WorldWideScience

Sample records for tungsten molybdenum tantalum

  1. Yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten at high strain rates and very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Škoro, G.P.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Edgecock, T.R.; Booth, C.N.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New experimental data on the yield strength of molybdenum, tantalum and tungsten. ► High strain rate effects at record high temperatures (up to 2700 K). ► Test of the consistency of the Zerilli–Armstrong model at very high temperatures. - Abstract: Recently reported results of the high strain rate, high temperature measurements of the yield strength of tantalum and tungsten have been analyzed along with new experimental results on the yield strength of molybdenum. Thin wires are subjected to high stress by passing a short, fast, high current pulse through a thin wire; the amplitude of the current governs the stress and the repetition rate of the pulses determines the temperature of the wire. The highest temperatures reached in the experiments were 2100 °C (for molybdenum), 2250 °C (for tantalum) and 2450 °C (for tungsten). The strain-rates in the tests were in the range from 500 to 1500 s −1 . The parameters for the constitutive equation developed by Zerilli and Armstrong have been determined from the experimental data and the results have been compared with the data obtained at lower temperatures. An exceptionally good fit is obtained for the deformation of tungsten.

  2. Implantation of titanium, chromium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum ion source into 440C stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Jun; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sugiyama, Kenji; Ichiko, Osami; Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro

    1992-01-01

    Titanium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, chromium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into 440C stainless steel in the dose region 10 17 ions cm -2 with extraction voltages of up to 70 kV. Glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS), friction coefficient, and Vickers microhardness of the specimens were studied. Grooves made by friction tests were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). GDS showed incorporation of carbon in the yttrium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum implanted specimens, as well as titanium implanted samples. A large amount of oxygen was observed in the yttrium implanted specimen. The friction coefficient was measured by reciprocating sliding of an unimplanted 440C ball without lubricant at a load of 0.245 N. The friction decreased and achieved a stable state after implantation of titanium, hafnium and tantalum. The friction coefficient of the platinum implanted specimen showed a gradual decrease after several cycles of sliding at high friction coefficient. The yttrium implanted sample exhibited a decreased but slightly unstable friction coefficient. Results from EPMA showed that the implanted elements, which gave decreased friction, remained even after sliding of 200 cycles. Implantation of chromium, molybdenum, silver and tungsten did not provide a decrease in friction and the implants were gone from the wear grooves after the sliding tests. (orig.)

  3. Potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys with chromium II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavra, Z.; Ronen, S.; Levin, R.

    1977-05-01

    A method was developed for the potentiometric determination of the tungsten content of tantalum-tungsten alloys of different compositions. These were dissolved under conditions that enabled the tungsten content to be determined with chromium (II). Phosphoric acid was selected as a suitable complexing agent for the prevention of the precipitation of tungsten and tantalum compounds. The use of chromium (II) required an oxygen-tight system and therefore the work was carried out in suitable vessels for storage and tritation

  4. Efficacy of Tantalum Tungsten Alloys for Diffusion Barrier Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, D. B.; Aimone, P. R.

    2017-12-01

    Traditionally either Niobium, Tantalum or a combination of both have been used as diffusion barriers in Nb3Sn Multi-filament wire. Vanadium has also been used successfully but the ultimate RRR of the copper is limited unless an external shell of Niobium is included. Niobium is preferred over Tantalum when alternating current losses are not an issue as the Niobium will react to form Nb3Sn. Pure Tantalum tends to deform irregularly requiring extra starting thickness to ensure good barrier qualities. Our evaluations showed Tantalum lightly alloyed with 3 wt% Tungsten is compatible with the wire drawing process while deforming as well as or better than pure Niobium. Ta3wt%W has been processed as a single barrier and as a distributed barrier to fine dimensions. In addition, the higher modulus and strength of the Tantalum Tungsten alloy improves the overall tensile properties of the wire.

  5. Fabrication of a tantalum-clad tungsten target for KENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji; Kurishita, Hiroaki; Li, J.-F.; Furusaka, Michihiro

    2001-01-01

    Since the cold neutron source intensity of KENS (the spallation neutron source at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization) was decreased into about a third of the designed value because a cadmium liner at the cold neutron source deformed and obstructed the neutron beam line, the target-moderator-and-reflector assembly (TMRA) has been replaced by a new one aimed at improving the neutron performance and recovering the cold neutron source. The tantalum target has also been replaced by a tantalum-clad tungsten one. In order to bond the tantalum-clad with the tungsten block, a hot isostatic press (HIP) process was applied and optimized. It was found that gaseous interstitial impurity elements severely attacked tantalum and embrittled, and that the getter materials such as zirconium and tantalum were effective to reduce the embrittlement

  6. Titrimetric determination of tungsten in its alloys with tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elinson, S.V.; Nezhnova, T.I.

    1982-01-01

    Titrimetric method of tungsten determination in tantalum base alloys has been developed. The method permits to determine 5-10% tungsten in the alloys with relative standard deviation of 0.013. The conditions are created by application of precipitation from homogeieous solutions or by the method of appearing reagents at pH values, which condition gradual hydrolytic precipitation of tantalum, and sodium tungstate remains in the solution and is not sorbed on tantalum hydroxide. After separation of tantalum oxide tungsten is precipitated in the form of lead tungstate by the excess of ti trated solution of lead salt during boiling and then at the background of lead tungstate precipitate without its separation lead excess is titrated by EDTA in the presence of mixed indicator-4-(2-pyridylazo)resocinol and xylenole orange in acetate buffer solution

  7. Hydro-Metathesis of Long-Chain Olefin (1-decene) using Well-Defined Silica-Supported Tungsten (VI), Molybdenum (VI) and Tantalum (V) Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Saidi, Aya

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, catalysis lies at the heart of economy growth mainly in the petroleum industry. Catalysis can offer real and potential solutions to the current challenges for a long-term sustainable energy, green chemistry, and environmental protection. In this context, one of the most important and future prosperity promising catalytic applications in the petrochemical field is hydrocarbons metathesis; it consists on the conversion of both renewable and non-petroleum fossil carbon sources to transportation fuels. Olefin metathesis has become one of the standard methodologies for constructing C-C bonds in many organic transformation reactions. This owed to the numerous types of metathesis reactions that have been developed, for example, enyne, ring-opening and closing, self and cross metathesis, etc. But the one step conversion of olefin to alkanes has not been studied much. Recently, only one such a work has been published for the hydro-metathesis of propylene by tantalum hydride supported on KCC-1 in dynamic reactor. With this knowledge, we thought to study the hydro-metathesis using liquid olefin (1-decene). Another aspect of using 1-decene comes from our previous experience on metathesis of n-decane where the first step is the conversion of decane to 1-decene and subsequently to different chain length alkanes with W-alkyl/alkylidene catalyst. In this way, it would be easy for us to use different catalysts and compare them with parent catalyst concerning TON. We found 100% conversion with TON of 1010 using supported WMe6 onto SiO2-700 [(≡Si-O-)WMe5] against the previous results for n-decane showing 20% conversion and TON of 153. In this work, we disclose the hydro-metathesis reaction of 1-decene using well-defined silica supported W(VI), Mo(VI) and Ta(V) alkyl catalysts in batch reactor condition. This work is divided into three major sections; first chapter contains an introduction to the field of catalysis and surface organometallic chemistry. In second chapter

  8. Process for separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelikman, A.N.; Voldman, G.M.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Ziberov, G.N.; Kagermanian, V.S.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the separation of tungsten and molybdenum by extraction involves the addition of HCl or HNO 3 to an aqueous solution containing tungsten and molybdenum to obtain a pH from 0.5 to 4.3, and introduction of a stabilizer comprising water-soluble phosphorus salts and a complexing agent, hydrogen peroxide, in an amount from 1.5 to 2 mole per 1 g-atom of the total content of tungsten and molybdenum. Then molybdenum is selectively extracted from the resulting aqueous solution with tri-n-butylphosphate with equal volumetric proportioning of the aqueous and organic solutions. Re-extraction of molybdenum and partially tungsten is carried out from the organic extracting agent with an alkali or soda solution. The process makes possible the preparation of tungsten solution containing no more than 0.001 g/l of molybdenum, and an increase in the degree of extraction of tungsten and molybdenum

  9. Hydroxyaromatic compounds of tantalum, tungsten, and the lighter actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gfaller, H.

    1980-01-01

    Some hydroxyaromatic compounds of the elements tantalum, tungsten, thorium and uranium were prepared as well as the basic materials for these synthesis processes, i.e. metal halides and metal alkoxides. The hydroxyaromatic compounds were studied by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, 1 H-NMR spectroscopy (if soluble in suitable solvents) and, in some cases, by X-ray fine structure analysis. (orig./EF) [de

  10. Durability of adhesive bonds to uranium alloys, tungsten, tantalum, and thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childress, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Long-term durability of epoxy bonds to alloys of uranium (U-Nb and Mulberry), nickel-plated uranium, thorium, tungsten, tantalum, tantalum--10 percent tungsten, and aluminum was evaluated. Significant strengths remain after ten years of aging; however, there is some evidence of bond deterioration with uranium alloys and thorium stored in ambient laboratory air

  11. Matrix composition effects on the tensile properties of tungsten-molybdenum heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; German, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    Tungsten-base heavy alloys are liquid-phase sintered from mixed tungsten, nickel, and iron powders. The sintered product is a composite consisting of interlaced tungsten and solidified matrix (W-Ni-Fe) phases. These alloys are most useful in applications requiring high density, strength, and toughness. The design of improved tungsten heavy alloys has been the subject of several research investigations. Much success has taken place through improved processing, but parallel compositional studies have resulted in new microstructure-property combinations. As part of these investigations, the Ni/Fe ratio has been varied, with the general conclusion that optimal strength and ductility occur with a ratio between 2 and 4. Brittle intermetallic phases can form outside of this composition range. Historically, a 7/3 Ni/Fe ratio has been selected for processing studies. Recently, others reported higher ductilities and impact energies for 90 and 93 pct W heavy alloys with the 8/2 Ni/Fe ratio. Alternatively, these alloys can be strengthened by both solid solution and grain size refinement through incorporation of molybdenum, tantalum, or rhenium. These additions are soluble in both the tungsten and matrix phases and retard solution-reprecipitation during liquid phase sintering. In this study, the alloy composition was varied in the nickel/iron ratio and molybdenum was partially substituted for tungsten. The sintered tensile properties are assessed vs these compositional variations

  12. Fabrication and use of zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed cladding thermocouples and molybdenum/rhenium-sheathed fuel centerline thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, S.C.; Sepold, L.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermocouples described in this report are zircaloy/tantalum-sheathed and molybdenum/rhenium alloy-sheathed instruments intended for fuel rod cladding and fuel centerline temperature measurements, respectively. Both types incorporate beryllium oxide insulation and tungsten/rhenium alloy thermoelements. These thermocouples, operated at temperatures of 2000 0 C and above, were developed for use in the internationally sponsored Severe Fuel Damage test series in the Power Burst Facility. The fabrication steps for both thermocouple types are described in detail. A laser-welding attachment technique for the cladding-type thermocouple is presented, and experience with alternate materials for cladding and fuel therocouples is discussed

  13. Dithiolato complexes of molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieuwpoort, A.

    1975-01-01

    The synthesis of eight-coordinated and six-coordinated tungsten and molybdenum complexes with dithioligands is described. Molecular and crystal structures are determined and bond angles, bond lengths and structural parameters tabulated. Infrared spectra of dithiocarbamato complexes are discussed more extensively. Redox reactions are studied by voltammetry and electron transfer properties derived. Properties of the d electrons of the metal ion are interpreted in the ligand field model with data from electronic and e.s.r. spectra and magnetic susceptibilities. The result of molecular orbital calculations with the extended Hueckel-LCAO method are presented for eight-coordinated d 1 and d 2 systems, the six-coordinated complexes, and the free ligands

  14. High strength tungsten heavy alloys with molybdenum additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Sims, D.M.; German, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    Tungsten heavy alloys are candidates for numerous applications based on the unique combination of high density, high strength, and high ductility coupled with excellent machinability. Though there has been considerable research on heavy alloys, the primary focus has been on the ductility. These alloys are well suited for ballistic uses due to their high densities and it is expected that for superior ballistic performance, a high hardness, high strength and moderate ductility alloy would be ideal. The major goal of this investigation was to obtain heavy alloys with hardness greater than HRA 72. It is evident from the phase diagrams that molybdenum, which goes into solution in tungsten, nickel and iron, could act as a potential strengthening addition. With this in view, tungsten heavy alloys with molybdenum additions were fabricated from mixed elemental powders. A baseline composition of 90W-7Ni-3Fe was chosen to its good elongation and moderate strength. The molybdenum additions were made by replacing the tungsten. Compared to the baseline properties with no molybdenum addition, the strength and hardness showed a continuous increase with molybdenum addition. The ductility of the alloy continued to decrease with increasing molybdenum content, but even with 16% wt. % molybdenum of the elongation was still around 6%. An interesting facet of these alloying additions is the grain refinement that is brought about by adding to molybdenum to the system. The grain refinement is related to the lower solubility of tunbsten in the matrix due to partial displacement by molybdenum

  15. Chromium and molybdenum diffusion in tungsten single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotsman, S.M.; Koloskov, V.M.; Osetrov, S.V.; Polikarpova, I.P.; Tatarinova, G.N.; Timofeev, A.N.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of measuring temperature dependences of diffusion coefficients of homovalent impurities of chromium and molybdenum in tungsten single crystals. It is concluded that the difference of activation energies of selfdiffusion and impurity diffusion in the system 'tungsten-homovalent impurity' is conditioned by interaction of screened potentials of impurity and vacancy with Lazarus-Le Claire model

  16. Electron accelerator-based production of molybdenum-99: Bremsstrahlung and photoneutron generation from molybdenum vs. tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsechanski, A. [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Bielajew, A.F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, The University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Archambault, J.P.; Mainegra-Hing, E. [National Research Council of Canada, Ionizing Radiation Standards Laboratory, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2016-01-01

    A new “one-stage” approach for production of {sup 99}Mo and other radioisotopes by means of an electron linear accelerator is described. It is based on using a molybdenum target both as a bremsstrahlung converter and as a radioisotope producing target for the production of {sup 99}Mo via the photoneutron reaction {sup 100}Mo(γ,n){sup 99}Mo. Bremsstrahlung characteristics, such as bremsstrahlung efficiency, angular distribution, and energy deposition for molybdenum targets were obtained by means of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation code system. As a result of our simulations, it is concluded that a 60 MeV electron beam incident on a thick Mo target will have greater bremsstrahlung efficiency than the same thickness (in units of r{sub 0}) W target, for target thickness z > 1.84r{sub 0}, where r{sub 0} is the electron range. A 50 MeV electron beam incident on a Mo target will result in greater bremsstrahlung efficiency than the same thickness W target (in units of r{sub 0}) for target thickness case: z ⩾ 2.0r{sub 0}. It is shown for the one-stage approach with thicknesses of (1.84–2.0)r{sub 0}, that the {sup 99}Mo-production bremsstrahlung efficiency of a molybdenum target is greater by ∼100% at 30 MeV and by ∼70% at 60 MeV compared to the values for tungsten of the same thickness (in units of the appropriate r{sub 0}) in the traditional two-stage approach (W converter and separate {sup 99}Mo producing target). This advantage of the one-stage approach arises from the fact that the bremsstrahlung produced is attenuated only once from attenuation in the molybdenum converter/target. In the traditional, two-stage approach, the bremsstrahlung generated in the W-converter/target is attenuated both in the converter in the {sup 99}Mo-producing molybdenum target. The photoneutron production yield of molybdenum and tantalum (as a substitute for tungsten) target was calculated by means of the MCNP5 transport code. On the basis of these data, the specific activity

  17. Cracking in dissimilar laser welding of tantalum to molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xingwen; Huang, Yongde; Hao, Kun; Chen, Yuhua

    2018-06-01

    Dissimilar joining of tantalum (Ta) to molybdenum (Mo) is of great interest in high temperature structural component applications. However, few reports were found about joining of these two hard-to-weld metals. The objective of this experimental study was to assess the weldability of laser butt joining of 0.2 mm-thick Ta and Mo. In order to study cracking mechanism in Ta/Mo joint, similar Ta/Ta and Mo/Mo joints were compared under the same welding conditions. An optical microscope observation revealed presence of intergranular cracks in the Mo/Mo joint, while both transgranular and intergranular cracks were observed in Ta/Mo joint. The cracking mechanism of the Ta/Mo joint was investigated further by micro-hardness testing, micro X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that solidification cracking tendency of Mo is a main reason for crack initiation in the Ta/Mo joint. Low ductility feature in fusion zone most certainly played a role in the transgranular propagation of cracking.

  18. Dynamic material properties of refractory metals: tantalum and tantalum/tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnish, M.D.; Lassila, D.H.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Steinberg, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    We have made a careful set of impact wave-profile measurements (16 profiles) on tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys at relatively low stresses (to 15 GPa). Alloys used were Ta 96.5 W 3.5 and Ta 86.5 W 13.5 (wt%) with oxygen contents of 30 endash 70 ppm. Information available from these experiments includes Hugoniot, elastic limits, loading rates, spall strength, unloading paths, reshock structure and specimen thickness effects. Hugoniot and spall properties are illustrated, and are consistent with expectations from earlier work. Modeling the tests with the Steinberg-Guinan-Lund rate-dependent material model provides for an excellent match of the shape of the plastic loading wave. The release wave is not well modeled due to the absence of the dynamic Bauschinger effect. There is also a discrepancy between experiments and calculations regarding the relative timing of the elastic and plastic waves that may be due to texture effects. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  19. A review of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klopp, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanical properties of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed, with particular emphasis on high-temperature strength and low-temperature ductility. Precipitate strengthening is highly effective at 0.4-0.8 Tsub(m) in these metals, with HfC being most effective in tungsten and molybdenum, and Ta(B,C) most effective in chromium. Low-temperature ductility can be improved by alloying to promote rhenium ductilizing or solution softening. The low-temperature mechanical properties of these alloys appear related to electronic interactions rather than to the usual metallurgical considerations. (Auth.)

  20. Recovery of Tungsten and Molybdenum from Low-Grade Scheelite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongli; Yang, Jinhong; Zhao, Zhongwei

    2017-10-01

    With most high-quality tungsten ores being exhausted, the enhancement of low-grade scheelite concentrates processing has attracted a great deal of attention. The objective of this study is to develop a method to maximize the recovery tungsten and molybdenum from a low-grade scheelite via a new acid leaching process followed by solvent extraction. Under optimal conditions (350 g/L H2SO4, 95°C, and 2 h), approximately 99.8% of tungsten and 98% of molybdenum were leached out. In the subsequent solvent extraction process, more than 99% of the tungsten and molybdenum were extracted with a co-extraction system (50% TBP, 30% HDEHP, and 10% 2-octanol in kerosene) using a three-stage cross-flow extraction. The raffinate can be recycled for the next leaching process after replenishing the H2SO4 to the initial value (approximately 350 g/L). Based on these results, a conceptual flowsheet is presented to recover tungsten and molybdenum from the low-grade scheelite.

  1. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S; Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Department of Reactor Materials, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1964-04-15

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  2. Radiation damage in molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veljkovic, S.; Milasin, N.

    1964-01-01

    The effects of radiation on molybdenum and tungsten in high neutron fluxes are presented. The changes induced, particularly defects with a high migration activation energy, are analyzed. The correlation of these changes with the basic concepts of radiation damage in solids is considered. An attempt is made to relate the defects studied with the changes in macroscopic properties (author)

  3. Brazing molybdenum and tungsten for high temperature service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Turner, W.C.; Hoffman, C.G.

    1978-01-01

    Investigations were conducted to develop vacuum brazes for molybdenum and tungsten which can be used in seal joint applications up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F). Joints were attempted in molybdenum, tungsten and tungsten--molybdenum. The braze materials included: Ti--10Cr powder, Ti--30V wire, Ti--65V wire, V wire, Ni electroplate, MoB--50MoC powder mixture, V--50Mo powder mixture, Mo--15MoB 2 powder mixture and Mo--49V--15MoB 2 powder mixture. Braze temperature ranged from 1900 K (1627 C, 2961 F) to 2530 K, (2257 C, 4095 F), and leak-tight joints were made with all braze materials except Ti--10Cr. After heat treatments up to 1870 K (1597 C, 2907 F) Kirkendall voiding was found to cause leakage of some of the joints made with only substitutional alloying elements. However, adding base metal powders to the braze or narrowing the root opening eliminated this problem. Kirkendall voiding was not a problem when interstitial elements were a major ingredient in the braze material. Shear testing of Ti--65V, V, MoB--50MoC and V--50Mo brazed molybdenum at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) indicated strengths equal to or better than the base metal. Ti--65V, V--50Mo and MoB--50MoC brazed joints were exposed to basalt at 1670 K (1397 C, 2547 F) for 3 h without developing leaks

  4. Clustering of transmutation elements tantalum, rhenium and osmium in tungsten in a fusion environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu-Wei; Kong, Xiang-Shan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Fang, Q. F.; Chen, J. L.; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-08-01

    The formation of transmutation solute-rich precipitates has been reported to seriously degrade the mechanical properties of tungsten in a fusion environment. However, the underlying mechanisms controlling the formation of the precipitates are still unknown. In this study, first-principles calculations are therefore performed to systemically determine the stable structures and binding energies of solute clusters in tungsten consisting of tantalum, rhenium and osmium atoms as well as irradiation-induced vacancies. These clusters are known to act as precursors for the formation of precipitates. We find that osmium can easily segregate to form clusters even in defect-free tungsten alloys, whereas extremely high tantalum and rhenium concentrations are required for the formation of clusters. Vacancies greatly facilitate the clustering of rhenium and osmium, while tantalum is an exception. The binding energies of vacancy-osmium clusters are found to be much higher than those of vacancy-tantalum and vacancy-rhenium clusters. Osmium is observed to strongly promote the formation of vacancy-rhenium clusters, while tantalum can suppress the formation of vacancy-rhenium and vacancy-osmium clusters. The local strain and electronic structure are analyzed to reveal the underlying mechanisms governing the cluster formation. Employing the law of mass action, we predict the evolution of the relative concentration of vacancy-rhenium clusters. This work presents a microscopic picture describing the nucleation and growth of solute clusters in tungsten alloys in a fusion reactor environment, and thereby explains recent experimental phenomena.

  5. Synthesis, Consolidation and Characterization of Sol-gel Derived Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervantes, O [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Energetic composite powders consisting of sol-gel (SG) derived nanostructured tungsten oxide were produced with various amounts of micrometer-scale tantalum fuel metal. Such energetic composite powders were ignition-tested and results show that the powders are not sensitive to friction, spark and/or impact ignition. Initial consolidation experiments, using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique, on the SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide produced samples with higher relative density than can be achieved with commercially available tungsten oxide. The SG derived nanostructured tungsten oxide with immobilized tantalum fuel metal (Ta - WO3) energetic composite was consolidated to a density of 9.17 g·cm-3 or 93% relative density. In addition, those samples were consolidated without significant pre-reaction of the constituents, thus retaining their stored chemical energy.

  6. Study of mechanoactivation of tungsten-molybdenum containing raw material in gas-jet mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnokov, T.Sh.; Gorobets, L.Zh.; Martynenko, V.P.; Fedorov, Yu.P.; Krakhmaleva, M.T.; Sokolova, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Investigation is aimed at intensifying autoclave-soda leaching of tungsten-molybdenum-containing raw material. Connection of reactivity and physicochemical properties of crushed tungsten-molybdenum-containing products under different gas-jet crushing parameters is investigated. Optimal technological indices of hydrometallurgical reprocessing of tungsten-molybdenum-containing raw materials and products processed by gas-jet technique are given. The results obtained point out to perspectiveness of applying gas-jet technique of thermomechanical processing for intensifying and increasing the quality of tungsten- and molybdenum-containing raw materials and products of hydrometallurgical production

  7. Analysis of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in tungsten carbide by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Archer, M

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used to measure the concentrations of cobalt, tantalum, titanium, vanadium and chromium in solutions of tungsten carbide. The main advantage of the method described here lies...

  8. Preparation and properties of molybdenum-tungsten-carbonitrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, M.; Ettmayer, P.; Kieffer, R.

    1982-01-01

    Molybdenum-tungsten-carbonitrides can be prepared by reacting prealloyed powders of Mo and W with carbon in the presence of nitrogen or ammonia. Single phase carbonitrides (Mo,W) (C,N) with the WC-type structure can be obtained. The nitrogen content of these carbonitrides increases with increasing molybdenum content. Flowing ammonia has a decarburizing effect, which has to be counterbalanced by an addition of a carbonaceous gas such as methane. Nitrogen instead of ammonia is equally effective and gives carbonitrides which have a nitrogen content only insignificantly lower than the carbonitrides obtained in flowing ammonia. The lattice parameters of the carbonitrides are found to slightly smaller than the lattice parameters of the corresponding carbides. (Author)

  9. Tungsten and molybdenum with oxide dispersion, production and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haerdtle, S.; Schmidberger, R.

    1989-01-01

    By the reaction spray process metal powders with dispersed metal oxides can be produced in one step. The systems investigated here are tungsten and molybdenum with 0,5% resp. 5% La 2 O 3 , Y 2 O 3 and ZrO 2 . The oxides with diameters below 0,5μm are finely dispersed within the metal powder particles. The sinterability of the powders depends on the oxide content. Maximum density at an oxide content of 0,5% is about 96% at a sintering temperature of 1600 0 C. The type of oxide influences the densification versus temperature but not the final density. 5 refs., 11 figs. (Author)

  10. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of tungsten and molybdenum with dithiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navale, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    Toluene-3,4-dithiol is a very sensitive reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of tungsten and molybdenum. Since the absorption spectra of the dithiol complexes of these two elements overlap, a separation of the two elements is carried out. This leads to time consuming extraction procedures. Measuring the absorption of the mixed complexes at two wavelengths and solving a set of simultaneous equations is also not favorable because a lot of time and effort is required for solving the simultaneous equations for each sample. A faster and simpler method is described here for the simultaneous determination of the two elements. The method is based on measurement of absorbance of the mixed complexes at three pre-selected wavelengths and simple calculations involving the absorbance differences. The criteria for selecting the three wavelengths and the theory are described. Application of the method for the determination of tungsten and molybdenum in ore samples is presented. The method is applicable to any similar system consisting of two interfering components. 4 figures, 2 tables, 6 refs. (author)

  11. Tellurium adsorption on tungsten and molybdenum field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.A.; Kiwanga, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of the adsorption of tellurium onto tungsten and molybdenum field emitters are described and the results obtained are compared with those obtained in previous work on the adsorption of silicon and selenium. The adsorption of Te onto W was found to be much more uniform than in the case of Se. Although Te is metallic in many of its properties its adsorptive behavior on field emitters is found to be similar to that of selenium and these adsorptive properties are basically common to all semiconductors. The most evident property of these adsorbates is that the work function and emission current decrease simultaneously at coverages of less than half a monolayer and the work function subsequently increases. (B.D.)

  12. Effect of silicon, tantalum, and tungsten doping and polarization on bioactivity of hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhal, Jharana

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics has important applications as bone graft because of the structural and compositional similarities with bone tissue. However, inferior osteogenic capacity to bone and poor mechanical properties have been identified to be major disadvantages of synthetic HAp compared to the living bone tissue. The objective of the current study is to evaluate the effect of doping with higher valent cations (Tungsten, tantalum, and silicon) and polarization or combination of both on change in property of doped HAp and subsequent impact its bioactivity. In vitro study with human osteoblast cells was used to investigate the influences of doping and polarization on bone cell-materials interactions. The bioactivity of doped HAp was compared with pure HAp. Effect of doping and polarization on the change in HAp was investigated by monitoring change in mineral phases, stored charge, and activation energy of HAp. Activation energy of depolarization was used to explain the possible mechanism of polarization in doped samples. Bioactivity of HAp increased when doped with tantalum and tungsten. Polarization further increased the bioactivity of tungsten- and tantalum-doped samples. Increase in bioactivity on polarized and doped samples was attributed to increase in surface energy and increase in surface wettability. Whereas, an increase in bioactivity on doped unpolarized surface was attributed to change in microstructure. Polarized charge calculated from TSDC indicates that polarized charge decreases on tantalum- and tungsten-doped HAp. The decrease in polarized charge was attributed to the presence of significant amount of different phases that may hinder the ionic motion in doped samples. However, for silicon-doped HAp, TSDC study showed no difference in the mechanism of polarization between doped and undoped samples. Increase in silicon doping decreased the grain size though mechanism is not affected by grain size. Total stored charge decreased with increase in

  13. Characterization and performances of cobalt-tungsten and molybdenum-tungsten carbides as anode catalyst for PEFC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izhar, Shamsul; Yoshida, Michiko; Nagai, Masatoshi

    2009-01-01

    The preparation of carbon-supported cobalt-tungsten and molybdenum-tungsten carbides and their activity as an anode catalyst for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell were investigated. The electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen oxidation reaction over the catalysts was evaluated using a single-stack fuel cell and a rotating disk electrode. The characterization of the catalysts was performed by XRD, temperature-programmed carburization, temperature-programmed reduction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The maximum power densities of the 30 wt% 873 K-carburized cobalt-tungsten and molybdenum-tungsten mixed with Ketjen carbon (cobalt-tungsten carbide (CoWC)/Ketjen black (KB) and molybdenum-tungsten carbide (MoWC)/KB) were 15.7 and 12.0 mW cm -2 , respectively, which were 14 and 11%, compared to the in-house membrane electrode assembly (MEA) prepared from a 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst. The CoWC/KB catalyst exhibited the highest maximum power density compared to the MoWC/KB and WC/KB catalysts. The 873 K-carburized CoW/KB catalyst formed the oxycarbided and/or carbided CoW that are responsible for the excellent hydrogen oxygen reaction

  14. Iron binary and ternary coatings with molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yar-Mukhamedova, Gulmira, E-mail: gulmira-alma-ata@mail.ru [Institute Experimental and Theoretical Physics Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 050038, Al-Farabi av., 71, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ved, Maryna; Sakhnenko, Nikolay; Karakurkchi, Anna; Yermolenko, Iryna [National Technical University “Kharkov Polytechnic Institute”, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • High quality coatings of double Fe-Mo and ternary Fe-Mo-W electrolytic alloys can be produced both in a dc and a pulsed mode. • Application of unipolar pulsed current allows receiving an increased content of the alloying components and their more uniform distribution over the surface. • It is established that Fe-Mo and Fe-Mo-W coatings have an amorphous structure and exhibit improved corrosion resistance and microhardness as compared with the steel substrate due to the inclusion molybdenum and tungsten. - Abstract: Electrodeposition of Fe-Mo-W and Fe-Mo layers from a citrate solution containing iron(III) on steel and iron substrates is compared. The utilization of iron(III) compounds significantly improved the electrolyte stability eliminating side anodic redox reactions. The influence of concentration ratios and electrodeposition mode on quality, chemical composition, and functional properties of the alloys is determined. It has been found that alloys deposited in pulse mode have more uniform surface morphology and chemical composition and contain less impurities. Improvement in physical and mechanical properties as well as corrosion resistance of Fe-Mo and Fe-Mo-W deposits when compared with main alloy forming metals is driven by alloying components chemical passivity as well as by alloys amorphous structure. Indicated deposits can be considered promising materials in surface hardening technologies and repair of worn out items.

  15. The effects of tantalum addition on the microtexture and mechanical behaviour of tungsten for ITER applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejado, E., E-mail: elena.tejado@mater.upm.es [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales-CIME, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain); Carvalho, P.A. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Técnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Munoz, A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III, Leganés (Spain); Dias, M. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2015-12-15

    Tungsten (W) and its alloys are very promising materials for producing plasma-facing components (PFCs) in the fusion power reactors of the near future, even as a structural part in them. However, whereas the properties of pure tungsten are suitable for a PFC, its structural applications are still limited due to its low toughness, ductile to brittle transition temperature and recrystallization behaviour. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve its performance by alloying tungsten with other elements. Hence, in this investigation, the thermo-mechanical performance of two new tungsten-tantalum materials has been evaluated. Materials with W–5wt.%Ta and W–15wt.%Ta were processed by mechanical alloying (MA) and later consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), with distinct settings for each composition. Thus, it was possible to determine the relationship between the microstructure and the addition of Ta with the macroscopic mechanical properties. These were measured by means of hardness, flexural strength and fracture toughness, in the temperature range of 300–1473 K. The microstructure and the fracture surfaces features of the tested materials were analysed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

  16. The effects of tantalum addition on the microtexture and mechanical behaviour of tungsten for ITER applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejado, E.; Carvalho, P.A.; Munoz, A.; Dias, M.; Correia, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten (W) and its alloys are very promising materials for producing plasma-facing components (PFCs) in the fusion power reactors of the near future, even as a structural part in them. However, whereas the properties of pure tungsten are suitable for a PFC, its structural applications are still limited due to its low toughness, ductile to brittle transition temperature and recrystallization behaviour. Therefore, many efforts have been made to improve its performance by alloying tungsten with other elements. Hence, in this investigation, the thermo-mechanical performance of two new tungsten-tantalum materials has been evaluated. Materials with W–5wt.%Ta and W–15wt.%Ta were processed by mechanical alloying (MA) and later consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIP), with distinct settings for each composition. Thus, it was possible to determine the relationship between the microstructure and the addition of Ta with the macroscopic mechanical properties. These were measured by means of hardness, flexural strength and fracture toughness, in the temperature range of 300–1473 K. The microstructure and the fracture surfaces features of the tested materials were analysed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM).

  17. Effect of temperature on the crack resistance of a molybdenum alloy with 30% tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uskov, E.I.; Babak, A.V.; D'yachkov, A.P.; Platonov, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented for a study of the effect of temperature on the crack resistance of molybdenum alloy with 30% tungsten (Mo - 30% W), and data are presented for the crack resistance of commercial-purity molybdenum and tungsten obtained by power metallurgy in the temperature range 20-1800 C. It was found that the nature of failure for Mo-30% W alloy depends on test temperature; in the temperature range 20 C-T /SUP d/ /SUB br/ (upper boundary for the temperature range of the ductile to brittle transition), failure is unstable in nature, and at temperatures exceeding this transition, it occurs by steady main crack development

  18. Electroerosion resistance of tungsten-copper and molybdenum-copper pseudoalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nerus, L.N.; Verkhoturov, A.D.; Marek, B.A.; Mukha, I.M.

    1977-01-01

    Results of the study of electroerosion resistance of W-Cu and Mo-Cu pseudoalloys in a wide range of concentrations are presented. Tungsten alloys with 10-20% copper and pure molybdenum have exhibited the best erosion resistance at electrospark machining

  19. Secondary electron emission of sapphire tungsten molybdenum and titanium for Maxwellian incident electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saussez-Hublet, M.-C.; Harbour, P.J.

    1980-06-01

    The second electron emission coefficient of various materials, namely titanium, molybdenum, tungsten and sapphire, has been calculated for a Maxwellian energy distribution from data for a normally incident monoenergetic beam of primary electrons. The most significant difference from the monoenergetic case occurs at low energies. In addition the influence of the incident angle of the electrons is discussed. (author)

  20. High heat flux testing of TiC coated molybdenum with a tungsten intermediate layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujitsuka, Masakazu; Fukutomi, Masao; Okada, Masatoshi

    1988-01-01

    The use of low atomic number (Z) material coatings for fusion reactor first-wall components has proved to be a valuable technique to reduce the plasma radiation losses. Molybdenum coated with titanium carbide is considered very promising since it has a good capability of receiving heat from the plasma. An interfacial reaction between the TiC film and the molybdenum substrate, however, causes a severe deterioration of the film at elevated temperatures. In order to solve this problem a TiC coated molybdenum with an intermediate tungsten layer was developed. High temperature properties of this material was evaluated by a newly devised electron beam heating apparatus. TiC coatings prepared on a vacuum-heat-treated molybdenum with a tungsten intermediate layer showed good high temperature stability and survived 2.0 s pulses of heating at a power density as high as 53 MW/m 2 . The melt area of the TiC coatings in high heat flux testings also markedly decreased when a tungsten intermediate layer was applied. The melting mechanism of the TiC coatings with and without a tungsten intermediate layer was discussed by EPMA measurements. (author)

  1. Structure-performance relations of molybdenum- and tungsten carbide catalysts for deoxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stellwagen, D.R.; Bitter, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    This work demonstrates for the first time that carbide particle size is a critical factor for the activity and stability of carbon supported tungsten- and molybdenum carbide catalysts in (hydro-)deoxygenation reactions. The stability of the catalyst was shown to increase for larger particles due to

  2. The determination of molybdenum and tungsten in resin by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, B.T.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a method using X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of molybdenum and tungsten in ion-exchange resins. The dried resin is milled with sand, binder, and an internal-standard mixture before being briquetted. Niobium and zinc are used as the internal standards for molybdenum and tungsten respectively. Intensity measurements are made with the gold anode tube. Corrections are made for the interference of the Mo Kα analytical line on the background intensities used for the Mo Kα and Nb Kα lines. The precision of the analysis for molybdenum ranges from a relative standard deviation 0,02 at 5 mg/g to 0.045 at 55μg/g; for tungsten, the relative standard deviation ranges from 0,04 at 5 mg/g to 0,055 at 55μg/g. The limits of determination in the original resin sample were found to be 40μg/g for molybdenum and 80μg/g for tungsten. The laboratory method is given in an appendix

  3. Conflict minerals in the compute sector: estimating extent of tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold use in ICT products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Colin; Olivetti, Elsa; Miller, Reed; Roth, Richard; Kirchain, Randolph

    2015-01-20

    Recent legislation has focused attention on the supply chains of tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold (3TG), specifically those originating from the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The unique properties of these so-called “conflict minerals” lead to their use in many products, ranging from medical devices to industrial cutting tools. This paper calculates per product use of 3TG in several information, communication, and technology (ICT) products such as desktops, servers, laptops, smart phones, and tablets. By scaling up individual product estimates to global shipment figures, this work estimates the influence of the ICT sector on 3TG mining in covered countries. The model estimates the upper bound of tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold use within ICT products to be 2%, 0.1%, 15%, and 3% of the 2013 market share, respectively. This result is projected into the future (2018) based on the anticipated increase in ICT device production.

  4. The separation of tungsten and molybdenum by the formation of sulphide complexes and extraction into a weak-base resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The separation of molybdenum from tungten can be achieved if a solution containing molybdate and tungstate ions is reacted with sulphide ions, and the molybdenum sulphide is extracted with an anion-exchangeresin. The separation between molybdenum and tungsten is influenced byfactors such as the pH value of the solution, the concentrations of sulphide and resin in the solution, and the period of contact between theresin and the metal ions in solution. A fundamental study of the interaction between sulphide ions and molybdate or tungstate ions confirmed a mechanism proposed recently in the literature: MeOsup(2-)sub(4)+nHSsup(-)+nHsup(+) is equivalent to MeO 4 sub(-n)Ssub(n)sup(2-)+nH 2 O, where Me = molybdenum or tungsten and n = 1, 2, 3, or 4. In these reaction sequences, each successive step in the reaction (sulphur being substituted for oxygen) is slower than the preceding one, and the molybdate reactions with sulphide are several orders of magnitude faster than the analogous tungsten reactions. As a result, the extent of the complexing of tungsten with sulphide is minimal compared with that of molybdenum in the time span of the extraction experiments. However, the current investigation shows that this is not the cause of the selectivity of anion-exchange resins for molybdenum in this system, and that the separation factor between molybdenum and tungsten is much the same for the precursor tungstate anion as it is for the various tungsten sulphide anions. The selectivity of the resin for molybdenum apparently originates from a thermodynamic preference of the amine functional group on the resin for molybdenum sulphide anions over tungstate or tungsten sulphide anions. It is shown that, under optimum conditions, a separation factor of about 30 between molybdenum and tungsten can be achieved in this system

  5. Effect of tungsten and tantalum on the low cycle fatigue behavior of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Vani, E-mail: vani@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India); Mariappan, K.; Nagesha, A.; Prasad Reddy, G.V.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603102 (India)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of tungsten and tantalum on low cycle fatigue behavior of RAFM steels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both alloying elements W and Ta improved fatigue life. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increase in Ta content improved fatigue life more than W. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimization of W content at 1.4 wt.%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Softening behavior closely related to W and Ta content. - Abstract: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are candidate materials for the test blanket modules of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Several degradation mechanisms such as thermal fatigue, low cycle fatigue, creep fatigue interaction, creep, irradiation hardening, swelling and phase instability associated irradiation embrittlement must be understood in order to estimate the component lifetime and issues concerning the structural integrity of components. The current work focuses on the effect of tungsten and tantalum on the low cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of RAFM steels. Both alloying elements tungsten and tantalum improved the fatigue life. Influence of Ta on increasing fatigue life was an order of magnitude higher than the influence of W on improving the fatigue life. Based on the present study, the W content was optimized at 1.4 wt.%. Softening behavior of RAFM steels showed a strong dependence on W and Ta content in RAFM steels.

  6. Formation of solid solution during mutual diffusion of tungsten and molybdenum in the process of sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, A.A.; Bulat, I.B.; Voronin, Yu.V.; Fedoseev, G.K.; Karasev, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    A process of a solid solution homogenization during sintering of W-15Mo and W-5Mo alloys is studied by the methods of density measurements, analysis of the X-ray lines physical broadening and determination of crystalline lattice constant. Study of the process of solid solution formation under conditions of powder composite sintering is shown to be conducted with account of peculiarities of tungsten and molybdenum mutual diffusion in the investigated temperature range of concentrations

  7. Direct atomic-emission determination of tungsten in molybdenum oxide in dc arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotareva, N.I.; Grazhulene, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    A method of direct atomic-emission determination of tungsten impurity in molybdenum trioxide of high purity in dc arc is presented. Chemically active additives of elementary sulfur and gallium oxide are used to optimize W evaporation rate and residence time in the arc plasma. The procedure is easy to use and provides the limit of W determination at a level of 2x10 -4 wt. % [ru

  8. Separation of Molybdenum from Acidic High-Phosphorus Tungsten Solution by Solvent Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongli; Zhao, Zhongwei

    2017-10-01

    A solvent-extraction process for deep separation of molybdenum from an acidic high-phosphate tungsten solution was developed using tributyl phosphate (TBP) as the extractant and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a complexing agent. The common aqueous complexes of tungsten and molybdenum (PMoxW12-xO40 3-, x = 0-12) are depolymerized to {PO4[Mo(O)2(O-O)]4}3- and {PO4[W(O)2(O-O)]4}3- by H2O2. The former can be preferentially extracted by TBP. The extractant concentration, phase contact time, H2O2 dosage, and H2SO4 concentration were optimized. By employing 80% by volume TBP, O:A = 1:1, 1.0 mol/L H2SO4, 1.0 mol/L H3PO4, a contact time of 2 min, and a molar ratio of H2O2/(W + Mo) equal to 1.5, 60.2% molybdenum was extracted in a single stage, while limiting tungsten co-extraction to 3.2%. An extraction isotherm indicated that the raffinate could be reduced to <0.1 g/L Mo in six stages of continuous counter-current extraction.

  9. In-situ field-ion microscope study of the recovery behavior of heavy metal ion-irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, C.H.

    1977-06-01

    Three field ion microscope (FIM) experiments were carried out to study the annealing behavior of heavy ion irradiated tungsten, tungsten (rhenium) alloys and molybdenum. The first experiment dealt with the stage I long-range migration of tungsten self interstitial atoms (SIAs) in high purity tungsten of resistivity ratio, R = 24,000 (R = rho 300 /rho 4 . 2 , where rho 300 and rho 4 . 2 are the room temperature and 0 0 C resistivities). The FIM specimens were irradiated in situ at 18 K with 30 keV W + ions to an average dose of 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 and subsequently examined by the pulsed-field evaporation technique. The second experiment dealt with the phenomenon of impurity atom trapping of SIAs during long-range migration. It was shown that rhenium atoms in a tungsten matrix tend to capture tungsten SIAs and remain bound up to temperatures as high as 390 K. The final experiment was concerned with the low temperature annealing kinetics of irradiated molybdenum. High purity molybdenum of resistivity ratio R = 5700 was irradiated at 10 K with 30 keV Mo + ions to a dose of approximately 5 x 10 12 ions cm -2 . The results indicated that the electric field has only a minimal effect on the SIA annealing kinetics. This tends to strengthen the contention that the molybdenum SIA becomes mobile at 32 K

  10. The effect of low energy helium ion irradiation on tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys under fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonderman, S.; Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Sizyuk, T.; Hassanein, A.

    2017-08-01

    Currently, tungsten remains the best candidate for plasma-facing components (PFCs) for future fusion devices because of its high melting point, low erosion, and strong mechanical properties. However, continued investigation has shown tungsten to undergo severe morphology changes under fusion-like conditions. These results motivate the study of innovative PFC materials which are resistant to surface morphology evolution. The goal of this work is to examine tungsten-tantalum (W-Ta) alloys, a potential PFC material, and their response to low energy helium ion irradiation. Specifically, W-Ta samples are exposed to 100 eV helium irradiations with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, at 873 K, 1023 K, and 1173 K for 1 h duration. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals significant changes in surface deterioration due to helium ion irradiation as a function of both temperature and tantalum concentration in W-Ta samples. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) studies show a slight lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples compared to pure W samples. The observed lattice parameter expansion in W-Ta alloy samples (proportional to increasing Ta wt.% concentrations) reflect significant differences observed in the evolution of surface morphology, i.e., fuzz development processes for both increasing Ta wt.% concentration and target temperature. These results suggest a correlation between the observed morphology differences and the induced crystal structure change caused by the presence of tantalum. Shifts in the XRD peaks before and after 100 eV helium irradiation with a flux of 1.15 × 1021 ions m-2 s-1, 1023 K, for 1 h showed a significant difference in the magnitude of the shift. This has suggested a possible link between the atomic spacing of the material and the accumulated damage. Ongoing research is needed on W-Ta alloys and other innovative materials for their application as irradiation resistant materials in future fusion or irradiation environments.

  11. Early stage of deformation in tungsten, tantalum, and nickel single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.

    1977-01-01

    High purity Tantalum, Tungsten and Nickel single crystals were tested in simple tension between 77 and 300 K. The Ta and W was oriented for maximum resolved shear stress on the [111] (101) system. Simultaneously microstrain and ultrasonic propagation measurements (attenuation and modulus defect) were performed at various stress bias in order to test details of theories concerning the preyield region and the flow stress in body-centered cubic refractory metals. The experimental retical predictions for the kink chain model over the string model for dislocation. It appears that double kink nucleation in non-screw dislocations has negligible effect in this domains. The results for annealed Ta exhibited no stress bias effect on the ultrasonic propagation measurements, which suggest that the strong influence of impurities mask our ability to discern this fine structure for dislocation motion. For prestrained W and Ta, it was found that double-kink nucleation on nonscrew dislocation plays an important role and revealed interesting results with respect to our understanding of the intrinsic dislocation structure in bcc metals. These results support the kink chain model for dislocation unambiguously. The experiments on the prestrained samples also exhibited experimental results which are qualitatively but not quantitatively in agreement with the theoretical predictions of Seeger and Sectak. The Ni single crystals were prestrained between 10 and 23 percent in stage II, and the microstrain damping loops have been studied as a function of stress amplitude, temperature and magnetic field. The predominant hysteretic contribution to the observed decrement was analyzed according to the model of Roberts (Al. 14, Al. 15), and good agreement between theory and experiment was found

  12. Neutron displacement cross-sections for tantalum and tungsten at energies up to 1 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broeders, C.H.M. [Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: cornelis.broeders@irs.fzk.de; Konobeyev, A.Yu. [Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute of Nuclear and Power Engineering, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Villagrasa, C. [Institut fuer Reaktorsicherheit, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-06-30

    The neutron displacement cross-section has been evaluated for tantalum and tungsten at energies from 10{sup -5} eV up to 1 GeV. The nuclear optical model, the intranuclear cascade model combined with the pre-equilibrium and evaporation models were used for the calculations. The number of defects produced by recoil atoms nuclei in materials was calculated by the Norgett, Robinson, Torrens model and by the approach combining calculations using the binary collision approximation model and the results of the molecular dynamics simulation. The numerical calculations were done using the NJOY code, the ECIS96 code, the MCNPX code and the IOTA code.

  13. Development of India-specific RAFM steel through optimization of tungsten and tantalum contents for better combination of impact, tensile, low cycle fatigue and creep properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, K., E-mail: laha@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Saroja, S.; Moitra, A.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Rajendra Kumar, E. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2013-08-15

    Effects of tungsten and tantalum contents on impact, tensile, low cycle fatigue and creep properties of Reduced Activation Ferritic–Martensitic (RAFM) steel were studied to develop India-specific RAFM steel. Four heats of the steel have been melted with tungsten and tantalum contents in the ranges 1–2 wt.% and 0.06–0.14 wt.% respectively. Increase in tungsten content increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), low cycle fatigue and creep strength of the steel, whereas the tensile strength was not changed significantly. Increase in tantalum content increased the DBTT and low cycle fatigue strength of the steel whereas the tensile and creep strength decreased. Detailed TEM investigations revealed enhanced microstructural stability of the steel against creep exposure on tungsten addition. The RAFM steel having 1.4 wt.% tungsten with 0.06 wt.% tantalum was found to possess optimum combination of impact, tensile, low cycle fatigue and creep properties and is considered for Indian-specific RAFM steel.

  14. Preparation and characterization of dimeric and tetrameric clusters of molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, T.R.

