurwell, W.E.

    1994-10-01

    Solid-state sintering is a technologically important step in the fabrication of tungsten heavy alloys. This work addresses practical variables affecting the sinterability: powder particle size, powder mixing, and sintering temperature and time. Compositions containing 1 to 10 micrometer (μM) tungsten (W) powders can be fully densified at temperatures near the matrix solidus. Blending with an intensifier bar provided good dispersion of elemental powders and good as-sintered mechanical properties under adequate sintering conditions. Additional ball milling increases powder bulk density which primarily benefits mold and die filling. Although fine, 1 μm W powder blends have high sinterability, higher as-sintered ductilities are reached in shorter sintering times with coarser, 5 μm W powder blends; 10μm W powder blends promise the highest as-sintered ductilities due to their coarse microstructural W

  8. A comparison of interatomic potentials for modeling tungsten nanocluster structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiannan; Shu, Xiaolin, E-mail: shuxlin@buaa.edu.cn; Jin, Shuo; Zhang, Xuesong; Zhang, Ying; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2017-02-15

    Molecular dynamic simulation is utilized to study the nanocluster and the fuzz structure on the PFM surface of tungsten. The polyhedral and linear cluster structures based on the icosahedron, cuboctahedron and rhombic dodecahedron are built up. Three interatomic potentials are used in calculating the relationship between the cluster energy and the number of atoms. The results are compared with first-principles calculation to show each potential’s best application scale. Furthermore, the transition between the icosahedral and the cuboctahedral clusters is observed in molecular dynamic simulation at different temperatures, which follows a critical curve for different numbers of atoms. The linear structures are proved to be stable at experimental temperatures by thermodynamics. The work presents a selection of interatomic potentials in simulating tungsten cluster systems and helps researchers understand the growth and evolution laws of clusters and the fuzz-like structure formation process in fusion devices.

  9. R&D of the CEPC scintillator-tungsten ECAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, M. Y.

    2018-03-01

    The circular electron and positron collider (CEPC) was proposed as a future Higgs factory. To meet the physics requirements, a particle flow algorithm-oriented calorimeter system with high energy resolution and precise reconstruction is considered. A sampling calorimeter with scintillator-tungsten sandwich structure is selected as one of the electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) options due to its good performance and relatively low cost. We present the design, the test and the optimization of the scintillator module read out by silicon photomultiplier (SiPM), including the design and the development of the electronics. To estimate the performance of the scintillator and SiPM module for particles with different energy, the beam test of a mini detector prototype without tungsten shower material was performed at the E3 beams in Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP). The results are consistent with the expectation. These studies provide a reference and promote the development of particle flow electromagnetic calorimeter for the CEPC.

  10. Thermal desorption and surface modification of He+ implanted into tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhang; Yoshida, N.; Iwakiri, H.; Xu Zengyu

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten divertor plates in fusion reactors will be subject to helium bombardment. Helium retention and thermal desorption is a concerned issue in controlling helium ash. In the present study, fluence dependence of thermal desorption behavior of helium in tungsten was studied at different irradiation temperatures and ion energies. Results showed that helium desorption could start at ∼400 K with increasing fluence, while no noticeable peaks were detected at low fluence. Total helium desorption reached a saturation value at high fluence range, which was not sensitive to irradiation temperature or ion energy for the conditions evaluated. Surface modifications caused by either ion irradiation or thermal desorption were observed by SEM. The relationship of surface modifications and helium desorption behavior was discussed. Some special features of elevated irradiation temperature and lower ion energy were also indicated

  11. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  12. Erosion of nanostructured tungsten by laser ablation, sputtering and arcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogyun Hwangbo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass loss of nanostructured tungsten, which was formed by helium plasma irradiation, due to laser ablation, sputtering, and arcing was investigated. Below the helium sputtering energy threshold (200eV. Reduction in sputtering on nanostructured surface was observed. Arcing was initiated using laser pulses, and the erosion rate by arcing was measured. The erosion rate increased with arc current, while the erosion per Coulomb was not affected by arc current.

  13. Width of electromagnetic wave instability spectrum in tungsten plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinkevich, A.B.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the study of high-frequency signal modulation and spectrum analysis of the envelope a measurement of spectrum width for electromagnetic wave instability was carried out under conditions of current pulse action on tungsten plate in magnetic field. The existence of amplitude-frequency wave modulation was revealed. The width of current disturbance spectrum in a specimen was evaluated. Current disturbances are shown to cause the instability of electromagnetic wave. 11 refs.; 6 figs

  14. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding of Copper and Mild Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel T; Timotius P; Maziar R

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, copper and mild steel were welded using a gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. To determine the weldablity factor, tests are needed to provide information on mechanical strength, potential defects in structure, and nature of failure. Mechanical testing included transverse tensile tests, micro hardness tests, and bend tests. The results for the transverse tensile test revealed failure occurred at the copper heat affected zone (HAZ) with an ultimate tensile strength of 220MPa...

  15. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Neu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux component asks for an increase of their operational range towards higher temperature in case of Cu/CuCrZr and lower temperatures for W. A remedy for both issues- brittleness of W and degrading strength of CuCrZr- could be the use of W fibres (Wf in W and Cu based composites. Fibre preforms could be manufactured with industrially viable textile techniques. Flat textiles with a combination of 150/70 µm W wires have been chosen for layered deposition of tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten (Wf/W samples and tubular multi-layered braidings with W wire thickness of 50 µm were produced as a preform for tungsten-fibre reinforced copper (Wf /Cu tubes. Cu melt infiltration was performed together with an industrial partner resulting in sample tubes without any blowholes. Property estimation by mean field homogenisation predicts strongly enhanced strength of the Wf/CuCrZr composite compared to its pure CuCrZr counterpart. Wf /W composites show very high toughness and damage tolerance even at room temperature. Cyclic load tests reveal that the extrinsic toughening mechanisms counteracting the crack growth are active and stable. FEM simulations of the Wf/W composite suggest that the influence of fibre debonding, which is an integral part of the toughening mechanisms, and reduced thermal conductivity of the fibre due to the necessary interlayers do not strongly influence the thermal properties of future components.

  16. Far-infrared spectroscopy of thermally annealed tungsten silicide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiotti, M.; Borghesi, A.; Guizzetti, G.; Nava, F.; Santoro, G.

    1991-01-01

    The far-infrared transmittance spectrum of tungsten silicide has been observed for the first time. WSi 2 polycrystalline films were prepared by coevaporation and chemical-vapour deposition on silicon wafers, and subsequently thermally annealed at different temperatures. The observed structures are interpreted, on the basis of the symmetry properties of the crystal, such as infrared-active vibrational modes. Moreover, the marked lineshape dependence on annealing temperature enables this technique to analyse the formation of the solid silicide phases

  17. Hydroxyaromatic compounds of tantalum, tungsten, and the lighter actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfaller, H.

    1980-01-01

    Some hydroxyaromatic compounds of the elements tantalum, tungsten, thorium and uranium were prepared as well as the basic materials for these synthesis processes, i.e. metal halides and metal alkoxides. The hydroxyaromatic compounds were studied by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1 H-NMR spectroscopy (if soluble in suitable solvents) and, in some cases, by X-ray fine structure analysis. (orig./EF) [de

  18. Refining waste hardmetals into tungsten oxide nanosheets via facile method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhifei; Zheng, Guangwei; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Li, Hongyi, E-mail: lhy06@bjut.edu.cn; Wu, Junshu; Du, Yucheng [Beijing University of Technology, Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-04-15

    A new hydrothermal system has been designed to recycle waste WC–Co hardmetal with low cobalt (Co) content (3 %). In the solution system, nitric acid was designed to dissolve Co, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} served as oxidant to accelerate the oxidation of the WC–Co hardmetals, and fluorine (F{sup −}) was designed to dissolve and recrystallize generated tungsten oxides, which were found to possess a layered structure using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The obtained tungsten oxides were identified as WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O by X-ray diffraction and their specific surface area was measured as 89.2 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} via N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption techniques. The present layered structure tungsten oxides exhibited a promising capability for removing lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}) and organic species, such as methyl blue. The adsorption model was found to be in agreement with Langmuir isotherm model. Given the facile synthesis procedure and promising properties of final products, this new approach should have great potential for refining some other waste hardmetals or tungsten products.Graphical AbstractA new hydrothermal system was designed to recycle waste hardmetal with low cobalt content. Through this method, waste hardmetal was refined into WO{sub 3}·0.33H{sub 2}O nanosheets which shows excellent adsorption capacities toward methylene blue and lead ion (Pb{sup 2+}).

  19. USE OF TITANIUM AND TUNGSTEN AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO GOLD IN JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.Y.R. Surnam

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study the use titanium and tungsten as alternatives to the noble metals in the jewellery industry was investigated. The degradation of titanium and tungsten were compared to that of gold, used as reference. Alternate immersion tests were performed in 3.5% sodium chloride and artificial perspiration. The metals’ abrasion resistance with respect to textile fabrics was determined. In general, there is around 30% difference in pit density for titanium and tungsten as compared to that of gold. Pit depth and pit diameter showed a similar trend. From the abrasive test performed, it was observed that titanium and tungsten had insignificant changes in the surface reflectivity with time. Hence, it was deduced that titanium and tungsten products would have longer maintenance intervals than that of gold. New tools and techniques, however, would be required by jewellers to work with titanium and tungsten.  

  20. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A; Donaldson, N

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its 'inertness' and 'stability' common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W 6+ , typically represented by the orthotungstate [Formula: see text] (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal's unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  1. Flow behaviour of a heat treated tungsten heavy alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Jiten; Sarkar, R.; Rao, G. Appa; Sankaranarayana, M.; Nandy, T.K.; Pabi, S.K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An Arrhenius type of constitutive equation is proposed for the investigated alloy. ► Peierl's controlled dislocation motion is observed at low temperature. ► Transition from Peierl's to forest controlled mechanism is observed at 673 K. ► At room temperature predominantly tungsten grain, cleavage fracture is observed. ► At elevated temperature predominantly intergranular fracture is observed. - Abstract: Flow behaviour of a tungsten heavy alloy was studied in the strain rate-temperature range of 10 −5 –1/s and 298–973 K, respectively. It was observed in this study that the dislocation motion in tungsten heavy alloy was controlled by a Peierl's mechanism at low temperatures (up to 573 K). This was confirmed by the magnitude of apparent activation volume and apparent activation enthalpy as well as TEM observations. Apparent activation enthalpy in the Peierls regime, determined by several methods, was found to vary in between 22 and 37 kJ/mol. An Arrhenius type of constitutive equation was also proposed in the Peierls controlled regime for predicting flow stress as a function of temperature and strain rate. Transition temperature of rate controlling mechanism—from Peierl's mechanism to forest mechanism—was determined from the strain rate sensitivity and apparent activation volume estimation at several temperatures. The transition temperature was found to be about 673 K.

  2. Corrosion of high-density sintered tungsten alloys. Part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batten, J.J.; Bombaci, S.A.; Garrard, W.N.C.; Moore, B.T.; Smith, B.S.

    1988-12-01

    The corrosion behaviour of tungsten and high-density tungsten alloys (W ≥ 90 weight %) has been examined electrochemically through anodic polarization measurements, instantaneous corrosion rate measurements, galvanic coupling, and surface potential mapping. In the anodic polarization tests, pure tungsten and the four alloys studied underwent transitions from an active state to a state where any further increase in potential produced no further increase in current. The presence of chloride ions increased corrosion rates. Predictions of likely trends in corrosion rates from the above electrochemical tests were not in complete agreement with those obtained by the long-term immersion tests. Similarly, a consistent prediction of the likely nature of the corrosion products that would result from long-term immersion testing was not obtained from the above studies. Predictions about which alloys would be susceptible to a crevice effect were in agreement with the immersion testing results, namely those alloys not containing Cu would be the most susceptible. Some insight into the nature of the corrosion mechanism is afforded by the work on galvanic coupling and surface potential mapping. This supported the view that galvanic corrosion plays a part in the corrosion process. 15 refs., 5 tabs., 19 figs

  3. Deuterium retention in tungsten films after different heat treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Jacob, W.; Elgeti, S.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten films deposited by magnetron sputtering on polycrystalline tungsten substrates were used as a model system to study the influence of the film microstructure on deuterium retention behavior. Different microstructures were produced by annealing the films up to recrystallization temperature and the corresponding structural changes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy combined with focused ion beam (FIB) cross sectioning. The influence of the induced structural changes on D retention was investigated by both nuclear reaction analysis and temperature-programmed desorption. D concentration in the investigated W films is higher than in polycrystalline bulk tungsten by a factor of 3. D retention in the films decreases as a function of annealing temperature. After annealing at 2000 K, FIB cross-section images reveal that cavities appeared at the grain boundaries within the film and at the initial interface between the W film and W substrate. This new microstructure strongly affects the D depth profile and leads to the increase of D retention. Although a further increase of the holding time at 2000 K or an increase of the annealing temperature to 2150 K lead to the reduction of the retained D amount, the D concentration in the recrystallized W films cannot be reduced to a level as low as that of bulk W recrystallized at 2000 K for 30 min.

  4. Tungsten Oxide Photonic Crystals as Optical Transducer for Gas Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Wu, Xia; Wagner, Thorsten

    2018-01-26

    Some metal oxide semiconductors, such as tungsten trioxide or tin dioxide, are well-known as resistive transducers for gas sensing and offer high sensitivities down to the part per billion level. Electrical signal read-out, however, limits the information obtained on the electronic properties of metal oxides to a certain frequency range and its application because of the required electrical contacts. Therefore, a novel approach for building an optical transducer for gas reactions utilizing metal oxide photonic crystals is presented here. By the rational design of the structure and composition it is possible to synthesize a functional material which allows one to obtain insight into its electronic properties in the optical frequency range with simple experimental measures. The concept is demonstrated by tungsten trioxide inverse opal structure as optical transducer material for hydrogen sensing. The sensing behavior is analyzed in a temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C and in a wide hydrogen concentration range (3000 ppm to 10%). The sensing mechanism is mainly the refractive index change resulting from hydrogen intercalation in tungsten trioxide, but the back reaction has also impact on the optical properties of this system. Detailed chemical reaction studies provide suggestions for specific sensing conditions.

  5. Extraction Factor Of Pure Ammonium Paratungstate From Tungsten Scraps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pee J.-H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical oxidation process of tungsten scraps was modified by the rotary kiln with oxygen burner to increase the oxidation rate of tungsten scraps. Also to accelerate the solubility of solid oxidized products, the hydrothermal reflux method was adapted. By heating tungsten scraps in rotary kiln with oxygen burner at around 900° for 2hrs, the scraps was oxidized completely. Then oxidized products (WO3 and CoWO4 was fully dissolved in the solution of NaOH by hydrothermal reflux method at 150° for 2hrs. The dissolution rate of oxidized products was increased with increasing the reaction temperature and concentration of NaOH. And then CaWO4 and H2WO4 could be generated from the aqueous sodium tungstate solution. Ammonium paratungstate (APT also could be produced from tungstic acid using by aqueous ammonium solution. The morphologies (cubic and plate types of APT was controlled by the stirring process of purified solution of ammonium paratungstate.

  6. Closed-cage tungsten oxide clusters in the gas phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D M David Jeba; Pradeep, T; Thirumoorthy, Krishnan; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2010-05-06

    During the course of a study on the clustering of W-Se and W-S mixtures in the gas phase using laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, we observed several anionic W-O clusters. Three distinct species, W(6)O(19)(-), W(13)O(29)(-), and W(14)O(32)(-), stand out as intense peaks in the regular mass spectral pattern of tungsten oxide clusters suggesting unusual stabilities for them. Moreover, these clusters do not fragment in the postsource decay analysis. While trying to understand the precursor material, which produced these clusters, we found the presence of nanoscale forms of tungsten oxide. The structure and thermodynamic parameters of tungsten clusters have been explored using relativistic quantum chemical methods. Our computed results of atomization energy are consistent with the observed LDI mass spectra. The computational results suggest that the clusters observed have closed-cage structure. These distinct W(13) and W(14) clusters were observed for the first time in the gas phase.

  7. Brazing molybdenum and tungsten for high temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Turner, W.C.; Hoffman, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to develop vacuum brazes for molybdenum and tungsten which can be used in seal joint applications up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F). Joints were attempted in molybdenum, tungsten and tungsten--molybdenum. The braze materials included: Ti--10Cr powder, Ti--30V wire, Ti--65V wire, V wire, Ni electroplate, MoB--50MoC powder mixture, V--50Mo powder mixture, Mo--15MoB 2 powder mixture and Mo--49V--15MoB 2 powder mixture. Braze temperature ranged from 1900 K (1627 C, 2961 F) to 2530 K, (2257 C, 4095 F), and leak-tight joints were made with all braze materials except Ti--10Cr. After heat treatments up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F) Kirkendall voiding was found to cause leakage of some of the joints made with only substitutional alloying elements. However, adding base metal powders to the braze or narrowing the root opening eliminated this problem. Kirkendall voiding was not a problem when interstitial elements were a major ingredient in the braze material. Shear testing of Ti--65V, V, MoB--50MoC and V--50Mo brazed molybdenum at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) indicated strengths equal to or better than the base metal. Ti--65V, V--50Mo and MoB--50MoC brazed joints were exposed to basalt at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) for 3 h without developing leaks

  8. The thermal accommodation of helium and argon on hot tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments are described in which the momentum flux of gas atoms, remitted normal to the surface of a hot clean tungsten ribbon immersed in a low pressure of helium or argon, is measured with a torsion balance and the thermal accommodation coefficient deduced. Data are presented in which the tungsten temperature range was 700 to 1900 K for helium and 1100 to 1700 K for argon. A model is proposed which assumes that atoms impinging on and remitted from the hot tungsten ribbon conserve momentum in directions parallel to the surface. This results in a remitted flux, in the direction of the normal, greater than the cosine emission relation would predict. The resulting accommodation coefficients are then of the same order as those found using the total heat loss method. The accuracy of the reported method increases with the temperature of the hot solid. Measurement of translational thermal accommodation is possible without relying on the temperature coefficient of resistance of the solid and hence is applicable to alloys and to non-metals. For metals, which have a normal temperature coefficient of resistance, the method allows translational accommodation to be measured and internal energy accommodation to be deduced. (U.K.)

