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Sample records for tumors ctvt detected

  1. Tumor detection using feature extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sankar, A.S.; Amudhavalli, N.; Sivakolundu, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    The assistance system for brain tumor detection helps the doctor to analyse the brain tumor in MRI image and help to make decision. The manual detection system takes 3 -5 hours time to analyse the tumor. Doctors are in a position to analyze the tumor faster and make a correct decision with an assistance system

  2. The establishment of transmissible venereal tumor lung cancer model in canine and the observation of its biological characteristics

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    Sun Zhichao; Dong Weihua; Xiao Xiangsheng; Zhu Ruimin; Chen mofan; Wang Zhi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To establish an allogeneic transplanted lung cancer model in canine by percutaneously injecting canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) cell suspension and to observe its biological characteristics. Methods: Under CT guidance fresh CTVT cell suspension was inoculated into the middle or posterior lobe of lungs through percutaneous puncturing needle in 12 beagle dogs. Cyclosporin was administrated orally to obtain immunosuppression. Tumor growth and metastasis were judged by chest CT scanning at regular intervals (every 1-2 weeks). The daily mental and physical condition of the dogs was observed. Autopsy and pathological examination were performed when the animals died naturally or at the tenth week after the procedure when the animals were sacrificed. Results: A total of 15 sites were inoculated in 12 dogs. The formation of tumor was observed in 2 dogs at the fifth week and in 9 dogs at the sixth week. Ten weeks after the inoculation the formation of tumor was detected in 10 inoculated points in 9 dogs, the inoculation success rate was 66.67%. The mean largest diameter of the tumor at 6, 8 and 10 weeks after the inoculation was (1.059 ± 0.113)cm, (1.827 ± 0.084)cm and (2.189 ± 0.153)cm, respectively. The largest diameter of the tumor nodule was 3.5 cm. Moderate to severe pleural effusion and mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis were found in all the dogs that showed the formation of the tumor. Conclusion: Percutaneous CTVT cell suspension injection can establish an allogeneic canine lung cancer model, which is helpful for the experimental studies related to lung cancer. (authors)

  3. SEMIAUTOMATIC DETECTION OF TUMORAL ZONE

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    Ezzeddine Zagrouba

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a robust method based on the cooperation of fuzzy classification and regions segmentation algorithms, in order to detect the tumoral zone in the brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. On one hand, the classification in fuzzy sets is done by the Fuzzy C-Means algorithm (FCM, where a study of its different parameters and its complexity has been previously realised, which led us to improve it. On the other hand, the segmentation in regions is obtained by an hierarchical method through adaptive thresholding. Then, an operator expert selects a germ in the tumoral zone, and the class containing the sick zone is localised in return for the FCM algorithm. Finally, the superposition of the two partitions of the image will determine the sick zone. The originality of our approach is the parallel exploitation of different types of information in the image by the cooperation of two complementary approaches. This allows us to carry out a pertinent approach for the detection of sick zone in MRI images.

  4. Tumor location and detectability in mammographic screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, E.L.; Threatt, B.

    1982-01-01

    The adequacy of a film mammogram that does not visualize the retromammary space or ribs has concerned radiologists. The 79 prevalent cancers detected in the 10,000 self-referred woman at the University of Michigan Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project were analyzed for number of films required to detect the cancer, relationship of the cancer to the posterior edge of the film, number of occult lesions, tumor size, histologic type, sensitivity of detection method, and number of interval carcinomas. The mammograms were obtained using a dedicated mammographic machine and the upright position, with visualization of the anterior axillary fold on the mediolateral view. The ribs were not imaged. Of the 79 cancers, 76 were detectable on the mammogram. All were visualized on the mediolateral view, while three were not imaged on the craniocaudal view. Twelve percent of the cancers were within 1 cm of the posterior edge of the film. Only six ''interval'' carcinomas were found in the 10,000 patients within the year of the initial examinations; these women had dense P2 or DY mammographic parenchymal patterns. The detected cancers were smaller and had a significantly higher percentage of noninvasive cancers than in a symptomatic clinical population. Thus, properly exposed film mammograms using vigorous breast compression examine the breast adequately without visualizing the ribs

  5. Current status of indium-111 labeled bleomycin for tumor detection

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    Taylor, R.D.; Blahd, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of 111 In-labeled bleomycin for tumor detection are briefly mentioned. Indium-111 labeled bleomycin does localize in human tumors. However, its role in tumor detection and staging as compared with 67 Ga is still somewhat controversial

  6. Comparison of apoptosis in canine transmissible veneral tumor (TVT pre and post chemotraoy with vincristine sulphate

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    Y Doustar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The canine transmissible veneral tumor (CTVT is a prevalent tumor in canidae. It is transmitted by coitus, forming multiple neoplastic masses on the external genitalia of both sexes within the family canidae. CTVT have an aberrant karyotype and the origin of the neoplastic cells is undetermined but immunophenotyping suggests that the tumor has a histocytic origin. In this study 10 dogs with canine transmissible veneral tumor were selected and received vincristine sulphate (0.025 mg/kg/b.w chemotrapy to induce apoptosis in neoplastic cells. Biopsy specimens were collected from tumors during the growth phase, before and again after chemotherapy from the same dogs. The specimens were fixed in 10% formalin and then prepared routinely for H&E and TUNEL assays. Histopathological study of tissue section of CTVT before chemotherapy revealed sheets of uniform neoplastic cells, round to oval in shape with defined cytoplasmic border. There were a few TUNEL positive cells and mitotic figures. In tumor specimens after chemotherapy increased TUNEL positive cells and depilation of neoplastic cells in stroma of tumor were observed. Mean deference of histopathological changes and TUNEL positive cells before and after chemotherapy were significant (p

  7. Prenatal detection of a Wilms` tumor

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    Applegate, K.E.; Ghei, M. [Department of Radiology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation and Children`s Hospital, OH (United States); Perez-Atayde, A.R. [Department of Pathology, Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); *

    1999-01-01

    Kidney tumors occur very rarely in utero but when present, they are most often congenital mesoblastic nephroma. A newborn boy was transferred to our hospital with a history of fetal renal mass which proved to be a Wilms` tumor. The clinical history, imaging results, and differential diagnosis are presented with a discussion of neonatal Wilms` tumor. While imaging may not specify the exact diagnosis, it provides staging and anatomic information for the surgeon and the oncologist. (orig.) With 4 figs., 6 refs.

  8. Immunohistochemical, lectin histochemical and ultrastructural studies of canine transmissible venereal tumor in Brazil

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    Mariana B. Mascarenhas

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT is a naturally occurring contagious round-cell neoplasia, with poorly understood origin and transmission. This study aims to further investigate the tumor nature through immunohistochemistry, lectin histochemistry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis, and to provide support for diagnostic and differential diagnoses of CTVT. Immunohistochemistry was performed in 10 genital and six exclusively extragenital tumors, which were previously diagnosed by citology and histopathology. CTVT samples were incubated with biotinylated antibodies to specific membrane and cytoplasmic antigens (anti-lysozyme, anti-macrophage, anti-vimentin, anti-CD18, monoclonal anti-CD117, monoclonal anti-CD3, polyclonal anti-CD117, polyclonal CD3 and anti-CD79a, followed by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex technique. The lectins Con A, DBA, SBA, PNA, UEA-1, WGA, sWGA, GSL, JSA, PSA, PHA-L, PHA-E and RCA were additionally tested in four genital CTVTs and TEM was performed in eight genital tumors. The anti-vimentin antibody revealed strong immunoreactivity to neoplastic cells in all the assessed samples (16/16. The polyclonal anti-CD3 antibodies showed moderate to strong immunoreactivity in fourteen (14/16 and the polyclonal anti-CD117 in fifteen cases (15/16. There was no immunoreactivity to anti-lysozyme, anti-macrophage, anti-CD18, monoclonal anti-CD117, monoclonal anti-CD3 and anti-CD79a antibodies. At lectin histochemistry, it was observed strong staining of tumor cells to Con-A, PHA-L and RCA. There was no histopathological and immunoreactivity differences between genital and extragenital CTVTs. These findings do not support the hypothesis of histiocytic origin of CTVT. In contrast, the lectin histochemical results were similar to cells from lymphoid/myeloid origin.

  9. Tumor detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

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    Moldofsky, P.J.; Powe, J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope conjugated to monoclonal antibody products has been used for imaging tumors targeted by the antibody. As imaging progresses, new sets of procedural and technical questions arise. In this chapter, we discuss several current problems in imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody. These include (1) methods for selection of specific antibody and, once the particular antibody is selected, which fragment form is to be used; (2) imaging procedures: what are the optimum imaging parameters, such as optimum time for imaging after administration of tracer and considerations regarding background subtraction; and (3) noninvasive quantitative techniques: quantitation of localization of antibody indirectly from quantitative information in the images.100 references

  10. Detecting brain tumor in pathological slides using hyperspectral imaging.

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    Ortega, Samuel; Fabelo, Himar; Camacho, Rafael; de la Luz Plaza, María; Callicó, Gustavo M; Sarmiento, Roberto

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is an emerging technology for medical diagnosis. This research work presents a proof-of-concept on the use of HSI data to automatically detect human brain tumor tissue in pathological slides. The samples, consisting of hyperspectral cubes collected from 400 nm to 1000 nm, were acquired from ten different patients diagnosed with high-grade glioma. Based on the diagnosis provided by pathologists, a spectral library of normal and tumor tissues was created and processed using three different supervised classification algorithms. Results prove that HSI is a suitable technique to automatically detect high-grade tumors from pathological slides.

  11. Detection limits of intraoperative near infrared imaging for tumor resection.

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    Thurber, Greg M; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Weissleder, Ralph

    2010-12-01

    The application of fluorescent molecular imaging to surgical oncology is a developing field with the potential to reduce morbidity and mortality. However, the detection thresholds and other requirements for successful intervention remain poorly understood. Here we modeled and experimentally validated depth and size of detection of tumor deposits, trade-offs in coverage and resolution of areas of interest, and required pharmacokinetics of probes based on differing levels of tumor target presentation. Three orthotopic tumor models were imaged by widefield epifluorescence and confocal microscopes, and the experimental results were compared with pharmacokinetic models and light scattering simulations to determine detection thresholds. Widefield epifluorescence imaging can provide sufficient contrast to visualize tumor margins and detect tumor deposits 3-5  mm deep based on labeled monoclonal antibodies at low objective magnification. At higher magnification, surface tumor deposits at cellular resolution are detectable at TBR ratios achieved with highly expressed antigens. A widefield illumination system with the capability for macroscopic surveying and microscopic imaging provides the greatest utility for varying surgical goals. These results have implications for system and agent designs, which ultimately should aid complete resection in most surgical beds and provide real-time feedback to obtain clean margins. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Early skin tumor detection from microscopic images through image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqi, A.A.; Narejo, G.B.; Khan, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The research is done to provide appropriate detection technique for skin tumor detection. The work is done by using the image processing toolbox of MATLAB. Skin tumors are unwanted skin growth with different causes and varying extent of malignant cells. It is a syndrome in which skin cells mislay the ability to divide and grow normally. Early detection of tumor is the most important factor affecting the endurance of a patient. Studying the pattern of the skin cells is the fundamental problem in medical image analysis. The study of skin tumor has been of great interest to the researchers. DIP (Digital Image Processing) allows the use of much more complex algorithms for image processing, and hence, can offer both more sophisticated performance at simple task, and the implementation of methods which would be impossibly by analog means. It allows much wider range of algorithms to be applied to the input data and can avoid problems such as build up of noise and signal distortion during processing. The study shows that few works has been done on cellular scale for the images of skin. This research allows few checks for the early detection of skin tumor using microscopic images after testing and observing various algorithms. After analytical evaluation the result has been observed that the proposed checks are time efficient techniques and appropriate for the tumor detection. The algorithm applied provides promising results in lesser time with accuracy. The GUI (Graphical User Interface) that is generated for the algorithm makes the system user friendly. (author)

  13. Immunohistochemical detection of estrogen receptors in canine mammary tumors

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    Elena Atanaskova Petrov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mammary tumors are among the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs.They have a complex morphology, usually affecting middle age and older bitches. Almost 50% of the mammary tumors in dogs are malignant neoplasms. Prognosis is based on several factors: stage, age, tumor size, metastasis, histopathology, ovariectomy status and hormone-receptor activity. Immunohistochemical (IHC measurement has become increasingly an important diagnostic and prognostic parameter, with the development of monoclonal antibodies against nuclear estrogen and progestin receptors. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of ER receptors in malignant canine mammary tumors and to identify their association with the clinical course of the tumor. Mammary tumor samples have been obtained by mastectomy from dogs presented at our clinic. Detailed clinical examination, CBC and basic serum biochemical profile were performed in all patients. Surgery was the only treatment. Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical detection of estrogen α receptors (ERα was performed on 8 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples, using the PT LINK immunoperoxidase technique. Histopathological examination of the mammary tumor samples (n=11 revealed tubular adenocarcinoma (n=6,54.5% and ductal adenocarcinoma (n=3, 27.3%, one patient with benign adenoma and one with mastitis. Patients with positive ER tumors are alive, without remission, while 3 of the patients that were ER negative died due to lung metastases. According to our results, it can be concluded that the appearance and development of canine mammary tumors is highly connected with ovarian steroid hormones and that immunostaining of the tumors may be used as a good prognostic parameter in these patients.

  14. Recent development of fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, Eiji; Morii, Takashi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Increasing recent studies on fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors are described here on strategies of molecular targeting, metabolic specificity and hypoxic circumstance. There is described an instance of a conjugate of antibody and pH-activable fluorescent ligand, which specifically binds to the tumor cells, is internalized in the cellular lysozomes where their pH is low, and then is activated to become fluorescent only in viable tumor cells. For the case of metabolic specificity, excessive loading of the precursor (5-aminolevulinic acid) of protoporphyrin IX (ppIX), due to their low activity to convert ppIX to heme B, results in making tumors observable in red as ppIX emits fluorescence (red, 585 nm) when excited by blue ray of 410 nm. Similarly, imaging with indocyanine green which is accumulated in hepatoma cells is reported in success in detection of small lesion and metastasis when the dye is administered during operation. Reductive reactions exceed in tumor hypoxic conditions, of which feature is usable for imaging. Conjugates of nitroimidazole and fluorescent dye are reported to successfully image tumors by nitro reduction. Authors' UTX-12 is a non-fluorescent nitroaromatic derivative of pH-sensitive fluorescent dye seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), and is designed for the nitro group, the hypoxia-responding sensor, to be reduced in tumor hypoxic conditions and then for the aromatic moiety to be cleaved to release free SNARF. Use of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) for imaging has been also reported in many. As above, studies on fluorescent imaging for specific detection of tumors are mostly at fundamental step but its future is conceivably promising along with advances in other technology like fluorescent endoscopy and multimodal imaging. (author)

  15. Phospholipid ether analogs for the detection of colorectal tumors.

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    Dustin A Deming

    Full Text Available The treatment of localized colorectal cancer (CRC depends on resection of the primary tumor with adequate margins and sufficient lymph node sampling. A novel imaging agent that accumulates in CRCs and the associated lymph nodes is needed. Cellectar Biosciences has developed a phospholipid ether analog platform that is both diagnostic and therapeutic. CLR1502 is a near-infrared fluorescent molecule, whereas 124/131I-CLR1404 is under clinical investigation as a PET tracer/therapeutic agent imaged by SPECT. We investigated the use of CLR1502 for the detection of intestinal cancers in a murine model and 131I-CLR1404 in a patient with metastatic CRC. Mice that develop multiple intestinal tumors ranging from adenomas to locally advanced adenocarcinomas were utilized. After 96 hours post CLR1502 injection, the intestinal tumors were analyzed using a Spectrum IVIS (Perkin Elmer and a Fluobeam (Fluoptics. The intensity of the fluorescent signal was correlated with the histological characteristics for each tumor. Colon adenocarcinomas demonstrated increased accumulation of CLR1502 compared to non-invasive lesions (total radiant efficiency: 1.76×10(10 vs 3.27×10(9 respectively, p = 0.006. Metastatic mesenteric tumors and uninvolved lymph nodes were detected with CLR1502. In addition, SPECT imaging with 131I-CLR1404 was performed as part of a clinical trial in patients with advanced solid tumors. 131I-CLR1404 was shown to accumulate in metastatic tumors in a patient with colorectal adenocarcinoma. Together, these compounds might enhance our ability to properly resect CRCs through better localization of the primary tumor and improved lymph node identification as well as detect distant disease.

  16. Image Denoising And Segmentation Approchto Detect Tumor From BRAINMRI Images

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    Shanta Rangaswamy

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of the Brain Tumor is a challenging problem, due to the structure of the Tumor cells in the brain. This project presents a systematic method that enhances the detection of brain tumor cells and to analyze functional structures by training and classification of the samples in SVM and tumor cell segmentation of the sample using DWT algorithm. From the input MRI Images collected, first noise is removed from MRI images by applying wiener filtering technique. In image enhancement phase, all the color components of MRI Images will be converted into gray scale image and make the edges clear in the image to get better identification and improvised quality of the image. In the segmentation phase, DWT on MRI Image to segment the grey-scale image is performed. During the post-processing, classification of tumor is performed by using SVM classifier. Wiener Filter, DWT, SVM Segmentation strategies were used to find and group the tumor position in the MRI filtered picture respectively. An essential perception in this work is that multi arrange approach utilizes various leveled classification strategy which supports execution altogether. This technique diminishes the computational complexity quality in time and memory. This classification strategy works accurately on all images and have achieved the accuracy of 93%.

  17. Asymptomatic brain tumor detected at brain check-up

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    Onizuka, Masanari; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Shibayama, Akira; Hiura, Tsuyoshi; Horie, Nobutaka; Miyazaki, Hisaya

    2001-01-01

    Brain check-up was performed in 4000 healthy subjects who underwent medical and radiological examinations for possible brain diseases in our hospital from April 1996 to March 2000. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 11 brain tumors which consisted of six meningiomas, three pituitary adenomas, one astrocytoma, and one epidermoid cyst. The detection rate of incidental brain tumor in our hospital was 0.3%. Nine patients underwent surgery, with one case of morbidity due to postoperative transient oculomotor nerve paresis. The widespread use of brain check-up may increasingly detect asymptomatic brain tumors. Surgical indications for such lesions remain unclear, and the strategy for treatment should be determined with consideration of the patient's wishes. (author)

  18. Incidentally detected gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report

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    Tolga Canbak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST are mesenchymal tumors located primarily in the gastrointestinal tract. We aimed to present a case report of GIST incidentally detected during laparoscopic cholecystectomy.A 60-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency room due to abdominal pain for one day. The physical examination revealed sensitivity on the right upper quadrant. In the laboratory examinations, white blood cell count 6,490 k/uL, hemoglobin 12 g/dL, hematocrit 35% and other biochemical tests were normal. Abdominal ultrasound revealed hydropic gallbladder, several gallstones with a maximum diameter of 15 mm and pericholecystic fluid collection was present. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was planned due to acute cholecystitis. In exploration, beside the presence of acute cholecystitis, a mass of approximately 5 cm, located 15 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz was detected. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed. Conversion to open laparotomy was done; small intestine resection with end-to-end anastomosis was performed. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with CD117, CD34 and S100 positivity was detected on histopathologic examination.It is thought that GISTs are mesenchymal tumors originating from precursors of Kajal cells. GISTs are usually detected in their 60s. The first option for treatment is surgical resection.

  19. Reactivity of p53 protein in canine transmissible venereal tumor Reatividade da proteína P53 no tumor venéreo transmissível canino

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    J.V. Moro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The expression of p53 protein was evaluated in canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT, as following: natural occurrence (n=8; resistant to chemotherapy (n=4; and allogeneic transplanted in progression (n=8, stable (n=8, and regression (n=8stages. The collected specimens were submitted to GM1 immunohistochemical reaction. Results showed a mean percentage of immunomarked cells around 18.6% in CTVT of natural occurrence, 23.8% in CTVT resistant to chemotherapy, 22.9% in allogeneic transplanted CTVT in both progression and stable stages, and 35.8% in transplanted CTVT in regression stage. The results suggest that there is a functional abnormality in p53 gene and its products in the studied tumors; although, it is not possible to correlate the percentage of cells marked by p53 and a prognosis.A expressão da proteína p53 foi avaliada em espécimes de tumor venéreo transmissível canino (TVT de ocorrência natural (n=8; resistente à quimioterapia (n=4 e transplantado em cão nas fases de progressão tumoral (n=8, de latência (n=8 e de regressão (n=8. Os espécimes foram submetidos à reação de imunoistoquímica. Os resultados mostraram porcentagem média de células imunomarcadas de 18,6% no TVT de ocorrência natural, de 23,8% no TVT refratário, 22,9% nos TVTs transplantados nas fases de progressão e latência e de 35,8% na fase de regressão. Os resultados sugerem que há uma anormalidade funcional no gene P53 e seus produtos nos tumores estudados, apesar de não ser possível correlacionar a porcentagem de células marcadas pelo p53 ao prognóstico.