    1981-10-01

    The cyclo-addition of two Mo/sub 2/Cl/sub 4/(P(C/sub 6/H/sub 5/)/sub 3/)/sub 2/(CH/sub 3/OH)/sub 2/ molecules has produced a new type of tetrameric molybdenum cluster, Mo/sub 4/Cl/sub 8/L/sub 4/. Structural characterization of this dimer revealed weak molybdenum-methanol bonding which was consistent with the observed reactivity of the compound. New synthetic methods were devised for the preparation of Mo/sub 4/X/sub 8/L/sub 4/ clusters where X = Cl, Br, I and L = PR/sub 3/, Po/sub 3/, RCN, CH/sub 3/OH. A scheme for the metal-metal bonding in these clusters was presented which was in agreement with the known structural features of Mo/sub 4/Cl/sub 8/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/, R = C/sub 2/H/sub 5/, n-C/sub 4/H/sub 9/. The preparation of the analogous W/sub 4/Cl/sub 8/(PR/sub 3/)/sub 4/ cluster from WCl/sub 4/ was accomplished by application of techniques used in the molybdenum syntheses. The single crystal x-ray structure revealed slight differences from the molybdenum analog which were rationalized in terms of the known behavior in dimeric tungsten and molybdenum species. The attempted preparation of a tetrameric tungsten cluster from W/sub 2/(mhp)/sub 4/ was unsuccessful (mhp = anion of 2-methyl-6-hydroxypyridine). Instead, the new tungsten dimer, W/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/(mhp)/sub 3/, was isolated which possessed a metal-metal bond order of 3.5. The x-ray crystal structure of the dimer revealed that the chlorine atoms were situated cis, one bound to each tungsten. Cyclic voltammetry showed that the compound could be reversibly reduced, presumably to a W/sub 2//sup 4 +/ dimer containing a quadruple metal-metal bond.

  15. Separation of tungsten from molybdenum by liquid-liquid extraction and extraction chromatography using thiocyanate and a quarternary ammonium salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, C.; Onishi, H.

    1977-01-01

    Methods were developed for the separation of tungsten from molybdenum by liquid-liquid extraction and extraction chromatography using thiocyanate and a quaternary ammonium salt, Zephiramine. Tungsten was extracted into chloroform as an ion associate of tungsten(V)-thiocyanate complex and Zephiramine cation was retained on a column of Teflon powder coated with Zephiramine, but molybdenum(III) was neither extracted nor retained. The extraction chromatographic method was succesfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of tungsten in molybdenum by neutron activation analysis. The γ-ray spectrum, observed with the Ge(Li) detector, of tungsten fraction separated from irradiated molybdenum are shown. The peaks of 99 Mo, sup(99m)Tc, and sup(99m)Nb (produced by 92 Mo(n,p)sup(99m)Nb) were seen, but these nuclides did nit interfere with the determination of tungsten using a NaI(Tl) detector. The results of the neutron activation analysis of a sample of ammonium molybdate agreed quite well with that of the spectrophotometric determination after extraction chromatographic separation. (T.G.)

  16. Direct determination of tungsten in the presence of high content of molybdenum in the form of its complex with bromopyrogallol red and hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, I.Yu.; Lebedeva, L.I.; Flotskaya, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that tungsten reacts with Bromopyrogallol Red and hydrogen peroxide to form a ternary complex. A procedure has been developed of determining tungsten(6) in the presence of 500 times molar amounts of molybdenum(6). Under the conditions chosen molybdenum forms a stable peroxide complex and does not interfere with the determination

  17. Mechanism of anodic oxidation of molybdenum and tungsten in nitrate-nitrite melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurkinskij, V.P.; Firsova, E.G.; Morachevskij, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of anode oxidation of tungsten and molybdenum in NaNO 3 -KNO 3 (50 mass %) nitrate-nitrite melts with NaNO 2 -KNO 2 (0.5-50 mass %) addition and in NaNO 2 -KNO 2 (35 mole %) nitrite melt in the 516-580 K temperature range is studied. It is supposed that the process of anode dissloving of the mentioned metals in nitrite melt and nitrate-nitrite mixtures is two-electron. Formation of oxide passivating film is possible under electrolysis on the anode surface, the film is then dissolved in nitrate-nitrite melt with formation of molybdates or tungstates

  18. Brazing of molybdenum- and tungsten based refractory materials with copper and graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutes, J.; Falbriard, P.; Rochette, P.; Nicolas, G.

    1989-01-01

    Molybdenum and Tungsten base refractory metals and alloys have been brazed 1. to copper between 800 0 C and 900 0 C with silver base metal; 2. to graphite, with CVD coatings between 800 0 C and 900 0 C with silver base metal and between 1100 0 C and 1200 0 C with copper base metal; 3. to graphite between 800 0 C and 1100 0 C with silver or nickel base metal. The brazed joints have been characterized by micrographic observations before and after bending tests from room temperature to 800 0 C. 2 tabs., 9 figs. (Author)

  19. Effect of an intermediate tungsten layer on thermal properties of TiC coatings ion plated onto molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, M.; Fujitsuka, M.; Shikama, T.; Okada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Among the various low-Z coating-substrate systems proposed for fusion reactor first-wall applications, molybdenum coated with titanium carbide is considered very promising since it has a good capability of receiving heat from the plasma. The thermal stabilities of TiC layers ion plated onto the molybdenum substrate are discussed with particular reference to the interfacial reaction between the TiC coating and molybdenum. The deposition of an intermediate tungsten layer was found to be very effective in suppressing the formation of reaction layers, resulting in a marked improvement in thermal stabilities of TiC--Mo systems. Thermal shock test using a pulsed electron beam showed that the TiC coatings remained adherent to the molybdenum substrates during energy depositions high enough to melt the substrates within the area of beam deposition. The melt area of the TiC coatings apparently decreased when a tungsten intermediate layer was applied

  20. Tungsten carbide and tungsten-molybdenum carbides as automobile exhaust catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercq, L.; Daubrege, F.; Gengembre, L.; Leclercq, G.; Prigent, M.

    1987-01-01

    Several catalyst samples of tungsten carbide and W, Mo mixed carbides with different Mo/W atom ratios, have been prepared to test their ability to remove carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and propane from a synthetic exhaust gas simulating automobile emissions. Surface characterization of the catalysts has been performed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and selective chemisorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Tungsten carbide exhibits good activity for CO and NO conversion, compared to a standard three-way catalyst based on Pt and Rh. However, this W carbide is ineffective in the oxidation of propane. The Mo,W mixed carbides are markedly different having only a very low activity. 9 refs.; 10 figs.; 5 tabs

  1. Carbon-coated tungsten and molybdenum carbides for electrode of electrochemical capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Takahiro; Soneda, Yasushi; Hatori, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Michio

    2007-01-01

    New electrode materials for electrochemical capacitor, tungsten carbide WC and molybdenum carbide Mo 2 C coated by porous carbon, were prepared through a simple heat treatment of the mixture of K 2 WO 4 and K 2 MoO 4 , respectively, with hydroxy propyl cellulose. Carbide changed to hydroxide during the 1st charge-discharge cycle in H 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte, which showed redox reaction in further charge-discharge cycles, in addition to electric double layers of the carbon formed on its surface. The carbon-coated carbide gave a high capacitance in 1 mol L -1 H 2 SO 4 electrolyte, as about 350 F cm -3 for carbon-coated WC and 550-750 F cm -3 for carbon-coated Mo 2 C. Coating of carbon inhibits the growth of carbide particles during their formation, of which the small particle size make possible to complete transformation to hydroxides during the 1st charge-discharge cycle, and also disturbs the agglomeration of tungsten and molybdenum hydroxides during charge-discharge cycles, as well as porous carbon coated act as electrode material for electric double layers of electrolyte ions

  2. Mechanical properties of molybdenum alloyed liquid phase-sintered tungsten-based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, P.B.; German, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Tungsten-based composites are fabricated from mixed elemental powders using liquid phase sintering, usually with a nickel-iron matrix. During sintering, the tungsten undergoes grain growth, leading to microstructure coarsening that lowers strength but increases ductility. Often the desire is to increase strength at the sacrifice of ductility, and historically, this has been performed by postsintering deformation. There has been considerable research on alloying to adjust the as-sintered mechanical properties to match those of swaged alloys. Prior reports cover many additions, seemingly including much of the periodic table. Unfortunately, many of the modified alloys proved disappointing, largely due to degraded strength at the tungsten-matrix interface. Of these modified alloys, the molybdenum-containing systems exhibit a promising combination of properties, cost, and processing ease. For example, the 82W-8Mo-7Ni-3Fe alloy gives a yield strength that is 34% higher than the equivalent 90W-7Ni-3Fe alloy (from 535 to 715 MPa) but with a 33% decrease in fracture elongation (from 30 to 20% elongation). This article reports on experiments geared to promoting improved properties in the W-Mo-Ni-Fe alloys. However, unlike the prior research which maintained a constant Ni + Fe content and varied the W:Mo ratio, this study considers the Mo:(Ni + Fe) ratio effect for 82, 90, and 93 wt pct W

  3. Effect of cathodic current density on performance of tungsten coatings on molybdenum prepared by electrodeposition in molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Smooth tungsten coatings were prepared at current density below 70 mA cm-2 by electrodeposition on molybdenum substrate from Na2WO4-WO3 -melt at 1173 K in air atmosphere. As the current density reached up to 90 mA cm-2, many significant nodules were observed on the surface of the coating. Surface characterization, microstructure and mechanical properties were performed on the tungsten coatings. As the increasing of current density, the preferred orientation of the coatings changed to (2 0 0). All coatings exhibited columnar-grained-crystalline. There was about a 2 μm thick diffusion layer between tungsten coating and molybdenum substrate. The bending test revealed the tungsten coating had -good bonding strength with the molybdenum substrate. There is a down trend of the grain size of the coating on molybdenum as the current density increased from 30 mA cm-2 to 50 mA cm-2. The coating obtained at 50 mA cm-2 had a minimum grain size of 4.57 μm, while the microhardness of this coating reached to a maximum value of 495 HV.

  4. Irradiation of steel, molybdenum and tungsten - VISA-2f; Ozracivanje celika, molibdena i volframa - VISA-2f -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veljkovic, S; Milasin, N [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1962-12-15

    The objective of the experiment is to study the radiation damage of steel, molybdenum and tungsten after irradiation under fast neutron flux. The sample wires of steel Mo and W will be irradiated, integral fast neutron flux should be higher than 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, the temperature should be as low as possible.

  5. Effect of cathodic current density on performance of tungsten coatings on molybdenum prepared by electrodeposition in molten salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fan, E-mail: jiangfan1109@163.com [Department of Materials and Physics, School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, 219 Ningliu Road, Nanjing 210044, Jiangsu Province (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 10083 (China)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Tungsten coatings were successfully electroplated on molybdenum substrate. • The electrodeposition was studied in the air atmosphere at 1173 K. • The coating had columnar structure with preferential growth orientation of (2 0 0). • The coating obtained at 50 mA cm{sup −2} had a maximum microhardness of 495 HV. - Abstract: Smooth tungsten coatings were prepared at current density below 70 mA cm{sup −2} by electrodeposition on molybdenum substrate from Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}-WO{sub 3} -melt at 1173 K in air atmosphere. As the current density reached up to 90 mA cm{sup −2}, many significant nodules were observed on the surface of the coating. Surface characterization, microstructure and mechanical properties were performed on the tungsten coatings. As the increasing of current density, the preferred orientation of the coatings changed to (2 0 0). All coatings exhibited columnar-grained-crystalline. There was about a 2 μm thick diffusion layer between tungsten coating and molybdenum substrate. The bending test revealed the tungsten coating had –good bonding strength with the molybdenum substrate. There is a down trend of the grain size of the coating on molybdenum as the current density increased from 30 mA cm{sup −2} to 50 mA cm{sup −2}. The coating obtained at 50 mA cm{sup −2} had a minimum grain size of 4.57 μm, while the microhardness of this coating reached to a maximum value of 495 HV.

  6. A process for electrodeposition of layers of niobium, vanadium, molybdenum or tungsten, or of their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diepers, H.; Schmidt, O.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement is proposed for the process for electrodeposition of layers of niobium, vanadium, molybdenum or tungsten or of their alloys from molten-salt electrolytes (fluorid melts) which is to increase the quality of layers in order to obtain regular thickness and smooth surfaces. According to the invention, a pre-separation is executed on an auxiliary cathode before the (preheated) cathode is immersed. The cathode is only charged for separation after the adjustment of a constant anode potential. It is an advantage that the auxiliary cathode is mechanically and electrically connected with the cathode. As an electrolyte, a mixture of niobium fluorides and a eustetic mixture of potassium fluorides, sodium fluorides and lithium fluorides are particularly suitable for the electrodeposition of miobium. (UWI) [de

  7. Atomic absorption spectrometry using tungsten and molybdenum tubes as metal atomizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneco, Satoshi; Katsumata, Hideyuki; Ohta, Kiyohisa; Suzuki, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a metal tube atomizer for the electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (ETA-AAS). Tungsten, molybdenum, platinum tube atomizers were used as the metal atomizer for ETA-AAS. The atomization characteristics of various metals using these metal tube atomizers were investigated. The effects of heating rate of atomizer, atomization temperature, pyrolysis temperature, argon purge gas flow rate and hydrogen addition on the atomic absorption signal were investigated for the evaluation of atomization characteristics. Moreover, ETA-AAS with metal tube atomizer has been combined with the slurry-sampling techniques. Ultrasonic slurry-sampling ETA-AAS with metal tube atomizer were effective for the determination of trace metal elements in biological materials, calcium drug samples, herbal medicine samples, vegetable samples and fish samples. Furthermore, a preconcentration method of trace metals involving adsorption on a metal wire has been applied to ETA-AAS with metal tube atomizer. (author)

  8. Nitrides and carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with high specific-surface area: their synthesis, structure, and catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, L.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature-programmed reactions between trioxides of molybdenum or tungsten and ammonia provide a new method to synthesize dimolybdenum and ditungsten nitrides with specific surface areas to two-hundred-and-twenty and ninety-one square meters per gram, respectively. These are the highest values on record for any unsupported metallic powders. They correspond to three-four nonometer particles. The reaction of molybdenum trioxide with ammonia is topotactic in the sense that one-zero-zero planes of dimolybdenum nitride are parallel to zero-one-zero planes of molybdenum trioxide. As the trioxide transforms, it passes through an oxynitride intermediate with changing bulk structure and increasing surface area and extent of reduction. The nitride product consists of platelets, pseudomorphous with the original trioxide, which can be regarded as highly porous defect single crystals. By treating small particles of dimolybdenum or ditungsten nitride with methane-dihydrogen mixtures it is possible to replace interstitial nitrogen atoms by carbon atoms, without sintering, and thus to prepare carbides of molybdenum and tungsten with very high specific surface areas. Molybdenum nitride powders catalyze ammonia synthesis. A pronounced increase in the catalytic activity with increasing particle size confirms the structure-sensitive character of this reaction

  9. Synthesis, structure and properties of oxo- and dioxochloride complexes of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenko, V.L.; Sergienko, V.S.; Egorova, O.A.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of oxo- and dioxochlorides of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline of molecular and intracomplex type are synthesized and studied by the method of IR spectroscopy. The complexes have octahedral structure. It is proposed that 8-oxyquinoline in molecular complexes is coordinated by central atom through nitrogen atom of heterocycle, but in intracomplex compounds - through heterocyclic nitrogen atom and oxygen atom of deprotonated OH-group. Thermal stability of the complexes is studied [ru

  10. The influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the elevated temperature mechanical properties of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of composition on the tensile and creep strength of 001-line oriented nickel-base superalloy single crystals at temperatures near 1000 C was investigated. Cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten concentrations were varied according to a matrix of compositions based on the single crystal version of MAR-M247. For alloys with the baseline refractory metal level of 3 wt pct Ta and 10 wt pct W, decreases in Co level from 10 to 0 wt pct resulted in increased tensile and creep strength. Substitution of 2 wt pct W for 3 wt pct Ta resulted in decreased creep life at high stresses, but improved life at low stresses. Substitution of Ni for Ta caused large reductions in tensile strength and creep resistance, and corresponding increases in ductility. For these alloys with low Ta-plus-W totals, strength was independent of Co level. The effects of composition on properties were related to the microstructural features of the alloys. In general, high creep strength was associated with high levels of gamma-prime volume fraction, gamma-gamma-prime lattice mismatch, and solid solution hardening.

  11. Cathodic electrodeposition of mixed molybdenum tungsten oxides from peroxo-polymolybdotungstate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrachova, Lilia; Hahn, Benjamin P; Vijayaraghavan, Ganesh; Williams, Ryan D; Stevenson, Keith J

    2006-12-05

    Mixed molybdenum tungsten trioxide films of varying stoichiometry (MoxW1 - xO3, 0 cathodic electrodeposition on indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrates from aqueous peroxo-polymolybdotungstate solutions. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), cyclic voltammetry, and chronocoulometry were used to gain insight into the electrodeposition mechanism. The compositional and structural properties were characterized for MoxW1 - xO3 films deposited at intermediate potentials (-0.35 V vs Ag/AgCl) and sintered at 250 degrees C using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. These studies reveal that films consist of homogeneously mixed MoxW1 - xO3, with an enriched Mo content ranging in composition from 0.4 < x < 0.7 depending upon the mol % Mo present in the deposition solution. Chronoamperometry and spectroelectrochemical measurements were conducted to estimate lithium ion diffusion coefficients and coloration efficiencies for the mixed metal oxide films in 1 M LiClO4/propylene carbonate. The subtle interplay between structural and compositional properties due to the uniform mixing of Mo and W oxide components shows that electrochromic and lithium ion transport properties are moderately enhanced relative to those of single-component WO3 and MoO3 and demonstrate improved structural stability over pure MoO3 polymorphs during electrochemical cycling.

  12. Differential reflectometry of thin film metal oxides on copper, tungsten, molybdenum and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, F.K. III; Hummel, R.E.; Verink, E.D. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A differential reflectometry study was undertaken to investigate the characteristics of thin oxide films on metal substrates. The oxides were produced by heating pure metals of copper, tungsten, molybdenum and chromium in dry oxygen. A new 'halfpolishing' technique was applied to obtain specimens with a step in oxide thickness in order to make them suitable for differential reflectometry. It was found that oxides formed this way yielded the same differential reflectograms as by electrochemical oxidation. A mathematical model involving the interaction of light with a thin corrosion product on metal substrates was applied to generate computer calculated differential reflectograms utilizing various optical constants and thicknesses of the assumed film. Three different thickness ranges have been identified. (a) For large film thicknesses, the differential reflectograms are distinguished by a sequence of interference peaks. (b) If the product of thickness and refraction index of the films is smaller than about 40 nm, no interference peaks are present. Any experimentally observed peaks in differential reflectograms of these films are caused entirely by electron interband transitions. (c) In an intermediate thickness range, superposition of interference and interband peaks are observed. (author)

  13. The Design and Use of Tungsten Coated TZM Molybdenum Tile Inserts in the DIII-D Tokamak Divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Christopher [General Atomics, San Diego; Nygren, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Chrobak, C P. [General Atomics, San Diego; Buchenauer, Dean [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Holtrop, Kurt [General Atomics, San Diego; Unterberg, Ezekial A. [ORNL; Zach, Mike P. [ORNL

    2017-08-01

    Future tokamak devices are envisioned to utilize a high-Z metal divertor with tungsten as theleading candidate. However, tokamak experiments with tungsten divertors have seen significantdetrimental effects on plasma performance. The DIII-D tokamak presently has carbon as theplasma facing surface but to study the effect of tungsten on the plasma and its migration aroundthe vessel, two toroidal rows of carbon tiles in the divertor region were modified with high-Zmetal inserts, composed of a molybdenum alloy (TZM) coated with tungsten. A dedicated twoweek experimental campaign was run with the high-Z metal inserts. One row was coated withtungsten containing naturally occurring levels of isotopes. The second row was coated withtungsten where the isotope 182W was enhanced from the natural level of 26% up to greater than90%. The different isotopic concentrations enabled the experiment to differentiate between thetwo different sources of metal migration from the divertor. Various coating methods wereexplored for the deposition of the tungsten coating, including chemical vapor deposition,electroplating, vacuum plasma spray, and electron beam physical vapor deposition. The coatingswere tested to see if they were robust enough to act as a divertor target for the experiment. Testsincluded cyclic thermal heating using a high power laser and high-fluence deuterium plasmabombardment. The issues associate with the design of the inserts (tile installation, thermal stress,arcing, leading edges, surface preparation, etc.), are reviewed. The results of the tests used toselect the coating method and preliminary experimental observations are presented.

  14. Features of soldering of molybdenum a lols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.L.; Rybkin, B.V.; Cherkasov, A.F.

    1980-01-01

    Soldering features of complex-alloy molybdenum alloys were investigated in comparison with alloys based on solid solutions. Soldering features of heterogeneous molybdenum base alloys were investigated using samples of 0.5-1.O mm sheets with the strain of about 95% made of ingots which had been smelted in arc vacuum furnaces. The soldering of samples was carried out in 5x1O -5 mm Hg vacuum using different sources of heating: radiation, electron-ray and contact. It was shown that heat-resisting soldered joints of heterogeneous molybdenum alloys could be produced using zirconium and niobium base solders containing the most effective hardeners of the parent material (titanum, vanadium, tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten). To preserve high mechanical properties of heterogeneous alloys it was expedient to use for welding local heating sources which permitted to decrease considerably temperature- time conditions of the process

  15. Performance and impedance studies of thin, porous molybdenum and tungsten electrodes for the alkali metal thermoelectric converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, B. L.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Lamb, J. L.; Loveland, M. E.; Bankston, C. P.; Cole, T.

    1988-01-01

    Columnar, porous, magnetron-sputtered molybdenum and tungsten films show optimum performance as alkali metal thermoelectric converter electrodes at thicknesses less than 1.0 micron when used with molybdenum or nickel current collector grids. Power densities of 0.40 W/sq cm for 0.5-micron molybdenum films at 1200 K and 0.35 W/sq cm for 0.5-micron tungsten films at 1180 K were obtained at electrode maturity after 40-90 h. Sheet resistances of magnetron sputter deposited films on sodium beta-double-prime-alumina solid electrolyte (BASE) substrates were found to increase very steeply as thickness is decreased below about 0.3-double-prime 0.4-micron. The ac impedance data for these electrodes have been interpreted in terms of contributions from the bulk BASE and the porous electrode/BASE interface. Voltage profiles of operating electrodes show that the total electrode area, of electrodes with thickness less than 2.0 microns, is not utilized efficiently unless a fairly fine (about 1 x 1 mm) current collector grid is employed.

  16. Synthesis of molybdenum and tungsten modified composite systems based on bisorbent from rice husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duisek Haisagalievich Kamysbaev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of the synthesis of a new composite material modified with polyvalent metals. Rice husk was chosen as a raw material for obtaining a carrier – a bisorbent consisting of carbon and amorphous silicon oxide. The sorption material was obtained from the products of thermal decomposition of rice husks. Further it was modified with ammonium salts of molybdenum and tungsten: (NH46Mo7O24·4H2O and (NH42O·12WO3·5H2O in Mo/W ratios: 5/5 wt. %, 10/5 wt. % and reducted by heating in a stream of hydrogen. The registration of the voltammetric curves in the medium of 1-methyl-4-piperidone was carried out in various background electrolytes: 0.2 M Li2SO4, pH = 6.36 and 0.1 M KOH, pH = 13, 2,5·10–2 M K2HPO4 + 2,5·10–2 M NaH2PO4, pH = 6.86. Differential voltammetric curves were analyzed. The electrochemical activity of the obtained modified composites in the potential range from -1.2 V to 0.5 V was determinated. The mechanism of the proceeding electrochemical processes on these modified electrode materials has been studied. The possibility of further use of synthesized composite systems based on bisorbents from the rice husk for the electrochemical reduction of 1-methyl-4-piperidone was shown.

  17. Tungsten and molybdenum double perovskites as pinning centers in melt-textured Y123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawh, Ravi-Persad; Weinstein, Roy; Parks, Drew; Gandini, Alberto; Ren, Yanru; Rusakova, Irene

    2003-01-01

    Y123+30 mol% Y211 powders were doped with tungsten and platinum, and textured. Microstructure studies show the presence of profuse spherical deposits, 200-300 nm in diameter. These deposits were identified as (W{sub 0.5}Pt{sub 0.5})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6}, a double perovskite. The size of the W-rich deposits is independent of the W doping level. There is no substitution of W into the Y123 matrix. For Pt doping >0.5 wt.%, trapped field is observed to increase monotonically up to 40% for W doping of up to 0.48 wt.%. We conservatively estimate that this corresponds to a 60% increase in J{sub c} at constant field. Thus (W{sub 0.5}Pt{sub 0.5})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6} double perovskites deposits act as pinning centers. Similar studies of molybdenum doping indicate deposits 200-300 nm, of (Mo{sub 0.5}Pt{sub 0.5})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6}, also a double perovskite. The (W{sub 0.5}Pt{sub 0.5})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6} and (Mo{sub 0.5}Pt{sub 0.5})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6} deposits are remarkably similar to the (U{sub 0.6}Pt{sub 0.4})YBa{sub 2}O{sub 6} deposits found earlier in U-doped Y123. Therefore, W and Mo are suitable non-radioactive substitutes for U.

  18. Neutron-activation determination of phosphorus and sulfur in molybdenum and tungsten with the help of a beta-spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmanova, M.M.; Mukhamedshina, N.M.; Kim, R.D.; Kaganov, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    An instrumental variant of the neutron-activation determination of phosphorus and sulfur in molybdenum and tungsten was developed with the help of a β-spectrometer that makes it possible to discriminate the participation of the 99 Mo and 187 W radioisotopes in the overall activity of the sample. It was shown that simultaneous determination of P and S on the basis of the 32 P radioisotope is feasible if their contents are comparable or are not different by more than 1-1.5 orders of magnitude, and then the maximum relative standard deviation is 0.15

  19. Kinetics of carbide formation in the molybdenum-tungsten coatings used in the ITER-like Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, H.; Rasinski, M.; von Toussaint, U.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Balden, M.; Elgeti, S.; Ruset, C.; Matthews, G. F.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of tungsten carbide formation was investigated for tungsten coatings on carbon fibre composite with a molybdenum interlayer as they are used in the ITER-like Wall in JET. The coatings were produced by combined magnetron sputtering and ion implantation. The investigation was performed by preparing focused ion beam cross sections from samples after heat treatment in argon atmosphere. Baking of the samples was done at temperatures of 1100 °C, 1200 °C, and 1350 °C for hold times between 30 min and 20 h. It was found that the data can be well described by a diffusional random walk with a thermally activated diffusion process. The activation energy was determined to be (3.34 ± 0.11) eV. Predictions for the isothermal lifetime of this coating system were computed from this information.

  20. The determination of molybdenum, by x-ray-fluorescence spectrometry, in ores, residues, and concentrates of tin and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spimpolo, G.F.

    1985-01-01

    Three methods were investigated that would minimize or possibly eliminate the matrix variations in the analysis of molybdenum, and possibly simplify the existing method for the analysis of tin and tungsten, which often occur together with molybdenum. The three methods involve the use of back-scattered radiation in the determination of the mass-absorption coefficient of unknown samples, the use of a background ratio with an exponent that minimizes the effect of matrix variations, and the use of an internal standard that shows the same matrix variation as the analyte. In the first two approaches, the sample preparation and analysis are much simpler than in the third, but, for the great variety of mass absorptions encountered, the internal-standard method proved to be the most successful. The precision of analysis for molybdenum by that method ranges from a relative standard deviation of 0,06 at 50μg/g to 0,02 at 1 000 μg/g. The lower limit of detection is 4 μg/g. The recommended laboratory procedure for the method using internal standards is detailed in an appendix

  1. Use of ion exchange during preparation of raw materials for production of molybdenum and tungsten of high purify

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhin, A.A.; Rumyantsev, V.K.; Taushkanov, V.P.; Maksimkov, S.M.; Majorov, D.Yu.; Pak, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    The data on the application of selective ionites for the steep purification of ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions, are given. It is shown that to purify molybdenum and ammonium tungstate solutions from the impuerities of alkali earth and two- and threevalent transition metals, iminodiacetate ampholites of the ANKB-35 type are the most effective sorbents. To purify from phosphorus, silicon and arsenic impurities composition ionites on the base of hydrated oxides of multivalent metals introduced in the granules of porous cationites should be used. To extract phosphorus, silicon, arsenic impurities from ammonium molybdate and tungstate solutions and tungsten from ammonium molybdate solutions the method of their coprecipitation with iron (3) hydroxide can also be used. The best results on the purification of ammonium molybdate from tungstate provides for the application of structural organomineral ionites as well as weak-basicity anionites of the AN-31 type and its different modifications containing hydroxyl groups along with aminogroups. To purity ammonium tungstate solutions from molybdate a method is developed which transforms molybdenum in the form of thiocomplexes and the following selective sorption by strong-basicity anionites. The data on the quality of molybdenum monocrystals which are taken from the raw material purified using ionites, are given

  2. 2s 2p 3P10 → 2s21S0 intercombination line in beryllium-like krypton, molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, R.

    1979-01-01

    Transition probabilities are evaluated for the 2s 2p 3 P 1 0 → 2s 2 1 S 0 transition in beryllium-like ions for krypton, molybdenum and tungsten, using configuration-interaction wavefunctions. The importance of the 2s 3p 1 P 1 0 configuration is considered

  3. A density-functional theory approach to the existence and stability of molybdenum and tungsten sesquioxide polymorphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Nils; Dronskowski, Richard [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie; RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance; Reimann, Christoph; Bredow, Thomas [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie; Weber, Dominik; Luedtke, Tobias; Lerch, Martin [Berlin Technische Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie

    2017-03-01

    The sesquioxides of molybdenum and tungsten have been reported as thin films or on surfaces as early as 1971, but the preparation of bulk materials and their crystal structures are still unknown up to the present day. We present a systematic ab initio approach to their possible syntheses and crystal structures applying complementary methods and basis-set types. For both compounds, the corundum structure is the most stable and does not display any imaginary frequencies. Calculations targeted at a high-pressure synthesis starting from the stable oxides and metals predict a reaction pressure of 15 GPa for Mo{sub 2}O{sub 3} and over 60 GPa for W{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  4. Fundamentals of and experiences with forming by rolling of sintered rods of the high-melting metals molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohlstrung, G.; Marx, H.; Bresch, J.; Leich, M.; Kalning, I.

    1986-01-01

    An efficient and economical technique for rolling sintered rods of the high-melting metals molybdenum and tungsten which comprises only a minimum of processing steps and provides crucial advantages in comparison with the conventional hammering procedure has been developed for application in medium-sized powder-metallurgical plants. The advantages are, in particular, given with the favourable structure development and the elimination of pores from the sintered bar as a result of the higher degree of deformation, increased labour productivity, savings of electrical energy and consumables, as well as a reduction of the working inconveniencies. Experiences gained in test series as well as in industrial practice indicate that final wire diameters can be obtained with a high material economy, provided that the preceding and subsequent process stages are adapted in the optimum manner dependent on the physical and chemical parameters of the starting material and the strain-hardening behaviour in the process of forming by rolling. (orig.) [de

  5. Coupling effects of tungsten and molybdenum on microstructure and stress-rupture properties of a nickel-base cast superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongjin Zhou

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to comprehensively understand the forming mechanism of abnormal phases solidified in a nickel-base cast superalloy with additives of tungsten and molybdenum, the coupling effects of W and Mo on the microstructure and stress-rupture properties were investigated in this paper. The results indicated that the precipitation of primary α-(W, Mo phase depended tremendously on the amount of W and Mo addition. When the total amount of W and Mo was greater than 5.79 at%, α-(W, Mo phase became easily precipitated in the alloy. With increasing of Mo/W ratio, the dendrite-like α-(W, Mo phases were apt to convert into small bars or blocky-like phases at the vicinities of γ′/γ eutectic. The morphological changes of α-(W, Mo phase can be interpreted as the non-equilibrium solidification of W and Mo in the alloy. Since the large sized α-(W, Mo phase has detrimental effects on stress-rupture properties in as-cast conditions, secondary cracks may mainly initiate at and then propagate along the interfaces of brittle phases and soft matrix. During exposing at 1100 ℃ for 1000 h, the α-(W, Mo phases transformed gradually into bigger and harder M6C carbide, which results in decreasing of stress-rupture properties of the alloy. Finally, the alloy with an addition of 14W-1Mo(wt% maintained the longest stress lives at high temperatures and therefore it revealed the best microstructure stability after 1100 ℃/1000 h thermal exposure. Keywords: Superalloy, Tungsten and molybdenum, Cast, Microstructure, Stress-rupture properties

  6. Experimental investigation of the behaviour of tungsten and molybdenum alloys at high strain-rate and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Scapin, Martina; Carra, Federico; Peroni, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The introduction in recent years of new, extremely energetic particle accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) gives impulse to the development and testing of refractory metals and alloys based on molybdenum and tungsten to be used as structural materials. In this perspective, in this work the experimental results of a tests campaign on Inermet® IT180 and pure Molybdenum (sintered by two different producers) are presented. The investigation of the mechanical behaviour was performed in tension varying the strain-rates, the temperatures and both of them. Overall six orders of magnitude in strain-rate (between 10−3 and 103 s−1) were covered, starting from quasi-static up to high dynamic loading conditions. The high strain-rate tests were performed using a direct Hopkinson Bar setup. Both in quasi-static and high strain-rate conditions, the heating of the specimens was obtained with an induction coil system, controlled in feedback loop, based on measurements from thermocouples directly welded on...

  7. Tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschnauer, H.

    1978-01-01

    There is no substitute for tungsten in its main field of application so that the demand will not decrease, but there is a need for further important applications. If small variations are left out of account, a small but steady increase in the annual tungsten consumption can be expected. The amount of tungsten available will increase due to the exploritation of new deposits and the extension of existing mines. This tendency will probably be increased by the world-wide prospection. It is hard to make an assessment of the amount of tungsten are obtained in the People's Republic of china, the purchases of Eastern countries in the West, and the sales policy of the USA; pice forecasts are therefore hard to make. A rather interesting subject with regard to the tungsten cycle as a whole is the reprocessing of tungsten-containing wastes. (orig.) [de

  8. Molybdenum and tungsten disulfides surface-modified with a conducting polymer, polyaniline, for application in electrorheology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stejskal, Jaroslav; Mrlík, M.; Plachý, T.; Trchová, Miroslava; Kovářová, Jana; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 120, November (2017), s. 30-37 ISSN 1381-5148 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-04109S Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : molybdenum sulfide * polyaniline * conducting polymer Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 3.151, year: 2016

  9. A kinetic study of the redox reactions of complex cyanides of iron, molybdenum and tungsten with compounds of the group VI A elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetic study arises out of the fact that few is known about redox kinetics of complex cyanides of molybdenum and tungsten. The redox kinetics of the complex cyanides of iron with organic and inorganic compounds are well known in organic chemistry. This comparitive study is done to obtain more information on redox reactions of complex cyanides of molybdenum and tungsten considering its greater applicability in organic and inorganic chemistry because of the propitious reduction potential of this complex cyanide in acidic and alkaline mediums. Various redox systems are kinetically investigated regarding the influence of the oxidising agent, reducing agent hydrogen ions and alkaline-metal ions on the reaction rate. A reaction mechanism is proposed for every system

  10. Application of neutron activation analysis to the study of impurities in molybdenum, tungsten and nuclear graphite; Application de l'analyse par activation neutronique a l'etude des impuretes dans le molybdene, le tungstene et le graphite nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinte, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-10-15

    A neutron activation method is described for the analysis of a maximum number of foreign elements in molybdenum, tungsten and graphite. The various elements are isolated using a systematic separation programme; the elements are subsequently analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using {gamma}-spectrometry. By this method are dosed 27 elements in molybdenum and tungsten, and 20 elements in graphite to which can be added those elements which are already the object of routine analysis: V, Mn, Si, P, S, Cl and 14 rare earths. (author) [French] On decrit une methode d'analyse par activation neutronique permettant de doser un maximum d'elements etrangers dans le molybdene, le tungstene et le graphite. En suivant un schema de separation systematique, on isole les differents elements dont les analyses qualitatives et quantitatives sont ensuite effectuees par spectrometrie {gamma}. Par cette methode, on dose 27 elements dans le molybdene et le tungstene, 20 elements dans le graphite, auxquels on peut encore ajouter les elements doses couramment: V, Mn, Si, P, S, Cl et 14 Terres Rares. (auteur)

  11. Precipitation and ion floatation of molybdenum, tungsten, copper, and cobalt compounds by cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strizhko, V.S.; Shekhirev, D.V.; Ignatkina, V.A.; Alimova, R.Eh.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental data are presented on application of ion-flotation in purification of low-concentration (less than 10 -3 M) acid solutions from molybdenum, tungsten, copper and cobalt ions. Two collectors, i.e. DEDC and CTMAB have been tested, their optimal consumption is determined. It is shown that CTMAB provides for selective purification from Mo and W ions and allows foam product with little water on flotation in a column to be obtained. But the achieved residual W and Mo concentration of 20 to 10 mg/l require deeper finishing purification in order to meet a sanitary permissible limiting concentration value employing other methods. DEDC provides for sufficient purification from nonferrous metal ions but does not possess selectivity with respect to some metals. The obtained results have shown the possibility to apply ion-flotation in concentration of metal ions in foam product in the process of waste water purification with further finishing purification up to a sanitary permissible limiting concentration value. 14 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  12. Sputtering of molybdenum and tungsten nano rods and nodules irradiated with 150 eV argon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoniem, N.M.; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Neff, Anton L.; Allain, Jean-Paul; Williams, Brian; Sharghi-Moshtaghin, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The work was motivated by the idea of designing material surface architecture, using the CVD process, that can result in a reduction in the surface sputtering rate as compared to planar surfaces. • We present an experimental investigation of the effects of low energy (150 eV) Ar ions on surface sputtering, amorphization of near-surface layers, and the formation of surface ripples in Mo and W nano-rods and nano-nodules at room temperature. • We show that the sputtering rate decreases in all nano-architecture surfaces as compared to planar surfaces. • We discovered that energy deposition in the near surface layer in W leads to its amorphization at room temperature, to a depth of 5–10 nm. • We also show that surfaces of nano rods become rippled as a result of an ion-induced roughening instability. - Abstract: The influence of surface nano architecture on the sputtering and erosion of tungsten and molybdenum is discussed. We present an experimental investigation of the effects of low energy (150 eV) Ar ions on surface sputtering in Mo and W nano-rods and nano-nodules at room temperature. Measurements of the sputtering rate from Mo and W surfaces with nano architecture indicate that the surface topology plays an important role in the mechanism of surface erosion and restructuring. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is utilized as a material processing route to fabricate nano-architectures on the surfaces of W and Mo substrates. First, Re dendrites form as needles with cross-sections that have hexagonal symmetry, and are subsequently employed as scaffolding for further deposition of W and Mo to create nano rod surface architecture. The sputtering of surface atoms in these samples shows a marked dependence on their surface architecture. The sputtering rate is shown to decrease at normal ion incidence in all nano-architecture surfaces as compared to planar surfaces. Moreover, and unlike an increase in sputtering of planar crystalline surfaces, the

  13. Hot tungsten plate based ionizer for cesium plasma in a multi-cusp field experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Amitkumar D.; Sharma, Meenakshee; Ramasubramanian, Narayanan; Chattopadhyay, Prabal K.

    2015-01-01

    In a newly proposed basic experiment, contact-ionized cesium ions will be confined by a multi cups magnetic field configuration. The cesium ion will be produced by impinging collimated neutral atoms on an ionizer consisting of the hot tungsten plate. The temperature of the tungsten plate will also be made high enough (∼2700 K) such that it will contribute electrons also to the plasma. It is expected that at this configuration the cesium plasma would be really quiescent and would be free from even the normal drift waves observed in the classical Q-machines. For the ionizer a design based on F. F. Chen's design was made. This ionizer is very fine machining and exotic material like Tungsten plate, Molybdenum screws, rings, and Boron Nitride ceramics etc. The fine and careful machining of these materials was very hard. In this paper, the experience about to join the tungsten wire to molybdenum plate and alloy of tantalum and molybdenum ring is described. In addition experimental investigations have been made to measure 2D temperature distribution profile of the Tungsten hot plate using infrared camera and the uniformity of temperature distribution over the hot plate surface is discussed. (author)

  14. Tungsten and refractory metals 3, proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Tungsten and Refractory Metals was held in Greater Washington DC at the McLean Hilton, McLean Virginia, on November 15--16, 1995. This meeting was the third in a series of conferences held in the Washington DC area. The first meeting was in 1992 and was entitled ''International Conference on Tungsten and Tungsten Alloys.'' In 1994, the scope of the meeting was expanded to include other refractory metals such as molybdenum, iridium, rhenium, tantalum and niobium. The tremendous success of that meeting was the primary motivation for this Conference. The broader scope (the inclusion of other refractory metals and alloys) of the Conference was kept intact for this meeting. In fact, it was felt that the developments in the technology of these materials required a common forum for the interchange of current research information. The papers presented in this meeting examined the rapid advancements in the technology of refractory metals, with special emphasis on the processing, structure, and properties. Among the properties there was emphasis on both quasi-static and dynamic rates. Another topic that received considerable interest was the area of refractory carbides and tungsten-copper composites. One day of concurrent session was necessary to accommodate all of the presentations

  15. Oxidation of cyclic amines by molybdenum(II and tungsten(II halocarbonyls, [M(CO4X2]2 (M = Mo, W; X = Cl, Br

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Mbuvi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The molybdenum(II and tungsten(II halocarbonyls, [M(CO4X2]2 (M = Mo, W; X = Cl, Br react with a large excess of the nitrogen bases, 1-methylpyrrolidine, 1-methylpiperidine, 1-ethylpiperidine and 2-ethylpiperidine to give aminecarbonyl complexes of the type M(CO3L3 (L= alkylamine. Excess piperidine reacts with the tungsten halocarbonyls, [W(CO4X2]2 (X = Cl, Br, to give the trans isomer of the complex, W(CO3(C5H11N3. The halogens were recovered as the amminium salts, amine, HX. The oxidized amine dimerized to form a yellow product which was recovered as an oily liquid but in very small amounts. However, in the reaction between Mo(CO4Br2 and 1-ethylpiperidine, a yellow crystalline solid, with a melting point of 224 oC was recovered in sufficient amounts for elemental analysis, melting point and spectral data. Its mass spectrum showed a molecular ion peak at m+/z = 222, a clear evidence that the oxidized amine dimerizes. The cyclic dibasic amine piperazine, C4H10N2 is not, however, oxidized by these halocarbonyls but rather it reacts by substituting some CO groups to form products of the type, M(CO3(C4H10N22X2 (M = Mo, W; X = Cl, Br. Products were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV, 1H NMR and mass spectrometry.

  16. Codeposition of either molybdenum or tungsten with the metals of iron group 8. The citric acid influence on codeposition of nickel and tungsten from sulphamic electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernotas, A.; Kadziauskiene, V.; Jasulaitiene, V.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of citric acid on codeposition of Ni and W from sulphamic electrolytes was investigated by measuring the hydrogen content in electro deposits and determining the current efficiency and the alloy composition by chemical analysis and X-ray spectroscopy. The reduction of W(VI) to W(0) in the electrolyte with and without citric acid was found to proceed through the formation of tungsten compounds of intermediate oxidation state. It is supposed that an increased amount of tungsten in the alloys with the increase of citric acid concentration in the electrolyte (to 0.042 mol/l) is caused by a large amount of W(IV) at the cathodic surface. The further increase of the concentration of citric acid in the electrolyte causes a decrease of tungsten amount in the alloy, because the blocking of the metallic surface of Ni and W by W compounds of intermediate oxidation state makes the reduction of W(VI) to W(0) more difficult. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  17. Peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and thorium(IV) ions containing tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarafder, M.T.H.; Khan, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), thorium(IV) and their possible oxygen transfer reactions is presented. An attempt has also been made to study the size of the metal ions and the electronic effect derived from the tridentate Schiff bases on the v 1 (O-O) mode of the complexes in their IR spectra

  18. Potentiometric determination of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusina, O.N.; Gorbatkova, B.Kh.

    1977-01-01

    Potentiometric titration by lead acetate is used to determine molybdenum in the form of molybdate ions. The behaviour of bimetallic electrode couples, i.e. tungsten-lead, platinum-lead, lead-carbon electrode, molybdenum-carbon electrode platinum-molibdenum has been investigated. The greatest jump of the potential in the finite point is observed for platinum-molybdenum electrode couple (150 mV/ml at pH 4.0-5.5). The limiting concentration of molybdenum in potentiometric titration by lead acetate is 2.8x10 -4 M. The measurements are accurate to within +-0.1%

  19. Effects of tungsten and titanium oxide nanoparticles on the diazotrophic growth and metals acquisition by Azotobacter vinelandii under molybdenum limiting condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Patrick; Darnajoux, Romain; Phalyvong, Karine; Bellenger, Jean-Philippe

    2013-02-19

    The acquisition of essential metals, such as the metal cofactors (molybdenum (Mo) and iron (Fe)) of the nitrogenase, the enzyme responsible for the reduction of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonium, is critical to N(2) fixing bacteria in soil. The release of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) to the environment could be detrimental to N(2) fixing bacteria by introducing a new source of toxic metals and by interfering with the acquisition of essential metals such as Mo. Since Mo has been reported to limit nonsymbiotic N(2) fixation in many ecosystems from tropical to cold temperate, this question is particularly acute in the context of Mo limitation. Using a combination of microbiology and analytical chemistry techniques, we have evaluated the effect of titanium (Ti) and tungsten (W) oxide nanoparticles on the diazotrophic growth and metals acquisition in pure culture of the ubiquitous N(2) fixing bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii under Mo replete and Mo limiting conditions. We report that under our conditions (≤10 mg·L(-1)) TiO(2) NPs have no effects on the diazotrophic growth of A. vinelandii while WO(3) NPs are highly detrimental to the growth especially under Mo limiting conditions. Our results show that the toxicity of WO(3) NPs to A. vinelandii is due to an interference with the catechol-metalophores assisted uptake of Mo.

  20. Hydro-Metathesis of Long-Chain Olefin (1-decene) using Well-Defined Silica-Supported Tungsten (VI), Molybdenum (VI) and Tantalum (V) Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Saidi, Aya

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, catalysis lies at the heart of economy growth mainly in the petroleum industry. Catalysis can offer real and potential solutions to the current challenges for a long-term sustainable energy, green chemistry, and environmental protection

  1. Kinetic method for determination of molybdenum(6) and tungsten(6) from oxidaton of O-aminophenol with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejngol'ts, S.U.; Vasnev, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    A new method for determination of Mo(6) and W(6), based on the oxidation of O-aminophenol with hydrogen peroxide, catalysed by Mo and W(6) ions, is suggested. The reaction takes place in the neutral medium at a rather high substrate concentrations. The 1.5 M acetate buffer solution, 0.2N EDTA and 0.1M solution of O-aminophenol in 0.1M HCl were suggested for determination of Mo (0.2N EDTA was used for Fe(3) camouflage). The 1.5M acetate buffer solution with 0.3M K 2 C 2 O 4 xH 2 O additions, for Fe(3) and Mo(6) camouflage, and 0.1M O-aminophenol solution in 0.1M solution of H 2 C 2 O 4 xH 2 O were used for tungsten determination. The range for Mo and W determination is 3x10 -3 and 1x10 -2 mkg/ml respectively. The range of Mo and W concentrations under determination is from 3x10 -3 -10 -2 to 2 mkg/ml. The techniques for the analysis of highly pure substances is developed

  2. X-ray target with substrate of molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    Rotary targets for x-ray tubes are provided comprising a molybdenum base body alloyed with a stabilizing proportion of iron, silicon, cobalt, tantalum, niobium, hafnium, stable metal oxide, or a mixture of the preceding

  3. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nikel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) seamless pipe and tube

  4. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045 and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) plate, sheet and strip

  5. Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    Standard specification for Nickel-Chromium-Iron alloys (UNS N06600, N06601, N06603, N06690, N06693, N06025, N06045, and N06696), Nickel-Chromium-Cobalt-Molybdenum alloy (UNS N06617), and Nickel-Iron-Chromium-Tungsten alloy (UNS N06674) rod, bar, and wire

  6. Superconducting properties and uniaxial strain characteristics of Nb3Sn fiber-reinforced superconductors with tantalum reinforcement fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Kazuaki; Umeda, Masaichi; Agatsuma, Koh; Tateishi, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    We have been developing fiber-reinforced superconductors (FRS) for high-field and large-scale magnets. Tungsten fibers have been selected as the reinforcement fiber for FRS so far because tungsten has the highest elastic modulus of approximately 400 GPa which can minimize the strain from electromagnetic force. The preparation process of FRS consists of sputtering deposition and heat treatment because it may be difficult to apply drawing methods to materials of high-elastic modulus such as tungsten. Tantalum has high elastic modulus of 178 GPa and its thermal expansion coefficient that is closer to that of Nb 3 Sn than tungsten's, which means prestrain in Nb 3 Sn in FRS is reduced by adopting tantalum fibers. Tantalum has been used as barriers between bronze and copper in conventional Nb 3 Sn superconductors which are usually prepared with drawing process despite of the tantalum's high elastic modulus. That implies drawing process may be applied to prepare FRS with tantalum reinforcement fibers. In this paper, FRS using tantalum fibers prepared with sputtering process are described with making comparison with FRS of tungsten to clarify the basic properties of FRS using tantalum fibers. Depth profiles in Nb 3 Sn layer in FRS were measured to examine reaction between superconducting layers and reinforcement fibers. Superconducting properties including strain and stress characteristics were shown. Those data will contribute to design of FRS using tantalum reinforcement fibers with adopts the drawing processes. (author)

  7. Vapor deposition of tantalum and tantalum compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkula, M.

    1996-01-01

    Tantalum, and many of its compounds, can be deposited as coatings with techniques ranging from pure, thermal chemical vapor deposition to pure physical vapor deposition. This review concentrates on chemical vapor deposition techniques. The paper takes a historical approach. The authors review classical, metal halide-based techniques and current techniques for tantalum chemical vapor deposition. The advantages and limitations of the techniques will be compared. The need for new lower temperature processes and hence new precursor chemicals will be examined and explained. In the last section, they add some speculation as to possible new, low-temperature precursors for tantalum chemical vapor deposition

  8. Structure of tungsten electrodeposited from oxide chloride-fluoride molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlovskij, V.A.; Reznichenko, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigation results on the influence of electrolysis parameters and electrolyte composition on tungsten cathode deposit structure are presented. The electrolysis was performed in NaCl-NaF-WO 3 molten salts using tungsten and tungsten coated molybdenum cathodes. Morphological and metallographic studies of tungsten crystals were carrier out. Tungsten deposits were obtained in the form of crystalline conglomerates, sponge and high dispersity powder

  9. Niobium Nb and tantalum Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining niobium and tantalum in various objects are described. Nb and Ta are separated with the aid of N-benzoyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine by precipitating Nb(5) from a tartaric acid solution with subsequent precipitation of Ta from the filtrate. The gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta in steels is based on their quantitative separation from a diluted solution by way of hydrolysis with subsequent after-precipitation with phenylarsonic acid (in the absence of W). The gravimetric determination of Nb in the presence of W is carried out with the aid of Cupferron. To determine Nb in its carbide, Nb(5) reduced to Nb(3) is titrated with a solution of K 2 Cr 2 O 7 in the presence of phenyl-anthranilic acid. The photometric determination of Nb in tungsten-containing steels and in ores containing Ti, W, Mo and Cr is based on the rhodanide method. Nb is determined in alloys with Zr and Ti photometrically with the aid of 4-(2-pyridylazo)-resorcin and in alloyed steels with the aid of benzhydroxamic acid. The latter complex is extracted with chloroform. This method is used to determine Nb in rocks. The photometric determination of Ta in TiCl 4 is carried out with the aid of pyrogallol, in commercial niobium with the aid of methyl violet, and in steel with the aid of 4-(-pyridylazo)-resorcin. Also described is the polarographic determination of Nb in tantalum pentoxide

  10. An experimental assessment of methods used to compute secondary electron emission yield for tungsten and molybdenum electrodes based on exposure to Alcator C-Mod scrape-off layer plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, W.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Kuang, A. Q.