  9. Extractive separation and spectrophotometric determination of tungsten as phosphotungsten blue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yatirajam, V.; Dhamija, S.

    1977-01-01

    Phosphotungsten blue is produced by tin(II) reduction of tungstate solution complexed with phosphate at a w/w ratio of W/P = 5, in 4M hydrochloric acid medium, and extracted with isoamyl alcohol; thus tungsten is separated from Fe(III), Ni, Co, Cr(III), V(V), As(V), Sb(III), Bi, Si, U(VI), Ca and Cu(II). In presence of bismuth (0.5 mg/ml), >= 99.7% W is separated in a single extraction. After alkaline back-extraction, tungsten is determined spectrophotometrically as phosphotungsten blue; it is measured at 930 nm in aqueous solution or at 900 to 960 nm after isoamyl alcohol extraction, the Beer's law ranges being 0.08 to 0.6 and 0.16 to 0.72 mg/ml respectively. The methods are shown to give satisfactory results in the analysis of practical samples containing some milligrams of tungsten. (author)

  10. The use of tungsten as a chronically implanted material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah Idil, A.; Donaldson, N.

    2018-04-01

    This review paper shows that tungsten should not generally be used as a chronically implanted material. The metal has a long implant history, from neuroscience, vascular medicine, radiography, orthopaedics, prosthodontics, and various other fields, primarily as a result of its high density, radiopacity, tensile strength, and yield point. However, a crucial material criterion for chronically implanted metals is their long-term resistance to corrosion in body fluids, either by inherently noble metallic surfaces, or by protective passivation layers of metal oxide. The latter is often assumed for elemental tungsten, with references to its ‘inertness’ and ‘stability’ common in the literature. This review argues that in the body, metallic tungsten fails this criterion, and will eventually dissolve into the soluble hexavalent form W6+, typically represented by the orthotungstate WO42- (monomeric tungstate) anion. This paper outlines the metal’s unfavourable corrosion thermodynamics in the human physiological environment, the chemical pathways to either metallic or metal oxide dissolution, the rate-limiting steps, and the corrosion-accelerating effects of reactive oxidising species that the immune system produces post-implantation. Multiple examples of implant corrosion have been reported, with failure by dissolution to varying extents up to total loss, with associated emission of tungstate ions and elevated blood serum levels measured. The possible toxicity of these corrosion products has also been explored. As the field of medical implants grows and designers explore novel solutions to medical implant problems, the authors recommend the use of alternative materials.

  11. Hypervelocity impact of tungsten cubes on spaced armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandel, Pradeep S; Sood, Dharmanshu; Kumar, Rajeev; Sharma, Prince; Sewak, Bhupinder; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Athwal, Manoj; Mangla, Vikas; Biswas, Ipsita; Singh, Manjit

    2012-01-01

    The paper summarizes the experimental observations and simulation studies of damage potential of tungsten alloy cubes on relatively thin mild steel spaced armour target plates in the velocity regime 1300 – 4000 ms −1 using Two Stage Light Gas Gun technique. The cubes of size 9.5 mm and 12 mm having mass 15 g and 30 g respectively were made to impact normally on three target plates of size 300 mm × 300 mm of thickness 4, 4 and 10 mm at 100 mm distance apart. Flash radiography has been used to image the projectile-target interaction in the nitrogen environment at 300 mbar vacuum at room temperature. The results reveal clear perforation by 9.5 mm cube in all the three target plates up to impact velocity of about 2000 m/s. While 12 mm cube can perforate the spaced armour upto impact velocity of 4000 m/s. This shows that 9.5mm tungsten alloy cube is not effective beyond 2000 m/s while 12 mm tungsten alloy cube can defeat the spaced armour upto 4000 m/s. The simulation studies have been carried out using Autodyn 3D nonlinear code using Lagrange solver at velocities 1200 – 4000 m/s. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  12. Analysis on volume fraction and crystal orientation relationship of monoclinic and tetragonal oxide grown on Zr-2.5Nb alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Jianlong [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, H3A 2B2 (Canada)]. E-mail: jianlong.lin@mail.mcgill.ca; Li Hualong [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Nam, Cheol [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, H3A 2B2 (Canada); Szpunar, Jerzy A. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, H3A 2B2 (Canada)

    2004-09-01

    Texture and phase volume fraction of the oxide grown on Zr-2.5Nb, in static autoclaves, at 623 K, with lithiated heavy water were investigated. It is found that both monoclinic and tetragonal zirconia are highly textured with {l_brace}100{r_brace}<100> preferred crystal orientation for the tetragonal phase, and (103-bar )[01-bar 0] and (104-bar)[401] texture for the monoclinic phase. No change in the texture for both phases was observed with the increase of thickness of the oxide layer. The crystal orientation relationship of both the monoclinic and tetragonal phases was found to be (103-bar )m-bar (100)t or (103-bar )m-bar (101)t and [100]t-bar [010]m. The integrated intensity over pole figures was used to calculate the volume fraction of the tetragonal phase in the oxide layer. The volume fraction of the tetragonal phase in the dense oxide layer near the metal-oxide interface was found to be about 8% and gradually decreases with an increase of the oxide thickness.

  13. A fracture mechanics study of tungsten failure under high heat flux loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Muyuan

    2015-01-01

    The performance of fusion devices is highly dependent on plasma-facing components. Tungsten is the most promising candidate material for armors in plasma-facing components in ITER and DEMO. However, the brittleness of tungsten below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature is very critical to the reliability of plasma-facing components. In this work, thermo-mechanical and fracture behaviors of tungsten are predicted numerically under fusion relevant thermal loadings.

  14. Structural and magnetic properties of tetragonal Heusler compounds Mn{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 1+x}Ga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasi, Teuta; Winterlik, Juergen; Balke, Benjamin; Fecher, Gerhard H.; Felser, Claudia [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes-Gutenberg-University, 55099 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Heusler compounds such as tetragonal phase of Mn{sub 3-x}Ga are currently receiving increased interest. These materials play an important role due to their multifunctional properties and high potential for applications in STT-MRAM technology. STT-MRAMs require high Curie temperatures, low Gilbert damping constants, and low magnetic moments. This contribution focuses on the structural and magnetic properties of tetragonal Heusler compounds Mn{sub 2-x}Fe{sub 1+x}Ga. These compounds are of exceptional importance due to their large diversity of adaptive magnetic properties and their tunability by variation of several physical parameters such as temperature, magnetic field, or electron-doping. The series of samples was successfully synthesized by arc-melting and characterized. The magnetic measurements show that all these materials show high T{sub C}s above 600 K and diverse magnetic hardness. Additionally, we found that the compound Fe{sub 2}MnGa shows magnetic shape memory behavior.

  15. Ionic and Optical Properties of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite across the Tetragonal-Cubic Structural Phase Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoque, Md Nadim Ferdous [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock Texas 79409 USA; Islam, Nazifah [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock Texas 79409 USA; Li, Zhen [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Ren, Guofeng [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock Texas 79409 USA; Zhu, Kai [Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado 80401 USA; Fan, Zhaoyang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock Texas 79409 USA

    2016-09-01

    Practical hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs) must endure temperatures above the tetragonal-cubic structural phase transition of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). However, the ionic and optical properties of MAPbI3 in such a temperature range, and particularly, dramatic changes in these properties resulting from a structural phase transition, are not well studied. Herein, we report a striking contrast at approximately 45 degrees C in the ionic/electrical properties of MAPbl3 owing to a change of the ion activation energy from 0.7 to 0.5 eV, whereas the optical properties exhibit no particular transition except for the steady increase of the bandgap with temperature. These observations can be explained by the 'continuous' nature of perovskite phase transition. We speculate that the critical temperature at which the ionic/electrical properties change, although related to crystal symmetry variation, is not necessarily the same temperature as when tetragonal-cubic structural phase transition occurs.

  16. Infrared studies of the monoclinic-tetragonal phase transition in Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarany, C A; Pelaio, L H Z; Araujo, E B; Yukimitu, K; Moraes, J C S; Eiras, J A

    2003-01-01

    Recently, the observation of a new monoclinic phase in the PbZr 1-x Ti x O 3 (PZT) system in the vicinity of the morphotropic phase boundary was reported. Investigations of this new phase were reported using different techniques such as high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. In this work, the monoclinic → tetragonal phase transition in PbZr 0.50 Ti 0.50 O 3 ceramics was studied using infrared spectroscopy between 1000 and 400 cm -1 . The four possible ν 1 -stretching modes (Ti-O and Zr-O stretch) in the BO 6 octahedron in the ABO 3 structure of PZT in this region were monitored as a function of temperature. The lower-frequency mode ν 1 -(Zr-O) remains practically unaltered, while both intermediate ν 1 -(Ti-O) modes decrease linearly as temperature increases from 89 to 263 K. In contrast, the higher-frequency ν 1 -(Ti-O) and ν 1 -(Zr-O) modes present anomalous behaviour around 178 K. The singularity observed at this mode was associated with the monoclinic → tetragonal phase transition in PbZr 0.50 Ti 0.50 O 3 ceramics

  17. 75 FR 75694 - Certain Semiconductor Integration Circuits Using Tungsten Metallization and Products Containing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-648] Certain Semiconductor Integration... semiconductor integrated circuits using tungsten metallization and products containing the same by reason of...

  18. Tissue distribution patterns of solubilized metals from internalized tungsten alloy in the F344 rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernieda B. Vergara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of its unique physical and chemical properties, tungsten has been increasingly utilized in a variety of civilian and military applications. This expanded use also raises the risk of human exposure through internalization by various routes. In most cases the toxicological and carcinogenic properties of these tungsten-based compounds are not known nor are the dissolution biokinetics and ultimate fate of the associated metals. Using a laboratory rodent model system designed to assess the health effects of embedded metals, and a tungsten alloy comprised of tungsten (91.1%, nickel (6.0%, and cobalt (2.9%, we investigated the tissue distribution patterns of the metals over a six month period. Despite its perceived insolubility, tungsten rapidly solubilized from the implanted metal fragments, as did nickel and cobalt. All three metals distributed systemically over time with extremely elevated levels of all three metals found in kidney, liver, and spleen. Unexpectedly, tungsten was found to cross the blood-brain and blood-testis barriers and localize in those tissues. These results, along with recent reports suggesting that tungsten is a tumor promoter, raises serious concerns as to the long-term health effects of exposure to tungsten and tungsten-based compounds.

  19. An update to the toxicological profile for water-soluble and sparingly soluble tungsten substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus, Ranulfo; Venezia, Carmen F

    2015-05-01

    Tungsten is a relatively rare metal with numerous applications, most notably in machine tools, catalysts, and superalloys. In 2003, tungsten was nominated for study under the National Toxicology Program, and in 2011, it was nominated for human health assessment under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System. In 2005, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) issued a toxicological profile for tungsten, identifying several data gaps in the hazard assessment of tungsten. By filling the data gaps identified by the ATSDR, this review serves as an update to the toxicological profile for tungsten and tungsten substances. A PubMed literature search was conducted to identify reports published during the period 2004-2014, in order to gather relevant information related to tungsten toxicity. Additional information was also obtained directly from unpublished studies from within the tungsten industry. A systematic approach to evaluate the quality of data was conducted according to published criteria. This comprehensive review has gathered new toxicokinetic information and summarizes the details of acute and repeated-exposure studies that include reproductive, developmental, neurotoxicological, and immunotoxicological endpoints. Such new evidence involves several relevant studies that must be considered when regulators estimate and propose a tungsten reference or concentration dose.

  20. Programming voltage reduction in phase change memory cells with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Feng; Song Zhitang; Gong Yuefeng; Wu Liangcai; Feng Songlin; Chen, Bomy

    2008-01-01

    A phase change memory cell with tungsten trioxide bottom heating layer/electrode is investigated. The crystalline tungsten trioxide heating layer promotes the temperature rise in the Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 layer which causes the reduction in the reset voltage compared to a conventional phase change memory cell. Theoretical thermal simulation and calculation for the reset process are applied to understand the thermal effect of the tungsten trioxide heating layer/electrode. The improvement in thermal efficiency of the PCM cell mainly originates from the low thermal conductivity of the crystalline tungsten trioxide material.

  1. Molecular basis of carcinogenicity of tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Robert M.; Williams, Tim D.; Waring, Rosemary H.; Hodges, Nikolas J., E-mail: n.hodges@bham.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    The tungsten alloy of 91% tungsten, 6% nickel and 3% cobalt (WNC 91–6–3) induces rhabdomyosarcoma when implanted into a rat thigh muscle. To investigate whether this effect is species-specific human HSkMc primary muscle cells were exposed to WNC 91–6–3 particles and responses were compared with those from a rat skeletal muscle cell line (L6-C11). Toxicity was assessed by the adenylate kinase assay and microscopy, DNA damage by the Comet assay. Caspase 3 enzyme activity was measured and oligonucleotide microarrays were used for transcriptional profiling. WNC 91–6–3 particles caused toxicity in cells adjacent to the particles and also increased DNA strand breaks. Inhibition of caspase 3 by WNC 91–6–3 occurred in rat but not in human cells. In both rat and human cells, the transcriptional response to WNC 91–6–3 showed repression of transcripts encoding muscle-specific proteins with induction of glycolysis, hypoxia, stress responses and transcripts associated with DNA damage and cell death. In human cells, genes encoding metallothioneins were also induced, together with genes related to angiogenesis, dysregulation of apoptosis and proliferation consistent with pre-neoplastic changes. An alloy containing iron, WNF 97–2–1, which is non-carcinogenic in vivo in rats, did not show these transcriptional changes in vitro in either species while the corresponding cobalt-containing alloy, WNC 97–2–1 elicited similar responses to WNC 91–6–3. Tungsten alloys containing both nickel and cobalt therefore have the potential to be carcinogenic in man and in vitro assays coupled with transcriptomics can be used to identify alloys, which may lead to tumour formation, by dysregulation of biochemical processes. - Highlights: • Use of transcriptomics to identify likely carcinogenic tungsten alloys in vitro • Cobalt containing alloys cause oxidative stress, DNA-damage and perturb apoptosis. • Presence of cobalt causes changes in gene expression

  2. Spatially modulated magnetic structure of EuS due to the tetragonal domain structure of SrTiO3 APS

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Aaron J.; Kirtley, John R.; Gedik, Nuh; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.; Moler, Kathryn A.

    2017-12-15

    The combination of ferromagnets with topological superconductors or insulators allows for new phases of matter that support excitations such as chiral edge modes and Majorana fermions. EuS, a wide-bandgap ferromagnetic insulator with a Curie temperature around 16 K, and SrTiO3 (STO), an important substrate for engineering heterostructures, may support these phases. We present scanning superconducting quantum interference device measurements of EuS grown epitaxially on STO that reveal micron-scale variations in ferromagnetism and paramagnetism. These variations are oriented along the STO crystal axes and only change their configuration upon thermal cycling above the STO cubic-to-tetragonal structural transition temperature at 105 K, indicating that the observed magnetic features are due to coupling between EuS and the STO tetragonal structure. We speculate that the STO tetragonal distortions may strain the EuS, altering the magnetic anisotropy on a micron scale. This result demonstrates that local variation in...

  3. Hydrothermal degradation of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} ceramic components used in dental applications; Efeito da degradacao em meio aquoso de componentes ceramicos a base de ZrO{sub 2} tetragonal para uso odontologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukaeda, L.E.; Robin, A.; Taguchi, S.P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DEMAR/EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia de Lorena. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Santos, C. [ProtMat Materiais Avancados, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    With the evolution of the dental restoration techniques, a considerable growth in the demand of ceramic products occurred. These materials present good strength associated to reliability. In this work, micrometric and nanometric scale tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} blocks were sintered at 1500 deg C-2h and 1350 deg C-2h, respectively, ground and polished. Ceramics with relative density higher than 98% were obtained. The specimens were immersed in hot water (150 deg C), for times ranging from 10h to 30h. The mass variation of the samples was measured and the crystalline phases present before and after the degradation tests were identified by X-ray diffractometry, in order to evaluate the capacity of these ceramics in resisting to aqueous medium exposure. Materials with nanometric structure present higher resistance to degradation than those with micrometric scale, and this interferes in structural stability after the test, and reduces the martensitic transformation. (author)

  4. Systematic studies of the nucleation and growth of ultrananocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates coated with a tungsten layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yueh-Chieh; Jiang, Gerald [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tu, Chia-Hao [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chang Chi [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chuan-pu; Ting, Jyh-Ming [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lee, Hsin-Li [Industrial Technology Research Institute - South, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Yonhua [Institute of Microelectronics, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, No.1, University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Auciello, Orlando [Argonne National Laboratory, Materials Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We report on effects of a tungsten layer deposited on silicon surface on the effectiveness for diamond nanoparticles to be seeded for the deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD). Rough tungsten surface and electrostatic forces between nanodiamond seeds and the tungsten surface layer help to improve the adhesion of nanodiamond seeds on the tungsten surface. The seeding density on tungsten coated silicon thus increases. Tungsten carbide is formed by reactions of the tungsten layer with carbon containing plasma species. It provides favorable (001) crystal planes for the nucleation of (111) crystal planes by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (MPECVD) in argon diluted methane plasma and further improves the density of diamond seeds/nuclei. UNCD films grown at different gas pressures on tungsten coated silicon which is pre-seeded by nanodiamond along with heteroepitaxially nucleated diamond nuclei were characterized by Raman scattering, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy.