  20. Radiological imaging detection of tumors localized in fossa cranii posterior.

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    Kabashi, Serbeze; Muçaj, Sefedin; Ahmetgjekaj, Ilir; Gashi, Sanije; Fazliu, Ilir; Dreshaj, Shemsedin; Shala, Nexhmedin

    2008-01-01

    Intracranial tumors are characterized by a variety imaging aspects and their detection is always a challenge. Clinical application of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Computerized Tomography has provided an earlier detection and treatment of many CNS pathologies. The aim of this study is to estimate the role of CT and MRI in the determination of posterior fossa tumors. During period 2000-2005 in UCCK-Prishtina, 368 patients were diagnosed with intracranial tumors. Fifty-nine of them were found to have tumor localized in fossa crani posterior (FCP) without any significant difference between genders (50.8% female vs. 49.2% male, chi2 test=0.02 p=0.896). The average age of patients with FCP tumors was 33.1 (SD +/- 22.5, rank 1-70). The most of these patients were registered in 2003 (20.3%) whereas the least in 2000 (11.9%). The most affected age-group was 0-9 (25.4%) and 50-59 (23.7%) whereas the incidences was between 30-39 years of age (3.4%). Tumor types that more often were found in young's individuals were: Astrocytomas with a peak incidence in teenagers (average age was 12-year-old SD +/- 7.5, rank 3-23), next was Medulloblastomas (average age was 11-years-old, SD +/- 2.9, rank 6-16 years) and ependymomas (average age was 6.8-years-old, SD +/- 4.6, rank 1-12). Patients with osseous tumors are characterized by older age than median (61.0, SD +/- 4.2, rank 58-64), then metastases (53.0, SD +/- 5.3, rank 45-60) and meningiomas (50.8, SD +/- 7.7, rank 38-63). The overall average mortality was 0.41 cases per 100,000 inhabitants with variations through years from 0.30-0.50/100,000 inhabitants. Comparing with other countries, for some types of FCP tumors, lower morbidity is shown in Kosova, with mean incidence 0.41/100,000. The most frequent tumors in children were medulloblastomas, brainstem gliomas, astrocytomas and ependymomas whereas meningiomas and metastasis were most often found in adults. For FCP tumors detection, MRI had 100% sensitivity, specificity and

  1. Detectability of metastatic bone tumor by Ga-67 scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Guio; Araki, Tsutomu; Hihara, Toshihiko; Ogata, Hitoshi; Monzawa, Shuichi; Kachi, Kenji; Matsusako, Masaki

    1989-01-01

    Ga-67 scintigrams in patients with malignant diseases sometimes reveal uptake of the tracer in the bone metastases. Detectability of Ga-67 scintigraphy for metastatic bone tumors and benign bone lesions was compared with that of Tc-99m bone scintigraphy. Countable bone metastases detected by bone scintigraphy were evaluated whether the lesion showed apparent, faint, or negative Ga-67 uptake. Of 47 lesions 23 (49%) showed apparent uptake and 17 (36%) showed negative uptake, only 7 (10%) mostly fracture/osteotomy, showed apparent uptake of the tracer. Uptake in the other benign lesions such as trauma of the ribs, spondylosis deformans, and arthrosis deformans was rather faint. In patients with multiple bone metastases, 9 patients (82%) out of 11 showed more prominent abnormal findings in Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy than in Ga-67 scintigraphy; that is, Ga-67 scintigraphy was not able to reveal all metastatic bone lesions. In patients with untreated or recurrent tumors, relation between Ga-67 uptake in the tumors and that in the bone metastases was evaluated. Of 7 patients with negative Ga-67 uptake in the bone metastases; that is, there seemed to be little relation between Ga-67 affinity to the primary tumors and that to the bone metastases. Mechanisms of the Ga-67 uptake in the bone metastases were discussed. Not only the tumor cells or tissues in the bone metastases but also bone mineral or osteoclasts might be the deposition sites of Ga-67. (author)

  2. Detectability of metastatic bone tumor by Ga-67 scintigraphy

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    Koizumi, Kiyoshi; Uchiyama, Guio; Araki, Tsutomu; Hihara, Toshihiko; Ogata, Hitoshi; Monzawa, Shuichi; Kachi, Kenji; Matsusako, Masaki

    1989-03-01

    Ga-67 scintigrams in patients with malignant diseases sometimes reveal uptake of the tracer in the bone metastases. Detectability of Ga-67 scintigraphy for metastatic bone tumors and benign bone lesions was compared with that of Tc-99m bone scintigraphy. Countable bone metastases detected by bone scintigraphy were evaluated whether the lesion showed apparent, faint, or negative Ga-67 uptake. Of 47 lesions 23 (49%) showed apparent uptake and 17 (36%) showed negative uptake, only 7 (10%) mostly fracture/osteotomy, showed apparent uptake of the tracer. Uptake in the other benign lesions such as trauma of the ribs, spondylosis deformans, and arthrosis deformans was rather faint. In patients with multiple bone metastases, 9 patients (82%) out of 11 showed more prominent abnormal findings in Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy than in Ga-67 scintigraphy; that is, Ga-67 scintigraphy was not able to reveal all metastatic bone lesions. In patients with untreated or recurrent tumors, relation between Ga-67 uptake in the tumors and that in the bone metastases was evaluated. Of 7 patients with negative Ga-67 uptake in the bone metastases; that is, there seemed to be little relation between Ga-67 affinity to the primary tumors and that to the bone metastases. Mechanisms of the Ga-67 uptake in the bone metastases were discussed. Not only the tumor cells or tissues in the bone metastases but also bone mineral or osteoclasts might be the deposition sites of Ga-67.

  3. Limits of Tumor Detectability in Nuclear Medicine and PET

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    Yusuf Emre Erdi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Nuclear medicine is becoming increasingly important in the early detection of malignancy. The advantage of nuclear medicine over other imaging modalities is the high sensitivity of the gamma camera. Nuclear medicine counting equipment has the capability of detecting levels of radioactivity which exceed background levels by as little as 2.4 to 1. This translates to only a few hundred counts per minute on a regular gamma camera or as few as 3 counts per minute when using coincidence detection on a positron emission tomography (PET camera. Material and Methods: We have experimentally measured the limits of detectability using a set of hollow spheres in a Jaszczak phantom at various tumor-to-background ratios. Imaging modalities for this work were (1 planar, (2 SPECT, (3 PET, and (4 planar camera with coincidence detection capability (MCD. Results: When there is no background (infinite contrast activity present, the detectability of tumors is similar for PET and planar imaging. With the presence of the background activity , PET can detect objects in an order of magnitude smaller in size than that can be seen by conventional planar imaging especially in the typical clinical low (3:1 T/B ratios. The detection capability of the MCD camera lies between a conventional nuclear medicine (planar / SPECT scans and the detection capability of a dedicated PET scanner Conclusion: Among nuclear medicine’s armamentarium, PET is the closest modality to CT or MR imaging in terms of limits of detection. Modern clinical PET scanners have a resolution limit of 4 mm, corresponding to the detection of tumors with a volume of 0.2 ml (7 mm diameter in 5:1 T/B ratio. It is also possible to obtain better resolution limits with dedicated brain and animal scanners. The future holds promise in development of new detector materials, improved camera design, and new reconstruction algorithms which will improve sensitivity, resolution, contrast, and thereby further

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells: From Theory to Nanotechnology-Based Detection

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    Ming, Yue; Li, Yuanyuan; Xing, Haiyan; Luo, Minghe; Li, Ziwei; Chen, Jianhong; Mo, Jingxin; Shi, Sanjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells with stem-cell properties are regarded as tumor initiating cells. Sharing stem-cell properties, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for the development of metastasis, which significant affects CTC analysis in clinical practice. Due to their extremely low occurrence in blood, however, it is challenging to enumerate and analyze CTCs. Nanotechnology is able to address the problems of insufficient capture efficiency and low purity of CTCs owing to the unique structural and functional properties of nanomaterials, showing strong promise for CTC isolation and detection. In this review, we discuss the role of stem-like CTCs in metastases, provide insight into recent progress in CTC isolation and detection approaches using various nanoplatforms, and highlight the role of nanotechnology in the advancement of CTC research. PMID:28203204

  5. Multisite tumor sampling enhances the detection of intratumor heterogeneity at all different temporal stages of tumor evolution.

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    Erramuzpe, Asier; Cortés, Jesús M; López, José I

    2018-02-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) is an inherent process of tumor development that has received much attention in previous years, as it has become a major obstacle for the success of targeted therapies. ITH is also temporally unpredictable across tumor evolution, which makes its precise characterization even more problematic since detection success depends on the precise temporal snapshot at which ITH is analyzed. New and more efficient strategies for tumor sampling are needed to overcome these difficulties which currently rely entirely on the pathologist's interpretation. Recently, we showed that a new strategy, the multisite tumor sampling, works better than the routine sampling protocol for the ITH detection when the tumor time evolution was not taken into consideration. Here, we extend this work and compare the ITH detections of multisite tumor sampling and routine sampling protocols across tumor time evolution, and in particular, we provide in silico analyses of both strategies at early and late temporal stages for four different models of tumor evolution (linear, branched, neutral, and punctuated). Our results indicate that multisite tumor sampling outperforms routine protocols in detecting ITH at all different temporal stages of tumor evolution. We conclude that multisite tumor sampling is more advantageous than routine protocols in detecting intratumor heterogeneity.

  6. Sensitive detection of viral transcripts in human tumor transcriptomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Eric Schelhorn

    Full Text Available In excess of 12% of human cancer incidents have a viral cofactor. Epidemiological studies of idiopathic human cancers indicate that additional tumor viruses remain to be discovered. Recent advances in sequencing technology have enabled systematic screenings of human tumor transcriptomes for viral transcripts. However, technical problems such as low abundances of viral transcripts in large volumes of sequencing data, viral sequence divergence, and homology between viral and human factors significantly confound identification of tumor viruses. We have developed a novel computational approach for detecting viral transcripts in human cancers that takes the aforementioned confounding factors into account and is applicable to a wide variety of viruses and tumors. We apply the approach to conducting the first systematic search for viruses in neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infancy. The diverse clinical progression of this disease as well as related epidemiological and virological findings are highly suggestive of a pathogenic cofactor. However, a viral etiology of neuroblastoma is currently contested. We mapped 14 transcriptomes of neuroblastoma as well as positive and negative controls to the human and all known viral genomes in order to detect both known and unknown viruses. Analysis of controls, comparisons with related methods, and statistical estimates demonstrate the high sensitivity of our approach. Detailed investigation of putative viral transcripts within neuroblastoma samples did not provide evidence for the existence of any known human viruses. Likewise, de-novo assembly and analysis of chimeric transcripts did not result in expression signatures associated with novel human pathogens. While confounding factors such as sample dilution or viral clearance in progressed tumors may mask viral cofactors in the data, in principle, this is rendered less likely by the high sensitivity of our approach and the number of biological replicates

  7. Clinical experience in humans with radiolabeled antibody for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, R.T.; Lyster, D.M.; Szasz, I.; Alcorn, L.N.; Huckell, V.F.; Rhodes, B.; Breslow, K.; Burchiel, S.

    1982-01-01

    I-131 and Tc-99m labeled polyclonal or monoclonal antibody and fragments of antibody, specific to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) or to a melanoma cell surface antigen (MCSA) were injected into proven cancer patients. Using standard homeostasis parameters, and scanning techniques, the safety and efficacy of each antibody was evaluated. Antibody fragments were expected to clear faster from the circulation allowing for earlier imaging and a better target-to-non-target ratio. The technetium label may perturb the antiboby's kinetics so that clearance is more rapid for both whole antibody and fragments. After a statistical evaluation of all parameters measured pre and post injection it was concluded that no acute toxicity reactions were present in any patient studied. Scan results were not acceptable for a tumor detecting procedure used in routine practice. Tumor upake was seen in less than 10% of scans

  8. Fluorescence diffuse tomography for tumor detection and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balalaeva, Irina V.; Orlova, Anna G.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kibraeva, Elena A.; Zagainova, Elena V.; Turchin, Ilya V.

    2007-05-01

    Strong light scattering and absorption limit visualization of the internal structure of biological tissue. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffuse tomography, enable noninvasive investigation of the internal biological tissues, including visualization and intravital monitoring of deep tumors. In this work the preliminary results of fluorescence diffuse tomography (FDT) of small animals are presented. Using of exogenous fluorophores, targeted specifically at tumor cells, and fluorescent proteins expressed endogenously can significantly increase the contrast of obtained images. Fluorescent compounds of different nature, such as sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (Photosens), red fluorescing proteins and CdTe/CdSe-core/shell nanocrystals (quantum dots) were applied. The animal was scanned in the transilluminative configuration by low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at the wavelength of 532 nm or semiconductor laser at the wavelength of 655 nm. Photosens was injected intravenously into linear mice with metastazing Lewis lung carcinoma in dose 4 mg/kg. Quantum dots (5x10 -11 M) or protein DsRed2 (1-5x10 -6 M) in glass capsules (inner diameter 2-3 mm) were placed inside the esophagus of 7-day-old hairless rats (18-20 g) to simulate marked tumors. Cells of HEK-293 Phoenix line, transitory transfected with Turbo-RFP protein gene, were injected hypodermically to immunodeficient mice. This work demonstrates potential capabilities of FDT method for detection and monitoring of deep fluorescent-labeled tumors in animal models. Strong advantages of fluorescent proteins and quantum dots over the traditional photosensitizer for FDT imaging are shown.

  9. Plasmonic Nanobubbles Rapidly Detect and Destroy Drug-Resistant Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Ren, Xiaoyang; Townley, Debra; Wu, Xiangwei; Kupferman, Michael E.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    The resistance of residual cancer cells after oncological resection to adjuvant chemoradiotherapies results in both high recurrence rates and high non-specific tissue toxicity, thus preventing the successful treatment of such cancers as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The patients' survival rate and quality of life therefore depend upon the efficacy, selectivity and low non-specific toxicity of the adjuvant treatment. We report a novel, theranostic in vivo technology that unites both the acoustic diagnostics and guided intracellular delivery of anti-tumor drug (liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin, Doxil) in one rapid process, namely a pulsed laser-activated plasmonic nanobubble (PNB). HNSCC-bearing mice were treated with gold nanoparticle conjugates, Doxil, and single near-infrared laser pulses of low energy. Tumor-specific clusters of gold nanoparticles (solid gold spheres) converted the optical pulses into localized PNBs. The acoustic signals of the PNB detected the tumor with high specificity and sensitivity. The mechanical impact of the PNB, co-localized with Doxil liposomes, selectively ejected the drug into the cytoplasm of cancer cells. Cancer cell-specific generation of PNBs and their intracellular co-localization with Doxil improved the in vivo therapeutic efficacy from 5-7% for administration of only Doxil or PNBs alone to 90% thus demonstrating the synergistic therapeutic effect of the PNB-based intracellular drug release. This mechanism also reduced the non-specific toxicity of Doxil below a detectable level and the treatment time to less than one minute. Thus PNBs combine highly sensitive diagnosis, overcome drug resistance and minimize non-specific toxicity in a single rapid theranostic procedure for intra-operative treatment. PMID:23139725

  10. Multiplex detection of tumor markers with photonic suspension array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yuanjin; Zhao Xiangwei [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Pei Xiaoping [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hu Jing; Zhao Wenju [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Chen Baoan [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gu Zhongze [State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Laboratory of Environment and Biosafety, Research Institute of Southeast University in Suzhou, Dushu Lake Higher Education Town, Suzhou 215123 (China)], E-mail: gu@seu.edu.cn

    2009-02-02

    A novel photonic suspension array was developed for multiplex immunoassay. The carries of this array were silica colloidal crystal beads (SCCBs). The codes of these carriers are the characteristic reflection peak originated from their structural periodicity, and therefore they do not suffer from fading, bleaching, quenching, and chemical instability. In addition, because no dyes or materials related with fluorescence are included, the fluorescence background of SCCBs is very low. With a sandwich format, the proposed suspension array was used for simultaneous multiplex detection of tumor markers in one test tube. The results showed that the four tumor markers, {alpha}-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carcinoma antigen 125 (CA 125) and carcinoma antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) could be assayed in the ranges of 1.0-500 ng mL{sup -1}, 1.0-500 ng mL{sup -1}, 1.0-500 U mL{sup -1} and 3.0-500 U mL{sup -1} with limits of detection of 0.68 ng mL{sup -1}, 0.95 ng mL{sup -1}, 0.99 U mL{sup -1} and 2.30 U mL{sup -1} at 3{sigma}, respectively. The proposed array showed acceptable accuracy, detection reproducibility, storage stability and the results obtained were in acceptable agreement with those from parallel single-analyte test of practical clinical sera. This technique provides a new strategy for low cost, automated, and simultaneous multiplex immunoassay.

  11. Computer-Aided Detection of Kidney Tumor on Abdominal Computed Tomography Scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D.Y.; Park, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To implement a computer-aided detection system for kidney segmentation and kidney tumor detection on abdominal computed tomography (CT) scans. Material and Methods: Abdominal CT images were digitized with a film digitizer, and a gray-level threshold method was used to segment the kidney. Based on texture analysis performed on sample images of kidney tumors, a portion of the kidney tumor was selected as seed region for start point of the region-growing process. The average and standard deviations were used to detect the kidney tumor. Starting at the detected seed region, the region-growing method was used to segment the kidney tumor with intensity values used as an acceptance criterion for a homogeneous test. This test was performed to merge the neighboring region as kidney tumor boundary. These methods were applied on 156 transverse images of 12 cases of kidney tumors scanned using a G.E. Hispeed CT scanner and digitized with a Lumisys LS-40 film digitizer. Results: The computer-aided detection system resulted in a kidney tumor detection sensitivity of 85% and no false-positive findings. Conclusion: This computer-aided detection scheme was useful for kidney tumor detection and gave the characteristics of detected kidney tumors

  12. Using tumor phenotype, histological tumor distribution, and mammographic appearance to explain the survival differences between screen-detected and clinically detected breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Lin; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Yu, Cheng-Ping; Chang, King-Jen; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Tabár, László; Stephen, Duffy W; Smith, Robert A; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2014-08-01

    In the era of mass screening for breast cancer with mammography, it has been noted that conventional tumor attributes and mammographic appearance are insufficient to account for the better prognosis of screen-detected tumors. Such prognostication may require additional updated pathological information regarding tumor phenotype (e.g., basal status) and histological tumor distribution (focality). We investigated this hypothesis using a Bayesian approach to analyze breast cancer data from Dalarna County, Sweden. We used data for tumors diagnosed in the Swedish Two-County Trial and early service screening period, 1977-1995, and from the mature service screening period, 1996-1998. In the early period of mammographic screening (1977-1995), the crude hazard ratio (HR) of breast cancer death for screen-detected cases compared with symptomatic ones was 0.22 (95% CI: 0.17-0.29) compared with 0.53 (95% CI: 0.34-0.76) when adjusted for conventional tumor attributes only. Using the data from the mature service screening period, 1996-1998, the HR was 0.23 (95% CI: 0.08-0.44) unadjusted and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.26-1.47) after adjustment for tumor phenotype, mammographic appearance, histological tumor distribution, and conventional tumor attributes. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) for the prediction of breast cancer deaths using these variables without the detection mode was 0.82, only slightly less than that observed when additionally including the detection mode (AUC=0.83). Using Freedman statistics, conventional tumor attributes and mammographic appearances explained 58% (95% CI: 57.5-58.6%) of the difference of breast cancer survival between the screen-detected and the clinically detected breast cancers, whereas the corresponding figure was increased to 77% (95% CI: 75.6-77.6%) when adding the two information on tumor phenotype and histological tumor distribution. The results indicated that conventional tumor attributes and mammographic appearance are not sufficient to be

  13. Detection of brain tumor margins using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez-Chambi, Ronald M.; Kut, Carmen; Rico-Jimenez, Jesus; Campos-Delgado, Daniel U.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Li, Xingde; Jo, Javier

    2018-02-01

    In brain cancer surgery, it is critical to achieve extensive resection without compromising adjacent healthy, non-cancerous regions. Various technological advances have made major contributions in imaging, including intraoperative magnetic imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). However, these technologies have pros and cons in providing quantitative, real-time and three-dimensional (3D) continuous guidance in brain cancer detection. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, label-free, cost-effective technique capable of imaging tissue in three dimensions and real time. The purpose of this study is to reliably and efficiently discriminate between non-cancer and cancer-infiltrated brain regions using OCT images. To this end, a mathematical model for quantitative evaluation known as the Blind End- Member and Abundances Extraction method (BEAE). This BEAE method is a constrained optimization technique which extracts spatial information from volumetric OCT images. Using this novel method, we are able to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous tissues and using logistic regression as a classifier for automatic brain tumor margin detection. Using this technique, we are able to achieve excellent performance using an extensive cross-validation of the training dataset (sensitivity 92.91% and specificity 98.15%) and again using an independent, blinded validation dataset (sensitivity 92.91% and specificity 86.36%). In summary, BEAE is well-suited to differentiate brain tissue which could support the guiding surgery process for tissue resection.

  14. Using Electronic Noses to Detect Tumors During Neurosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.; Kateb, Babak; Chen, Mike

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed to develop special-purpose electronic noses and algorithms for processing the digitized outputs of the electronic noses for determining whether tissue exposed during neurosurgery is cancerous. At present, visual inspection by a surgeon is the only available intraoperative technique for detecting cancerous tissue. Implementation of the proposal would help to satisfy a desire, expressed by some neurosurgeons, for an intraoperative technique for determining whether all of a brain tumor has been removed. The electronic-nose technique could complement multimodal imaging techniques, which have also been proposed as means of detecting cancerous tissue. There are also other potential applications of the electronic-nose technique in general diagnosis of abnormal tissue. In preliminary experiments performed to assess the viability of the proposal, the problem of distinguishing between different types of cultured cells was substituted for the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal specimens of the same type of tissue. The figure presents data from one experiment, illustrating differences between patterns that could be used to distinguish between two types of cultured cancer cells. Further development can be expected to include studies directed toward answering questions concerning not only the possibility of distinguishing among various types of normal and abnormal tissue but also distinguishing between tissues of interest and other odorous substances that may be present in medical settings.

  15. Canine transmissible venereal tumor and seminoma: a cytohistopathology and chemotherapy study of tumors in the growth phase and during regression after chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanbakht, J; Pedram, B; Taheriyan, M R; Khadivar, F; Hosseini, S H; Abdi, F S; Hosseini, E; Moloudizargari, M; Aghajanshakeri, S H; Javaherypour, S; Shafiee, R; Emrani Bidi, R

    2014-06-01

    In this study, 12 dogs affected by canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) and testicular seminoma tumor were studied retrospectively. The cytological sample was smeared onto a glass slide and either air-dried for May-Grünwald-stain, and masses were surgically removed. The tumors were grossly examined, and sections of 4-μm thick were obtained from each sample and stained with H&E. For chemotherapy, vincristine sulfate was administered weekly as an infusion over 3 min via the cephalic vein at a dose of 0.025 mg/kg after diluting with physiological saline to a total amount of 10 ml. If no remission was observed after 8 weeks, chemotherapy was continued with weekly doxorubicin infusion at a dose of 1 mg/kg. All the tumor samples were divided into four cytohistopathologic groups, namely: multilobular (six cases), papillary (two cases), pedunculated (two cases), and tubular (two cases of seminoma). The most frequently represented tumor type was multilobular (6/10, 60 %) followed by pedunculated (2/10, 20 %), papillary (2/10, 20 %), and tubular (two cases of seminoma, 100 %). Cytological smears from eight tumors in regression after chemotherapy were poorly cellular, and many cells were fragmented. In two progressive tumors, there was an average of 1,406 ± 972 CTVT 200 cells/μl or 96.71 % of total cells counted. Thus, tumor cells represented 96.71 % of total cells within the biopsy specimens and the leukocytes 4.29 % (leukocyte, tumor cell ratio=0.062 ± 0.031). In eight regressive tumors, there was an average of 1,245 ± 1,032 CTVT 200 cells/μl or 97.31 % of total cells counted. Thus, tumor cells represented 97.31 % of total cells and leukocytes 2.69 % (leukocyte, tumor cell ratio=0.071 ± 0.174). Our data suggested that combination treatment with vincristine and doxorubicin in the future could be an excellent therapeutic alternative for the treatment of TVT for probably reducing the resistance to vincristine, and also, treatment success could easily be followed

  16. The accuracy of CT and tumor markers in the detection of a recurrent ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Yukari; Ishida, Jiro; Kotake, Fumio; Hirose, Masahiro; Kawana, Koji; Abe, Kimihiko; Amino, Saburo; Negishi, Yoshiyuki; Akiya, Kiyoshi

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-three patients previously diagnosed as having ovarian cancer were examined with both serum tumor markers (CA 125, CA 19-9, TPA, IAP, AFP) and a pelvic CT scan. The tumor markers predict the clinical outcome more accurately than the CT scan. Further, the tumor markers showed a clear correlation with the clinical course. But in one case, however, the tumor markers were seen to reduce below the normal level from chemotherapy, while the CT scan showed a tumor mass. Thus, both, a CT scan and tumor marker assays are felt to be indispensable for detecting the recurrence of an ovarian cancer. (author)

  17. Optical detection and virotherapy of live metastatic tumor cells in body fluids with vaccinia strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqiang Wang

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumor cells in body fluids are important targets for treatment, and critical surrogate markers for evaluating cancer prognosis and therapeutic response. Here we report, for the first time, that live metastatic tumor cells in blood samples from mice bearing human tumor xenografts and in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with cancer were successfully detected using a tumor cell-specific recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV. In contrast to the FDA-approved CellSearch system, VACV detects circulating tumor cells (CTCs in a cancer biomarker-independent manner, thus, free of any bias related to the use of antibodies, and can be potentially a universal system for detection of live CTCs of any tumor type, not limited to CTCs of epithelial origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that VACV was effective in preventing and reducing circulating tumor cells in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Importantly, a single intra-peritoneal delivery of VACV resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid from a patient with gastric cancer. Taken together, these results suggest VACV to be a useful tool for quantitative detection of live tumor cells in liquid biopsies as well as a potentially effective treatment for reducing or eliminating live tumor cells in body fluids of patients with metastatic disease.