    2018-03-01

    Plasma potentials computed from Langmuir probe data rely on a method to account for secondary electron emission (SEE) from the electrodes. However, significant variations exist among published models for SEE and the reported experimental parameters used to evaluate them. As a means to critically assess SEE computation methods, two of four tungsten electrodes on a Langmuir-Mach probe head were replaced with molybdenum and exposed to Alcator C-Mod boundary plasmas where electron temperatures exceed 50 eV and SEE becomes significant. In this situation, plasma potentials computed for either material should be identical—the SEE evaluation method should properly account for the differences in SEE yields. Of the six methods used to compute SEE, two are found to produce consistent results (Sternglass model with Bronstein experimental parameters and Young-Dekker model with Bronstein experimental parameters). In contrast, the method previously used for C-Mod data analysis (Sternglass model with Kollath parameters) was found to be inconsistent. We have since adopted Young-Dekker-Bronstein as the preferred method.

  11. Fabrication of a Tantalum-Based Josephson Junction for an X-Ray Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohashi, Shin'ichi; Gotoh, Kohtaroh; Yokoyama, Naoki

    2000-06-01

    We have fabricated a tantalum-based Josephson junction for an X-ray detector. The tantalum layer was selected for the junction electrode because of its long quasiparticle lifetime, large X-ray absorption efficiency and stability against thermal cycling. We have developed a buffer layer to fabricate the tantalum layer with a body-centered cubic structure. Based on careful consideration of their superconductivity, we have selected a niobium thin layer as the buffer layer for fabricating the tantalum base electrode, and a tungsten thin layer for the tantalum counter electrode. Fabricated Nb/AlOx-Al/Ta/Nb and Nb/Ta/W/AlOx-Al/Ta/Nb Josephson junctions exhibited current-voltage characteristics with a low subgap leakage current.

  12. Spectrographic determination of impurities in high-purity tantalum oxide and niobium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.T.G.; Russell, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of spectrographic methods by direct current arc excitation and carrier distillation for the determination of impurities in tantalum and niobium oxides are described. Iron, silicon, aluminium, titanium, calcium, silver, tin, magnesium, and manganese can be determined in tantalum oxide and niobium oxide in concentrations ranging from 3 to 300 p.p.m. Niobium can be determined in tantalum oxide in concentrations ranging from 10 to 300 p.p.m. Tantalum cannot be determined in niobium oxide, and tungsten cannot be determined in either matrix as a result of the absence of sensitive lines in the spectra of these elements. Relative standard deviations of analyte element concentrations are in the region of 0,18 for tantalum oxide samples, and 0,13 for niobium oxide samples. A detailed laboratory method is included. 4 figs., 4 tabs., 3 refs

  13. Elaboration, physical and electrochemical characterizations of CO tolerant PEMFC anode materials. Study of platinum-molybdenum and platinum-tungsten alloys and composites; Elaborations et caracterisations electrochimiques et physiques de materiaux d'anode de PEMFC peu sensibles a l'empoisonnement par CO: etude d'alliages et de composites a base de platine-molybdene et de platine-tungstene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyrelade, E.

    2005-06-15

    PEMFC development is hindered by the CO poisoning ability of the anode platinum catalyst. It has been previously shown that the oxidation potential of carbon monoxide adsorbed on the platinum atoms can be lowered using specific Pt based catalysts, either metallic alloys or composites. The objective is then to realize a catalyst for which the CO oxidation is compatible with the working potential of a PEMFC anode. In our approach, to enhance the CO tolerance of platinum based catalyst supported on carbon, we studied platinum-tungsten and platinum-molybdenum alloys and platinum-metal oxide materials (Pt-WO{sub x} and Pt-MoO{sub x}). The platinum based alloys demonstrate a small effect of the second metal towards the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The platinum composites show a better tolerance to carbon monoxide. Electrochemical studies on both Pt-MoO{sub x} and Pt-WO{sub x} demonstrate the ability of the metal-oxides to promote the ability of Pt to oxidize CO at low potentials. However, chrono-amperometric tests reveal a bigger influence of the tungsten oxide. Complex chemistry reactions on the molybdenum oxide surface make it more difficult to observe. (author)

  14. Niobium and tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Papp, John F.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Niobium and tantalum are transition metals that are almost always found together in nature because they have very similar physical and chemical properties. Their properties of hardness, conductivity, and resistance to corrosion largely determine their primary uses today. The leading use of niobium (about 75 percent) is in the production of high-strength steel alloys used in pipelines, transportation infrastructure, and structural applications. Electronic capacitors are the leading use of tantalum for high-end applications, including cell phones, computer hard drives, and such implantable medical devices as pacemakers. Niobium and tantalum are considered critical and strategic metals based on the potential risks to their supply (because current production is restricted to only a few countries) and the significant effects that a restriction in supply would have on the defense, energy, high-tech industrial, and medical sectors.The average abundance of niobium and tantalum in bulk continental crust is relatively low—8.0 parts per million (ppm) niobium and 0.7 ppm tantalum. Their chemical characteristics, such as small ionic size and high electronic field strength, significantly reduce the potential for these elements to substitute for more common elements in rock-forming minerals and make niobium and tantalum essentially immobile in most aqueous solutions. Niobium and tantalum do not occur naturally as pure metals but are concentrated in a variety of relatively rare oxide and hydroxide minerals, as well as in a few rare silicate minerals. Niobium is primarily derived from the complex oxide minerals of the pyrochlore group ((Na,Ca,Ce)2(Nb,Ti,Ta)2(O,OH,F)7), which are found in some alkaline granite-syenite complexes (that is, igneous rocks containing sodium- or potassium-rich minerals and little or no quartz) and carbonatites (that is, igneous rocks that are more than 50 percent composed of primary carbonate minerals, by volume). Tantalum is derived mostly from the

  15. Process for recovering tungsten from alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onozaki, S.; Nemoto, S.; Hazeyama, T.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a process for recovering tungsten from an alkaline leaching solution of tungsten ores. This invention comprises adjusting the pH of an alkaline leaching solution which is obtained by lixiviating ore containing tungsten with an alkaline solution to 7--8 with acid to oxidize molybdic acid ions in the solution, adding a sulfide donor, then precipitating molybdenum sulfide compounds by adjusting the pH value of the solution to 2--3. Tungstic acid ions are recovered as calcium tungstate by the addition of a calcium ion donor after the molybdenum sulfide compounds are separated

  16. Determination of niobium, tantalum, and uranium in tantalite-columbite ores by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry; Application de la spectrometrie de fluorescence de rayos X a la determination de niobium, tantale et uranium dans niobiotantalites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latorre, O; Bermudez Polonio, J

    1964-07-01

    A simple and quick procedure is carried out to determine niobium, tantalum and uranium employing the internal standard technique; zinc as internal standard for tantalum and molybdenum for niobium and uranium were selected. Some inter element effects were studied and the ratios. (Author)

  17. Potentiometric titration of molybdenum (6) with a cathode-polarized solid electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeva, L.V.; Kimstach, V.A.; Bagdasarov, K.N.

    1980-01-01

    The possibility has been studied of using solid electrodes for potentiometric precipitation titration of molybdenum (6). A cathode-polarized electrode, electrochemically covered with a molybdenum blue layer, can be used as indicator electrode. The best results were obtained during deposition of molybdenum blue on a tungsten electrode. The mechanism of electrode work during titration has been investigated. A procedure has been developed of titration of molybdenum (6) in acid solutions using hydroxylamine N-aryl derivatives as titrants

  18. Tantalum markers in radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronson, A.S.; Jonsson, N.; Alberius, P.

    1985-01-01

    The biocompatibility of two types of radiopaque tantalum markers was evaluated histologically. Reactions to pin markers (99.9% purity) and spherical markers (95.2% purity) were investigated after 3-6 weeks in rabbits and 5-48 weeks in children with abnormal growth. Both marker types were firmly attached to bone trabeculae; this was most pronounced in rabbit bone, and no adverse macroscopic reactions were observed. Microscopically, no reactions or only slight fibrosis of bone tissue were detected, while soft tissues only demonstrated a minor inflammatory reaction. Nevertheless, the need for careful preparation and execution of marker implantations is stressed, and particularly avoidance iof the use of emery in sharpening of cannulae. The bioinertness of tantalum was reconfirmed as was its suitability for use as skeletal and soft tissue radiographic markers. (orig.)

  19. Method for palladium activating molybdenum metallized features on a ceramic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, A.H.; Schwartz, B.

    1985-01-01

    A molybdenum or tungsten metallurgical pattern is formed on or in a dielectric green sheet. Palladium, nickel, platinum or rhodium is coated on a layer of polyvinyl butyral which is carried on a polyester film. The metal layer of this assembly is laminated to a dielectric green sheet which carries the molybdenum or tungsten metallurgy. The polyester film is stripped off. The resulting assembly is sintered to a fired structure, whereby the polyvinyl butyral is volatilized off and the palladium, nickel, platinum or rhodium is alloyed with the molybdenum or tungsten metallurgy to provide a densified metallurgy whose surface is free of glass

  20. Dendrite tungsten liquation in molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, M.M.; Ageeva, E.N.; Kolotinskij, V.N.

    1992-01-01

    A study was made on primary crystallization structure of ingots of Mo-W-B system alloys with electron microscopy were used to establish, that cells and cellular dendrites were the main elements of primary crystallization structure. Method of local X-ray spectral analysis enabled to establish, that intracrystallite liquation at cellular growth developed more intensively, as compared to the case of cellular dendrite formation. Change of boron content in alloys didn't practically affect the degree of development of intracrystallite W liquation in Mo

  1. Behavior of molybdenum in mixed-oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacchetti, G.; Sari, C.

    1976-01-01

    Metallic molybdenum, Mo--Ru--Rh--Pd alloys, barium, zirconium, and tungsten were added to uranium and uranium--plutonium oxides by coprecipitation and mechanical mixture techniques. This material was treated in a thermal gradient similar to that existing in fuel during irradiation to study the behavior of molybdenum in an oxide matrix as a function of the O/(U + Pu) ratio and some added elements. Result of ceramographic and microprobe analysis shows that when the overall O/(U + Pu) ratio is less than 2, molybdenum and Mo--Ru--Rh--Pd alloy inclusions are present in the uranium--plutonium oxide matrix. If the O/(U + Pu) ratio is greater than 2, molybdenum oxidizes to MoO 2 , which is gaseous at a temperature approximately 1000 0 C. Molybdenum oxide vapor reacts with barium oxide and forms a compound that exists as a liquid phase in the columnar grain region. Molybdenum oxide also reacts with tungsten oxide (tungsten is often present as an impurity in the fuel) and forms a compound that contains approximately 40 wt percent of actinide metals. The apparent solubility of molybdenum in uranium and uranium--plutonium oxides, determined by electron microprobe, was found to be less than 250 ppM both for hypo- and hyperstoichiometric fuels

  2. Niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polupanova, L.I.; Volkova, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    General mineralogical-geochemical and analytical characteristics of niobium and tantalum are presented. Potentialities of any analytical methods for determining these elements in various geologic samples are estimated. The following specific techniques are described: neutron + activation determination of Ta, fluorescence X-radiometric determination of Nb and Ta, fluorescence X-ray spectral determination of Nb and Ta, spectrographic determination of Nb and Ta, gravimetric determination of Nb and Ta, their extraction-photometric determination with various reagents (crystal violet, rhodamine 6 Y, butylrhodamine B)

  3. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tantalum Alloy T-222 During Air Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolik, Galen Richard; Petti, David Andrew; Sharpe, John Phillip; Schuetz, Stanley Thomas

    2000-10-01

    Tantalum alloys are one of the refractory metals with renewed consideration for high temperatures in fusion reactor applications. Tantalum alloys perform well in protective environments but oxidized readily in gases containing higher oxygen levels. In addition, the radioactive isotope Ta-182 would be produced in tantalum and could be a significant contributor to dose if mobilized. Other isotopes of importance are produced from tungsten and hafnium. Mobilization of activated products during an accident with air ingress is therefore a safety issue. In this study, we measured the extent of oxidation and mobilization from tantalum alloy T-222 oxidized in flowing air between 500 and 1200°C. This alloy nominally contains 10 wt% tungsten, 2.5 wt% hafnium and 0.01 wt% carbon. We found that the mobilization of Ta and Hf was closely linked to the occurrence of oxide spalling. These elements showed no migration from the test chamber. Some W was mobilized by volatilization as evidenced by transport from the chamber. Tungsten volatilization could occur primarily during initial stages of oxidation before an oxide scale forms and impedes the process. The mobilization of Ta and W are presented in terms of the mass flux (g/m 2 -h) as a function of test temperature. These measurements along with specific designs, activation calculations, and accident scenarios provide information useful for dose calculations of future fusion devices

  4. Oxidation and Volatilization from Tantalum Alloy T-222 During Air Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolik, G.R.; Petti, D.A.; Sharpe, J.P.; Schuetz, S.T.

    2000-10-31

    Tantalum alloys are one of the refractory metals with renewed consideration for high temperatures in fusion reactor applications. Tantalum alloys perform well in protective environments but oxidized readily in gases containing higher oxygen levels. In addition, the radioactive isotope Ta-182 would be produced in tantalum and could be a significant contributor to dose if mobilized. Other isotopes of importance are produced from tungsten and hafnium. Mobilization of activated products during an accident with air ingress is therefore a safety issue. In this study, we measured the extent of oxidation and mobilization from tantalum alloy T-222 oxidized in flowing air between 500 and 1200 C. This alloy nominally contains 10 wt% tungsten, 2.5 wt% hafnium and 0.01 wt% carbon. We found that the mobilization of Ta and Hf was closely linked to the occurrence of oxide spalling. These elements showed no migration from the test chamber. Some W was mobilized by volatilization as evidenced by transport from the chamber. Tungsten volatilization could occur primarily during initial stages of oxidation before an oxide scale forms and impedes the process. The mobilization of Ta and W are presented in terms of the mass flux (g/m 2 -h) as a function of test temperature. These measurements along with specific designs, activation calculations, and accident scenarios provide information useful for dose calculations of future fusion devices.

  5. Hydride Olefin complexes of tantalum and niobium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klazinga, Aan Hendrik

    1979-01-01

    This thesis describes investigations on low-valent tantalum and niobium hydride and alkyl complexes, particularly the dicyclopentadienyl tantalum hydride olefin complexes Cp2Ta(H)L (L=olefin). ... Zie: Summary

  6. Thermometric titration in investigation of the formation of polyanions of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), vanadium(V), and chromium (VI)-I: comparison of thermometric and potentiometric titration curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiba, N; Takeuchi, T

    1973-09-01

    A new twin-cell thermometric titrator has been devised and used for thermometric titration of solutions of sodium molybdate, sodium tungstate, sodium orthovanadate, ammonium metavanadate, and potassium chromate with perchloric acid. The thermometric titration curves were compared with corresponding pH-titration curves for elucidation of the reactions occurring in the titrations. Thermometric titrimetric methods have been developed for the determination of tungsten, vanadium and chromium.

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of electrode materials pyrochlore tungsten trioxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jingdong; Li, Yingjeng James; Stanley Whittingham, M.

    Hydrothermal synthesis methods have been successfully used to prepare new transition-metal oxides for cathodes in electrochemical devices such as lithium batteries and electrochromic windows. The tungsten oxides were the first studied, but the method has been extended to the oxides of molybdenum, vanadium and manganese. Sodium tungsten oxide films with the pyrochlore structure have been prepared on gold/alumina and indium-doped tin oxide substrates. These films reversibly and rapidly intercalate lithium and hydrogen ions.

  8. Additively manufactured porous tantalum implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wauthle, Ruben; Van Der Stok, Johan; Yavari, Saber Amin; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Kruth, Jean Pierre; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas; Weinans, Harrie; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The medical device industry's interest in open porous, metallic biomaterials has increased in response to additive manufacturing techniques enabling the production of complex shapes that cannot be produced with conventional techniques. Tantalum is an important metal for medical devices because of

  9. Dissolution kinetics of small amounts of oxygen in tantalum alloy T-111 and internal oxide displacement reactions during annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecura, S.

    1976-01-01

    Oxygen was added to T-111 (Ta-8W-2Hf, wt. %) at 820 and 990 C at an oxygen pressure of about 0.0003 torr. The technique employed permitted predetermined and reproducible doping of T-111 up to 3.0 at. % oxygen. Based on the temperature dependence of the doping reaction, it is concluded that the initial rates of oxygen pickup are probably controlled by solution of oxygen into the T-111 lattice. Although hafnium oxides are more stable than those of tantalum or tungsten, analyses of extracted residues indicate that the latter oxides predominate in the as-doped specimens, presumably because of the higher concentrations of tantalum and tungsten in the alloy. However, high-temperature annealing promotes gettering of dissolved oxygen and of other oxides to form hafnium oxides. Small amounts of tantalum and tungsten oxides were still present after high-temperature annealing. Tungsten oxide (WO3) volatilizes slightly from the surface of T-111 at 990 C. The vaporization of WO3 has no apparent affect on the doping reaction.

  10. Molybdenum extraction from copper-molybdenum ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevaeva, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Molybdenum extraction from copper-molybdenum ores as practised in different countries is reviewed. In world practice the production process including depression of copper and iron sulfides and flotation of molybdenite is widely spread. At two USA factories the process of a selective flotation with molybdenite depression by dextrin is used

  11. Tantalum-based multilayer coating on cobalt alloys in total hip and knee replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balagna, C., E-mail: cristina.balagna@polito.it [Institute of Materials Engineering and Physics, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24,10129 Torino (Italy); Faga, M.G. [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Strada delle Cacce 73, 10135 Torino (Italy); Spriano, S. [Institute of Materials Engineering and Physics, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24,10129 Torino (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys are widely used in total hip and knee joint replacement, due to high mechanical properties and resistance to wear and corrosion. They are able to form efficient artificial joints by means of coupling metal-on-polymer or metal-on-metal contacts. However, a high concentration of stress and direct friction between surfaces leads to the formation of polyethylene wear debris and the release of toxic metal ions into the human body, limiting, as a consequence, the lifetime of implants. The aim of this research is a surface modification of CoCrMo alloys in order to improve their biocompatibility and to decrease the release of metal ions and polyethylene debris. Thermal treatment in molten salts was the process employed for the deposition of tantalum-enriched coating. Tantalum and its compounds are considered biocompatible materials with low ion release and high corrosion resistance. Three different CoCrMo alloys were processed as substrates. An adherent coating of about 1 {mu}m of thickness, with a multilayer structure consisting of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum was deposited. The substrates and modified layers were characterized by means of structural, chemical and morphological analysis. Moreover nanoindentation, scratch and tribological tests were carried out in order to evaluate the mechanical behavior of the substrates and coating. The hardness of the coated samples increases more than double than the untreated alloys meanwhile the presence of the coating reduced the wear volume and rate of about one order of magnitude. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal treatment in molten salts deposits a Ta-based coating on Co-based alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coating is composed by one or two tantalum carbides and/or metallic tantalum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coating structure depends on thermal temperature and substrates carbon content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coating is able to

  12. Adhesion of non-selective CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, D.W.; Wilson, R.H.; Sanchez-Martinez, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Adhesion of non-selective, CVD tungsten to silicon dioxide is a critical issue in the development of tungsten as a metalization for VLSI circuitry. Without special adhesion promoters, tungsten deposited from WF/sub 6/ and H/sub 2/ has typically failed a standard tape test over all types of silicon oxides and nitrides. The reasons for failure of thin films, and CVD tungsten in particular are explored along with standard techniques for improving adhesion of thin films. Experiments are reported which include a number of sputtered metals as adhesion promoters, as well as chemical and plasma treatment of the oxide surface. Sputtered molybdenum is clearly the superior adhesion promoting layer from these tests. Traditional adhesion layers such as chromium or titanium failed as adhesion layers for CVD tungsten possibly due to chemical reactions between the WF/sub 6/ and Cr or Ti

  13. Molybdenum, molybdenum oxides, and their electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Viswanathan S; Lee, Chi-Woo

    2012-07-01

    The electrochemical behaviors of molybdenum and its oxides, both in bulk and thin film dimensions, are critical because of their widespread applications in steels, electrocatalysts, electrochromic materials, batteries, sensors, and solar cells. An important area of current interest is electrodeposited CIGS-based solar cells where a molybdenum/glass electrode forms the back contact. Surprisingly, the basic electrochemistry of molybdenum and its oxides has not been reviewed with due attention. In this Review, we assess the scattered information. The potential and pH dependent active, passive, and transpassive behaviors of molybdenum in aqueous media are explained. The major surface oxide species observed, reversible redox transitions of the surface oxides, pseudocapacitance and catalytic reduction are discussed along with carefully conducted experimental results on a typical molybdenum glass back contact employed in CIGS-based solar cells. The applications of molybdenum oxides and the electrodeposition of molybdenum are briefly reviewed. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Electrorecovery of tantalum in molten fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinola, A.; Dutra, A.J.B.; Silva, F.T. da

    1988-01-01

    Considering the privileged situation of Brazil as a productor of tantaliferous minerals, the authors have in view the development of a technology for production of metallic tantalum via molten salts electrolysis; this has the advantage of improving the aggregate value of exportation products, additionally to tantalum oxide and tantalum concentrates. Having in view the preliminary determintion of better conditions of temperature, electrolyte composition and current density for this process, electrolysis were conducted with a solvent composed of an eutetic mixture of lithium, sodium and potassium fluoride for dipotassium fluotantalate and occasionally for tantalum oxide. Current efficiencies as high as 83% were obtained in favoured conditions. (author) [pt

  15. Tungsten anode tubes with K-edge filters for mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaman, S.; Lillicrap, S.C. (Wessex Regional Medical Physics Service, Bath (UK)); Price, J.L. (Jarvis Screening Centre, Guildford (UK))

    1983-10-01

    Optimum X-ray energies for mammography have previously been calculated using the maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) per unit dose to the breast, or the minimum exposure for constant SNR. Filters having absorption edges at appropriate energy positions have been used to modify the shape of tungsten anode spectra towards the calculated optimum. The suitability of such spectra for practical use has been assessed by comparing the film image quality and the incident breast dose obtained using a K-edge filtered tungsten anode tube with that obtained using a molybdenum anode. Image quality has been assessed by using a 'random' phantom and by comparing mammograms where one breast was radiographed using a filtered tungsten anode tube and the other using a standard molybdenum anode unit. Relative breast doses were estimated from both ionisation chamber measurements with a phantom and thermoluminescent dosimetry measurements on the breast. Film image quality assessment indicated that the filtered tungsten anode tube gave results not significantly different from those obtained with a molybdenum anode tube for a tissue thickness of about 4 cm and which were better for larger breast thicknesses. Doses could be reduced to between one-half and one-third with the filtered tungsten anode tube.

  16. Tungsten anode tubes with K-edge filters for mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaman, S.; Lillicrap, S.C.; Price, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    Optimum X-ray energies for mammography have previously been calculated using the maximum signal to noise ratio (SNR) per unit dose to the breast, or the minimum exposure for constant SNR. Filters having absorption edges at appropriate energy positions have been used to modify the shape of tungsten anode spectra towards the calculated optimum. The suitability of such spectra for practical use has been assessed by comparing the film image quality and the incident breast dose obtained using a K-edge filtered tungsten anode tube with that obtained using a molybdenum anode. Image quality has been assessed by using a 'random' phantom and by comparing mammograms where one breast was radiographed using a filtered tungsten anode tube and the other using a standard molybdenum anode unit. Relative breast doses were estimated from both ionisation chamber measurements with a phantom and thermoluminescent dosimetry measurements on the breast. Film image quality assessment indicated that the filtered tungsten anode tube gave results not significantly different from those obtained with a molybdenum anode tube for a tissue thickness of abut 4 cm and which were better for larger breast thicknesses. Doses could be reduced to between one-half and one-third with the filtered tungsten anode tube. (U.K.)

  17. Producing tantalum or columbium powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rerat, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for the production of tantalum or columbium powder with a high yield within a desired range of particle sizes. A molten salt bath of a double salt comprising either an alkali metal tantalum fluoride or an alkali metal columbium fluoride and a relatively large amount of alkali metal halide diluent salt to act as a heat sink is initially maintained at a temperature a little above the liquidus temperature of the salt mixture. A liquid alkali metal at a comparatively low temperature is added to the continuously stirred bath at a high mass flow rate, and reduces the double salt, producing tantalum or columbium. The reaction is exothermic and causes the temperature to rise rapidly to a desired final reaction temperature within the range 760 to 1000 0 . The liquid alkali metal is thereafter fed at a high mass flow rate to complete the reaction quickly at the final reaction temperature. Forced cooling at a heat extraction rate not less than 42 kilojoules/min./kg. of double salt is used during at least a portion of the reaction cycle at a rate sufficient to maintain the final reaction temperature within a desired range. (author)

  18. Analytic chemistry of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    Electrochemical, colorimetric, gravimetric, spectroscopic, and radiochemical methods for the determination of molybdenum are summarized in this book. Some laboratory procedures are described in detail while literature citations are given for others. The reader is also referred to older comprehensive reviews of the analytical chemistry of molybdenum. Contents, abridged: Gravimetric methods. Titrimetric methods. Colorimetric methods. X-ray fluorescence. Voltammetry. Catalytic methods. Molybdenum in non-ferrous alloys. Molydbenum compounds

  19. Molybdenum from uranium solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, H.E.

    1981-01-01

    A method of removing molybdenum from a uranium bearing solution is claimed. It comprises adding sufficient reactive lead compound to supply at least 90 percent of the stoichiometric quantity of lead ion required to fully react with the molybdenum present to form insoluble lead molybdate and continuing the reaction with agitation until the desired percentage of the molybdenum present has reacted with the lead ion

  20. Preparation of potassium tantalum fluoride from tantalum hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, F.T. da; Espinola, A.; Dutra, A.J.B.

    1987-01-01

    Potassium tantalum fluoride (K 2 TaF 7 ) is an intermediary product in the processing of tantaliferous materials; it is the basic raw material for both reduction processes in use presently: reduction by metallic sodium and electrolysis in molten halides. It is normally obtained from a fluorotantalic acid solution to which potassium ions are added the precipitation of white acicular crystals of K 2 TaF 7 . The conditions for precipitation and recrystallization were studied, and crystal characterization were done by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric and thermodifferential analyses. (Author) [pt

  1. Principal component analysis of NEXAFS spectra for molybdenum speciation in hydrotreating catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faro Junior, Arnaldo da C.; Rodrigues, Victor de O.; Eon, Jean-G.; Rocha, Angela S.

    2010-01-01

    Bulk and supported molybdenum based catalysts, modified by nickel, phosphorous or tungsten were studied by NEXAFS spectroscopy at the Mo L III and L II edges. The techniques of principal component analysis (PCA) together with a linear combination analysis (LCA) allowed the detection and quantification of molybdenum atoms in two different coordination states in the oxide form of the catalysts, namely tetrahedral and octahedral coordination. (author)

  2. Climax-Type Porphyry Molybdenum Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludington, Steve; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Climax-type porphyry molybdenum deposits, as defined here, are extremely rare; thirteen deposits are known, all in western North America and ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to mainly Tertiary. They are consistently found in a postsubduction, extensional tectonic setting and are invariably associated with A-type granites that formed after peak activity of a magmatic cycle. The deposits consist of ore shells of quartz-molybdenite stockwork veins that lie above and surrounding the apices of cupola-like, highly evolved, calc-alkaline granite and subvolcanic rhyolite-porphyry bodies. These plutons are invariably enriched in fluorine (commonly >1 percent), rubidium (commonly >500 parts per million), and niobium-tantalum (Nb commonly >50 parts per million). The deposits are relatively high grade (typically 0.1-0.3 percent Mo) and may be very large (typically 100-1,000 million tons). Molybdenum, as MoS2, is the primary commodity in all known deposits. The effect on surface-water quality owing to natural influx of water or sediment from a Climax-type mineralized area can extend many kilometers downstream from the mineralized area. Waste piles composed of quartz-silica-pyrite altered rocks will likely produce acidic drainage waters. The potential exists for concentrations of fluorine or rare metals in surface water and groundwater to exceed recommended limits for human consumption near both mined and unmined Climax-type deposits.

  3. Molybdenum market in transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutulov, A.

    1980-01-01

    Since the beginning of 1980 - after seven years of constant unbalance between supply and demand of molybdenum, characterized by a demand overhang and after two years of unprecedented spot market prices - clear signals for a consolidation of the molybdenum market can be recognized. (orig.) [de

  4. Tantalum-178 - a short-lived nuclide for nuclear medicine: development of a potential generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neirinckx, R.D.; Jones, A.G.; Davis, M.A.; Harris, G.I.; Holman, B.L.

    1978-01-01

    We describe a chemical separation that may form the basis of a generator system for the short-lived radionuclide Ta-178 (T/sub 1/2/ = 9 min). The parent nuclide W-178 (T/sub 1/2/ = 21.7 days) is loaded on an anion-exchange column and the daughter eluted with a mixture of dilute hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide. The yields of tantalum and the breakthrough of the tungsten parent as a function of the eluting conditions are discussed, and preliminary animal distribution data are presented for various treatments of the eluant solution

  5. Targets for the production of neutron activated molybdenum-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, E.L.R.; Boyd, R.E.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron activation of natural molybdenum is, ostensibly, the least complex route to 99m Tc. However in most commercial generators the severe limitation in 99 Mo specific activity that the route imposes has caused manufacturers to choose the alternative fission process despite its disadvantages of being more expensive and requiring a more complex waste management strategy. The development of a newer generator technology is capable of reviving the demand for neutron activated 99 Mo and might encourage the production of 99m Tc by countries possessing less developed nuclear infrastructures. The targets used in the (n,γ) production route consist of analytical grade molybdenum trioxide which has been further refined to remove both rhenium and tungsten trace impurities. The basic methods used by ANSTO to produce a molybdenum target capable of yielding 99m Tc of high radionuclidic purity are described. (author)

  6. Preparation of potassium-reduced tantalum powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolosov, V.N.; Miroshnichenko, M.N.; Orlov, V.M.; Prokhorova, T.Yu.

    2005-01-01

    Characteristics of tantalum powders prepared by reduction of molten potassium heptafluorotantalate with liquid potassium are studied in a temperature range of 750 - 850 deg C using potassium chloride as a flux at a ratio of K 2 TaF 7 : KCl = 1, 2, and 3. The use of potassium as a reducing agent facilitates washing of tantalum powders for impurity salt removal, reduces sodium content and leakage currents in the anodes. As compared to sodium process, the potassium reduction results in a high yield of sponge material, a decrease in the specific surface area and yield of tantalum powder suitable for manufacture of capacitor anodes [ru

  7. Tungsten and tungsten alloys by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belhadjhamida, A.; German, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten has a historical link with powder metallurgy and there is continued progress in expanding the available compositions and processing options. This paper starts with an introduction to the history of tungsten powder metallurgy and use this as a basis for analyzing some of the current trends. The literature base in tungsten processing is expanding and includes new alloys, microstructures, and processing routes. A few examples will be emphasize here to produce a frame work for this program, including description of sintering mechanisms for tungsten, liquid phase sintering advances, hot consolidation fundamentals, and options for complex shaping using powder injection modeling. For this base, subsequent presentations will expand on these fundamental advances

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of tungsten with salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Z.C.

    1976-10-01

    The method comprises the complexation of tungsten with salicylic acid in concentrated sulphuric acid yielding a reddish color. The maximum absorbance of the complex lies within 410-420 nm, 420 nm being the chosen wavelenght. The final concentration of salicylic acid is 0,080 g/ml. The sensitivity is 0,13 μg W(%T) -1 ml -1 . Titanium, vanadium, rhenium, niobium and molybdenum interferes and must be separated, titanium being the strongest interferent. The separation procedures, advantages of the process, stoichiometric relations and equilibrium constant are discussed. (Author) [pt

  9. Improved processes of molybdenum-99 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dadachova, K.; La Riviere, K.; Anderon, P.

    1997-01-01

    Two improved processes of Molybdenum-99 production have been developed at ANSTO on laboratory scale. The first one allows to purify Mo of natural isotopic composition from tungsten impurities by using preferential adsorption of tungsten on hydrated tin(IV) oxide SnO 2 x nH 2 O before irradiation in the nuclear reactor. Mo-99 obtained via this route can be used for production of i nstant Tc-99m. As the starting material MoO 3 contains considerable amounts of tungsten impurity (W > 60 ppm), 5-7 days irradiation results in generation of W-188 in amounts sufficient to contaminate the final Tc-99m product with rhenium-188 (Re-188, 16.8 h half-life) - radioactive daughter of W-188. To overcome this problem, a method of MoO 3 purification from W, based on preferential adsorption of W by hydrated tin (IV) oxide has been developed. The contents of W in MoO 3 purified by this technique became 3 and retaining of Mo-99 on a large alumina column. Mo-99 is stripped off the column with 200 mL 1M NH 4 OH followed by loading this solution onto the AG 1x8 column. The next steps are different for each version of separation process

  10. Preparation of tantalum targets of known thicknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, J.R.; Wirth, H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A series of carbon-backed tantalum targets were produced in a heavy ion sputtering system with a Penning ion source. The target thicknesses were then measured using the alpha-ray energy loss method. The resulting tabulated measurements were reproducible and make possible the production of carbon-backed tantalum targets with pre-determined thicknesses ranging from 20 μg/cm 2 to 1 mg/cm 2 . (orig.)

  11. Process for purifying molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheresnowsky, J.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a process for purifying molybdenum containing arsenic and phosphorus. The process comprising: adding to an acidic slurry of molybdenum trioxide, a source of magnesium ions in a solid form, with the amount of magnesium and the magnesium ion concentration in the subsequently formed ammonium molybdate solution being sufficient to subsequently form insoluble compounds containing greater than about 80% by weight of the arsenic and greater than about 80% by weight of the phosphorus, and ammonia in an amount sufficient to subsequently dissolve the molybdenum and subsequently form the insoluble compounds, with the source of magnesium ions being added prior to the addition of the ammonia; digesting the resulting ammoniated slurry at a temperature sufficient to dissolve the molybdenum and form an ammonium molybdate solution while the pH is maintained at from bout 9 to about 10 to form a solid containing the insoluble compounds; and separating the solid from the ammonium molybdate solution

  12. Tungsten Alloy Outgassing Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherfoord, John P; Shaver, L

    1999-01-01

    Tungsten alloys have not seen extensive use in liquid argon calorimeters so far. Because the manufacturing process for tungsten is different from the more common metals used in liquid argon there is concern that tungsten could poison the argon thereby creating difficulties for precision calorimetry. In this paper we report measurements of outgassing from the tungsten alloy slugs proposed for use in the ATLAS FCal module and estimate limits on potential poisoning with reasonable assumptions. This estimate gives an upper limit poisoning rate of tungsten slugs.

  13. Extraction of Tantalum from locally sourced Tantalite using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Extraction of Tantalum from locally sourced Tantalite using ... ABSTRACT: The ability of polyethylene glycol solution to extract tantalum from locally .... metal ion in question by the particular extractant. ... Loparite, a rare-earth ore (Ce, Na,.

  14. Bibliographic study on molybdenum biokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzberger, A.

    1988-05-01

    This bibliographical study compiles and analyzes findings about the metabolism and resorption of molybdenum. Besides including studies on the physiology of molybdenum 99, a general survey is given on molybdenum in the environment and on its physiological behaviour. In particular, information on the dependence of molybdenum resorption on various factors, such as the chemical form, antagonisms etc., are gathered from literature. These factors have to be considered for sensibly carrying out necessary experiments. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Radio frequency induction plasma spraying of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xianliang

    2003-01-01

    Radio frequency (RF) induction plasma was used to make free-standing deposition of molybdenum (Mo). The phenomena of particle melting, flattening, and stacking were investigated. The effect of process parameters such as plasma power, chamber pressure, and spray distance on the phenomena mentioned above was studied. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to analyze the plasma-processed powder, splats formed, and deposits obtained. Experimental results show that less Mo particles are spheroidized when compared to the number of spheroidized tungsten (W) particles at the same powder feed rate under the same plasma spray condition. Molten Mo particles can be sufficiently flattened on substrate. The influence of the process parameters on the flattening behavior is not significant. Mo deposit is not as dense as W deposit, due to the splash and low impact of molten Mo particles. Oxidation of the Mo powder with a large particle size is not evident under the low pressure plasma spray

  16. Molybdenum solar neutrino experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfsberg, K.; Cowan, G.A.; Bryant, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The goal of the molybdenum solar neutrino experiment is to deduce the 8 B solar neutrino flux, averaged over the past several million years, from the concentration of 98 Tc in a deeply buried molybdenum deposit. The experiment is important to an understanding of stellar processes because it will shed light on the reason for the discrepancy between theory and observation of the chlorine solar neutrino experiment. Possible reasons for the discrepancy may lie in the properties of neutrinos (neutrino oscillations or massive neutrinos) or in deficiencies of the standard solar model. The chlorine experiment only measures the 8 B neutrino flux in current times and does not address possible temporal variations in the interior of the sun, which are also not considered in the standard model. In the molybdenum experiment, we plan to measure 98 Tc (4.2 Myr), also produced by 8 B neutrinos, and possibly 97 Tc (2.6 Myr), produced by lower energy neutrinos

  17. Method of producing molybdenum-99

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2013-05-28

    Method of producing molybdenum-99, comprising accelerating ions by means of an accelerator; directing the ions onto a metal target so as to generate neutrons having an energy of greater than 10 MeV; directing the neutrons through a converter material comprising techentium-99 to produce a mixture comprising molybdenum-99; and, chemically extracting the molybdenum-99 from the mixture.

  18. Modeling the mechanical behavior of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.J.; Ahzi, S.

    1997-01-01

    A crystal plasticity model is proposed to simulate the large plastic deformation and texture evolution in tantalum over a wide range of strain rates. In the model, a modification of the viscoplastic power law for slip and a Taylor interaction law for polycrystals are employed, which account for the effects of strain hardening, strain-rate hardening, and thermal softening. A series of uniaxial compression tests in tantalum at strain rates ranging from 10 -3 to 10 4 s -1 were conducted and used to verify the model's simulated stress-strain response. Initial and evolved deformation textures were also measured for comparison with predicted textures from the model. Applications of this crystal plasticity model are made to examine the effect of different initial crystallographic textures in tantalum subjected to uniaxial compression deformation or biaxial tensile deformation

  19. Dioxobridged complexes of molybdenum (IV) and tungsten (IV) with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Acknowledgement. We thank Rhone Poulenc, Paris, France for supplying MPM and M/s Bayer A G,. Leverkusen, Germany for providing PCPD and TFPH as gift samples. References. 1. Hewitt E J 1959 Biol. Rev. 34 333. 2. Kay A and Mitchell P C H 1970 J. Chem. Soc. A 2421. 3. Russell Melby L 1969 Inorg. Chem. 8 1539.

  20. Hydroprocessing with self-promoted molybdenum and tungsten sulfide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mc Candish, L.E.; Ho, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    A hydroprocessing process is described comprising contacting a hydrocarbon feed at elevated temperature of at least about 100 0 C and in the presence of hydrogen with a supported, self-promoted catalyst obtained by compositioning one or more catalyst precursors of the formula (ML) (Mo/sub y/W/sub 1-y/O/sub 4/) with an inorganic refractory oxide support and heating the composition in a non-oxidizing atmosphere in the presence of sulfur at elevated temperature for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. M comprises one or more divalent promoter metals, y is any value ranging from 0 to 1, and wherein L is one or more, neutral, nitrogen-containing ligands at least one of which is a chelating polydentate ligand. The contacting occurs for a time sufficient to convert at least a portion of the feed

  1. Supported chromium-molybdenum and tungsten sulfide catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chianelli, R.R.; Jacobson, A.J.; Young, A.R.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the process for preparing a supported hydroprocessing catalyst. The process comprising compositing a quantity of a particulate, porous catalyst support material comprising one or more refactory oxides with one or more catalyst precursor salts and heating the composite at elevated temperature of at least about 200/sup 0/C up to about 600/sup 0/, in the presence of a sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur-bearing compound in an amount whereby sulfur in the form of the sulfur bearing compound is present in excess of that contained in the catalyst precursor and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The catalyst precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture therof and a cation comprising trivalent chromium or a mixture of trivalent chromium with one or more divalent promoter metals selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Co, Mn, Cu and a mixture thereof wherein the trivalent chromium and divalent promoter metals are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand, L

  2. Processing and production of molybdenum and tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagel, W.C.; Shields, J.A. Jr.; Tuominen, S.M.

    1984-01-01

    The technological means to produce and process Mo and W alloys are summarized because for many Mo and W alloy systems the mechanical properties can be optimized only by thermomechanical processing requiring production and processing capabilities that are not widely available. First, the producers of commercial Mo and W alloys are presented along with currently available product forms. Second, currently disclosed standard capabilities of producers and processors in the United States are presented. 56 references, 13 figures, 9 tables

  3. Low temperature irradiation creep of tungsten and molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouchou, J.-L.

    1975-12-01

    It is demonstrated that the mechanism of stress biased nucleation of dislocation loops may contribute significantly to the low temperature irradiation creep. This is achieved by measuring length and electrical resistivity changes at liquid hydrogen temperature, under fission fragments bombardement. From these measurements (correlated with some electron microscopy observations of irradiated samples), the following three stages of deformation appear: at low doses (smaller than 10 -2 displacement per atom) the deformation is mainly an increase in volume due to point defects. The study of this stage gives the formation volume of a Frenkel pair, and the number of point defects created by an initial fission fragment; for doses higher than 10 -2 d.p.a., the point defects saturation is reached. At this stage, vacancies and interstitials collapse into loops, the nucleation of which is polarized by the applied stress. At zero stress, the corresponding creep rate is zero. At high stresses (>50 kg/mm 2 ), creep rate saturates at value of the order of 10 -21 (FF/cm 3 ) -1 ; because of the recombinations of loops, the creep rate decreases continuously during irradiation. The recombinations lead to a dense dislocation network (formed at doses of 1 d.p.a.), the climb of which oriented by the applied stress gives rise to a steady state creep. The creep rate is smaller, by at least one order of magnitude, than that which is observed in the stage of loop formation [fr

  4. Molybdenum and tungsten interaction with rare earth metals and boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhalenko, S.I.; Kuz'ma, Yu.B.

    1976-01-01

    The systems Y-[Mo, W]-B (1000 0 C) and [La, Ce]-[Mo, W]-B (800, 600 0 C) were studied by methods of X-ray crystallographic analysis, and the corresponding isothermal dimensions were plotted. The existence of the ternary compounds YMoB 4 and YWB 4 with a structure of the YCrB 4 type was confirmed. In the Ce-Mo-B system, a ternary compound of unknown structure (approximately CeMoB 3 ), formed only after annealing at 800 0 C, was found. In the Ce-Mo-B system, the following equilibria were found: CeB 6 -MoB 4 , Mo 2 B 5 , MoB; CeMoB 3 -CeB 4 , Ce, MoB; MoB-CeB 4 , Ce; Mo 2 B-Ce. In the Ce-W-B system, there are the following equilibria: CeB 6 -WB 4 , W 2 B 5 , WB; CeB 4 -WB, W 2 B; Ce-W 2 B. A comparative description is given of the ternary systems [Y, La, Ce]-[Mo, W]-B and the conditions for the formation of compounds with a structure of the YCrB 4 type are discussed. (author)

  5. Tantalum high-temperature oxidation kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigor'ev, Yu.M.; Sarkisyan, A.A.; Merzhanov, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    Kinetics of heat release and scale growth during tantalum oxidation within 650-1300 deg C temperature range in oxygen-containing media is investigated. Kinetic equations and temperature and pressure dependences of constants are ound Applicability of the kinetic Lorie mechanism for the description of the tantalum oxidation kinetics applicably to rapid-passing processes is shown. It is stated that the process rate (reaction ability) is determined by adsorption desorption factors on the external surface of the ''protective'' oxide for the ''linear'' oxidation stage [ru

  6. Conflict minerals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo: global tantalum processing plants, a critical part of the tantalum supply chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) analyzes mineral and metal supply chains to identify and describe major components of mineral and metal material flows from ore extraction, through intermediate forms, to a final product. Supply chain analyses may be used (1) to identify risks to the United States associated with the supply of critical and strategic minerals and metals and (2) to provide greater supply chain transparency so that policymakers have the fact-based information needed to formulate public policy. This fact sheet focuses on the post-mining/pre-consumer-product part of the tantalum supply chain. The USGS National Minerals Information Center (NMIC) has been asked by governmental and non-governmental organizations to provide information about tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold (collectively known as “3TG minerals”) processing facilities worldwide in response to U.S. legislation aimed at identifying and removing the supply chain links between the trade in these minerals and civil unrest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and adjacent countries.

  7. Liquid phase sintering of carbides using a nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, J.M.; Warenchak, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid phase vacuum sintering was used to densify four carbide groups. These were titanium carbide, tungsten carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide. The liquid phase consisted of nickel with additions of molybdenum of from 6.25 to 50.0 weight percent at doubling increments. The liquid phase or binder comprised 10, 20, and 40 percent by weight of the pressed powders. The specimens were tested using 3 point bending. Tungsten carbide showed the greatest improvement in bend rupture strength, flexural modulus, fracture energy and hardness using 20 percent binder with lesser amounts of molybdenum (6.25 or 12.5 wt %) added to nickel compared to pure nickel. A refinement in the carbide microstructure and/or a reduction in porosity was seen for both the titanium and tungsten carbides when the alloy binder was used compared to using the nickel alone. Curves depicting the above properties are shown for increasing amounts of molybdenum in nickel for each carbide examined. Loss of binder phase due to evaporation was experienced during heating in vacuum at sintering temperatures. In an effort to reduce porosity, identical specimens were HIP processed at 15 ksi and temperatures averaging 110 C below the sintering g temperature. The tungsten carbide and titanium carbide series containing 80 and 90 weight percent carbide phase respectively showed improvement properties after HIP while properties decreased for most other compositions

  8. New Sesame equation of state for tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greeff, C. W.; Johnson, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    A new Sesame equation of state (EOS) table has been created for tantalum. This EOS incorporates new high pressure Hugoniot data and diamond anvil cell compression data. The new EOS gives better agreement with this data as well as with sound speeds and Hugoniot curves of porous samples

  9. Bone remodeling around cementless tantalum cups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grillo, J. -C.; Flecher, X.; Bouvenot, J.; Argenson, J. -N.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of the study.-Most studies have reported a significant decrease in periacetabular bone stock one year after implantation of a cementless cup. The purpose of this work was to study the bone-implant interface of the tantalum cup using plain X-rays and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA).

  10. Review of tantalum and niobium alloy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the current state of niobium- and tantalum-base alloy production. The materials requirements, alloy compositions of interest, and production status are discussed. Finally, a list of developments needed to support the SP-100 program will be identified. A bibliography is included

  11. Obtainment of tantalum oxide from national ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinatti, D.G.; Ribeiro, S.; Martins, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    The experimental results of tantalum oxides (Ta 2 O 5 ) obtainment from Brazilian ores of tantalite and columbite are described. This study is a part of the technologic and scientific research design of refractory metals (Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo and W) and correlate ceramics. (C.G.C.) [pt

  12. Intercalated compounds of niobium and tantalum dicalcogenides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wypych, F.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of niobium and tantalum lamellar compounds and its intercalated derivatives is described. The intercalated compounds with lithium, with alkaline metal and with metals of the first-row transition are studied, characterized by X-ray diffraction. (C.G.C.) [pt

  13. Tungsten Filament Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.; Perkins, James

    2016-01-01

    We safely remove the outer glass bulb from an incandescent lamp and burn up the tungsten filament after the glass is removed. This demonstration dramatically illustrates the necessity of a vacuum or inert gas for the environment surrounding the tungsten filament inside the bulb. Our approach has added historical importance since the incandescent…

  14. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  15. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, M.