  5. Potential irradiation of Cu alloys and tungsten samples in DONES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, F.; Palermo, I.; Laces, S.; Molla, J.; Ibarra, A.

    2017-12-01

    Tungsten and Cu alloys are currently proposed as reference candidate material for ITER and DEMO first wall and divertor. Tungsten is proposed for its high fusion temperature and CuCrZr alloys for their high thermal conductivity together with good mechanical properties. However its behaviour under the extreme irradiation conditions as expected in ITER or DEMO fusion reactors is still unknown. Due to the determinant role of H and He played in the material behaviour any irradiation experiment must take into account the amount of these gases produced during the irradiation in Fusion reactors with high-energy neutrons. DONES (DEMO oriented neutron source) has been conceived as a simplified IFMIF (International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility) like plant to provide in a reduced time scale and with a reduced budget—both compared to IFMIF—the basic information on materials damage. The objective of DONES-IFMIF in its first stage will be to test structural materials under similar neutron irradiation nuclear fusion conditions as expected in fusion reactors. These tests will be carried out with specimens irradiated in the so called high flux test module (HFTM). The objective of this paper is to assess on the potential use of DONES to irradiate copper (Cu) alloys and tungsten (W) in the HFTM together with reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel like for example EUROFER (9%-Cr-steel). The presence of Cu alloys or W specimens may have an effect in the irradiation parameters of the EUROFER samples placed also in the HFTM and in the samples of the creep fatigue test module (CFTM). McDeLicious code is used for neutron transport calculations. Damage dose rate and H and He production are analysed in the different locations and compared with the irradiation conditions in first wall and divertor in fusion machines.

  6. Helium segregation on surfaces of plasma-exposed tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroudas, Dimitrios; Blondel, Sophie; Hu, Lin; Hammond, Karl D.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-02-01

    We report a hierarchical multi-scale modeling study of implanted helium segregation on surfaces of tungsten, considered as a plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors. We employ a hierarchy of atomic-scale simulations based on a reliable interatomic interaction potential, including molecular-statics simulations to understand the origin of helium surface segregation, targeted molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations of near-surface cluster reactions, and large-scale MD simulations of implanted helium evolution in plasma-exposed tungsten. We find that small, mobile He n (1  ⩽  n  ⩽  7) clusters in the near-surface region are attracted to the surface due to an elastic interaction force that provides the thermodynamic driving force for surface segregation. This elastic interaction force induces drift fluxes of these mobile He n clusters, which increase substantially as the migrating clusters approach the surface, facilitating helium segregation on the surface. Moreover, the clusters’ drift toward the surface enables cluster reactions, most importantly trap mutation, in the near-surface region at rates much higher than in the bulk material. These near-surface cluster dynamics have significant effects on the surface morphology, near-surface defect structures, and the amount of helium retained in the material upon plasma exposure. We integrate the findings of such atomic-scale simulations into a properly parameterized and validated spatially dependent, continuum-scale reaction-diffusion cluster dynamics model, capable of predicting implanted helium evolution, surface segregation, and its near-surface effects in tungsten. This cluster-dynamics model sets the stage for development of fully atomistically informed coarse-grained models for computationally efficient simulation predictions of helium surface segregation, as well as helium retention and surface morphological evolution, toward optimal design of plasma facing components.

  7. Pipe bend wear - is tungsten carbide the answer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freinkel, D.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to compare the relative wear resistance of various grades of sintered tungsten carbide liners against a mild steel standard in a full-scale pneumatic conveying testing rig. Speciments ranging in cobalt content from 6 to 30 per cent and in grain size from 0,56 to 2,98 microns, including a mild steel standard, were placed on a specially designed holder which fitted into a tee type 100 mm diameter bend. The specimens were tested under various operating conditions, ie air velocity ranging from 28m/s to 52m/s, impact angles of 30 0 to 70 0 mass flow rates of 35kg/min to 83kg/min and phase densities of 1,2 to 2,9, using a 4 mm nominal size crushed granite rock. The experimental results show that the ultrafine-grained, low cobalt (6 per cent) tungsten carbide displays little sensitivity to varying velocities, impact angles, mass flow rates or phase densities, and consistently gave the best wear resistance under all testing conditions. It consistently showed the least wear resistance under all testing conditions and performed only slightly better than mild steel. The effect of the carbide grain size was found to be small, although the finer grain sizes displayed greater wear resistance than the coarse grains. The effect of cobalt content was such that the lower cobalt specimens (6 per cent range) consistently performed better than the higher cobalt contents (10 per cent, 15 per cent, 30 per cent) under all testing conditions; the wear resistance decreasing with increasing cobalt content. An empirical model for the prediction of wear for each type of material tested has been proposed, given the particular operating conditions. Microstructurally it has been shown that there is a definite relationship between erosion resistance and the inverse of the magnetic coercivity of the tungsten carbide alloys

  8. Ce O{sub 2}-Zr O{sub 2} tetragonal ceramics (Ce-TZP): mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nono, Maria do Carmo de Andrade [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais

    1994-12-31

    This work presents the development and the characterization of Ce O{sub 2}-stabilized tetragonal Zr O{sub 2} polycrystals (Ce-TZP ceramics), since it is considered candidate material for applications as structural high performance ceramics, an as substitute of some metallic materials. Ce-TZP ceramics attain remarkable increasing in strength and fracture toughness. Sintered ceramics were fabricated from mixtures of powders containing different Ce O{sub 2} content prepared by conventional mechanical technique. It were adopted the bending strength, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness techniques to the determination of the mechanical parameters. These results were discussed and compared to those published in international literature. (author) 11 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Mapping the orthorhombic-to-tetragonal transition at ambient temperature in YBa2Cu3O/sub y/ ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The orthorhombic-to-tetragonal transition at ambient temperature in YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub y/ ceramics is empirically mapped as a function of oxygen content (y) based on published neutron and x-ray diffraction studies. On approaching the transition region (y∼6.5) from the orthorhombic phase, there is a noticeable anomaly in the c-axis length, a smooth evolution of the b axis, and a rather abrupt transition of the a axis (the axis along which oxygen deficiency obtains at larger values of y in the orthorhombic phase). Finally, the empirical method developed here for ascertaining oxygen content from crystallographic data is compared to neutron, hydrogen reduction, and iodometric titration results for several metastable YBa 2 Cu 3 O/sub y/ ceramics and Fe- and Co-doped materials

  10. Tetragonal zirconia ceramics in Zr O2-Ce O2 system (Ce-TZP): preparation, characterization and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Nono, M.C. de.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the results achieved in a study about Ce-TZP ceramics prepared from conventional powder mixtures of Zr O 2 and Ce O 2 (with composition in the range of 8 to 16 mol% Ce O 2 ). Physical and chemical characteristics were related with the powder compaction behavior and with the sintering state. The sintered ceramics showed a level of high porosity (≅ 4%), mainly due to the fairly adequate powder characteristics and compaction. The crystalline phases were analysed from X-rays diffraction data and showed that these ceramics can present tetragonal-to-monoclinic stress induced transformation. The bending strength, fracture toughness and Vickers hardness results were influenced by Ce O 2 content microstructure and sintering temperature. These Ce-TZP ceramics showed mechanical strength results comparable to those published in the international literature. (author)

  11. Electric-field tunable perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in tetragonal Fe4N/BiFeO3 heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Li; Wang, Xiaocha; Mi, Wenbo

    2017-07-01

    Electric field control on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is indispensable for spintronic devices. Herewith, in tetragonal Fe4N/BiFeO3 heterostructures with the FeAFeB/Fe-O2 interface, PMA in each Fe4N layer, not merely interfacial layers, is modulated by the electric field, which is attributed to the broken spin screening of the electric field in highly spin-polarized Fe4N. Moreover, the periodical dx y+dy z+dz2 and dx y+dx2-y2 orbital-PMA oscillation enhances the interactions between adjacent FeAFeB and (FeB)2N atomic layers, which benefits the electric field modulation on PMA in the whole Fe4N atomic layers. The electric-field control on PMA in Fe4N/BiFeO3 heterostructures is favored by the electric-field-lifted potential in Fe4N.

  12. Durability of adhesive bonds to uranium alloys, tungsten, tantalum, and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Long-term durability of epoxy bonds to alloys of uranium (U-Nb and Mulberry), nickel-plated uranium, thorium, tungsten, tantalum, tantalum--10 percent tungsten, and aluminum was evaluated. Significant strengths remain after ten years of aging; however, there is some evidence of bond deterioration with uranium alloys and thorium stored in ambient laboratory air

  13. Incorporation of tungsten metal fibers in a metal and ceramic matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Vokáč, M.; Kolísko, J.; Pokorný, P.; Kubatík, Tomáš František

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, 1-2 (2017), s. 79-82 ISSN 0543-5846 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tungsten wires * tungsten fibers * plasma spraying * metallic coatings * ceramic coatings Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics http://hrcak.srce.hr/168890

  14. Electrodeposition mechanism and corrosion behavior of multilayer nanocrystalline nickel-tungsten alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allahyarzadeh, M.H.; Aliofkhazraei, M.; Rouhaghdam, A. Sabour

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer nickel-tungsten coatings were deposited on carbon steel using the pulse reverse current technique. Nickel-tungsten layered structure coatings were developed using the continuous and alternative variation of pulse duty cycle at two specific and fixed values. In these coatings, the multi...

  15. Binary-collision-approximation-based simulation of noble gas irradiation to tungsten materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Seiki; Takayama, Arimichi; Ito, Atsushi M.; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    To reveal the possibility of fuzz formation of tungsten material under noble gas irradiation, helium, neon, and argon atom injections into tungsten materials are performed by binary-collision-approximation-based simulation. The penetration depth is strongly depends on the structure of the target material. Therefore, the penetration depth for amorphous and bcc crystalline structure is carefully investigated in this paper

  16. TiNi shape memory alloy coated with tungsten : A novel approach for biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Huafang; Zheng, Yufeng; Pei, Y. T.; de Hosson, Jeff

    This study explores the use of DC magnetron sputtering tungsten thin films for surface modification of TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) targeting for biomedical applications. SEM, AFM and automatic contact angle meter instrument were used to determine the surface characteristics of the tungsten thin

  17. Phase II Tungsten Fate-and Transport Study for Camp Edwards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    cubic meters degrees Fahrenheit (oF-32)/1.8 degrees Celsius (oC) feet 0.3048 meters gallons (U.S. liquid) 3.785412 E-03 liters inches 0.0254 meters...1 Desorption/dissolution of tungsten 451 39 8.1 2 Sorption of sodium tungstate and desorption/dissolution of tungsten and sodium tungstate 124

  18. Deepening of floating potential for tungsten target plate on the way to nanostructure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamura, Shuichi; Miyamoto, Takanori; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2010-01-01

    Deepening of floating potential has been observed on the tungsten target plate immersed in high-density helium plasma with hot electron component on the way to nanostructure formation. The physical mechanism is thought to be a reduction of secondary electron emission from such a complex nano fiber-form structure on the tungsten surface. (author)

  19. Thermal shock behaviour of tungsten after high flux H-plasma loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Wright, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that transient thermal shock loads induce crack networks on tungsten samples especially at low base temperatures. To achieve test conditions which are more relevant for the performance of tungsten-armoured plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices

  20. On-chip microplasma reactors using carbon nanofibres and tungsten oxide nanowires as electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agiral, A.; Groenland, A.W.; Chinthaginjala, J.K.; Kumar Chinthaginjala, J.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Lefferts, Leonardus; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanofibres (CNFs) and tungsten oxide (W18O49) nanowires have been incorporated into a continuous flow type microplasma reactor to increase the reactivity and efficiency of the barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure. CNFs and tungsten oxide nanowires were characterized by high-resolution

  1. Electrical and optical properties of mixed phase tungsten trioxide films grown by laser pyrolysis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser pyrolysis was chosen to synthesize tungsten trioxide starting with tungsten ethoxide precursor. The film was found to have a thickness that varied from 205 nm to 1 µm. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of a...

  2. Tungsten determination in heat resistant nickel-base-alloys by the method of atomic absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregorczyk, S.; Wycislik, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method of atomic absorption was developed. It allows for the tungsten to be determined in heatresistant nickel-base-alloys within the range 0.01 to 7%. It consists in precipitating tungsten acid in the presence of alkaloids with its following decomposition by hydrofluoric acid in the teflon bomb. (author)

  3. Molybdenum and tungsten enzymes: the xanthine oxidase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondino, Carlos D; Romão, Maria João; Moura, Isabel; Moura, José J G

    2006-04-01

    Mononuclear molybdenum and tungsten are found in the active site of a diverse group of enzymes that, in general, catalyze oxygen atom transfer reactions. Enzymes of the xanthine oxidase family are the best-characterized mononuclear Mo-containing enzymes. Several 3D structures of diverse members of this family are known. Recently, the structures of substrate-bound and arsenite-inhibited forms of two members of this family have also been reported. In addition, spectroscopic studies have been utilized to elucidate fine details that complement the structural information. Altogether, these studies have provided an important amount of information on the characteristics of the active site and the electron transfer pathways.

  4. Tungsten based anisotropic metamaterial as an ultra-broadband absorber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Yinyue; Cui, Yanxia; Ding, Fei

    2017-01-01

    : We show theoretically that an array of tungsten/germanium anisotropic nano-cones placed on top of a reflective substrate can absorb light at the wavelength range from 0.3 μm to 9 μm with an average absorption efficiency approaching 98%. It is found that the excitation of multiple orders of slow...... of the nano-cones and the interaction between neighboring nano-cones is quite weak. Our proposal has some potential applications in the areas of solar energy harvesting and thermal emitters....

  5. Femtosecond laser fabrication of microspike-arrays on tungsten surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Tomokazu; Yanai, Masato; Ohmura, Etsuji; Nomura, Yasumitsu; Miyamoto, Isamu; Hirose, Akio; Kobayashi, Kojiro F.

    2005-01-01

    Microspike-arrays were fabricated by irradiating a femtosecond laser on a tungsten surface through a mask opening in air. The natural logarithms of the calculated intensity distributions diffracted at the edge of the mask opening were qualitatively consistent with the experimental results of the shape and arrays of microspikes fabricated. The shape and the array of microspikes depend on the intensity distribution diffracted at the edge of the mask opening. This microspike-array has the potential to be used as a source of micro emitter tips

  6. Transient induced tungsten melting at the Joint European Torus (JET).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Coenen, J.W.; Matthews, G.F.; Krieger, K.; Iglesias, D.; Bunting, P.; Corre, Y.; Silburn, S.; Balboa, I.; Bazylev, B.; Conway, N.; Coffey, I.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gauthier, E.; Gaspar, J.; Jachmich, S.; Jepu, I.; Makepeace, C.; Scannell, R.; Stamp, M.; Petersson, P.; Pitts, R.A.; Wiesen, S.; Widdowson, A.; Heinola, K.; Baron-Wiechec, A.

    T170, December (2017), č. článku 014013. ISSN 0031-8949. [PFMC 2017: 16th International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications. Düsseldorf, 16.05.2017-19.05.2017] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : fusion * melting * plasma wall interaction * tungsten * plasma facing components Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: 1.3 Physical sciences Impact factor: 1.280, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/ article /10.1088/1402-4896/aa8789/meta

  7. Titania supported tungsten oxide species studied by Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Hack Sung; Kim, Kwan

    1991-01-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the tungsta catalyst supported on titania. The surface tungsten species which forms on titania after calcination appeared to possess a structure that is independent of the initial impregnation condition. The surface polytungstate seemed to be stable only at the interfacial region since the crystalline WO 3 phase was observed as long as the tungsta loading was in excess of monolayer coverage. The close intact and strong interaction between the polytungstate and the titania could be evidenced from the inhibition of the phase transition of TiO 2 from anatase to rutile.(Author)

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of tungsten doped tin dioxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cailong; Li, Yufeng; Chen, Yiwen; Lin, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten doped tin dioxide (WTO) nanocrystals were synthesized through a one-step hydrothermal method. The structure, composition and morphology of WTO nanocrystals were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra, zeta potential analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the as-prepared WTO nanocrystals were rutile-type structure with the size near 13 nm. Compared with the undoped tin dioxide nanocrystals, the WTO nanocrystals possessed better dispersity in ethanol phase and formed transparent sol.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of tungsten or calcium doped PZT ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, D.M.; Caracas, L.B.; Noronha, R.G.; Santos, M.M.T. dos; Paiva-Santos, C.O.

    2009-01-01

    Pure and doped (tungsten or calcium) PZT ceramics were prepared by association of the polymeric precursor and partial oxalate method. The phase formation was investigated by thermal analysis (TG/DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The affect of W or Ca doping PZT and their electrical properties was evaluated. Substitution of W by Ti and Ca by Pb leads to an increase of Curie temperature and broadening of dielectric constant. A typical hysteresis loop was observed at room temperature and the remnant polarization was increased with the content of W and Ca. (author)

  10. Tungsten surface evolution by helium bubble nucleation, growth and rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Wirth, Brian D.; Hammond, Karl D.; Juslin, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reveal sub-surface mechanisms likely involved in the initial formation of nanometre-sized ‘fuzz’ in tungsten exposed to low-energy helium plasmas. Helium clusters grow to over-pressurized bubbles as a result of repeated cycles of helium absorption and Frenkel pair formation. The self-interstitials either reach the surface as isolated adatoms or trap at the bubble periphery before organizing into prismatic 〈1 1 1〉 dislocation loops. Surface roughening occurs as single adatoms migrate to the surface, prismatic loops glide to the surface to form adatom islands, and ultimately as over-pressurized gas bubbles burst. (paper)

  11. Theoretical investigation of crack formation in tungsten after heat loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A. S.; Huber, A.; Wirtz, M.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; Burdakov, A. V.; Coenen, J. W.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Mertens, Ph.; Shoshin, A. A.; Unterberg, B.; Vasilyev, A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Transient events such as ELMs in large plasma devices lead to significant heat load on plasma-facing components (PFCs). ELMs cause mechanical damage of PFCs (e.g. cracks). The cracks appear due to stresses caused by thermal extension. Analytical calculations of the stresses are carried out for tungsten. The model only takes into account the basic features of solid body mechanics without material modifications (e.g. fatigue or recrystallization). The numerical results of the model demonstrate good agreement with experimental data obtained at the JUDITH-1, PSI-2 and GOL-3 facilities.