  18. Immunohistochemical detection of estrogen receptors in canine mammary tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Atanaskova Petrov; Ivica Gjurovski; Trpe Ristoski; Goran Nikolovski; Pandorce Trenkoska; Plamen Trojacanec; Ksenija Ilievska; Toni Dovenski; Gordana Petrushevska

    2016-01-01

    Mammary tumors are among the most common neoplasms in intact female dogs.They have a complex morphology, usually affecting middle age and older bitches. Almost 50% of the mammary tumors in dogs are malignant neoplasms. Prognosis is based on several factors: stage, age, tumor size, metastasis, histopathology, ovariectomy status and hormone-receptor activity. Immunohistochemical (IHC) measurement has become increasingly an important diagnostic and prognostic parameter, with the development of m...

  19. Molecular diagnostics detect radio resistant tumor in cancer cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, B.

    2004-01-01

    After successful external radiation/intracavitary and interstitial radiation therapy some cancer cervix patients presented with recurrent tumors on 6-12 months follow up period. They had high level of IL-6 on first reporting. This augurs well with the premise that up regulation of IL-6 might be involved in tumor progression

  20. Detection of Secondary Liver Tumors in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma by Using Tumor Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubec jr., L.; Topolčan, O.; Třeška, V.; Holubec sen., L.; Pecen, Ladislav; Pikner, R.; Finek, J.; Visokai, V.; Lipská, L.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2002), s. 134-135 ISSN 0886-3849. [International Conference on Human Tumor Markers /19./. 25.08.2002-29.08.2002, Velje] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : tumor markers * colorectal CA Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  1. Highly-sensitive and large-dynamic diffuse optical tomography system for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wenwen; Zhang, Limin; Yin, Guoyan; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) as a new functional imaging has important clinical applications in many aspects such as benign and malignant breast tumor detection, tumor staging and so on. For quantitative detection of breast tumor, a three-wavelength continuous-wave DOT prototype system combined the ultra-high sensitivity of the photon-counting detection and the measurement parallelism of the lock-in technique was developed to provide high temporal resolution, high sensitivity, large dynamic detection range and signal-to-noise ratio. Additionally, a CT-analogous scanning mode was proposed to cost-effectively increase the detection data. To evaluate the feasibility of the system, a series of assessments were conducted. The results demonstrate that the system can obtain high linearity, stability and negligible inter-wavelength crosstalk. The preliminary phantom experiments show the absorption coefficient is able to be successfully reconstructed, indicating that the system is one of the ideal platforms for optical breast tumor detection.

  2. Clinical studies of 57Co-BLM for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jhin Oh; Ryu, Yong Wun; Kim, Jang Hee

    1986-12-01

    Investigation with 57 Co-Bleomycin in patients with the various cancers and in tumor bearing animals are described. In the patients, 57 Co-Bleomycin appears to be one of the useful tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, and worth applicable to clinical uses. Labelled yield of 57 Co-Bleo. was about 97% by thin layer chromatography. The pyrogen free tests were performed to meet U.S.P. critical ranges. In clinical studies with 57 Co-Bleo, 4 cases out of 5 patients with lung cancer, 2 cases among 3 thyroid cancer patients, and all 3 hepatoma patients showed positive tumor scans. The patients with stomach cancer, and the esophageal cancer showed false negative scintigraphy. A case with pulmonary tuberculosis showed a positive scan while liver abscess showed a negative picture. The merits of 57 Co-Bleomycin scintigraphy seems to be its relatively high affinity to tumors and low radiation hazard in spite of long physical half life. (Author)

  3. Detecting somatostatin receptor in breast tumor tissue and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongjian; Yu Xian; Lin Wei; Ding Xuan; Huang Shizhang; Lu Guangming

    2002-01-01

    The authors observe the difference of somatostatin receptor (SSR) between benign and malignant breast tumor and the relation between SSR and estrogen receptor (ER) or progesterone receptor (PR) in breast tumor tissue, and to predict the clinical value of detecting breast tumor by SSR receptor imaging. These tissues excised from operation in breast tumor were divided into 4 groups: breast malignant tumor group (BMTG) and its control group (C1G), breast benign tumor group (BBTG) and its control group (C2G). SSR was detected by radioligand binding assay (RBA) and ER, PR by LsAB method in these groups. Results is: (1) The SSR express quantity is 108.6 +- 67.3 fmol/mg pr, 37.2 +- 9.6 fmol/mg pr, 43.4 +- 12.6 fmol/mg pr 33.9 +- 10.2 fmol/mg pr respectively in BMTG, C1G, BBTG, C2G. The SSR of BMTG is the most among these groups, the difference is obvious, P 0.05); (2) The correlation coefficient of SSR and ER is 0.859, SSR and PR is 0.750. Most breast tumor tissues express high density SSR, the authors suppose that malignant tumor can been distinguished from benign tumor preliminarily by SSR receptor imaging. There is a good correlation between SSR and ER, PR, detecting SSR may predict the quality of tumor and the prognosis of the patient

  4. [Detection of fps tumor antigen with mono-specific anti-fps serum in tumors induced by acute transforming ALV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Peng; Li, Jianliang; Cui, Zhizhong

    2013-03-04

    To prepare anti-fps mono-specific serum, and detect the fps antigen in tumors induced by acute transforming avian leukosis/sarcoma virus containing v-fps oncogene. Two part of v-fps gene was amplified by RT-PCR using the Fu-J viral RNA as the template. Mono-specific serum was prepared by immuning Kunming white mouse with both two recombinant infusion proteins expressed by the prokaryotic expression system. Indirect immunofluorescent assay was used to detect fps antigen in tumor tissue suspension cells and CEF infected by sarcoma supernatant. Immunohistochemical method was used to detect fps antigen in tumor tissue. The mouse mono-specific serum was specific as it had no cross reaction with classical ALV-J strains. The result reveals that the tumor tissue suspension cells, the CEF infected by sarcoma supernatant, and the slice immunohistochemistry of the sarcoma showed positive results. The anti-fps mono-specific serum was prepared, and the detection method was established, which laid the foundation for the study of viral biological characteristics and mechanism of tumourgenesis of acute transforming avian leukosis/sarcoma virus containing v-fps oncogene.

  5. Detection of bladder tumors using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yingtian; Xie, Tuqiang; Wang, Zhenguo

    2004-07-01

    This paper summarizes the engineering development of our lab for endoscopic optical coherence tomography toward the ultimate goal to image bladder micro architecture and to diagnose bladder cancers. To test the utility and potential limitations of OCT setups for bladder tumor diagnosis, we used a rat bladder cancer model to track the morphological changes following tumor growth. Image results are presented, suggesting that OCT is able to differentiate cancerous lesions from inflammatory lesions based on OCT characterizations of epithelial thickness and backscattering changes of bladder tissue.

  6. Automatic Brain Tumor Detection in T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Images

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořák, Pavel; Kropatsch, W.G.; Bartušek, Karel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2013), s. 223-230 ISSN 1335-8871 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/12/1104; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Brain tumor * Brain tumor detection * Symmetry analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.162, year: 2013

  7. Intraoperative Detection of Superficial Liver Tumors by Fluorescence Imaging Using Indocyanine Green and 5-aminolevulinic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaibori, Masaki; Matsui, Kosuke; Ishizaki, Morihiko; Iida, Hiroya; Okumura, Tadayoshi; Sakaguchi, Tatsuma; Inoue, Kentaro; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Asano, Hiroaki; Kon, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) and the porphyrin precursor 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) have been approved as fluorescence imaging agents in the clinical setting. This study evaluated the usefulness of fluorescence imaging with both ICG and 5-ALA for intraoperative identification of latent small liver tumors. There were 48 patients who had main tumors within 5 mm of the liver surface. 5-ALA hydrochloride was orally administered to patients 3 h before surgery. ICG had been intravenously injected within 14 days prior to surgery. Intraoperatively, after visual inspection, manual palpation and ultrasonography fluorescence images of the liver surface were obtained with ICG and 5-ALA prior to resection. With ICG, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting the preoperatively identified main tumors were 96%, 50% and 94%, respectively. Twelve latent small tumors were newly detected on the liver surface using ICG, five of which proved to be carcinomas. With 5-ALA, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for detecting the main tumors were 57%, 100% and 58%, respectively. Five latent small tumors were newly detected using 5-ALA; all were carcinomas. Overall, five new tumors were detected by both ICG and 5-ALA fluorescence imaging; two were hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and three were metastases of colorectal cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of ICG fluorescence imaging for main tumor detection were relatively high and low, respectively, but the opposite was true of 5-ALA imaging. Fluorescence imaging using 5-ALA may provide greater specificity in the detection of surface-invisible malignant liver tumors than using ICG fluorescence imaging alone. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of lung tumor movement in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Shinichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Ogura, Shigeaki; Akita-Dosaka, Hirotoshi; Kitamura, Kei; Nishioka, Takeshi; Kagei, Kenji; Nishimura, Masaji; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: External radiotherapy for lung tumors requires reducing the uncertainty due to setup error and organ motion. We investigated the three-dimensional movement of lung tumors through an inserted internal marker using a real-time tumor-tracking system and evaluated the efficacy of this system at reducing the internal margin. Methods and Materials: Four patients with lung cancer were analyzed. A 2.0-mm gold marker was inserted into the tumor. The real-time tumor-tracking system calculates and stores three-dimensional coordinates of the marker 30 times/s. The system can trigger the linear accelerator to irradiate the tumor only when the marker is located within the predetermined 'permitted dislocation'. The value was set at ±1 to ±3 mm according to the patient's characteristics. We analyzed 10,413-14,893 data sets for each of the 4 patients. The range of marker movement during normal breathing (beam-off period) was compared with that during gated irradiation (beam-on period) by Student's t test. Results: The range of marker movement during the beam-off period was 5.5-10.0 mm in the lateral direction (x), 6.8-15.9 mm in the craniocaudal direction (y) and 8.1-14.6 mm in the ventrodorsal direction (z). The range during the beam-on period was reduced to within 5.3 mm in all directions in all 4 patients. A significant difference was found between the mean of the range during the beam-off period and the mean of the range during the beam-on period in the x (p=0.007), y (p=0.025), and z (p=0.002) coordinates, respectively. Conclusion: The real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system was useful to analyze the movement of an internal marker. Treatment with megavoltage X-rays was properly given when the tumor marker moved into the 'permitted dislocation' zone from the planned position

  9. Infiltrating leukocytes confound the detection of E-cadherin promoter methylation in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombaerts, Marcel; Middeldorp, Janneke W.; Weide, Esther van der; Philippo, Katja; Wezel, Tom van; Smit, Vincent T.H.B.M.; Cornelisse, Cees J.; Cleton-Jansen, Anne-Marie

    2004-01-01

    Promoter hypermethylation is known to result in transcriptional downregulation of many genes including the CDH1 gene. In this study we set out to determine CDH1 promoter methylation in breast tumors with decreased or absent E-cadherin protein expression and without CDH1 gene mutations by methylation-specific PCR (MSP). Interestingly, some tumor samples with normal E-cadherin expression yielded a methylation-specific PCR product. We hypothesized that other cells than tumor cells contribute to these products. Since in normal breast tissue no CDH1 promoter methylation is detected, infiltrating leukocytes, often present in tumors, might account for these methylation-specific fragments. Indeed, a methylation-specific fragment is found in all twelve leukocyte samples tested. Furthermore, activated T-cells also yielded a methylation-specific fragment. Sequencing of these fragments reveals two distinct methylation profiles. Leukocytes have only partial methylation of some CpGs, while the tumor-associated methylation profile shows complete methylation of most CpGs. Therefore, to assess whether CDH1 methylation is tumor associated, sequencing of MSP products is a prerequisite. Here we show that out of six lobular tumors lacking E-cadherin protein expression, three have tumor-associated CDH1 promoter methylation while in three other tumors no methylation is detected

  10. Using 18F FDG PET/CT to Detect an occult Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Oncogenic Osteomalacia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate excretion, hypophosphatemia, and osteomalacia. This syndrome is often caused by tumors of mesenchymal origin. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia have abnormal bone mineralization, resulting in a high frequency of fractures. Tumor resection is the treatment of choice, as it will often correct the metabolic imbalance. Although oncogenic osteomalacia is a potentially curable disease, diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because of the small size and sporadic location of the tumor. Bone scintigraphy and radiography best characterize osteoma lacia; magnetic resonance imaging findings are nonspecific. Here, we report a case of oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor that was successfully detected by 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ( 18F FDG PET/CT). This case illustrates the advantages of 18F FDG PET/CT in detecting the occult mesenchymal tumor that causes oncogenic osteomalacia.

  11. Early detection of tumor masses by in vivo hematoporphyrin-mediated fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Cozzolino, Rosanna; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Cristina Montesi, Maria; Quarto, Maria; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the capability of fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) for the early detection of surface tumors in mice. We used a hematoporphyrin (HP) compound (HP dichlorohydrate) as a red fluorescent marker and a low noise, high sensitivity, digital CCD camera for fluorescence imaging. In this preliminary study, highly malignant anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously in one mouse and their growth was monitored daily for 5 days by FRI. The selective HP uptake by the tumor tissues was successfully observed: we observed the fluorescence of tumor only 3 days after cancer cells injection, i.e. when the tumor mass was neither visible (to the naked eye) or palpable. These measurements indicate that FRI is a suitable technique to detect minute subcutaneous tumor masses. This FRI system will be coupled to a radionuclide imaging system based on a CdTe detector for in vivo multimodal imaging in mice

  12. Tc99m glucoheptonate in detection of lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiff, D.N.E.; Nascimento, C.B.L.; Riesgo, A.; Ferreira, E.D.; Kwiatowski, A.; Bornemann, C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors intended, with this study, the use and the efficacy of pulmonary scintigraphy with GHA Tc99 as auxiliary method in the diagnosis of lung tumors. Fifty-five patients were studied clinically and radiologically and afterwards with GHA Tc99 pulmonary scintigraphy. The data were confronted with pathologic findings. In thirty-nine of this patients the isotope were captivate in the place of the tumour. (author) [pt

  13. Detection of Hypoxia in Human Brain Tumor Xenografts Using a Modified Comet Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Wang

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available We used the standard comet assay successfully to generate in vitro dose-response curves under oxic and hypoxic conditions. We then made mixtures of cells that had been irradiated with 3 and 9 Gy of X-rays to simulate two subpopulations in a tumor, but efforts to accurately detect and quantify the subpopulations using the standard comet assay were unsuccessful. Therefore, we investigated a modified comet assay to determine whether it could be used for measuring hypoxia in our model systems. U251 MG cells were grown as subcutaneous tumors in athymic mice; U251 MG and U87 MG cells were grown as intracerebral (i.c. tumors in athymic rats. Animals were injected with RSU 1069, irradiated, and euthanized. Tumors and normal brains were removed, and the cells were analyzed using a modified comet assay. Differences in comet tail moment distributions between tumor and contralateral normal brain, using tail moments at either the 25th or 50th percentile in each distribution, were taken as measures of the degree of tumor hypoxia. For U251 MG tumors, there was a positive relationship between tumor size and the degree of hypoxia, whereas preliminary data from U87 MG i.c. tumors showed less hypoxia and no apparent relationship between tumor size and hypoxia.

  14. An approach to malignant mammary phyllodes tumors detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mammary phyllodes tumors (MPT are uncommon fibroepithelial (biphasic neoplasms whose clinical behavior is difficult to predict on the basis of histological criteria only. They are divided into benign, borderline malignant and malignant groups. Sometimes it appears difficult to distinguish these tumors from other types of soft tissue sarcomas. Because of the relatively scant data on the role of biological markers in MPT histogenesis, we have decided to undertake the following study, trying to shed more light on the issue by investigating the following elements that make up MPT: their histological patterns, biological behavior, enzymohistochemical, histochemical and immunohistochemical characteristics (ICH together with the mast cell analysis. Methods. We examined the biopsy material of 35 MPT in our laboratory. Enzymohistochemistry was performed on frozen sections (method of Crowford, Nachlas and Seligman. The used methods were classical hematoxylin-eosin (H&E; histochemical Massontrichrome, Alcian-blue, Periodic acid Schiff and immunohistochemical LSAB2 method (DacoCytomation. Ki-67, ckit, vimentin, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and Her-2 oncoprotein immunohistochemistry was performed on all tumors. Results. The patients were ranged per age from 30-62 years (mean 43.3 years, median 39 years. A total of 35 cases of MPT were included: 20 benign (57%, 6 borderline malignant (17% and 9 malignant (26%. Twenty-two patients (62.8 % underwent segmental mastectomy, while 13 (37.2% had total mastectomies. Twenty-eight patients had negative surgical margins at original resection. The mean size of malignant MPT (7.8 cm was larger than that of benign MPT (4.5 cm. Significant features of the malignant MPT were: stromal cellularity, stromal cellular atypism, high mitotic activity, atypic mitoses, stromal overgrowth, infiltrative tumor contour and heterologous stromal elements. Benign MPT showed strong enzymohistochemical

  15. Viral-Cellular DNA Junctions as Molecular Markers for Assessing Intra-Tumor Heterogeneity in Cervical Cancer and for the Detection of Circulating Tumor DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Carow

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of cervical cancer is frequently accompanied by the integration of human papillomaviruses (HPV DNA into the host genome. Viral-cellular junction sequences, which arise in consequence, are highly tumor specific. By using these fragments as markers for tumor cell origin, we examined cervical cancer clonality in the context of intra-tumor heterogeneity. Moreover, we assessed the potential of these fragments as molecular tumor markers and analyzed their suitability for the detection of circulating tumor DNA in sera of cervical cancer patients. For intra-tumor heterogeneity analyses tumors of 8 patients with up to 5 integration sites per tumor were included. Tumor islands were micro-dissected from cryosections of several tissue blocks representing different regions of the tumor. Each micro-dissected tumor area served as template for a single junction-specific PCR. For the detection of circulating tumor-DNA (ctDNA junction-specific PCR-assays were applied to sera of 21 patients. Samples were collected preoperatively and during the course of disease. In 7 of 8 tumors the integration site(s were shown to be homogenously distributed throughout different tumor regions. Only one tumor displayed intra-tumor heterogeneity. In 5 of 21 analyzed preoperative serum samples we specifically detected junction fragments. Junction-based detection of ctDNA was significantly associated with reduced recurrence-free survival. Our study provides evidence that HPV-DNA integration is as an early step in cervical carcinogenesis. Clonality with respect to HPV integration opens new perspectives for the application of viral-cellular junction sites as molecular biomarkers in a clinical setting such as disease monitoring.

  16. Patient-Specific Circulating Tumor DNA Detection during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Francesca; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Houy, Alexandre; Saliou, Adrien; Madic, Jordan; Rampanou, Aurore; Hego, Caroline; Milder, Maud; Cottu, Paul; Sablin, Marie-Paule; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Proudhon, Charlotte; Pierga, Jean-Yves

    2017-03-01

    In nonmetastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients, we investigated whether circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) detection can reflect the tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and detect minimal residual disease after surgery. Ten milliliters of plasma were collected at 4 time points: before NCT; after 1 cycle; before surgery; after surgery. Customized droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assays were used to track tumor protein p53 ( TP53 ) mutations previously characterized in tumor tissue by massively parallel sequencing (MPS). Forty-six patients with nonmetastatic TNBC were enrolled. TP53 mutations were identified in 40 of them. Customized ddPCR probes were validated for 38 patients, with excellent correlation with MPS ( r = 0.99), specificity (≥2 droplets/assay), and sensitivity (at least 0.1%). At baseline, ctDNA was detected in 27/36 patients (75%). Its detection was associated with mitotic index ( P = 0.003), tumor grade ( P = 0.003), and stage ( P = 0.03). During treatment, we observed a drop of ctDNA levels in all patients but 1. No patient had detectable ctDNA after surgery. The patient with rising ctDNA levels experienced tumor progression during NCT. Pathological complete response (16/38 patients) was not correlated with ctDNA detection at any time point. ctDNA positivity after 1 cycle of NCT was correlated with shorter disease-free ( P < 0.001) and overall ( P = 0.006) survival. Customized ctDNA detection by ddPCR achieved a 75% detection rate at baseline. During NCT, ctDNA levels decreased quickly and minimal residual disease was not detected after surgery. However, a slow decrease of ctDNA level during NCT was strongly associated with shorter survival. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  17. Raw Tumor MRI Edge Detection using Interval Type 2 Fuzzy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-22

    Mar 22, 2018 ... detectors are tested on images added with 0.001 white Gaussian noise and salt and ... noise removable and its effect on edge detection to various images contents. ..... Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 36, no. 7, pp.

  18. Tumor specific glycoproteins and method for detecting tumorigenic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, E.A.; Bolmer, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of tumour specific glycoproteins (TSGP) in human sera often indicates the presence of a malignant tumour in a patient. The distinguishing characteristics of TSGP isolated from the blood sera of cancer patients are described in detail together with methods of TSGP isolation and purification. Details are also given of radioimmunoassay techniques capable of detecting very low levels of serum TSGP with high specificity. (U.K.)

  19. Direct detection of early-stage cancers using circulating tumor DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phallen, Jillian; Sausen, Mark; Adleff, Vilmos

    2017-01-01

    Early detection and intervention are likely to be the most effective means for reducing morbidity and mortality of human cancer. However, development of methods for noninvasive detection of early-stage tumors has remained a challenge. We have developed an approach called targeted error correction...