    2004-01-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D 2 molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  16. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poon, M

    2004-07-01

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. . Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten void, D is trapped as atoms adsorbed on the inner walls of the void with a trap energy of 2.1 eV, or as D{sub 2} molecules inside the void with a trap energy of 1.2 eV. . Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten was also studied as a function of the incident fluence, irradiation temperature, and irradiation history. Deuterium trapping in polycrystalline tungsten also occurs primarily at vacancies and voids with the same trap energies as in single crystal tungsten; however, the presence of grain boundaries promotes the formation of large surface blisters with high fluence irradiations at 500 K. In general, D trapping is greater in polycrystalline tungsten than in single crystal tungsten. To simulate mixed materials comprising of carbon (C) and tungsten, tungsten specimens were pre-irradiated with carbon ions prior to D

  17. Textbook tests with tungsten

    CERN Multimedia

    Barbara Warmbein

    2010-01-01

    CERN's linear collider detector group joins forces with CALICE in building the world's first tungsten hadronic calorimeter.   Hadronic calorimeter prototype made of tungsten for the linear collider detector being equipped with CALICE scintillators. In a hall for test beam experiments at CERN, next to the CLOUD climate experiment and an irradiation facility, sits a detector prototype that is in many ways a first. It's the first ever hadronic sandwich calorimeter (HCal) prototype made of tungsten. It's the first prototype for a detector for the Compact Linear Collider Study CLIC, developed by the linear collider detector R&D group (LCD group) at CERN. And it's the first piece of hardware that results directly from the cooperation between CLIC and ILC detector study groups. Now its makers are keen to see first particle showers in their detector. The tungsten calorimeter has just moved from a workshop at CERN, where it was assembled from finely polished tungsten squares and triangles, into the ...

  18. Molybdenum dioxide-molybdenite roasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabacky, B.J.; Hepworth, M.T.

    1984-01-01

    A process is disclosed for roasting molybdenite concentrates directly to molybdenum dioxide. The process comprises establishing a roasting zone having a temperature of about 700 0 C. to about 800 0 C., introducing into the roasting zone particulate molybdenum dioxide and molybdenite in a weight ratio of at least about 2:1 along with an oxygen-containing gas in amount sufficient to oxidize the sulfur content of the molybdenite to molybdenum dioxide

  19. Plasma etching of patterned tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franssila, S.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma etching of tungsten is discussed from the viewpoint of thin film structure and integrated circuit process engineering. The emphasis is on patterned tungsten etching for silicon device and X-ray mask fabrication. After introducing tungsten etch chemistries and mechanisms, microstructural aspects of tungsten films (crystal structure, grain size, film density, defects, impurities) in relation to etching are discussed. Approaches to etch process optimization are presented, and the current state-of-the-art of patterned tungsten etching is reviewed. (orig.)

  20. Case history of tantalum-weld cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knorovsky, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Tantalum welding is normally a routine operation. Of course, the routine involves careful cleaning beforehand, and welding in an atmosphere which excludes reactive gases (O 2 , N 2 , H 2 ). Recently a weld cracking problem was encountered at SNLA despite the fact that normal precautions had been taken. This account reviews what happened, the analytical procedures followed to determine the unusual source of the problem, and the remedy which solved the problem

  1. Origins of Beta Tantalum in Sputtered Coatings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mulligan, C

    2001-01-01

    .... Some of the most recent work has attempted to relate the energetics (i.e., atom/ion energy) of the plasma to the alpha right arrow beta transition. It has been shown that the energetics of the plasma can relate to the most crucial sputtering parameters. The most significant feature of the use of plasma energy to explain the alpha right arrow beta transition is that it relates the formation of beta-tantalum to a quantifiable measure.

  2. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, Evan; Lin, Yen-Shan; Meyers, Marc A.; Olevsky, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A tantalum carbide powder was consolidated by spark plasma sintering. The specimens were processed under various temperature and pressure conditions and characterized in terms of relative density, grain size, rupture strength and hardness. The results are compared to hot pressing conducted under similar settings. It is shown that high densification is accompanied by substantial grain growth. Carbon nanotubes were added to mitigate grain growth; however, while increasing specimens' rupture strength and final density, they had little effect on grain growth.

  3. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in Alkali Halide Melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon in...

  4. Electrodepositions on Tantalum in alkali halide melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barner, Jens H. Von; Jensen, Annemette Hindhede; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Surface layers of tantalum metal were electrodeposited on steel from K 2TaF7-LiF-NaF-KF melts. With careful control of the oxide contents dense and adherent deposits could be obtained by pulse plating. In NaCl-KCl-NaF-Na2CO3 and NaCl-KCl-Na2CO 3 melts carbonate ions seems to be reduced to carbon ...

  5. Formation of nickel-tantalum compounds in tantalum fluoride halide melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matychenko, Eh.S.; Zalkind, O.A.; Kuznetsov, B.Ya.; Orlov, V.M.; Sukhorzhevskaya, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    Interaction of nickel with NaCl-K 2 TaF 7 melt (14 mol.%) at 750 deg C was studied, the composition of intermetallic compounds formed in Ni-Ta system being analyzed, using the methods of chemical and X-ray phase analyses, IR spectroscopy. It was ascertained that composition of intermetallic compounds (Ni 3 Ta, Ni 2 Ta) depends on K 2 TaF 7 concentration in the melt, metallic tantalum additions, nickel substrate thickness and experiment duration. The mechanism of currentless deposition of tantalum on nickel was considered and the assumption was made that disproportionation reaction lies in the basis of the process [ru

  6. Advances in the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of Tantalum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Christensen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The chemical stability of tantalum in hot acidic media has made it a key material in the protection of industrial equipment from corrosion under such conditions. The Chemical Vapor Deposition of tantalum to achieve such thin corrosion resistant coatings is one of the most widely mentioned examples...

  7. Tantalum: A strategic metal; Tantalo: Un metal estrategico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Lopez, G.; Lopez-Lopez, J.; Garcia-Yagues, M. R.

    2009-07-01

    In nature, the main source of tantalum is an isomorphous series of minerals containing oxides of tantalum, niobium, iron and manganese, which are collectively known as columbine-tantalite (coltan). Upgraded Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-containing tin slags are also used as a secondary source of tantalum. Coltan, either naturally occurring or synthetically produced as concentrates from tin slags, are digested with hydrofluoric and sulphuric acid at an elevated temperature. the aqueous solution of ta-Nb in hydrofluoric acid is extracted in several continuously operating mixer-settler systems or extraction columns with an organic solvent like methyl isobutyl ketone. The organic phase is then scrubbed with 6-15 N H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} to separate the niobium from the tantalum by selective stripping. The tantalum salt is extracted from the organic phase with water or diluted aqueous ammonium fluoride solution, the demands of the solid tantalum capacitor industry for high quality, high surface area tantalum powders have driven improvements in the sodium reduction of K{sub 2}TaF{sub 7}. The much-improved chemistry reflects the many modifications to the process put in place after 1990 and the subsequent improvements in the electrical quality as measured by the performance of tantalum capacitors. (Author) 5 refs.

  8. Human bone ingrowth into a porous tantalum acetabular cup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory N. Haidemenopoulos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Porous Tantalum is increasingly used as a structural scaffold in orthopaedic applications. Information on the mechanisms of human bone ingrowth into trabecular metal implants is rather limited. In this work we have studied, qualitatively, human bone ingrowth into a retrieved porous tantalum monoblock acetabular cup using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. According to the results and taking into account the short operational life (4 years of the implant, bone ingrowth on the acetabular cup took place in the first two-rows of porous tantalum cells to an estimated depth of 1.5 to 2 mm. The bone material, grown inside the first raw of cells, had almost identical composition with the attached bone on the cup surface, as verified by the same Ca:P ratio. Bone ingrowth has been a gradual process starting with Ca deposition on the tantalum struts, followed by bone formation into the tantalum cells, with gradual densification of the bone tissue into hydroxyapatite. A critical step in this process has been the attachment of bone material to the tantalum struts following the topology of the porous tantalum scaffold. These results provide insight to the human bone ingrowth process into porous tantalum implants.

  9. 21 CFR 886.3100 - Ophthalmic tantalum clip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... blood vessels in the eye. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 886.3100 Ophthalmic tantalum clip. (a) Identification. An ophthalmic tantalum clip is a malleable metallic device intended to be implanted permanently...

  10. Standard specification for tantalum and tantalum alloy plate, sheet, and strip. ASTM standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.03 on Niobium and Tantalum. Current edition approved May 10, 1998 and published September 1998. Originally published as B 708-82. Last previous edition was B 708-92

  11. Uptake and retention of insufflated tantalum by lymph nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpper, R.W.; Bianco, A.; Gibb, F.R.; Landman, S.; Morrow, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A nonsacrifice, radiographic technique is presented for evaluating the lymph node uptake of radiographically dense materials from the lungs of beagle dogs into which the material was insufflated. With tantalum as the contrast agent, lymph nodes sometimes become visible within 2 days after exposure when the insufflation resulted in radiographic ''alveolarization'' of some of the tantalum. Localization of the material within the nodes was observed in subsequent radiographs as well as persistent retention after as much as 1 year. Through the use of preinsufflation control films and tantalum foils of varying thickness, densitometric methods for determining the amount of tantalum within the lymph nodes are being investigated. Tantalum-182 is being used to follow the lung retention of the material as well as to verify estimates of burdens in harvested nodes. Preliminary lymphokinetic data are presented from experiments utilizing powders of 1 and 5 μm (mean) particle sizes

  12. Process for the production of a tantalum and niobium bearing concentrate from a tantalum and niobium bearing ferro-alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deweck, J.; Van, H.

    1980-01-01

    In a process for the production of a tantalum and niobium bearing concentrate from a tantalum and niobium bearing ferro-alloy containing tantalum and niobium as carbide, by treating the ferro-alloy in molten state with a controlled amount of an oxidizing agent in order to slag at least most of the tantalum and at least part of the niobium and by separting the so obtained slag phase from the metal phase, the improvement which comprises using air, oxygen enriched air or oxygen as oxidizing agent and adjusting the iron content to the ferro-alloy by adding at least 70% by weight of iron prior to the step of forming the slag so that at least most of the tantalum carbide is dissolved in the molten ferro-alloy

  13. Fracture of an uncemented tantalum patellar component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan L. Grimm, MD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man presented with the acute, atraumatic onset of pain 3 years after uncemented right total knee arthroplasty. He complained of new mechanical locking with the knee held in extension on examination and unable to flex the knee. On the plain radiographs, the patellar component peg was fractured and the plate was dislocated. The knee was immobilized, and revision to a cemented 3-peg component was performed. Fracture of a single-peg, tantalum-backed uncemented patellar component has not been described. Clinical suspicion for this should be given in the setting of acute locking. We recommend revision with a cemented polyethylene component.

  14. Plasma-sprayed tantalum/alumina cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, C.M.

    1977-12-01

    Cermets of tantalum and alumina were fabricated by plasma spraying, with the amount of alumina varied from 0 to 65 percent (by volume). Each of four compositions was then measured for tensile strength, elastic modulus, and coefficient of thermal expansion. In general, strength and strain to failure decreased with increasing alumina content: 62 MPa for 100 percent Ta to 19 MPa for 35 v percent Ta. A maximum of 0.1 percent strain was observed for the sprayed 100 percent Ta specimens. The coefficient of thermal expansion measured for the pure Ta was 6.2 (10 -6 )/K

  15. On molybdenum (6) alcoholates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turova, N.Ya.; Kessler, V.G.

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis techniques for molybdenum (6) alcoholates of MoO(OR) 4 (1) and MoO 2 (OR) 2 (2) series by means of exchange interaction of corresponding oxychloride with MOR (M=Li, Na) are obtained. These techniques have allowed to prepare 1(R=Me, Et, i-Pr) and 2(R=Me, Et) with 70-98 % yield. Methylates are also prepared at ether interchange of ethylates by methyl alcohol. Metal anode oxidation in corresponding alcohol may be used for 1 synthesis. Physicochemical properties of both series alcoholates, solubility in alcohols in particular, depend on their formation conditions coordination polymerism. Alcoholates of 1 are rather unstable and tend to decomposition up to 2 and ether. It is suggested to introduce NaOR microquantities to stabilize those alcoholates

  16. Molybdenum Tube Characterization report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaux II, Miles Frank [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-07

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques have been utilized to produce free-standing molybdenum tubes with the end goal of nuclear fuel clad applications. In order to produce tubes with properties desirable for this application, deposition rates were lowered requiring long deposition durations on the order of 50 hours. Standard CVD methods as well as fluidized-bed CVD (FBCVD) methods were applied towards these objectives. Characterization of the tubes produced in this manner revealed material suitable for fuel clad applications, but lacking necessary uniformity across the length of the tubes. The production of freestanding Mo tubes that possess the desired properties across their entire length represents an engineering challenge that can be overcome in a next iteration of the deposition system.

  17. Tungsten behaviour under anodic polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vas'ko, A.T.; Patsyuk, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical investigations have been carried out to identify the state of elements of the tungsten galvanic coating. Active zones on anode polarization curves in the hydrogen region of galvanic tungsten are established. The difference in the behaviour of monocrystal and galvanic tungsten electrodes is shown to be connected with the oxidation of hydrogen in the galvanic sediment

  18. Diffusion in molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salamon, M.; Mehrer, H.

    2005-01-01

    The diffusion behaviour of the high-temperature material molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) was completely unknown until recently. In this paper we present studies of Mo self-diffusion and compare our present results with our already published studies of Si and Ge diffusion in MoSi 2 . Self-diffusion of molybdenum in monocrystalline MoSi 2 was studied by the radiotracer technique using the radioisotope 99 Mo. Deposition of the radiotracer and serial sectioning after the diffusion anneals to determine the concentration-depth profiles was performed using a sputtering device. Diffusion of Mo is a very slow process. In the entire temperature region investigated (1437 to 2173 K), the 99 Mo diffusivities in both principal directions of the tetragonal MoSi 2 crystals obey Arrhenius laws, where the diffusion perpendicular to the tetragonal axis is faster by two to three orders of magnitude than parallel to it. The activation enthalpies for diffusion perpendicular and parallel to the tetragonal axis are Q perpendicular to = 468 kJ mol -1 (4.85 eV) and Q parallel = 586 kJ mol -1 (6.07 eV), respectively. Diffusion of Si and its homologous element Ge is fast and is mediated by thermal vacancies of the Si sublattice of MoSi 2 . The diffusion of Mo is by several orders of magnitude slower than the diffusion of Si and Ge. This large difference suggests that Si and Mo diffusion are decoupled and that the diffusion of Mo likely takes place via vacancies on the Mo sublattice. (orig.)

  19. Shock compression and quasielastic release in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.N.; Hixson, R.S.; Tonks, D.L.; Gray, G.T. III

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of quasielastic release in shock-loaded FCC metals have shown a strong influence of the defect state on the leading edge, or first observable arrival, of the release wave. This is due to the large density of pinned dislocation segments behind the shock front, their relatively large pinning separation, and a very short response time as determined by the drag coefficient in the shock-compressed state. This effect is entirely equivalent to problems associated with elastic moduli determination using ultrasonic methods. This is particularly true for FCC metals, which have an especially low Peierls stress, or inherent lattice resistance, that has little influence in pinning dislocation segments and inhibiting anelastic deformation. BCC metals, on the other hand, have a large Peierls stress that essentially holds dislocation segments in place at low net applied shear stresses and thus allows fully elastic deformation to occur in the complete absence of anelastic behavior. Shock-compression and release experiments have been performed on tantalum (BCC), with the observation that the leading release disturbance is indeed elastic. This conclusion is established by examination of experimental VISAR records taken at the tantalum/sapphire (window) interface in a symmetric-impact experiment which subjects the sample to a peak longitudinal stress of approximately 7.3 GPa, in comparison with characteristic code calculations. copyright 1994 American Institute of Physics

  20. Twinning anisotropy of tantalum during nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Saurav, E-mail: S.GOEL@qub.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Beake, Ben [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dalton Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M15GD (United Kingdom); Chan, Chi-Wai [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Haque Faisal, Nadimul [School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ (United Kingdom); Dunne, Nicholas [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-11

    Unlike other BCC metals, the plastic deformation of nanocrystalline Tantalum (Ta) during compression is regulated by deformation twinning. Whether or not this twinning exhibits anisotropy was investigated through simulation of displacement-controlled nanoindentation test using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. MD data was found to correlate well with the experimental data in terms of surface topography and hardness measurements. The mechanism of the transport of material was identified due to the formation and motion of prismatic dislocations loops (edge dislocations) belonging to the 1/2〈111〉 type and 〈100〉 type Burgers vector family. Further analysis of crystal defects using a fully automated dislocation extraction algorithm (DXA) illuminated formation and migration of twin boundaries on the (110) and (111) orientation but not on the (010) orientation and most importantly after retraction all the dislocations disappeared on the (110) orientation suggesting twinning to dominate dislocation nucleation in driving plasticity in tantalum. A significant finding was that the maximum shear stress (critical Tresca stress) in the deformation zone exceeded the theoretical shear strength of Ta (Shear modulus/2π~10.03 GPa) on the (010) orientation but was lower than it on the (110) and the (111) orientations. In light of this, the conventional lore of assuming the maximum shear stress being 0.465 times the mean contact pressure was found to break down at atomic scale.

  1. Evaluation of Polymer Hermetically Sealed Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer cathode tantalum capacitors have lower ESR (equivalent series resistance) compared to other types of tantalum capacitors and for this reason have gained popularity in the electronics design community. Their use allows improved performance of power supply systems along with substantial reduction of size and weight of the components used. However, these parts have poor thermal stability and can degrade in humid environments. Polymer hermetically sealed (PHS) capacitors avoid problems related to environmental degradation of molded case parts and can potentially replace current wet and solid hermetically sealed capacitors. In this work, PHS capacitors manufactured per DLA LAM DWG#13030 are evaluated for space applications. Several lots of capacitors manufactured over period from 2010 to 2014 were tested for the consistency of performance, electrical and thermal characteristics, highly accelerated life testing, and robustness under reverse bias and random vibration conditions. Special attention was given to analysis of leakage currents and the effect of long-term high temperature storage on capacitors in as is condition and after hermeticity loss. The results show that PHS capacitors might be especially effective for low-temperature applications or for system requiring a cold start-up. Additional screening and qualification testing have been recommended to assure the necessary quality of capacitors for space projects.

  2. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, B.E.; Roszell, L.E.; Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A.; Demaree, J.D.; Klotz, B.R.; Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E.; Bao, W.; Perkins, E.J.; Dillman, J.F.; Bannon, D.I.

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  3. In vivo corrosion, tumor outcome, and microarray gene expression for two types of muscle-implanted tungsten alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, B.E. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Roszell, L.E. [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States); Murr, L.E.; Ramirez, D.A. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Demaree, J.D. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, B434 Mulberry Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5609 (United States); Klotz, B.R. [Dynamic Science Inc., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005‐5609 (United States); Rosencrance, A.B.; Dennis, W.E. [U.S. Army Center for Environmental Health Research, Department of Chemistry, Ft. Detrick, MD 21702‐5010 (United States); Bao, W. [SAS Institute, Inc. SAS Campus Drive, Cary, NC 27513 (United States); Perkins, E.J. [U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 3909 Hall Ferry Road, Vicksburg MS 39180 (United States); Dillman, J.F. [U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, 3100 Ricketts Point Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5400 (United States); Bannon, D.I., E-mail: desmond.bannon@us.army.mil [U.S. Army Institute of Public Health, 5158 Blackhawk Road, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010‐5403 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Tungsten alloys are composed of tungsten microparticles embedded in a solid matrix of transition metals such as nickel, cobalt, or iron. To understand the toxicology of these alloys, male F344 rats were intramuscularly implanted with pellets of tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, or pure tungsten, with tantalum pellets as a negative control. Between 6 and 12 months, aggressive rhabdomyosarcomas formed around tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets, while those of tungsten/nickel/iron or pure tungsten did not cause cancers. Electron microscopy showed a progressive corrosion of the matrix phase of tungsten/nickel/cobalt pellets over 6 months, accompanied by high urinary concentrations of nickel and cobalt. In contrast, non-carcinogenic tungsten/nickel/iron pellets were minimally corroded and urinary metals were low; these pellets having developed a surface oxide layer in vivo that may have restricted the mobilization of carcinogenic nickel. Microarray analysis of tumors revealed large changes in gene expression compared with normal muscle, with biological processes involving the cell cycle significantly up‐regulated and those involved with muscle development and differentiation significantly down‐regulated. Top KEGG pathways disrupted were adherens junction, p53 signaling, and the cell cycle. Chromosomal enrichment analysis of genes showed a highly significant impact at cytoband 7q22 (chromosome 7) which included mouse double minute (MDM2) and cyclin‐dependant kinase (CDK4) as well as other genes associated with human sarcomas. In conclusion, the tumorigenic potential of implanted tungsten alloys is related to mobilization of carcinogenic metals nickel and cobalt from corroding pellets, while gene expression changes in the consequent tumors are similar to radiation induced animal sarcomas as well as sporadic human sarcomas. -- Highlights: ► Tungsten/nickel/cobalt, tungsten/nickel/iron, and pure tungsten were studied. ► Male Fischer rats implanted with

  4. Tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Jijie; Gong, Jinlong

    2014-07-07

    Solar energy utilization is one of the most promising solutions for the energy crises. Among all the possible means to make use of solar energy, solar water splitting is remarkable since it can accomplish the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. The produced hydrogen is clean and sustainable which could be used in various areas. For the past decades, numerous efforts have been put into this research area with many important achievements. Improving the overall efficiency and stability of semiconductor photocatalysts are the research focuses for the solar water splitting. Tantalum-based semiconductors, including tantalum oxide, tantalate and tantalum (oxy)nitride, are among the most important photocatalysts. Tantalum oxide has the band gap energy that is suitable for the overall solar water splitting. The more negative conduction band minimum of tantalum oxide provides photogenerated electrons with higher potential for the hydrogen generation reaction. Tantalates, with tunable compositions, show high activities owning to their layered perovskite structure. (Oxy)nitrides, especially TaON and Ta3N5, have small band gaps to respond to visible-light, whereas they can still realize overall solar water splitting with the proper positions of conduction band minimum and valence band maximum. This review describes recent progress regarding the improvement of photocatalytic activities of tantalum-based semiconductors. Basic concepts and principles of solar water splitting will be discussed in the introduction section, followed by the three main categories regarding to the different types of tantalum-based semiconductors. In each category, synthetic methodologies, influencing factors on the photocatalytic activities, strategies to enhance the efficiencies of photocatalysts and morphology control of tantalum-based materials will be discussed in detail. Future directions to further explore the research area of tantalum-based semiconductors for solar water splitting

  5. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  6. OPAL Silicon Tungsten Luminometer

    CERN Multimedia

    OPAL was one of the four experiments installed at the LEP particle accelerator from 1989 - 2000. The Silicon Tungsten Luminometer was part of OPAL's calorimeter which was used to measure the energy of particles. Most particles end their journey in calorimeters. These detectors measure the energy deposited when particles are slowed down and stopped.

  7. Work hardening and plastic equation of state of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gypen, L.A.; Aernoudt, E.; Deruyttere, A.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of cold deformation on the thermal and athermal components of the flow stress of tantalum was investigated. Up to high deformation levels the strain hardening is due only to the development of internal stress fields; the effective stress remains almost constant. The athermal strain hardening of tantalum is parabolic at low deformation levels (epsilon < 0.5) and linear at high deformation levels, as for other bcc metals. Hart's plastic equation of state is shown to be valid for tantalum at room temperature in the whole deformation range investigated (from epsilon = 0.005 to epsilon = 2.8). (author)

  8. The Chemical Vapour Deposition of Tantalum - in long narrow channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki

    protective layers of tantalum because of the process’ ability to coat complex geometries and its relative ease to control. This work focuses on studying the CVD of tantalum in long narrow channels with the view that the knowledge gained during the project can be used to optimise the commercial coating...... and that there is a major change in morphology between 850 – 900 °C. The effects of system pressure and precursor partial pressure are also studied, and were found to have relevance to the tantalum distribution along the substrates but little effect on the structural morphology of the deposited layer. In the implemented...

  9. Purification of molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheresnowsky, M.J.; Brunelli, T.A.; Kim, T.K.

    1987-01-01

    A method for purifying molybdenum is described comprising: (a) adding to an ammoniacal ammonium molybdate solution which is at a pH of from about 8.5 to about 11 and which contains the impurities of phosphorus and arsenic with the phosphorus concentration being from about 0.01 to about 0.12 g/l, a soluble magnesium salt to form a precipitate comprising magnesium ammonium salts of the phosphorus and the arsenic, and to form a purified ammonium molybdate solution, with the amount of the magnesium salt being added in an amount sufficient to result in a concentration of from about 0.005 to about 0.04 moles Mg/l in the ammoniacal ammonium molybdate solution, and the purified solution containing no greater than about 0.01 g P/l; (b) separating the precipitate from the purified ammonium molybdate solution; and (c) contacting the purified ammonium molybdate solution with a chelating cation exchange resin supplying a sufficient amount of ammonium as the cation to remove the major portion of the magnesium ions from the purified solution and form a further purified ammonium molybdate solution

  10. Electronic structure and charge transport in nonstoichiometric tantalum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perevalov, T. V.; Gritsenko, V. A.; Gismatulin, A. A.; Voronkovskii, V. A.; Gerasimova, A. K.; Aliev, V. Sh; Prosvirin, I. A.

    2018-06-01

    The atomic and electronic structure of nonstoichiometric oxygen-deficient tantalum oxide TaO x<2.5 grown by ion beam sputtering deposition was studied. The TaO x film content was analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and by quantum-chemistry simulation. TaO x is composed of Ta2O5, metallic tantalum clusters and tantalum suboxides. A method for evaluating the stoichiometry parameter of TaO x from the comparison of experimental and theoretical photoelectron valence band spectra is proposed. The charge transport properties of TaO x were experimentally studied and the transport mechanism was quantitatively analyzed with four theoretical dielectric conductivity models. It was found that the charge transport in almost stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric tantalum oxide can be consistently described by the phonon-assisted tunneling between traps.

  11. Force-dominated non-equilibrium oxidation kinetics of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Prasenjit; Wang, Ke; Liang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Using a combined electrochemical and mechanical manipulation technique, we compared the equilibrium and non-equilibrium oxidation processes and states of tantalum. Experimentally, a setup was developed with an electrochemical system attached to a sliding mechanical configuration capable of friction force measurement. The surface chemistry of a sliding surface, i.e., tantalum, was modified through the electrolyte. The mechanically applied force was fixed and the dynamics of the surface was monitored in situ through a force sensor. The formation of non-equilibrium oxidation states of tantalum was found in oxidation limiting environment of acetic acid. An oxidative environment of deionized water saturated with KCl was used as comparison. We proposed a modified Arrhenius-Eyring equation in which the mechanical factor was considered. We found that the mechanical energy induced the non-stable-state reactions leading to metastable oxidation states of tantalum. This equation can be used to predict mechanochemical reactions that are important in many industrial applications

  12. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  13. Radiographic examination of tracheal strictures by means of powdered tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheel, W.; Dippmann, A.

    1979-01-01

    This report deals with the diagnostic value of a tracheobronchography with powdered tantalum in 5 patients who suffer from a severe stricture of the trachea. The own experiences with this method are described. (orig.) [de

  14. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  15. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  16. Fast-neutrons incident on rotors: Tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alan B.

    2005-01-01

    Mono-energetic neutrons are elastically and inelastically scattered from elemental tantalum at incident energies of ∼0.3-10.0 MeV. These experimental results are augmented with neutron total-cross-section and additional neutron-scattering data from the literature to form a composite experimental database. The latter is interpreted in the context of optical-statistical and coupled-channels models, including consideration of collective rotations, dispersion effects and other physical properties. The results are compared with those of similar processes in this region of collective nuclei. A regional model is proposed for the interpretation and prediction of such interactions. The model and the experimental results are compared with corresponding values given in ENDF/B-VI

  17. Nitrogen reduction: Molybdenum does it again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Richard R.

    2011-02-01

    Nature reduces dinitrogen under mild conditions using nitrogenases, the most active of which contains molybdenum and iron. The only abiological dinitrogen reduction catalyst that avoids the harsh conditions of the Haber-Bosch process contains just molybdenum.

  18. Tungsten - rhenium alloys wire: overview of thermomechanical processing and properties data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryskin, B.

    2001-01-01

    The scope of this study encompasses the compositional modifications of the tungsten-rhenium dual system (W-3/5 Re up to W-27 Re) as well as some of the tungsten-molybdenum-rhenium ternary system. The alloys of interest are considered with a specific representation of powder metallurgy route based on doped or undoped tungsten vs. vacuum melted materials. This paper constitutes an in-depth review of structural and mechanical properties and systematic compilation of challenges necessary to provide the quality consistency of severely drawn filaments. The issue of thermomechanical processing trends is addressed as an important part of W-Re fabrication technology to achieve further improvement in design properties of rod and wire. (author)

  19. The global tantalum industry and Sons of Gwalia Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paull, D.

    2002-01-01

    Sons of Gwalia Ltd., in Perth Australia is a long-term supplier of tantalum (Ta), a valuable rare metal with adequate supply. Tantalum is soft and ductile with high melting and boiling points and a low co-efficient of thermal expansion. It has excellent capacity to store and release electrical charge and offers exceptional resistance to corrosion. Its' main use is in consumer electronics such as mobile phones, laptop computers, DVD players, personal video recorders and MP-3 players. For automotive electronics, tantalum is used for air-bags, audio systems, navigation systems, anti-lock break systems and under the hood vehicle management systems. The super alloy is also in demand by the aerospace industry and for turbine blades for power stations. The total demand of Tantalum in 2000 was 5 million lbs. Demand growth has increased steadily since 1993 with perhaps a slight increase in the past 5 years. Resources are estimated at a 125 year supply based on year 2000 production rates. 41 per cent of the world supply of tantalum is obtained from Australia, 13 per cent from Africa, 16 per cent from America, 22 per cent from Asia. The Greenbushes mine in Australia is the world's largest tantalum mine with 80 million lbs Ta, followed by Australia's Wodgina Mine with 50 million lbs Ta. Both mines are expected to be operational for the next 25 years. 12 figs

  20. Spectrographic determination of zirconium, niobium, rhodium, ruthenium, tantalum, and tungsten in uranium and its compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alduan, F.A.; Capdevila, C.

    1976-01-01

    The determination of Nb, Rh, Ru, Ta, W and Zr in uranium and its compounds has been studied, using the carrier distillation method with either AgCl or AgCl-SrF 2 (4:3) as carrier. In order to get the best sensitivity, the influence of the carrier concentration, the dc arc intensity and several controlled atmospheres on the variation of the line to background ratio of intensities has been considered. With the most suitable conditions, the sensitivities achieved for the considered elements are in the range 1-10 ppm. (author)

  1. Evaluation of some chemical analysis of granite rocks for rare elements (Tungsten, Nobuim, Tin, Tantalum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohmmed, I. A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, granite rocks samples were collected from Jebel Nikrab, in the eastern Sudan. A total of 16 samples were analyzed for Fe 2 O 3 , Mg O, CaO, Na 2 O, K 2 O and MnO 2 , using the atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS) and SiO 2 Al 2 O 3 using colorimeter. By classical methods analyzed for W, Ta, Nb and Sn, and all these results compared with the results have been done in the international laboratories give the same results even the results of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Ca O, MnO, Fe 2 O 3 , Mg O, K 2 O and Na 2 O. The range of W (0.0001-0.0005), Sn (0.00010.0024), Ta (0.003-0.0042), Nb (0.007-0.05). The range of oxide of Mn (0.07-0.1), Fe (0.17-17), Mg (0,009-0.3), Ca (0.05-1.2), Na (0.07-4.29) and K (0.02-3.7). (Author)

  2. Influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure and mechanical properties of superalloy single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathal, M.V.; Ebert, L.J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of Co, Ta, and W on the microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel base super-alloy single crystals was investigated. A matrix of alloys was based on Mar-M 247 stripped of C, B, Zr, and Hf. The microstructures of the alloys were examined using optical and electron microscopy, phase extraction, X-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis. Tensile and creep-rupture tests were performed at 1000 C. An increase in tensile and creep strength resulted when Co was removed from alloys containing high refractory metal contents, but Co effects were negligible for alloys with lower refractory metal levels. In the composition range studied, W was more effective than Ta in increasing the creep resistance. The mechanical properties are discussed in relation to the microstructures of the alloys

  3. Influence of cobalt, tantalum, and tungsten on the microstructure and mechanical properties of superalloy single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of Co, Ta, and W on the microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel base super-alloy single crystals was investigated. A matrix of alloys was based on Mar-M 247 stripped of C, B, Zr, and Hf. The microstructures of the alloys were examined using optical and electron microscopy, phase extraction, X-ray diffraction, and differential thermal analysis. Tensile and creep-rupture tests were performed at 1000 C. An increase in tensile and creep strength resulted when Co was removed from alloys containing high refractory metal contents, but Co effects were negligible for alloys with lower refractory metal levels. In the composition range studied, W was more effective than Ta in increasing the creep resistance. The mechanical properties are discussed in relation to the microstructures of the alloys.

  4. Materials Survey: Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    1956-12-01

    Columbia, from which tungsten production is planned approximately 60 miles east fromSkagway, were estimated at the end of 1951 to be Alaska. Reserves...of the principal mines inimportant producers. 1952 halted expansion programs planned by Production in Argentina reached a maxi- Patiffo Mines and...government.Concentrates International Mining Co. (W. R. Grace & from small producers are collected and Co.), La Paz; Chojlla Mine; type ore-- marketed by Banco Minero

  5. Method of molybdenum kinetic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krejngol'd, S.U.; Dzotsenidze, N.E.; Ruseishviyai, T.G.; Nelen', I.M.

    1980-01-01

    The method molybdenum kinetic determination according to oxidation of pyrogallol with bromate in the medium of 0.05-0.15 M perchloric or sulphuric acids is presented. 1 mg of Ni, Co, Mn, Mg, Zn, Cr(3); 100 μg of Ca, Al, Cu, 10 μg of Cr(4), W; 10 μg of Fe in the presence of 22x10 - 4 M solution of EDTA, as well as 10 - 4 M solutions of chlorides and fluorides, 10 - 5 M solutions of bromides do not interfere with molybdenum determination using the given method. The method is rather simple, it takes 30 min to carry out the analysis. Determination limit of molybdenum constitutes 0.01 μg/ml

  6. Isotope analysis of molybdenum in selected minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, S.; Dietze, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    An analytical method is described for the mass spectrometric determination of molybdenum abundance values. The results of analyses of three molybdenum mineral samples are presented and compared with the results of other authors. It is shown that the fine variations of molybdenum in natural minerals cannot be analysed with currently available mass spectrometers

  7. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  8. Evaluation of molybdenum and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of pure molybdenum as the prime candidate material for space reactor core heat pipes is critically examined. Pure molybdenum's high ductile-brittle transition temperature appears to be its major disadvantage. The candidate materials examined in detail for this application include low carbon arc-cast molybdenum, TZM-molybdenum alloy, and molybdenum-rhenium alloys. Published engineering properties are collected and compared, and it appears that Mo-Re alloys with 10 to 15% rhenium offer the best combination. Hardware is presently being made from electron beam melted Mo-13Re to test this conclusion

  9. Room and ultrahigh temperature structure-mechanical property relationships of tungsten alloys formed by field assisted sintering technique (FAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, Paul N.; Alagic, Sven [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State College, PA-16801 (United States); Pennsylvania State University, Applied Research Laboratory, State College, PA-16801 (United States); Kulkarni, Anil [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Nuclear and Mechanical Engineering, State College, PA-16801 (United States); Matson, Lawrence [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH (United States); Singh, Jogender, E-mail: jxs46@arl.psu.edu [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State College, PA-16801 (United States); Pennsylvania State University, Applied Research Laboratory, State College, PA-16801 (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Tungsten based alloys have become of critical importance in a number of applications including plasma-facing materials in nuclear fusion reactors, rocket nozzles for aerospace applications, and in kinetic energy penetrators in the defense industry. Formation of components for these uses by powder metallurgical techniques has proven challenging, due to tungsten's relatively poor sinterability. Here we report the use of field assisted sintering technique (FAST) to produce high density, fine grain alloys with mechanical properties comparable or superior to that of components produced by conventional techniques. Alloys of pure tungsten, W-3 vol%TiC, W-5 vol%TiC, and W-10 vol%Ta were synthesized at 2100 °C, 35 MPa for 25 min using FAST. Microstructural characterization revealed effective reduction of grain size with TiC addition and preferential diffusion of oxygen into the center of tantalum particles in tantalum containing alloys. Tensile testing of alloys revealed TiC addition to W resulted in substantially improved ultimate tensile strength at the cost of ductility in comparison at temperatures up to 1926 °C (3500 °F) however this strengthening effect was lost at 2204 °C (4000 °F). Addition of 10 vol%Ta to W resulted in reduced hardness at room temperature, but substantially increased yield strength at the cost of slightly reduced ductility at 1926 °C and 2204 °C.

  10. Gel Fabrication of Molybdenum “Beads”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Armstrong, Beth L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cooley, Kevin M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-11-01

    Spherical molybdenum particles or “beads” of various diameters are of interest as feedstock materials for the additive manufacture of targets and assemblies used in the production of 99Mo medical isotopes using accelerator technology. Small metallic beads or ball bearings are typically fabricated from wire; however, small molybdenum spheres cannot readily be produced in this manner. Sol-gel processes are often employed to produce small dense microspheres of metal oxides across a broad diameter range that in the case of molybdenum could be reduced and sintered to produce metallic spheres. These Sol-gel type processes were examined for forming molybdenum oxide beads; however, the molybdenum trioxide was chemically incompatible with commonly used gelation materials. As an alternative, an aqueous alginate process being assessed for the fabrication of oxide spheres for catalyst applications was employed to form molybdenum trioxide beads that were successfully reduced and sintered to produce small molybdenum spheres.

  11. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN MOLYBDENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd El Keriem, M.S.; van der Werf, D.P.; Pleiter, F

    1993-01-01

    Vacancy-hydrogen interaction in molybdenum was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. The complex InV2 turned out to trap up to two hydrogen atoms: trapping of a single hydrogen atom gives rise to a decrease of the quadrupole

  12. Self diffusion in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundy, J.N.; Rothman, S.J.; Lam, N.Q.; Nowicki, L.J.; Hoff, H.A.

    1978-01-01

    The lack of understanding of self-diffusion in Group VI metals together with the wide scatter in the measured values of tungsten self-diffusion has prompted the present measurements to be made over a wide temperature range (1/2Tsub(m) to Tsub(m)). The diffusion coefficients have been measured in the temperature range 1430-2630 0 C. The present measurements show non-linear Arrhenius behavior but a reliable two-exponential fit of the data should await further measurements. (Auth.)

  13. Gas tungsten arc welder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01

    A welder for automated closure of fuel pins by a gas tungsten arc process in which a rotating length of cladding is positioned adjacent a welding electrode in a sealed enclosure. An independently movable grinder, co-axial with the electrode, is provided in the enclosure for refurbishing the used electrode between welds. The specification also discloses means for loading of the cladding with fuel pellets and for placement of reflectors, gas capsules and end caps. Gravity feed conveyor and inerting means are also described. (author)

  14. Reduction of blue tungsten oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilken, T.; Wert, C.; Woodhouse, J.; Morcom, W.

    1975-01-01

    A significant portion of commercial tungsten is produced by hydrogen reduction of oxides. Although several modes of reduction are possible, hydrogen reduction is used where high purity tungsten is required and where the addition of other elements or compounds is desired for modification of the metal, as is done for filaments in the lamp industry. Although several investigations of the reduction of oxides have been reported (1 to 5), few principles have been developed which can aid in assessment of current commercial practice. The reduction process was examined under conditions approximating commercial practice. The specific objectives were to determine the effects of dopants, of water vapor in the reducing atmosphere, and of reduction temperature upon: (1) the rate of the reaction by which blue tungsten oxide is reduced to tungsten metal, (2) the intermediate oxides associated with reduction, and (3) the morphology of the resulting tungsten powder

  15. Tantalum oxide thin films as protective coatings for sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carsten; Reus, Roger De; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Reactively sputtered tantalum oxide thin films have been investigated as protective coatings for aggressive media exposed sensors. Tantalum oxide is shown to be chemically very robust. The etch rate in aqueous potassium hydroxide with pH 11 at 140°C is lower than 0.008 Å h-l. Etching in liquids...... with pH values in the range from pH 2 to 11 have generally given etch rates below 0.04 Å h-l. On the other hand patterning is possible in hydrofluoric acid. Further, the passivation behaviour of amorphous tantalum oxide and polycrystalline Ta2O5 is different in buffered hydrofluoric acid. By ex situ...... annealing O2 in the residual thin-film stress can be altered from compressive to tensile and annealing at 450°C for 30 minutes gives a stress-free film. The step coverage of the sputter deposited amorphous tantalum oxide is reasonable, but metallization lines are hard to cover. Sputtered tantalum oxide...

  16. Tantalum oxide thin films as protective coatings for sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Carsten; Reus, Roger De; Bouwstra, Siebe

    1999-01-01

    Reactively sputtered tantalum oxide thin-films have been investigated as protective coating for aggressive media exposed sensors. Tantalum oxide is shown to be chemically very robust. The etch rate in aqueous potassium hydroxide with pH 11 at 140°C is lower than 0.008 Å/h. Etching in liquids with p......H values in the range from pH 2-11 have generally given etch rates below 0.04 Å/h. On the other hand patterning is possible in hydrofluoric acid. Further, the passivation behaviour of amorphous tantalum oxide and polycrystalline Ta2O5 is different in buffered hydrofluoric acid. By ex-situ annealing in O2...... the residual thin-film stress can be altered from compressive to tensile and annealing at 450°C for 30 minutes gives a stress-free film. The step coverage of the sputter deposited amorphous tantalum oxide is reasonable, but metallisation lines are hard to cover. Sputtered tantalum oxide exhibits high...

  17. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Development of technology of high-purity compounds of tantalum and niobium with octanol use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorov, V.G.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Kopkov, V.K.; Baklanova, I.V.; Safonova, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Effect of composition of solutions and extractant expenditure on tantalum and niobium distribution during extraction by octanol and purification of tantalum and niobium extracts from impurities was studied. Scheme was developed according to which samples of high-pure tantalum and niobium pentaoxides were prepared [ru

  19. Corrosion resistance of tantalum base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gypen, L.A.; Brabers, M.; Deruyttre, A.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion behaviour of substitutional Ta-Mo, Ta-W, Ta-Nb, Ta-Hf, Ta-Zr, Ta-Re, Ta-Ni, Ta-V, Ta-W-Mo, Ta-W-Nb, Ta-W-Hf and Ta-W-Re alloys has been investigated in various corrosive media, i.e. (1) concentrated sulfuric acid at 250 0 C and 200 0 C, (2) boiling hydrochloric acid of azeotropic composition, (3) concentrated hydrochloric acid at 150 0 C under pressure, (4) HF-Containing solutions and (5) 0.5% H 2 SO 4 at room temperature (anodisation). In highly corrosive media such as concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C and concentrated HCl at 150 0 C tantalum is hydrogen embrittled, probably by stress induced precipitation of β-hydride. Both corrosion rate and hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C are strongly influenced by alloying elements. Small alloying additions of either Mo or Re decrease the corrosion rate and the hydrogen embrittlement, while Hf has the opposite effect. Hydrogen embrittlement in concentrated H 2 SO 4 at 250 0 C is completely eliminated by alloying Ta with 1 to 3 at % Mo (0.5 to 1.5 wt % Mo). These results can be explained in terms of oxygen deficiency of the Ta 2 O 5 film and the electronic structure of these alloys. (orig.) [de

  20. Thermomechanical characterization of pure polycrystalline tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittel, D.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Poon, B.; Zhao, J.; Ravichandran, G.

    2007-01-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of pure polycrystalline tantalum has been characterized over a wide range of strain rates, using the recently developed shear compression specimen [D. Rittel, S. Lee, G. Ravichandran, Experimental Mechanics 42 (2002) 58-64]. Dynamic experiments were carried out using a split Hopkinson pressure bar, and the specimen's temperature was monitored throughout the tests using an infrared radiometer. The results of the mechanical tests confirm previous results on pure Ta. Specifically, in addition to its significant strain rate sensitivity, it was observed that pure Ta exhibits very little strain hardening at high strain rates. The measured temperature rise in the specimen's gauge was compared to theoretical predictions which assume a total conversion of the mechanical energy into heat (β = 1) [G.I. Taylor, H. Quinney, Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, vol. A, 1934, pp. 307-326], and an excellent agreement was obtained. This result confirms the previous result of Kapoor and Nemat-Nasser [R. Kapoor, S. Nemat-Nasser, Mech. Mater. 27 (1998) 1-12], while a different experimental approach was adopted here. The assumption that β = 1 is found to be justified in this specific case by the lack of dynamic strain hardening of pure Ta. However, this assumption should be limited to non-hardening materials, to reflect the fact that strain hardening implies that part of the mechanical energy is stored into the material's microstructure

  1. Tantalum powder consolidation, modeling and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingert, S.R.; Vargas, V.D.; Sheinberg, H.C.

    1996-01-01

    A systematic approach was taken to investigate the consolidation of tantalum powders. The effects of sinter time, temperature and ramp rate; hot isostatic pressing (HIP) temperature and time; and powder oxygen content on consolidation density, kinetics, microstructure, crystallographic texture, and mechanical properties have been evaluated. In general, higher temperatures and longer hold times resulted in higher density compacts with larger grain sizes for both sintering and HIP'ing. HIP'ed compacts were consistently higher in density than sintered products. The higher oxygen content powders resulted in finer grained, higher density HIP'ed products than the low oxygen powders. Texture analysis showed that the isostatically processed powder products demonstrated a near random texture. This resulted in isotropic properties in the final product. Mechanical testing results showed that the HIP'ed powder products had consistently higher flow stresses than conventionally produced plates, and the sintered compacts were comparable to the plate material. A micromechanics model (Ashby HIP model) has been employed to predict the mechanisms active in the consolidation processes of cold isostatic pressing (CIP), HIP and sintering. This model also predicts the density of the end product and whether grain growth should be expected under the applied processing conditions

  2. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allain, E.; Gaballah, I.; Garcia, F.; Ferreira, S.; Ayala, J. N.; Hernandez, A.

    1999-01-01

    The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 by gas mixture (CL 2 +CO+N 2 ) between 380 and 1,000 degree centigree is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the partial pressure of Cl 2 and Co at temperatures below 650 degree centigree on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb 2 O 5 and Ta 2 O 5 , respectively. At temperatures above 650 degree centigree the Arrhenius diagram presents and anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCL 2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl 2 +CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl 2 +N 2 . The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides. (Author) 14 refs

  3. Conflict minerals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo: global tungsten processing plants, a critical part of the tungsten supply chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Lugo, Omayra

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) analyzes supply chains to identify and define major components of mineral and material flows from ore extraction, through intermediate forms, to a final product. Two major reasons necessitate these analyses: (1) to identify risks associated with the supply of critical and strategic minerals to the United States and (2) to provide greater supply chain transparency so that policymakers have the information necessary to ensure domestic legislation compliance. This fact sheet focuses on the latter. The USGS National Minerals Information Center has been asked by governmental and non-governmental organizations to provide information on tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold (collectively known as “3TG minerals”) processing facilities worldwide in response to U.S. legislation aimed at removing the link between the trade in these minerals and civil unrest in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Post beneficiation processing plants (smelters and refineries) of 3TG mineral ores and concentrates were identified by company and industry association representatives as being the link in the 3TG mineral supply chain through which these minerals can be traced to their source of origin (mine); determining the point of origin is critical to establishing a transparent conflict mineral supply chain. This fact sheet, the first in a series of 3TG mineral fact sheets, focuses on the tungsten supply chain by listing plants that consume tungsten concentrates to produce ammonium paratungstate and ferrotungsten worldwide.

  4. Material removal mechanisms in electrochemical-mechanical polishing of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, F.; Liang, H.

    2009-01-01

    Material removal mechanisms in tantalum chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) and electrochemical-mechanical polishing (ECMP) were investigated using the single frequency electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Through measuring the impedance of the tantalum surface, the single frequency EIS scan made it possible to observe the CMP and ECMP processes in situ. The impedance results presented competing mechanisms of removal and formation of a surface oxide layer of tantalum. Analysis indicated that the thickness of the oxide layer formed during polishing was related to the mechanical power correlated to the friction force and the rotating speed. Furthermore, the rate of growth and removal of the oxide film was a function of the mechanical power. This understanding is beneficial for optimization of CMP and ECMP processes.

  5. An investigation of tantalum and niobium contents by nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patmasiriwat, N.

    1981-01-01

    The objective of this experimental study was to find suitable nuclear techniques to determine the quantities of niobium and tantalum in columbite. The study has been performed by using radioisotope X-ray fluorescent technique (X RF) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The results showed a good agreement between these two techniques. Nevertheless, with NAA, if there is uranium in the sample, the spectrum of niobium will be interfered. So practically, on the basis of accuracy and speed of determination, X-ray fluorescence is more suitable than NAA to determine the quantity of niobium while tantalum is preferable to use NAA. The detection limit of niobium and tantalum using the above techniques are 0.661% and 0.1 mg respectively

  6. Behaviour of tantalum- and ceramics implants in the organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of human and animal tissues after the use of orthopaedic implants were carried out by means of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), as well as studies on the corrosion behaviour of tantalum by means of tracer techniques. After the use of an Al 2 O 3 -ceramic-metal compound prosthesis of the hip joint samples from the joint capsule and the Fascia Lata of 9 patients were studied. The measured Al amounts in the capsule tissues were greater than the normal values by up to 3 orders of magnitude. The corrosion experiment with tantalum was carried out in Ringer's solution as a model of body fluids. Local and systemic changes because of tantalum implants in animal experiments showed massive local stress of the contact tissue as a result of corrosion. Along with this, increased values of Ta were found in the spleen and the liver. (orig./RB) [de

  7. Photo field emission spectroscopy of the tantalum band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleint, Ch.; Radon, T.

    1978-01-01

    Photo field emission (PFE) currents of clean and barium covered tantalum tips have been measured with single lines of the mercury arc spectrum and phase-sensitive detection. Field strength and work function were determined from Fowler-Nordheim plots of the FE currents. Shoulders in the PFE current-voltage characteristics could be correlated to transitions in the band structure of tantalum according to a recently proposed two-step PFE model. A comparison with the relativistic calculations of Mattheiss and the nonrelativistic bands of Petroff and Viswanathan shows that Mattheiss' bands are more appropriate. Beside direct transitions several nondirect transitions from the different features composing the upper two density of states maxima below the Fermi edge of tantalum have been found. (Auth.)