  12. Vanadium Doped Tungsten Oxide Material - Electrical Physical and Sensing Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shishkin N. Y.

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The electrical physical and sensing (to VOCs and inorganic gases properties of vanadium doped tungsten oxide in the regions of phase transition temperature were investigated. Vanadium oxide (II dimerization was observed in the doped material, corresponding to new phase transition. The extreme sensitivity and selectivity to chemically active gases and vapors in small concentrations: CO, NOx, NH3 acetone, ethanol near phase transitions temperature was found. Sensor elements were manufactured for the quantitative detection (close to 1 ppm of alcohol and ammonia.

  13. Molybdenum (6) and tungsten (6) complexes with aminopropanols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Subbotina, N.A.; Felin, M.G.; Mozgin, S.V. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1982-04-01

    Interaction of molybdenum and tungsten acids or their ammonium salts with 1-aminopropanediol-2, 3, 1-2-diaminopropanol, tris-(oxymethyl) aminomethane, as well as with N-buthyldiethanolamine is studied: and compounds of MO/sub 2/(AP)xR composition, where M=Mo, W; AP-aminopropoxyl group, R-water, dimethyl sulphoxide, n-butyl alcohol are separated. The obtained substances are characterized by the data of element analysis, infrared spectroscopy, thermography and magnetic measurements. On the base of these physicochemical investigations the structure of the mentioned complexes is proposed.

  14. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites for advanced plasma facing components

    OpenAIRE

    Neu, R.; Riesch, J.; Müller, A.v.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J.W.; Gietl, H.; Höschen, T.; Li, M.; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    The European Fusion Roadmap foresees water cooled plasma facing components in a first DEMO design in order to provide enough margin for the cooling capacity and to only moderately extrapolate the technology which was developed and tested for ITER. In order to make best use of the water cooling concept copper (Cu) and copper-chromium-zirconium alloy (CuCrZr) are envisaged as heat sink whereas as armour tungsten (W) based materials will be used. Combining both materials in a high heat flux comp...

  15. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebsz, Melinda [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Kollender, Jan Philipp [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Hassel, Achim Walter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    In the present work, which is aimed to monitor in situ the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten by using a Flow-Type Scanning Droplet Cell Microscope (FT-SDCM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), novel results are reported. The anodic oxide growth and its dissolution on the surface of W have been monitored in situ. The results of this current study show the importance of coupling electrochemical experiments to ICP-MS. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Evaluation of stable tungsten isotopes in the resolved resonance region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schillebeeckx P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade benchmark experiments and simulations, together with newly obtained neutron cross section data, have pointed out deficiencies in evaluated data files of W isotopes. The role of W as a fundamental structural material in different nuclear applications fully justifies a new evaluation of 182, 183, 184, 186W neutron resonance parameters. In this regard transmission and capture cross section measurements on natural and enriched tungsten samples were performed at the GELINA facility of the EC-JRC-IRMM. A resonance parameter file used as input in the resonance shape analysis was prepared based on the available literature and adjusted in first instance to transmission data.

  17. Fabricating tungsten crucibles by drawing and extrusion spinning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edstrom, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication of seamless tungsten crucibles 127-mm ID x 265-mm high x 6.25-mm wall thickness (5 in. x 10 1/2 in. x 1/4 in.) involved three drawing operations and extrusion spinning. The success of the drawing operations came from a combination of low draw reduction percentage, generous draw radii, large punch-to-die clearance, and attention to drawing temperature. The extrusion spinning success related to good drawn-cup-to-spinning-mandrel fit prior to making the extrusion passes, removal of stress risers in the part prior to spinning, and special attention to part and mandrel temperature

  18. The occurrence and damage of unipolar arcing on fuzzy tungsten

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aussems, D.U.B.; Nishijima, D.; Brandt, C.; van der Meiden, H.J.; Vilémová, Monika; Matějíček, Jiří; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R.P.; Lopes Cardozo, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 463, August (2015), s. 303-307 ISSN 0022-3115. [PLASMA-SURFACE INTERACTIONS 21: International Conference on Plasma-Surface Interactions in Controlled Fusion Devices. Kanazawa, 26.05.2014-30.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12837S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Tungsten * fuzz * unipolar arcing * melting * fusion reactor Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering Impact factor: 2.199, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022311514005996514005996

  19. Structural perfection and residual electric resistance of tungsten single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagirova, D.M.; Dyakina, V.P.; Startsev, V.E.; Esin, V.O.

    1997-01-01

    A study was made into residual relative resistance (RRR) and structural perfection (SP) of tungsten single crystals, grown by electron beam zone melting using seeding crystals of several orientations, namely, , , , . The single crystals were of 99.98 and 99.9995 wt.% purity. The RRR value is found to depend on crystallographic orientation of an axis of crystal growth and to correlate with SP. Single crystals of different purity are differ in the nature of orientational dependences. It is shown that the correlation between RRR and SP of crystals is mainly due to conduction electron scattering by subgrain boundaries (internal size effect)

  20. Tungsten-nanodiamond composite powders produced by ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, D., E-mail: daniela.nunes@ist.utl.pt [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Livramento, V. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Mardolcar, U.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Ciencias Moleculares e Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-07-15

    The major challenge in producing tungsten-nanodiamond composites by ball milling lies in successfully dispersing carbon nanoparticles in the metallic matrix while keeping carbide formation at a minimum. Processing windows for carbide minimization have been established through systematic variation of the nanodiamond fraction, milling energy and milling time. Materials characterization has been carried out by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microhardness testing. Nanostructured matrices with homogeneously dispersed particles that preserved the diamond structure have been produced. Differential thermal analysis has been used to evaluate the composites thermal stability.

  1. Self-castellation of tungsten monoblock under high heat flux loading and impact of material properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Panayotis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the full-tungsten divertor qualification program at ITER Organization, macro-cracks, so called self-castellation were found in a fraction of tungsten monoblocks during cyclic high heat flux loading at 20MW/m2. The number of monoblocks with macro-cracks varied with the tungsten products used as armour material. In order to understand correlation between the macro-crack appearance and W properties, an activity to characterize W monoblock materials was launched at the IO. The outcome highlighted that the higher the recrystallization resistance, the lower the number of cracks detected during high heat flux tests. Thermo-mechanical finite element modelling demonstrated that the maximum surface temperature ranges from 1800 °C to 2200 °C and in this range recrystallization of tungsten occurred. Furthermore, it indicated that loss of strength due to recrystallization is responsible for the development of macro-cracks in the tungsten monoblock.

  2. Chemical states and deuterium retention behavior of vacuum plasma sprayed tungsten coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Yaran; Suzuki, Sachiko; Zheng Xuebin; Ding Chuanxian; Chen Junling; Wang Wanjing; Oya, Yasuhisa; Okuno, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Tungsten (W) coatings were prepared using vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) technology and then the chemical states and retention behaviors of deuterium in VPS-W coatings were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The results showed that chemical reacted oxygen (W-O bonds) and chemisorbed oxygen (O-O bonds) existed both on the surface and interior of tungsten coatings. Oxygen was chemically sputtered during D 2 + implantation. Two deuterium desorption stages at the temperature ranges around 300-700 K and 800-1150 K were observed for tungsten coatings. The retention behavior of deuterium in tungsten coatings was greatly different from that of bulk tungsten, which was related to the existence of oxygen.

  3. Optimum tungsten content in high strength 9 to 12% chromium containing creep resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Muraki, T.; Mimura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Tungsten containing ferritic creep resistant steels are the candidate materials for ultra-super-critical fossil power plant because of their high creep rupture strength. But the strengthening mechanisms by tungsten addition have not yet been completely studied. In this report, creep rupture time and creep strain rate measurement decided the optimum tungsten content in 9 to 12% chromium ferritic steels. The precipitation behavior of Laves phase and the precise discussion of creep strain rate analyses explain the contribution of Laves phase at the lath boundary and the contribution of tungsten in solid solution. P92 contains the optimum amount of tungsten and chromium, 1.8 mass% and 9 mass% respectively judging from the creep rupture strength point of view. (orig.)

  4. R and D on tungsten plasma facing components for the JET ITER-like wall project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piazza, G. [European Fusion Development Agreement, JET Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giovanni.piazza@jet.efda.org; Matthews, G.F. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Pamela, J. [European Fusion Development Agreement, JET Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Altmann, H. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Coad, J.P. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hirai, T. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Lioure, A. [European Fusion Development Agreement, JET Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Maier, H. [Association EURATOM-IPP Garching, P.O. Box 1322, D-85741 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Mertens, Ph. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Philipps, V. [Association EURATOM-Forschungszentrum Juelich (FZJ), D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Riccardo, V. [Association EURATOM-UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Royal Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-VR, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden); Villedieu, E. [Association EURATOM-CEA, Cadarache, DSM/DRFC, 13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-08-01

    Currently, the primary ITER materials choice is a full beryllium main wall with carbon fibre composite at the divertor strike points and tungsten on the upper vertical targets and dome. The full tungsten divertor option is a possibility for the subsequent D-T phase. Neither of the ITER material combinations of first wall and divertor materials has ever been tested in a tokamak. To collect operational experience at JET with ITER relevant material combination (Be, C and W) would reduce uncertainties and focus the preparation for ITER operations. Therefore, the ITER-like wall project has been launched to install in JET a tungsten divertor and a beryllium main wall. This paper describes the R and D activities carried out for the project to develop an inertially cooled bulk tungsten divertor tile, to fully characterise tungsten coating technologies for CFC divertor tiles and to develop erosion markers for use as diagnostics on beryllium tiles.

  5. On the shear strength of tungsten nano-structures with embedded helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.D.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Modification of plastic properties of tungsten nano-structures under shear stress load due to embedded helium atoms is studied using molecular dynamics modelling. The modelling demonstrates that the yield strength of tungsten nano-structures reduces significantly with increasing embedded helium concentration. At high helium concentrations (>10 at%), the yield strength decreases to values characteristic to the pressure in helium nano-bubbles, which are formed in tungsten under such conditions and thought to be responsible for the formation of nano-fuzz on tungsten surfaces irradiated with helium plasma. It is also shown that tungsten plastic flow strongly facilitates coagulation of helium clusters to larger bubbles. The temperature dependencies of the yield strength are obtained. (letter)

  6. Surface modification and droplet formation of tungsten under hot plasma irradiation at the GOL-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzhannikov, A. V.; Bataev, V. A.; Bataev, I. A.; Burdakov, A. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Ivantsivsky, M. V.; Kuklin, K. N.; Mekler, K. I.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Polosatkin, S. V.; Postupaev, V. V.; Sinitsky, S. L.; Shoshin, A. A.

    2013-07-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of tungsten surface modification after plasma loads at the multimirror trap GOL-3. Energy loads on tungsten surface varied from 2 up to 4 MJ/m2 per shot with sets from 1 to 9 repetitive irradiations that corresponds to loads higher than tungsten melting threshold and is close to ITER giant ELM loads. Targets surface modification and transverse microsections after irradiation was studied by optical microscopy, SEM and hardness tester. Formation on tungsten surface of three different crack networks with typical cell sizes of 1000, 10 and 0.3 μm and bubbles are identified. The network of large cracks extend perpendicularly to the irradiated sample surface to a depth of 50-350 μm. Erosion depth depends on energy loads - rises from 20 to 200 μm at 2 and 4 MJ/m2 correspondingly. Cracking, development of tungsten surface morphology and droplets splashing are discussed.

  7. Surface modification and droplet formation of tungsten under hot plasma irradiation at the GOL-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Bataev, V.A.; Bataev, I.A.; Burdakov, A.V.; Ivanov, I.A.; Ivantsivsky, M.V.; Kuklin, K.N.; Mekler, K.I.; Rovenskikh, A.F.; Polosatkin, S.V.; Postupaev, V.V.; Sinitsky, S.L.; Shoshin, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents experimental investigations of tungsten surface modification after plasma loads at the multimirror trap GOL-3. Energy loads on tungsten surface varied from 2 up to 4 MJ/m 2 per shot with sets from 1 to 9 repetitive irradiations that corresponds to loads higher than tungsten melting threshold and is close to ITER giant ELM loads. Targets surface modification and transverse microsections after irradiation was studied by optical microscopy, SEM and hardness tester. Formation on tungsten surface of three different crack networks with typical cell sizes of 1000, 10 and 0.3 μm and bubbles are identified. The network of large cracks extend perpendicularly to the irradiated sample surface to a depth of 50–350 μm. Erosion depth depends on energy loads – rises from 20 to 200 μm at 2 and 4 MJ/m 2 correspondingly. Cracking, development of tungsten surface morphology and droplets splashing are discussed

  8. Growth and characterization of α and β-phase tungsten films on various substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong-Seop; Cho, Jaehun; You, Chun-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    The growth conditions of tungsten thin films were investigated using various substrates including Si, Si/SiO 2 , GaAs, MgO, and Al 2 O 3 , and recipes were discovered for the optimal growth conditions of thick metastable β-phase tungsten films on Si, GaAs, and Al 2 O 3 substrates, which is an important material in spin orbit torque studies. For the Si/SiO 2 substrate, the crystal phase of the tungsten films was different depending upon the tungsten film thickness, and the transport properties were found to dramatically change with the thickness owing to a change in phase from the α + β phase to the α-phase. It is shown that the crystal phase changes are associated with residual stress in the tungsten films and that the resistivity is closely related to the grain sizes

  9. Two component tungsten powder injection molding – An effective mass production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antusch, Steffen; Commin, Lorelei; Mueller, Marcus; Piotter, Volker; Weingaertner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten and tungsten-alloys are presently considered to be the most promising materials for plasma facing components for future fusion power plants. The Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) divertor design concept for the future DEMO power plant is based on modular He-cooled finger units and the development of suitable mass production methods for such parts was needed. A time and cost effective near-net-shape forming process with the advantage of shape complexity, material utilization and high final density is Powder Injection Molding (PIM). This process allows also the joining of two different materials e.g. tungsten with a doped tungsten alloy, without brazing. The complete technological process of 2-Component powder injection molding for tungsten materials and its application on producing real DEMO divertor parts, characterization results of the finished parts e.g. microstructure, hardness, density and joining zone quality are discussed in this contribution

  10. Tungsten transport and sources control in JET ITER-like wall H-mode plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorczak, N., E-mail: nicolas.fedorczak@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Monier-Garbet, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Pütterich, T. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jlich, Assoc EURATOM-FZJ, Jlich (Germany); Devynck, P.; Dumont, R.; Goniche, M.; Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C. [MPI für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Matthews, G. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Istituto de plasmas e fusao nuclear, Lisboa (Portugal); Rimini, F. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EURATOM-CCFE Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Solano, E.R. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusin, Asociacin EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsalas, M. [Association EURATOM-Hellenic Republic, NCSR Demokritos 153 10, Attica (Greece); Vries, P. de [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    A set of discharges performed with the JET ITER-like wall is investigated with respect to control capabilities on tungsten sources and transport. In attached divertor regimes, increasing fueling by gas puff results in higher divertor recycling ion flux, lower divertor tungsten source, higher ELM frequency and lower core plasma radiation, dominated by tungsten ions. Both pedestal flushing by ELMs and divertor screening (including redeposition) are possibly responsible. For specific scenarios, kicks in plasma vertical position can be employed to increase the ELM frequency, which results in slightly lower core radiation. The application of ion cyclotron radio frequency heating at the very center of the plasma is efficient to increase the core electron temperature gradient and flatten electron density profile, resulting in a significantly lower central tungsten peaking. Beryllium evaporation in the main chamber did not reduce the local divertor tungsten source whereas core radiation was reduced by approximately 50%.

  11. Arsenic(3) extraction from fluoride-iodide solutions. Extraction-photometric determination of arsenic in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlova, V.A.; Spivakov, B.Ya.; Sharova, N.A.; Malyutina, T.M.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii)

    1977-01-01

    For developing a rapid and sensitive method of determining arsenic in tungsten, extraction of arsenic and tungsten from fluoride-chloride-iodide and fluoride-iodide solutions with the aid of carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, benzene, toluene and amyl acetate has been studied. It is established that optimum extractant for separating arsenic from tungsten and fluoride ions is CCl 4 . Since in the presence of HCl considerable quantity of HF and tungsten passes into the organic phase, introducing of HCl had to be renounced. Extraction of arsenic with carbon tetrachloride increases with the growth of KI concentration and with an increase of HF concentration in the aqueous phase. A procedure is given for extraction-photometric determination of arsenic in tungsten, based on extraction of arsenic with carbon tetrachloride and subsequent determination of arsenic in the form of reduced molybdoarsenic heteropolyacid. Arsenic detection limit is 1-10 -5 %. Relative standard deviation is 0.1 to 0.2

  12. Numerical simulation of CFC and tungsten target erosion in ITER-FEAT divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filatov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Physical, chemical and thermal surface erosion for water-cooled target armoured by CFC and tungsten is simulated by numerical code ERosion OF Immolated Layer (EROFIL-1). Some calculation results on the CFC and tungsten vertical target (VT) erosion in the ITER-FEAT divertor are presented for various operation modes (normal operations, slow transients, ELMs and disruptions). The main erosion mechanisms of CFC armour are the chemical and sublimation ones. Maximum erosion depth per 3000 cycles during normal operations and slow transients is of 2.7 mm at H phase and of 13.5 mm at DT phase. An evaluation of VT tungsten armour erosion per 3000 cycles of H and DT operations shows that no physical or chemical erosion as well as no melting are expected for tungsten armour at normal operations and slow transients. The tungsten armour melting at 2x10 6 ELMs is not allowable. The 300 disruptions are not dangerous in view of evaporation

  13. Electronic and structural properties of ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes by density functional theory calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shih-Jye; Lin, Ken-Huang; Li, Jia-Yun; Ju, Shin-Pon

    2014-01-01

    The simulated annealing basin-hopping method incorporating the penalty function was used to predict the lowest-energy structures for ultrathin tungsten nanowires and nanotubes of different sizes. These predicted structures indicate that tungsten one-dimensional structures at this small scale do not possess B.C.C. configuration as in bulk tungsten material. In order to analyze the relationship between multi-shell geometries and electronic transfer, the electronic and structural properties of tungsten wires and tubes including partial density of state and band structures which were determined and analyzed by quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, in order to understand the application feasibility of these nanowires and tubes on nano-devices such as field emitters or chemical catalysts, the electronic stability of these ultrathin tungsten nanowires was also investigated by density functional theory calculations.