  20. Noninvasive detection of temozolomide in brain tumor xenografts by magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Y.; Holm, David Alberg; Okollie, B.

    2010-01-01

    demonstrate partial breakdown of the BBB/BTB and good vascularization in U87MG xenografts. A [C-13] TMZ peak was detected at 3.9 ppm by HMQC from a selected volume of about 0.15 cm(3) within the brain tumor with HMQC pulse sequences. This study clearly demonstrates the noninvasive detection of [C-13]TMZ...

  1. Analysis of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals detects tumor responses to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Timothy J; Canuto, Holly C; Kettunen, Mikko I; Booth, Thomas C; Hu, De-En; Krishnan, Anant S; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Neves, André A; McLachlan, Charles; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of ever increasing volumes of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has created an urgent need to develop automated and objective image analysis algorithms that can assist in determining tumor margins, diagnosing tumor stage, and detecting treatment response. We have shown previously that Minkowski functionals, which are precise morphological and structural descriptors of image heterogeneity, can be used to enhance the detection, in T1 -weighted images, of a targeted Gd(3+) -chelate-based contrast agent for detecting tumor cell death. We have used Minkowski functionals here to characterize heterogeneity in T2 -weighted images acquired before and after drug treatment, and obtained without contrast agent administration. We show that Minkowski functionals can be used to characterize the changes in image heterogeneity that accompany treatment of tumors with a vascular disrupting agent, combretastatin A4-phosphate, and with a cytotoxic drug, etoposide. Parameterizing changes in the heterogeneity of T2 -weighted images can be used to detect early responses of tumors to drug treatment, even when there is no change in tumor size. The approach provides a quantitative and therefore objective assessment of treatment response that could be used with other types of MR image and also with other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Intraoperative use of gamma-detecting probes to localize neuroendocrine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.; Baum, R.P.

    2000-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are characterized by the expression of different peptides and biogenic amines. These rare tumors tend to grow slowly and are notoriously difficult to localize, at least in the early stages. Surgical removal is the only definitive therapeutic option for neuroendocrine tumors and relief from hyper functional status. The effectiveness of surgical treatment is invariably dependent upon the complete surgical excision of all tumor tissue, because microscopic and occult disease not readily seen by the surgeon may remain in sit, leading to shortened survival. Radio guided surgery (RGS) is an intraoperative technique that enables the surgeon to localize radiolabelled tissue based on the characteristics of the various tissues. For imaging recurrent MTC (Medullary Thyroid Cancer) many radiopharmaceuticals have been used to visualize tumor sites, but none of them has shown excellent sensitivity. Preoperative somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and intraoperative RGS in patients with recurrent MTC demonstrate only part of the tumor sites and cannot visualize small tumor sites (less than 10 mm). In patients with recurrent MTC, intraoperative gamma probe examination is able to localize over 30% more tumor lesions when compared with conventional preoperative imaging modalities and surgical findings. In addition to scintigraphy of the adrenal glands by precursors of adrenal hormones, imaging with a radiolabelled somatostatin analogue is possible; however ( 111 In-DTPA-D-Phe 1 )-pentetreotide is not specific for any adrenal disease or function and the relatively high radioligand accumulation in the kidneys limited the use for detection of tumors in the area of the adrenal glands

  3. Intraoperative use of gamma-detecting probes to localize neuroendocrine tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany). Medical Center, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Bad Berka (Germany). Clinic of Nuclear Medicine/PET Center

    2000-03-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors are characterized by the expression of different peptides and biogenic amines. These rare tumors tend to grow slowly and are notoriously difficult to localize, at least in the early stages. Surgical removal is the only definitive therapeutic option for neuroendocrine tumors and relief from hyper functional status. The effectiveness of surgical treatment is invariably dependent upon the complete surgical excision of all tumor tissue, because microscopic and occult disease not readily seen by the surgeon may remain in sit, leading to shortened survival. Radio guided surgery (RGS) is an intraoperative technique that enables the surgeon to localize radiolabelled tissue based on the characteristics of the various tissues. For imaging recurrent MTC (Medullary Thyroid Cancer) many radiopharmaceuticals have been used to visualize tumor sites, but none of them has shown excellent sensitivity. Preoperative somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and intraoperative RGS in patients with recurrent MTC demonstrate only part of the tumor sites and cannot visualize small tumor sites (less than 10 mm). In patients with recurrent MTC, intraoperative gamma probe examination is able to localize over 30% more tumor lesions when compared with conventional preoperative imaging modalities and surgical findings. In addition to scintigraphy of the adrenal glands by precursors of adrenal hormones, imaging with a radiolabelled somatostatin analogue is possible; however ({sup 111}In-DTPA-D-Phe{sup 1})-pentetreotide is not specific for any adrenal disease or function and the relatively high radioligand accumulation in the kidneys limited the use for detection of tumors in the area of the adrenal glands.

  4. Radio (111In) capillary tube leukocyte adherence inhibition assay for the detection of specific tumor-associated immunity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, R.; Myers, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The specific tumor-associated immune response of C3H/HeJ mice was determined at various times after subcutaneous injection with a transplantable mammary adenocarcinoma (H2712) using a radio ( 111 In) leukocyte adherence inhibition (LAI) assay carried out in capillary tubes. Solubilized tumor-associated antigen prepared by a single phase 1-butanol extraction of the specific tumor and other transplantable tumors of different histological origin were used in the evaluation of LAI reactivity. The assay was found to be capable of detecting a significant antitumor response before the subcutaneous tumors became detectable by palpation. The response remained significant until the tumors were greater than 20 mm in diameter

  5. Diagnostic value of multi-tumor markers protein biochip detection for primary pulmonary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Fengpo; Wu Yiwei; Li Qingru; Fa Yihua

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of multi-tumor markers protein biochip detection for primary pulmonary cancer, 12 tumor markers including AFP, CEA, NSE, CA125, CA15-3, CA242, CA19-9, PSA, f-PSA, FER, β-HCG and HGH were measured by the protein biochip in the serum of 45 primary pulmonary cancer patients. Positive rate of tumor markers was FER (42.2%), CEA (35.6%), CA125 (24.4%), CA15-3 (17.8%), CA242 (13.3%), CA19-9 (11.1%), β-HCG(8.9%), HGH(6.7%), NSE(4.4%), AFP (0), f-PSA (0) and PSA (0), respectively. The rate of patients with one abnorma indicator was 57.8% except FER. The positive rate using multi-tumor markers protein biochip detection was significantly higher than that of single tumor marker detective method, and this detection can be used for the diagnosis of patients with primary pulmonary cancer. (authors)

  6. Detection of chromosome aberrations in tumors lineage after irradiation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luciana Maria Silva; Campos, Tarcisio

    2002-01-01

    When radioresistant cancerous cells are irradiated at level of few Gys, the interactions may not generate visible observations in the morphology of the cells or effects so intense such as death after few hours. The changes that will be observed depend on the combination of many factors that define the probability of cell surviving in response to the physical dose applied. Genetic factors may affect the cell response such as the cell sensitivity to irradiation, cancerous cell is studied when irradiated with Co-60 gamma rays. Besides the evaluation of the radiosensitivity of this cells when exposed to gamma irradiation, possible chromosomic aberrations and apoptosis were detected. (author)

  7. An accurate algorithm to match imperfectly matched images for lung tumor detection without markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozario, Timothy; Bereg, Sergey; Yan, Yulong; Chiu, Tsuicheng; Liu, Honghuan; Kearney, Vasant; Jiang, Lan; Mao, Weihua

    2015-05-08

    implanted and used as ground truth for tumor positions. Although other organs and bony structures introduced strong signals superimposed on tumors at some angles, this method accurately located tumors on every projection over 12 gantry angles. The maximum error was less than 2.2 mm, while the total average error was less than 0.9mm. This algorithm was capable of detecting tumors without markers, despite strong background signals.

  8. Pancreatic tumor detection using hypericin-based fluorescence spectroscopy and cytology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Harish; Geary, Kevin; Fetterman, Harold R.; Saxton, Romaine E.

    2005-04-01

    Hypericin is a novel, highly fluorescent photosensitizer that exhibits selective tumor cell uptake properties and is particularly resistant to photobleaching. In this study, we have characterized hypericin uptake in human pancreatic tumor cells with relation to incubation time, cell number, and drug concentration. Ex vivo hypericin based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed to detect the presence of MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic tumor cells in the peritoneal cavity of BALB/c nude mice, as well as to quantify gross tumor burden. Hypericin based cytology of peritoneal lavage samples, using both one and two photon laser confocal microscopy, demonstrated more than a two-fold increase in fluorescence emission of pancreatic tumor cells as compared to control samples. In vitro treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with hypericin based photodynamic therapy showed tumor cell cytotoxicity in a drug dose, incident laser power, and time dependent manner. For these experiments, a continuous wavelength solid-state laser source (532 nm) was operated at power levels in the range of 100-400 mW. Potential applications of hypericin in tumor diagnosis, staging, and therapy will be presented.

  9. MiR-139 in digestive system tumor diagnosis and detection: Bioinformatics and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Hui; Ji, Jia; Weng, Hong; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2018-06-05

    Accumulating evidence has indicated that microRNAs play important roles in the initiation and progression of digestive system tumors. However, previous studies suggest that the accuracy of miRNA detection in digestive system tumors was inconsistent. The candidate miRNAs were obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the diagnostic value of these miRNAs in digestive system tumors. Furthermore, the potential target genes of the miRNAs were predicted and assessed with functional analysis. According to TCGA data, miR-139 was a common biomarker of digestive system tumors. It was markedly reduced in tumor tissues as compared with non-cancerous tissues in digestive system tumors. In the meta-analysis, the pooled diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) and AUC was 57.51 (95% CI: 14.25-232.04) and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.94-0.97), respectively. Furthermore, the overall sensitivity and specificity was 0.89 (95% CI: 0.73-0.96) and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.75-0.97), respectively. The diagnostic value of tissue miR-139 was higher than the diagnostic value of blood miR-139. In particular, miR-139 was a superior marker for distinguishing colorectal cancer. miR-139 could be a potential biomarker for diagnosis of digestive system tumors especially colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Systematic review on the role of serum tumor markers in the detection of recurrent pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daamen, Lois A; Groot, Vincent P; Heerkens, Hanne D; Intven, Martijn P W; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2018-04-01

    Biomarker testing can be helpful to monitor disease progression after resection of pancreatic cancer. This systematic review aims to give an overview of the literature on the diagnostic value of serum tumor markers for the detection of recurrent pancreatic cancer during follow-up. A systematic search was performed to 2 October 2017. All studies reporting on the diagnostic value of postoperatively measured serum biomarkers for the detection of pancreatic cancer recurrence were included. Data on diagnostic accuracy of tumor markers were extracted. Forest plots and pooled values of sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Four articles described test results of CA 19-9. A pooled sensitivity and specificity of respectively 0.73 (95% CI 0.66-0.80) and 0.83 (95% CI 0.73-0.91) were calculated. One article reported on CEA, showing a sensitivity of 50% and specificity of 65%. No other serum tumor markers were discussed for surveillance purposes in the current literature. Although testing of serum CA 19-9 has considerable limitations, CA 19-9 remains the most used serum tumor marker for surveillance after surgical resection of pancreatic cancer. Further studies are needed to assess the role of serum tumor marker testing in the detection of recurrent pancreatic cancer and to optimize surveillance strategies. Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. His-tag ELISA for the detection of humoral tumor-specific immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disis Mary L

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The application of high throughput molecular techniques such as SEREX are resulting in the identification of a multitude of tumor associated antigens. As newly identified antigens are incorporated into a variety of clinical trials, standardization of immunologic monitoring methods becomes increasingly important. We questioned whether mammalian cell expression of a histadine-linked human protein could be used to produce antigen suitable for detecting tumor-specific humoral immunity and whether such an assay could be amenable to standardization for clinical use. Methods We designed a his-tagged capture ELISA based on lysate from genetically engineered CHO cells for detection of antibodies to insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2, a novel tumor antigen. We performed technical and preliminary clinical validation studies, including comparison to a standard indirect ELISA based on commercially prepared recombinant antigen. Results The his-tagged capture ELISA could be standardized. Precision experiments resulted in CVs 2 values of 0.99. In comparison to Western blot analysis, his-tag and indirect ELISA accurately identified 88% and 93% of samples, respectively. Sample concordance between capture and indirect assays was highly significant (p = 0.003. Furthermore, significantly greater levels of IGFBP-2 antibody immunity were found in cancer patients compared to normal controls (p = 0.008. Conclusion A genetically engineered cell lysate based ELISA can be amenable to standardization and can detect increased levels of antibody immunity to tumor-associated antigen in cancer patients compared to non tumor-bearing healthy controls.

  12. Clinical values of detection of multiple tumor markers in pleural fluid for diagnosis malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Chuangqing; Jiang Li; Zhou Guanghua; He Yunnan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To improve the diagnostic accuracy for the differentiation of malignant from tuberculous pleural effusion with determination of multiple tumor markers in pleural fluid. Methods: With a multiple tumor markers combined protein chip diagnostic system, contents of twelve common tumor markers were detected in the chest fluid from 60 patients with malignant pleural effusion and 30 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion. Results: For pulmonary carcinoma related pleural effusion, the contents of four common tumor markers (CEA, NSE, SF, CA125) in chest fluid were significantly higher those in tuberculous related chest fluid. The diagnostic positive rate of combined test of these four marker for malignancy could be as high as 96.7%. Conclusion: Combined determination of chest fluid CEA, NSE, SF, CA125 contents was very sensitive and accurate for differentiation of malignant from tuberculous pleural effusion. (authors)

  13. Detection of five tumor markers in lung cancer by trypsin digestion of sputum method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Min; Nong Tianlei; Liu Daying

    2011-01-01

    To explore the detection of five tumor markers by trypsin digestion of sputum in the diagnosis of lung cancer, the samples of sputum in patients with lung cancer and benign lung disease were digested by trypsin and used to measure five tumor markers. The results showed that the sputum were well digested by 6% trypsin at pH8 and no affect on the determination of tumor markers. The CEA, CA125, CA153, CA211 and NSE levels in lung cancer group were significantly higher than that of in benign group (P<0.05). The sputum CEA and CA125 levels were significantly higher than that of the serum levels (P<0.05). The detection of sputum CEA, CA125, CA153, CA211 and NSE levels have clinical value in the diagnosis of lung cancer. When combined with other diagnostic methods,it might be helpful for further diagnosis in non confirmed lung cancer patients. (authors)

  14. cis-4-[{sup 18}F]-Fluoro-L-proline fails to detect peripheral tumors in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffels, Gabriele; Pauleit, Dirk [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany); Haas, Rainer; Kobbe, Guido [Department of Oncology, Hematology, and Clinical Immunology, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Salber, Dagmar [C. and O. Vogt Institute of Brain Research, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, FRG (Germany); Hamacher, Kurt; Coenen, Heinz H. [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics - Nuclear Chemistry, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich, FRG (Germany); Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Biophysics-Medicine, Research Centre Juelich, D-52425 Juelich, FRG (Germany)], E-mail: k.j.langen@fz-juelich.de

    2008-11-15

    System A amino acid transport is increased in transformed and malignant cells. The amino acid 4-cis[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-proline (cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro) has been shown to be a substrate of the System A amino acid carrier. In this pilot study, we investigated the diagnostic potential of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in patients with various tumors in comparison with [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Methods: Eight patients (seven females, one male, age range 43-77 years) with large primary, recurrent or metastatic tumors of different histologies were included in this study. One patient had a recurrent non-Hodgkin lymphoma; two patients, metastatic colon or rectal cancer; one, a metastatic endometrial cancer; one, a multiple myeloma; one, an Ewing sarcoma; one, a metastatic breast cancer and one, a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PET scans of the trunk were acquired at 1 h after intravenous injection of 400 MBq cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro and compared to PET scans with [{sup 18}F]FDG. Results: None of the tumors or metastatic lesions in this series of patients demonstrated relevant uptake of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro. In contrast, all tumors with exception of the multiple myeloma showed an intensive uptake of [{sup 18}F]FDG. The mean standardized uptake value of cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro in the tumor or metastases was significantly lower than that of [{sup 18}F]FDG uptake (1.7{+-}0.6 vs. 5.7{+-}3.0; n=8; P<.01). Conclusion: Although other System A-specific tracers have shown relevant tumor uptake, cis-[{sup 18}F]FPro fails to detect most types of human tumors. Based on these results, we cannot recommend a further evaluation of this tracer as a tumor-seeking agent.

  15. Telomerase Activity in Breast Tumor Tissues and its Possible use for Detection of Circulating Carcinoma Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimíčková, M.; Nekulová, M.; Pecen, Ladislav; Vagundová, M.; Maláska, J.; Obermannová, R.; Lauerová, L.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 5, - (2002), s. 98 ISSN 1211-8869. [Central European Conference on Human Tumor Markers /4./. 13.02.2003-16.02.2003, Karlovy Vary] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : telomerase activity * early detection of distant metastases * cancer reccurence Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  16. Staging of primary head and neck tumors and detection of recurrences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, S.; Baum, R.P.; Knecht, R.; Hoer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas represent the vast majority of all malignant tumors of the head and neck region. Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor affecting survival of patients with head and neck cancer. The effectiveness of surgical treatment depends on the complete excision of all tumor tissue and an accurate preoperative diagnosis. Tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging is therefore mandatory. In comparison to positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET), morphological imaging modalities (CT, MRI) have been applied for the localization of primary head and neck tumors because of their better anatomical resolution. Metabolic tumor imaging using FDG PET is superior to morphological imaging by CT and MRI in the detection of small cervical lymph node metastases (Class 1a indication). Increased FDG uptake has also been observed in benign inflammatory lesions after radiation therapy, therefore detection of local recurrence with FDG PET can be problematic. To ensure a high diagnostic accuracy it is been suggested to perform FDG PET not earlier than 3 months after radiation therapy (Class 1a indication for the diagnosis of local recurrence). (orig.) [de

  17. Detection of high GS risk group prostate tumors by diffusion tensor imaging and logistic regression modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertas, Gokhan

    2018-07-01

    To assess the value of joint evaluation of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures by using logistic regression modelling to detect high GS risk group prostate tumors. Fifty tumors imaged using DTI on a 3 T MRI device were analyzed. Regions of interests focusing on the center of tumor foci and noncancerous tissue on the maps of mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were used to extract the minimum, the maximum and the mean measures. Measure ratio was computed by dividing tumor measure by noncancerous tissue measure. Logistic regression models were fitted for all possible pair combinations of the measures using 5-fold cross validation. Systematic differences are present for all MD measures and also for all FA measures in distinguishing the high risk tumors [GS ≥ 7(4 + 3)] from the low risk tumors [GS ≤ 7(3 + 4)] (P Logistic regression modelling provides a favorable solution for the joint evaluations easily adoptable in clinical practice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Detecting small lung tumors in mouse models by refractive-index microradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Chia-Chi; Hwu, Y. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Physics, Taipei (China); National Tsing Hua University, Department of Engineering and System Science, Hsinchu (China); Zhang, Guilin; Yue, Weisheng; Li, Yan; Xue, Hongjie [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Shanghai (China); Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Xu, Lisa X. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Wang, Chang Hai; Chen, Nanyow; Lu, Chien Hung; Lee, Ting-Kuo [Academia Sinica, Institute of Physics, Taipei (China); Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Lu, Yen-Ta [Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei City (China); Ching, Yu-Tai [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Computer Science, Hsinchu (China); Shih, T.F.; Yang, P.C. [National Taiwan University, College of Medicine, Taipei (China); Je, J.H. [Pohang University of Science and Technology Pohang, X-ray Imaging Center, Pohang CT, Kyungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Refractive-index (phase-contrast) radiology was able to detect lung tumors less than 1 mm in live mice. Significant micromorphology differences were observed in the microradiographs between normal, inflamed, and lung cancer tissues. This was made possible by the high phase contrast and by the fast image taking that reduces the motion blur. The detection of cancer and inflammation areas by phase contrast microradiology and microtomography was validated by bioluminescence and histopathological analysis. The smallest tumor detected is less than 1 mm{sup 3} with accuracy better than 1 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 3}. This level of performance is currently suitable for animal studies, while further developments are required for clinical application. (orig.)

  19. Detecting small lung tumors in mouse models by refractive-index microradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, Chia-Chi; Hwu, Y.; Zhang, Guilin; Yue, Weisheng; Li, Yan; Xue, Hongjie; Liu, Ping; Sun, Jianqi; Xu, Lisa X.; Wang, Chang Hai; Chen, Nanyow; Lu, Chien Hung; Lee, Ting-Kuo; Yang, Yuh-Cheng; Lu, Yen-Ta; Ching, Yu-Tai; Shih, T.F.; Yang, P.C.; Je, J.H.; Margaritondo, G.

    2011-01-01

    Refractive-index (phase-contrast) radiology was able to detect lung tumors less than 1 mm in live mice. Significant micromorphology differences were observed in the microradiographs between normal, inflamed, and lung cancer tissues. This was made possible by the high phase contrast and by the fast image taking that reduces the motion blur. The detection of cancer and inflammation areas by phase contrast microradiology and microtomography was validated by bioluminescence and histopathological analysis. The smallest tumor detected is less than 1 mm 3 with accuracy better than 1 x 10 -3 mm 3 . This level of performance is currently suitable for animal studies, while further developments are required for clinical application. (orig.)

  20. Selection of monoclonal anti-CEA antibody fragments for tumor detection by immunoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mach, J.P.; Buchegger, F.

    1986-01-01

    It is described how individual MAb directed against carcinoembryotic antigen (CEA) is selected which does not crossreact with granulocytes and gives the best tumor localization in the model of nude mice grafted with human colon carcinoma. Using this model, the superiority of F(ab')/sub 2/ and particularly Fab fragments from high affinity MAb for the localization of relatively small tumor nodules is demonstrated. These MAb fragments are also successfully used in an ongoing clinical trial for the detection of primary and metastatic colorectal carcinomas

  1. A minimally invasive multiple marker approach allows highly efficient detection of meningioma tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meese Eckart

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of effective frameworks that permit an accurate diagnosis of tumors, especially in their early stages, remains a grand challenge in the field of bioinformatics. Our approach uses statistical learning techniques applied to multiple antigen tumor antigen markers utilizing the immune system as a very sensitive marker of molecular pathological processes. For validation purposes we choose the intracranial meningioma tumors as model system since they occur very frequently, are mostly benign, and are genetically stable. Results A total of 183 blood samples from 93 meningioma patients (WHO stages I-III and 90 healthy controls were screened for seroreactivity with a set of 57 meningioma-associated antigens. We tested several established statistical learning methods on the resulting reactivity patterns using 10-fold cross validation. The best performance was achieved by Naïve Bayes Classifiers. With this classification method, our framework, called Minimally Invasive Multiple Marker (MIMM approach, yielded a specificity of 96.2%, a sensitivity of 84.5%, and an accuracy of 90.3%, the respective area under the ROC curve was 0.957. Detailed analysis revealed that prediction performs particularly well on low-grade (WHO I tumors, consistent with our goal of early stage tumor detection. For these tumors the best classification result with a specificity of 97.5%, a sensitivity of 91.3%, an accuracy of 95.6%, and an area under the ROC curve of 0.971 was achieved using a set of 12 antigen markers only. This antigen set was detected by a subset selection method based on Mutual Information. Remarkably, our study proves that the inclusion of non-specific antigens, detected not only in tumor but also in normal sera, increases the performance significantly, since non-specific antigens contribute additional diagnostic information. Conclusion Our approach offers the possibility to screen members of risk groups as a matter of routine

  2. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Kavanagh, M.C.; Newcombe, D.