  8. Change in lattice parameter of tantalum due to dissolved hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra P. Tiwari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The volume expansion of tantalum due to the dissolved hydrogen has been determined using Bragg equation. The hydrogen was dissolved in the pure tantalum metal at constant temperature (360 °C and constant pressure (132 mbar by varying the duration of hydrogen charging. The amount of dissolved hydrogen was within the solid solubility limit. The samples with different hydrogen concentration were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Slight peak shifts as well as peak broadening were observed. The relative changes of lattice parameters plotted against the hydrogen concentration revealed that the lattice parameters varied linearly with the hydrogen concentration.

  9. Hydrogen adsorption on skeletal rhodium-tantalum electrodes-catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsinstevich, V.M.; Krejnina, N.M.

    1975-01-01

    Skeleton rhodium-tantalic catalyst electrodes with a tantalum mass percentage of 0 to 100 have been obtained by the methodology of Crupp and others. The hydrogen adsorption is studied through the method of removing the galvano-static and potentiodynamic curves of charging in sulfuric acid and potassium hydroxide. It has been discovered that the maximum adsorption ability relatively to the hydrogen can be observed in an alloy with a 5% tantalum contents. The energetic characteristics of the alloys are higher in alkali than in acid

  10. Electromigration of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, C.L.

    1977-10-01

    The electric mobility and effective valence of hydrogen and deuterium in vanadium, niobium, tantalum and three niobium-tantalum alloys were measured. A resistance technique was used to directly determine the electric mobility of hydrogen and deuterium at 30 0 C while a steady-state method was used to measure the effective valence. The use of mass spectrographic techniques on a single specimen which contained both hydrogen and deuterium greatly increased the precision with which the isotope effect in the effective valence could be measured

  11. Neutron scattering and models: molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.B.

    1999-01-01

    A comprehensive interpretation of the fast-neutron interaction with elemental and isotopic molybdenum at energies of le 30 MeV is given. New experimental elemental-scattering information over the incident energy range 4.5 r a rrow 10 MeV is presented. Spherical, vibrational and dispersive models are deduced and discussed, including isospin, energy-dependent and mass effects. The vibrational models are consistent with the ''Lane potential''. The importance of dispersion effects is noted. Dichotomies that exist in the literature are removed. The models are vehicles for fundamental physical investigations and for the provision of data for applied purposes. A ''regional'' molybdenum model is proposed. Finally, recommendations for future work are made

  12. CVD molybdenum films of high infrared reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carver, G. E.

    1979-01-01

    Molybdenum thin films of high infrared reflectance have been deposited by pyrolytic decomposition of molybdenum carbonyl (Mo(CO)/sub 6/), and by hydrogen reduction of molybdenum pentachloride (MoCl/sub 5/). Reflectance values within 0.7% of the reflectance of supersmooth bulk molybdenum have been attained by annealing films of lower reflectance in both reducing and non-reducing atmospheres. All depositions and anneals proceed at atmospheric pressure, facilitating a continuous, flow-through fabrication. These reflectors combine the high temperature stability of molybdenum thin films with the infrared reflectance of a material such as aluminum. Deposition from Mo(CO)/sub 6/ under oxidizing conditions, and subsequent anneal in a reducing atmosphere, results in films that combine high solar absorptance with low thermal emittance. If anti-reflected, black molybdenum films can serve as highly selective single layer photothermal converters. Structural, compositional, and crystallographic properties have been measured after both deposition and anneal.

  13. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, A; Goldenstein, H.; Mei, P.R.; Albertin, E.; Fuoco, R.; Mariotto, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  14. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-12-15

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  15. Experimental mechanistic investigation of the nanostructuring of tungsten with low energy helium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiflis, P.; Connolly, N.; Ruzic, D.N.

    2016-01-01

    Helium ion bombardment of tungsten at temperatures between approximately one third and one half of its melting point has shown growth of nanostructures colloquially referred to as “fuzz”. The nanostructures take the form of thin tendrils of diameter about 30 nm and grow out of the bulk material. Tungsten will and does compose one of the key materials for plasma facing components (PFCs) in fusion reactors. The formation of nanostructured fuzz layers on PFCs would be detrimental to the performance of the reactor, and must therefore be avoided. Previous experiments have shown evidence that tungsten fuzz is initially grown by loop punching of helium bubbles created in the bulk. However, once the tendrils grow to sufficient length, the tendrils should intercept the entire helium flux, halting the production of fuzz. Fuzz continues to grow though. To increase the understanding of the mechanisms of tungsten fuzz formation, and thereby aid the avoidance of its production, a series of tests were performed to examine the validity of several theories regarding later stage tungsten fuzz growth. Tests showed that the fuzz formation was dependent solely on the bombardment of helium ions, and not on electric fields, or adatom diffusion. Experiments employing a tungsten coated molybdenum sample indicate the presence of a strong mixing layer and strongly suggest that tungsten fuzz growth continues to occur from the bottom up even as the tendrils grow in size. Tests also show a similarity between different metals exposed to helium ion fluxes where the ratio of bubble diameter to tendril diameter is constant.

  16. Tungsten and optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reglero, V.; Velasco, T.; Rodrigo, J.; Gasent, L.J.; Alamo, J.; Chato, R.; Ruiz Urien, I.; Santos, I.; Zarauz, J.

    2001-01-01

    High energy astronomy research requires accurate location to perform multiwavelength studies of the cosmic gamma-ray emitters. New technologies have been developed to achieve this goal, the use of large spatial signal multiplexing systems (Masks). The optical system based on the use of coded Masks together with solid stated pixelated planes provide a point source location capability of 1 arc min, that is 3600 times better than of the last NASA CGRO mission. Different materials were considered to modulate the high energy signals, tungsten was selected for implementing the codes due to both its high density and large atomic number that provide the required stooping power. An overview of the programme carried out to design and manufacture the coded Masks is provided. (nevyjel)

  17. Comparison of the thermal shock performance of different tungsten grades and the influence of microstructure on the damage behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirtz, M; Linke, J; Pintsuk, G; Singheiser, L; Uytdenhouwen, I

    2011-01-01

    The thermal shock performances of two new tungsten grades with 1 and 5 wt% of tantalum were characterized with the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. As a reference material, ultra-high-purity tungsten (W-UHP) with a purity of 99.9999 wt% was used. The induced thermal shock crack networks and surface modifications were analysed by a scanning electron microscope, light microscopy and laser profilometry. Damage and cracking thresholds were defined for all materials as a function of absorbed power density and base temperature. The materials showed significantly different thermal shock behaviour, which is, among others, expressed by differences in cracking patterns, i.e. crack distance and depth. These results allow us to quantify the influence of the materials' mechanical and thermal properties on the thermal shock performance. Furthermore, the specific grain structure of the materials has a significant influence on crack propagation towards the bulk material.

  18. TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2010-01-01

    After having recalled the Tungsten Inert Gas process principle and the different alternative TIG processes, the author explains the advantages and limits of this process. The applications and recent developments are given. (O.M.)

  19. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  20. Determination of tungsten in high-alloy steels and heat resisting alloys by isotope dilution-spark source mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Morimasa; Yamada, Kei; Okochi, Haruno; Hirose, Fumio

    1983-01-01

    Tungsten in high-alloy steels and heat-resisting alloys was determined by isotope dilution method combined with spark source mass spectrometry by using 183 W enriched tungsten. The spike solution was prepared by fusing tungsten trioxide in sodium carbonate. A high-alloy steel sample was dissolved in the mixture of sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid together with the spike solution; a sample of heat resisting alloy was similarly dissolved in the mixture of hydrochloric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, and phosphoric acid. The solution was evaporated to give dense white fumes. Tungsten was separated from the residue by a conventional cinchonine salt-precipitation method. The salt was ignited, and the residue was mixed with graphite powder and pressed into electrodes. The isotope 183 W and 184 W were measured. The method was applied to the determination of tungsten in JSS and NBS standard high-alloy steels and JAERI standard nickel- and NBS standard cobalt-base heat resisting alloys containing more than 0.05% tungsten. The results were obtained with satisfactory precision and accuracy. However, the results obtained for JSS standard high- speed steels containing molybdenum tended to be significantly lower than the certified values. (author)

  1. 2014 NEPP Tasks Update for Ceramic and Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation describes recent development in research on MnO2, wet, and polymer tantalum capacitors. Low-voltage failures in multilayer ceramic capacitors and techniques to reveal precious metal electrode (PME) and base metal electrode (BME) capacitors with cracks are discussed. A voltage breakdown technique is suggested to select high quality low-voltage BME ceramic capacitors.

  2. Electron microprobe analysis of tantalum--nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoltz, D.L.; Starkey, J.P.

    1979-06-01

    Quantitative chemical analysis of 500- and 2000-angstrom tantalum--nitride films on glass substrates has been accomplished using an electron microprobe x-ray analyzer. In order to achieve this analysis, modifications to the microprobe were necessary. A description of the calibration procedure, the method of analysis, and the quantitative results are discussed

  3. Evaluation of residual stress in sputtered tantalum thin-film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-masha’al, Asa’ad, E-mail: asaad.al@ed.ac.uk; Bunting, Andrew; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum thin-films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering system. • Thin-film stress is observed to be strongly influenced by sputtering pressure. • Transition towards the compressive stress is ascribed to the annealing at 300 °C. • Expose thin-film to air ambient or ion bombardment lead to a noticeable change in the residual stress. - Abstract: The influence of deposition conditions on the residual stress of sputtered tantalum thin-film has been evaluated in the present study. Films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and curvature measurement method has been employed to calculate the residual stress of the films. Transitions of tantalum film stress from compressive to tensile state have been observed as the sputtering pressure increases. Also, the effect of annealing process at temperature range of 90–300 °C in oxygen ambient on the residual stress of the films has been studied. The results demonstrate that the residual stress of the films that have been deposited at lower sputtering pressure has become more compressive when annealed at 300 °C. Furthermore, the impact of exposure to atmospheric ambient on the tantalum film stress has been investigated by monitoring the variation of the residual stress of both annealed and unannealed films over time. The as-deposited films have been exposed to pure Argon energy bombardment and as result, a high compressive stress has been developed in the films.

  4. Laser welding of a beryllium/tantalum collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lingenfelter, A.C.; Anglin, C.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the methods utilized in the fabrication of a collimator from 0.001 inch thick beryllium and tantalum foil. The laser welding process proved to be an acceptable method for joining the beryllium in a standing edge joint configuration

  5. Micro creep mechanisms of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoy, R.; Hugon, I.; Burlet, H.; Baillin, X.; Guetaz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Due to its high melting point (3410 deg C), tungsten offers good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures for several applications in non-oxidizing environment. The creep behavior of tungsten is well known between 1200 and 2500 deg C and 10 -3 to 10 -1 strain. However, in some applications when dimensional stability of components is required, these strains are excessive and it is necessary to know the creep behavior of the material for micro-strains (between 10 -4 and 10 -6 ). Methods and devices used to measure creep micro-strains are presented, and creep equations (Norton and Chaboche laws) were developed for wrought, annealed and recrystallized tungsten. The main results obtained on tungsten under low stresses are: stress exponent 1, symmetry of micro-strains in creep-tension and creep-compression, inverse creep (threshold stress), etc. TEM, SEM and EBSD studies allow interpretation of the micro-creep mechanism of tungsten under low stresses and low temperature (∼0.3 K) like the Harper-Dorn creep. In Harper-Dorn creep, micro-strains are associated with the density and the distribution of dislocations existing in the crystals before creep. At 975 deg C, the initial dislocation structure moves differently whether or not a stress is applied. To improve the micro-creep behavior of tungsten, a heat treatment is proposed to create the optimum dislocation structure. (authors)

  6. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weinberger, Christopher [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct

  7. Tungsten wire and tubing joined by nickel brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Thin tungsten wire and tungsten tubing are brazed together using a contacting coil of nickel wire heated to its melting point in an inert-gas atmosphere. This method is also effective for brazing tungsten to tungsten-rhenium parts.

  8. Molybdenum: the element and aqueous solution chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the chemistry of the coordination compounds of molybdenum concentrates on the element itself, its recovery from ores and its use in the manufacture of steels. Most of the chapter is devoted to the aqueous solution chemistry of molybdenum in oxidation states II, III and IV. (UK)

  9. Investigation of pressing of molybdenum powder compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mymrin, S.A.; Kuznetsov, V.Eh.; Yampol'skij, M.L.; Leonov, S.A.; Mikhridinov, R.M.; Korzukhin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation into pressing of compacts of MCh type molybdenum powders using the industrial equipment are presented. To measure the density of powder molybdenum billets a radioisotopic density meter with cesium-137 is used as radioactive gamma radiation source. The dependence of the produced billet density on the specific compacting pressure at different values of the powder bulk density is ascertained

  10. Extraction of molybdenum VI by alpha benzoinoxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achache, M.; Meklati, M.

    1990-06-01

    The concentration of molybdenum, was studied using alpha benzoinoxime dissolved in chloroform. Several acids and salt at different levels of concentration were investigated as well as other parameters such as (mixing time, extractant to metal ratio, temperature etc.) The molybdenum stippling was also studied in alkaline medium with the subsequent recovery of the extractant and solvent

  11. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eagan, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A glass-ceramic composition is described having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, and a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum. The composition is adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures between 900 and about 950 0 C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body

  12. Phenomenological effets of tantalum incorporation into diamond films: Experimental and first principle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullah, Mahtab, E-mail: mahtabullah@bzu.edu.pk [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmad, E. [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Raza, Rizwan [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore-54000 (Pakistan); Hussain, Fayyaz [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University Multan (Pakistan); Hussain, Akhtar; Iqbal, Muhammad [Theoretical Physics Division, PINSTECH, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2016-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fabrication of tantalum incorporated diamonds films using HFCVD technique. • Decrease in resistivity by increasing tantalum content in diamond thin films. • Electronic structure calculations of tantalum incorporated diamonds films through VASP code. • A rise of bond length and bond angles by addition of tantalum in the diamond lattice. • Confirmation of decrease of resistivity by adding tantalum due to creation of impurity states in the bandgap. - Abstract: Tantalum (Ta) incorporated diamond films are synthesized on silicon substrate by chemical vapor deposition under gas mixture of CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2}. Characterizations of the resulting films indicate that morphology and resistivity of as-grown diamond films are significantly influenced by the process parameters and the amount of tantalum incorporated in the diamond films. XRD plots reveal that diamond films are composed of TaC along with diamond for higher concentration of tantalum and Ta{sub 2}C phases for lower concentration of tantalum. EDS spectra confirms the existence of tantalum in the diamond films. Resistivity measurements illustrate a sudden fall of about two orders of magnitude by the addition of tantalum in the diamond films. Band structure of Ta-incorporated diamond has been investigated based on density functional theory (DFT) using VASP code. Band structure calculations lead to the semiconducting behavior of Ta-incorporated diamond films because of the creation of defects states inside the band gap extending towards conduction band minimum. Present DFT results support experimental trend of resistivity that with the incorporation of tantalum into diamond lattice causes a decrease in the resistivity of diamond films so that tantalum-incorporated diamond films behave like a good semiconductor.

  13. Further development of the tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gietl, Hanns; Hoeschen, Till; Riesch, Johann [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Aumann, Martin; Coenen, Jan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Huber, Philipp [Lehrstuhl fuer Textilmaschinenbau und Institut fuer Textiltechnik (ITA), 52062 Aachen (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    For the use in a fusion device tungsten has a unique property combination. The brittleness below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature and the embrittlement during operation e.g. by overheating, neutron irradiation are the main drawbacks for the use of pure tungsten. Tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites utilize extrinsic mechanisms to improve the toughness. After proofing that this idea works in principle the next step is the conceptual proof for the applicability in fusion reactors. This will be done by producing mock-ups and testing them in cyclic high heat load tests. For this step all constituents of the composite, which are fibre, matrix and interface, and all process steps need to be investigated. Tungsten fibres are investigated by means of tension tests to find the optimum diameter and pretreatment. New interface concepts are investigated to meet the requirements in a fusion reactor, e.g. high thermal conductivity, low activation. In addition weaving processes are evaluated for their use in the fibre preform production. This development is accompanied by an extensive investigation of the materials properties e.g. single fibre tension tests.

  14. Materials for Molybdenum 99 purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, M. Victoria; Mondino, Angel V.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    2003-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) produces fission Mo 99, an isotope of wide use in nuclear medicine. In order to simplify the current Mo 99 production process, to shorten its duration and reduce impurities in the final product, alternative methods for purification steps were looked for. In this work a variety of new materials for the purification columns were designed, all of them with carbon. These materials were studied and a material which contribute with the best results for molybdenum retention, was selected. The preparation procedure and the working conditions were determined. (author)

  15. Molybdenum Oxides - From Fundamentals to Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Isabela Alves; Datta, Robi Shankar; Ou, Jian Zhen; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Sriram, Sharath; Daeneke, Torben; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2017-10-01

    The properties and applications of molybdenum oxides are reviewed in depth. Molybdenum is found in various oxide stoichiometries, which have been employed for different high-value research and commercial applications. The great chemical and physical characteristics of molybdenum oxides make them versatile and highly tunable for incorporation in optical, electronic, catalytic, bio, and energy systems. Variations in the oxidation states allow manipulation of the crystal structure, morphology, oxygen vacancies, and dopants, to control and engineer electronic states. Despite this overwhelming functionality and potential, a definitive resource on molybdenum oxide is still unavailable. The aim here is to provide such a resource, while presenting an insightful outlook into future prospective applications for molybdenum oxides. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. L-H power threshold studies with tungsten/carbon divertor on the EAST tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, L.; Xu, G. S.; Gao, W.

    2016-01-01

    The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency heating and molybdenum first wall with lithium coating has been experimentally investigated on the EAST tokamak for two sets of divertor geometries and materials: tungsten/carbon divertor and full...... carbon divertor. For both sets of divertors, the power threshold was found to decrease with gradual accumulation of the lithium wall coating, suggesting the important role played by the low Z impurities and/or the edge neutral density on the L-H power threshold. When operating in the upper single null...

  17. Mineral-deposit model for lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dwight C.; McCauley, Andrew D.; Stillings, Lisa L.

    2017-06-20

    Lithium-cesium-tantalum (LCT) pegmatites comprise a compositionally defined subset of granitic pegmatites. The major minerals are quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite; typical accessory minerals include biotite, garnet, tourmaline, and apatite. The principal lithium ore minerals are spodumene, petalite, and lepidolite; cesium mostly comes from pollucite; and tantalum mostly comes from columbite-tantalite. Tin ore as cassiterite and beryllium ore as beryl also occur in LCT pegmatites, as do a number of gemstones and high-value museum specimens of rare minerals. Individual crystals in LCT pegmatites can be enormous: the largest spodumene was 14 meters long, the largest beryl was 18 meters long, and the largest potassium feldspar was 49 meters long.Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatites account for about one-fourth of the world’s lithium production, most of the tantalum production, and all of the cesium production. Giant deposits include Tanco in Canada, Greenbushes in Australia, and Bikita in Zimbabwe. The largest lithium pegmatite in the United States, at King’s Mountain, North Carolina, is no longer being mined although large reserves of lithium remain. Depending on size and attitude of the pegmatite, a variety of mining techniques are used, including artisanal surface mining, open-pit surface mining, small underground workings, and large underground operations using room-and-pillar design. In favorable circumstances, what would otherwise be gangue minerals (quartz, potassium feldspar, albite, and muscovite) can be mined along with lithium and (or) tantalum as coproducts.Most LCT pegmatites are hosted in metamorphosed supracrustal rocks in the upper greenschist to lower amphibolite facies. Lithium-cesium-tantalum pegmatite intrusions generally are emplaced late during orogeny, with emplacement being controlled by pre-existing structures. Typically, they crop out near evolved, peraluminous granites and leucogranites from which they are inferred to be

  18. Toughness enhancement of tungsten reinforced with short tungsten fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, L.H. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Fang, Q.F., E-mail: qffang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, T.; Wang, X.P.; Hao, T.; Liu, C.S. [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-04-06

    The feasibility and toughening efficiency of the short tungsten fibre reinforcement on tungsten were investigated in W{sub f}/W composites fabricated by powder metallurgy method of spark plasma sintering. Fibres in the composites presented a Z-free laminar structure. Partial recrystallization of fibre grains occurred but fibre crack or damage was not detected. Fracture energy of W{sub f}/W composites was estimated in tensile tests, and the results indicated great toughness improvement over pure tungsten in virtue of frictional pullout and plastic deformation of fibres, and matrix-fibres interfacial debonding since 873 K. The specimen with mass fraction of 10% and fibre diameter of 100 µm exhibits the largest elongation of 9±1.1% and the highest ultimate strength of 482±13 MPa at 873 K.

  19. Carbochlorination kinetics of tantalum and niobium pentoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain, E.

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The carbochlorination kinetics of pure Nb2O5 and Ta2O5 by gas mixture (C12 + CO + N2 between 380 and 1,000 °C is studied. A calculation of the standard free energy of the carbochlorination reactions is made. A diagram of the phases stability is drawn. The influence of the gas flow, temperature and the pardal pressure of Cl2 and CO at temperatures below 650 °C on the reaction rate is studied. The apparent activation energy is approximately 75 and 110 kJ/mol for Nb2Os and Ta2O5, respectively. At temperatures above 650°C the Arrhenius diagram presents an anomaly which may be attributed to the decomposition of the COCl2 formed in situ. The apparent reaction order of the carbochlorination of these oxides against Cl2+CO is approximately 2. The carbochlorination rates of these oxides are much greater than those of chlorination by Cl2 + N2. The carbochlorination kinetics of tin furnace slag leaching concentrates containing tantalum and niobium compounds are also studied and compared with the carbochlorination kinetics of the pure oxides.

    En este trabajo se estudia la cinética de carbocloruración del Nb2O5 y del Ta2O5 por la mezcla de gases (Cl2 + CO + N2 entre 380 y 1000°C. Se hace un cálculo de la energía libre estándar de carbocloruración y se dibujan los diagramas de equilibrio de fases. Se estudia la influencia del flujo de gas, la temperatura y la presión parcial de Cl2 y CO a temperaturas por debajo de 650°C sobre la velocidad de reacción. La energía de activación es aproximadamente 75 y 110 kJ/mol para el Nb2O5 y el Ta2O5, respectivamente. A temperaturas por encima de 650°C, el diagrama de Arrhenius presenta una anomalía que puede ser atribuida a la

  20. Vapor deposition of molybdenum oxide using bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum and water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, Tasha L.; Stair, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    Three molybdenum precursors—bis(acetylacetonate) dioxomolybdenum, molybdenum isopropoxide, and bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum—were tested for molybdenum oxide vapor deposition. Quartz crystal microbalance studies were performed to monitor growth. Molybdenum isopropoxide and bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum achieved linear growth rates 0.01 and 0.08 Å/cycle, respectively, using atomic layer deposition techniques. Negligible MoO_x growth was observed on alumina powder using molybdenum isopropoxide, as determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum achieved loadings of 0.5, 1.1, and 1.9 Mo/nm"2 on alumina powder after one, two, and five cycles, respectively, using atomic layer deposition techniques. The growth window for bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum is 135–150 °C. An alternative pulsing strategy was also developed for bis(ethylbenzene) molybdenum that results in higher growth rates in less time compared to atomic layer deposition techniques. The outlined process serves as a methodology for depositing molybdenum oxide for catalytic applications. All as-deposited materials undergo further calcination prior to characterization and testing.

  1. Study of electrochemical behaviour of tantalum in molten alkali metal chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajmakov, A.N.; Ezrokhina, A.M.; Sashinina, O.A.; Shkol'nikov, S.N.

    1985-01-01

    Equilibrium potentials of metallic tantalum in the melt TaCl 5 +KCl-NaCl are studied. Are average degree of tantalum ion oxidation, which are in equilibrium with metallic tantalum, is determined. Anodic behaviour of tantalum in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodium chlorides with Ta and F ion additions is considered. An average degree of oxidation of Ta ions, which transfer into the melt, depending on current density, is determined. It is established that tantalum is dissolved in the regime of diffusional kinetics. It is shown that tantalum corrodes in equimolar mixture of potassium and sodiUm chlorides, at that, corrosion rate increases with introdUction of Ta and F ions into solution. The corrosion is of electrochemical nature and it proceeds in the regime of diffusional kinetics

  2. Separation of niobium and tantalum by paper chromatography and their following spectrographic determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroshkina, T.M.; Peres Sanfiel', F.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an investigation into the use of water-saturated furfural to separate niobium and tantalum in a 1:1 ratio by means of ascending paper chromatography. The influence of sulphuric acid, ammonium fluoride and hydrofluoric acid concentrations on the completeness of the niobium and tantalum separation was investigated, the extent of the separation being checked by a spectral method. The results indicate that the use of furfural creates favourable conditions for niobium and tantalum separation. The purest tantalum is obtained at concentrations of sulphuric acid 600 k/l, hydrofluoric acid 4.6% and ammonium fluoride 30 g/l. To obtain pure niobium the acid concentrations remain the same but the quantity of ammonium fluoride is doubled. The fluoride ion concentration has a significant effect on the completeness of niobium and tantalum separation. The variation coefficient for the niobium determination is 14%, for the tantalum determination 1O% (author)

  3. Surface energy anisotropy of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, R; Grenga, H E [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta (USA). School of Chemical Engineering

    1976-10-01

    Field-ion microscopy was used to study the faceting behavior and/or surface energy anisotropy of tungsten in vacuum and in hydrogen. In vacuum below 1700 K the activation energy for (110) facet growth agreed with values previously reported for surface diffusion on tungsten. The observed anisotropy values at 0.5 Tsub(m), where Tsub(m) is the absolute melting temperature of tungsten (approximately 3680 K), were different from those previously reported at higher temperatures and more nearly agreed with broken bond calculations based on Mie potential using m=5, n=8, and a 1.5% lattice expansion. Hydrogen appeared to have a negligible effect on surface energy anisotropy, but did preferentially increase surface diffusion rates on (310) regions.

  4. Determination of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium and niobium-based alloys by atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, Kunikazu; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Sudo, Emiko.

    1985-01-01

    The analytical procedure is as follows: Weigh 1 g of a sample and put it into a 100 cm 3 PTFE beaker. Add 5 ml of distilled water and 5 ml of hydrofluoric acid, and then heat the solution on a hot plate, adding 3 ml of nitric acid dropwise. Dilute the solution to 100 cm 3 with distilled water. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of diammonium titanium hexafluoride ((NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 )) before dilution. Working standard solutions are prepared by adding the stock standard solutions of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium into niobium solutions. When hafnium is determined, add 2 g of (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 and the alloying elements in amounts corresponding to those in sample solutions into the working standard solutions. The tolerable amounts of hydrofluoric acid were 2.9 M, 2.1 M, and 3.1 M and those of nitric acid were 1.0 M, 1.6 M, and 1.6 M for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. It was found that (NH 4 ) 2 TiF 6 greatly increased the sensitivity for hafnium determination. Niobium showed minus effect for hafnium and plus effect for molybdenum and vanadium. The atomic absorption of molybdenum and vanadium were not influenced by the presence of 20 % of each alloying element, while the atomic absorption of hafnium was given plus effect by 20 % of zirconium, iron, cobalt, nickel, manganese, chromium or vanadium and minus effect by 20 % tungsten. The analytical values of hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium in niobium-based alloys by this method showed a good agreement with those by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The lower limits of determination (S/N=2) were 0.05, 0.001, and 0.002 % and the relative standard deviation were 3, 1, and 1.5 % for hafnium, molybdenum, and vanadium, respectively. (author)

  5. Fractographic peculiarities of cermet tungsten fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepanenko, V.A.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of test temperature on fracture peculiarities of cermets tungsten with initial cellular structure of deformation is shown. Tungsten crack resistance increases at temperatures to Tsub(x) (ductile-brittle transition temperature) and decreases at temperatures above Tsub(x). The degree of ceramics tungsten plasticity realization depends on its crack resistance

  6. Recrystallization and embrittlement of sintered tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bega, N.D.; Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1982-01-01

    The recrystallization of sintered tungsten with a cellular structure of deformation is studied as related to its embrittlement. It is stated that in case of preliminary recrystallization the sintered tungsten crack resistance does not depend on the testing temperature. The tungsten crack resistance is shown to lower with an increase of the structure tendency to primary recrystallization [ru

  7. Reaction of tantalum-alkyne complexes with isocyanates or acyl cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Yasutaka; Oguchi, Yoshiyuki; Yoshizumi, Kazuyuki; Miwatashi, Seiji; Takai, Kazuhiko; Utimoto, Kiitiro

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of alkynes with low-valent tantalum derived from TiCl 5 and zinc produces tantalum-alkyne complexes (not isolated), which react in situ with phenyl isocyanate (or butyl isocyanate) to give (E)-α, β-unsaturated amides stereoselectively. The tantalum-alkyne complexes also react with acyl cyanides in the presence of BF 3 ·OEt 2 to give α-cyanohydrins. In both reactions, filtration of the reaction mixture containing the tantalum-alkyne complexes before addition of isocyanates (or acyl cyanides) is indispensable to obtain good yields. (author)

  8. Kinetic Study of the Chemical Vapor Deposition of Tantalum in Long Narrow Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mugabi, James Atwoki; Eriksen, Søren; Petrushina, Irina

    2016-01-01

    A kinetic study of the chemical vapor deposition of tantalum in long narrow channels is done to optimize the industrial process for the manufacture of tantalum coated plate heat exchangers. The developed model fits well at temperatures between 750 and 850 °C, and in the pressure range of25–990 mbar....... According to the model, the predominant tantalum growth species is TaCl3. The temperature is shown to have a pronounced effect onthe morphology and rate of deposition of the tantalum and an apparent change in deposition mechanism occurs between 850–900 °C, resulting in the deposition rate at 900 °C being...

  9. Corrosion resistance of high-performance materials titanium, tantalum, zirconium

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the property of a material to resist corrosion attack in a particular aggressive environment. Although titanium, tantalum and zirconium are not noble metals, they are the best choice whenever high corrosion resistance is required. The exceptionally good corrosion resistance of these high–performance metals and their alloys results from the formation of a very stable, dense, highly adherent, and self–healing protective oxide film on the metal surface. This naturally occurring oxide layer prevents chemical attack of the underlying metal surface. This behavior also means, however, that high corrosion resistance can be expected only under neutral or oxidizing conditions. Under reducing conditions, a lower resistance must be reckoned with. Only very few inorganic and organic substances are able to attack titanium, tantalum or zirconium at ambient temperature. As the extraordinary corrosion resistance is coupled with an excellent formability and weldability these materials are very valua...

  10. Antimicrobial activity of tantalum oxide coatings decorated with Ag nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Huiliang, E-mail: hlc@mail.sic.ac.cn; Meng, Fanhao; Liu, Xuanyong, E-mail: xyliu@mail.sic.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Silver plasma immersion ion implantation was used to decorate silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on tantalum oxide (TO) coatings. The coatings acted against bacterial cells (Staphylococcus epidermidis) in the dark by disrupting their integrity. The action was independent of silver release and likely driven by the electron storage capability of the Schottky barriers established at the interfaces between Ag NPs and the TO support. Moreover, no apparent side effect on the adhesion and differentiation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells was detected when using Ag NPs-modified TO coatings. These results demonstrate that decoration of tantalum oxide using Ag NPs could be a promising procedure for improving the antibacterial properties for orthopedic and dental implants.

  11. Recent advances in P/M-tantalum products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P.; Uhlenhut, H.

    2001-01-01

    The metallurgical grade tantalum powder is used for producing parts and mill products. Some of the key requirements include purity, physical characteristics (flow, fill density and compressibility) and interstitial contents. A process to produce 99.99 % pure tantalum powder with less than 150 ppm oxygen has been developed. This powder was consolidated into metallurgical products via conventional P/M processing; resulting products had high purity and low oxygen. It also retained fine grain-size and uniform properties inherent in P/M-derived products. In addition, the desired crystallographic texture was obtained by controlled thermo-mechanical processing (TMP) of the consolidated powder. Fully dense products of this powder were tested for various applications, such as deep drawing, sputtering, ballistics and capacitors. Critical functional requirements in these applications along with the results of evaluations are discussed. (author)

  12. Gleeble Testing of Tungsten Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    temperature on an Instron load frame with a 222.41 kN (50 kip) load cell . The samples were compressed at the same strain rate as on the Gleeble...ID % RE Initial Density (cm 3 ) Density after Compression (cm 3 ) % Change in Density Test Temperature NT1 0 18.08 18.27 1.06 1000 NT3 0...4.1 Nano-Tungsten The results for the compression of the nano-tungsten samples are shown in tables 2 and 3 and figure 5. During testing, sample NT1

  13. Method of synthesizing tungsten nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Steven G; Anderson, Travis M

    2013-02-12

    A method to synthesize tungsten nanoparticles has been developed that enables synthesis of nanometer-scale, monodisperse particles that can be stabilized only by tetrahydrofuran. The method can be used at room temperature, is scalable, and the product concentrated by standard means. Since no additives or stabilizing surfactants are required, this method is particularly well suited for producing tungsten nanoparticles for dispersion in polymers. If complete dispersion is achieved due to the size of the nanoparticles, then the optical properties of the polymer can be largely maintained.

  14. molybdenum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A [13]). However, the larger size leads to an enhanced Si-C bond length (1.868 A [13]) relative to that of the C-C bond (1.527 Á [13]). This leads to a net cancellation of effects. Consequently the data suggest that the SiMe, and 'Bu appear of similar size when viewed from the centroid of the substituted cyclopentadienyl ligand ...

  15. Inter-diffusion study of rhodium and tantalum by RBS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuttens, V.E.; Hubert, R.L.; Bodart, F.; Lucas, S.

    2005-01-01

    The inter-diffusion of rhodium and tantalum has been studied with the goal of synthesizing an alloy acting as a diffusion barrier for high temperature applications. Rh/Ta sandwiched samples were annealed in vacuum at temperature ranging from 800 to 900 deg. C and from 1000 to 1075 deg. C. The diffusion profiles were obtained by RBS. They suggest the formation of two clearly different phases in each temperature range considered

  16. Random Vibration Testing of Advanced Wet Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Advanced wet tantalum capacitors allow for improved performance of power supply systems along with substantial reduction of size and weight of the systems that is especially beneficial for space electronics. Due to launch-related stresses, acceptance testing of all space systems includes random vibration test (RVT). However, many types of advanced wet tantalum capacitors cannot pass consistently RVT at conditions specified in MIL-PRF-39006, which impedes their use in space projects. This requires a closer look at the existing requirements, modes and mechanisms of failures, specifics of test conditions, and acceptance criteria. In this work, different lots of advanced wet tantalum capacitors from four manufacturers have been tested at step stress random vibration conditions while their currents were monitored before, during, and after the testing. It has been shown that the robustness of the parts and their reliability are mostly due to effective self-healing processes and limited current spiking or minor scintillations caused by RVT do not increase the risk of failures during operation. A simple model for scintillations events has been used to simulate current spiking during RVT and optimize test conditions. The significance of scintillations and possible effects of gas generation have been discussed and test acceptance criteria for limited current spiking have been suggested.

  17. Microstructures and phase transformations in interstitial alloys of tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahmen, U.

    1979-01-01

    The analysis of microstructures, phases, and possible ordering of interstitial solute atoms is fundamental to an understanding of the properties of metal-interstitial alloys in general. As evidenced by the controversies on phase transformations in the particular system tantalum--carbon, our understanding of this class of alloys is inferior to our knowledge of substitutional metal alloys. An experimental clarification of these controversies in tantalum was made. Using advanced techniques of electron microscopy and ultrahigh vacuum techology, an understanding of the microstructures and phase transformations in dilute interstitial tantalum--carbon alloys is developed. Through a number of control experiments, the role and sources of interstitial contamination in the alloy preparation (and under operating conditions) are revealed. It is demonstrated that all previously published work on the dilute interstitially ordered phase Ta 64 C can be explained consistently in terms of ordering of the interstitial contaminants oxygen and hydrogen, leading to the formation of the phases Ta 12 O and Ta 2 H

  18. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide interaction with tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, V.D.; Ustinov, Yu.K.; Komar, A.P.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on tantalum and the dissolution of these gases in the adsorbent at T >= 300 K have been studied. The flash-filament method (FFM) in a monopole mass-spectrometer and a field emission microscopy was used in the same apparatus. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide dissociate on the tantalum surface, carbon monoxide being desorbed in both cases during the flash. The desorption curves of CO reveal three different binding states: two of them (α and β' 1 ) for the adsorbed particles whereas the high temperature desorption state relates to the adsorbate dissolved in the metal. For the β' 1 state of CO the activation energy, the pre-exponential factor and the kinetic order in the kinetic equation of desorption have been estimated. They turned out to be E = 110 kcal/mol, C = 3 X 10 12 sec -1 , and γ = 1. The activation energy of diffusion for CO in tantalum and the energy of outgassing for the metal were found to be 9.4 and 49 kcal/mole, respectively. (Auth.)

  19. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide interaction with tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, V D; USTINOV, YU K; KOMAR, A P [AN SSSR, LENINGRAD. FIZIKO-TEKHNICHESKIJ INST.

    1978-03-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on tantalum and the dissolution of these gases in the adsorbent at T >= 300 K have been studied. The flash-filament method (FFM) in a monopole mass-spectrometer and a field emission microscopy was used in the same apparatus. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide dissociate on the tantalum surface, carbon monoxide being desorbed in both cases during the flash. The desorption curves of CO reveal three different binding states: two of them (..cap alpha.. and ..beta..'/sub 1/) for the adsorbed particles whereas the high temperature desorption state relates to the adsorbate dissolved in the metal. For the ..beta..'/sub 1/ state of CO the activation energy, the pre-exponential factor and the kinetic order in the kinetic equation of desorption have been estimated. They turned out to be E = 110 kcal/mol, C = 3 X 10/sup 12/ sec/sup -1/, and ..gamma.. = 1. The activation energy of diffusion for CO in tantalum and the energy of outgassing for the metal were found to be 9.4 and 49 kcal/mole, respectively.

  20. Recovery of hafnium radioisotopes from a proton irradiated tantalum target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.A.; Garcia, J.G.; Hamilton, V.T.; Heaton, R.C.; Jamriska, D.J.; Ott, M.A.; Philips, D.R.; Radzinski, S.D.

    1998-01-01

    The 178m2 Hf nucleus, with its long half-life (31 y) and high-spin isomeric state (16 + ) is desired for new and exotic nuclear physics studies. The Los Alamos Radioisotope Program irradiated a kilogram of natural tantalum at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility in early 1981. After fifteen years of decay, this target was ideal for the recovery of 178m2 Hf. There was more than a millicurie of 178m2 Hf produced during this irradiation and there has been a sufficient period of time for most of the other hafnium radioisotopes to decayed away. Traditionally, separation techniques for recovering hafnium isotopes from tantalum targets employ solvent extractions with reagents that are considered hazardous. These techniques are no longer condoned because they generate a mixed-waste (radioactive and hazardous components) that can not be treated for disposal. In this paper we describe a new and unique procedure for the recovery of hafnium radioisotopes from a highly radioactive, proton irradiated, tantalum target using reagents that do not contribute a hazardous waste component. (author)

  1. Hydrogen retention properties of polycrystalline tungsten and helium irradiated tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, T.; Koyama, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hirohata, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The hydrogen retention properties of a polycrystalline tungsten and tungsten irradiated by helium ions with an energy of 5 keV were examined by using an ECR ion irradiation apparatus and a technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy, TDS. The polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated at RT with energetic hydrogen ions, with a flux of 10 15 H cm -2 and an energy of 1.7 keV up to a fluence of 5 x 10 18 H cm -2 . Subsequently, the amount of retained hydrogen was measured by TDS. The heating temperature was increased from RT to 1000 C, and the heating rate was 50 C min -1 . Below 1000 C, two distinct hydrogen desorption peaks were observed at 200 C and 400 C. The retained amount of hydrogen was observed to be five times smaller than that of graphite, but the concentration in the implantation layer was comparable with that of graphite. Also, the polycrystalline tungsten was irradiated with 5 keV helium ions up to a fluence of 1.4 x 10 18 He cm -2 , and then re-irradiated with 1.7 keV hydrogen ions. The amount of retained hydrogen in this later experiment was close to the value in the case without prior helium ion irradiation. However, the amount of hydrogen which desorbed around the low temperature peak, 200 C, was largely enhanced. The desorption amount at 200 C saturated for the helium fluence of more than 5 x 10 17 He cm -2 . The present data shows that the trapping state of hydrogen is largely changed by the helium ion irradiation. Additionally, 5 keV helium ion irradiation was conducted on a sample pre-implanted with hydrogen ions to simulate a helium ion impact desorption of hydrogen retained in tungsten. The amount of the hydrogen was reduced as much as 50%. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis and structure of dihydridodichloro-tetrakis-(dimethylphenylphosphine)molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenenko, V.S.; Yanovskij, A.I.; Struchkov, Yu.T.; Shur, V.B.; Vol'pin, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The molybdenum hydride complex (Me 2 PhP) 4 MoH 2 Cl 2 (1) characterized by infrared and nmr spectra and studied using x-ray diffraction method is produced in the course of (THF) 3 MoCl 3 reduction in the Me 2 PhP presence. Crystals 1 are triclinic, at -120 deg a=8.092, b=9.820, c=22.73 A, α=86.13, β=89.28, γ=67.52 deg, Z=2, sp.gr. Panti1. Mo atom coordination polyhedron can be described as distorted triagular dodecahedron Mo-P bond lengths differ considerably: longer bonds such as Mo-P 2.544 and 2.531 A form an angle of 157.8 deg, an angle between shorter bonds such as Mo-P 2.459 and 2.445 A is 119.6 deg; other PMoP angles fall into the interval of 90.6-100.0 deg Mo-P and Mo-Cl (2.542 and 2.532 A) bonds in complex 1 are close to the corresponding distances in its tungsten analogue investigated before

  3. Poisoning Experiments Aimed at Discriminating Active and Less-Active Sites of Silica-Supported Tantalum Hydride for Alkane Metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Saggio, Guillaume; Taoufik, Mostafa; Basset, Jean-Marie; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Only 50% of the silica-supported tantalum hydride sites are active in the metathesis of propane. Indeed, more than 45% of the tantalum hydride can be eliminated by a selective oxygen poisoning of inactive sites with no significant decrease

  4. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  5. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading

  6. Recovery of molybdenum in froth flotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlman, R.M.; Bresson, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    Beta-mercaptoethanol has been found to be an effective suppressant for such minerals as copper, iron and lead in a molybdenum sulfide ore froth flotation operation. The recovery process and a suppressant utilizing said compound are claimed

  7. Large-Batch Reduction of Molybdenum Trioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiggans, Jr, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lowden, Richard Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menchhofer, Paul A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nunn, Stephen D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bryan, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Unconverted, isotopically-enriched molybdenum metal must be recovered from the spent radiopharmaceutical solution used in NorthStar’s Technetium-99m generator and reused. The recycle process begins by recovering the metal from the aqueous potassium molybdate (K2MoO4) solutions as molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) employing a process developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The MoO3 powder is subsequently reduced to molybdenum metal powder which can be blended with new powder and further processed into a flowable form to be used to produce target disks for irradiation. The molybdenum oxide reduction process has been examined and scaled to produce kilogram quantities of metal powder suitable for processing into a useable form employing spray drying or similar technique and ultimately used for target fabrication.

  8. Study of N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylaminate solubility in water and organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilipenko, A.T.; Shpak, Eh.A.; Samchuk, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    The composition of complexes of N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylamine with copper, cadmium, lead, indium, iron, gallium, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, molybdenum and vanadium was determined. The solubility products of the N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxylaminates of copper, cadmium, indium, gallium and iron were determined by the method of measuring the solubility of precipitates in acid. The solubility of N-cinnamoylphenylhydroxalaminates of cadmium, indium, iron, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, vanadium, molybdenum and tungsten in organic solvents was studied. Two-phase constants for the stability of the complexes were calculated. (author)

  9. Molybdenum solubility in aluminium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, X.; Sans, D.; Bertrand, M.; Eysseric, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DRCP, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Excoffier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DTEC, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Valery, J.F. [AREVA-NC, DOR/RDP, Paris - La Defense (France)

    2016-07-01

    For over 60 years, research reactors (RR or RTR for research testing reactors) have been used as neutron sources for research, radioisotope production ({sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc), nuclear medicine, materials characterization, etc... Currently, over 240 of these reactors are in operation in 56 countries. They are simpler than power reactors and operate at lower temperature (cooled to below 100 C. degrees). The fuel assemblies are typically plates or cylinders of uranium alloy and aluminium (U-Al) coated with pure aluminium. These fuels can be processed in AREVA La Hague plant after batch dissolution in concentrated nitric acid and mixing with UOX fuel streams. The aim of this study is to accurately measure the solubility of molybdenum in nitric acid solution containing high concentrations of aluminium. The higher the molybdenum solubility is, the more flexible reprocessing operations are, especially when the spent fuels contain high amounts of molybdenum. To be most representative of the dissolution process, uranium-molybdenum alloy and molybdenum metal powder were dissolved in solutions of aluminium nitrate at the nominal dissolution temperature. The experiments showed complete dissolution of metallic elements after 30 minutes long stirring, even if molybdenum metal was added in excess. After an induction period, a slow precipitation of molybdic acid occurs for about 15 hours. The data obtained show the molybdenum solubility decreases with increasing aluminium concentration. The solubility law follows an exponential relation around 40 g/L of aluminium with a high determination coefficient. Molybdenum solubility is not impacted by the presence of gadolinium, or by an increasing concentration of uranium. (authors)

  10. Elimination of excess molybdenum by cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelgyesi, G.; Elmoty, I.A.

    1967-01-01

    It was found that cattle would ingest spontaneously 5-15 g of molybdenum on one occasion. The uptake of this quantity caused but moderate loss of appetite and mild enteritis, both normalizing in one week. The occurrence of a severe acute molybdenum poisoning can be practically excluded, owing to refusal of the poisoned feed. Spontaneously ingested molybdenum caused on the first day a 30-100 fold rise of ruminal Mo-level, decreasing to the order of the normal value in about one week. But in the urine and faeces, Mo-level was at least 10 fold, in the blood and milk about 4 fold of the normal one, even one or two weeks after ingestion. During this period at least 90% of ingested Mo was eliminated with the faeces, urine and milk. One week after the ingestion of molybdenum, the rumen content showed no evidence on poisoning and no trace of molybdenum. Oral administration of ammonium molybdenate in an amount equivalent to 40 g molybdenum caused no fatality. In fact, cattle would never ingest spontaneously such a large dose.

  11. Method of producing oxidation resistant coatings for molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmons, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    A method is described for producing a molybdenum element having adherently bonded thereto a thermally self-healing plasma-sprayed coating consisting essentially of a composite of molybdenum and a refactory oxide material capable of reacting with molybdenum oxide under oxidizing conditions to form a substantially thermally stable refractory compound of molybdenum, the method comprising plasma-spraying a coating formed by the step-wise application of a plurality of interbonded plasma-sprayed layers of a composite of molybdenum/refractory oxide material produced from a particulate mixture thereof. The coating comprises a first layer of molybdenum plasma-sprayed bonded to the substrate of the molybdenum element, a second layer of plasma-sprayed mixture of particulate molybdenum/refactory oxide consisting essentially of predominantly molybdenum bonded to the first layer, and succeeding layers of this mixture. The next step is heating the coated molybdenum element under oxidizing conditions to an elevated temperature sufficient to cause oxygen to diffuse into the surface of the multi-layered coating to react with dispersed molybdenum therein to form molybdenum oxide and effect healing of the coating by reaction of the molybdenum oxide with the contained refractory oxide and thereby protect the substrate of the molybdenum element against oxidation

  12. Tensile behaviour of drawn tungsten wire used in tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, J; Feichtmayer, A; Fuhr, M; Gietl, H; Höschen, T; Neu, R; Almanstötter, J; Coenen, J W; Linsmeier, Ch

    2017-01-01

    In tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites (W f /W) the brittleness problem of tungsten is solved by utilizing extrinsic toughening mechanisms. The properties of the composite are very much related to the properties of the drawn tungsten wire used as fibre reinforcements. Its high strength and capability of ductile deformation are ideal properties facilitating toughening of W f /W. Tensile tests have been used for determining mechanical properties and study the deformation and the fracture behaviour of the wire. Tests of as-fabricated and straightened drawn wires with a diameter between 16 and 150 μ m as well as wire electrochemically thinned to a diameter of 5 μ m have been performed. Engineering stress–strain curves and a microscopic analysis are presented with the focus on the ultimate strength. All fibres show a comparable stress–strain behaviour comprising necking followed by a ductile fracture. A reduction of the diameter by drawing leads to an increase of strength up to 4500 MPa as a consequence of a grain boundary hardening mechanism. Heat treatment during straightening decreases the strength whereas electrochemical thinning has no significant impact on the mechanical behaviour. (paper)

  13. Experimental lumbar spine fusion with novel tantalum-coated carbon fiber implant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Woo, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    the possibility of coating a biocompatible metal layer on top of the carbon fiber material, to improve its biological performance. Tantalum was chosen because of its bone compatibility, based on our previous studies. A novel spinal fusion cage was fabricated by applying a thin tantalum coating on the surface...

  14. A Novel Method for Assessment of Polyethylene Liner Wear in Radiopaque Tantalum Acetabular Cups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Anders; Greene, Meridith E; Ayers, David C

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiostereometric analysis (RSA) for wear is not possible in patients with tantalum cups. We propose a novel method for wear analysis in tantalum cups. Wear was assessed by gold standard RSA and the novel method in total hip arthroplasty patients enrolled in a randomized controlled...

  15. Catalytic Hydroamination of Alkynes and Norbornene with Neutral and Cationic Tantalum Imido Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Laura L.; Arnold, John; Bergman, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    Several tantalum imido complexes have been synthesized and shown to efficiently catalyze the hydroamination of internal and terminal alkynes. An unusual hydroamination/hydroarylation reaction of norbornene catalyzed by a highly electrophilic cationic tantalum imido complex is also reported. Factors affecting catalyst activity and selectivity are discussed along with mechanistic insights gained from stoichiometric reactions. PMID:15255680

  16. Determination of molybdenum by the gravimetric plumbate method (with the molybdenum content from 50 % and above)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepin, V.V.; Kurbatova, V.I.; Fedorova, N.D.