  14. Phases containing tungsten in copper(I) positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stukan, R.A.; Vnukova, L.V.; Kil'yanov, Yu.N.; Polyakova, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    Tetragonal phase with the structure of the 123 type with the composition CdBa 2 Cu 2 WO 8 with full and selective substitution of Cu(1) positions for W atoms was synthesized from binary oxides CdWO 4 and BaCuO 2 at 800 Deg C in oxygen flow. Volumetric analysis and thermal gravimetric investigations were conducted. Phase content in the sample was no less than 90%, crystal lattice parameters were: a=b=0.4151(3) nm, c=1.2537(8) nm, peaks of X-ray pattern pointed to the availability of super structure with the twice of all three parameters in crystal cell [ru

  15. In-situ field-ion microscope study of the recovery behavior of heavy metal ion-irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, C.H.

    1977-06-01

    Three field ion microscope (FIM) experiments were carried out to study the annealing behavior of heavy ion irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum. The first experiment dealt with the stage I long-range migration of tungsten self interstitial atoms (SIAs) in high purity tungsten of resistivity ratio, R = 24,000 (R = rho 300 /rho 4 . 2 , where rho 300 and rho 4 . 2 are the room temperature and 0 0 C resistivities). The FIM specimens were irradiated in situ at 18 K with 30 keV W + ions to an average dose of 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 and subsequently examined by the pulsed-field evaporation technique. The second experiment dealt with the phenomenon of impurity atom trapping of SIAs during long-range migration. It was shown that rhenium atoms in a tungsten matrix tend to capture tungsten SIAs and remain bound up to temperatures as high as 390 K. The final experiment was concerned with the low temperature annealing kinetics of irradiated molybdenum. High purity molybdenum of resistivity ratio R = 5700 was irradiated at 10 K with 30 keV Mo + ions to a dose of approximately 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 . The results indicated that the electric field has only a minimal effect on the SIA annealing kinetics. This tends to strengthen the contention that the molybdenum SIA becomes mobile at 32 K

  16. Synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanosized powders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Yu-Wei [Graduate Institute of Applied Science, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Yang, Ko-Ho, E-mail: yangkoho@cc.kuas.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Science, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Department of Mold and Die Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kuo-Ming [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Dental Materials Research Center, National Kaohsiung University of Applied Sciences, 415 Chien-Kung Road, Kaohsiung 80782, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Sung-Wei [Metal Industries Research and Development Centre, 1001 Kaohsiung Highway, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Wang, Moo-Chin, E-mail: mcwang@kmu.edu.tw [Department of Fragrance and Cosmetics Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100, Shihchuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 80728, Taiwan (China)

    2011-06-16

    Highlights: > The thermal behavior of 3Y-TZP precursor powders had been investigated. > The crystallization behavior of 3Y-TZP nanopowders had been investigated. > The activation energy for crystallization of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} was obtained. > The growth morphology parameter n is approximated as 2.0. > The crystallites show a plate-like morphology. - Abstract: The synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanopowders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process at 348 K and pH = 7 were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The activation energy of tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} crystallization from 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders using a non-isothermal method, namely, 169.2 {+-} 21.9 kJ mol{sup -1}, was obtained. The growth morphology parameter n was approximated as 2.0, which indicated that it had a plate-like morphology. The XRD, Raman spectra, and SAED patterns showed that the phase of the tetragonal ZrO{sub 2} was maintained at 1273 K. The crystallite size of 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders calcined at 1273 K for 5 min was 21.3 nm.

  17. Formation Mechanism and Dispersion of Pseudo-Tetragonal BaTiO3-PVP Nanoparticles from Different Titanium Precursors: TiCl4 and TiO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized tetragonal BaTiO3 (BT particles that are well dispersed in solution are essential for the dielectric layer in multilayer ceramic capacitor technology. A hydrothermal process using TiCl4 and BaCl2, as source of Ti and Ba, respectively, or the precursor TiO2 as seed for the formation of BT, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a surfactant, was employed in this study to enhance both the dispersibility and tetragonality (c/a simultaneously in a single reaction process. The process parameters, i.e., the ratio of TiO2 substitution of TiCl4, the reaction time, and PVP content were systematically studied, and the growth mechanism and relation between the tetragonality and the particle size are discussed. Dynamic light scattering (DLS analysis was used to show that truncated pseudo-tetragonal BT-PVP particles with an average size of 100 nm, having a narrow size distribution and a coefficient of variation (CV as low as 20% and being mono-dispersed in water, were produced. The narrow particle size distribution is attributed to the ability of PVP to inhibit the growth of BT particles, and the high c/a of BT-PVP to heterogeneous particle growth using TiO2 seeds.

  18. Synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanosized powders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Yu-Wei; Yang, Ko-Ho; Chang, Kuo-Ming; Yeh, Sung-Wei; Wang, Moo-Chin

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The thermal behavior of 3Y-TZP precursor powders had been investigated. → The crystallization behavior of 3Y-TZP nanopowders had been investigated. → The activation energy for crystallization of tetragonal ZrO 2 was obtained. → The growth morphology parameter n is approximated as 2.0. → The crystallites show a plate-like morphology. - Abstract: The synthesis and crystallization behavior of 3 mol% yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (3Y-TZP) nanopowders prepared using a simple co-precipitation process at 348 K and pH = 7 were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry/thermogravimetry (DSC/TG), an X-ray diffractometer (XRD), the Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The activation energy of tetragonal ZrO 2 crystallization from 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders using a non-isothermal method, namely, 169.2 ± 21.9 kJ mol -1 , was obtained. The growth morphology parameter n was approximated as 2.0, which indicated that it had a plate-like morphology. The XRD, Raman spectra, and SAED patterns showed that the phase of the tetragonal ZrO 2 was maintained at 1273 K. The crystallite size of 3Y-TZP freeze-dried precursor powders calcined at 1273 K for 5 min was 21.3 nm.

  19. Arcing in ASDEX Upgrade with a tungsten first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, A.; Balden, M.; Laux, M.; Krieger, K.; Mueller, H.W.; Pugno, R.; Rohde, V.

    2009-01-01

    In-vessel inspections of AUG reveal arc tracks at different locations. This paper presents investigation of arcing at the inner transition and retention module where arc tracks were found around the whole toroidal circumference. A representative tile was investigated with profilometry, SEM, EDX, RBS, and colourimetry. Type 2 arc tracks with an area fraction of 12% were found in a 10 mm wide region near to the leading edge. Here the tungsten coating (3-4 μm) is removed and a small amount of carbon (max. 1-2 μm) is eroded. Droplets are detected at the surface. The region of the inner divertor where the arcs are observed shows a local enhancement of plasma density, n e ∼ 10 20 m -3 , and neutral pressure, 0.1 mbar, favouring the arc ignition. A high sheath potential at the beginning of an ELM might trigger the arc. The arc pattern and the target load as measured with a fast IR-camera coincide. 2 g of tungsten are eroded in the inner divertor. If 10% of the material is eroded as droplets, 10 8 droplets (5 μm diameter) are ejected.

  20. Prompt ignition of a unipolar arc on helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajita, Shin; Takamura, Shuichi; Ohno, Noriyasu

    2009-01-01

    A fibreform nanostructured layer is formed on a tungsten surface by helium plasma bombardment. The helium fluence was of the order of 10 26 m -2 , and the surface temperature and incident ion energy during helium irradiation were, respectively, 1900 K and 75 eV. By irradiating a laser pulse to the surface in the plasma, a unipolar arc, which many people have tried to verify in well-defined experiments, is promptly initiated and continued for a much longer time than the laser pulse width. The laser pulse width (∼0.6 ms) and power (∼5 MJ m -2 ) are similar to the heat load accompanied by type-I edge localized modes (ELMs) in ITER. The unipolar arc is verified from an increase in the floating potential, a moving arc spot detected by a fast camera and arcing traces on the surface. This result suggests that the nanostructure on the tungsten surface formed by the bombardment of helium, which is a fusion product, could significantly change the ignition property of arcing, and ELMs become a trigger of unipolar arcing, which would be a great impurity source in fusion devices. (letter)

  1. Preparation and performance of nanosized tungsten carbides for electrocatalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Peikang; Yin Shibin; Li Zihui; Chen Chan

    2010-01-01

    The principle of the intermittent microwave heating (IMH) method and the details on the working procedure for prepare nanosized materials were presented along with the comparison to the traditional continuous microwave heating (CMH) method. The nanosized tungsten carbides were synthesized as an example by this novel method. It produced WC with the average particle size of 21.4 nm at the procedure of 15 s-on and 15 s-off for 20 times, however, the particle size increased to 35.7 nm by CMH method for 5 min. The pure WC was obtained by post-treating the sample in NaOH solution, which gave the better performance as support. The nanosized WC was used as support for the Pt nanoparticles (Pt-WC/C(IMH)) for alcohol oxidation and oxygen reduction. It was proved that the Pt-WC/C(IMH) electrocatalysts gave the better performance than that prepared by CMH method (Pt-WC/C(CMH)) or Pt/C electrocatalysts in terms of the activity and CO-tolerance. The intermittent microwave heating method is easier to scale-up for mass production of the nanosized tungsten carbides and other nanosized materials as well.

  2. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of tungsten and molybdenum with dithiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navale, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Toluene-3,4-dithiol is a very sensitive reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of tungsten and molybdenum. Since the absorption spectra of the dithiol complexes of these two elements overlap, a separation of the two elements is carried out. This leads to time consuming extraction procedures. Measuring the absorption of the mixed complexes at two wavelengths and solving a set of simultaneous equations is also not favorable because a lot of time and effort is required for solving the simultaneous equations for each sample. A faster and simpler method is described here for the simultaneous determination of the two elements. The method is based on measurement of absorbance of the mixed complexes at three pre-selected wavelengths and simple calculations involving the absorbance differences. The criteria for selecting the three wavelengths and the theory are described. Application of the method for the determination of tungsten and molybdenum in ore samples is presented. The method is applicable to any similar system consisting of two interfering components. 4 figures, 2 tables, 6 refs. (author)

  3. Band gap engineering and optical properties of tungsten trioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Yuan; Li, Yan; Rocca, Dario; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia

    2012-02-01

    Tungsten trioxide (WO3) is a good photoanode material for water oxidation but it is not an efficient absorber of sunlight because of its large band gap (2.6 eV). Recently, stable clathrates of WO3 with interstitial N2 molecules were synthesized [1], which are isostructural to monoclinic WO3 but have a substantially smaller bang gap, 1.8 eV. We have studied the structural, electronic, an vibrational properties of N2-WO3 clathrates using ab-initio calculations and analyzed the physical origin of their gap reduction. We also studied the effect of atomic dopants, in particular rare gases. Substantial band gap reduction has been observed, especially in the case of doping with Xe, due to both electronic and structural effects. Absorption spectra have been computed by solving the Bethe-Salpeter Equation [2] to gain a thourough insight into the optical properties of pure and doped tungsten trioxide. [1] Q. Mi, Y. Ping, Y. Li., B.S. Brunschwig, G. Galli, H B. Gray, N S. Lewis (preprint) [2]D. Rocca, D. Lu and G. Galli, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 164109 (2010)

  4. Constitutive law for thermally-activated plasticity of recrystallized tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovev, Aleksandr; Terentyev, Dmitry; Dubinko, Andrii; Delannay, Laurent

    2017-12-01

    A physically-based constitutive law relevant for ITER-specification tungsten grade in as-recrystallized state is proposed. The material demonstrates stages III and IV of the plastic deformation, in which hardening rate does not drop to zero with the increase of applied stress. Despite the classical Kocks-Mecking model, valid at stage III, the strain hardening asymptotically decreases resembling a hyperbolic function. The material parameters are fitted by relying on tensile test data and by requiring that the strain and stress at the onset of diffuse necking (uniform elongation and ultimate tensile strength correspondingly) as well as the yield stress be reproduced. The model is then validated in the temperature range 300-600 °C with the help of finite element analysis of tensile tests which confirms the reproducibility of the experimental engineering curves up to the onset of diffuse necking, beyond which the development of ductile damage accelerates the material failure. This temperature range represents the low temperature application window for tungsten as divertor material in fusion reactor ITER.

  5. A reanalysis of resistive size effects in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sambles, J.R.; Mundy, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    A reanalysis of available data on the influence of surface scattering upon the resistivity of high-purity tungsten is presented. It is shown that some of the data appear to fit quite well to Soffer's model of surface scattering. From this new analysis values for the product rhosub(infinity)lambdasub(infinity) (bulk resistivity times bulk mean free path) may be obtained lying in the range 1.0-1.7 fΩ m 2 . Early data, which could not be interpreted using Fuchs' theory of surface scattering, may now be explained and yield surface roughness ratios (ratio of root mean square height of deviations from the mean surface to the Fermi wavelength) of the order of 0.2-2.5, typical of the value expected for atomically smooth to atomically rough surfaces. However, more recent data violate Soffer's theory in a convincing fashion. They illustrate fully the severe dangers of using a theory to interpret data for which it is not at all applicable. The Fermi surface of tungsten by no means approximates a simple sphere (one of the basic assumptions of the Soffer model). Hence such a naive treatment as Fuchs' leads to meaningless parameters such as quoted above. This paper is presented as a warning to all experimentalists who attempt to interpret data from metals with complex Fermi surfaces in a simple-minded fashion (e.g. using Fuchs' model). (author)

  6. Micro-powder injection moulding of tungsten; Prozessentwicklung fuer das Mikro-Pulverspritzgiessen von Wolfram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeep, B.

    2007-12-15

    For He-cooled Divertors as integral components of future fusion power plants, about 300000 complex shaped tungsten components are to be fabricated. Tungsten is the favoured material because of its excellent properties (high melting point, high hardness, high sputtering resistance, high thermal conductivity). However, the material's properties cause major problems for large scale production of complex shaped components. Due to the resistance of tungsten to mechanical machining, new fabrication technologies have to be developed. Powder injection moulding as a well established shaping technology for a large scale production of complex or even micro structured parts might be a suitable method to produce tungsten components for fusion applications but is not yet commercially available. The present thesis is dealing with the development of a powder injection moulding process for micro structured tungsten components. To develop a suitable feedstock, the powder particle properties, the binder formulation and the solid load were optimised. To meet the requirements for a replication of micro patterned cavities, a special target was to define the smallest powder particle size applicable for micro-powder injection moulding. To investigate the injection moulding performance of the developed feedstocks, experiments were successfully carried out applying diverse cavities with structural details in micro dimension. For debinding of the green bodies, a combination of solvent debinding and thermal debinding has been adopted for injection moulded tungsten components. To develop a suitable debinding strategy, a variation of the solvent debinding time, the heating rate and the binder formulation was performed. For investigating the thermal consolidation behaviour of tungsten components, sinter experiments were carried out applying tungsten powders suitable for micro-powder injection moulding. First mechanical tests of the sintered samples showed promising material properties such

  7. Experimental and numerical simulations of ELM-like transient damage behaviors to different grade tungsten and tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiang; Lian, Youyun; Chen, Lei; Chen, Zhenkui; Chen, Jiming; Duan, Xuru; Fan, Jinlian; Song, Jiupeng

    2015-01-01

    Transient heat loads, such as plasma disruptions and ELMs, could induce plastic deformations, cracking, melting, even fatigue cracks and creep of tungsten (W) surface. A high purity W, CVD-W coating, TiC dispersion strengthened and K doped tungsten alloys were tested in a 60 kW electron-beam facility by simulating the transient load events under different base temperatures. It was found that CVD-W, W-TiC and W-K alloys have higher crack thresholds than high purity W, meanwhile CVD-W is more sensitive to the crack disappearing at elevated base temperatures. On the other hand, repetitive pulse loading like ELMs can induce serious network cracks even the power density was quite lower than the crack threshold determined by a single shot. The ABAQUS code was used to simulate the crack behaviors of ITER grade pure W by a single shot and a FE-SAFE code was adopted to estimate the fatigue life under ELMs-like loads. A good agreement with experiment results was found

  8. Electrodeposition of metallic tungsten coating from binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.H.; Zhang, Y.C.; Jiang, F.; Fu, B.J.; Sun, N.B.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten is considered a promising plasma facing armor material for future fusion devices. An electrodeposited metallic tungsten coating from Na 2 WO 4 –WO 3 binary oxide molten salt on low activation steel (LAS) substrate was investigated in this paper. Tungsten coatings were deposited under various pulsed currents conditions at 1173 K in atmosphere. Cathodic current density and pulsed duty cycle were investigated for pulsed current electrolysis. The crystal structure and microstructure of tungsten coatings were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy X-ray dispersive analysis techniques. The results indicated that pulsed current density and duty cycle significantly influence tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. The average grain size of the coating becomes much larger with increasing cathodic current density, which demonstrates that appropriate high cathodic current density can accelerate the growth of grains on the surface of the substrate. The micro-hardness of tungsten coatings increases with the increasing thickness of coatings; the maximum micro-hardness is 482 HV. The prepared tungsten coatings have a smooth surface, a porosity of less than 1%, and an oxygen content of 0.024 wt%

  9. Fabrication of tungsten probe for hard tapping operation in atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Guebum, E-mail: hanguebum@live.co.kr [Department of Physics and Optical Engineering, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, 5500 Wabash Avenue, Terre Haute, Indiana 47803 (United States); Department of Mechanical Design and Robot Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Sok, E-mail: hsahn@seoultech.ac.kr [Manufacturing Systems and Design Engineering Programme, Seoul National University of Science & Technology, 232 Gongneung-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-743 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We propose a method of producing a tungsten probe with high stiffness for atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to acquire enhanced phase contrast images and efficiently perform lithography. A tungsten probe with a tip radius between 20 nm and 50 nm was fabricated using electrochemical etching optimized by applying pulse waves at different voltages. The spring constant of the tungsten probe was determined by finite element analysis (FEA), and its applicability as an AFM probe was evaluated by obtaining topography and phase contrast images of a Si wafer sample partly coated with Au. Enhanced hard tapping performance of the tungsten probe compared with a commercial Si probe was confirmed by conducting hard tapping tests at five different oscillation amplitudes on single layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). To analyze the damaged graphene sample, the test areas were investigated using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). The test results demonstrate that the tungsten probe with high stiffness was capable of inducing sufficient elastic and plastic deformation to enable obtaining enhanced phase contrast images and performing lithography, respectively. - Highlights: • We propose a method of producing highly stiff tungsten probes for hard tapping AFM. • Spring constant of tungsten probe is determined by finite element method. • Enhanced hard tapping performance is confirmed. • Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is used to identify damage to graphene.