    1995-01-01

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 ± 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 ± 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 ± 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 ± 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO 2 values, or [ 3 H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  3. Ultrasonographic detection of adrenal gland tumor and ureterolithiasis in a guinea pig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaschen, L.; Ketz, C.; Lang, J.; Weber, U.; Bacciarini, L.; Kohler, I.

    1998-01-01

    A 5-year-old guinea pig was presented to the University of Berne Small Animal Radiology Department for an ultrasound examination of the abdomen to confirm a suspected diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. The patient had bilateral alopecia, was apathic and obese. Ultrasonographically, a tumor of the left adrenal gland, obstruction of the left ureter by an ureterolith, as well as hydronephrosis of the left kidney were detected. During surgery to relieve the ureteral obstruction the adrenal gland tumor was removed. The guinea pig died post-operatively due to blood loss. The left adrenal gland tumor was found histopathologically to be an adenoma and the right adrenal gland also had multiple small adenomas, but grossly appeared normal. The ureterolith was analyzed and found by x-ray diffraction to consist of calcium carbonate

  4. Limited utility of tissue micro-arrays in detecting intra-tumoral heterogeneity in stem cell characteristics and tumor progression markers in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kündig, Pascale; Giesen, Charlotte; Jackson, Hartland; Bodenmiller, Bernd; Papassotirolopus, Bärbel; Freiberger, Sandra Nicole; Aquino, Catharine; Opitz, Lennart; Varga, Zsuzsanna

    2018-05-08

    Intra-tumoral heterogeneity has been recently addressed in different types of cancer, including breast cancer. A concept describing the origin of intra-tumoral heterogeneity is the cancer stem-cell hypothesis, proposing the existence of cancer stem cells that can self-renew limitlessly and therefore lead to tumor progression. Clonal evolution in accumulated single cell genomic alterations is a further possible explanation in carcinogenesis. In this study, we addressed the question whether intra-tumoral heterogeneity can be reliably detected in tissue-micro-arrays in breast cancer by comparing expression levels of conventional predictive/prognostic tumor markers, tumor progression markers and stem cell markers between central and peripheral tumor areas. We analyzed immunohistochemical expression and/or gene amplification status of conventional prognostic tumor markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6), tumor progression markers (PTEN, PIK3CA, p53, Ki-67) and stem cell markers (mTOR, SOX2, SOX9, SOX10, SLUG, CD44, CD24, TWIST) in 372 tissue-micro-array samples from 72 breast cancer patients. Expression levels were compared between central and peripheral tumor tissue areas and were correlated to histopathological grading. 15 selected cases additionally underwent RNA sequencing for transcriptome analysis. No significant difference in any of the analyzed between central and peripheral tumor areas was seen with any of the analyzed methods/or results that showed difference. Except mTOR, PIK3CA and SOX9 (nuclear) protein expression, all markers correlated significantly (p < 0.05) with histopathological grading both in central and peripheral areas. Our results suggest that intra-tumoral heterogeneity of stem-cell and tumor-progression markers cannot be reliably addressed in tissue-micro-array samples in breast cancer. However, most markers correlated strongly with histopathological grading confirming prognostic information as expression profiles were independent on the site of the

  5. Early tumor detection afforded by in vivo imaging of near-infrared II fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhimin; Dang, Xiangnan; Huang, Xing; Muzumdar, Mandar D; Xu, Eric S; Bardhan, Neelkanth Manoj; Song, Haiqin; Qi, Ruogu; Yu, Yingjie; Li, Ting; Wei, Wei; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Birrer, Michael J; Belcher, Angela M; Ghoroghchian, P Peter

    2017-07-01

    Cell-intrinsic reporters such as luciferase (LUC) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) have been commonly utilized in preclinical studies to image tumor growth and to monitor therapeutic responses. While extrinsic reporters that emit near infrared I (NIR-I: 650-950 nm) or near-infrared II (NIR-II: 1000-1700 nm) optical signals have enabled minimization of tissue autofluorescence and light scattering, it has remained unclear as to whether their use has afforded more accurate tumor imaging in small animals. Here, we developed a novel optical imaging construct comprised of rare earth lanthanide nanoparticles coated with biodegradable diblock copolymers and doped with organic fluorophores, generating NIR-I and NIR-II emissive bands upon optical excitation. Simultaneous injection of multiple spectrally-unique nanoparticles into mice bearing tumor implants established via intraperitoneal dissemination of LUC + /RFP + OVCAR-8 ovarian cancer cells enabled direct comparisons of imaging with extrinsic vs. intrinsic reporters, NIR-II vs. NIR-I signals, as well as targeted vs. untargeted exogenous contrast agents in the same animal and over time. We discovered that in vivo optical imaging at NIR-II wavelengths facilitates more accurate detection of smaller and earlier tumor deposits, offering enhanced sensitivity, improved spatial contrast, and increased depths of tissue penetration as compared to imaging with visible or NIR-I fluorescent agents. Our work further highlights the hitherto underappreciated enhancements in tumor accumulation that may be achieved with intraperitoneal as opposed to intravenous administration of nanoparticles. Lastly, we found discrepancies in the fidelity of tumor uptake that could be obtained by utilizing small molecules for in vivo as opposed to in vitro targeting of nanoparticles to disseminated tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Tumor-Targeted Nanodelivery System to Improve Early MRI Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Pirollo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that would enhance sensitivity, leading to earlier detection of cancer and visualization of metastatic disease, is an area of intense exploration. We have devised a tumor-targeting, liposomal nanodelivery platform for use in gene medicine. This systemically administered nanocomplex has been shown to specifically and efficiently deliver both genes and oligonucleotides to primary and metastatic tumor cells, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and even tumor regression. Here we examine the effect on MRI of incorporating conventional MRI contrast agent Magnevist® into our anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody (TfRscFv liposomal complex. Both in vitro and in an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we show increased resolution and image intensity with the complexed Magnevist®. Using advanced microscopy techniques (scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, we also established that the Magnevist® is in fact encapsulated by the liposome in the complex and that the complex still retains its nanodimensional size. These results demonstrate that this TfRscFv-liposome-Magnevist® nanocomplex has the potential to become a useful tool in early cancer detection.

  7. Development of a cell microarray chip for detection of circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, S.; Yatsushiro, S.; Abe, K.; Baba, Y.; Kataoka, M.

    2012-03-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of metastatic cancer patients has clinical significance in earlier diagnosis of metastases. In this study, a novel cell microarray chip for accurate and rapid detection of tumor cells from human leukocytes was developed. The chip with 20,944 microchambers (105 μm diameter and 50 μm depth) was made from polystyrene, and the surface was rendered to hydrophilic by means of reactive-ion etching, which led to the formation of mono-layers of leukocytes on the microchambers. As the model of CTCs detection, we spiked human bronchioalveolar carcinoma (H1650) cells into human T lymphoblastoid leukemia (CEM) cells suspension and detected H1650 cells using the chip. A CEM suspension contained with H1650 cells was dispersed on the chip surface, followed by 10 min standing to allow the cells to settle down into the microchambers. About 30 CEM cells were accommodated in each microchamber, over 600,000 CEM cells in total being on a chip. We could detect 1 H1650 cell per 106 CEM cells on the microarray by staining with fluorescence-conjugated antibody (Anti-Cytokeratin) and cell membrane marker (DiD). Thus, this cell microarray chip has highly potential to be a novel tool of accurate and rapid detection of CTCs.

  8. Epo receptors are not detectable in primary human tumor tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Elliott

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (Epo is a cytokine that binds and activates an Epo receptor (EpoR expressed on the surface of erythroid progenitor cells to promote erythropoiesis. While early studies suggested EpoR transcripts were expressed exclusively in the erythroid compartment, low-level EpoR transcripts were detected in nonhematopoietic tissues and tumor cell lines using sensitive RT-PCR methods. However due to the widespread use of nonspecific anti-EpoR antibodies there are conflicting data on EpoR protein expression. In tumor cell lines and normal human tissues examined with a specific and sensitive monoclonal antibody to human EpoR (A82, little/no EpoR protein was detected and it was not functional. In contrast, EpoR protein was reportedly detectable in a breast tumor cell line (MCF-7 and breast cancer tissues with an anti-EpoR polyclonal antibody (M-20, and functional responses to rHuEpo were reported with MCF-7 cells. In another study, a functional response was reported with the lung tumor cell line (NCI-H838 at physiological levels of rHuEpo. However, the specificity of M-20 is in question and the absence of appropriate negative controls raise questions about possible false-positive effects. Here we show that with A82, no EpoR protein was detectable in normal human and matching cancer tissues from breast, lung, colon, ovary and skin with little/no EpoR in MCF-7 and most other breast and lung tumor cell lines. We show further that M-20 provides false positive staining with tissues and it binds to a non-EpoR protein that migrates at the same size as EpoR with MCF-7 lysates. EpoR protein was detectable with NCI-H838 cells, but no rHuEpo-induced phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3, pS6RP or STAT5 was observed suggesting the EpoR was not functional. Taken together these results raise questions about the hypothesis that most tumors express high levels of functional EpoR protein.

  9. Detection of multiple tumor markers using ultra-long carbon nanotube devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hye-Mi; Park, Dong-Won; Kim, Beom Soo; Kong, Ki-Jeong; Buh, Gyoung-Ho; Chang, Hyunju; Lee, Jeong-O.; Kong, Jing

    2008-03-01

    For the simultaneous detection of multiple tumor markers, we have fabricated ultra-long carbon nanotube sensors that can detect carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), simultaneously. Ultra-long carbon nanotubes, several millimeters long, were grown by ethanol CVD, and fabricated as FET sensors by using conventional photolithography. To functionalize each segment of a single ultra-long nanotube device with multiple-tumor markers, we first functionalize the entire device with CDI-Tween 20 linking molecules, and then immobilized CEA and PSA antibodies using the microfluidic channel. The electrical conductance from CEA-antibody functionalized and PSA-antibody functionalized segment of a ultra-long carbon nanotube device was monitored simultaneously with Ag/AgCl reference electrode as a liquid gate. We will discuss the advantages of long-nanotube device in detail.

  10. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves high accuracy brain tumor segmentation results.

  11. Bone scintigraphy with 99m Tc MIBI. Its importance for the detection of malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrero, Luis O.; Tamayo, Alicia; Rodriguez, Oscar; Solano, Maria E.; Perera, Alejandro; Perez, Marylin

    1997-01-01

    99mT c-MIBI is a radiopharmaceutical widely employed for the detection and follow-up of different oncological diseases. The aim of the present work was to determine the value of the scintigraphy with 99mT c-MIBI for the diagnosis of malignant bone tumors, its metastases and recurrences. Twenty patients aged 24+- years old, suspected of having bone neoplasms, were studied. I

  12. Automatic detection and classification of breast tumors in ultrasonic images using texture and morphological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanni; Wang, Yuanyuan; Jiao, Jing; Guo, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Due to severe presence of speckle noise, poor image contrast and irregular lesion shape, it is challenging to build a fully automatic detection and classification system for breast ultrasonic images. In this paper, a novel and effective computer-aided method including generation of a region of interest (ROI), segmentation and classification of breast tumor is proposed without any manual intervention. By incorporating local features of texture and position, a ROI is firstly detected using a self-organizing map neural network. Then a modified Normalized Cut approach considering the weighted neighborhood gray values is proposed to partition the ROI into clusters and get the initial boundary. In addition, a regional-fitting active contour model is used to adjust the few inaccurate initial boundaries for the final segmentation. Finally, three textures and five morphologic features are extracted from each breast tumor; whereby a highly efficient Affinity Propagation clustering is used to fulfill the malignancy and benign classification for an existing database without any training process. The proposed system is validated by 132 cases (67 benignancies and 65 malignancies) with its performance compared to traditional methods such as level set segmentation, artificial neural network classifiers, and so forth. Experiment results show that the proposed system, which needs no training procedure or manual interference, performs best in detection and classification of ultrasonic breast tumors, while having the lowest computation complexity.

  13. Clinical characteristics of elastofibroma dorsi incidentally detected on FDG-PET/CT for a thoracic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Hidenori; Higa, Noboru; Yohena, Tomofumi

    2011-01-01

    When elastofibroma dorsi with FDG accumulation is found by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in patients with a malignant tumor, its differentiation from a metastasis seems to be a difficult and critical problem. As there are few reports on FDG-PET for elastofibroma dorsi, we reviewed those cases of elastofibroma dorsi which were incidentally discovered on FDG-PET/CT. We retrospectively reviewed 306 patients who underwent FDG-PET/CT for the evaluation of a lung or mediastinal tumor, and in whom elastofibroma dorsi was detected, and analyzed their clinical characteristics. Elastofibroma dorsi was detected in 16 of the 306 cases (5.2%); 10 of whom were women and 6 were men. Age ranged from 55 to 82 years, with an average of 71.6 years. Woman were predominant among the patients with elastofibroma dorsi, compared with patients without a tumor (p=0.0177). Elderly patients were also predominant among the patients with elastofibroma dorsi, compared with patients without a tumor, but the difference was not significant (p=0.0587). The accumulation of FDG was observed in 8 of the 16 cases (15 of 31 tumors). The maximum standardized uptake values (SUVmax) ranged from 2.0 to 2.9, with an average of 2.3, among those cases in which the SUVmax was evaluated. Although elastofibroma is rare, it is important for physicians to know that some elastofibromas exhibit FDG accumulation on PET. This knowledge may help to prevent unnecessary biopsies or surgical interventions, and also prevent excessive anxiety in patients with elastofibroma dorsi. (author)

  14. Multi-modality photoacoustic tomography, ultrasound, and light sheet microscopy for volumetric tumor margin detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Hu, Bihe; Bolus, Daniel; Wang, Mei; Skidmore, Shelby J.; Sholl, Andrew B.; Brown, J. Quincy; Goergen, Craig J.

    2018-02-01

    Current methods for breast tumor margin detection are invasive, time consuming, and typically result in a reoperative rate of over 25%. This marks a clear clinical need to develop improved tools to intraoperatively differentiate negative versus positive tumor margins. Here, we utilize photoacoustic tomography (PAT), ultrasound (US), and inverted Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (iSPIM) to assess breast tumor margins in eight human breast biopsies. Our PAT/US system consists of a tunable Nd:YAG laser (NT 300, EKSPLA) coupled with a 40MHz central frequency US probe (Vevo2100, FUJIFILM Visual Sonics). This system allows for the delivery of 10Hz, 5ns pulses with fluence of 40mJ/cm2 to the tissue with PAT and US axial resolutions of 125μm and 40μm, respectively. For this study, we used a linear stepper motor to acquire volumetric PAT/US images of the breast biopsies using 1100nm light to identify bloodrich "tumor" regions and 1210nm light to identify lipid-rich "healthy" regions. iSPIM (Applied Scientific Instrumentation) is an advanced microscopy technique with lateral resolution of 1.5μm and axial resolution of 7μm. We used 488nm laser excitation and acridine orange as a general comprehensive histology stain. Our results show that PAT/US can be used to identify lipid-rich regions, dense areas of arterioles and arteries, and other internal structures such as ducts. iSPIM images correlate well with histopathology slides and can verify nuclear features, cell type and density, stromal features, and microcalcifications. Together, this multimodality approach has the potential to improve tumor margin detection with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity.

  15. Comparison of Near-Infrared Imaging Camera Systems for Intracranial Tumor Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Steve S; Zeh, Ryan; Pierce, John T; Salinas, Ryan; Singhal, Sunil; Lee, John Y K

    2018-04-01

    Distinguishing neoplasm from normal brain parenchyma intraoperatively is critical for the neurosurgeon. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) has been shown to improve gross total resection and progression-free survival but has limited availability in the USA. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence has advantages over visible light fluorescence with greater tissue penetration and reduced background fluorescence. In order to prepare for the increasing number of NIR fluorophores that may be used in molecular imaging trials, we chose to compare a state-of-the-art, neurosurgical microscope (System 1) to one of the commercially available NIR visualization platforms (System 2). Serial dilutions of indocyanine green (ICG) were imaged with both systems in the same environment. Each system's sensitivity and dynamic range for NIR fluorescence were documented and analyzed. In addition, brain tumors from six patients were imaged with both systems and analyzed. In vitro, System 2 demonstrated greater ICG sensitivity and detection range (System 1 1.5-251 μg/l versus System 2 0.99-503 μg/l). Similarly, in vivo, System 2 demonstrated signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of 2.6 ± 0.63 before dura opening, 5.0 ± 1.7 after dura opening, and 6.1 ± 1.9 after tumor exposure. In contrast, System 1 could not easily detect ICG fluorescence prior to dura opening with SBR of 1.2 ± 0.15. After the dura was reflected, SBR increased to 1.4 ± 0.19 and upon exposure of the tumor SBR increased to 1.8 ± 0.26. Dedicated NIR imaging platforms can outperform conventional microscopes in intraoperative NIR detection. Future microscopes with improved NIR detection capabilities could enhance the use of NIR fluorescence to detect neoplasm and improve patient outcome.

  16. Circulating tumor cell detection: A direct comparison between negative and unbiased enrichment in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Biao; Ding, Fengan; Zhou, Xiaodie; Tu, Pin; Yu, Bo; He, Yan; Huang, Peilin

    2017-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), isolated as a 'liquid biopsy', may provide important diagnostic and prognostic information. Therefore, rapid, reliable and unbiased detection of CTCs are required for routine clinical analyses. It was demonstrated that negative enrichment, an epithelial marker-independent technique for isolating CTCs, exhibits a better efficiency in the detection of CTCs compared with positive enrichment techniques that only use specific anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecules. However, negative enrichment techniques incur significant cell loss during the isolation procedure, and as it is a method that uses only one type of antibody, it is inherently biased. The detection procedure and identification of cell types also relies on skilled and experienced technicians. In the present study, the detection sensitivity of using negative enrichment and a previously described unbiased detection method was compared. The results revealed that unbiased detection methods may efficiently detect >90% of cancer cells in blood samples containing CTCs. By contrast, only 40-60% of CTCs were detected by negative enrichment. Additionally, CTCs were identified in >65% of patients with stage I/II lung cancer. This simple yet efficient approach may achieve a high level of sensitivity. It demonstrates a potential for the large-scale clinical implementation of CTC-based diagnostic and prognostic strategies.

  17. Integration of biomimicry and nanotechnology for significantly improved detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Ja Hye; Park, Sin-Jung; Wang, Andrew Z; Hong, Seungpyo

    2017-12-13

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have received a great deal of scientific and clinical attention as a biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of many types of cancer. Given their potential significance in clinics, a variety of detection methods, utilizing the recent advances in nanotechnology and microfluidics, have been introduced in an effort of achieving clinically significant detection of CTCs. However, effective detection and isolation of CTCs still remain a tremendous challenge due to their extreme rarity and phenotypic heterogeneity. Among many approaches that are currently under development, this review paper focuses on a unique, promising approach that takes advantages of naturally occurring processes achievable through application of nanotechnology to realize significant improvement in sensitivity and specificity of CTC capture. We provide an overview of successful outcome of this biomimetic CTC capture system in detection of tumor cells from in vitro, in vivo, and clinical pilot studies. We also emphasize the clinical impact of CTCs as biomarkers in cancer diagnosis and predictive prognosis, which provides a cost-effective, minimally invasive method that potentially replaces or supplements existing methods such as imaging technologies and solid tissue biopsy. In addition, their potential prognostic values as treatment guidelines and that ultimately help to realize personalized therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Intraoperative tumor detection: Relative performance of single-element, dual-element, and imaging probes with various collimators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartsough, N.E.; Barrett, H.H.; Barber, H.B.; Woolfenden, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate tumor staging depends on finding all tumor sites, and curative surgery requires the removal of all cancerous tissue from those sites. One technique for locating tumors is to inject patients before surgery with a radiotracer that is preferentially taken up by cancerous tissue. Then, an intraoperative gamma-sensitive probe is used to locate the tumors. Small (< 1-cm diameter) tumors, often undetectable by external imaging and by the standard surgical inspection with sight and touch, can be found with probes. Simple calculations and measurements with radioactive tumor models show that small tumors should be detected by single-element probes, but often such probes fail to detect these small tumors in practice. This discrepancy is often caused by the use of a uniform background to predict probe performance. Real backgrounds are nonuniform and can decrease probe performance dramatically. Dual-element, coincidence, or imaging probes may solve the background problem. The authors devised a method to predict probe performance in a realistic background which includes variations in normal organ uptakes. They predict the relative performance of both existing probes and those in the design stage so that optimal detector and collimator configurations can be determined. The procedure includes a Monte-Carlo-calculated point-response function, a numerical torso phantom, and measured biodistribution of a monoclonal antibody. The Hotelling Trace Value, a measure of tumor-detection performance, is computed from the probe responses in simulated studies

  19. In vivo tumor detection with combined MR–Photoacoustic-Thermoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Huang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we report a new method using combined magnetic resonance (MR–Photoacoustic (PA–Thermoacoustic (TA imaging techniques, and demonstrate its unique ability for in vivo cancer detection using tumor-bearing mice. Circular scanning TA and PA imaging systems were used to recover the dielectric and optical property distributions of three colon carcinoma bearing mice While a 7.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI unit with a mouse body volume coil was utilized for high resolution structural imaging of the same mice. Three plastic tubes filled with soybean sauce were used as fiducial markers for the co-registration of MR, PA and TA images. The resulting fused images provided both enhanced tumor margin and contrast relative to the surrounding normal tissues. In particular, some finger-like protrusions extending into the surrounding tissues were revealed in the MR/TA infused images. These results show that the tissue functional optical and dielectric properties provided by PA and TA images along with the anatomical structure by MRI in one picture make accurate tumor identification easier. This combined MR–PA–TA-imaging strategy has the potential to offer a clinically useful triple-modality tool for accurate cancer detection and for intraoperative surgical navigation.

  20. The use of image morphing to improve the detection of tumors in emission imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykstra, C.; Greer, K.; Jaszczak, R.; Celler, A.