    1980-01-01

    A gravimetric method of molybdenum determination in ferromolybdenum (Mo content from 50% and higher) after its dissolving in HNO 3 is developed. The method is based on Mo deposition in acetic acid solution in the form of molybdenum oxide lead after separation of Fe and other interfering elements with sodium hydroxide [ru

  17. Tungsten oxide nanowires grown on amorphous-like tungsten films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellasega, D; Pezzoli, A; Russo, V; Passoni, M; Pietralunga, S M; Nasi, L; Conti, C; Vahid, M J; Tagliaferri, A

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten oxide nanowires have been synthesized by vacuum annealing in the range 500–710 °C from amorphous-like tungsten films, deposited on a Si(100) substrate by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in the presence of a He background pressure. The oxygen required for the nanowires formation is already adsorbed in the W matrix before annealing, its amount depending on deposition parameters. Nanowire crystalline phase and stoichiometry depend on annealing temperature, ranging from W_1_8O_4_9-Magneli phase to monoclinic WO_3. Sufficiently long annealing induces the formation of micrometer-long nanowires, up to 3.6 μm with an aspect ratio up to 90. Oxide nanowire growth appears to be triggered by the crystallization of the underlying amorphous W film, promoting their synthesis at low temperatures. (paper)

  18. Rapid analysis of molybdenum contents in molybdenum master alloys by X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tongkong, P.

    1985-01-01

    Determination of molybdenum contents in molybdenum master alloy had been performed using energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDX) technique where analysis were made via standard additions and calibration curves. Comparison of EDX technique with other analyzing techniques, i.e., wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence, neutron activation analysis and inductive coupled plasma spectrometry, showed consistency in the results. This technique was found to yield reliable results when molybdenum contents in master alloys were in the range of 13 to 50 percent using HPGe detector or proportional counter. When the required error was set at 1%, the minimum analyzing time was found to be 30 and 60 seconds for Fe-Mo master alloys with molybdenum content of 13.54 and 49.09 percent respectively. For Al-Mo master alloys, the minimum times required were 120 and 300 seconds with molybdenum content of 15.22 and 47.26 percent respectively

  19. Bronchography by tantalum aerosols, an experimental investigation of lung clearance and retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Causse, Andre.

    1974-01-01

    Lung clearance of tantalum used as contrast medium has been studied in three animal species: rat, monkey and cat. In rats and monkeys, 80 to 90 percent of the inhaled tantalum was removed with a half life of 10 to 30 hr, but the residual fraction was removed with a half life longer than 100 days; consequently persistent roentgenographic pictures could be observed. These results were in accordance with those obtained by other authors studying dogs and men (accidental inhalation of radioactive tantalum). In cats, about 98 percent was removed with a half life of 15 hr and the remaining fraction with a half life of 18 days. In the three species, the physiological lung clearance mechanisms did not seem disturbed. Microscopic examination showed the peribronchiolar localisation of remaining tantalum in rats and monkeys, with proliferation of granulomes and fibrotic reaction. These results must induce to the greatest care when using tantalum in man in order to outline peripheral airways [fr

  20. Incorporation of tantalum ions enhances the electrocatalytic activity of hexagonal WO3 nanowires for hydrogen evolution reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xiang; Mu, Wanjun; Li, Xingliang; Wei, Hongyuan; Jian, Yuan; Yu, Qianhong; Zhang, Rui; Lv, Kai; Tang, Hui; Luo, Shunzhong

    2014-01-01

    WO 3 has been identified as a promising candidate electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), because it can form a tungsten bronze (HxWO 3 ) which is highly electron and proton conducting. In this paper, we report that the electrocatalytic activity of WO 3 for HER can be enhanced by incorporation of tantalum ions (Ta 5+ ) into the lattice of WO 3 . The most active performance is achieved with the molar ratio of Ta/W being 0.01, which is two times more active than that of undoped WO 3 at an overpotential of -0.52 V. It is shown that incorporation of proper Ta 5+ into WO 3 can induce moderate defects and oxygen vacancies, as well as intercalate a higher amount of protons, which enhance the electron transfer and short the protons diffusion paths. These changes correlated positively with the enhanced catalytic HER activity. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that metal ions-doped WO 3 nanowires are promising electrocatalysts for HER

  1. Molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 is catalyzed by a novel molybdenum-reducing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukor, M Y; Halmi, M I E; Rahman, M F A; Shamaan, N A; Syed, M A

    2014-01-01

    The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C). A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a V max for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent K m for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent V max and apparent K m values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m ) of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M(-1) s(-1). The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction.

  2. Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue in Serratia sp. Strain DRY5 Is Catalyzed by a Novel Molybdenum-Reducing Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Shukor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The first purification of the Mo-reducing enzyme from Serratia sp. strain DRY5 that is responsible for molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue in the bacterium is reported. The monomeric enzyme has an apparent molecular weight of 105 kDalton. The isoelectric point of this enzyme was 7.55. The enzyme has an optimum pH of 6.0 and maximum activity between 25 and 35°C. The Mo-reducing enzyme was extremely sensitive to temperatures above 50°C (between 54 and 70°C. A plot of initial rates against substrate concentrations at 15 mM 12-MP registered a Vmax for NADH at 12.0 nmole Mo blue/min/mg protein. The apparent Km for NADH was 0.79 mM. At 5 mM NADH, the apparent Vmax and apparent Km values for 12-MP of 12.05 nmole/min/mg protein and 3.87 mM, respectively, were obtained. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km of the Mo-reducing enzyme was 5.47 M-1 s-1. The purification of this enzyme could probably help to solve the phenomenon of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue first reported in 1896 and would be useful for the understanding of the underlying mechanism in molybdenum bioremediation involving bioreduction.

  3. HIP (hot isostatic pressing) sintering of Tantalum (Ta) and tantalum carbide (TaC) powder mixture: relations between microstructure and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valin, F.; Schnedecker, M.

    1994-01-01

    HIP sintering at 1630 C and 195 MPa, during 2 hours, can be used for complete densification of mixtures of commercial tantalum carbide and tantalum powders. HIPed material properties are depending upon initial compositions. For C/Ta ratios inferior to 80%, the monocarbide structure is preserved. A partial ordering of the carbon vacancies will result, for TaC(0.80), in microhardness maximization. The microstructurally homogenous TaC(0.45) shows an excellent toughness. 2 figs., 2 refs

  4. Thermodynamics of the hydrogen-carbon-oxygen-tungsten system, as applied to the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenke, G.K.

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the quaternary hydrogen-carbon oxygen-tungsten system and its binary and ternary sub-systems are reviewed. Published thermodynamic data are evaluated, and expression for free energies of formation are chosen. These expressions are integrated with and equilibrium-calculating algorithm, producing a powerful tool for understanding and improving the manufacture of tungsten and tungsten carbide. Three examples are presented: reduction/carburization of tungstic oxide with hydrogen, carbon, and methane. (author)

  5. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Joining of tungsten foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Jens, E-mail: jens.reiser@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM-AWP) (Germany); Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas [PLANSEE SE, Reutte (Austria); Armstrong, D.E.J.; Yi, Xiaoou [University of Oxford, Department of Materials (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  6. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications - Joining of tungsten foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Möslang, Anton; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Jan; Mrotzek, Tobias; Hoffmann, Andreas; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Yi, Xiaoou

    2013-05-01

    This paper is the fourth in our series on tungsten laminates. The aim of this paper is to discuss laminate synthesis, meaning the joining of tungsten foils. It is obvious that the properties of the tungsten laminate strongly depend on the combination of (i) interlayer and (ii) joining technology, as this combination defines (i) the condition of the tungsten foil after joining (as-received or recrystallised) as well as (ii) the characteristics of the interface between the tungsten foil and the interlayer (wettability or diffusion leading to a solid solution or the formation of intermetallics). From the example of tungsten laminates joined by brazing with (i) an eutectic silver copper brazing filler, (ii) copper, (iii) titanium, and (iv) zirconium, the microstructure will be discussed, with special focus on the interface. Based on our assumptions of the mechanism of the extraordinary ductility of tungsten foil we present three syntheses strategies and make recommendations for the synthesis of high temperature tungsten laminates.

  7. The Role of the Component Metals in the Toxicity of Military-Grade Tungsten Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy A. Emond

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten-based composites have been recommended as a suitable replacement for depleted uranium. Unfortunately, one of these mixtures composed of tungsten (W, nickel (Ni and cobalt (Co induced rhabdomyosarcomas when implanted into the leg muscle of laboratory rats and mice to simulate a shrapnel wound. The question arose as to whether the neoplastic effect of the mixture could be solely attributed to one or more of the metal components. To investigate this possibility, pellets with one or two of the component metals replaced with an identical amount of the biologically-inert metal tantalum (Ta were manufactured and implanted into the quadriceps of B6C3F1 mice. The mice were followed for two years to assess potential adverse health effects. Implantation with WTa, CoTa or WNiTa resulted in decreased survival, but not to the level reported for WNiCo. Sarcomas in the implanted muscle were found in 20% of the CoTa-implanted mice and 5% of the WTa- and WCoTa-implanted rats and mice, far below the 80% reported for WNiCo-implanted mice. The data obtained from this study suggested that no single metal is solely responsible for the neoplastic effects of WNiCo and that a synergistic effect of the three metals in tumor development was likely.

  8. The pressure, internal energy, and conductivity of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfelbaum, E.M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Department of Computational Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-15

    The pressure, internal energy, and conductivity of a tantalum plasma were calculated at the temperatures 10-100 kK and densities less than 3 g/cm{sup 3}. The plasma composition, pressure, and internal energy were obtained by means of the corresponding system of the coupled mass action law equations. We have considered atom ionization up to +3. The conductivity was calculated within the relaxation time approximation. Comparisons of our results with available measurements and calculation data show good agreement in the area of correct applicability of the present model. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Trace diffusion of different nuclear reactions products in polycrystalline tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, G.J.; Fromm, W.D.; Novgorodov, A.F.

    1976-07-01

    Measurements of the lattice diffusion coefficients for carrier free isotopes of Hf, Lu, Yb, Tm, Tb, Gd, Eu, Ba, Cs, Y, Sr, Rb and As in polycrystalline tantalum were made over the temperature range 1700 Fsub(As)>Fsub(lanthanides)>Fsub(Sr)>Fsub(Ba)>Fsub(Hf)>Fsub(Rb)>Fsub(Cs). The data indicate, that the Arrhenius relation was obeyed over the entire temperature range. Within the lanthanide-group no differences in the diffusion velocities could be detected, this fact points to a diffusion mechanism of Me 3+ -ions of lanthanides, Me 2+ -ions of earth alkaline elements and Me + -ions of alkaline elements. (author)

  10. Diffusion-Cooled Tantalum Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalare, Anders; McGrath, William; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry

    2004-01-01

    A batch of experimental diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers (HEBs), suitable for use as mixers having input frequencies in the terahertz range and output frequencies up to about a gigahertz, exploit the superconducting/normal-conducting transition in a thin strip of tantalum. The design and operation of these HEB mixers are based on mostly the same principles as those of a prior HEB mixer that exploited the superconducting/normal- conducting transition in a thin strip of niobium and that was described elsewhere.

  11. Low-temperature diffusion of hydrogen isotopes in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peichl, R.; Ziegler, P.; Weidinger, A.

    1987-01-01

    The mobility of hydrogen and deuterium in tantalum is investigated in the temperature range between 4.2 and 30 K. On the time scale of the present experiment (25 μs) we find that hydrogen begins to move above 15 K whereas deuterium remains immobile at least up to 30 K. Since the interpretation of the data depends critically on the exact hydrogen configurations a major part of the paper is devoted to this problem. We suggest that hydrogen can exist in fairly localized or more extended states depending on the local homogeneity of the crystal. (orig.)

  12. Development and characterisation of a tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, Johann

    2012-01-01

    In tungsten-fibre reinforced tungsten, tungsten wire is combined with a tungsten matrix. The outstanding ductility of the fibres and extrinsic mechanisms of energy dissipation lead to an intense toughening. With extensive analytical and experimental investigations a manufacturing method based on chemical vapour infiltration is developed and first material is produced. The toughening mechanisms are shown by means of sophisticated mechanical experiments i.a. X-ray microtomography.

  13. Tungsten Speciation in Firing Range Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    satisfactorily, such as: which tungsten mineral phase is present in soil and to what extent is adsorption important in regu- lating soil solution concentrations... soil solution rather than discrete mineral phases. Information provided in this report will assist the following organizations in future decision...the soil solution ERDC TR-11-1 43 must affect tungsten speciation in other ways. The precipitation of soil minerals also would limit tungsten

  14. A comparison of lifetimes of beryllium, carbon, molybdenum and tungsten as divertor armour materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.H.; Mszanowski, U.

    1995-01-01

    An assessment of lifetime as a function of plasma temperature was made for the plasma-facing materials, Be, C, Mo and W. This analysis was based on the erosion by D/T neutrals and by D + /T + ions. A Maxwellian energy distribution was applied for the impinging neutral particles, whilst the energy distribution of the impinging ions, a Maxwellian shifted by sheath potentials, was used to calculate the erosion. For carbon material, the analysis was made for the two cases: (a) with chemical erosion by forming hydrocarbon species and (b) neglecting chemical erosion. This study was performed for divertor relevant conditions: high flux density >10 19 cm -2 s -1 and low plasma temperature <50 eV. The results show that at plasma temperatures between 2 and 10 eV, the erosion of C (no chemical erosion) is about factor of 10 to 1000 smaller than that of Be. The C erosion (including chemical erosion) is of the same order of magnitude as that of Be. The lifetimes of Be, C, Mo, and W as well as the limitation of operation temperatures were compared and the implications discussed. ((orig.))

  15. Pressure vessel code construction capabilities for a nickel-chromium-tungsten-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, M.F.

    1990-01-01

    HAYNES alloy 230 (UNS NO6230) has achieved wide usage in a variety of high-temperature aerospace, chemical process industry and industrial heating applications since its introduction in 1981. Combining high elevated temperature strength with excellent metallurgical stability, environment-resistance and relatively straight forward fabrication characteristics, this Ni-Cr-W-Mo alloy was an excellent candidate for ASME Pressure vessel Code applications. Coverage under case No. 2063 was granted in July, 1989, for both Section I and Section VIII Division 1 construction. In this paper, the metallurgy of 230 alloy will be described, and its design strength capabilities contrasted with those for more established code materials. Other important performance capabilities, such as long-term thermal stability, oxidation-resistance, fatigue-resistance, and resistance to other forms of environmental degradation will be discussed. It will be shown that the combined properties of 230 alloy offer some significant advantages over other materials for applications such as expansion bellows, heat-exchangers, valves and other components in the fossil energy, nuclear energy and chemical process industries, among others

  16. Kinetics of reactions of chromium, molybdenum and tungsten hexacarbonyls with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksakov, V.A.; Ershova, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism of M(CO) 6 (M = Cr, Mo, W) reaction with hydroxylamine was studied. On the basis of kinetic data it was ascertained that as a result of the reaction CO oxidation to CO 2 and intramolecular transfer of amine formed to the central atom of metal occur. Mechanisms of M(CO) 6 reactions with hydroxylamine and trimethylamine oxide are compared

  17. Structures of ordered tungsten- or molybdenum-containing quaternary perovskite oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, Bradley E.; Bley, Nicholas D.; Jones, Heather R.; McCullough, Ryan M.; Eng, Hank W.; Porter, Spencer H.; Woodward, Patrick M.; Barnes, Paris W.

    2012-01-01

    The room temperature crystal structures of six A 2 MMoO 6 and A 2 MWO 6 ordered double perovskites were determined from X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data. Ba 2 MgWO 6 and Ba 2 CaMoO 6 both adopt cubic symmetry (space group Fm3-bar m, tilt system a 0 a 0 a 0 ). Ba 2 CaWO 6 has nearly the same tolerance factor (t=0.972) as Ba 2 CaMoO 6 (t=0.974), yet it surprisingly crystallizes with I4/m symmetry indicative of out-of-phase rotations of the MO 6 octahedra about the c-axis (a 0 a 0 c − ). Sr 2 ZnMoO 6 (t=0.979) also adopts I4/m symmetry; whereas, Sr 2 ZnWO 6 (t=0.976) crystallizes with monoclinic symmetry (P2 1 /n) with out-of-phase octahedral tilting distortions about the a- and b-axes, and in-phase tilting about the c-axis (a − a − c + ). Ca 2 CaWO 6 (t=0.867) also has P2 1 /n symmetry with large tilting distortions about all three crystallographic axes and distorted CaO 6 octahedra. Analysis of 93 double perovskites and their crystal structures showed that while the type and magnitude of the octahedral tilting distortions are controlled primarily by the tolerance factor, the identity of the A-cation acts as the secondary structure directing factor. When A=Ba 2+ the boundary between cubic and tetragonal symmetries falls near t=0.97, whereas when A=Sr 2+ this boundary falls somewhere between t=1.018 and t=0.992. - Graphical abstract: A survey of the tolerance factor of 41 Mo/W- and 52 Nb/Ta-containing quaternary perovskites plotted as a function of the difference between the two six-coordinate M-cation ionic radii. Compounds with cubic symmetry are represented by diamonds, those with tetragonal symmetry are represented by squares, those with I2/m monoclinic symmetry are represented by ×, and those with P2 1 /n monoclinic symmetry are represented by triangles. White symbols represent compositions where A=Ba 2+ , gray symbols represent compositions where A=Sr 2+ , and black symbols represent where A=Ca 2+ . The filled circle represents rhombohedral Ba 2 BiTaO 6 (t=0.961; space group—R3-bar ; tilt system—a − a − a − ). References for the compounds included in this figure are listed in the Supporting Information File.▪ Highlights: ► Reports the structures of six double perovskites containing either Mo 6+ or W 6+ . ► Compounds with similar tolerance factors (t) exhibited different symmetries. ► This effect was observed in Sr 2 ZnMO 6 and Ba 2 CaMO 6 (M=Mo or W). ► Contains a structural survey of 93 double perovskites. ► Octahedral tilting distortions are controlled by t and the nature of the A-cation.

  18. Transition metal sulfide promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfide catalysts and their uses for hydroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, A.J.; Chianelli, R.R.; Pecoraro, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for hydrorefining a hydrocarbon feed which comprises contacting the feed at a temperature of at least about 150 0 C and in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst obtained by heating one or more precursor salts at elevated temperature of at least about 150 0 C, in the presence of sulfur or one or more sulfur-bearing compounds and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture thereof and a cation comprising one or more divalent promoter metals which are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand. The divalent promoter metal is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Co, Zn, Cu and mixture thereof. The contacting occurs for a time sufficient to hydrorefine at least a portion of the feed

  19. Supported transition metal sulfide promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfide catalysts and their uses for hydroprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, T.C.; Chianelli, R.R.; Jacobson, A.J.; Young, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    A process is described for hydrotreating a hydrocarbon feed which comprises contacting the feed at a temperature of at least about 150 0 C and heating the composite at elevated temperature of at least about 150 0 C, in the presence of sulfur and under oxygen-free conditions for a time sufficient to form the catalyst. The precursor salt contains a tetrathiometallate anion of Mo, W or mixture thereof and a cation comprising one or more divalent promoter metals which are chelated by at least one neutral, nitrogen-containing polydentate ligand L. The divalent promoter metal is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Co, Zn, Cu and mixture thereof. The contacting occurs for a time sufficient to hydrotreat at least a portion of the feed

  20. Complexes of molybdenum (6) and tungsten (6) with amino- and pyridine carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitsyn, V I; Mozgin, S V; Felin, M G; Subbotina, N A; Ajzenberg, M I [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1984-01-01

    By interaction of Na/sub 2/MO/sub 4/ with amino acid excess in muriatic medium the complexes Mo/sub 2/O/sub 4/ (OH)/sub 3/L (LH-anthranilic, nicotinic acids, histidine), Mo/sub 2/O/sub 5/ (OH)L' (L'H-..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-alanine, valine, isonicotinic acid), W/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (OH) (H/sub 2/O)/sub 4/ L'' (L'H-nicotinic, isonicotinic acids, histidine) are isolated. On the basis of the data of elementary analysis, IR spectroscopy and thermogravimetry assumptions on their composition and structure have been suggested.

  1. Studies on the complexes of some triphenylmethane dyes with chromium, molybdenum and tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, W U; Bembi, Ramesh; Bhargava, P P; Singh, R [Roorkee Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1978-01-01

    Crystal violet, malachite green and fuchsine react with potassium chromate, sodium molybdate and sodium tungstate in 1N H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ give 1:1 metal ligand complexes. However, in the case of chromate only an addition product with these cationic dyes is obtained. Infrared spectra of the isolated complexes show that the dyes are bound to the metal through the nitrogen atom.

  2. Complexes of molybdenum (6) and tungsten (6) with amino- and pyridine carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mozgin, S.V.; Felin, M.G.; Subbotina, N.A.; Ajzenberg, M.I.

    1984-01-01

    By interaction of Na 2 MO 4 With amino acid excess in muriatic medium the complexes Mo 2 O 4 (OH) 3 L (LH-anthranilic, nicotinic acids, histidine), Mo 2 O 5 (OH)L' (L'H-α- and β-alanine, valine, isonicotinic acid), W 3 O 8 (OH) (H 2 O) 4 L'' (L'H-nicotinic, isonicotinic acids, histidine) are isolated. On the basis of the data of elementary analysis, IR spectrosfopy and thermogravimetry assumptions on their composition and structure have been suggested

  3. Isolation and characterization of interacted heteropoly complexes of vanadium with molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.K.; Jha, P.P.

    1980-01-01

    The nature and conditions of formation of two new interacted heteropoly vanadomolybdate and vanadotungstate of the compositions, (NH 4 ) 10 (MoV 12 O 38 ) 20H 2 O and (NH 4 ) 2 (WV 6 O 19 )11H 2 O, respectively, have been studied with the help of pH and thermometric titrations. From X-ray crystal diffraction studies, the unit cell dimensions and the number of unit cells have been determined. On the basis of these data the molecular weights of the compounds are found to be 1828 and 998 respectively. (author)

  4. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane with cobalt, tungsten and molybdenum based materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurin Salamanca-Guzmán

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available La deshidrogenación oxidativa de propano es una alternativa interesante para la obtención de olefinas. En este trabajo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la deshidrogenación oxidativa de propano utilizando dos materiales a partir de cobalto, tungsteno y molibdeno. Los materiales fueron caracterizados utilizando Difracción de Rayos X (XRD, espectroscopia infrarroja con transformada de Fourier (FTIR, análisis termogravimétrico (TGA y análisis térmico diferencial (DTA. El material CoMo φ y al ser calcinado a 623 K se transforma en la fase β -CoMoO4 (CoMo φ y623, la misma fase es obtenida cuando el material se calcina a 873 K (CoMo φ y873. CoMo φ y623 muestra un buen desempeño en la deshidrogenación oxidativa de propano, se obtuvo un rendimiento a propeno de 3,4% a una temperatura de 623 K y una velocidad espacial de 100 mL g-1 min-1. El material CoWs φ y fue calcinado a 673 K, obteniéndose una fase wolframita de baja cristalinidad. Este material presenta una alta selectividad a propeno y un bajo rendimiento. CoMo φ y873 presenta una buena actividad y selectividad, comparable con otros materiales reportados en la literatura, y su potencial como catalizador en la deshidrogenación oxidativa de propano se hace más evidente con la prueba que muestra ser estable durante 24 h de operación continua a 773 K.

  5. Controllable synthesis of molybdenum tungsten disulfide alloy for vertically composition-controlled multilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jeong-Gyu; Ryu, Gyeong Hee; Lee, Su Jeong; Sim, Sangwan; Lee, Chang Wan; Choi, Taejin; Jung, Hanearl; Kim, Youngjun; Lee, Zonghoon; Myoung, Jae-Min; Dussarrat, Christian; Lansalot-Matras, Clement; Park, Jusang; Choi, Hyunyong; Kim, Hyungjun

    2015-01-01

    The effective synthesis of two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides alloy is essential for successful application in electronic and optical devices based on a tunable band gap. Here we show a synthesis process for Mo1−xWxS2 alloy using sulfurization of super-cycle atomic layer deposition Mo1−xWxOy. Various spectroscopic and microscopic results indicate that the synthesized Mo1−xWxS2 alloys have complete mixing of Mo and W atoms and tunable band gap by systematically controlled composition and layer number. Based on this, we synthesize a vertically composition-controlled (VCC) Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer using five continuous super-cycles with different cycle ratios for each super-cycle. Angle-resolved X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometer results reveal that a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer has different vertical composition and broadband light absorption with strong interlayer coupling within a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer. Further, we demonstrate that a VCC Mo1−xWxS2 multilayer photodetector generates three to four times greater photocurrent than MoS2- and WS2-based devices, owing to the broadband light absorption. PMID:26204328

  6. Some physical properties of the higher borides of molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval'chenko, M.S.; Bodrova, L.G.; Nemchenko, V.F.; Kolotun, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    The temperature dependences of the thermal conductivity, the specific electrical resistance, the thermo-e.m.f. and the magnetic susceptibility, together with the variation of magnetic resistance and of Hall constant with the magnetic field strength at liquid nitrogen temperature and at room temperature, for the higher borides Mo 2 B 5 , MoB 4 , W 2 B 5 and WB 4 were studied. Some features of the physical properties of these metallic borides were established. In contrast with the corresponding metals the higher borides are diamagnetic and the Hall constants are negative. The values of the magnetic susceptibility and the Hall constant are larger for the higher borides than for the low borides. As the temperature increased an inversion of the thermo-e.m.f. sign took place and the signs of the thermo-e.m.f. and the Hall constant are different. The values of the magnetic susceptibility of Mo 2 B 5 , MoB 4 and WB 4 were temperature independent. The electronic structure of the compounds studied is discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  7. Nucleophilic reactions of hydrazido(2-) complexes of molybdenum and tungsten with succinyl dichloride and phenyl isocyanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanami, Kiyotaka; Mizobe, Yasushi; Takahashi, Tamotsu; Kodama, Teruyuki; Uchida, Yasuzo

    1981-01-01

    Nucleophilic attack of the WNNH 2 group in the hydrazido(2-) complex [WF(NNH 2 )(dpe) 2 ][BF 4 ] (dpe = Ph 2 PCH 2 CH 2 PPh 2 ) on succinyl dichloride gives a novel ethanedioylhydrazido(2-) complex, [WF(NNCOCH 2 CH 2 CO)(dpe) 2 ][BF 4 ]. X-Ray structural analysis shows that the carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms of the ethanedioylhydrazido(2-) ligand lie nearly in the same plane, indicating sp 2 character of the nitrogen atom bearing the two carbonyl groups. Phenyl isocyanate also undergoes nucleophilic attack by the hydrazido(2-) complex [MBr(NNH 2 )(dpe) 2 ]Br (M = Mo or W) to yield the phenylsemicarbazido(2-) type complex, [MBr(NNHCONHPh)(dpe) 2 ]Br. Treatment of the semicarbazido(2-) complex with triethylamine gives a new diazenido complex [MBr(NNCONHPh)(dpe) 2 ]. (author)

  8. Tellurium adsorption on single crystal faces of molybdenum and tungsten field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.A.; Kiwanga, C.A.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this letter is to report the extension of previous studies of Te adsorption on Mo and W field emitters to measurements on single crystal planes. The adsorption of semiconductors on metallic emitters has been found to be characterized by simultaneous decreases in emission current and the Fowler-Nordheim work function for adsorbate coverages of less than a monolayer. (Auth.)

  9. Thermophysical and elastic properties of titanium carbonitrides containing molybdenum and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tetsushi; Matsubara, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► (Ti,Me)(C,N) sintered bodies were prepared by hot-pressing. ► The thermophysical and elastic properties of the carbonitrides were evaluated. ► The porosities of the specimens were less than 1%. ► The Young’s modulus decreases with increasing Mo content. ► The Debye temperatures decrease with increasing Mo/W content. -- Abstract: Titanium carbonitride has good mechanical properties such as high hardness and high Young’s modulus. It is a major raw material for Ti(C,N)-based cermets, and their properties are strongly dependent on the properties of titanium carbonitrides. The thermophysical and elastic properties of the carbonitride need to be systematically investigated, so as to be used for designing cutting tools and wear-resistant tools. The thermophysical and elastic properties of (Ti,Me)(C,N) (Me = Mo. W) sintered bodies prepared by hot-pressing at 2200 °C were evaluated. The porosities of the specimens were less than 1%. The Young’s modulus decreased with increasing Mo, which seems to be the result of vacancy formation. The thermal expansion coefficient, the thermal conductivity and the Debye temperatures of (Ti,Me)(C,N) sintered bodies decreased with increasing Mo/W content

  10. Comparison of Tungsten and Molybdenum Carbide Catalysts for the Hydrodeoxygenation of Oleic Acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, S.A.W.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Es, van D.S.; Bitter, J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Group 6 (W, Mo) metal carbide catalysts are promising alternatives to hydrodesulfurization (NiMo, CoMo) catalysts and group 10 (Pd) type catalysts in the deoxygenation of vegetable fats/oils. Herein, we report a comparison of carbon nanofiber-supported W2C and Mo2C catalysts on activity,

  11. Preparation of selective molybdenum concentrate from collective coppermolybdenum concentrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Tusupbaev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers possibilities of selective separation of the concentrate of copper and molybdenum from a collective copper-molybdenum concentrate of Aktogay deposit using regrinding and conventional flotation reagents. In the case of conventional flotoreagents, the content of molybdenum in a molybdenum concentrate was 8.0% at extraction effectiveness 83.12%. At 27.96% extraction degree of copper, it’s content in the concentrate equaled to 21.3%. After regrinding, molybdenum content in the concentrate was 24.0% at the extraction effectiveness 59.63%, and copper content in the concentrate was 21.9% at the recovery of 61.23%. Thus, the regrinding of a collective copper-molybdenum concentrate resulted in an increase in the content of molybdenum in molybdenum concentrate by 16%, and the copper concentration increased by 0.6%.

  12. Bibliographic study on molybdenum biokinetics. Literaturstudie zur Biokinetik von Molybdaen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erzberger, A.

    1988-05-01

    This bibliographical study compiles and analyzes findings about the metabolism and resorption of molybdenum. Besides including studies on the physiology of molybdenum 99, a general survey is given on molybdenum in the environment and on its physiological behaviour. In particular, information on the dependence of molybdenum resorption on various factors, such as the chemical form, antagonisms etc., are gathered from literature. These factors have to be considered for sensibly carrying out necessary experiments.

  13. Direct electroplating of copper on tantalum from ionic liquids in high vacuum: origin of the tantalum oxide layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaltin, Stijn; D'Urzo, Lucia; Zhao, Qiang; Vantomme, André; Plank, Harald; Kothleitner, Gerald; Gspan, Christian; Binnemans, Koen; Fransaer, Jan

    2012-10-21

    In this paper, it is shown that high vacuum conditions are not sufficient to completely remove water and oxygen from the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride. Complete removal of water demands heating above 150 °C under reduced pressure, as proven by Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA). Dissolved oxygen gas can only be removed by the use of an oxygen scavenger such as hydroquinone, despite the fact that calculations show that oxygen should be removed completely by the applied vacuum conditions. After applying a strict drying procedure and scavenging of molecular oxygen, it was possible to deposit copper directly on tantalum without the presence of an intervening oxide layer.

  14. The XUV spectra of highly ionised molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfield, M.W.D.; Peacock, N.J.; Smith, C.C.; Hobby, M.G.; Cowan, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    The spectra of molybdenum ions produced in Tokamaks in the wavelength range 10-200 A have been reproduced in a plasma formed by laser beam irradiation of solid molybdenum targets. Lines from highly ionised stages of molybdenum (Mo XXX to Mo XXXII) have been distinguished by varying the laser beam intensity. Detailed analyses of the simpler ions, Mo XV (Ni-like), Mo XVI (Co-like), Mo XXXII (Na-like), and to a lesser extent Mo XXXI (Mg-like) and Mo XVII (Fe-like), have been achieved by comparison with ab initio calculations. A general interpretation of intermediate ion stages is also given but it is shown that most of these spectra are so complex, as a result of inner-subshell excitation, that detailed term-scheme analyses are nearly impossible. (author)

  15. XUV spectra of highly ionised molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansfield, M W.D.; Peacock, N J; Smith, C C; Hobby, M G [UKAEA, Abingdon. Culham Lab.; Cowan, R D

    1978-05-14

    The spectra of molybdenum ions produced in Tokamaks in the wavelength range 10-200 A have been reproduced in a plasma formed by laser beam irradiation of solid molybdenum targets. Lines from highly ionised stages of molybdenum (Mo XXX to Mo XXXII) have been distinguished by varying the laser beam intensity. Detailed analyses of the simpler ions, Mo XV (Ni-like), Mo XVI (Co-like), Mo XXXII (Na-like), and to a lesser extent Mo XXXI (Mg-like) and Mo XVII (Fe-like), have been achieved by comparison with ab initio calculations. A general interpretation of intermediate ion stages is also given but it is shown that most of these spectra are so complex, as a result of inner-subshell excitation, that detailed term-scheme analyses are nearly impossible.

  16. Molybdenum peroxo complex. Structure and thermal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, Koichi; Ooga, Katsumi; Kurusu, Yasuhiko

    1984-10-01

    The molybdenum peroxide (Mo-y) prepared by oxidation of molybdenum metal with hydrogen peroxide has been studied to determine its structure and thermal behavior. Temperature programmed decomposition has been used to study the thermal stability of Mo-y. Two distinct peaks, I and II, of decomposition processes are discernible in Mo-y. Peak I corresponds to the elimination of water of crystallization and peak II to the decomposition of a peroxide ion of Mo-y. IR and UV examinations support the results of the thermal analysis. The IR band at 931 cm/sup -1/ and the UV band at 381 nm show the same thermal behavior. Both bands are attributable to the peroxide ion of Mo-y. Spectroscopic studies show that Mo-y has the tetrahedral coordination derived from the single molybdenum complex, which has double bond oxygens attached to Mo atom and has a symmetric type of peroxide ion with one water of crystallization.

  17. Separation and selective determination of molybdenum with sodiumthiosulfate and ethylacetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainberger, L.; de Oliveira Andrade, W.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive and selective method of spectrophotometric determination of molybdenum is described. Molybdenum is extracted to more than 97%. Lambert-Beer's law is obeyed between 0.35 and 30μg/10ml of the used aqueous solution. 43 ions concerning their interference are studied. The method was used to determine the content of molybdenum in black beans. (Author)

  18. Recovery of uranium and molybdenum from a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Genmao; Zeng Yijun; Tang Baobin; Meng Shu; Xu Guolong

    2014-01-01

    Based on the results of process mineralogical research of a carbonate type uranium-molybdenum ore, leaching behaviors of the uranium-molybdenum ore were studied by alkali agitation leaching, conventional alkali column leaching and alkali curing column leaching processes. The results showed that using the alkali curing column leaching process, the leaching rate of molybdenum increased to more than 90%, and the leaching rate of uranium was about 85%, Compared with the conventional alkali column leaching process, the leaching time of the alkali curing column leaching process decreased by 60 days. (authors)

  19. Synergistic helium and deuterium blistering in tungsten–tantalum composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, M., E-mail: marta.dias@itn.pt [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Mateus, R.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, D. [CENIMAT-I3N, Departamento de Ciência dos Materiais, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia, Estrada do Paço do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [Associação Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Hanada, K. [AIST, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-2-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, 305-8564 Ibaraki (Japan); Sârbu, C. [National Institute of Materials and Physics, 105bis Atomistilor street, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); and others

    2013-11-15

    Abstruct: Tungsten–tantalum composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared by ball milling W powder with Ta fibers and by consolidating the milled materials with spark plasma sintering. The composites were implanted at room temperature with He{sup +} (30 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) and/or D{sup +} (15 keV with a fluence 5 × 10{sup 21} at/m{sup 2}) ion beams. The materials were studied by scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, both coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure observations revealed that the milling operation resulted in severe fragmentation of the Ta fibers. Furthermore, during the consolidation process the Ta phase acted as oxygen getter and reduced the W oxide present in the original material. The surface of the tungsten–tantalum composites implanted with D{sup +} remained essentially unaltered, while the materials implanted with He{sup +} evidenced blisters on the Ta-rich regions. D retention in the composites increased with He{sup +} pre-implantation.

  20. Synergistic helium and deuterium blistering in tungsten–tantalum composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M.; Mateus, R.; Catarino, N.; Franco, N.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Hanada, K.; Sârbu, C.

    2013-01-01

    Abstruct: Tungsten–tantalum composites with 10 and 20 at.% Ta were prepared by ball milling W powder with Ta fibers and by consolidating the milled materials with spark plasma sintering. The composites were implanted at room temperature with He + (30 keV with a fluence 5 × 10 21 at/m 2 ) and/or D + (15 keV with a fluence 5 × 10 21 at/m 2 ) ion beams. The materials were studied by scanning and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, both coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and by X-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and nuclear reaction analysis. The microstructure observations revealed that the milling operation resulted in severe fragmentation of the Ta fibers. Furthermore, during the consolidation process the Ta phase acted as oxygen getter and reduced the W oxide present in the original material. The surface of the tungsten–tantalum composites implanted with D + remained essentially unaltered, while the materials implanted with He + evidenced blisters on the Ta-rich regions. D retention in the composites increased with He + pre-implantation

  1. Cracking and delamination of vapor-deposited tantalum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.M.; Duan, J.Z.; Liu, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on tantalum films which begin to crack and spall during vapor deposition on glass at a thickness of 180 nm. Islands and ribbons, 10 - 30 μm in size, delaminate by crack growth along the Ta/glass interface for several μm after which the crack penetrates into the glass to a depth of 0.5 - 1 μm and complete spalling occurs. X-ray diffraction showed that about 50% of the original bct, β-tantalum, phase had transformed to the bcc α-Ta phase. When Ta was deposited on glass that was first covered with 52 nm of copper, spalling was observed to begin at a thickness of 105 nm. In this case, the film first cracks and then peels along the Cu/glass interface and curls into scrolls indicating the presence of a small stress gradient. X-ray diffraction of the as-deposited film, and electron diffraction of ion-milled flakes, showed that the Ta films deposited on Cu-coated glass almost completely transform to bcc α-Ta. The critical thickness for delamination along the Cu/glass interface is about 1/2 that for cracking in the glass substrate when an intermediate layer of Cu is not present. All of the above findings are in good agreement with previous observations on Cr films

  2. Characterization of a texture gradient in tantalum plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, S.I.; Gray, G.T. III.

    1994-01-01

    Clark et al. have shown that significant texture gradients can be produced in rolled tantalum plate and that the strength of the gradient is dependent on the processing path. Texture gradients are often ignored because they are time consuming to characterize and add significant complexity to materials modeling. The variation in texture through the thickness of rolled materials is most commonly measured by sectioning samples to different depths through the thickness of the plate and then measuring the texture from these section planes by X-ray diffraction. A new technique based on automatic indexing of electron backscatter diffraction patterns in the scanning electron microscope enables spatially specific orientations to be measured in a practical manner. This technique allows spatial variations in texture to be measured directly enabling gradients in texture to be investigated in more detail than previously possible. This data can be used directly in coupled finite-element/polycrystal-plasticity models to simulate the effects of variations in texture on the plastic behavior of polycrystals. This work examines the variation in texture through the thickness of a tantalum plate and its resultant effect on the compressive deformation of samples prepared from the plate. The characterization of the texture gradient using the automatic point-by-point measurement technique mentioned above is described in detail. The effect of the gradient on the plastic response of through-thickness compression tests is also discussed

  3. NEPP Evaluation of Automotive Grade Tantalum Chip Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Mike; Brusse, Jay

    2018-01-01

    Automotive grade tantalum (Ta) chip capacitors are available at lower cost with smaller physical size and higher volumetric efficiency compared to military/space grade capacitors. Designers of high reliability aerospace and military systems would like to take advantage of these attributes while maintaining the high standards for long-term reliable operation they are accustomed to when selecting military-qualified established reliability tantalum chip capacitors (e.g., MIL-PRF-55365). The objective for this evaluation was to assess the long-term performance of off-the-shelf automotive grade Ta chip capacitors (i.e., manufacturer self-qualified per AEC Q-200). Two (2) lots of case size D manganese dioxide (MnO2) cathode Ta chip capacitors from 1 manufacturer were evaluated. The evaluation consisted of construction analysis, basic electrical parameter characterization, extended long-term (2000 hours) life testing and some accelerated stress testing. Tests and acceptance criteria were based upon manufacturer datasheets and the Automotive Electronics Council's AEC Q-200 qualification specification for passive electronic components. As-received a few capacitors were marginally above the specified tolerance for capacitance and ESR. X-ray inspection found that the anodes for some devices may not be properly aligned within the molded encapsulation leaving less than 1 mil thickness of the encapsulation. This evaluation found that the long-term life performance of automotive grade Ta chip capacitors is generally within specification limits suggesting these capacitors may be suitable for some space applications.

  4. Spectrographic analysis of uranium-molybdenum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roca, M.

    1967-01-01

    A spectrographic method of analysis has been developed for uranium-molybdenum alloys containing up to 10 % Mo. The carrier distillation technique, with gallium oxide and graphite as carriers, is used for the semiquantitative determination of Al, Cr, Fe, Ni and Si, involving the conversion of the samples into oxides. As a consequence of the study of the influence of the molybdenum on the line intensities, it is useful to prepare only one set of standards with 0,6 % MoO 3 . Total burning excitation is used for calcium, employing two sets of standards with 0,6 and 7.5 MoO 3 . (Author) 5 refs

  5. Mechanism of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten carbide and tungsten electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesener, K.; Winkler, E.; Schneider, W.

    1985-01-01

    The course of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten-carbide electrodes in hydrogen saturated 2.25 M H 2 SO 4 follows a electrochemical sorption-desorption mechanism in the potential range of -0.4 to +0.1 V. At potentials greater than +0.1 V the hydrogen oxidation is controlled by a preliminary chemical sorption step. Concluding from the similar behaviour of tungsten-carbide and tungsten electrodes after cathodic pretreatment, different tungsten oxides should be involved in the course of the hydrogen reaction on tungsten carbide electrodes. (author)

  6. Bacterial adherence to tantalum versus commonly used orthopedic metallic implant materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhauer, Thomas A; Robie, Bruce; Muhr, Gert; Köller, Manfred

    2006-07-01

    Evaluation of bacterial adhesion to pure tantalum and tantalum-coated stainless steel versus commercially pure titanium, titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), and grit-blasted and polished stainless steel. Experimental in vitro cell culture study using Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively bacterial adherence to metallic implants. A bacterial adhesion assay was performed by culturing S. aureus (ATCC 6538) and S. epidermidis (clinical isolate) for one hour with tantalum, tantalum-coated stainless steel, titanium, titanium alloy, grit-blasted and polished stainless steel metallic implant discs. Adhered living and dead bacteria were stained using a 2-color fluorescence assay. Adherence was then quantitatively evaluated by fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing. Qualitative adherence of the bacteria was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. The quantitative data were related to the implant surface roughness (Pa-value) as measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Bacterial adherence of S. aureus varied significantly (p = 0.0035) with the type of metallic implant. Pure tantalum presented with significantly (p titanium alloy, polished stainless steel, and tantalum-coated stainless steel. Furthermore, pure tantalum had a lower, though not significantly, adhesion than commercially pure titanium and grit-blasted stainless steel. Additionally, there was a significantly higher S. aureus adherence to titanium alloy than to commercially pure titanium (p = 0.014). S. epidermidis adherence was not significantly different among the tested materials. There was no statistically significant correlation between bacterial adherence and surface roughness of the tested implants. Pure tantalum presents with a lower or similar S. aureus and S. epidermidis adhesion when compared with commonly used materials in orthopedic implants. Because bacterial adhesion is an important predisposing factor in the development of

  7. Radiochemical separations of hafnium, tantalum, and germanium from tungsten and selenium irradiated by 14 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blachot, J.; Benabed, A.; Herment, J.; Monnand, E.

    1968-01-01

    Radiochemical separations of Hf, Ta and Ge from W and Se respectively, after 14 MeV-neutron irradiation. A new isotope: 79 Ge with a half-live of 50 ± 5 s and emitter of a 230 keV γ transition is observed. (authors) [fr

  8. Quantitative spark-source analysis of UO2-PuO2 for rare earths and tantalum, tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alkire, G.J.

    A quantitative analytical technique good to 20% for the determination of Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ta, and W in Pu-U mixed oxides by spark source mass spectrography has been developed. The technique uses La as an added internal standard and an electronic integrator to measure peak areas of each line photometered on the densitometer. 3 tables

  9. CONTRIBUTION TO THE TECHNOLOGY OF TANTALUM--TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Beitrag zur technologie der tantal-wolfram-legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, H.; Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.

    1971-12-15

    The available literature on Ta-W alloys is briefly surveyed, and the methods used for the preparation of sintered Ta-W alloys (preliminary formation of solid solutions) and the type of working (cold working, vacuum sheathing, and hot working) are described. The characteristics - density, lattice parameter, hardness, specific electric resistance, hydridability, oxidation resistance, modulus of elasticity, and corrosion resistance - of sintered and cast compositions containing 0 to 100% Ta are presented.

  10. Spectrochemical determination of tantalum in plutonium metal using direct current plasma emission spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadeff, S.K.; Morris, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Tantalum is determined by direct current plasma spectrometry after separation of plutonium from solution as PuF 3 . After centrifugation of the PuF 3 precipitate, a low level of plutonium remains in solution in sufficient quantity to cause spectral interferences. It is necessary to determine the plutonium by dc plasma spectrometry and apply a correction to determine low tantalum concentrations with good accuracy and precision. Tantalum can be determined down to 0.4 ppM in solution with a relative standard deviation of 10 percent. Better precision can be achieved at higher concentrations. The procedure is simple and convenient for glovebox work. 5 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  11. Synthesis and characterization of tantalum organometallic complexes. Catalytic activity for olefins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baley, A.S.

    1990-11-01

    Synthesis of monoaryloxy (alcoxy) neopentyl compounds is investigated. The tantalum-oxygen bond is formed by two parallel ways from TaCl 5 or TaR 2 Cl 3 with R = neopentyl and the tantalum carbon bond from a neopentyl derivative of the main series. Some compounds were isolated and characterized by NMR, elemental analysis and sometimes X-ray structure, some others are characterized in solution only. Catalytic effect is tested by ethylene dimerization and olefin polymerization. Reactivity of tantalum aryloxy neopentyl in respect to complexing and chelating ligands is studied for preparation of neopentylidene complexes

  12. Structural characterisation of oxygen diffusion hardened alpha-tantalum PVD-coatings on titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertl, C; Koll, L; Schmitz, T; Werner, E; Gbureck, U

    2014-08-01

    Titanium substrates were coated with tantalum layers of 5 μm thickness using physical vapour deposition (PVD). The tantalum layers showed a (110)-preferred orientation. The coated samples were hardened by oxygen diffusion. Using X-ray diffraction the crystallographic structure of the tantalum coatings was characterised, comparing untreated and diffusion hardened specimen conditions. Oxygen depth profiles were determined by glow discharge spectrometry. The hardening effect of the heat treatment was examined by Vickers microhardness testing. The increase of surface hardness caused by oxygen diffusion was at least 50%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study Using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from currentless plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of W 24+ to W 33+ ions are very sensitive to electron temperature (Te) and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. Based on the first quantitative analysis of measured spatial profile of W 44+ ion, the tungsten concentration is determined to be n(W 44+ )/n e = 1.4x10 -4 and the total radiation loss is estimated as ∼4 MW, of which the value is roughly half the total NBI power. (author)

  14. High-energy, high-rate consolidation of tungsten and tungsten-based composite powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunathan, S.K.; Persad, C.; Bourell, D.L.; Marcus, H.L. (Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1991-01-20

    Tungsten and tungsten-based heavy alloys are well known for their superior mechanical properties at elevated temperatures. However, unalloyed tungsten is difficult to consolidate owing to its very high melting temperature (3683 K). The additions of small amounts of low-melting elements such as iron, nickel, cobalt and copper, facilitate the powder processing of dense heavy alloys at moderate temperatures. Energetic high-current pulses have been used recently for powder consolidation. In this paper, the use of a homopolar generator as a power source to consolidate selected tungsten and tungsten-based alloys is examined. Various materials were consolidated including unalloyed tungsten, W-Nb, W-Ni, and tungsten heavy alloy with boron carbide. The effect of process parameters such as pressure and specific energy input on the consolidation of different alloy systems is described in terms of microstructure and property relationships. (orig.).

  15. Quenching and recovery experiments on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasch, K.D.; Siegel, R.W.; Schultz, H.

    1976-01-01

    A short summary is given of new results concerning transmission electron microscopy and resistivity measurements on quenched tungsten. These results give evidence for the first time that the quenching and annealing of high purity tungsten leads to vacancy--defect clustering resulting in small voids observable in the electron microscope. 21 references

  16. Tungsten deposition by hydrogen-atom reaction with tungsten hexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W.W.