  10. Effect on structure and mechanical property of tungsten irradiated by high intensity pulsed ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xianxiu; Zhang, Xiaonan; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Younian

    2017-09-01

    The anti-thermal radiation performance of tungsten was investigated by high intensity pulsed ion beam technology. The ion beam was mainly composed of Cn+ (70%) and H+ (30%) at an acceleration voltage of 250 kV under different energy densities for different number of pulses. GIXRD analysis showed that no obvious phase structural changes occurred on the tungsten, and microstress generated. SEM analysis exhibited that there was no apparent irradiation damage on the surface of tungsten at the low irradiation frequency (3 times and 10 times) and at the low energy density (0.25 J/cm2 and 0.7 J/cm2). Cracks appeared on the surface of tungsten after 100-time and 300-time irradiation. Shedding phenomenon even appeared on the surface of tungsten at the energy densities of 1.4 J/cm2 and 2.0 J/cm2. The surface nano-hardness of tungsten decreased with the increase of the pulse times and the energy density. The tungsten has good anti-thermal radiation properties under certain heat load environment.

  11. Precipitation formation in recrystallized nickel-plated non-sag tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, Z.H.

    1994-01-01

    It is well established that some metals, such as palladium and nickel, can easily penetrate into tungsten by fast diffusion via crystal defects such as grain boundaries and dislocations. As a result of the fast penetration of these so called activators the recrystallization temperature of heavily drawn non-sag tungsten wire can be lower from about 2,000 C to about 1,000 C, thus the application of the tungsten wire, serving as reinforcement material in metal matrix composites used at high temperatures, is limited. An interesting question is in which form these activators exist in the recrystallized tungsten wire. It is generally believed that W-Ni intermediate compounds could form in the recrystallized material, presumably at grain boundaries. The free energy difference between the pure tungsten fibbers and the precipitating W(Ni) solid solution was suggested as the chemical driving force which governed the recrystallization process. The presence of nickel in small particles had also been observed in recrystallized grains of nickel plated tungsten wires using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These particles were considered to be nickel rich precipitates. However, a detailed investigation of the precipitation process has not been reported. In the present work an investigation of the structure, composition and distribution of nickel rich particles precipitated in recrystallized grains of nickel plated heavily drawn non-sage tungsten wires was carried out using analytical electron microscopy (AEM)

  12. Smart tungsten alloys as a material for the first wall of a future fusion power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litnovsky, A.; Wegener, T.; Klein, F.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Rasinski, M.; Kreter, A.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Du, H.; Mayer, J.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Calvo, A.; Ordas, N.

    2017-06-01

    Tungsten is currently deemed as a promising plasma-facing material (PFM) for the future power plant DEMO. In the case of an accident, air can get into contact with PFMs during the air ingress. The temperature of PFMs can rise up to 1200 °C due to nuclear decay heat in the case of damaged coolant supply. Heated neutron-activated tungsten forms a volatile radioactive oxide which can be mobilized into the atmosphere. New self-passivating ‘smart’ alloys can adjust their properties to the environment. During plasma operation the preferential sputtering of lighter alloying elements will leave an almost pure tungsten surface facing the plasma. During an accident the alloying elements in the bulk are forming oxides thus protecting tungsten from mobilization. Good plasma performance and the suppression of oxidation are required for smart alloys. Bulk tungsten (W)-chroimum (Cr)-titanium (Ti) alloys were exposed together with pure tungsten (W) samples to the steady-state deuterium plasma under identical conditions in the linear plasma device PSI 2. The temperature of the samples was ~576 °C-715 °C, the energy of impinging ions was 210 eV matching well the conditions expected at the first wall of DEMO. Weight loss measurements demonstrated similar mass decrease of smart alloys and pure tungsten samples. The oxidation of exposed samples has proven no effect of plasma exposure on the oxidation resistance. The W-Cr-Ti alloy demonstrated advantageous 3-fold lower mass gain due to oxidation than that of pure tungsten. New yttrium (Y)-containing thin film systems are demonstrating superior performance in comparison to that of W-Cr-Ti systems and of pure W. The oxidation rate constant of W-Cr-Y thin film is 105 times less than that of pure tungsten. However, the detected reactivity of the bulk smart alloy in humid atmosphere is calling for a further improvement.

  13. Molecular dynamics and density functional simulations of tungsten nanostructure formation by helium plasma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, A.M.; Takayama, A.; Oda, Y.

    2014-10-01

    For the purposes of long-term use of tungsten diverter walls, it is necessary to suppress the surface deterioration due to the helium ash which induces the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures. In the present paper, the formation mechanisms of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures were explained by the four-step process which is composed of the penetration process, the diffusion and agglomeration process, the helium bubble growth process and the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure formation process. The first to third step processes of the four-step process were investigated by using binary collision approximation, density functional theory and molecular dynamics, respectively. Furthermore, newly developed molecular dynamics and Monte-Carlo hybrid simulation has successfully reproduced the early formation process of tungsten fuzzy nanostructure. From these simulations, we here suggest the following key mechanisms of the formations of helium bubbles and tungsten fuzzy nanostructures: (1) By comparison between helium, neon, argon and hydrogen, the noble gas atoms can agglomerate limitlessly not only at a vacancy but also at an interstitial site. In particular, at the low incident energy, only helium atoms bring about the nucleation for helium bubble. (2) In the helium bubble growth process, the strain of the tungsten material around a helium atom is released as a dislocation loop, which is regarded as the loop punching phenomenon. (3) In the tungsten nanostructure formation process, the bursting of a helium bubble forms cavity and convexity in the surface. The helium bubbles tend to be grown and to burst at the cavity region, and then the difference of height between the cavity and convexity on the surface are enhanced. Consequently, the tungsten fuzzy nanostructure is formed. (author)

  14. Tissue distribution of tungsten in mice following oral exposure to sodium tungstate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guandalini, Gustavo S; Zhang, Lingsu; Fornero, Elisa; Centeno, Jose A; Mokashi, Vishwesh P; Ortiz, Pedro A; Stockelman, Michael D; Osterburg, Andrew R; Chapman, Gail G

    2011-04-18

    Heavy metal tungsten alloys have replaced lead and depleted uranium in many munitions applications, due to public perception of these elements as environmentally unsafe. Tungsten materials left in the environment may become bioaccessible as tungstate, which might lead to population exposure through water and soil contamination. Although tungsten had been considered a relatively inert and toxicologically safe material, recent research findings have raised concerns about possible deleterious health effects after acute and chronic exposure to this metal. This investigation describes tissue distribution of tungsten in mice following oral exposure to sodium tungstate. Twenty-four 6-9 weeks-old C57BL/6 laboratory mice were exposed to different oral doses of sodium tungstate (0, 62.5, 125, and 200 mg/kg/d) for 28 days, and after one day, six organs were harvested for trace element analysis with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Kidney, liver, colon, bone, brain, and spleen were analyzed by sector-field high-resolution ICP-MS. The results showed increasing tungsten levels in all organs with increased dose of exposure, with the highest concentration found in the bones and the lowest concentration found in brain tissue. Gender differences were noticed only in the spleen (higher concentration of tungsten in female animals), and increasing tungsten levels in this organ were correlated with increased iron levels, something that was not observed for any other organ or either of the two other metals analyzed (nickel and cobalt). These findings confirmed most of what has been published on tungsten tissue distribution; they also showed that the brain is relatively protected from oral exposure. Further studies are necessary to clarify the findings in splenic tissue, focusing on possible immunological effects of tungsten exposure.

  15. Tungsten coatings electro-deposited on CFC substrates from oxide molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ningbo; Zhang, Yingchun; Lang, Shaoting; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Lili

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten is considered as plasma facing material in fusion devices because of its high melting point, its good thermal conductivity, its low erosion rate and its benign neutron activation properties. On the other hand, carbon based materials like C/C fiber composites (CFC) have been used for plasma facing materials (PFMs) due to their high thermal shock resistance, light weight and high strength. Tungsten coatings on CFC substrates are used in the JET divertor in the frame of the JET ITER-like wall project, and have been prepared by plasma spray (PS) and other techniques. In this study, tungsten coatings were electro-deposited on CFC from Na2WO4-WO3 molten salt under various deposition parameters at 900 °C in air. In order to obtain tungsten coatings with excellent performance, the effects of pulse duration ratio and pulse current density on microstructures and crystal structures of tungsten coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Rigaku Industrial Co., Ltd., D/MAX-RB) and a scanning electron microscope (SEM, JSM 6480LV). It is found that the pulsed duration ratio and pulse current density had a significant influence on tungsten nucleation and electro-crystallization phenomena. SEM observation revealed that intact, uniform and dense tungsten coatings formed on the CFC substrates. Both the average grain size and thickness of the coating increased with the pulsed current density. The XRD results showed that the coatings consisted of a single phase of tungsten with the body centered cubic (BCC) structure. The oxygen content of electro-deposited tungsten coatings was lower than 0.05%, and the micro-hardness was about 400 HV.

  16. Structural stability of super duplex stainless weld metals and its dependence on tungsten and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, J.O.; Wilson, A.; Huhtala, T.; Karlsson, L.; Jonsson, P.

    1996-01-01

    Three different superduplex stainless weld metals have been produced using manual metal arc welding under identical welding conditions. The concentration of the alloying elements tungsten and copper corresponded to the concentrations in commercial superduplex stainless steels (SDSS). Aging experiments in the temperature range 700 C to 1,110 C showed that the formation of intermetallic phase was enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal and also dissolved at higher temperatures compared with tungsten-poor and tungsten-free weld metals. It could be inferred from time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams produced in the present investigation that the critical cooling rate to avoid 1 wt pct of intermetallic phase was 2 times faster for tungsten-rich weld metal. Microanalysis in combination with thermodynamic calculations showed that tungsten was accommodated in χ phase, thereby decreasing the free energy. Experimental evidence supports the view that the formation of intermetallic phase is enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal, owing to easier nucleation of nonequilibrium χ phase compared with σ phase. The formation of secondary austenite (γ 2 ) during welding was modeled using the thermodynamic computer program Thermo-Calc. Satisfactory agreement between theory and practice was obtained. Thermo-Calc was capable of predicting observed lower concentrations of chromium and nitrogen in γ 2 compared with primary austenite. The volume fraction of γ 2 was found to be significantly higher in tungsten-rich and tungsten + copper containing weld metal. The results could be explained by a higher driving force for precipitation of γ 2 in these

  17. Structural stability of super duplex stainless weld metals and its dependence on tungsten and copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, J.-O.; Huhtala, T.; Jonsson, P.; Karlsson, L.; Wilson, A.

    1996-08-01

    Three different superduplex stainless weld metals have been produced using manual metal arc welding under identical welding conditions. The concentration of the alloying elements tungsten and copper corresponded to the concentrations in commercial superduplex stainless steels (SDSS). Aging experiments in the temperature range 700 °C to 1110 °C showed that the formation of intermetallic phase was enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal and also dissolved at higher temperatures compared with tungsten-poor and tungsten-free weld metals. It could be inferred from time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams produced in the present investigation that the critical cooling rate to avoid 1 wt pct of intermetallic phase was 2 times faster for tungsten-rich weld metal. Microanalysis in combination with thermodynamic calculations showed that tungsten was accommodated in χ phase, thereby decreasing the free energy. Experimental evidence supports the view that the formation of intermetallic phase is enhanced in tungsten-rich weld metal, owing to easier nucleation of nonequilibrium χ phase compared with σ phase. The formation of secondary austenite (γ2) during welding was modeled using the thermodynamic computer program Thermo-Calc. Satisfactory agreement between theory and practice was obtained. Thermo-Calc was capable of predicting observed lower concentrations of chromium and nitrogen in γ2 compared with primary austenite. The volume fraction of γ2 was found to be significantly higher in tungsten-rich and tungsten + copper containing weld metal. The results could be explained by a higher driving force for precipitation of γ2 in these.

  18. Solvent Extraction of Tungsten(VI) from Moderate Hydrochloric Acid Solutions with LIX 63

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truong, Hoai Thanh; Lee, Man Seung [Mokpo National University, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Hwan [Incheon Technology Service Centre, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The solvent extraction of tungsten(VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions using 5,8-diethyl-7-hydroxydodecan-6-one oxime (LIX 63) was analyzed in solutions having an initial pH range from 2 to 5, by varying the concentration of metal and extractant. In our experimental range, the cationic exchange reaction as well as the solvation reaction occurred simultaneously. The cation exchange reaction was identified by applying a slope analysis method to the extraction data. The existence of cationic tungsten(VI) species was confirmed by ion exchange experiments with Diphonix resin at pH 3. Further study is needed to identify the nature of this tungsten cationic species.

  19. Preservation of Earth-forming events in the tungsten isotopic composition of modern flood basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizo, Hanika; Walker, Richard J.; Carlson, Richard W.; Horan, Mary F.; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Manthos, Vicky; Francis, Don; Jackson, Matthew G.

    2016-05-01

    How much of Earth's compositional variation dates to processes that occurred during planet formation remains an unanswered question. High-precision tungsten isotopic data from rocks from two large igneous provinces, the North Atlantic Igneous Province and the Ontong Java Plateau, reveal preservation to the Phanerozoic of tungsten isotopic heterogeneities in the mantle. These heterogeneities, caused by the decay of hafnium-182 in mantle domains with high hafnium/tungsten ratios, were created during the first ~50 million years of solar system history, indicating that portions of the mantle that formed during Earth’s primary accretionary period have survived to the present.

  20. Self-castellation of tungsten monoblock under high heat flux loading and impact of material properties

    OpenAIRE

    Panayotis, S.; Hirai, T.; Wirtz, Marius; Barabash, V.; Durocher, A.; Escourbiac, F.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th.; Merola, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Uytdenhouwen, I.

    2017-01-01

    In the full-tungsten divertor qualification program at ITER Organization, macro-cracks, so called self-castellation were found in a fraction of tungsten monoblocks during cyclic high heat flux loading at 20MW/m2. The number of monoblocks with macro-cracks varied with the tungsten products used as armour material. In order to understand correlation between the macro-crack appearance and W properties, an activity to characterize W monoblock materials was launched at the IO. The outcome highligh...

  1. Status of technology R&D for the ITER tungsten divertor monoblock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirai, T., E-mail: takeshi.hirai@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Escourbiac, F.; Barabash, V.; Durocher, A.; Fedosov, A.; Ferrand, L.; Jokinen, T.; Komarov, V.; Merola, M.; Carpentier-Chouchana, S. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Arkhipov, N. [Project Center ITER, 1, Building 3, Kurchatov Sq., 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuznetcov, V.; Volodin, A. [NIIEFA, 3 doroga na Metallostroy, Metallostroy, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Suzuki, S.; Ezato, K.; Seki, Y. [JAEA, Fusion Research and Development Directorate JAEA, 801-1 Mukouyama, Naka, Ibaragi 311-0193 (Japan); Riccardi, B.; Bednarek, M.; Gavila, P. [F4E, c/Josep Pla, n.2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, E-08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    In order to develop and validate the high performance tungsten monoblock technology, the full-tungsten divertor qualification program was defined. As the first step, small-scale mock-ups were manufactured and successfully tested under the required high heat flux loads. The test results demonstrated that the technology is available in Japan and Europe. Post-tests observation of the loaded W monoblocks showed generation of self-castellation – a crack along coolant tube axis. The cause of the self-castellation was discussed and a tungsten material characterization program is being developed with the objective to understand mechanical properties that influence the occurrence of the self-castellation.

  2. Measurements of carbon and tungsten erosion/deposition in the DIII-D divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastasz, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Cuthbertson, J.W.; Buchenauer, D.A.; Brooks, N.; Junge, R.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1994-01-01

    Net erosion/deposition rates of carbon and tungsten were measured at the outer strike point of the divertor plasma on the floor of the DIII-D tokamak during deuterium H-mode operation at a peak power deposition of about 40 W/cm 2 . For carbon, net erosion rates of up to 4 nm/s were found. For a tungsten film, no appreciable erosion was detected. However, measurements of deposited tungsten on adjacent carbon surfaces indicated a net W erosion rate of 0.06 nm/s

  3. Study of neutron induced outgassing from tungsten alloy for ATLAS FCAL

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, C; Cheplakov, A P; Golikov, V; Golubyh, S M; Kulagin, E; Kukhtin, V; Luschikov, V

    1999-01-01

    The use of sintered tungsten alloy slugs as absorber in the ATLAS Forward Calorimeter (FCAL) raised concern that it could possibly poison the liquid argon during the detector operation in the hard radiation environment expected at LHC. A vacuum container filled with tungsten slugs was exposed to the fast neutron fluence of 1.5$\\cdot$10$^{16}$~n~cm$^{-2}$ at the IBR-30 reactor of JINR, Dubna. The residual gas pressure was analysed. The study was completed by mass spectrometer measurements. An upper limit value of 0.1~ppm was determined for the pollution of liquid argon in FCAL due to outgassing from tungsten slugs under irradiation.