    1999-01-01

    Two of the limitations on the utility of SPECT and planar scintigraphy for the non-invasive detection of carcinoma are the small sizes of many tumors and the possible low contrast between tumor uptake and background. This is particularly true for breast imaging. Use of some form of image processing can improve the visibility of tumors which are at the limit of hardware resolution. Smoothing, by some form of image averaging, either during or post-reconstruction, is widely used to reduce noise and thereby improve the detectability of regions of elevated activity. However, smoothing degrades resolution and, by averaging together closely spaced noise, may make noise look like a valid region of increased uptake. Image morphing by erosion and dilation does not average together image values; it instead selectively removes small features and irregularities from an image without changing the larger features. Application of morphing to emission images has shown that it does not, therefore, degrade resolution and does not always degrade contrast. For these reasons it may be a better method of image processing for noise removal in some images. In this paper the authors present a comparison of the effects of smoothing and morphing using breast and liver studies

  1. Computer aided detection of tumor and edema in brain FLAIR magnetic resonance image using ANN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nandita; Sinha, A. K.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents an efficient region based segmentation technique for detecting pathological tissues (Tumor & Edema) of brain using fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) magnetic resonance (MR) images. This work segments FLAIR brain images for normal and pathological tissues based on statistical features and wavelet transform coefficients using k-means algorithm. The image is divided into small blocks of 4×4 pixels. The k-means algorithm is used to cluster the image based on the feature vectors of blocks forming different classes representing different regions in the whole image. With the knowledge of the feature vectors of different segmented regions, supervised technique is used to train Artificial Neural Network using fuzzy back propagation algorithm (FBPA). Segmentation for detecting healthy tissues and tumors has been reported by several researchers by using conventional MRI sequences like T1, T2 and PD weighted sequences. This work successfully presents segmentation of healthy and pathological tissues (both Tumors and Edema) using FLAIR images. At the end pseudo coloring of segmented and classified regions are done for better human visualization.

  2. Multi-slice spiral CT detects spread of small laryngeal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, R.; Schoepf, U.; Becker, C.; Reiser, M.; Hong, C.; Sturm, C.; Wollenberg, B.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to preoperatively investigate small laryngeal carcinomas using multi-slice spiral CT (MSCT) and subsequent multiplanar reconstructions (MPR) and to compare the results to the detailed spread found a surgery and histology. Nine patients with small (T1, T2) laryngeal cancer were investigated on a MSCT scanner (Siemens plus 4 Volume Zoom, Siemens). A 4x1 mm collimation, 120 kV, 200 mAs and a 0.5 seconds rotation time were used, allowing a coverage of the entire larynx in approximately 10 seconds within a single breathhold. Multiplanar reconstruction's (MPR) in sagittal and coronal plane were reconstructed in all patients and rated in consensus reading. In 8 of nine patients, the glottic spread was detected by MSCT, in one case of a supraglottic tumor a glottic invasion was excluded. The infiltration of the anterior commissure, the infiltration into the subglottic space and the extension into the hypo-pharynx was correctly assessed in all patients. MSCT was not able to predict infiltration of the arythnoids in two patients. The use of multi-slice CT for the preoperative assessment of small laryngeal tumors shows great promise. The detection or exclusion of subtle spread of these tumors into the supra- or subglottic space and along the glottic level was possible with high accuracy. As the examination time is short, artifacts are rare and multiplanar reconstructions gain in clinical importance. (orig.) [de

  3. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase......-reverse-transcriptase-positive cancer cells and expresses green-fluorescent-protein that identifies viable CTCs from a broad spectrum of malignancies. Our method recovered 75.5-87.2% of tumor cells spiked into healthy donor blood, as validated by different methods, including single cell sequencing. CTCs were detected in 59-100% of 326...

  4. Anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibodies and the detection of circulating normal-like breast tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); J. Kraan (Jaco); J. Bolt (Joan); P. van der Spoel (Petra); F. Elstrodt (Fons); A.E.M. Schutte (Mieke); J.W.M. Martens (John); J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J.A. Foekens (John)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIdentification of specific subtypes of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of cancer patients can provide information about the biology of metastasis and improve patient management. However, to be effective, the method used to identify circulating tumor cells must detect all

  5. Novel Selective Detection Method of Tumor Angiogenesis Factors Using Living Nano-Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fandi, Mohamed; Alshraiedeh, Nida; Owies, Rami; Alshdaifat, Hala; Al-Mahaseneh, Omamah; Al-Tall, Khadijah; Alawneh, Rawan

    2017-07-14

    This paper reports a novel self-detection method for tumor cells using living nano-robots. These living robots are a nonpathogenic strain of E. coli bacteria equipped with naturally synthesized bio-nano-sensory systems that have an affinity to VEGF, an angiogenic factor overly-expressed by cancer cells. The VEGF-affinity/chemotaxis was assessed using several assays including the capillary chemotaxis assay, chemotaxis assay on soft agar, and chemotaxis assay on solid agar. In addition, a microfluidic device was developed to possibly discover tumor cells through the overexpressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Various experiments to study the sensing characteristic of the nano-robots presented a strong response toward the VEGF. Thus, a new paradigm of selective targeting therapies for cancer can be advanced using swimming E. coli as self-navigator miniaturized robots as well as drug-delivery vehicles.

  6. Evaluation of clinical value of combined tumor markers detection in diagnosis of lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangming; Deng Shouzhen; Wang Yun; Xu Lianqin; He Wanting; Gao Quan; Lin Xiangtong

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate clinical value of single or combined tumor marker detection CY21-1, CEA, CA15-3 and SCC in the diagnosis of lung cancer. There was retrospective analysis of 87 lung cancer inpatients, all of them was confirmed by pathology. Results showed: (1) Sensitivity of CY21-1, CEA, CA15-3 and SCC by single detection in diagnosing lung cancer was 59.8%, 39.1%, 44.8%, 18.4%, respectively. (2) Sensitivity of group I (CY21-1 + CEA) was 78.2%; sensitivity of group II (CY21-1 + CEA + CA15-3) was 88.5%; sensitivity of group III (CY21-1 + CEA + CA15-3 + SCC) was the same as group II. In the diagnosis of lung cancer, the combined detection with CY21-1, CEA, CA15-3 was an ideal selective combination

  7. Non-invasive method for screening and early detection of breast tumors using thermal field analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Drosu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper refers to general presentation of international and European evaluation regarding breast cancer incidence and mortality as well as recommendations for prevention, screening, detection and treatment.The past years international research development in biomedical engineering has put a particular emphasis on the thermography use in breast pathology diagnosis and its main advantages, such as: an early diagnose of the breast cancer, in that stage when the mammography or ultrasounds can not easily detect the changes of the tissue; a totally non-invasive interaction with human body; very low costs and possibilities for the women to do a self thermographic test.We also present some important results of our research within the field of breast tumor detection using the numerical analysis of the thermal inverse problem.

  8. Speed and amplitude of lung tumor motion precisely detected in four-dimensional setup and in real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro; Sharp, Gregory C.; Fujita, Katsuhisa R.T.; Onimaru, Rikiya; Fujino, Masaharu; Kato, Norio; Osaka, Yasuhiro; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Onodera, Shunsuke; Miyasaka, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    Background: To reduce the uncertainty of registration for lung tumors, we have developed a four-dimensional (4D) setup system using a real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. Methods and Materials: During treatment planning and daily setup in the treatment room, the trajectory of the internal fiducial marker was recorded for 1 to 2 min at the rate of 30 times per second by the real-time tumor-tracking radiotherapy system. To maximize gating efficiency, the patient's position on the treatment couch was adjusted using the 4D setup system with fine on-line remote control of the treatment couch. Results: The trajectory of the marker detected in the 4D setup system was well visualized and used for daily setup. Various degrees of interfractional and intrafractional changes in the absolute amplitude and speed of the internal marker were detected. Readjustments were necessary during each treatment session, prompted by baseline shifting of the tumor position. Conclusion: The 4D setup system was shown to be useful for reducing the uncertainty of tumor motion and for increasing the efficiency of gated irradiation. Considering the interfractional and intrafractional changes in speed and amplitude detected in this study, intercepting radiotherapy is the safe and cost-effective method for 4D radiotherapy using real-time tracking technology

  9. Detection of tumor recurrence using technetium99m-tetrofosmin brain SPECT in patients with previously irradiated brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llamas A; Reyes A; Uribe, L F; Martinez T

    2004-01-01

    Objective: to assess the clinical utility of brain SPECT with Tc-99m Tetrofosmin to differentiate between tumor recurrence and radionecrosis in patients with primary brain tumors previously treated with external beam radiotherapy. Materials and methods: thirteen patients with clinical or radiological suspicion of tumor recurrence were studied with brain SPECT using 20-mCi of Tc-99m Tetrofosmin. Obtained images were interpreted by consensus between two experienced observers and subsequently classified as positive or negative for tumor viability. Results were compared to those of conventional diagnostic imaging techniques. Diagnostic test values and 95% confidence intervals were quantified. Results: SPECT results included 7 true-positives, 5 true-negatives and 1 false negative result. Conclusions: Tc-99m Tetrofosmin brain SPECT night be a useful alternative to diagnose recurrent brain tumors, especially with non-conclusive clinical and radiological findings

  10. Detection of primary tumor by 18F-FDG-TEP in patients with cup syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberini, J.L.; Belhocine, T.; Daenen, F.; Hustinx, R.; Rigo, P.

    2000-01-01

    To study the performance of whole body 18 F-FDG-PET in the detection of the primary tumor in patients with unknown primary carcinoma in comparison with conventional imaging. Patients and methods: Forty-one patients, without previous history of known cancer, (18 women and 23 men; average age 64,1 years) with bone, brain, lymph node, liver, cutaneous, pleural and epidural metastases were included in a retrospective study. Results of PET (UGM Penn PET 240 H) were compared with those of techniques used in the current conventional procedure. There were 26 true positives, 2 false negatives (1 renal carcinoma and 1 myeloma) and one false positive results. Origins were lung [16], gut [6], breast [3] and head and neck [1] but stayed undetermined in 8 patients. Results of PET were superior to conventional diagnostic procedure in 12 patients and led to modify the therapy management in 11 patients. All known metastatic lesions were detected by PET. FDG-PET can be useful to determine the origin of metastasis. It allows detection of the primary tumor (26/33 patients) and allows evaluation of the spread of the disease. These results have to be confirmed and particularly in patients with highly treatable unknown primary carcinoma. (author)

  11. A full Monte Carlo simulation of the YAP-PEM prototype for breast tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, A.; Righi, S.; Del Guerra, A.; Belcari, N.; Vaiano, A.; De Domenico, G.; Zavattini, G.; Campanini, R.; Lanconelli, N.; Riccardi, A.

    2004-07-01

    A prototype for Positron Emission Mammography, the YAP-PEM, is under development within a collaboration of the Italian Universities of Pisa, Ferrara, and Bologna. The aim is to detect breast lesions, with dimensions of 5 mm in diameter, and with a specific activity ratio of 10:1 between the cancer and breast tissue. The YAP-PEM is composed of two stationary detection heads of 6×6 cm 2, composed of a matrix of 30×30 YAP:Ce finger crystals of 2×2×30 mm 3 each. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code has been used to simulate several characteristics of the prototype. A fast EM algorithm has been adapted to reconstruct all of the collected lines of flight, also at large incidence angles, by achieving 3D positioning capability of the lesion in the FOV. The role of the breast compression has been studied. The performed study shows that a 5 mm diameter tumor of 37 kBq/cm 3 (1 μCi/cm 3), embedded in active breast tissue with 10:1 tumor/background specific activity ratio, is detected in 10 min with a Signal-to-Noise Ratio of 8.7±1.0. Two hot lesions in the active breast phantom are clearly visible in the reconstructed image.

  12. A novel approach for the detection and genetic analysis of live melanoma circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody J Xu

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC detection and genetic analysis may complement currently available disease assessments in patients with melanoma to improve risk stratification and monitoring. We therefore sought to establish the feasibility of a telomerase-based assay for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs.The telomerase-based CTC assay utilizes an adenoviral vector that, in the presence of elevated human telomerase activity, drives the amplification of green fluorescent protein. Tumor cells are then identified via an image processing system. The protocol was tested on melanoma cells in culture or spiked into control blood, and on samples from patients with metastatic melanoma. Genetic analysis of the isolated melanoma CTCs was then performed for BRAF mutation status.The adenoviral vector was effective for all melanoma cell lines tested with sensitivity of 88.7% (95%CI 85.6-90.4% and specificity of 99.9% (95%CI 99.8-99.9%. In a pilot trial of patients with metastatic disease, CTCs were identified in 9 of 10 patients, with a mean of 6.0 CTCs/mL. At a cutoff of 1.1 CTCs/mL, the telomerase-based assay exhibits test performance of 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. BRAF mutation analysis of melanoma cells isolated from culture or spiked control blood, or from pilot patient samples was found to match the known BRAF mutation status of the cell lines and primary tumors.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a telomerase-based assay effective for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. These promising findings support further studies, including towards integrating into the management of patients with melanoma receiving multimodality therapy.

  13. Using {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT to Detect an occult Mesenchymal Tumor Causing Oncogenic Osteomalacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Hyo Jung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Cho, Arthur; Lee, Jae Hoon; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Oncogenic osteomalacia is a rare paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by renal phosphate excretion, hypophosphatemia, and osteomalacia. This syndrome is often caused by tumors of mesenchymal origin. Patients with oncogenic osteomalacia have abnormal bone mineralization, resulting in a high frequency of fractures. Tumor resection is the treatment of choice, as it will often correct the metabolic imbalance. Although oncogenic osteomalacia is a potentially curable disease, diagnosis is difficult and often delayed because of the small size and sporadic location of the tumor. Bone scintigraphy and radiography best characterize osteoma lacia; magnetic resonance imaging findings are nonspecific. Here, we report a case of oncogenic osteomalacia secondary to a phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor that was successfully detected by {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography ({sup 18F} FDG PET/CT). This case illustrates the advantages of {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in detecting the occult mesenchymal tumor that causes oncogenic osteomalacia.

  14. Circulating Tumor Cell Detection and Capture by Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry in Vivo and ex Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Zharov, Vladimir P., E-mail: zharovvladimirp@uams.edu [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Despite progress in detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), existing assays still have low sensitivity (1–10 CTC/mL) due to the small volume of blood samples (5–10 mL). Consequently, they can miss up to 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} CTCs, resulting in the development of barely treatable metastasis. Here we analyze a new concept of in vivo CTC detection with enhanced sensitivity (up to 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} times) by the examination of the entire blood volume in vivo (5 L in adults). We focus on in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) of CTCs using label-free or targeted detection, photoswitchable nanoparticles with ultrasharp PA resonances, magnetic trapping with fiber-magnetic-PA probes, optical clearance, real-time spectral identification, nonlinear signal amplification, and the integration with PAFC in vitro. We demonstrate PAFC’s capability to detect rare leukemia, squamous carcinoma, melanoma, and bulk and stem breast CTCs and its clusters in preclinical animal models in blood, lymph, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as the release of CTCs from primary tumors triggered by palpation, biopsy or surgery, increasing the risk of metastasis. CTC lifetime as a balance between intravasation and extravasation rates was in the range of 0.5–4 h depending on a CTC metastatic potential. We introduced theranostics of CTCs as an integration of nanobubble-enhanced PA diagnosis, photothermal therapy, and feedback through CTC counting. In vivo data were verified with in vitro PAFC demonstrating a higher sensitivity (1 CTC/40 mL) and throughput (up to 10 mL/min) than conventional assays. Further developments include detection of circulating cancer-associated microparticles, and super-resolution PAFC beyond the diffraction and spectral limits.

  15. Tumor-associated auto-antibodies as early detection markers for ovarian cancer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée Turzanski; Hüsing, Anika

    2018-01-01

    .08-0.40] for CTAG1A, CTAG2 and NUDT1 to 0.23 [0.10-0.44] for P53 (0.33 [0.11-0.68] for high-grade serous tumors). However, at longer lead-times the ability of these AAb markers to distinguish future ovarian cancer cases from controls declined rapidly; at lead times >1 year, SE98 estimates were close to zero (all...... invasive cases, range: 0.01-0.11). Compared to CA125 alone, combined logistic regression scores of AAbs and CA125 did not improve detection sensitivity at equal level of specificity. The added value of these selected AAbs as markers for ovarian cancer beyond CA125 for early detection is therefore limited...

  16. Changes in Tumor Marker Values with Patients with Beginning Disease Git. Detection of Secondary Liver Tumors in Patients with Colorectal Carcinoma by using Tumor Markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubec jr., L.; Topolčan, O.; Pašková, H.; Holubec sen., L.; Pecen, Ladislav; Třeška, L.; Finek, J.; Pikner, R.; Visokai, V.; Lipská, V.; Svobodová, S.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2002), s. 133-134 ISSN 0886-3849. [International Conference on Human Tumor Markers /19./. 25.08.2002-29.08.2002, Velje] Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : tumor markers * GIT cancers Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  17. A comparison of scintigraphy with tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals to detect an experimental bone tumors in the rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Nobuaki; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2003-01-01

    A comparative study on the accumulation of 99m Tc-phosphorous compound, 99m Tc-hexakis-2-methoxy isobutyl-isonitrile (MIBI), and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin (TF) in the experimental bone tumors using the VX-2 cell was performed. In the group of the femoral metastatic bone tumor, 99m Tc-MIBI showed no accumulation in the femur at 12 days after the transplantation despite the presence of a bone marrow tumor. In the group of the iliac metastatic bone tumor, a bone scintigraphy showed decreased accumulation in the ileum at 16 days, but hot lesions were observed in same sites at 18 days after the transplantation on 99m Tc-MIBI and 99m Tc-TF scintigrams. The tumor to soft tissue accumulation ratio was higher for 99m Tc-MIBI (3.03±1.03) than for 99m Tc-TF (2.55±0.80) (P 99m Tc-MIBI is less satisfactory for the early diagnosis of tumors than bone scintigraphy, and a combined study with both 99m Tc-phosphorous compounds and 99m Tc-MIBI is useful for the evaluation and diagnosis of lesions. (author)

  18. DETECTION OF OCCULT LYMPH NODE TUMOR CELLS IN NODE-NEGATIVE GASTRIC CANCER PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Marina Alessandra; Ramos, Marcus Fernando Kodama Pertille; Dias, Andre Roncon; Yagi, Osmar Kenji; Faraj, Sheila Friedrich; Zilberstein, Bruno; Cecconello, Ivan; Mello, Evandro Sobroza de; Ribeiro, Ulysses

    2017-01-01

    The presence of lymph nodes metastasis is one of the most important prognostic indicators in gastric cancer. The micrometastases have been studied as prognostic factor in gastric cancer, which are related to decrease overall survival and increased risk of recurrence. However, their identification is limited by conventional methodology, since they can be overlooked after routine staining. To investigate the presence of occult tumor cells using cytokeratin (CK) AE1/AE3 immunostaining in gastric cancer patients histologically lymph node negative (pN0) by H&E. Forty patients (T1-T4N0) submitted to a potentially curative gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy were evaluated. The results for metastases, micrometastases and isolated tumor cells were also associated to clinicopathological characteristics and their impact on stage grouping. Tumor deposits within lymph nodes were defined according to the tumor-node-metastases guidelines (7th TNM). A total of 1439 lymph nodes were obtained (~36 per patient). Tumor cells were detected by immunohistochemistry in 24 lymph nodes from 12 patients (30%). Neoplasic cells were detected as a single or cluster tumor cells. Tumor (p=0.002), venous (p=0.016), lymphatic (p=0.006) and perineural invasions (p=0.04), as well as peritumoral lymphocytic response (p=0.012) were correlated to CK-positive immunostaining tumor cells in originally negative lymph nodes by H&E. The histologic stage of two patients was upstaged from stage IB to stage IIA. Four of the 28 CK-negative patients (14.3%) and three among 12 CK-positive patients (25%) had disease recurrence (p=0.65). The CK-immunostaining is an effective method for detecting occult tumor cells in lymph nodes and may be recommended to precisely determine tumor stage. It may be useful as supplement to H&E routine to provide better pathological staging. A presença de metástase em linfonodos é um dos indicadores prognósticos mais importantes no câncer gástrico. As micrometástases têm sido

  19. Impact of endoscopic stent insertion on detection of viable circulating tumor cells from obstructive colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shinya; Tanemura, Masahiro; Sawada, Genta; Moon, Jeongho; Shimizu, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Toshiki; Kuwai, Toshio; Urata, Yasuo; Kuraoka, Kazuya; Hatanaka, Nobutaka; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Taniyama, Kiyomi

    2018-01-01

    The placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) in obstructive colorectal cancer (OCRC) is acknowledged to be a safe and effective procedure for the relief of obstruction. However, there is concern that shear forces acting on the tumor during stent expansion may release cancer cells into the circulation, resulting in a poor prognosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether colonic stent insertion increases viable circulating tumor cells (v-CTCs). A telomerase-specific replication-selective adenovirus-expressing GFP (TelomeScanF35) detection system was used to detect v-CTCs in 8 OCRC patients with a SEMS before and after stent insertion and after surgical resection. In 7 patients, a SEMS was inserted as a bridge to surgery (BTS), and in one patient, a SEMS was inserted for palliation. Surgical resection (R0) was performed in 7 patients. Four patients had no v-CTCs before SEMS placement, two of four measurable patients had an increased number of v-CTCs after SEMS placement (1-3 v-CTCs), and one of two patients with increased v-CTCs developed distant lymphatic metastasis despite curative resection. Four patients had v-CTCs (1-19 cells) before SEMS placement, and two of these four patients had an increase in the number of v-CTCs (20-21 cells) after SEMS placement, while one of the four patients died early with distant metastasis. The present study demonstrated that endoscopic stent insertion for OCRC may result in tumor cell dissemination into the peripheral circulation and may induce distant metastases.

  20. Detection of metastatic tumor in normal-sized retroperitoneal lymph nodes by monoclonal-antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Sears, H.F.; Mulhern, C.B. Jr.; Hammond, N.D.; Powe, J.; Gatenby, R.A.; Steplewski, Z.; Koprowski, H.