    1991-01-01

    Using gaseous hydrogen atoms with WF 6 , tungsten atoms can be produced in a gas-phase reaction. The atoms then deposit in a near-room temperature process, which results in the formation of tungsten films. The W atoms (10 10 -10 11 /cm 3 ) were measured in situ by atomic absorption spectroscopy during the CVD process. Deposited W films were characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering, and X-ray diffraction. The surface morphology of the deposited films and filled holes was studied using scanning electron microscopy. The deposited films were highly adherent to different substrates, such as Si, SiO 2 , Ti/Si, TiN/Si and Teflon. The reaction mechanism and kinetics were studied. The experimental results indicated that this method has three advantages compared to conventional CVD or PECVD: (1) film growth occurs at low temperatures; (2) deposition takes place in a plasma-free environment; and (3) a low level of impurities results in high-quality adherent films

  17. Temperature dependent surface modification of molybdenum due to low energy He+ ion irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, J.K.; Novakowski, T.J.; Joseph, G.; Linke, J.; Hassanein, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the temperature dependent surface modifications in molybdenum (Mo) samples due to 100 eV He + ion irradiation in extreme conditions as a potential candidate to plasma-facing components in fusion devices alternative to tungsten. The Mo samples were irradiated at normal incidence, using an ion fluence of 2.6 × 10 24 ions m −2 (with a flux of 7.2 × 10 20 ions m −2 s −1 ). Surface modifications have been studied using high-resolution field emission scanning electron-(SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopy. At 773 K target temperature homogeneous evolution of molybdenum nanograins on the entire Mo surface were observed. However, at 823 K target temperature appearance of nano-pores and pin-holes nearby the grain boundaries, and Mo fuzz in patches were observed. The fuzz density increases significantly with target temperatures and continued until 973 K. However, at target temperatures beyond 973 K, counterintuitively, a sequential reduction in the fuzz density has been seen till 1073 K temperatures. At 1173 K and above temperatures, only molybdenum nano structures were observed. Our temperature dependent studies confirm a clear temperature widow, 823–1073 K, for Mo fuzz formation. Ex-situ high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies on Mo fuzzy samples show the evidence of MoO 3 3d doublets. This elucidates that almost all the Mo fuzz were oxidized during open air exposure and are thick enough as well. Likewise the microscopy studies, the optical reflectivity measurements also show a sequential reduction in the reflectivity values (i.e., enhancement in the fuzz density) up to 973 K and after then a sequential enhancement in the reflectivity values (i.e., reduction in the fuzz density) with target temperatures. This is in well agreement with microscopy studies where we observed clear temperature window for Mo fuzz growth

  18. Recent situation and future of molybdenum mineral resources; Molybdenum shigen no genjo to shorai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, K.; Nishiyama, T. [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    1997-05-05

    Molybdenum is produced mainly from molybdenite, and the majority of this ore is exploited from the porphyry deposit. The reserve is estimated at 5.5-million ton. A total of 118-thousand ton was produced across the world in 1995, in the U.S., China, Chile, and Canada, the countries named in the order of quantities they exploited. Molybdenite is first refined by flotation for the production of a sulphide. It is subjected to oxidizing roasting for conversion into crude molybdenum trioxide, which is next subjected to extraction in warmed-up aqueous ammonia and then to evaporation for the crystallization of ammonium paramolybdate. The crystals are baked for conversion into molybdenum trioxide of the ordinary purity, to be further processed into ferromolybdenum, molybdenum compounds, molybdenum powder, etc. In view of the magnitude of demand, the metal is used mostly for the manufacture of special steels and special alloys. The demand for this metal, though small in size, involves important articles, such as line materials for semiconductors in the power industry, catalysts in the chemical industry, and lubricants. Japan`s stockpile includes molybdenum, but the U.S. has been stockpiling none since 1977. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Thermodynamic Properties of Manganese and Molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, P.D.

    1987-01-01

    This work reviews and discusses the data on the various thermodynamic properties of manganese and molybdenum available through March 1985. These include heat capacity, enthalpy, enthalpy of transitions and melting, vapor pressure, and enthalpy of vaporization. The existing data have been critically evaluated and analyzed. The recommended values for the heat capacity, enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs energy function from 0.5 to 2400 K for manganese and from 0.4 to 5000 K for molybdenum have been generated, as have heat capacity values for supercooled β-Mn and for γ-Mn below 298.15 K. The recommended values for vapor pressure cover the temperature range from 298.15 to 2400 K for manganese and from 298.15 to 5000 K for molybdenum. These values are referred to temperatures based on IPTS-1968. The uncertainties in the recommended values of the heat capacity range from +-3% to +-5% for manganese and from +-1.5% to +-3% for molybdenum

  20. Paraelasticity in electron-irradiated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuneu, Brigitte; Quere, Yves.

    1981-11-01

    The relaxation of a radiation-induced point defect-most probably the rotation of a dumbell-is observed during isothermal anneals of irradiated molybdenum by resistivity measurements. The recovery of close pairs is not affected, in first analysis, by the presence of a uniaxial stress

  1. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua; Hu, Zhixin; Probert, Matt; Li, Kun; Lv, Danhui; Yang, Xinan; Gu, Lin; Mao, Nannan; Feng, Qingliang; Xie, Liming; Zhang, Jin; Wu, Dianzhong; Zhang, Zhiyong; Jin, Chuanhong; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xixiang; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm '2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  2. Exploring atomic defects in molybdenum disulphide monolayers

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua

    2015-02-19

    Defects usually play an important role in tailoring various properties of two-dimensional materials. Defects in two-dimensional monolayer molybdenum disulphide may be responsible for large variation of electric and optical properties. Here we present a comprehensive joint experiment-theory investigation of point defects in monolayer molybdenum disulphide prepared by mechanical exfoliation, physical and chemical vapour deposition. Defect species are systematically identified and their concentrations determined by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, and also studied by ab-initio calculation. Defect density up to 3.5 × 10 13 cm \\'2 is found and the dominant category of defects changes from sulphur vacancy in mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition samples to molybdenum antisite in physical vapour deposition samples. Influence of defects on electronic structure and charge-carrier mobility are predicted by calculation and observed by electric transport measurement. In light of these results, the growth of ultra-high-quality monolayer molybdenum disulphide appears a primary task for the community pursuing high-performance electronic devices.

  3. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  4. Molybdenum silicide based materials and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, Z.; Stiglich, J.; Sudarshan, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi 2 ) is a promising candidate material for high temperature structural applications. It is a high melting point (2030 C) material with excellent oxidation resistance and a moderate density (6.24 g/cm 3 ). However, low toughness at low temperatures and high creep rates at elevated temperatures have hindered its commercialization in structural applications. Much effort has been invested in MoSi 2 composites as alternatives to pure molybdenum disilicide for oxidizing and aggressive environments. Molybdenum disilicide-based heating elements have been used extensively in high-temperature furnaces. The low electrical resistance of silicides in combination with high thermal stability, electron-migration resistance, and excellent diffusion-barrier characteristics is important for microelectronic applications. Projected applications of MoSi 2 -based materials include turbine airfoils, combustion chamber components in oxidizing environments, missile nozzles, molten metal lances, industrial gas burners, diesel engine glow plugs, and materials for glass processing. On this paper, synthesis, fabrication, and properties of the monolithic and composite molybdenum silicides are reviewed

  5. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W-Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (˜0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, while a W-Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ˜0.9 MJ m-2. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  6. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W–Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, while a W–Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ∼0.9 MJ m{sup −2}. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  7. The Development of Molybdenum Speciation as a Paleoredox Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodley, J.; Peacock, C.; Mosselmans, J. F. W.; Poulton, S.

    2017-12-01

    The redox state of the oceans has changed throughout geological time and an understanding of these changes is essential to elucidate links between ocean chemistry, climate and life. Due to its abundance in seawater and redox-sensitive nature, molybdenum has enormous potential as a paleoredox proxy. Although a significant amount of research has been done on molybdenum in ancient and modern sediments in terms of its concentrations and isotopic ratios there remains a limited understanding of the drawdown mechanisms of molybdenum under different redox conditions restricting its use in identifying a range of redox states. In order to address these uncertainties, we have developed a novel sequential extraction technique to examine molybdenum concentrations in six sediment fractions from modern samples that represent oxic, nitrogenous, ferruginous and euxinic environments. In addition we use µ-XRF and µ-XANES synchrotron spectroscopy to examine the molybdenum speciation within these fractions and environments. To interpret our µ-XANES data we have developed an extensive library of molybdenum XANES standards that represent molybdenum sequestration by the sediment fractions identified from the sequential extraction. To further verify our synchrotron results we developed a series of µ-XANES micro-column experiments to examine preferential uptake pathways of molybdenum to different sediment phases under a euxinic water column. The initial data from both the sequential extraction and µ-XANES methods indicate that molybdenum is not limited to a single burial pathway in any of the redox environments. We find that each of the redox environments can be characterised by a limited set of molybdenum phase associations, with molybdenum adsorption to pyrite likely the dominant burial pathway. These findings agree with existing research for molybdenum speciation in euxinic environments suggesting that both pyrite and sulphidised organic matter act as important molybdenum sinks. Our

  8. The DAMPE silicon tungsten tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Gallo, Valentina; Asfandiyarov, R; Azzarello, P; Bernardini, P; Bertucci, B; Bolognini, A; Cadoux, F; Caprai, M; Domenjoz, M; Dong, Y; Duranti, M; Fan, R; Franco, M; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gong, K; Guo, D; Husi, C; Ionica, M; Lacalamita, N; Loparco, F; Marsella, G; Mazziotta, M N; Mongelli, M; Nardinocchi, A; Nicola, L; Pelleriti, G; Peng, W; Pohl, M; Postolache, V; Qiao, R; Surdo, A; Tykhonov, A; Vitillo, S; Wang, H; Weber, M; Wu, D; Wu, X; Zhang, F; De Mitri, I; La Marra, D

    2017-01-01

    The DArk Matter Particle Explorer (DAMPE) satellite has been successfully launched on the 17th December 2015. It is a powerful space detector designed for the identification of possible Dark Matter signatures thanks to its capability to detect electrons and photons with an unprecedented energy resolution in an energy range going from few GeV up to 10 TeV. Moreover, the DAMPE satellite will contribute to a better understanding of the propagation mechanisms of high energy cosmic rays measuring the nuclei flux up to 100 TeV. DAMPE is composed of four sub-detectors: a plastic strip scintillator, a silicon-tungsten tracker-converter (STK), a BGO imaging calorimeter and a neutron detector. The STK is made of twelve layers of single-sided AC-coupled silicon micro-strip detectors for a total silicon area of about 7 $m^2$ . To promote the conversion of incident photons into electron-positron pairs, tungsten foils are inserted into the supporting structure. In this document, a detailed description of the STK constructi...

  9. Reorientation measurements on tungsten isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, J J; Saladin, J X; Baktash, C; Alessi, J G [Pittsburgh Univ., Pa. (USA)

    1977-11-14

    In a particle-..gamma.. coincidence experiment, a thick tungsten target, of natural isotopic abundance, was bombarded with ..cap alpha.. and /sup 16/O beams. From analysis of the deexcitation ..gamma..-rays following Coulomb excitation, the spectroscopic quadrupole moment of the second 2/sup +/ state (the 2/sup +/' state) was determined for /sup 186/W and /sup 184/W. In a separate Coulomb excitation experiment a thin, isotopically enriched /sup 186/W target was bombarded with /sup 16/O ions. From analysis of projectiles scattered elastically and inelastically the quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state of /sup 186/W was extracted. The results of the two experiments are in good agreement. The quadrupole moment of the 2/sup +/' state is found to be opposite in sign to that of the first 2/sup +/ state for both isotopes studied. However, its magnitude decreases rapidly in going from /sup 186/W to /sup 184/W, in contrast to the predictions of the rotation-vibration of asymmetric rotor models. The microscopic theory of Kumar and Baranger does predict the experimental trend, qualitatively. Thus the present results are interpreted as being evidence of strong coupling between ..beta.. and ..gamma.. degrees of freedom in the tungsten isotopes, which, according to the theory of Kumar and Baranger, is the source of the reduced value of the quadrupole moment.

  10. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesch, J.; Han, Y.; Almanstötter, J.; Coenen, J. W.; Höschen, T.; Jasper, B.; Zhao, P.; Linsmeier, Ch; Neu, R.

    2016-02-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself.

  11. Development of tungsten fibre-reinforced tungsten composites towards their use in DEMO—potassium doped tungsten wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesch, J; Han, Y; Höschen, T; Zhao, P; Neu, R; Almanstötter, J; Coenen, J W; Jasper, B; Linsmeier, Ch

    2016-01-01

    For the next step fusion reactor the use of tungsten is inevitable to suppress erosion and allow operation at elevated temperature and high heat loads. Tungsten fibre-reinforced composites overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten and its susceptibility to operation embrittlement and thus allow its use as a structural as well as an armour material. That this concept works in principle has been shown in recent years. In this contribution we present a development approach towards its use in a future fusion reactor. A multilayer approach is needed addressing all composite constituents and manufacturing steps. A huge potential lies in the optimization of the tungsten wire used as fibre. We discuss this aspect and present studies on potassium doped tungsten wire in detail. This wire, utilized in the illumination industry, could be a replacement for the so far used pure tungsten wire due to its superior high temperature properties. In tensile tests the wire showed high strength and ductility up to an annealing temperature of 2200 K. The results show that the use of doped tungsten wire could increase the allowed fabrication temperature and the overall working temperature of the composite itself. (paper)

  12. Tantalum oxide-based compounds as new non-noble cathodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Akimitsu; Tamura, Motoko; Matsuzawa, Koichi; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Ota, Ken-ichiro

    2010-01-01

    Tantalum oxide-based compounds were examined as new non-noble cathodes for polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Tantalum carbonitride powder was partially oxidized under a trace amount of oxygen gas at 900 o C for 4 or 8 h. Onset potential for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of the specimen heat-treated for 8 h was 0.94 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode in 0.1 mol dm -3 sulfuric acid at 30 o C. The partial oxidation of tantalum carboniride was effective to enhance the catalytic activity for the ORR. The partially oxidized specimen with highest catalytic activity had ca. 5.25 eV of ionization potential, indicating that there was most suitable strength of the interaction of oxygen and tantalum on the catalyst surface.

  13. Tantalum Nitride Electron-Selective Contact for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Xinbo; Aydin, Erkan; Xu, Hang; Kang, Jingxuan; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Liu, Wenzhu; Wan, Yimao; Peng, Jun; Samundsett, Christian; Cuevas, Andres; De Wolf, Stefaan

    2018-01-01

    novel electron‐selective, passivating contact for c‐Si solar cells is presented. Tantalum nitride (TaN x ) thin films deposited by atomic layer deposition are demonstrated to provide excellent electron‐transporting and hole‐blocking properties

  14. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  15. Micro-powder injection moulding of tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeep, B.

    2007-12-01

    For He-cooled Divertors as integral components of future fusion power plants, about 300000 complex shaped tungsten components are to be fabricated. Tungsten is the favoured material because of its excellent properties (high melting point, high hardness, high sputtering resistance, high thermal conductivity). However, the material's properties cause major problems for large scale production of complex shaped components. Due to the resistance of tungsten to mechanical machining, new fabrication technologies have to be developed. Powder injection moulding as a well established shaping technology for a large scale production of complex or even micro structured parts might be a suitable method to produce tungsten components for fusion applications but is not yet commercially available. The present thesis is dealing with the development of a powder injection moulding process for micro structured tungsten components. To develop a suitable feedstock, the powder particle properties, the binder formulation and the solid load were optimised. To meet the requirements for a replication of micro patterned cavities, a special target was to define the smallest powder particle size applicable for micro-powder injection moulding. To investigate the injection moulding performance of the developed feedstocks, experiments were successfully carried out applying diverse cavities with structural details in micro dimension. For debinding of the green bodies, a combination of solvent debinding and thermal debinding has been adopted for injection moulded tungsten components. To develop a suitable debinding strategy, a variation of the solvent debinding time, the heating rate and the binder formulation was performed. For investigating the thermal consolidation behaviour of tungsten components, sinter experiments were carried out applying tungsten powders suitable for micro-powder injection moulding. First mechanical tests of the sintered samples showed promising material properties such as a

  16. Thermal and electrical conductivities of high purity tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of three high purity tantalum samples have been measured as functions of temperature over a temperature range of 5K to 65K. Sample purities ranged up to a resistivity ratio of 1714. The highest purity sample had a residual resistivity of .76 x 10 -10 OMEGA-m. The intrinsic resistivity varied as T 3 . 9 from 10K to 31K. The thermal conductivity of the purest sample had a maximum of 840 W/mK at 9.8K. The intrinsic thermal resistivity varied as T 2 . 4 from 10K to 35K. At low temperatures electrons were scattered primarily by impurities and by phonons with both interband and intraband transitions observed. The electrical and thermal resistivity is departed from Matthiessen's rule at low temperatures

  17. Raman spectra of ruthenium and tantalum trimers in argon matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Shen, Xiaole; Chen, Xiaoyu; Lombardi, John R.

    2000-12-01

    The resonance Raman spectra of ruthenium trimers (Ru 3) in argon matrices have been obtained. Three resonance Raman transitions were observed between 570 and 590 nm. Two of them (303.4 and 603.7 cm -1) are assigned to the totally symmetric vibrational progression, giving k e=1.86 mdyne/ Å. The line at 581.5 cm-1 is assigned as the origin of a low-lying electronic state. We also report on the observation of a resonance Raman spectrum of tantalum trimers (Ta 3). Observed lines include 251.2 and 501.9 cm-1 which we assign to the fundamental and the first overtone of the symmetric stretch in Ta 3. This gives k e=2.25 mdyne/ Å.

  18. Diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, P.; Miranda, L.; Lagos, M.

    1988-08-01

    We show that the current data on hydrogen diffusion in Tantalum between 15K and 550K and in Niobium between 135K and 400K can be quantitatively explained by the small polaron theory. The experimental data can be understood assuming ground-state to ground-state tunneling between interstitial sites with tetrahedral symmetry plus an activated contribution due to tunneling between excited states having octahedral symmetry. The break of the diffusivity curve at T approx. = 250K follows naturally. It evidences the transition between the tetrahedral and octahedral hopping. For Ta the second break of the diffusivity curve at T approx. = 20K indicated the recovering of the ground-state hopping with tetrahedral symmetry. Below T approx. = 10K for Ta and T approx. = 7K for Nb the diffusion coefficient becomes independent of T. (author). 17 refs, 3 figs, 1 tab

  19. KAJIAN SIFAT OPTIK FILM TIPIS BST DIDADAH NIOBIUM DAN TANTALUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida Huriawati

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research thin films of Barium Strontium Titanate (BST has been synthesis with different compositions Ba0,5Sr0,5TiO3 and Ba0,25Sr0,75TiO3 which doped by Nb2O5 (Niobium and Ta2O5 (Tantalum on Si (100 type-p substrate. Thin films were produced by chemical solution deposition technique (CSD and spin coating technique with annealing temperature at 850oC, 900oC dan 950oC. Rotation velocity at 3000 rpm and time of rotation is 30 seconds. Characterization of Films is optic Characterization (absorbance ana reflectance. From the Characterizations were obtained BNST thin film with 5% doping and anneling temperature at 8500C as photodiode light sensor which applied in electronic circuit.

  20. Dielectric properties of tantalum powder with broccoli-like morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Masahiko [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Suzuki, Ryosuke O [Department of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2005-04-19

    Metallic tantalum powder with broccoli-like morphology, consisting of spherical fine particles and of long rods or thin plates, was prepared in a hundred gram scale by calcium reduction of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} in molten CaCl{sub 2}. The properties as electrolytic capacitor were evaluated in comparison with commercial powder obtained by Na reduction and with powder consisting of only fine particles obtained by Ca reduction. The capacitance was larger than that of conventional powder with the same surface area, because the broccoli-like powder showed a strong resistance against shrinkage during high temperature annealing due to the framework of branches. The powder with new broccoli-like morphology can circumvent the conventional treatments for grain size control and gas removal.

  1. Dielectric properties of tantalum powder with broccoli-like morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baba, Masahiko; Suzuki, Ryosuke O.

    2005-01-01

    Metallic tantalum powder with broccoli-like morphology, consisting of spherical fine particles and of long rods or thin plates, was prepared in a hundred gram scale by calcium reduction of Ta 2 O 5 in molten CaCl 2 . The properties as electrolytic capacitor were evaluated in comparison with commercial powder obtained by Na reduction and with powder consisting of only fine particles obtained by Ca reduction. The capacitance was larger than that of conventional powder with the same surface area, because the broccoli-like powder showed a strong resistance against shrinkage during high temperature annealing due to the framework of branches. The powder with new broccoli-like morphology can circumvent the conventional treatments for grain size control and gas removal

  2. Split-Hopkinson pressure bar tests on pure tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Richard D.; Armstrong, Ronald W.; Williams, John D.

    1998-01-01

    Pure tantalum (Ta) was loaded in compression by a split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) to strain rates from 450 to 6350 s -1 . The results are compared with SHPB data for commercial Ta and with predictions from the constitutive model for Ta developed by Zerilli and Armstrong (Z-A). The main conclusions are: (1) the flow stress versus log strain rate agree with the Z-A constitutive model and other reported data, (2) uniform strain exponents computed on a true stress-strain basis for pure Ta are somewhat greater than those determined from SHPB data for commercial Ta, and (3) in both cases the uniform strain exponents versus log strain rate are in good agreement with predictions from the Z-A constitutive model for strain rates above 1500 s -1 without a clear indication of dislocation generation

  3. Cast and hipped gamma titanium aluminum alloys modified by chromium, boron, and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Shyhchin.

    1993-01-01

    A cast body is described of a chromium, boron, and tantalum modified titanium aluminum alloy, said alloy consisting essentially of titanium, aluminum, chromium, boron, and tantalum in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti-Al 45-50 Cr 1-3 Ta 1-8 B 0.1-0.3 , and said alloy having been prepared by casting the alloy to form said cast body and by HIPping said body

  4. Sputter deposition of tantalum-nitride films on copper using an rf-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, K.C.; Fetherston, R.P.; Sridharan, K.; Chen, A.; Shamim, M.M.; Conrad, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    A tantalum-nitride film was successfully deposited at ambient temperature on copper with a modified ion-assisted-deposition (IAD) technique. The process uses an argon and nitrogen plasma to sputter deposit from a tantalum rf-cathode and ion implant the deposited film simultaneously. Both argon and nitrogen ions are used for sputtering and ion implantation. Auger spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to characterize the resulting film

  5. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ding Ding; Youtao Xie; Kai Li; Liping Huang; Xuebin Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs), a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were co...

  6. Electron tunneling in tantalum surface layers on niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, S.T.; Track, E.K.; Prober, D.E.; Arnold, G.B.; DeWeert, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    We have performed electron tunneling measurements on tantalum surface layers on niobium. The tunnel junctions comprise 2000-A-circle Nb base electrodes with 10--100-A-circle in situ--deposited Ta overlayers, an oxide barrier, and Ag, Pb, or Pb-Bi alloy counterelectrodes. The base electrodes were prepared by ion-beam sputter deposition. The characteristics of these junctions have been studied as a function of Ta-layer thickness. These include the critical current, bound-state energy, phonon structure, and oxide barrier shape. We have compared our results for the product I/sub c/R versus tantalum-layer thickness with an extended version of the Gallagher theory which accounts for both the finite mean free path in the Ta overlayers and suppression of the I/sub c/R product due to strong-coupling effects. Excellent fits to the data yield a value of the intrinsic scattering probability for electrons at the Ta/Nb interface of r 2 = 0.01. This is consistent with the value expected from simple scattering off the potential step created by the difference between the Fermi energies of Ta and Nb. We have found a universal empirical correlation in average barrier height phi-bar and width s in the form phi-bar = 6 eV/(s-10 A-circle) for measured junctions which holds both for our data and results for available data in the literature for oxide-barrier junctions. The latter are composed of a wide variety of base and counterelectrode materials. These results are discussed in the general context of oxide growth and compared with results for artificial tunnel barriers

  7. Radionuclide trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The deposition of radionuclides manganese-54, cobalt-58 and cobalt-60 from liquid sodium coolant is controlled by providing surfaces of nickel or high nickel alloys to extract the radionuclides from the liquid sodium, and by providing surfaces of tungsten, molybdenum or tantalum to prevent or retard radionuclide deposition

  8. The lattice dynamics of six prominent B.C.C. transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brescansin, L.M.; Padial, N.T.; Shukla, M.M.

    1975-01-01

    The frequency versus wave vector dispersion relations along the three principal symmetry directions, [xi00], [xixi0] and [xixixi], of six prominent body centered cubic transition metals, namely that of molybdenum, α-iron, tungsten, tantalum, niobium and that of chromium, have been computed on the basis of a phenomenological model. The calculated results are in very good agreements to the experimental findings

  9. Thermophysical measurements on liquid metals above 4000 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaner, J.W.; Gathers, G.R.; Hodgson, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    Thermophysical data are presented for liquid niobium up to approximately 6000 0 K and for liquid lead up to approximately 5000 0 K. These new results are summarized along with previously obtained high temperature data for liquid molybdenum, tantalum, tungsten, and uranium

  10. An investigation of tungsten by neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svetsreni, R.

    1978-01-01

    This investigation used neutron from Plutonium-Beryllium source (5 curie) to analyse the amount of tungsten in tungsten oxide which was extracted from tungsten ores, slag and tungsten alloy of tungsten iron and carbon. The technique of neutron activation analysis with NaI(Tl) gamma detector 3'' x 3'' and 1024 multichannel analyzer. The dilution technique was used by mixing Fe 2 O 3 or pure sand into the sample before irradiation. In this study self shielding effect in the analysis of tungsten was solved and the detection limit of the tungsten in the sample was about 0.5%

  11. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ding; Xie, Youtao; Li, Kai; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2018-04-03

    Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs), a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs) were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta₂O₅ nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  12. Micro/Nano Structural Tantalum Coating for Enhanced Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, tantalum has been attracting much attention for its anticorrosion resistance and biocompatibility, and it has been widely used in surface modification for implant applications. To improve its osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs, a micro/nano structure has been fabricated on the tantalum coating surface through the combination of anodic oxidation and plasma spraying method. The morphology, composition, and microstructure of the modified coating were comprehensively studied by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The effects of hierarchical structures as well as micro-porous structure of tantalum coating on the behavior for human bone marrow stem cells (hBMSCs were evaluated and compared at both cellular and molecular levels in vitro. The experimental results show that a hierarchical micro/nano structure with Ta2O5 nanotubes spread onto a micro-scale tantalum coating has been fabricated successfully, which is confirmed to promote cell adhesion and spreading. Besides, the hierarchical micro/nano tantalum coating can provide 1.5~2.1 times improvement in gene expression, compared with the micro-porous tantalum coating. It demonstrates that it can effectively enhance the proliferation and differentiation of hBMSCs in vitro.

  13. Effect of sputtering parameters and substrate composition on the structure of tantalum thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallmann, Lubica, E-mail: lubica.hallmann@zzm.uzh.c [Clinic of Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics and Dental Material Science, Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zürich (Switzerland); Ulmer, Peter [Institute of Geochemistry and Petrology, ETH Zürich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-01

    The crystallographic properties of tantalum films deposited as a bioactive coating on Co–Cr–Mo and Ti–Al–Nb alloys have been investigated. The desired tough and ductile alpha phase of tantalum has been obtained by DC magnetron sputtering on Co–Cr–Mo and Ti–Al–Nb substrates. The thickness of the tantalum layer was between 20 and 600 nm. The crystallographic structure of tantalum thin film was dependent on the sputtering parameters such as DC power, bias voltage and gas impurities. Oxygen is an important factor for the stabilization of the tantalum alpha phase on Co–Cr–Mo substrate. The crystallographic structure and texture of tantalum thin films was found to be additionally dependent on the substrate composition. For Ti–Al–Nb substrate, oxygen content was not an important factor for the stabilization of the alpha phase. The observed shift of X-ray diffraction peaks to lower 2(θ) is an indication of stress evolving during the sputtering process and was dependent on bias voltage and oxygen content of the carrier gas.

  14. The evaluation of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated and uncoated porous tantalum for biomedical material applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safuan, Nadia; Sukmana, Irza; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul; Noviana, Deni

    2014-01-01

    Porous tantalum has been used as an orthopedic implant for bone defects as it has a good corrosion resistance and fatigue behaviour properties. However, there are some reports on the rejection of porous Ta after the implantation. Those clinical cases refer to the less bioactivity of metallic-based materials. This study aims to evaluate hydroxyapatite coated and uncoated porous Tantalum in order to improve the biocompatibility of porous tantalum implant and osseointegration. Porous tantalum was used as metallic-base substrate and hydroxyapatite coating has been done using plasma-spraying technique. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) techniques were utilizes to investigate the coating characteristics while Confocal Raman Microscopy to investigate the interface and image. The effect of coating to the corrosion behaviour was assessed by employing potentiodynamic polarization tests in simulated body fluid at 37±1 °C. Based on SEM and FESEM results, the morphologies as well the weight element consists in the uncoated and hydroxyapatite coated porous tantalum were revealed. The results indicated that the decrease in corrosion current density for HA coated porous Ta compared to the uncoated porous Ta. This study concluded that by coating porous tantalum with HA supports to decrease the corrosion rate of pure porous.

  15. The Evaluation of Hydroxyapatite (HA) Coated and Uncoated Porous Tantalum for Biomedical Material Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safuan, Nadia; Sukmana, Irza; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul; Noviana, Deni

    2014-04-01

    Porous tantalum has been used as an orthopedic implant for bone defects as it has a good corrosion resistance and fatigue behaviour properties. However, there are some reports on the rejection of porous Ta after the implantation. Those clinical cases refer to the less bioactivity of metallic-based materials. This study aims to evaluate hydroxyapatite coated and uncoated porous Tantalum in order to improve the biocompatibility of porous tantalum implant and osseointegration. Porous tantalum was used as metallic-base substrate and hydroxyapatite coating has been done using plasma-spraying technique. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) techniques were utilizes to investigate the coating characteristics while Confocal Raman Microscopy to investigate the interface and image. The effect of coating to the corrosion behaviour was assessed by employing potentiodynamic polarization tests in simulated body fluid at 37±1 °C. Based on SEM and FESEM results, the morphologies as well the weight element consists in the uncoated and hydroxyapatite coated porous tantalum were revealed. The results indicated that the decrease in corrosion current density for HA coated porous Ta compared to the uncoated porous Ta. This study concluded that by coating porous tantalum with HA supports to decrease the corrosion rate of pure porous.

  16. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Jay L.; Korte, Nic

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use

  17. Environmental fate of tungsten from military use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Jay L. [Research and Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, 72 Lyme Road, Hanover, New Hampshire, 03755 (United States)], E-mail: Jay.L.Clausen@erdc.usace.army.mil; Korte, Nic [1946 Clover Ct., Grand Junction, Colorado, 81506 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    This manuscript describes the distribution, fate and transport of tungsten used in training rounds at three small arms ranges at Camp Edwards on the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR), USA. Practice with tungsten/nylon rounds began in 2000 subsequent to a 1997 US Environmental Protection Agency ban on training with lead. Training with the tungsten rounds was halted in 2005 because of concerns regarding tungsten's environmental mobility and potential toxicity. This study, therefore, examines how tungsten partitions in the environment when fired on a small arms training range. Soil sampling revealed surface soil concentrations, highest at the berm face, up to 2080 mg/kg. Concentrations decreased rapidly with depth-at least by an order of magnitude by 25 cm. Nonetheless, tungsten concentrations remained above background to at least 150 cm. Pore-water samples from lysimeters installed in berm areas revealed a range of concentrations (< 1-400 mg/L) elevated with respect to background although there was no discernable trend with depth. Groundwater monitoring well samples collected approximately 30 m below ground surface showed tungsten (0.001-0.56 mg/L) attributable to range use.

  18. Molybdenum distribution and sensitivity in tomatoes, sunflowers and beans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hecht-Buchholz, C

    1973-01-01

    The influence of increasing levels of molybdenum on the growth, molybdenum uptake and distribution in individual plant organs was investigated in tomatoes, beans and sunflowers in a 9 day trial. With tomatoes, which showed marked damage with high molybdenum levels, the molybdenum content of dry matter was highest in the leaf and lowest in the stem. On the other hand, beans, insensitive towards the high molybdenum level, dry matter molybdenum content was appreciably higher in the stem than in the leaf. It is supposed that in plant species, insensitive to high molybdenum levels, molybdenum is held less firmly in this tissue and can attain damaging levels in the cytoplasm of the youngest leaf tissue cells. It is supposed, on the basis of the reactions which were carried out with expressed root juice and on the basis of the yellow coloration attainable in vitro in the tissue caused by the addition of molybdate solution, that the yellow coloration appearing in the cells and plant organs of various plant species, here tomatoes and sunflowers, with high molybdenum levels is due to a reaction between molybdenum and polyvalent phenols in cellsap.

  19. Combustion of powdery tungsten in pyrotechnic mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, G.V.; Reshetov, A.A.; Viktorenko, A.M.; Surkov, V.G.; Karmadonov, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    The basic regularities of tungsten burning (powder 2-5 μm) with oxidizers most typical for pyrotechnics: nitrates, lead and barium peroxides (powder, 2-8 μm) and potassium perchlorate (powder, 2-8 μm) are studied. Dependences of burning rate as a function of pressure and ratio of components are established. It is supposed that tungsten burning in mixtures with the mentioned nitrates is a complex and multistage process the rate of which is determined by tungsten dissolution in nitrate melts. Analysis of burning products using available methods is complex

  20. Characterization of porous tungsten by microhardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selcuk, C.; Wood, J.V.; Morley, N.; Bentham, R.

    2001-01-01

    One of the applications of tungsten is as high current density dispenser cathode in the form of porous tungsten. It is used as a cathode after being impregnated with an electron emissive material so pore distribution in the part is the most important parameter for its function as a uniform and controlled porosity will lead to a better performance. In this study, application of microhardness as a characterization method for uniformity of the pore distribution and homogeneity of the structure is introduced. Optical microscopy and SEM is used to relate the results and porous tungsten structure for a better understanding of the method applied. (author)

  1. Corrosion of oxide dispersion strengthened iron–chromium steels and tantalum in fluoride salt coolant: An in situ compatibility study for fusion and fusion–fission hybrid reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph; Ferreira, James; Serrano de Caro, Magdalena; Rubenchik, Alexander; Kimura, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► ODS steel corrosion in molten fluoride salts was studied in situ using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ► Steel/coolant interfacial resistance increases from 600 to 800 °C due to an aluminum enriched layer forming at the surface. ► The addition of tungsten to ODS steels increases corrosion resistance measurably at 600 °C. - Abstract: Primary candidate classes of materials for future nuclear power plants, whether they be fission, fusion or hybrids, include oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels which rely on a dispersion of nano-oxide particles in the matrix for both mechanical strength and swelling resistance, or tantalum alloys which have an inherent neutron-induced swelling resistance and high temperature strength. For high temperature operation, eutectic molten lithium containing fluoride salts are attractive because of their breeding capability as well as their relatively high thermal capacity, which allow for a higher average operating temperature that increases power production. In this paper we test the compatibility of Flinak (LiF–NaF–KF) salts on ODS steels, comparing the performance of current generation ODS steels developed at Kyoto University with the commercial alloy MA956. Pure tantalum was also tested for comparative purposes. In situ data was obtained for temperatures ranging from 600 to 900 °C using a custom-built high temperature electrochemical impedance spectroscopy cell. Results for ODS steels show that steel/coolant interfacial resistance increases from 600 to 800 °C due to an aluminum enriched layer forming at the surface, however an increase in temperature to 900 °C causes this layer to break up and aggressive attack to occur. Performance of current generation ODS steels surpassed that of the MA956 ODS steel, with an in situ impedance behavior similar or better than that of pure tantalum.

  2. Tungsten ion implantation of aluminum for improved resistance to pitting corrosion -- electrochemical testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, P.P.; Buchanan, R.A.; Williams, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The greatly accelerated localized corrosion of aluminum in salt solutions has been observed and combated for many years. The susceptibility to pitting attack has been linked to the presence of chloride ions in the solution. Alloying additions to aluminum for improved corrosion resistance are restricted due to its limited solubility for passivating species such as chromium and molybdenum. However, many recent attempts to produce non-equilibrium alloys with these and other species, both through sputtering techniques and by rapid solidification, have met with very promising pitting resistance enhancements. The most dramatic increase in passivity is demonstrated by a thin co-sputtered film of Al and 9 atomic percent W, in which the pitting potential is increased by 2600 m V relative to pure Al. Recent efforts to extrapolate the promising W-Al thin film results to a bulk aluminum alloy using tungsten ion implantation are discussed here

  3. Kinetics of molybdenum reduction to molybdenum blue by Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, A R; Bakar, N A; Halmi, M I E; Johari, W L W; Ahmad, S A; Jirangon, H; Syed, M A; Shukor, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v) glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30 °C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS) such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong's constants p max, K(s), S(m), and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr(-1), 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution.

  4. Evaluation of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum and molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.J.; Bianco, R.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum alloys being developed for high temperature applications possess excellent high temperature strength and creep resistance. In addition they exhibit a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBIT) in the worked and stress-relieved condition under longitudinal tensile load well below room temperature. However, in the recrystallized condition, the DBTT maybe near or above room temperature, depending on the volume fraction of oxide dispersion and the amount of prior work. Dilute rhenium additions (7 and 14 wt.%) to ODS molybdenum were evaluated to determine their effect on low temperature ductility. The addition of 7 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum did not significantly enhance the mechanical properties. However, the addition of 14 wt.% rhenium to the ODS molybdenum resulted in a DBTT well below room temperature in both the stress-relieved and recrystallized condition. Additionally, the tensile strength of ODS Mo-14Re is greater than the base ODS molybdenum at 1,000 to 1,250 C

  5. Low activation ferritic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  6. Study of the molybdenum retention in alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, Maria V.; Mondino, Angel V.; Manzini, Alberto

    2002-01-01

    The Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission routinely produces 99 Mo by fission of highly enriched uranium contained in targets irradiated in RA-3 reactor. The current process begins with the dissolution of the irradiated target in a basic media, considering the possibility of changing the targets, it could be convenient to dissolve them in acid media. The use of alumina as a first separation step in acid dissolution processes is already known although it is necessary to determine both the type of alumina to be used and the separation conditions. The study of molybdenum retention in alumina was performed at laboratory scale, using Mo-99 as radiotracer. Different kinds of alumina were tried, varying charge solution acidity. Influence of uranium concentration in the loading solution on molybdenum retention was also studied. (author)

  7. Evaluation of a molybdenum assay canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshizumi, T.T.; Keener, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a commercial molybdenum assay canister were evaluated. The geometrical variation of the technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc) activity reading was studied as a function of the elution volume for the standard vials. It was found that the /sup 99m/Tc canister activity reading was ∼ 5% lower than that of the standard method. This is due to attenuation by the canister wall. However, the effect of the geometric variation on the clinical dose preparation was found to be insignificant. The molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) contamination level was compared by two methods: (1) the commercial canister and (2) the standard assay kit. The 99 Mo contamination measurements with the canister indicated consistently lower readings than those with the standard 99 Mo assay kit. The authors conclude that the canister may be used in the clinical settings. However, the user must be aware of the problems and the limitations associated with this canister

  8. Electrical resistivity of sputtered molybdenum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, J.

    1980-01-01

    The electrical resistivity of r.f. sputtered molybdenum films of thickness 5-150 nm deposited on oxidized silicon substrates was resolved into the three electron scattering components: isotropic background scattering, scattering at grain boundaries and scattering at surfaces. It was concluded that the isotropic background scattering is almost equal to that of bulk molybdenum and is not influenced by sputtering and annealing conditions. When the film thickness is sufficient that surface scattering can be ignored, the decrease in film resistivity after annealing is caused by the decrease in scattering at the grain boundaries for zero bias sputtered films, and is caused by an increase of the grain diameter for r.f. bias sputtered films. (Auth.)

  9. Investigation of molybdenum pentachloride interaction with chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salyulev, A.B.; Vovkotrub, Eh.G.; Strekalovskij, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    In Raman spectra of molybdenum pentachloride solutions in liquid chlorine lines were recorded in case of 397, 312, 410, 217 and 180 cm - 1 vibrations of ν 1 (A 1 '), ν 2 (A 1 '), ν 5 (E'), ν 6 (E') and ν 8 (E'') monomer (symmetry D 3h ) molecules of MoCl 5 . Interaction of molten molybdenum pentachloride with chlorine at increased (up to 6 MPa) pressures of Cl 2 was studied. In Raman spectra of its vapour distillation in liquid chlorine alongside with MoCl 5 lines appearance of new lines at 363 and 272 cm -1 , similar in their frequency to the ones calculated for the vibrations ν 1 (A 1g ) and ν 2 (E g ) of MoCl 6 molecules (symmetry O h ), was observed

  10. The electrodeposition of niobium on tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.G.

    1977-03-01

    The electrodeposition of niobium on a tungsten substrate has been demonstrated by electrolysis of an alkali metal fluoride melt. The deposit produced was non-porous, coherent and formed a good bond to the substrate. (author)

  11. Modeling of hydrogen desorption from tungsten surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guterl, J., E-mail: jguterl@ucsd.edu [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Smirnov, R.D. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Nuclear Research National University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Uberuaga, B.; Voter, A.F.; Perez, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 8754 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Hydrogen retention in metallic plasma-facing components is among key-issues for future fusion devices. For tungsten, which has been chosen as divertor material in ITER, hydrogen desorption parameters experimentally measured for fusion-related conditions show large discrepancies. In this paper, we therefore investigate hydrogen recombination and desorption on tungsten surfaces using molecular dynamics simulations and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to analyze adsorption states, diffusion, hydrogen recombination into molecules, and clustering of hydrogen on tungsten surfaces. The quality of tungsten hydrogen interatomic potential is discussed in the light of MD simulations results, showing that three body interactions in current interatomic potential do not allow to reproduce hydrogen molecular recombination and desorption. Effects of surface hydrogen clustering on hydrogen desorption are analyzed by introducing a kinetic model describing the competition between surface diffusion, clustering and recombination. Different desorption regimes are identified and reproduce some aspects of desorption regimes experimentally observed.

  12. SINTERED REFRACTORY TUNGSTEN ALLOYS. Gesinterte hochschmelzende wolframlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieffer, R.; Sedlatschek, K.; Braun, H.

    1971-12-15

    Dependence of the melting point of the refractory metals on their positions in the periodic system - alloys of tungsten with other refractory metals - sintering of the alloys - processing of the alloys - technological properties.

  13. A solid tungsten divertor for ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, A; Greuner, H; Jaksic, N; Böswirth, B; Maier, H; Neu, R; Vorbrugg, S

    2011-01-01

    The conceptual design of a solid tungsten divertor for ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) is presented. The Div-III design is compatible with the existing divertor structure. It re-establishes the energy and heat receiving capability of a graphite divertor and overcomes the limitations of tungsten coatings. In addition, a solid tungsten divertor allows us to investigate erosion and bulk deuterium retention as well as test castellation and target tilting. The design criteria as well as calculations of forces due to halo and eddy currents are presented. The thermal properties of the proposed sandwich structure are calculated with finite element method models. After extensive testing of a target tile in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS, two solid tungsten tiles were installed in AUG for in-situ testing.

  14. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  15. Tungsten: A Preliminary Environmental Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Tungsten Effects on Soil Microbial Communities BUILDING STRONG® Actinobacteria Bacteroidetes Firmicutes alpha-Proteobacteria beta-Proteobacteria gamma...Persistence of Actinobacteria & gamma- Proteobacteria • Actinobacteria – includes the actinomycetes  γ-Proteobacteria – includes a variety of microbes

  16. Molybdenum-99 supply: a global issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cote, R.V.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the global supply of Molybdenum 99 used in nuclear medicine. Following a disruption in supplies of isotopes in the last few years, a Canadian expert panel assessed the most viable options for securing a sustainable supply of Technitium 99 over the medium to long term. The general recommendations were to strive for diversity and redundancy throughout the supply chain, leverage multi-use infrastructure, continue with international coordination and seek processing standardization within North America.

  17. Reaction between molybdenum hexafluoride and carboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shustov, L.D.; Nikolenko, L.N.; Senchenkova, T.M.

    1983-01-01

    Trifluoromethyl derivatives of pyridine, imidazole and difluoromethane are synthesized during interaction of MoF 6 surplUs (190-210 deg) with nicotine-isomicotine-, 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic-, 4,5-imidazoledicarboxyclic- and diffluoroacetic acids. The yield of trifluoromethyl derivatives attains 84%. Molybdenum hexafluoride offers some advantages in comparisoo with toxic SF 4 . MoF 6 toxicity is low; leakage of MoF 6 vapors is easily detected

  18. Statistics of grain misorientations in molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybin, V V; Titovets, Yu F; Teplitskij, D M; Zolotorevskij, N Yu

    1982-03-01

    Sets of misorientations between neighbouring grains for three recrystallized molybdenum polycrystals differing in purity, phase composition and prehistory are experimentally determined. The data obtained are analyzed according to modern representations of intergrain boundary structure. In the two materials among the three mentioned above the share of boundaries close to special boundaries with high density of coinciding points turned to be 1.5 times higher than in the polycrystal with chaotic distribution of grains by orientations.

  19. Biomass as biosorbent for molybdenum ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaura, Mitiko; Santos, Jacinete L. dos; Damasceno, Marcos O.; Egute, Nayara dos S.; Moraes, Adeniane A.N.; Santos, Bruno Z., E-mail: myamaura@ipen.br, E-mail: jlsantos@ipen.br, E-mail: molidam@ipen.br, E-mail: nayara.egute@usp.br, E-mail: adenianemrs@ig.com.br, E-mail: bzsantos@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Biosorbents have been focused as renewable materials of low cost, and have been used for metal removal from the wastewater by adsorption phenomenon. Biosorbents are prepared of biomass, whose reactive sites in its chemical structure have affinity to bind to metal ions. In this work, performance of corn husk, sugarcane bagasse, coir, banana peel, fish scale, chitin and chitosan as biosorbents of molybdenum (VI) ions in aqueous medium was evaluated. The adsorption experiments were investigated in a batch system varying the pH solution from 0.5 to 12 and the contact time between the phases from 2 min to 70 min. {sup 99}Mo radioisotope was used as radioactive tracer for analysis of molybdenum ions by gamma spectroscopy using a HPGe detector. Results revealed that acidity of the solution favored the adsorption of Mo (VI) ions on the all biosorbents. Adsorption values higher than 85% were found on sugarcane bagasse, coir, corn husk, chitin and chitosan at pH 2.0. Only the chitosan was dissolved at pH 0.5 and a gel was formed. The models of pseudo-second order and external film diffusion described the kinetics of adsorption of Mo ions on the coir. This work showed that the studied biomass has high potential to be used as biosorbent of molybdenum ions from acidic wastewater, and the kinetics of Mo adsorption on the coir suggested high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. (author)

  20. Biomass as biosorbent for molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaura, Mitiko; Santos, Jacinete L. dos; Damasceno, Marcos O.; Egute, Nayara dos S.; Moraes, Adeniane A.N.; Santos, Bruno Z.

    2013-01-01

    Biosorbents have been focused as renewable materials of low cost, and have been used for metal removal from the wastewater by adsorption phenomenon. Biosorbents are prepared of biomass, whose reactive sites in its chemical structure have affinity to bind to metal ions. In this work, performance of corn husk, sugarcane bagasse, coir, banana peel, fish scale, chitin and chitosan as biosorbents of molybdenum (VI) ions in aqueous medium was evaluated. The adsorption experiments were investigated in a batch system varying the pH solution from 0.5 to 12 and the contact time between the phases from 2 min to 70 min. 99 Mo radioisotope was used as radioactive tracer for analysis of molybdenum ions by gamma spectroscopy using a HPGe detector. Results revealed that acidity of the solution favored the adsorption of Mo (VI) ions on the all biosorbents. Adsorption values higher than 85% were found on sugarcane bagasse, coir, corn husk, chitin and chitosan at pH 2.0. Only the chitosan was dissolved at pH 0.5 and a gel was formed. The models of pseudo-second order and external film diffusion described the kinetics of adsorption of Mo ions on the coir. This work showed that the studied biomass has high potential to be used as biosorbent of molybdenum ions from acidic wastewater, and the kinetics of Mo adsorption on the coir suggested high-affinity adsorption governed by chemisorption. (author)

  1. Preparation of single phase molybdenum boride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camurlu, Hasan Erdem

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Formation of Mo and a mixture of molybdenum boride phases take place in preparation of molybdenum borides. → It is intricate to prepare single phase molybdenum borides. → Formation of single phase MoB from MoO 3 + B 2 O 3 + Mg mixtures has not been reported previously. → Single phase MoB was successfully prepared through a combination of mechanochemical synthesis and annealing process. - Abstract: The formation of MoB through volume combustion synthesis (VCS), and through mechanochemical synthesis (MCS) followed by annealing has been investigated. MoO 3 , B 2 O 3 and Mg were used as reactants while MgO and NaCl were introduced as diluents. Products were leached in dilute HCl solution and were subjected to X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations. Mo was the major phase component in the VCS products under all the experimental conditions. Mo 2 B, MoB, MoB 2 and Mo 2 B 5 were found as minor phases. Products of MCS contained a mixture of Mo 2 B, MoB, MoB 2 and Mo. After annealing the MCS product at 1400 deg. C for 3 h, single phase α-MoB was obtained.

  2. Weldability of powder-metallurgy molybdenum with low oxygen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Yutaka; Okada, Masatoshi

    1987-01-01

    Relationships between the formation of weld pores and the chemical compositions in powder-metallurgy molybdenum were investigated. It is suggested that almost 100% of Ca and Mg form oxides. In contrast, Fe, Ni, Cr and Al, Si only partly form oxides. A powder-metallurgy molybdenum containing less than 84 at.ppm oxygen did not show any large weld pores. The reduction of the oxygen content was achieved by purifying the molybdenum powder. (orig.) [de

  3. Molybdenum(6) complexing with ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid from PMR spectroscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larchenko, V.E.; Kovaleva, I.B.; Mitrofanova, N.D.; Martynenko, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    Methods of high resolution PMR spectroscopy and pH potentiometry are used to study molybdenum(6) complexing with ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid in aqueous solutions. It is shown that molybdenum(6) interacts with ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid in the narrow range of pH values 4.0-6.5, where MoO 3 H 2 L 2 - and MoO 3 HL 3- complexes with asymmetrical structure are formed. Composition and structure of molybdenum(6) ethylenediaminedisuccinates and ethylenediaminetetraacetates are compared

  4. Deformation localization and cyclic strength in polycrystalline molybdenum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidorov, O.T.; Rakshin, A.F.; Fenyuk, M.I.

    1983-06-01

    Conditions of deformation localization and its interrelation with cyclic strength in polycrystalline molybdenum were investigated. A fatigue failure of polycrystalline molybdenum after rolling and in an embrittled state reached by recrystallization annealing under cyclic bending at room temperature takes place under nonuniform distribution of microplastic strain resulting in a temperature rise in separate sections of more than 314 K. More intensive structural changes take place in molybdenum after rolling than in recrystallized state.