  4. Recovery of Tungsten Surface with Fiber-Form Nanostructure by Plasmas Exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Takanori; Takamura, Shuichi; Kurishita, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    One of the serious concerns for tungsten materials in fusion devices is the radiation defects caused by helium plasma irradiation since helium is a fusion product. The fiber-formed nanostructure is thought to have a possible weakness against the plasma heat flux on the plasma-facing component and also may destroy the reflectivity of optical mirrors. In this paper an interesting method for the recovery of such tungsten surfaces is shown. The recovery process depends on the grade and manufacturing process of tungsten materials. (fusion engineering)

  5. Deuterium removal from radiation damage in tungsten by isotopic exchange with hydrogen atomic beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Markelj, S.; Efimov, V. S.; Gasparyan, Yu M.

    2016-09-01

    The tungsten samples were pre-irradiated with self-ions to create radiation-induced defects and then exposed to the deuterium atomic beam. The deuterium removal was studied by isotopic exchange with atomic hydrogen beam. Modification of the deuterium depth profile in self-ion irradiated tungsten under isotopic exchange up to a depth of 6 μm was measured in- situ by nuclear reaction analysis. The total deuterium retention after isotopic exchange was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. It is shown that the efficiency of the deuterium removal increases with increasing of the hydrogen incident flux, incident energy and temperature of the tungsten sample.

  6. In situ transmission electron microscope observation of the formation of fuzzy structures on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, M; Watanabe, T; Nagashima, H; Nishijima, D; Doerner, R P; Krasheninnikov, S I; Sagara, A; Yoshida, N

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the formation processes of tungsten nano-structures, so called fuzz, in situ transmission electron microscope observations during helium ion irradiation and high temperature annealing have been performed. The irradiation with 3 keV He + from room temperature to 1273 K is found to cause high-density helium bubbles in tungsten with no significant change in the surface structure. At higher temperatures, surface morphology changes were observed even without helium irradiation due probably to surface diffusion of tungsten atoms driven by surface tension. It is clearly shown that this morphology change is enhanced with helium irradiation, i.e. the formation of helium bubbles. (paper)

  7. The determination of oxygen in molybdenum and tungsten monocrystals taking into account the surface oxygen contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, V.D.; Egiazarov, B.G.; Polyakova, I.S.; Sel'dyakov, Yu.P.; Chernyavskij, V.T.

    1977-01-01

    The method has been developed for determining oxygen content in molybdenum and tungsten usign the neutron activation analysis. The sensitivity is 1.6X10 -5 and 1.3x10 -3 wt.% for molybdenum and tungsten, respectively. The density of oxygen distribution in surface layers has been experimentally evaluated. It is shown that the oxygen presence in a surface layer of molybdenum and tungsten does not impede oxygen determination in the bulk of the sample, when the oxygen content is >5x10 -5 wt.%. If oxygen content is -3 wt.%, the presence of oxygen in the surface layer should be taken into account

  8. Investigation on the structural and mechanical properties of anti-sticking sputtered tungsten chromium nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tai-Nan [Chemical Engineering Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan, ROC (China); Han, Sheng [Department of Leisure and Recreation Management, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China); Weng, Ko-Wei, E-mail: kowei@nqu.edu.tw [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Quemoy University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, Chin-Tan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Quemoy University, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-02-01

    Tungsten chromium nitride (WCrN) thin films are prepared by dual-gun co-sputter process. As the surface coatings on the molding die for glass forming, WCrN films show less deterioration at high temperature than the conventional CrN coating. WCrN thin films are deposited via the reactive co-sputtering of Cr/W targets. The working pressure is kept at 2.66 Pa and the argon/nitrogen ratio is 10. Applied power of chromium is fixed and the applied power of tungsten is varied. Experimental results indicate that the atomic ratio of tungsten in the films increases with the applied power of tungsten. The dominant crystalline phase is chromium nitride when the tungsten target power is below 100 W, while tungsten nitride dominates in the film structure when the tungsten target power is beyond 200 W. A dense structure with much finer particles is developed as the tungsten power is 200 W. As the power is increased to 300 W, the particles become coarser in size. The film roughness exhibits a decreasing trend at low tungsten power and then increases as the tungsten power increased up to 300 and 400 W, presumably due to the phase change from chromium nitrides to tungsten nitrides. Further annealing of the WCrN thin films is simulated as the glass molding condition to check the anti-sticking property which is a critical requirement in molding die surface coating application. The WCrN thin film coating shows good anti-sticking property at 400 °C annealing when the tungsten target power is 200 W. - Highlights: ► WCrN films are deposited by dual sputtering of pure Cr and W targets. ► The covalent bonding character of WCrN films explains the difference in hardness. ► WCrN (200 W W-target-power/400 °C-annealing) exhibits the best anti-sticking performance.

  9. Hydrogen and helium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by RF plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazunari Katayama; Kazumi Imaoka; Takayuki Okamura; Masabumi Nishikawa

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of tritium behavior in plasma facing materials is an important issue for fusion reactor from viewpoints of fuel control and radiation safety. Tungsten is used as a plasma facing material in the divertor region of ITER. However, investigation of hydrogen isotope behavior in tungsten deposition layer is not sufficient so far. It is also necessary to evaluate an effect of helium on a formation of deposition layer and an accumulation of hydrogen isotopes because helium generated by fusion reaction exists in fusion plasma. In this study, tungsten deposition layers were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen and helium RF plasma. An erosion rate and a deposition rate of tungsten were estimated by weight measurement. Hydrogen and helium retention were investigated by thermal desorption method. Tungsten deposition was performed using a capacitively-coupled RF plasma device equipped with parallel-plate electrodes. A tungsten target was mounted on one electrode which is supplied with RF power at 200 W. Tungsten substrates were mounted on the other electrode which is at ground potential. The plasma discharge was continued for 120 hours where pressure of hydrogen or helium was controlled to be 10 Pa. The amounts of hydrogen and helium released from deposition layers was quantified by a gas chromatograph. The erosion rate of target tungsten under helium plasma was estimated to be 1.8 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. The deposition rate on tungsten substrate under helium plasma was estimated to be 4.1 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. Atomic ratio of hydrogen to tungsten in a deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma was estimated to be 0.17 by heating to 600 o C. From a deposition layer formed by helium plasma, not only helium but also hydrogen was released by heating to 500 o C. Atomic ratios of helium and hydrogen to tungsten were estimated to be 0.080 and 0.075, respectively. The trapped hydrogen is probably impurity hydrogen

  10. Fabrication of Tungsten-UO 2 Hexagonal-Celled Fuel-Element Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, R.R.; Cover, P.W.; Gripshover, P.J.; Wilson, W.J.

    1964-12-04

    The gas-pressure-bonding process is being evaluated as a means of fabricating tungsten-UO 2 hexagonal-celled fuel geometries. A two-part study was initiated to optimize the fuel materials and to develp the required fixturing and loading techniques. Production of fueled tungsten-coated UO 2 particles in in progress so that geometries embodying coated particles or coated particles plus fine tungsten powder can be evaluated. Tests to data have shown the rquirement for a pretreatment in which a gaseous oxide phase is removed. Initial loading and fixturing procedures were proven satisfactory by the fabrication of a 19-cylindrical-hole hexagonal-type composite.

  11. Electron stimulated desorption study of oxygen adsorption on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prince, R.H.; Floyd, G.R.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen on a polycrystalline tungsten surface at approximately 800 K has been studied by means of electron stimulated desorption (ESD). Although precision gas dosing was not employed, the initial sticking probability for dissociative adsorption appears to be essentially unity, while the variation with coverage suggests that a high degree of order exists and that precursor state kinetics are significant. A most noticeable and reproducible discontinuity in ESD parameters occurs at a fractional coverage theta approximately 0.8 (exposure approximately 1.4 X 10 15 molecules/cm 2 incident) which is interpreted as an order-disorder transition within a single (β 1 ) chemisorption state, and results in an increase in the ionic desorption cross-section by a factor of approximately 1.26. A discussion of the adsorption kinetics and the disorder transition is given in terms of current models of dissociative adsoption which include the effects of nearest neighbour lateral interactions. (Auth.)

  12. Photochemical reactions of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls with dimethylglyoxime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hassan A.

    2006-02-01

    Sunlight irradiation of the reactions of [M(CO) 6], M=Cr, Mo and W with dimethylglyoxime (H 2dmg) in THF were investigated. The reaction of [Cr(CO) 6] with H 2dmg resulted in the formation of the square pyramidal complex [CrO(H 2dmg) 2] (1). The H 2dmg coordinated the metal from the two nitrogen atoms. The corresponding reactions of molybdenum and tungsten carbonyls yielded the binuclear oxo complex [(H 2dmg)O 2M(μ-O) 2MO 2(H 2dmg)] (2, 3). Unusual bonding of H 2dmg was observed with the formation of six membered chelates. All complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, infrared, mass and 1H NMR spectroscopy. The UV-vis spectra of the complexes showed visible bands due to ligand-to-metal charge transfer. Thermal properties of the complexes were investigated by thermogravimetry (TG) technique.

  13. Dissimilar Brazed Joints Between Steel and Tungsten Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, I.; Geanta, V.; Binchiciu, H.; Iovanas, D.; Stefanoiu, R.

    2017-06-01

    Brazing is a joining process used to obtain heterogeneous assemblies between different materials, such as steels, irons, non-ferrous metals, ceramics etc. Some application, like asphalt cutters, require quick solutions to obtain dissimilar joints at acceptable costs, given the very short period of operation of these parts. This paper presents some results obtained during the brazing of dissimilar joints between steel and tungsten carbide by using different types of Ag-Cu system filler materials alloyed with P and Sn. The brazing techniques used were oxygen-gas flame and induction joining. The brazing behaviour was analysed in cross sections by optical and electron microscopy. The metallographic analysis enhanced the adhesion features and the length of penetration in the joining gap. The melting range of the filler materials was measured using thermal analysis.

  14. Reflection properties of hydrogen ions at helium irradiated tungsten surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, K; Tawada, Y; Kato, S; Sasao, M; Kenmotsu, T; Wada, M; Lee, H T; Ueda, Y; Tanaka, N; Kisaki, M; Nishiura, M; Matsumoto, Y; Yamaoka, H

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured W surfaces prepared by He bombardment exhibit characteristic angular distributions of hydrogen ion reflection upon injection of 1 keV H + beam. A magnetic momentum analyzer that can move in the vacuum chamber has measured the angular dependence of the intensity and the energy of reflected ions. Broader angular distributions were observed for He-irradiated tungsten samples compared with that of the intrinsic polycrystalline W. Both intensity and energy of reflected ions decreased in the following order: the polycrystalline W, the He-bubble containing W, and the fuzz W. Classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulations based on Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target code suggests that lower atom density near the surface can make the reflection coefficients lower due to increasing number of collisions. (paper)

  15. Weld pool oscillation during gas tungsten arc welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, You Hong

    The oscillation behavior of Gas Tungsten Arc (GTA) weld pools in mild steels Fe 360 and in austenitic stainless steel AISI 304 is considered. Special attention is given to the possibility of using the weld pool oscillation behavior as a sensor of weld pool geometry during welding, which is one of the objectives in adaptive control of the welding process. The topics discussed include the theoretical background of the oscillation phenomenon, the direct observation of weld pool oscillation, the experimental determination of the relation between the weld pool geometry and the oscillation frequency both under stationary arc conditions and under traveling arc conditions and the possibility of sensing the weld pool geometry, especially the weld pool penetration, by monitoring the oscillation frequency.

  16. Electron beam treatment of tungsten mock-ups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalavutdinov, R.; Novokhatsky, A.; Gusev, V.; Bukhovets, V.; Gorodetsky, A.; Kuznetsov, V.; Litunovsky, N.; Makhankov, A.; Mazul, I.; Mukhin, E.; Petrov, Yu; Rybkina, T.; Sakharov, N.; Tolstyakov, S.; Voronin, A.; Zakharov, A.

    2017-12-01

    To simulate thermal loads in ITER several tungsten (W) water cooled mock-ups were treated by a scanning electron beam (Tsefey-M) at a heat flux up to 1.68 GW m‑2 for a duration of 18 μs and a frequency about 30 kHz. Surface morphology, chemical composition, structure, and microhardness of formed W layers were analyzed by SEM, EPMA, XRD, OM, and Vickers hardness tester. The irradiation treatment resulted in W melting to a depth of 0.3 mm, increasing sub-surface grain sizes, grain ordering in the metal bulk, deep cracking, and decreasing of microhardness to a depth of 2–4 mm. Installation of the pre-damaged W samples in a tokamak Globus-M divertor did not change practically discharge conditions.

  17. Deuterium retention in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hai-Shan; Xu, Yu-Ping; Sun, Ning-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Oya, Yasuhisa; Zhao, Ming-Zhong; Mao, Hong-Min; Ding, Fang; Liu, Feng; Luo, Guang-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We investigate D retention in electrodeposition W coatings. • W coatings are exposed to D plasmas in the EAST tokamak. • A cathodic current density dependence on D retention is found. • Electrodeposition W exhibits lower D retention than VPS-W. - Abstract: Molten salt electrodeposition is a promising technology to manufacture the first wall of a fusion reactor. Deuterium (D) retention behavior in molten salt electrodeposition tungsten (W) coatings has been investigated by D-plasma exposure in the EAST tokamak and D-ion implantation in an ion beam facility. Tokamak exposure experiments demonstrate that coatings prepared with lower current density exhibit less D retention and milder surface damage. Deuterium-ion implantation experiments indicate the D retention in the molten salt electrodeposition W is less than that in vacuum plasma spraying W and polycrystalline W.

  18. CO tolerance effects of tungsten-based PEMFC anodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Luis Gustavo S.; Santos, Fatima R. dos; Pereira, Maristela E.; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Ticianelli, Edson A.

    2006-01-01

    The performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) fed with CO-contaminated hydrogen was investigated for anodes with PtWO x /C and phosphotungstic acid (PTA) impregnated Pt/C electrocatalysts. A quite high performance was achieved for the PEMFC fed with H 2 + 100 ppm CO with anodes containing 0.4 mg PtWO x cm -2 and also for those with 0.4 mg Pt cm -2 impregnated with ca. 1 mg PTA cm -2 . A decay of the single cell performance with time is observed, and this was attributed to an increase of the membrane resistance due to the polymer degradation promoted by the crossover of the tungsten species throughout the membrane

  19. The electronic work function of the different faces of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modinos, A.

    1978-01-01

    A semi-empirical theory of the electronic work function of the different faces of tungsten is presented. All the parameters entering the theory, except one, are estimated independently. The one adjustable parameter relates to the isotropic contribution to the work function, and, can, in principle, be determined from a self-consistent calculation of the band-structure of the energy levels in the bulk of the metal. The calculated values for the work function are in reasonably good agreement with available experimental data for practically all of the crystallographic planes with the exception of the (100) plane. For the latter, the calculated value is 0.3 eV above the experimental value. It is suggested that a negative contribution to the surface dipole potential from surface states, that exist on this plane, may be the reason of this discrepancy. (Auth.)

  20. Investigation of cascade effect failure for tungsten armour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, A.; Barabash, V.; Berkhov, N.; Divavin, V.; Giniatullin, R.; Grigoriev, S.; Ibbott, C.; Komarov, V.; Labusov, A.; Mazul, I.; McDonald, J.; Tanchuk, V.; Youchison, D.

    2001-01-01

    The glancing angle of incident power on the target of a tokamak divertor results in doubled and highly peaked heat flux onto adjacent downstream tile in the case of lost of tile event (LOTE). As a result downstream tile has higher probability to fail resulting in triple loads to the next downstream tile and so on (cascade effect). This paper devoted to analytical and experimental investigation of the cascade effect failure for the flat tile option of tungsten armoured plasma facing components. Armour geometry resistant to the cascade effect failure was selected on the base of thermal and stress analyses. Experimental investigation of the LOTE has been performed also. Small size W/Cu mock-up withstood not only LOTE simulation load, but also survived afterwards for 1500 cycles at 26-28 MW/m 2 without damage in joint

  1. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  2. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  3. Simulations of thermionic suppression during tungsten transient melting experiments.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komm, Michael; Tolias, P.; Ratynskaia, S.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Gunn, J. P.; Krieger, K.; Podolník, Aleš; Pitts, R.A.; Pánek, Radomír

    T170, December (2017), č. článku 014069. ISSN 0031-8949. [PFMC 2017: 16th International Conference on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications. Düsseldorf, 16.05.2017-19.05.2017] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14228S; GA MŠk(CZ) 8D15001 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : tokamak * thermionic emission * tungsten * melt * plasma-facing component Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: 1.3 Physical sciences Impact factor: 1.280, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1402-4896/aa9209

  4. Colour centres in amorphous tungsten trioxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleperis, J.J.; Cikmach, P.D.; Lusis, A.R.