    1984-01-01

    Detection of metastatic colon carcinoma is reported in retroperitoneal lymph nodes that were visible but normal in size (less than 1 cm) and number on CT scanning and at surgery. A case history is presented of 1 of 27 patients with colon carcinoma, metastatic or primary, evaluated with intravenously administered, radiolabeled monoclonal-antibody fragments and subsequent nuclear medicine imaging. Images of /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red cells corresponding to each [ 131 I]antibody view of the abdomen were obtained as a control, to avoid interpretation of simple blood-pool radioactivity as specific localization of antibody on tumor. Antibody images were evaluated both without and with computer blood-pool image substraction. Directed to the level of the left renal hilum by the antibody scan, the surgeon removed the largest palpable node, which measured slightly less than 1 cm in diameter and was not palpably or visibly abnormal to the surgeon until it was removed and sectioned. Pathological evaluation of frozen and permanent sections revealed microscopic foci of adenocarcinoma consistent with a colonic primary tumor. Immunoperoxidase staining for the 1083-17-1A colorectal-carcinoma antigen demonstrated the presence of the antigen in the lymph node. As a result of the detection of this metastasis outside the liver, the patient did not receive the planned hepatic-artery chemotherapy pump but instead received intravenous chemotherapy

  1. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author)

  2. Ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to detect breast tumors. Comparison with ultrasonography and mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terao, Eri; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Iwamura, Akira; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Harada, Junta; Tada, Shinpei (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1994-09-01

    We evaluated the ability of subtraction and dynamic MR imaging to accurately detect breast tumors. Sixty-five breast carcinomas and 24 fibroadenomas were examined by an SE pulse sequence using a 0.2 Tesla unit. Subtraction MR images were obtained every minute during dynamic study with Gd-DTPA. Almost all breast tumors were seen as very bright masses, and the margin of the mass was clearly demonstrated on subtraction MR images. Breast carcinomas and fibroadenomas showed characteristic time-intensity curves on dynamic study. Time-intensity curves of the early peak type and plateau type were seen in 97% of breast carcinomas, while the gradually increasing type was seen in 92% of fibroadenomas. The detectability of breast carcinoma was 98% by MRI, 98% by ultrasonography, and 87% by mammography. That of fibroadenoma was 95% by MRI, 91% by ultrasonography and 60% by mammography. Sensitivity and specificity for breast carcinoma were 98% and 92% for MRI and 97% and 71% for ultrasonography. For fibroadenoma, they were 96% and 98% for MRI and 89% and 92% for ultrasonography. (author).

  3. Amperometric magnetoimmunoassay for the direct detection of tumor necrosis factor alpha biomarker in human serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eletxigerra, U. [Micro-NanoFabrication Unit, IK4-Tekniker, Eibar (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Martinez-Perdiguero, J. [CIC microGUNE, Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Merino, S. [Micro-NanoFabrication Unit, IK4-Tekniker, Eibar (Spain); CIC microGUNE, Arrasate-Mondragón (Spain); Villalonga, R.; Pingarrón, J.M. [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de CC. Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Campuzano, S., E-mail: susanacr@quim.ucm.es [Departamento de Química Analítica, Facultad de CC. Químicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical magnetoimmunosensor for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) biomarker. • Sensitive and selective detection of TNFα in undiluted serum. • LOD achieved lower than the cut-off value established for relevant illnesses. • Useful and affordable alternative to ELISAs for TNFα determination in serum. - Abstract: An amperometric immunoassay for the determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) protein biomarker in human serum based on the use of magnetic microbeads (MBs) and disposable screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) has been developed. The specifically modified microbeads were magnetically captured on the working electrode surface and the amperometric responses were measured at −0.20 V (vs. Ag pseudo-reference electrode), upon addition of hydroquinone (HQ) as electron transfer mediator and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as the enzyme substrate. After a thorough optimization of the assay, extremely low limits of detection were achieved: 2.0 pg mL{sup −1} (36 fM) and 5.8 pg mL{sup −1} (105 fM) for standard solutions and spiked human serum, respectively. The simplicity, robustness and this clinically interesting LOD proved the developed TNFα immunoassay as a good contender for real clinical application.

  4. Amperometric magnetoimmunoassay for the direct detection of tumor necrosis factor alpha biomarker in human serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eletxigerra, U.; Martinez-Perdiguero, J.; Merino, S.; Villalonga, R.; Pingarrón, J.M.; Campuzano, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Electrochemical magnetoimmunosensor for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) biomarker. • Sensitive and selective detection of TNFα in undiluted serum. • LOD achieved lower than the cut-off value established for relevant illnesses. • Useful and affordable alternative to ELISAs for TNFα determination in serum. - Abstract: An amperometric immunoassay for the determination of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) protein biomarker in human serum based on the use of magnetic microbeads (MBs) and disposable screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) has been developed. The specifically modified microbeads were magnetically captured on the working electrode surface and the amperometric responses were measured at −0.20 V (vs. Ag pseudo-reference electrode), upon addition of hydroquinone (HQ) as electron transfer mediator and H 2 O 2 as the enzyme substrate. After a thorough optimization of the assay, extremely low limits of detection were achieved: 2.0 pg mL −1 (36 fM) and 5.8 pg mL −1 (105 fM) for standard solutions and spiked human serum, respectively. The simplicity, robustness and this clinically interesting LOD proved the developed TNFα immunoassay as a good contender for real clinical application

  5. Micro-computed tomography derived anisotropy detects tumor provoked deviations in bone in an orthotopic osteosarcoma murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A Cole

    Full Text Available Radiographic imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. Currently, computed-tomography (CT is used to measure tumor-induced osteolysis as a marker for tumor growth by monitoring the bone fractional volume. As most tumors primarily induce osteolysis, lower bone fractional volume has been found to correlate with tumor aggressiveness. However, osteosarcoma is an exception as it induces osteolysis and produces mineralized osteoid simultaneously. Given that competent bone is highly anisotropic (systematic variance in its architectural order renders its physical properties dependent on direction of load and that tumor induced osteolysis and osteogenesis are structurally disorganized relative to competent bone, we hypothesized that μCT-derived measures of anisotropy could be used to qualitatively and quantitatively detect osteosarcoma provoked deviations in bone, both osteolysis and osteogenesis, in vivo. We tested this hypothesis in a murine model of osteosarcoma cells orthotopically injected into the tibia. We demonstrate that, in addition to bone fractional volume, μCT-derived measure of anisotropy is a complete and accurate method to monitor osteosarcoma-induced osteolysis. Additionally, we found that unlike bone fractional volume, anisotropy could also detect tumor-induced osteogenesis. These findings suggest that monitoring tumor-induced changes in the structural property isotropy of the invaded bone may represent a novel means of diagnosing primary and metastatic bone tumors.

  6. Impact of breast cancer family history on tumor detection and tumor size in women newly-diagnosed with invasive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Fabienne Dominique; Bürki, Nicole; Huang, Dorothy Jane; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola; Schmid, Seraina Margaretha; Vetter, Marcus; Schötzau, Andreas; Güth, Uwe

    2014-03-01

    This study evaluated the impact of family history (FH) on tumor detection, the patient's age and tumor size at diagnosis in breast cancer (BC). Furthermore, we investigated whether the impact of FH on these features was dependent on degree of relationship, number of relatives with a BC history, or the age of the affected relative at the time that her BC was diagnosed. Out of the entire cohort (n = 1,037), 244 patients (23.5%) had a positive FH; 159 (15.3%) had first-degree relatives affected with BC and 85 patients (8.2%) had second-degree affected relatives. Compared to women who had no BC-affected relatives, the tumors of women who had positive FH were more often found by radiological breast examination (RBE: 31.7%/27.2%, p = 0.008), and they were smaller (general tumor size: 21.8 mm/26.4 mm, p = 0.003; size of tumors found by breast self-examination (BSE): 26.1 mm/30.6 mm, p = 0.041). However, this positive effect of increased use of BC screening and smaller tumor sizes was only observed in patients whose first-degree relatives were affected (comparison with second-degree affected relatives: RBE: 43.8%/24.7%; odds ratio 2.38, p = 0.007; general tumor size: 19.3 mm/26.3 mm; mean difference (MD) -6.9, p = 0.025; tumor size found by BSE: 22.5 mm/31.0 mm; MD -8.5, p = 0.044). When more second-degree relatives or older relatives were diagnosed with BC, the tumors of these patients were similarly often detected by RBE (relationship: 24.7%/27.2%, p = 0.641; age: 33.7 %/27.2 %, p = 0.177) and had similar tumor sizes (general size: 26.3 mm/26.4 mm, p = 0.960; BSE: 31.0 mm/30.6 mm, p = 0.902) as those of women without a FH. Women with a positive FH generally use mammography screening more often and perceive changes in the breast earlier than women without such history. The increased awareness of BC risk decreases if the relationship is more distant.

  7. Diagnostic value of combined detection of serum tumor markers for lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanping; Wang Qun; Zhao Zihong; Zhou Shan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of combined detection of serum tumor markers, including CEA, CA125, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and cytokeratin fragment antigen 21-1 (CYFRA21-1) for lung cancer patients. Methods: The subjects involved 138 diagnosed lung cancer patients (82 males, 56 females, average age 58.6 years, from October 2010 to March 2012), 96 patients with benign lung diseases (56 males, 40 females, average age 51.3 years) and 45 healthy adults (30 males, 15 females, average age 43.9 years). The pathological types of lung cancer consisted of 66 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 52 adenocarcinoma and 20 small cell lung cancer (SCLC). The serum levels of CEA, CA125, NSE and CYFRA21-1 were measured with electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. The diagnostic efficacy for different pathological types was compared among each single tumor marker and combination of tumor markers. One-way analysis of variance q test were used for statistical analysis. Results: The serum levels of CEA, CA125, NSE and CYFRA21-1 in patients with lung cancer were higher than those in patients with benign lung diseases and in healthy subjects (CEA: (19.99±30.99), (10.78±19.77), (3.25±3.42) μg/L; CA125: (79.70±95.98), (44.96±44.97), (20.66±7.13) μg/L; NSE: (35.23±40.22), (15.31±8.42), (13.30±5.65) μg/L; CYFRA21-1: (18.07±43.71), (8.30±8.83), (3.13±1.60) μg/L; F=4.481, 5.436, 4.776, 6.002, all P<0.05). The highest level of CEA, NSE or CYFRA21-1 were found in adenocarcinoma (F=4.932, P<0.05), SCLC (F=5.119, P<0.05) or SCC (F=5.378, P<0.05), respectively. The highest sensitivity tumor markers for SCC, SCLC and adenocarcinoma were CYFRA21-1 (78.8%, 52/66), NSE (75.0%, 15/20) and CEA (57.7%, 30/52), respectively. In combined detection, the highest sensitivity combinations for SCC, SCLC and adenocarcinoma were CEA + CYFRA21-1 + NSE (89.4%, 59/66), CEA + CYFRA21-1 + NSE (80.0%, 16/20) and CEA + CA125 + NSE (78.8%, 41/52), respectively. Conclusions: Combined detection

  8. Stimuli-Responsive Nanodiamond-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Metastatic Tumor Site Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Gu, Mengjie; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Nurrul Lissa Binti; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Metastasis is often critical to cancer progression and linked to poor survival and drug resistance. Early detection of metastasis, as well as identification of metastatic tumor sites, can improve cancer patient survival. Thus, developing technology to improve the detection of cancer metastasis biomarkers can improve both diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we investigated the use of nanodiamonds to develop a stimuli-responsive metastasis detection complex that utilizes matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) as a metastasis biomarker, as MMP9 increased expression has been shown to be indicative of metastasis. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor complex consists of nanodiamonds functionalized with MMP9-specific fluorescent-labeled substrate peptides. Using this design, protease activity of MMP9 can be accurately measured and correlated to MMP9 expression. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor also demonstrated an enhanced ability to protect the base sensor peptide from nonspecific serum protease cleavage. This enhanced peptide stability, combined with a quantitative stimuli-responsive output function, provides strong evidence for the further development of a nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor for metastasis site detection. More importantly, this work provides the foundation for use of nanodiamonds as a platform for stimuli-responsive biosensors and theranostic complexes that can be implemented across a wide range of biomedical applications.

  9. Profiling of microRNAs in tumor interstitial fluid of breast tumors – a novel resource to identify biomarkers for prognostic classification and detection of cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Ann Rita; Helland, Åslaug; Gromov, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    and to elucidate the cross-talk that exists among cells in a tumor microenvironment. Matched tumor interstitial fluid samples (TIF, n = 60), normal interstitial fluid samples (NIF, n = 51), corresponding tumor tissue specimens (n = 54), and serum samples (n = 27) were collected from patients with breast cancer......, and detectable microRNAs were analyzed and compared. In addition, serum data from 32 patients with breast cancer and 22 healthy controls were obtained for a validation study. To identify potential serum biomarkers of breast cancer, first the microRNA profiles of TIF and NIF samples were compared. A total of 266...... microRNAs were present at higher level in the TIF samples as compared to normal counterparts. Sixty-one of these microRNAs were present in > 75% of the serum samples and were subsequently tested in a validation set. Seven of the 61 microRNAs were associated with poor survival, while 23 were associated...

  10. Nanostructure Embedded Microchips for Detection, Isolation, and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells that break away from either a primary tumor or a metastatic site and circulate in the peripheral blood as the cellular origin of metastasis. With their role as a “tumor liquid biopsy”, CTCs provide convenient access to all disease sites, including that of the primary tumor and the site of fatal metastases. It is conceivable that detecting and analyzing CTCs will provide insightful information in assessing the disease status without the flaws and limitations encountered in performing conventional tumor biopsies. However, identifying CTCs in patient blood samples is technically challenging due to the extremely low abundance of CTCs among a large number of hematologic cells. To address this unmet need, there have been significant research endeavors, especially in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and bioengineering, devoted to developing CTC detection, isolation, and characterization technologies. Inspired by the nanoscale interactions observed in the tissue microenvironment, our research team at UCLA pioneered a unique concept of “NanoVelcro” cell-affinity substrates, in which CTC capture agent-coated nanostructured substrates were utilized to immobilize CTCs with high efficiency. The working mechanism of NanoVelcro cell-affinity substrates mimics that of Velcro: when the two fabric strips of a Velcro fastener are pressed together, tangling between the hairy surfaces on two strips leads to strong binding. Through continuous evolution, three generations (gens) of NanoVelcro CTC chips have been established to achieve different clinical utilities. The first-gen NanoVelcro chip, composed of a silicon nanowire substrate (SiNS) and an overlaid microfluidic chaotic mixer, was created for CTC enumeration. Side-by-side analytical validation studies using clinical blood samples suggested that the sensitivity of first-gen NanoVelcro chip outperforms that of FDA-approved CellSearch. In conjunction with

  11. Evaluation of a CLEIA automated assay system for the detection of a panel of tumor markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzarano, Renato; Viggiani, Valentina; Michienzi, Simona; Longo, Flavia; Tudini, Silvestra; Frati, Luigi; Anastasi, Emanuela

    2013-10-01

    Tumor markers are commonly used to detect a relapse of disease in oncologic patients during follow-up. It is important to evaluate new assay systems for a better and more precise assessment, as a standardized method is currently lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the concordance between an automated chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay system (LUMIPULSE® G1200) and our reference methods using seven tumor markers. Serum samples from 787 subjects representing a variety of diagnoses, including oncologic, were analyzed using LUMIPULSE® G1200 and our reference methods. Serum values were measured for the following analytes: prostate-specific antigen (PSA), alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cancer antigen 125 (CA125), carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), and cytokeratin 19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1). For the determination of CEA, AFP, and PSA, an automatic analyzer based on chemiluminescence was applied as reference method. To assess CYFRA 21-1, CA125, CA19-9, and CA15-3, an immunoradiometric manual system was employed. Method comparison by Passing-Bablok analysis resulted in slopes ranging from 0.9728 to 1.9089 and correlation coefficients from 0.9977 to 0.9335. The precision of each assay was assessed by testing six serum samples. Each sample was analyzed for all tumor biomarkers in duplicate and in three different runs. The coefficients of variation were less than 6.3 and 6.2 % for within-run and between-run variation, respectively. Our data suggest an overall good interassay agreement for all markers. The comparison with our reference methods showed good precision and reliability, highlighting its usefulness in clinical laboratory's routine.

  12. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding

  13. Radiosensitivity evaluation of Human tumor cell lines by detecting 4977bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yipei

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of determining radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines in vitro using the assay of mtDNA4977bp deletion. Methods: Three human tumor cell lines were selected in this study, HepG 2 , EC-9706 and MCF-7. The surviving fraction(SF), the ratio of mtDNA4977bp deletion and DNA damage were detected by MTT assay and nested PCR technique respectively. Results: MTT assay: The SF of HepG 2 and EC-9706 after irradiated by 2, 4and 8Gy was lower significantly than that of MCF-7, which showed that the radiosensitivity of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. But there was no statistical difference of SF between HepG 2 and EC-9706. PCR method:The differences on mtDNA 4977bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA among HepG 2 , EC-9706 and MCF-7 were not significant after 1Gy and 4Gy γ-ray irradiation. The ratio of 4977bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA of HepG 2 and EC-9706 increased while that of MCF-7 decreased after 8Gy irradiation. The ratio of mtDNA 4977bp deletion of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher significantly than that of MCF-7, which implies that the radiosensitivity of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF -7. Conclusion: As a new biological marker, mtDNA4977bp deletion may be hopeful to evaluate the radiosensitivity of tumor cells more objectively and exactly. (authors)

  14. Evaluation of [1-11C]-α-aminoisobutyric acid for tumor detection and amino acid transport measurement: Spontaneous canine tumor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Schmall, B.; Conti, P.S.; Dahl, J.R.; Rothman, L.; Sgouros, G.

    1985-01-01

    Alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) or α-methyl alanine, is a nonmetabolized amino acid treansported into cells particularly malignant cells, predominantly by the ''A'' amino acid transport system. Since it is not metabolized, [1- 11 C]-AIB can be used to quantify A-type amino acid transport into cells using a relatively simple compartmental model and quantitative imaging procedures (e.g. positron tomography). The tissue distribution of [1- 11 C]-AIB was determined in six dogs bearing spontaneous tumors, including lymphosarcoma, osteogenic sarcoma, mammary carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma. Quantitative imaging with tissue radioassay confirmation at necropsy showed poor to excellent tumor localization. However, in all cases the concentrations achieved appear adequate for amino acid transport measurement at known tumor locations. The observed low normal brain (due to blood-brain barrier exclusion) and high (relative to brain) tumor concentrations of [1- 11 C]-AIB suggest that this agent may prove effective for the early detection of human brain tumors. (orig.)

  15. Detection and cultivation of circulating tumor cells in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobek, Vladimir; Kacprzak, Grzegorz; Rzechonek, Adam; Kolostova, Katarina

    2014-05-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an aggressive disease with very poor prognosis which tends to affect older patients. Progress in the management of this group of patients has been limited by the rarity of the disease and hence, difficulty in conducting randomized trials. The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to metastasis of the primary tumor to distant sites via circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the circulation. CTCs are extremely rare and limits in technology used to capture these cells hamper our complete understanding over the metastatic process. In the present study we present a new method for detection and cultivation of CTCs isolated from peripheral blood of MPM patients. Patients with diagnosed MPM were enrolled into this study. A size-based separation method for viable CTC enrichment from unclothed peripheral blood has been introduced; MetaCell. The size-based enrichment process was based on filtration of peripheral blood (PB) through porous polycarbonate membrane. The separated CTCs are cultured on the membrane in vitro under standard cancer cell culture conditions and observed by an inverted microscope. The reported methodology allows for quick and easy enrichment of CTCs and their cultivation. The cultivated cells can be used for next specification of gene expression and histological/biological specificity of concrete mesothelioma.

  16. A simple method for detecting tumor in T2-weighted MRI brain images. An image-based analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Phooi-Yee; Ozawa, Shinji

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a decision support system which uses a computer-based procedure to detect tumor blocks or lesions in digitized medical images. The authors developed a simple method with a low computation effort to detect tumors on T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain images, focusing on the connection between the spatial pixel value and tumor properties from four different perspectives: cases having minuscule differences between two images using a fixed block-based method, tumor shape and size using the edge and binary images, tumor properties based on texture values using spatial pixel intensity distribution controlled by a global discriminate value, and the occurrence of content-specific tumor pixel for threshold images. Measurements of the following medical datasets were performed: different time interval images, and different brain disease images on single and multiple slice images. Experimental results have revealed that our proposed technique incurred an overall error smaller than those in other proposed methods. In particular, the proposed method allowed decrements of false alarm and missed alarm errors, which demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed technique. In this paper, we also present a prototype system, known as PCB, to evaluate the performance of the proposed methods by actual experiments, comparing the detection accuracy and system performance. (author)

  17. Molecular assays for the detection of prostate tumor derived nucleic acids in peripheral blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnunen Martin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. Although serum PSA testing is widely used for early detection, more specific prognostic tests are needed to guide treatment decisions. Recently, the enumeration of circulating prostate epithelial cells has been shown to correlate with disease recurrence and metastasis following definitive treatment. The purpose of our study was to investigate an immunomagnetic fractionation procedure to enrich circulating prostate tumor cells (CTCs from peripheral blood specimens, and to apply amplified molecular assays for the detection of prostate-specific markers (PSA, PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Results As few as five prostate cancer cells were detected per 5 mL of whole blood in model system experiments using anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone or in combination with anti-PSMA magnetic particles. In our experiments, anti-EpCAM magnetic particles alone exhibited equivalent or better analytical performance with patient samples compared to a combination of anti-EpCAM + anti-PSMA magnetic particles. Up to 39% of men with advanced prostate cancer tested positive with one or more of the molecular assays tested, whereas control samples from men with benign prostate hyperplasia gave consistently negative results as expected. Interestingly, for the vast majority of men who tested positive for PSA mRNA following CTC enrichment, their matched plasma samples also tested positive, although CTC enrichment gave higher overall mRNA copy numbers. Conclusion CTCs were successfully enriched and detected in men with advanced prostate cancer using an immunomagnetic enrichment procedure coupled with amplified molecular assays for PSA, PCA3, and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion mRNAs. Our results indicate that men who test positive following CTC enrichment also exhibit higher detectable levels of non-cellular, circulating prostate-specific mRNAs.

  18. Detection of irradiation-induced, membrane heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in mouse tumors using Hsp70 Fab fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangl, Stefan; Themelis, George; Friedrich, Lars; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Sarantopoulos, Athanasios; Molls, Michael; Skerra, Arne; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The major stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) is frequently overexpressed in highly aggressive tumors, and elevated intracellular Hsp70 levels mediate protection against apoptosis. Following therapeutic intervention, such as ionizing irradiation, translocation of cytosolic Hsp70 to the plasma membrane is selectively increased in tumor cells and therefore, membrane Hsp70 might serve as a therapy-inducible, tumor-specific target structure. Materials and methods: Based on the IgG1 mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb) cmHsp70.1, we produced the Hsp70-specific recombinant Fab fragment (Hsp70 Fab), as an imaging tool for the detection of membrane Hsp70 positive tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Results: The binding characteristics of Hsp70 Fab towards mouse colon (CT26) and pancreatic (1048) carcinoma cells at 4 deg. C were comparable to that of cmHsp70.1 mAb, as determined by flow cytometry. Following a temperature shift to 37 deg. C, Hsp70 Fab rapidly translocates into subcellular vesicles of mouse tumor cells. Furthermore, in tumor-bearing mice Cy5.5-conjugated Hsp70 Fab, but not unrelated IN-1 control Fab fragment (IN-1 ctrl Fab), gradually accumulates in CT26 tumors between 12 and 55 h after i.v. injection. Conclusions: In summary, the Hsp70 Fab provides an innovative, low immunogenic tool for imaging of membrane Hsp70 positive tumors, in vivo.