  5. Tungsten metallizing alumina--yttria ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, R.E.; Stoddard, S.D.

    1977-03-01

    The ease with which high-alumina bodies may be metallized with tungsten is improved by additions of yttria to the alumina. Mechanisms of this bonding process were studied by use of optical and electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and tensile tests. Variables studied included yttria content of the body and the firing temperature during metallizing. The study showed that a reaction between the tungsten and the yttrogarnet grain boundary phase markedly improved adherence

  6. Strain aging in tungsten heavy alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowding, R.J.; Tauer, K.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on tungsten heavy alloys which are two-phase mixtures of body center cubic (BCC) tungsten surrounded by a face center cubic (FCC) matrix. The matrix is most often composed of nickel and iron in a ratio of 70:30 but, occasionally, the matrix may also contain cobalt or copper. Nickel, however, is always the primary matrix component. The tungsten heavy alloy is fabricated through powder metallurgy techniques. Elemental powders are blended, pressed to shape, and sintered. Depending upon the tungsten content, the sintering temperatures are usually in the range of 1450 degrees C to 1525 degrees C. These temperatures are high enough that, as a result, the matrix is at the liquid phase and the process is known as liquid phase sintering. At the liquid phase temperature, the matrix becomes saturated with tungsten, but this does not change the FCC character of the matrix. The sintering is usually done in a hydrogen atmosphere furnace in order to reduce the oxides on the tungsten powder surfaces and create clean, active surfaces which will enhance the adherence between the tungsten and the matrix. The hydrogen atmosphere also creates the presence of excess dissolved hydrogen in the alloy. It has been shown that the hydrogen degrades the toughness and ductility of the heavy alloy. A post-sintering vacuum heat treatment is generally required to insure that there is no residual hydrogen present. The as-sintered tensile strength of a 90% tungsten, 7% nickel, 3% iron alloy (90W) is in the range of 800 to 940 MPa and can be increased significantly by cold working, usually rolling or swaging. Swaging to reductions in area of 20% can result in tensile strengths of 1250 MPa or more. As the strength increases, the elongation, which may have been 30% or more, decreases to less than 5%

  7. Problems of tungsten crack resistance optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babak, A.V.; Uskov, E.I.

    1986-01-01

    Technically pure and precipitation-hardening tungsten is studied for its crack resistance in the initial and hardened states at the temperatures of 20...2000 deg C. Results of the study are presented. It is shown that hardening of tungsten base alloys in oil from the temperature corresponding to the upper boundary of the temperature region of ductile-brittle transition increases a crack propagation resistance of the studied materias at elevated and high temperatures

  8. Tungsten foil laminate for structural divertor applications – Analyses and characterisation of tungsten foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Jens; Rieth, Michael; Dafferner, Bernhard; Hoffmann, Andreas; Yi Xiaoou; Armstrong, David E.J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been attempted for several years to synthesise a tungsten material with a low brittle-to-ductile transition temperature and a high fracture toughness that can be used for structural parts. It was shown in our previous work that tungsten foil is ductile at room temperature and that this ductility can be transformed to bulk by synthesising a tungsten laminate. In this work we want to focus on tungsten foil and assess the microstructure as well as the mechanical properties of the foil. The assessment of the microstructure of 0.1 mm tungsten foil will be performed using electron microscopy. It will be shown that the grains of the tungsten foil have a dimension of 0.5 μm × 3 μm × 15 μm and a clear texture in (1 0 0) 〈0 1 1〉. This texture becomes even more pronounced by annealing. Three-point-bending tests with tungsten foil, as-received, will define the barriers: ductile at room temperature and brittle in liquid nitrogen (−196 °C). This shows that the ductility is a thermally activated process. Recrystallised tungsten foil (annealed for 1 h/2700 °C) shows ductile material behaviour at 200 °C. The paper closes with a discussion on the reasons of the ductility of 0.1 mm tungsten foil. These might be the ultra fine grained (UFG) microstructure or, in other words, a nano microstructure (see tungsten foil as-received), the high amount of mobile edge dislocations, and/or the foil effect, which means that dislocations can move to the surface and are annihilated (see tungsten foil recrystallised).

  9. Substitution of thoriated tungsten electrodes in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, H.; Piller, G.

    2006-01-01

    Thoriated tungsten electrodes are frequently used for inert gas welding (TIG/WIG). The use of these electrodes can lead to doses which are well above the limit for the general population (1mSv/year). This has been shown by different investigations, for example from the ''Berufsgenossenschaft''. With these findings in mind, the regulatory authorities (Swiss Federal Office of Public Health (SFOPH) and Swiss National Accident Insurance Association (Suva)) started in 1999 to examine the justification of thoriated tungsten electrodes and a possible substitution with products containing no radioactive material. Up to this time, the use of thoriated tungsten electrodes could be justified since no thorium-free products leading to comparable results were available on the market. This was also the reason why the SFOPH approved several types of these electrodes. Discussions with formation centers for welding and inquiries made at welding shops, trading companies and producers showed that in the mean-time thorium-free products with comparable welding specifications and results became available on the market. Since the 1 January 2004, thoriated tungsten electrodes can only be used if the user has obtained the corresponding license from the SFOPH. The use of thoriated tungsten electrodes is thus not completely forbidden, but very strict conditions have to be fulfilled. Up to now and due to the involvement of the relevant partners, the substitution process has not met any problem. Neither trading companies nor users made any opposition and no request for obtaining a license for thoriated tungsten electrodes was made. (orig.)

  10. Sorption of molybdenum by cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneva, N.K.; Oputina, A.G.; Ermolenko, I.N.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of molybdenum on cellulose polyphosphate from acid solutions of ammonium molybdate depending on the phosphorus content in samples, concentration and pH of the solution, sorption time is studied. It is shown that a maximum molybdenum content on the cellulose samples with different phosphorus content is pointed out at an ammonium molybdate concentration 0.02 M. Saturation of the sorption curve is attained at molar ratio of adsrbed molybdenum to phosphorus 1:4. In case of small fillings the compound with molybdenum to phosphorus ratio 1:10 is formed

  11. Separation of uranium from molybdenum by alkyl phosphoric acid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhongshi, Li

    1986-08-01

    The regularities of separation of uranium from molybdenum by alkyl phosphoric acid extraction are described. Two parameters, i.e., density ratio of uranium to molybdenum in organic phase at first stage and density of uranium in raffinate at last stage are presented. The relationship between these parameters and purity of molybdenum and uranium products is given. The method of adjusting and controlling these parameters in experiments and production is worked out. The technical key problem in comprehensive utilization of sedimentary type uranium ore containing molybdenum with close concentration of these to elements has been solved.

  12. X-ray diffraction study of pentachlorides of 5-7 group heavy transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobot, D.V.; Pisarev, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction study of niobiume tantalum, molybdenum, tungsten and rhenium pentachlorides is performed. It is shown that all MCl 5 (M=Nb, Ta, Mo, W and Re) are crystallized in the NbCl 5 structural type and with the exception of TaCl 5 have some polymorphous modifications. The parameters of pentachloride lattices are determined and the frequencies reference in the IR spectrum of tungsten pentachoride is performed

  13. Tungsten Targets the Tumor Microenvironment to Enhance Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Alicia M.; Sabourin, Valérie; Molina, Manuel Flores; Police, Alice M.; Negro Silva, Luis Fernando; Plourde, Dany; Lemaire, Maryse; Ursini-Siegel, Josie; Mann, Koren K.

    2015-01-01

    The number of individuals exposed to high levels of tungsten is increasing, yet there is limited knowledge of the potential human health risks. Recently, a cohort of breast cancer patients was left with tungsten in their breasts following testing of a tungsten-based shield during intraoperative radiotherapy. While monitoring tungsten levels in the blood and urine of these patients, we utilized the 66Cl4 cell model, in vitro and in mice to study the effects of tungsten exposure on mammary tumor growth and metastasis. We still detect tungsten in the urine of patients’ years after surgery (mean urinary tungsten concentration at least 20 months post-surgery = 1.76 ng/ml), even in those who have opted for mastectomy, indicating that tungsten does not remain in the breast. In addition, standard chelation therapy was ineffective at mobilizing tungsten. In the mouse model, tungsten slightly delayed primary tumor growth, but significantly enhanced lung metastasis. In vitro, tungsten did not enhance 66Cl4 proliferation or invasion, suggesting that tungsten was not directly acting on 66Cl4 primary tumor cells to enhance invasion. In contrast, tungsten changed the tumor microenvironment, enhancing parameters known to be important for cell invasion and metastasis including activated fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinases, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We show, for the first time, that tungsten enhances metastasis in an animal model of breast cancer by targeting the microenvironment. Importantly, all these tumor microenvironmental changes are associated with a poor prognosis in humans. PMID:25324207

  14. A study for an electrolytic reduction of tantalum oxide in a LiCl-Li2O molten salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Bin; Park, Byung Heung; Seo, Chung Seok; Kang, Dae Seung; Kwon, Seon Gil; Park, Seong Won

    2005-01-01

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed the Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) to be an innovative technology for handling the PWR spent fuel. As part of ACP, the electrolytic reduction process (ER process) is the electrochemical reduction process of uranium oxide to uranium metal in a molten salt. The ER process has advantages in a technical stability, an economic potential and a good proliferation resistance. KAERI has reported on the good experimental results of an electrochemical reduction of the uranium oxide in a 20 kg HM/batch lab-scale. The ER process can be applicable to the reduction of other metal oxides. Metal tantalum powder has attracted attention for a variety of applications. A tantalum capacitor made from superfine and pliable tantalum powders is very small in size and it has a higher-capacitance part, therefore it is useful for microelectronic devices. By the ER process the metal tantalum can be obtained from tantalum pentoxide. In this work, a 40 g Ta 2 O 5 /batch electrochemical reactor was used for the synthesis of the metal tantalum. From the results of the cyclic voltammograms for the Ta 2 O 5 -LiCl-Li 2 O system, the mechanism of the tantalum reduction in a molten LiCl-Li 2 O salt system was investigated. Tantalum pentoxide is chemically reduced to tantalum metal by the lithium metal which is electrochemically deposited into an integrated cathode assembly in the LiCl-Li 2 O molten salt. The experiments for the tantalum reduction were performed with a chronopotentiometry in the reactor cell, the reduced products were analyzed from an analysis of the X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX). From the results, the electrolytic reduction process is applicable to the synthesis of metal tantalum

  15. Effect of molybdenum and iron supply on molybdenum (99Mo) and iron (59Fe) uptake and activity of certain enzymes in tomato plants grown in sand culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, C.; Agarwala, S.C.

    1979-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. var. Marglobe) plants were raised under controlled sand culture to study the interaction of molybdenum and iron supply on the uptake of molybdenum and iron and activity of certain enzymes affected by iron and/or molybdenum supply. Iron deficiency caused a decrease in the molybdenum uptake and accentuated the effect of molybdenum deficiency in reducing the uptake and more so the translocation of molybdenum from roots to shoots, thus inducing more severe molybdenum deficiency. The deficiency of iron and molybdenum decreased the activity of catalase, succinate dehydrogenase and nitrate reductase, the most marked decrease being found in plants supplied with both iron and molybdenum at low levels. Changes in the activities of nitrate reductase and catalase can be attributed to the interaction of iron and molybdenum supply in their absorption and translocation. (auth.)

  16. On the effect of interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunin, V.M.; Karelin, A.I.; Solov'eva, L.N.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of molybdenum trioxide and magnesium oxide in water was studied. It is shown that molybdenum trioxide forms consecutively magnesium molybdate, dimolybdate and magnesium polymolybdates with magnesium oxide

  17. Electronic Transitions of Tungsten Monosulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L. F.; Chan, Man-Chor; Zou, Wenli; Cheung, Allan S. C.

    2017-06-01

    Electronic transition spectrum of the tungsten monosulfide (WS) molecule in the near infrared region between 725 nm and 885 nm has been recorded using laser ablation/reaction free-jet expansion and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The WS molecule was produced by reacting laser - ablated tungsten atoms with 1% CS_{2} seeded in argon. Fifteen vibrational bands with resolved rotational structure have been recorded and analyzed, which were organized into seven electronic transition systems. The ground state has been identified to be the X^{3}Σ^{-}(0^{+}) state, and the determined vibrational frequency, ΔG_{1/2} and bond length, r_{0}, are respectively 556.7 cm^{-1} and 2.0676 Å. In addition, vibrational bands belong to another transition system involving lower state with Ω = 1 component have also been analyzed. Least-squares fit of the measured line positions yielded molecular constants for the electronic states involved. The low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of WS have been calculated using state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) and followed by MRCISD+Q (internally contracted multi-reference configuration interaction with singles and doubles plus Davidson's cluster correction). The active space consists of 10 electrons in 9 orbitals corresponding to the W 5d6s and S 3p shells. The lower molecular orbitals from W 5s5p and S 3s are inactive but are also correlated, and relativistic effective core potential (RECPs) are adopted to replace the core orbitals with 60 (W) and 10 (S) core electrons, respectively. Spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is calculated via the state-interaction (SI) approach with RECP spin-orbit operators using SA-CASSCF wavefunctions, where the diagonal elements in the SOC matrix are replaced by the corresponding MRCISD+Q energies calculated above. Spectroscopic constants and potential energy curves of the ground and many low-lying Λ-S states and Ω sub-states of the WS molecule are obtained. The calculated

  18. Tribological performance of polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond films on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mahtab; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmed, E.; Malik, Abdul Sattar; Shah, Z. A.; Ahmad, Naseeb; Mehtab, Ujala; Raza, Rizwan

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond coatings have been made on unpolished side of Si (100) wafer by hot filament chemical vapor deposition process. Morphology of the coatings has been found to vary from (111) triangular-facetted to predominantly (111) square-faceted by increasing the concentration of tantalum carbide. The results have been compared to those of a diamond reference coating with no tantalum content. An increase in roughness has been observed with the increase of tantalum carbide (TaC) due to change in morphology of the diamond films. It is noticed that roughness of the coatings increases as grains become more square-faceted. It is found that diamond coatings involving tantalum carbide are not as resistant as diamond films with no TaC content and the coefficient of friction for such coatings with microcrystalline grains can be manipulated to 0·33 under high vacuum of 10-7 Torr. Such a low friction coefficient value enhances tribological behavior of unpolished Si substrates and can possibly be used in sliding applications.

  19. Use of sulfoxides for extraction-gravimetric determination of niobium and tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, A.I.; Babkin, A.G.; Tkachenko, V.G.

    1977-01-01

    An extraction-gravimetrical technique has been developed for determination of niobium and tantalum. The technique permits simultaneous extraction of tantalum and its concentrating in the aqueous phase; the range of Ta concentrations determined is essentially wider than in case of the routine gravimetric methods. The technique is based upon the fact, that tantalum is extracted by sulfoxides from fluorine-sulphate solutions at lower concentration of Hf and at lower ratios between the volumes of organic and aqueous phases than niobium. Two subsequent extractions by 1M sulfoxide solutions provide for practically complete transfer of tantalum into the organic phase, whereas extraction of niobium is only 3-20%. Sufficient recovery of Ta and Nb from organic phases is provided by re-extraction by NH 4 F solution. The technique is suitable for niobium and tantalum determination at the ratios of their pentoxides from 1:100 to 100:1. The disturbing influence of Fe(3) is suppressed by reductions to Fe(2)

  20. Tantalum coating of porous carbon scaffold supplemented with autologous bone marrow stromal stem cells for bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaowei; Zhao, Dewei; Wang, Benjie; Wang, Wei; Kang, Kai; Xie, Hui; Liu, Baoyi; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Zhang, Jinsong; Yang, Zhenming

    2016-03-01

    Porous tantalum metal with low elastic modulus is similar to cancellous bone. Reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) can provide three-dimensional pore structure and serves as the ideal scaffold of tantalum coating. In this study, the biocompatibility of domestic porous tantalum was first successfully tested with bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and for bone tissue repair in vivo. We evaluated cytotoxicity of RVC scaffold and tantalum coating using BMSCs. The morphology, adhesion, and proliferation of BMSCs were observed via laser scanning confocal microscope and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, porous tantalum rods with or without autologous BMSCs were implanted on hind legs in dogs, respectively. The osteogenic potential was observed by hard tissue slice examination. At three weeks and six weeks following implantation, new osteoblasts and new bone were observed at the tantalum-host bone interface and pores. At 12 weeks postporous tantalum with autologous BMSCs implantation, regenerated trabecular equivalent to mature bone was found in the pore of tantalum rods. Our results suggested that domestic porous tantalum had excellent biocompatibility and could promote new bone formation in vivo. Meanwhile, the osteogenesis of porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs was more excellent than only tantalum implantation. Future clinical studies are warranted to verify the clinical efficacy of combined implantation of this domestic porous tantalum associated with autologous BMSCs implantation and compare their efficacy with conventional autologous bone grafting carrying blood vessel in patients needing bone repairing. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  1. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-07-15

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO{sub 2}: N{sub 2}: He), O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis.

  2. Hydrocode analysis of lateral stress gauges in shocked tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, E. J.; Winter, R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Experiments published by other workers, on the resistance change of manganin stress gauges embedded in a lateral orientation in tantalum targets shocked to a range of stresses, have been analysed using an adaptive mesh refinement hydrocode. It was found that for all of the four experiments the shape of the time profile of the computed lateral stress in the mounting layer closely matched the shape of the experimental lateral stress profiles. However, the calculated lateral stresses at the gauge location in the mounting layer are significantly less than the lateral stresses that would have been produced in the target if no gauge had been present. The perturbation caused by the gauge increased as the strength of the applied shock increased. When the perturbations are taken into account values of flow stress that are significantly smaller than those reported in the original research paper are derived. The work shows that the lateral gauge technique can give valuable information on strength provided high resolution simulation is used to compensate for the perturbations caused by the gauges

  3. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of tantalum plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Sidra; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Khaleeq-ur-Rahman, M.; Faizan–ul-Haq

    2013-01-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) of Tantalum (Ta) plasma has been investigated. For this purpose Q-switched Nd: YAG laser pulses (λ∼ 1064 nm, τ∼ 10 ns) of maximum pulse energy of 100 mJ have been employed as an ablation source. Ta targets were exposed under the ambient environment of various gases of Ar, mixture (CO 2 : N 2 : He), O 2 , N 2 , and He under various filling pressure. The emission spectrum of Ta is observed by using LIBS spectrometer. The emission intensity, excitation temperature, and electron number density of Ta plasma have been evaluated as a function of pressure for various gases. Our experimental results reveal that the optical emission intensity, the electron temperature and density are strongly dependent upon the nature and pressure of ambient environment. The SEM analysis of the ablated Ta target has also been carried out to explore the effect of ambient environment on the laser induced grown structures. The growth of grain like structures in case of molecular gases and cone-formation in case of inert gases is observed. The evaluated plasma parameters by LIBS analysis such as electron temperature and the electron density are well correlated with the surface modification of laser irradiated Ta revealed by SEM analysis

  4. Effect of structural transition on magnetic susceptibility of tantalum carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Gusev, A.I.; Rempel', A.A.; Shvejkin, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Ordering of carbon atoms and vacancies in nonmetal sublattice of TaC y is investigated for the first time by methods of magnetic susceptibility and structural neutron diffraction analysis. Measurements of magnetic susceptibility were conducted on high-sensitive magnetic scales in temperature interval of 300 - 1300 K with holding at each temperature up to the establishment of constant, nonchanging in the course of time value of susceptibility x. When investigating x-hardened tantalum carbide within the interval of TaC 0.82 - TaC 0.85 compositions under the conditions of slow heating, it was observed nonrecorded earlier irreversible decrease of susceptibility at temperature of 960 - 1000 K. With further temperature increase T>T tr it was observed at first even and than uneven increase of x value at a temperature of T tr equal to 1090, 1130 and 1150 K for TaC 0.82 , TaC 0.83 and TaC 0.85 respectively. The measuring of magnetic susceptibility of the same samples at temperature decrease reveals the presence of susceptibility temperature hysteresis in the interval of 1070 - 1090, 1100 - 1130 and 1120 - 1150 for TaC 0.82 , TaC 0.83 and TaC 0.85 . Reversible susceptibility jump corresponding to the temperature hysteresis range at dependences of x(T), is connected with equilibrium structural phase transition of order-disorder

  5. Plasma arc melting of titanium-tantalum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, P.; Patterson, R.A.; Haun, R.

    1994-01-01

    Los Alamos has several applications for high temperature, oxidation and liquid-metal corrosion resistant materials. Further, materials property constraints are dictated by a requirement to maintain low density; e.g., less than the density of stainless steel. Liquid metal compatibility and density requirements have driven the research toward the Ti-Ta system with an upper bound of 60 wt% Ta-40 wt% Ti. Initial melting of these materials was performed in a small button arc melter with several hundred grams of material; however, ingot quantities were soon needed. But, refractory metal alloys whose constituents possess very dissimilar densities, melting temperatures and vapor pressures pose significant difficulty and require specialized melting practices. The Ti-Ta alloys fall into this category with the density of tantalum 16.5 g/cc and that of titanium 4.5 g/cc. Melting is further complicated by the high melting point of Ta(3020 C) and the relatively low boiling point of Ti(3287 C). Previous electron beam melting experience with these materials resulted, in extensive vaporization of the titanium and poor chemical homogeneity. Vacuum arc remelting(VAR) was considered as a melting candidate and discarded due to density and vapor pressure issues associated with electron beam. Plasma arc melting offered the ability to supply a cover gas to deal with vapor pressure issues as well as solidification control to help with macrosegregation in the melt and has successfully produced high quality ingots of the Ti-Ta alloys

  6. The dislocation-internal friction peak γ in tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baur, J.; Benoit, W.; Schultz, H.

    1989-01-01

    Torsion-pendulum measurements were carried out on high-purity single crystal specimens of tantalum, having extremely low oxygen contents ( 2 peak, which appears close to γ is small traces of oxygen are presents. The γ 2 peak was formerly explained as a ''dislocation-enhanced Snoek peak''. The γ peak recovers at the peak temperature, whereas the γ 2 peak is more stable. On the basis of their results, and making use of earlier investigations of Rodrian and Schultz, the authors suggest that γ 2 is modified γ relaxation, related to screw-dislocation segments, stabilized by oxygen-decorated kinks. The stability of the γ 2 peak allows an accurate determination of the activation energy, found to be 1.00 +- 0.03 eV. This value is distinctly lower than the activation energy of the oxygen Snoek effect (1.10 eV) and is related here to the mechanism of ''kink-pair formation'' in screw dislocations, as the original γ peak. The numerical value is compatible with recent values derived from flow-stress measurements. The peak γ 2 shows increasing stability with increasing oxygen content. This is explained by single- and multi-decorated kinks

  7. Structures and photocatalytic behavior of tantalum-oxynitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, J.H.; Li, Chuan; Liang, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Tantalum oxynitride films were created by direct nitridation/oxidation during rapid thermal annealing at temperatures 450-700 deg. C. Instead of during deposition, this post process may be proved to be an alternative way to make transition metallic oxynitride films. With sufficient supply of oxygen flow (≥ 30 sccm), TaO x N y was formed as examined from X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. This oxynitride film has a broad optical absorption over the range of visible light and sufficient photocatalytic function. For optical absorption, the films' transmittance and reflectance were measured by a UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer with wavelengths ranging from 300 to 900 nm. The broad visible light absorption is associated with the formation of band gap in TaO x N y film, which was examined by the theoretical calculations combining the Beer-Lambert law and Tauc formula. Lastly, the photocatalysis of TaO x N y was gauged by the photodegradation test which measured the reduction of light absorbance affected by the decomposition of methylene blue (C 16 H 18 N 3 SCl.3H 2 O) on TaO x N y under visible light irradiation.

  8. Multistate Memristive Tantalum Oxide Devices for Ternary Arithmetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wonjoo; Chattopadhyay, Anupam; Siemon, Anne; Linn, Eike; Waser, Rainer; Rana, Vikas

    2016-11-01

    Redox-based resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) offers excellent properties to implement future non-volatile memory arrays. Recently, the capability of two-state ReRAMs to implement Boolean logic functionality gained wide interest. Here, we report on seven-states Tantalum Oxide Devices, which enable the realization of an intrinsic modular arithmetic using a ternary number system. Modular arithmetic, a fundamental system for operating on numbers within the limit of a modulus, is known to mathematicians since the days of Euclid and finds applications in diverse areas ranging from e-commerce to musical notations. We demonstrate that multistate devices not only reduce the storage area consumption drastically, but also enable novel in-memory operations, such as computing using high-radix number systems, which could not be implemented using two-state devices. The use of high radix number system reduces the computational complexity by reducing the number of needed digits. Thus the number of calculation operations in an addition and the number of logic devices can be reduced.

  9. High temperature diffusion of hafnium in tungsten and a tungsten-hafnium carbide alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Y.; Zee, R.H.

    1994-01-01

    Refractory metals and ceramics are used extensively in energy systems due to their high temperature properties. This is particularly important in direct conversion systems where thermal to electric conversion efficiency is a direct function of temperature. Tungsten, which has the highest melting temperature among elemental metals, does not possess sufficient creep resistance at temperature above 1,600 K. Different dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys have been developed to extend the usefulness of tungsten to higher temperatures. One of these alloys, tungsten with 0.4 mole percent of finely dispersed HfC particles (W-HfC), has the optimum properties for high temperature applications. Hafnium carbide is used as the strengthening agent due to its high chemical stability and its compatibility with tungsten. The presence of HfC particles retards the rate of grain growth as well as restricting dislocation motion. Both of which are beneficial for creep resistance. The long term behavior of this alloy depends largely on the evolution of its microstructure which is governed by the diffusion of its constituents. Data on the diffusion of carbon in tungsten and tungsten self-diffusion are available, but no direct measurements have been made on the diffusion of hafnium in tungsten. The only diffusion data available are estimated from a coarsening study and these data are highly unreliable. In this study, the diffusion behavior of hafnium in pure tungsten and in a W-HfC alloy was directly measured by means of Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The selection of the W-HfC alloy is due to its importance in high temperature engineering applications, and its higher recrystallization temperature. The presence of HfC particles in tungsten restricts grain growth resulting in better high temperature creep resistance. The higher recrystallization temperature allows measurements to be made over a wider range of temperatures at a relatively constant grain size

  10. Porous tantalum coatings prepared by vacuum plasma spraying enhance bmscs osteogenic differentiation and bone regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Tang

    Full Text Available Tantalum, as a potential metallic implant biomaterial, is attracting more and more attention because of its excellent anticorrosion and biocompatibility. However, its significantly high elastic modulus and large mechanical incompatibility with bone tissue make it unsuitable for load-bearing implants. In this study, porous tantalum coatings were first successfully fabricated on titanium substrates by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS, which would exert the excellent biocompatibility of tantalum and alleviate the elastic modulus of tantalum for bone tissue. We evaluated cytocompatibility and osteogenesis activity of the porous tantalum coatings using human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs and its ability to repair rabbit femur bone defects. The morphology and actin cytoskeletons of hBMSCs were observed via electron microscopy and confocal, and the cell viability, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of hBMSCs were examined quantitatively by PrestoBlue assay, Ki67 immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR technology and ALP staining. For in vivo detection, the repaired femur were evaluated by histomorphology and double fluorescence labeling 3 months postoperation. Porous tantalum coating surfaces promoted hBMSCs adhesion, proliferation, osteogenesis activity and had better osseointegration and faster new bone formation rate than titanium coating control. Our observation suggested that the porous tantalum coatings had good biocompatibility and could enhance osseoinductivity in vitro and promote new bone formation in vivo. The porous tantalum coatings prepared by VPS is a promising strategy for bone regeneration.

  11. The recovery of tin, and the production of niobium pentoxide and potassium tantalum fluoride, from a tin slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, G.; Tyler, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the results of testwork on the recovery of tin, niobium, and tantalum from a tin slag. The slag, which consisted mainly of amorphous silica, with varying amounts of calcuim, magnesium, manganese, iron, and aluminium, contained an average of 8,8 per cent niobium pentoxide and 6,2 per cent tantalum pentoxide. The metallic tin-ion phase was removed from the crushed slag by magnetic separation. The slag was then leached with hydrochloric acid to remove magnesium, calcium, aluminium, iron, manganese, and the remainder of the tin. Leaching with sodium hydroxide for the removal of silica and phosphorous was followed by a final leach with hydrochloric acid for the removal of sodium. The upgraded concentrate thus obtained was purified by leaching with hydrofluoric acid, solvent extraction of niobium and tantalum into tri-n-butyl phosphate and methyl isobutyl ketone, and selective stripping of niobium with sulphuric acid and tantalum with ammonium floride. Niobium pentoxide and potassium tantalum fluoride were then precipitated by the addition of ammonium hydroxide and potassium fluoride to the respective strip liquors. The overall recoveries in the upgraded concentrate were 98 per cent for tantalum and 92 per cent for niobium. Dissolutions and recoveries of over 99 per cent were obtained for both tantalum and niobium in the purification steps. The niobium pentoxide and potassium tantalum fluoride precipitates obtained were of high purity

  12. Studies on the pressed yttrium oxide-tungsten matrix as a possible dispenser cathode material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Jinshu; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Zhou, Meiling

    2015-01-01

    Yttrium oxide was chosen as the secondary emission substance based on calculation results through first principle theory method. A new kind of pressed yttrium oxide-tungsten matrix dispenser cathodes are prepared by a sol–gel method combined with high temperature sintering in dry hydrogen atmosphere. The results show that the growth of the grains is hampered by the pinning effect of Y 2 O 3 distributing uniformly between the tungsten particles, resulting in the formation of small grain size. It is found that Y 2 O 3 improves the secondary electron emission property, i.e., the secondary emission yield increases with the increase of Y 2 O 3 content in the samples. The maximum secondary emission yield δ max of the cathode with 15% amount of Y 2 O 3 can reach 2.92. Furthermore, the cathode shows a certain thermionic emission performance. The zero field emission current density J 0 of 4.18A/cm 2 has reached at 1050 °C b for this kind of cathode after being activated at 1200 °C b , which are much higher than that of rare earth oxide doped molybdenum (REO-Mo) cathode reported in the previous work. - Highlights: • Yttrium oxide was chosen as the secondary emission substance based on first principle calculation result. • A new kind of cathode has been successfully obtained. • Pressed yttrium oxide-tungsten matrix dispenser cathode exhibits good emission properties. • The improvement of the cathode emission can be well explained by the surface analysis results presented in this work

  13. Studies on the pressed yttrium oxide-tungsten matrix as a possible dispenser cathode material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Liu, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Zhou, Meiling

    2015-01-15

    Yttrium oxide was chosen as the secondary emission substance based on calculation results through first principle theory method. A new kind of pressed yttrium oxide-tungsten matrix dispenser cathodes are prepared by a sol–gel method combined with high temperature sintering in dry hydrogen atmosphere. The results show that the growth of the grains is hampered by the pinning effect of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} distributing uniformly between the tungsten particles, resulting in the formation of small grain size. It is found that Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} improves the secondary electron emission property, i.e., the secondary emission yield increases with the increase of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} content in the samples. The maximum secondary emission yield δ{sub max} of the cathode with 15% amount of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} can reach 2.92. Furthermore, the cathode shows a certain thermionic emission performance. The zero field emission current density J{sub 0} of 4.18A/cm{sup 2} has reached at 1050 °C{sub b} for this kind of cathode after being activated at 1200 °C{sub b}, which are much higher than that of rare earth oxide doped molybdenum (REO-Mo) cathode reported in the previous work. - Highlights: • Yttrium oxide was chosen as the secondary emission substance based on first principle calculation result. • A new kind of cathode has been successfully obtained. • Pressed yttrium oxide-tungsten matrix dispenser cathode exhibits good emission properties. • The improvement of the cathode emission can be well explained by the surface analysis results presented in this work.

  14. Research of the technology of obtaining pure and disperse molybdenum disulfide from molybdenum concentrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovsepyan, A.H.; Israyelyan, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    The technology of obtaining pure and disperse molybdenum disulfide is worked out. The processes of refinement from the flotation reagents and deslimation by means of decantation, refinement of molybdenite concentrate from impurities by selective leaching methods are studied. The optimal regime of technological process is chosen

  15. Well-Defined Molybdenum Oxo Alkyl Complex Supported on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Highly Active Olefin Metathesis Precatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Merle, Nicolas; Le Qué mé ner, Fré dé ric; Bouhoute, Yassine; Szeto, Kai C.; De Mallmann, Aimery; Barman, Samir; Samantaray, Manoja; Delevoye, Laurent; Gauvin, Ré gis M.; Taoufik, Mostafa; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The well-defined silica-supported molybdenum oxo alkyl species (SiO−)MoO(CH Bu) was selectively prepared by grafting of MoO(CH Bu)Cl onto partially dehydroxylated silica (silica) using the surface organometallic chemistry approach. This surface species was fully characterized by elemental analysis and DRIFT, solid-state NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopy. This new material is related to the active species of industrial supported MoO/SiO olefin metathesis catalysts. It displays very high activity in propene self-metathesis at mild (turnover number = 90 000 after 25 h). Remarkably, its catalytic performance outpaces those of the parent imido derivative and its tungsten oxo analogue.

  16. Well-Defined Molybdenum Oxo Alkyl Complex Supported on Silica by Surface Organometallic Chemistry: A Highly Active Olefin Metathesis Precatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Merle, Nicolas

    2016-12-05

    The well-defined silica-supported molybdenum oxo alkyl species (SiO−)MoO(CH Bu) was selectively prepared by grafting of MoO(CH Bu)Cl onto partially dehydroxylated silica (silica) using the surface organometallic chemistry approach. This surface species was fully characterized by elemental analysis and DRIFT, solid-state NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopy. This new material is related to the active species of industrial supported MoO/SiO olefin metathesis catalysts. It displays very high activity in propene self-metathesis at mild (turnover number = 90 000 after 25 h). Remarkably, its catalytic performance outpaces those of the parent imido derivative and its tungsten oxo analogue.

  17. The Effect of Molybdenum Fertilization on Arachis Glabrata Biomass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of molybdenum fertilization on biomass and the number of nodules of Arachis glabrata was assessed at the Teaching and Research Farm of the University of Dschang in 2011 at different periods of mowing. A factorial design comparing four doses of molybdenum as ammonium molybdate (0, 0.75, 1.5 and 2.25 ...

  18. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-01-01

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities

  19. Influence of Soil Solution Salinity on Molybdenum Adsorption by Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molybdenum (Mo) adsorption on five arid-zone soils from California was investigated as a function of equilibrium solution Mo concentration (0-30 mg L-1), solution pH (4-8), and electrical conductivity (EC = 0.3 or 8 dS m-1). Molybdenum adsorption decreased with increasing pH. An adsorption maximum...

  20. Low-temperature heat capacity of molybdenum borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolgar, A.S.; Klinder, A.V.; Novoseletskaya, L.M.; Turov, V.P.; Klochkov, L.A.; Lyashchenko, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Heat capacity of molybdenum borides Mo 2 B, MoB, Mo 2 B 5 is studied for the first time in the 60-300 K range using the adiabatic method. Standard (at 298.15 K) thermodynamic functions (enthalpy, heat capacity, entropy, reduced Gibbs energy) of molybdenum borides are calculated

  1. Evaluation of Ferrite Chip Beads as Surge Current Limiters in Circuits with Tantalum Capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Limiting resistors are currently required to be connected in series with tantalum capacitors to reduce the risk of surge current failures. However, application of limiting resistors decreases substantially the efficiency of the power supply systems. An ideal surge current limiting device should have a negligible resistance for DC currents and high resistance at frequencies corresponding to transients in tantalum capacitors. This work evaluates the possibility of using chip ferrite beads (FB) as such devices. Twelve types of small size FBs from three manufacturers were used to evaluate their robustness under soldering stresses and at high surge current spikes associated with transients in tantalum capacitors. Results show that FBs are capable to withstand current pulses that are substantially greater than the specified current limits. However, due to a sharp decrease of impedance with current, FBs do not reduce surge currents to the required level that can be achieved with regular resistors.

  2. Tantalum(V) impurity extraction by octanol from niobium(V) fluoride solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majorov, V.G.; Nikolaev, A.I.; Kopkov, V.K.

    2002-01-01

    The conditions of the niobium and tantalum extraction separation by octanol in the fluoride solutions, depending on the metals and free hydrofluoric acid concentration as well as on the organic and water phases voluminous relation, are studied for the purpose of developing the technology of niobium deep purification from the tantalum impurities. The technological scheme of the niobium solutions(V) extraction purification from the tantalum impurities(V), which provides for obtaining the niobium oxide(V), containing less than 0.005 mass % Ta 2 O 5 , is proposed on the basis of the established optimal separation conditions. The possibility of using the developed technology by the pyrochlore reprocessing is indicated [ru

  3. An exploration in mineral supply chain mapping using tantalum as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Menzie, W. David; Papp, John F.; Yager, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    This report uses the supply chain of tantalum (Ta) to investigate the complexity of mineral and metal supply chains in general and show how they can be mapped. A supply chain is made up of all the manufacturers, suppliers, information networks, and so forth, that provide the materials and parts that go into making up a final product. The mineral portion of the supply chain begins with mineral material in the ground (the ore deposit); extends through a series of processes that include mining, beneficiation, processing (smelting and refining), semimanufacture, and manufacture; and continues through transformation of the mineral ore into concentrates, refined mineral commodities, intermediate forms (such as metals and alloys), component parts, and, finally, complex products. This study analyses the supply chain of tantalum beginning with minerals in the ground to many of the final goods that contain tantalum.

  4. Tantalum and niobium carbides obtention by carbothermic reduction of columbotantalite ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordo, E.; Garcia-Carcedo, F.; Torralba, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Tantalum and niobium carbides are characterized by its high hardness and chemical corrosion resistance. Both carbides, but mainly TaC, are used in hard metals (sintered carbides), together with their carbides, to manufacture cutting tools and dies in special machining applications involving mechanical shock at high temperature. Its use as reinforcement of wear resistant materials through powder metallurgy techniques are being investigated. However, the use of TaC is usually limited because of its high cost. Therefore tantalum carbide with niobium content, which is cheaper, is used. In this work the obtention of complex tantalum and niobium carbides from a Spanish columbotantalite ore is studied through relatively cheap and simple process as it is carbothermic reduction. Concentration of the ore, its reduction and the characterization of products are described. (Author) 11 refs

  5. Assembly of tantalum porous films with graded oxidation profile from size-selected nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vidyadhar; Grammatikopoulos, Panagiotis; Cassidy, Cathal; Benelmekki, Maria; Bohra, Murtaza; Hawash, Zafer; Baughman, Kenneth W.; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2014-05-01

    Functionally graded materials offer a way to improve the physical and chemical properties of thin films and coatings for different applications in the nanotechnology and biomedical fields. In this work, design and assembly of nanoporous tantalum films with a graded oxidation profile perpendicular to the substrate surface are reported. These nanoporous films are composed of size-selected, amorphous tantalum nanoparticles, deposited using a gas-aggregated magnetron sputtering system, and oxidized after coalescence, as samples evolve from mono- to multi-layered structures. Molecular dynamics computer simulations shed light on atomistic mechanisms of nanoparticle coalescence, which govern the films porosity. Aberration-corrected (S) TEM, GIXRD, AFM, SEM, and XPS were employed to study the morphology, phase and oxidation profiles of the tantalum nanoparticles, and the resultant films.

  6. Recovery of metal values and hydrofluoric acid from tantalum and columbium waste sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bielecki, E.; Romberger, K.; Bakke, B.; Hobin, M.A.; Clark, C.

    1992-01-01

    A metallurgical processing system for economically recovering metal values, such as columbium, tantalum, thorium, and uranium from dilute source solids, such as digestion sludges, by a series of steps including: (1) slurrying the source solids with dilute hydrofluoric acid to produce a solid phase and a liquid phase containing dissolved tantalum and columbium, then extracting tantalum and/or columbium from the liquid phase by means of a liquid ion-exchange process and then, additionally; (2) roasting the solid phase with sulfuric acid to recover and recycle hydrofluoric acid, leaching the roasted solids with dilute sulfuric acid to produce a disposable solid phase and a liquid phase containing thorium and uranium, and extracting thorium and uranium from the liquid phase by means of a liquid-liquid amine extraction process

  7. Kinetics of Molybdenum Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by Bacillus sp. Strain A.rzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Othman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum is very toxic to agricultural animals. Mo-reducing bacterium can be used to immobilize soluble molybdenum to insoluble forms, reducing its toxicity in the process. In this work the isolation of a novel molybdate-reducing Gram positive bacterium tentatively identified as Bacillus sp. strain A.rzi from a metal-contaminated soil is reported. The cellular reduction of molybdate to molybdenum blue occurred optimally at 4 mM phosphate, using 1% (w/v glucose, 50 mM molybdate, between 28 and 30°C and at pH 7.3. The spectrum of the Mo-blue product showed a maximum peak at 865 nm and a shoulder at 700 nm. Inhibitors of bacterial electron transport system (ETS such as rotenone, sodium azide, antimycin A, and potassium cyanide could not inhibit the molybdenum-reducing activity. At 0.1 mM, mercury, copper, cadmium, arsenic, lead, chromium, cobalt, and zinc showed strong inhibition on molybdate reduction by crude enzyme. The best model that fitted the experimental data well was Luong followed by Haldane and Monod. The calculated value for Luong’s constants pmax, Ks, Sm, and n was 5.88 μmole Mo-blue hr−1, 70.36 mM, 108.22 mM, and 0.74, respectively. The characteristics of this bacterium make it an ideal tool for bioremediation of molybdenum pollution.

  8. Tungsten or Wolfram: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoroddu, Maria A; Medici, Serenella; Peana, Massimiliano; Nurchi, Valeria M; Lachowicz, Joanna I; Laulicht-Glickc, Freda; Costa, Max

    2018-01-01

    Tungsten or wolfram was regarded for many years as an enemy within the tin smelting and mining industry, because it conferred impurity or dirtiness in tin mining. However, later it was considered an amazing metal for its strength and flexibility, together with its diamond like hardness and its melting point which is the highest of any metal. It was first believed to be relatively inert and an only slightly toxic metal. Since early 2000, the risk exerted by tungsten alloys, its dusts and particulates to induce cancer and several other adverse effects in animals as well as humans has been highlighted from in vitro and in vivo experiments. Thus, it becomes necessary to take a careful look at all the most recent data reported in the scientific literature, covering the years 2001-2016. In fact, the findings indicate that much more attention should be devoted to thoroughly investigate the toxic effects of tungsten and the involved mechanisms of tungsten metal or tungsten metal ions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Surface morphologies of He-implanted tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, M.E., E-mail: bannisterme@ornl.gov [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Meyer, F.W.; Hijazi, H. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Unocic, K.A.; Garrison, L.M.; Parish, C.M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Surface morphologies of tungsten surfaces, both polycrystalline and single-crystal [1 1 0], were investigated using SEM and FIB/SEM techniques after implantations at elevated surfaces temperatures (1200–1300 K) using well-characterized, mono-energetic He ion beams with a wide range of ion energies (218 eV–250 keV). Nanofuzz was observed on polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) following implantation of 100-keV He ions at a flux threshold of 0.9 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}, but not following 200-keV implantations with similar fluxes. No nanofuzz formation was observed on single-crystal [1 1 0] tungsten (SCW), despite fluxes exceeding those demonstrated previously to produce nanofuzz on polycrystalline tungsten. Pre-damaging the single-crystal tungsten with implanted C impurity interstitials did not significantly affect the surface morphologies resulting from the high-flux He ion implantations. The main factor leading to the different observed surface structures for the pristine and C-implanted single-crystal W samples appeared to be the peak He ion flux characterizing the different exposures. It was speculated that nanofuzz formation was not observed for any SCW target exposures because of increased incubation fluences required for such targets.

  10. Behaviour of helium after implantation in molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viaud, C.; Maillard, S.; Carlot, G.; Valot, C.; Gilabert, E.; Sauvage, T.; Peaucelle, C.; Moncoffre, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study deals with the behaviour of helium in a molybdenum liner dedicated to the retention of fission products. More precisely this work contributes to evaluate the release of implanted helium when the gas has precipitated into nanometric bubbles close to the free surface. A simple model dedicated to calculate the helium release in such a condition is presented. The specificity of this model lays on the assumption that the gas is in equilibrium with a simple distribution of growing bubbles. This effort is encouraging since the calculated helium release fits an experimental dataset with a set of parameters in good agreement with the literature

  11. Spectra from foil-excited molybdenum ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Cecchi, J.L.; Kruse, T.H.

    1978-01-01

    The extreme-ultraviolet spectra (5 to 55 nm) for foil-excited molybdenum ions have been measured using 22 to 200 MeV beams from the Brookhaven National Laboratory MP tandem Van de Graaff accelerator facility, 20 μg/cm 2 C stripping foils, and a grazing incidence spectrometer. The mean ion charge states (13 to 28) and the narrow distribution widths (about 2 charge states) were accurately predictable from experimental parameters. Where possible, comparisons are given with Mo radiation from tokamaks, vacuum sparks, and laser-excited plasmas

  12. Molybdenum protective coatings adhesion to steel substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesman, A. I.; Postnikov, D. V.; Polonyankin, D. A.; Teplouhov, A. A.; Tyukin, A. V.; Tkachenko, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Protection of the critical parts, components and assemblies from corrosion is an urgent engineering problem and many other industries. Protective coatings’ forming on surface of metal products is a promising way of corrosionprevention. The adhesion force is one of the main characteristics of coatings’ durability. The paper presents theoretical and experimental adhesion force assessment for coatings formed by molybdenum magnetron sputtering ontoa steel substrate. Validity and reliability of results obtained by simulation and sclerometry method allow applying the developed model for adhesion force evaluation in binary «steel-coating» systems.

  13. MHD simulations of molybdenum X-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanenkov, G.V.; Stepnevski, V.

    2002-01-01

    One investigates into compression of molybdenum X-pinches applying numerical MHD-models with parabolic and conical initial geometry. The second model describing plasma axial motion in greater detail offers a real geometry of a discharge and is applicable to loads characterized by higher masses in contrast to the first one. Both models enabled to describe all basic phases of compression including origination of a minidiode, occurrence of a narrow neck, microexplosion of a hot point and origination of shock waves followed by sausage instability [ru

  14. Hot rolling of thick uranium molybdenum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMint, Amy L.; Gooch, Jack G.

    2015-11-17

    Disclosed herein are processes for hot rolling billets of uranium that have been alloyed with about ten weight percent molybdenum to produce cold-rollable sheets that are about one hundred mils thick. In certain embodiments, the billets have a thickness of about 7/8 inch or greater. Disclosed processes typically involve a rolling schedule that includes a light rolling pass and at least one medium rolling pass. Processes may also include reheating the rolling stock and using one or more heavy rolling passes, and may include an annealing step.

  15. Electrochemical ammonia production on molybdenum nitride nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of electrochemical production of ammonia at ambient temperature and pressure on nitrogen covered molybdenum nanoparticles are presented. Density functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free...... energy profile for electrochemical protonation of N2 and N adatoms on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoparticles. Pathways for electrochemical ammonia production via direct protonation of N adatoms and N2 admolecules with an onset potential as low as -0.5 V and generally lower than -0.8 V on both a nitrogen...

  16. Simulations of intergranular fracture in nanocrystalline molybdenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Søren Lund; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2004-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we investigate the plastic deformation of nanocrystalline molybdenum with a grain size of 12 nm at high strain rates. The simulations are performed with an interatomic potential which is obtained through matching of atomic forces to a database generated...... with density-functional calculations. The simulations show the plastic deformation to involve both grain boundary processes and dislocation migration which in some cases lead to twin boundary formation. A large component of the strain is accommodated through the formation of cracks in the grain boundaries...

  17. Molybdenum Dichalcogenides for Environmental Chemical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Zappa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available 2D transition metal dichalcogenides are attracting a strong interest following the popularity of graphene and other carbon-based materials. In the field of chemical sensors, they offer some interesting features that could potentially overcome the limitation of graphene and metal oxides, such as the possibility of operating at room temperature. Molybdenum-based dichalcogenides in particular are among the most studied materials, thanks to their facile preparation techniques and promising performances. The present review summarizes the advances in the exploitation of these MoX2 materials as chemical sensors for the detection of typical environmental pollutants, such as NO2, NH3, CO and volatile organic compounds.

  18. Molybdenum oxide nanocubes: Synthesis and characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthamizh, S.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Manigandan, R.; Kumar, S. Praveen; Munusamy, S.; Narayanan, V., E-mail: vnnara@yahoo.co.in [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai -600025 (India); Stephen, A. [Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai-600025 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Molybdenum oxide nanoparticles were prepared by Solid state synthesis. The MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by using commercially available ammonium heptamolybdate. The XRD pattern reveals that the synthesized MoO{sub 3} has orthorhombic structure. In addition, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD data. The Raman analysis confirm the presence of Mo-O in MoO{sub 3} nanoparticles. DRS-UV analysis shows that MoO{sub 3} has a band gap of 2.89 eV. FE-SEM analysis confirms the material morphology in cubes with nano scale.

  19. Loss of shear strength in polycrystalline tungsten under shock compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandekar, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    A reexamination of existing data on shock compression of polycrystalline tungsten at room temperature indicates that tungsten may be an exception to the common belief that metals do not behave like elastic-isotropic solids under shock compression

  20. Solid solutions of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and their alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.T.

    1981-01-01

    The solubility of hydrogen in niobium, molybdenum and niobium-molybdenum alloys with varying atomic fraction of molybdenum from 0.15 to 0.75 was measured on the temperature range of 673 0 K to 1273 0 k for one atmosphere hydrogen pressure. The experimental technique involved the saturation of the solvent metal or alloy with hydrogen, followed by quenching and analysis of the solid solution. The results obtained of hydrogen solubility are consistent with the quasi-regular model for the dilute interstitial solid solutions. The partial molar enthalpy and partial molar entropy in excess of the dissolved hydrogen atoms were calculated from data of solubility versus reciprocal doping temperature. The variation of the relative partial molar enthalpy of hydrogen dissolved in niobium-molybdenum alloys, with the increase of molybdenum content of the alloy was analized. (Author) [pt