    1984-01-01

    Magnetic, optical, and electrical properties of thin tungsten trioxide (a-WO 3 ) films obtained on substrates with different temperatures and annealed in air and vacuum are investigated. On the basis of these results and recent structural investigations a structure model of the a-WO 3 film is given: a spatial network of tightly bounded clusters which are built from hydrated WO 6 octahedra. These octahedra contain terminal oxygens and being axially distorted they are the sites for localization of injected electrons. The colour centres formed are paramagnetic (ESR signal from W 5+ ) and their optical absorption is satisfactorily described by the intervalence charge transfer between the localized states of W 5+ and W 6+ ions. (author)

  5. Crystallization kinetics of amorphous aluminum-tungsten thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Car, T.; Radic, N. [Rugjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia). Div. of Mater. Sci.; Ivkov, J. [Institute of Physics, Bijenicka 46, P.O.B. 304, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Babic, E.; Tonejc, A. [Faculty of Sciences, Physics Department, Bijenicka 32, P.O.B. 162, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    1999-01-01

    Crystallization kinetics of the amorphous Al-W thin films under non-isothermal conditions was examined by continuous in situ electrical resistance measurements in vacuum. The estimated crystallization temperature of amorphous films in the composition series of the Al{sub 82}W{sub 18} to Al{sub 62}W{sub 38} compounds ranged from 800 K to 920 K. The activation energy for the crystallization and the Avrami exponent were determined. The results indicated that the crystallization mechanism in films with higher tungsten content was a diffusion-controlled process, whereas in films with the composition similar to the stoichiometric compound (Al{sub 4}W), the interface-controlled crystallization probably occurred. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab., 26 refs.

  6. Tungsten Z-Pinch Long Implosions on the Saturn Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS, MELISSA R.; DEENEY, Christopher; SPIELMAN, RICK B.; COVERDALE, CHRISTINE A.; RODERICK, N.F.; HAINES, M.G.

    1999-01-01

    Recent success on the Saturn and Z accelerators at Sandia National Laboratories have demonstrated the ability to scale z-pinch parameters to increasingly larger current pulsed power facilities. Next generation machines will require even larger currents (>20 MA), placing further demands on pulsed power technology. To this end, experiments have been carried out on Saturn operating in a long pulse mode, investigating the potential of lower voltages and longer implosion times while still maintaining pinch fidelity. High wire number, 25 mm diameter tungsten arrays were imploded with implosion times ranging from 130 to 240 ns. The results were comparable to those observed in the Saturn short pulse mode, with risetimes on the order of 4.5 to 6.5 ns. Experimental data will be presented, along with two dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations used to explain and reproduce the experiment

  7. Determination of tungsten by amperometric redox titration with dichromate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuensch, G.; Aupers, R.; Kranich, R.

    1985-11-01

    Tungsten is reduced by an excess of Cr(II) in about 10 M HCl. This is technically simpler than the use of reductor columns or liquid amalgams. Titration with Fe(III) or Cr(VI) first consumes the excess of Cr(II) and then oxidizes W(V) to W(VI). The potentiometric response of metal electrodes to W(V) is slow but biamperometric indication at Esub(pol) = 0.2 V applies well. A mixture of W, Fe and Mo can be analyzed in a consecutive titration. Only Ti interferes. As compared to the reductometric titration of W(VI) with Cr(II) the method uses a stable titrant and avoids deairating of the sample solution. Sample preparations for ferrotungsten, steel and wolframite ore are described. (orig.).

  8. Crystal plasticity study of single crystal tungsten by indentation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Weizhi

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its favorable material properties, tungsten (W) has been studied as a plasma-facing material in fusion reactors. Experiments on W heating in plasma sources and electron beam facilities have shown an intense micro-crack formation at the heated surface and sub-surface. The cracks go deep inside the irradiated sample, and often large distorted areas caused by local plastic deformation are present around the cracks. To interpret the crack-induced microscopic damage evolution process in W, one needs firstly to understand its plasticity on a single grain level, which is referred to as crystal plasticity. In this thesis, the crystal plasticity of single crystal tungsten (SCW) has been studied by spherical and Berkovich indentation tests and the finite element method with a crystal plasticity model. Appropriate values of the material parameters included in the crystal plasticity model are determined by fitting measured load-displacement curves and pile-up profiles with simulated counterparts for spherical indentation. The numerical simulations reveal excellent agreement with experiment. While the load-displacement curves and the deduced indentation hardness exhibit little sensitivity to the indented plane at small indentation depths, the orientation of slip directions within the crystals governs the development of deformation hillocks at the surface. It is found that several factors like friction, indentation depth, active slip systems, misoriented crystal orientation, misoriented sample surface and azimuthal orientation of the indenter can affect the indentation behavior of SCW. The Berkovich indentation test was also used to study the crystal plasticity of SCW after deuterium irradiation. The critical load (pop-in load) for triggering plastic deformation under the indenter is found to depend on the crystallographic orientation. The pop-in loads decrease dramatically after deuterium plasma irradiation for all three investigated crystallographic planes.

  9. Modeling cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifaz, E.A.; Richards, N.L.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite-element thermal model has been developed to generate weld profiles, and to analyze transient heat flow, thermal gradients and thermal cycles in cast IN-738 superalloy gas tungsten arc welds. Outputs of the model (cooling rates, the thermal gradient G and the growth rate R) were used to describe solidification structures found around the weld pool for three different welding speeds at constant heat input. Calculations around the weld pool indicate that the cooling rate increases from the fusion line to the centerline at all welding speeds. It was also observed that the cooling rate (G x R) and the ratio G/R fall with welding speed. For instance, as the welding speed is increased, the cooling rates at the centerline, fusion line and penetration depth decrease. Moreover, it was observed that as the power and welding speed both increase (but keeping the heat input constant), the weld pool becomes wider and more elongated, shifting from circular to elliptical shaped. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS FE code on the basis of a time-increment Lagrangian formulation. The heat source represented by a moving Gaussian power density distribution is applied over the top surface of the specimen during a period of time that depends on the welding speed. Temperature-dependent material properties and the effect of forced convection due to the flow of the shielding gas are included in the model. Numerically predicted sizes of the melt-pool zone and dendrite secondary arm spacing induced by the gas tungsten arc welding process are also given

  10. The thermoviscoplastic response of polycrystalline tungsten in compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennon, A.M.; Ramesh, K.T.

    2000-01-01

    The thermomechanical response of commercially pure polycrystalline tungsten was investigated over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. The material was examined in two forms: one an equiaxed recrystallized microstructure and the other a heavily deformed extruded microstructure that was loaded in compression along the extrusion axis. Low strain rate (10 -3 -10 0 s -1 ) compression experiments were conducted on an MTS servo-hydraulic load frame equipped with an infra-red furnace capable of sustaining specimen temperatures in excess of 600 C. High strain rate (10 3 -10 4 s -1 ) experiments were performed on a compression Kolsky bar equipped with an infra-red heating system capable of developing specimen temperatures as high as 800 C. Pressure-shear plate impact experiments were used to obtain shear stress versus shear strain curves at very high rates (∝10 4 -10 5 s -1 ). The recrystallized material was able to sustain very substantial plastic deformations in compression (at room temperature), with a flow stress that appears to be rate-dependent. Intergranular microcracks were developed during the compressive deformations. Under quasi-static loadings a few relatively large axial splitting cracks were formed, while under dynamic loadings a very large number of small, uniformly distributed microcracks (that did not link up to form macrocracks) were developed. The rate of nucleation of microcracks increased dramatically with strain rate. The extruded tungsten is also able to sustain large plastic deformations in compression, with a flow stress that increases with the rate of deformation. The strain hardening of the extruded material is lower than that of the recrystallized material, and is relatively insensitive to the strain rate. (orig.)

  11. Cryoprotection properties of salts of organic acids: a case study for a tetragonal crystal of HEW lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujacz, Grzegorz; Wrzesniewska, Blanka; Bujacz, Anna

    2010-07-01

    Currently, the great majority of the data that are used for solving macromolecular structures by X-ray crystallography are collected at cryogenic temperatures. Selection of a suitable cryoprotectant, which ensures crystal stability at low temperatures, is critical for the success of a particular diffraction experiment. The effectiveness of salts of organic acids as potential cryoprotective agents is presented in the following work. Sodium formate, acetate, malonate and citrate were tested, as were sodium potassium tartrate and acetate in the form of potassium and ammonium salts. For each salt investigated, the minimal concentration that was required for successful cryoprotection was determined over the pH range 4.5-9.5. The cryoprotective ability of these organic salts depends upon the number of carboxylic groups; the lowest concentration required for cryoprotection was observed at neutral pH. Case-study experiments conducted using the tetragonal form of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) confirmed that salts of organic acids can successfully act as cryoprotective agents of protein crystals grown from high concentrations of inorganic salts. When crystals are grown from solutions containing a sufficient concentration of organic acid salts no additional cryoprotection is needed as the crystals can safely be frozen directly from the crystallizing buffers.

  12. Stabilisation of late transition metal and noble metal films in hexagonal and body centred tetragonal phases by epitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueger, E.

    2005-08-26

    In this work ultrathin metallic films with a crystal phase different to their natural bulk structure were produced by hetero-epitaxial growth on metallic substrates. A further aim of this work was to understand the initiation, growth and stability of crystal phase modifications of these films. there exist cases where the films turn beyond the pseudomorphic-growth to a crystal phase different from their natural bulk structure. The present work presents and discusses such a case in addition to the general phenomenon of pseudomorphic-growth. In particular it is shown that metals whose natural phase is face centred cubic (fcc) can be grown in body centred tetragonal (bct) or hexagonal close packed (hcp) phases in the form of thin films on (001) surfaces of appropriate substrates. The growth behavior, electron diffraction analysis, appearance conditions, geometric fit considerations, examples and a discussion of the phase stability of non-covered films and superlattices is given reviewing all epitaxial-systems whose diffraction pattern can be explained by the hexagonal or pseudomorphic bct phase. (orig.)

  13. Effect of intermediate ceramics and firing temperature on bond strength between tetragonal zirconia polycrystal and veneering ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Yoshinari, Masao; Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of the intermediate ceramics and firing temperature on bond strength between tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (TZP) and its intermediate ceramics. Two types of intermediate ceramics, defined as a ceramics placed between the TZP and its veneering ceramics, were used; one including high-strength lithium-disilicate (EP) or feldspathic liner porcelain (SB). The firing temperature of the intermediate ceramics was set at 930°C, 945°C or 960°C. Shear bond strength showed values of 35.8 MPa in SB and 54.9 MPa in EP at a firing temperature of 960°C. Electron probe microanalysis revealed that components of the intermediate ceramics remained on the TZP surface after debonding, indicating that fractures occurred in the intermediate ceramics near the TZP. These results indicate that the bond strength between and a TZP framework and its veneering ceramics could be improved by using a high-strength intermediate ceramics and a comparatively high firing temperature.

  14. Multi-applicative tetragonal TiO2/SnO2 nanocomposites for photocatalysis and gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, S. M.; Dhodamani, A. G.; Vanalakar, S. A.; Deshmukh, S. P.; Delekar, S. D.

    2018-04-01

    TiO2-based mixed metal oxide heteronanostructures have multiple applications in photocatalysis and gas sensing because of their charge transport properties. In this study, we prepared tetragonal TiO2/SnO2 nanocomposites (NCs) with different weight percentages using a simple wet impregnation method. The physicochemical properties of the NCs were investigated using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. The results showed that the surface area of the NCs increased significantly and the anatase TiO2 was sensitized after the addition of a small amount of cassiterite SnO2 NPs. We systematically studied the as-prepared NCs during the photocatalytic degradation of Congo Red dye under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) and NH3 gas sensing, which demonstrated the efficient photocatalytic performance and the superior sensing response of the catalyst with a weight composition of 25% SnO2 in TiO2 (4:1) compared with the other NCs or the bare individual nanoparticles. The improved photocatalytic and gas sensing performance of the TiO2/SnO2 (4:1) NCs may be attributed to the increased active surface area, the increased adsorption of the dye and target gas molecules, as well as efficient electron-hole charge separation and transfer.

  15. Order parameters for symmetry-breaking structural transitions: The tetragonal-monoclinic transition in ZrO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, John C.; Van der Ven, Anton

    2017-10-01

    Group/subgroup structural phase transitions are exploited in a wide variety of technologies, including those that rely on shape-memory behavior and on transformation toughening. Here, we introduce an approach to identify symmetry-adapted strain and shuffle order parameters for any group/subgroup structural transition between a high-symmetry parent phase and its symmetrically equivalent low-symmetry product phases. We show that symmetry-adapted atomic shuffle order parameters can be determined by the diagonalization of an orbital covariance matrix, formed by taking the covariance among the atomic displacement vectors of all symmetrically equivalent product phase variants. We use this approach to analyze the technologically important tetragonal to monoclinic structural phase transformation of ZrO2. We explore the energy landscapes, as calculated with density functional theory, along distinct paths that connect m ZrO2 to t ZrO2 and to other m ZrO2 variants. The calculations indicate favorable pairs of variants and reveal intermediate structures likely to exist at coherent twin boundaries and having relatively low deformation energy. We identify crystallographic features of the monoclinic ZrO2 variant that make it very sensitive to shape changing strains.

  16. Tetragonal Ce-based Ce-Sm(Fe, Co, Ti){sub 12} alloys for permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Cid, Andres; Salazar, Daniel [BCMaterials, Bizkaia Science and Tecnology Park, 48160 Derio (Spain); Gabay, Aleksandr M.; Hadjipanayis, George C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 19716 (United States); Barandiaran, Jose Manuel [BCMaterials, Bizkaia Science and Tecnology Park, 48160 Derio (Spain); Department of Electricity and Electronics, University Basque Country (UPV/EHU), 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    Abundance and relatively low cost of Ce provide a great incentive for its use in rare-earth permanent magnets. It has been recently reported that the tetragonal Ce(Fe,Co,Ti)12 compounds may exhibit application-worthy intrinsic magnetic properties. In this work the effect of the α-Fe phase formation due to the evaporation of Sm during alloy fabrication has been studied, as a previous step in the attempt to convert the intrinsic magnetic properties into functional properties of a permanent magnet. Ce{sub 0.5}Sm{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 9}Co{sub 2}Ti alloys based on the ThMn12-type crystal structure have been synthesized via melt-spinning with different Sm content. Coercive fields between 2.8 and 1.4 kOe have been found for α-Fe phase contents between 8 and 46% in volume, showing the influence of the α-Fe phase on the coercivity and exchange coupling between the hard and soft phase. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Liquid Crystalline Assembly of Coil-Rod-Coil Molecules with Lateral Methyl Groups into 3-D Hexagonal and Tetragonal Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoshi; Lan, Yu; Zhong, Keli; Liang, Yongri; Chen, Tie; Jin, Long Yi

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report the synthesis and self-assembly behavior of coil-rod-coil molecules, consisting of three biphenyls linked through a vinylene unit as a conjugated rod segment and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) with a degree of polymerization (DP) of 7, 12 and 17, incorporating lateral methyl groups between the rod and coil segments as the coil segment. Self-organized investigation of these molecules by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal polarized optical microscopy (POM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals that the lateral methyl groups attached to the surface of rod and coil segments, dramatically influence the self-assembling behavior in the liquid-crystalline mesophase. Molecule 1 with a relatively short PEO coil length (DP = 7) self-assembles into rectangular and oblique 2-dimensional columnar assemblies, whereas molecules 2 and 3 with DP of 12 and 17 respectively, spontaneously self-organize into unusual 3-dimensional hexagonal close-packed or body-centered tetragonal assemblies. PMID:24699045

  18. Biaxial stress driven tetragonal symmetry breaking and high-temperature ferromagnetic semiconductor from half-metallic CrO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang-Bo; Liu, Bang-Gui

    2018-03-01

    It is highly desirable to combine the full spin polarization of carriers with modern semiconductor technology for spintronic applications. For this purpose, one needs good crystalline ferromagnetic (or ferrimagnetic) semiconductors with high Curie temperatures. Rutile CrO2 is a half-metallic spintronic material with Curie temperature 394 K and can have nearly full spin polarization at room temperature. Here, we find through first-principles investigation that when a biaxial compressive stress is applied on rutile CrO2, the density of states at the Fermi level decreases with the in-plane compressive strain, there is a structural phase transition to an orthorhombic phase at the strain of -5.6 % , and then appears an electronic phase transition to a semiconductor phase at -6.1 % . Further analysis shows that this structural transition, accompanying the tetragonal symmetry breaking, is induced by the stress-driven distortion and rotation of the oxygen octahedron of Cr, and the half-metal-semiconductor transition originates from the enhancement of the crystal field splitting due to the structural change. Importantly, our systematic total-energy comparison indicates the ferromagnetic Curie temperature remains almost independent of the strain, near 400 K. This biaxial stress can be realized by applying biaxial pressure or growing the CrO2 epitaxially on appropriate substrates. These results should be useful for realizing full (100%) spin polarization of controllable carriers as one uses in modern semiconductor technology.

  19. Evaluation of Electron-Emission Behavior for Detecting Carbon in Tungsten and Phenium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, James

    1963-01-01

    ... behavior of rehenium-carbon and tungsten-carbon alloys was determined. It is shown that the presence of a very small amount of carbon on the surface of rhenium produces an easily detectable increase in the emission current...

  20. Ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from spotlights incorporating tungsten halogen lamps

    CERN Document Server

    MacKinlay, Alistair F; Whillock, M J

    1989-01-01

    This report summarises measurements of the ultraviolet radiation and blue-light emissions from eleven 'desk-top' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamps and one 'floor-standing' tungsten halogen (quartz) lamp available in the UK. Values of occupational hazard weighted and erythemally weighted ultraviolet radiation irradiance and measurements and relevant calculations of blue-light hazards are presented. It is concluded that the safety design of some desk-top tungsten halogen lamps is inadequate to prevent unnecessary exposure of the skin to potentially harmful ultraviolet radiation. It is recommended that all tungsten halogen lamps should have sufficient filtration to reduce their ultraviolet emissions to an acceptably low level. As long as the comfort aversion responses of the eye are respected, direct viewing of the lamps examined should not constitute a retinal hazard.