  19. Detecting Vascular-Targeting Effects of the Hypoxic Cytotoxin Tirapazamine in Tumor Xenografts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bains, Lauren J.; Baker, Jennifer; Kyle, Alastair H.; Minchinton, Andrew I.; Reinsberg, Stefan A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether vascular-targeting effects can be detected in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: MR images of HCT-116 xenograft-bearing mice were acquired at 7 Tesla before and 24 hours after intraperitoneal injections of tirapazamine. Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses were performed to evaluate changes in tumor perfusion using two biomarkers: the volume transfer constant (K trans ) and the initial area under the concentration-time curve (IAUC). We used novel implanted fiducial markers to obtain cryosections that corresponded to MR image planes from excised tumors; quantitative immunohistochemical mapping of tumor vasculature, perfusion, and necrosis enabled correlative analysis between these and MR images. Results: Conventional histological analysis showed lower vascular perfusion or greater amounts of necrosis in the central regions of five of eight tirapazamine-treated tumors, with three treated tumors showing no vascular dysfunction response. MRI data reflected this result, and a striking decrease in both K trans and IAUC values was seen with the responsive tumors. Retrospective evaluation of pretreatment MRI parameters revealed that those tumors that did not respond to the vascular-targeting effects of tirapazamine had significantly higher pretreatment K trans and IAUC values. Conclusions: MRI-derived parameter maps showed good agreement with histological tumor mapping. MRI was found to be an effective tool for noninvasively monitoring and predicting tirapazamine-mediated central vascular dysfunction.

  20. Diagnostic value of combined tumor markers detection for gastric and colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wenzhang; Dong Lin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of combined tumor markers detection in the clinical diagnosis for gastric cancer and colorectal cancel. Methods: The serum concentration of CEA, CA199, CA125, CA242 were measured by radioimmunoassay and Immunoradioassy in 46 patients with gastric cancer, 62 patients with colorectal cancer and 30 controls. Results: The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CEA were 37.0%, 96.7%, 59.2% respectively in gastric cancer,and 51.6%, 96.7%, 66.3% respectively in colorectal cancer, those of CA199 were 47.8%, 100.0%, 65.8% in gastric cancer, and 43.5%, 100.0%, 62, 0% in colorectal cancer, those of CA125 were 41.3%, 96.7%, 63.2% in gastric cancer, and 38.7%, 100.0%, 58.7% in colorectal cancer, those of CA242 were 54.3%, 100.0%, 71.5% in gastric cancer, and 51.6%, 100.0%, 67.4% in colorectal cancer. The diagnostic sensitivity specificity and accuracy of combined four markers were 73.9%, 93.3%, 82.9% in gastric cancer, and 77.4%, 96.7%, 83.7% in colorectal cancer. Compared with the respective value of any single marker, the diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy were significantly improved (P<0.05). Conclusion: Combined tumor markers detection could improve the diagnostic sensitivity and accuracy in gastric and colorectal cancers and was helpful for screening. (authors)

  1. Three-dimensional CT virtual endoscopy in the detection of simulated tumors in a novel phantom bladder and ureter model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Shane T; Kawashima, Akira; Vrtiska, Terri J; LeRoy, Andrew J; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Hartman, Robert P; Slezak, Jeffrey M; McCollough, Cynthia H; Chow, George K; King, Bernard F

    2005-03-01

    Cystoscopy and ureteroscopy have limitations in the evaluation for urothelial tumors, and both are invasive. We studied the utility of three-dimensional (3D) CT virtual endoscopy in phantom models. A phantom pelvis was constructed of Plexiglas, porcine pelvic bones, and processed animal fat and scanned at various table speeds in a four detector-row CT machine for ability to detect "tumors" of Solidwater plastic polymer. Images were reconstructed at slice thicknesses of 2.5 to 5.0 mm and reconstructed in 3D for evaluation by two radiologists with no knowledge of the scanning parameters or tumor location. Similar studies were performed with a ureter model. With 5-mm slices, the sensitivity for bladder tumors ranged from 67% for 2-mm tumors to 100% for 4-mm tumors, with 12 false-positive findings. The overall sensitivity was 86% with 3.75-mm slices with one false positive, and with 2.5-mm slices, the sensitivity was 93%, again with one false positive. For the ureteral tumors, the overall sensitivities and numbers of false positives were 88.9% and eight with 5.0-mm collimation, 88.9% and four with 3.75-mm collimation, and 100% and three with 2.5-mm collimation. The effective radiation dose for all studies was equivalent to that of a standard abdomen/pelvis scan. Although virtual endoscopy traditionally has had difficulty detecting tumors <5 mm, the multidetector-row CT protocols used in this study could detect most lesions smaller than this. The scan also depicts the other tissues of the pelvis, which is valuable for staging. The 3D images were produced using data from the CT urogram parameters standard at our institution.

  2. A New Size-based Platform for Circulating Tumor Cell Detection in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bo Young; Kim, Jhingook; Lee, Woo Yong; Kim, Hee Cheol

    2017-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) might play a significant role in cancer progression and metastasis. However, the ability to detect CTCs is limited, especially in cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In this study, we evaluated a new size-based CTC detection platform and its clinical efficacy in colorectal cancer. Blood samples were obtained from 76 patients with colorectal cancer and 20 healthy control subjects for CTC analysis. CTCs were enriched using a high-density microporous chip filter and were detected using a 4-color staining protocol including 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) for nucleated cells, CD45 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as a leukocyte marker, and epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) mAb or cytokeratin (CK) mAb as an epithelial cell marker. CTC positivity was defined as DAPI-positive (DAPI + )/CD45 - /EpCAM + or CK + cells and clinical outcomes of patients were analyzed according to CTC counts. CTCs were detected in 50 patients using this size-based filtration platform. CTC + patients were more frequently identified with a high level of carcinoembryonic antigen and advanced stage cancer (P = .038 and P = .017, respectively). CTC counts for patients with stage IV cancer (12.47 ± 24.00) were significantly higher than those for patients with cancers that were stage I to III (2.84 ± 5.29; P = .005) and healthy control subjects (0.25 ± 0.55; P colorectal cancer patients. Our results suggest that this new size-based platform has potential for determining prognosis and therapeutic response in colorectal cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A new method for brain tumor detection using the Bhattacharyya similarity coefficient, color conversions and neural network

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    Bahman Mansori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is widely applied for examination and diagnosis of brain tumors based on its advantages of high resolution in detecting the soft tissues and especially of its harmless radiation damages to human bodies. The goal of the processing of images is automatic segmentation of brain edema and tumors, in different dimensions of the magnetic resonance images. Methods: The proposed method is based on the unsupervised method which discovers the tumor region, if there is any, by analyzing the similarities between two hemispheres and computes the image size of the goal function based on Bhattacharyya coefficient which is used in the next stage to detect the tumor region or some part of it. In this stage, for reducing the color variation, the gray brain image is segmented, then it is turned to gray again. The self-organizing map (SOM neural network is used the segmented brain image is colored and finally the tumor is detected by matching the detected region and the colored image. This method is proposed to analyze MRI images for discovering brain tumors, and done in Bu Ali Sina University, Hamedan, Iran, in 2014. Results: The results for 30 randomly selected images from data bank of MRI center in Hamedan was compared with manually segmentation of experts. The results showed that, our proposed method had the accuracy of more than 94% at Jaccard similarity index (JSI, 97% at Dice similarity score (DSS, and 98% and 99% at two measures of specificity and sensitivity. Conclusion: The experimental results showed that it was satisfactory and can be used in automatic separation of tumor from normal brain tissues and therefore it can be used in practical applications. The results showed that the use of SOM neural network to classify useful magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and demonstrated a good performance.

  4. Monoclonal antibody DS6 detects a tumor-associated sialoglycotope expressed on human serous ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearse, K P; Smith, N L; Semer, D A; Eagles, L; Finley, J L; Kazmierczak, S; Kovacs, C J; Rodriguez, A A; Kellogg-Wennerberg, A E

    2000-12-15

    A newly developed murine monoclonal antibody, DS6, immunohistochemically reacts with an antigen, CA6, that is expressed by human serous ovarian carcinomas but not by normal ovarian surface epithelium or mesothelium. CA6 has a limited distribution in normal adult tissues and is most characteristically detected in fallopian tube epithelium, inner urothelium and type 2 pneumocytes. Pre-treatment of tissue sections with either periodic acid or neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae abolishes immunoreactivity with DS6, indicating that CA6 is a neuraminidase-sensitive and periodic acid-sensitive sialic acid glycoconjugate ("sialoglycotope"). SDS-PAGE of OVCAR5 cell lysates has revealed that the CA6 epitope is expressed on an 80 kDa non-disulfide-linked glycoprotein containing N-linked oligosaccharides. Two-dimensional non-equilibrium pH gradient gel electrophoresis indicates an isoelectric point of approximately 6.2 to 6.5. Comparison of the immunohistochemical distribution of CA6 in human serous ovarian adenocarcinomas has revealed similarities to that of CA125; however, distinct differences and some complementarity of antigen expression were revealed by double-label, 2-color immunohistochemical studies. The DS6-detected CA6 antigen appears to be distinct from other well-characterized tumor-associated antigens, including MUC1, CA125 and the histo-blood group-related antigens sLea, sLex and sTn. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Effect of contrast leakage on the detection of abnormal brain tumor vasculature in high-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaViolette, Peter S; Daun, Mitchell K; Paulson, Eric S; Schmainda, Kathleen M

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal brain tumor vasculature has recently been highlighted by a dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) MRI processing technique. The technique uses independent component analysis (ICA) to separate arterial and venous perfusion. The overlap of the two, i.e. arterio-venous overlap or AVOL, preferentially occurs in brain tumors and predicts response to anti-angiogenic therapy. The effects of contrast agent leakage on the AVOL biomarker have yet to be established. DSC was acquired during two separate contrast boluses in ten patients undergoing clinical imaging for brain tumor diagnosis. Three components were modeled with ICA, which included the arterial and venous components. The percentage of each component as well as a third component were determined within contrast enhancing tumor and compared. AVOL within enhancing tumor was also compared between doses. The percentage of enhancing tumor classified as not arterial or venous and instead into a third component with contrast agent leakage apparent in the time-series was significantly greater for the first contrast dose compared to the second. The amount of AVOL detected within enhancing tumor was also significantly greater with the second dose compared to the first. Contrast leakage results in large signal variance classified as a separate component by the ICA algorithm. The use of a second dose mitigates the effect and allows measurement of AVOL within enhancement.

  6. Detection and quantitation of circulating tumor cell dynamics by bioluminescence imaging in an orthotopic mammary carcinoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs have been detected in the bloodstream of both early-stage and advanced cancer patients. However, very little is know about the dynamics of CTCs during cancer progression and the clinical relevance of longitudinal CTC enumeration. To address this, we developed a simple bioluminescence imaging assay to detect CTCs in mouse models of metastasis. In a 4T1 orthotopic metastatic mammary carcinoma mouse model, we demonstrated that this quantitative method offers sensitivity down to 2 CTCs in 0.1-1mL blood samples and high specificity for CTCs originating from the primary tumor, independently of their epithelial status. In this model, we simultaneously monitored blood CTC dynamics, primary tumor growth, and lung metastasis progression over the course of 24 days. Early in tumor development, we observed low numbers of CTCs in blood samples (10-15 cells/100 µL and demonstrated that CTC dynamics correlate with viable primary tumor growth. To our knowledge, these data represent the first reported use of bioluminescence imaging to detect CTCs and quantify their dynamics in any cancer mouse model. This new assay is opening the door to the study of CTC dynamics in a variety of animal models. These studies may inform clinical decision on the appropriate timing of blood sampling and value of longitudinal CTC enumeration in cancer patients.

  7. SNPase-ARMS qPCR: Ultrasensitive Mutation-Based Detection of Cell-Free Tumor DNA in Melanoma Patients.

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    Julia Stadler

    Full Text Available Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in the plasma of cancer patients has become a common point of interest as indicator of therapy options and treatment response in clinical cancer research. Especially patient- and tumor-specific single nucleotide variants that accurately distinguish tumor DNA from wild type DNA are promising targets. The reliable detection and quantification of these single-base DNA variants is technically challenging. Currently, a variety of techniques is applied, with no apparent "gold standard". Here we present a novel qPCR protocol that meets the conditions of extreme sensitivity and specificity that are required for detection and quantification of tumor DNA. By consecutive application of two polymerases, one of them designed for extreme base-specificity, the method reaches unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Three qPCR assays were tested with spike-in experiments, specific for point mutations BRAF V600E, PTEN T167A and NRAS Q61L of melanoma cell lines. It was possible to detect down to one copy of tumor DNA per reaction (Poisson distribution, at a background of up to 200 000 wild type DNAs. To prove its clinical applicability, the method was successfully tested on a small cohort of BRAF V600E positive melanoma patients.

  8. A preliminary study of murine walker-256 tumor hypoxia detected by blood oxygen level dependent-MR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Shengjian; Mao Jian; Wu Bin; Peng Weijun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish Walker-256 transplantation tumor model in SD Rats. To study of R_2"* signal changes on murine Walker-256 tumor after inhaling Carbogen by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD)-MR, and to explore the feasibility of BOLD-MRI on detecting tumor hypoxia. Methods: Walker-256 tumor cell implanted subcutaneously in right lower abdomen of 95 female SD rats. MR was performed on the tumor-forming rats when the maximum diameter of tumor reached 1-3 cm, using a 3.0 T MR scanner equipped with a 3 inch animal surface coil. BOLD-MRI was done by using a multiecho SPGR sequence during inhaling air and at 10 minute after inhaling Carbogen, respectively. All images were transferred to GE ADW 4.3 workstation, then a baseline R_2"* (R_2"* a) and R_2"* (R_2"* b) after inhaling Carbogen of tumor was calculated using R_2 Star analysis software and ΔR_2"* was calculated through ΔR_2"* = R_2"* b -R_2"* a", meanwhile the volume of tumor were calculated as well. The difference of R_2"* signal pre and post-inhaling of Carbogen was compared with a paired t test, Pearson correlation was calculated between R_2"* a, ΔR_2"* and the volume of tumor, respectively. The correlation between ΔR_2"* and R_2"* a was also assessed by Pearson correlation. Results: Sixty-eight of ninety-five female SD rats formed the tumor (71.6%). The volume of tumor was from 352 to 13 173 mm"3. Mean ΔR_2"* decreased significantly (-2.26 ± 3.90) s"-"1 from (41.18 ± 22.29) s"-"1 during breathing air to (38.91 ± 21.35) s"-"1 10 min after inhaling Carbogen (t = 4.01, P 0.05). Conclusions: BOLD-MRI can detect the R_2"* signal change of murine Walker-256 tumor pre-and post-inhaling of Carbogen. The R_2"* signal showed significant decrease after inhaling Carbogen, however, the individual variation was remarkable. (authors)

  9. Application of detecting cerebrospinal fluid circulating tumor cells in the diagnosis of meningeal metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong JIANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To observe a new technology for the detection and enumeration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with meningeal metastasis (MM.  Methods Five cases of NSCLC with MM that were diagnosed by CSF cytology were selected, and 20 ml CSF samples were obtained by lumbar puncture for every patient. The tumor marker immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TM-iFISH technology was adapted to detect enrichment and enumeration of circulating tumor cells in 7.50 ml CSF samples; CSF cytology was checked in 10 ml CSF samples; CSF tumor markers were detected in 2.50 ml CSF samples. All of 5 cases were examined by MRI enhancement scan.  Results TM-iFISH detection found circulating tumor cells numbers ranging 18-1823/7.50 ml. Only 2 cases of patients with CSF cytology examination showed the tumor cells. The results of CSF tumor markers in all samples were higher than normal serum tumor markers detection results. The enhanced MRI scan of 5 cases revealed typical signs of MM.  Conclusions The TM-iFISH test showed certain advantages in the detection of malignant tumor cells in CSF. This technology may be a new method of detection and enumeration of tumor cells in CSF, but more studies are needed to prove its sensitivity and specificity. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.011

  10. Detection of mycoplasma infection in circulating tumor cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Seo; Lee, Hyun Min; Kim, Won-Tae; Kim, Min Kyu [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hee Jin [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital of National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Ran [Department of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Joh, Jae-Won [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Shick, E-mail: oncorkim@skku.edu [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chun Jeih, E-mail: cjryu@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • This study generates a monoclonal antibody CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein. • CA27 isolates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of liver cancer patients. • Results show the first evidence for mycoplasma infected-CTCs in cancer patients. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that persistent infections of bacteria promote carcinogenesis and metastasis. Infectious agents and their products can modulate cancer progression through the induction of host inflammatory and immune responses. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is considered as an important indicator in the metastatic cascade. We unintentionally produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein in mycoplasma-infected cancer cells during the searching process of novel surface markers of CTCs. Mycoplasma-infected cells were enriched by CA27-conjugated magnetic beads in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and analyzed by confocal microscopy with anti-CD45 and CA27 antibodies. CD45-negative and CA27-positive cells were readily detected in three out of seven patients (range 12–30/8.5 ml blood), indicating that they are mycoplasma-infected circulating epithelial cells. CA27-positive cells had larger size than CD45-positive hematological lineage cells, high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios and irregular nuclear morphology, which identified them as CTCs. The results show for the first time the existence of mycoplasma-infected CTCs in patients with HCC and suggest a possible correlation between mycoplasma infection and the development of cancer metastasis.

  11. DNA methylation patterns in bladder cancer and washing cell sediments: a perspective for tumor recurrence detection

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    Goldberg José

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epigenetic alterations are a hallmark of human cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes is related to urinary bladder cancer recurrence. Methods A set of 4 genes, including CDH1 (E-cadherin, SFN (stratifin, RARB (retinoic acid receptor, beta and RASSF1A (Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6 domain family 1, had their methylation patterns evaluated by MSP (Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction analysis in 49 fresh urinary bladder carcinoma tissues (including 14 cases paired with adjacent normal bladder epithelium, 3 squamous cell carcinomas and 2 adenocarcinomas and 24 cell sediment samples from bladder washings of patients classified as cancer-free by cytological analysis (control group. A third set of samples included 39 archived tumor fragments and 23 matched washouts from 20 urinary bladder cancer patients in post-surgical monitoring. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation patterns were determined and correlated with standard clinic-histopathological parameters. Results CDH1 and SFN genes were methylated at high frequencies in bladder cancer as well as in paired normal adjacent tissue and exfoliated cells from cancer-free patients. Although no statistically significant differences were found between RARB and RASSF1A methylation and the clinical and histopathological parameters in bladder cancer, a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 71% were observed for RARB methylation (Fisher's Exact test (p RASSF1A gene, respectively, in relation to the control group. Conclusion Indistinct DNA hypermethylation of CDH1 and SFN genes between tumoral and normal urinary bladder samples suggests that these epigenetic features are not suitable biomarkers for urinary bladder cancer. However, RARB and RASSF1A gene methylation appears to be an initial event in urinary bladder carcinogenesis and should be considered as defining a panel of

  12. Development and statistical assessment of a paper-based immunoassay for detection of tumor markers

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    Mazzu-Nascimento, Thiago [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Morbioli, Giorgio Gianini [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil); School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Milan, Luis Aparecido [Departamento de Estatística, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Donofrio, Fabiana Cristina [Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, 78557-267, Sinop, MT (Brazil); Mestriner, Carlos Alberto [Wama Produtos para Laboratório Ltda, 13560-971, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Carrilho, Emanuel, E-mail: emanuel@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, 13566-590, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Bioanalítica, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2017-01-15

    Paper-based assays are an attractive low-cost option for clinical chemistry testing, due to characteristics such as short time of analysis, low consumption of samples and reagents, and high portability of assays. However, little attention has been given to the evaluation of the performance of these simple tests, which should include the use of a statistical approach to define the choice of best cut-off value for the test. The choice of the cut-off value impacts on the sensitivity and specificity of the bioassay. Here, we developed a paper-based immunoassay for the detection of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and performed a statistical assessment to establish the assay's cut-off value using the Youden's J index (68.28 A.U.), what allowed for a gain in sensibility (0.86) and specificity (1.0). We also discuss about the importance of defining a gray zone as a safety margin for test (±12% over the cut-off value), eliminating all false positives and false negatives outcomes and avoiding misleading results. The test accuracy was calculated as the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, presenting a value of 0.97, what classifies this test as highly accurate. We propose here a low-cost method capable of detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum samples, highlighting the importance of statistical tools to evaluate a new low-cost diagnostic method. - Highlights: • A paper-based sandwich immunoassay protocol for detection of tumor markers. • A statistical approach to define cut-off values and measuring test's sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. • A simple way to create a gray zone, avoiding false positive and false negative outcomes.

  13. Detection of circulating tumor cells harboring a unique ALK rearrangement in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailler, Emma; Adam, Julien; Barthélémy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Auger, Nathalie; Valent, Alexander; Borget, Isabelle; Planchard, David; Taylor, Melissa; André, Fabrice; Soria, Jean Charles; Vielh, Philippe; Besse, Benjamin; Farace, Françoise

    2013-06-20

    The diagnostic test for ALK rearrangement in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) for crizotinib treatment is currently done on tumor biopsies or fine-needle aspirations. We evaluated whether ALK rearrangement diagnosis could be performed by using circulating tumor cells (CTCs). The presence of an ALK rearrangement was examined in CTCs of 18 ALK-positive and 14 ALK-negative patients by using a filtration enrichment technique and filter-adapted fluorescent in situ hybridization (FA-FISH), a FISH method optimized for filters. ALK-rearrangement patterns were determined in CTCs and compared with those present in tumor biopsies. ALK-rearranged CTCs and tumor specimens were characterized for epithelial (cytokeratins, E-cadherin) and mesenchymal (vimentin, N-cadherin) marker expression. ALK-rearranged CTCs were monitored in five patients treated with crizotinib. All ALK-positive patients had four or more ALK-rearranged CTCs per 1 mL of blood (median, nine CTCs per 1 mL; range, four to 34 CTCs per 1 mL). No or only one ALK-rearranged CTC (median, one per 1 mL; range, zero to one per 1 mL) was detected in ALK-negative patients. ALK-rearranged CTCs harbored a unique (3'5') split pattern, and heterogeneous patterns (3'5', only 3') of splits were present in tumors. ALK-rearranged CTCs expressed a mesenchymal phenotype contrasting with heterogeneous epithelial and mesenchymal marker expressions in tumors. Variations in ALK-rearranged CTC levels were detected in patients being treated with crizotinib. ALK rearrangement can be detected in CTCs of patients with ALK-positive NSCLC by using a filtration technique and FA-FISH, enabling both diagnostic testing and monitoring of crizotinib treatment. Our results suggest that CTCs harboring a unique ALK rearrangement and mesenchymal phenotype may arise from clonal selection of tumor cells that have acquired the potential to drive metastatic progression of ALK-positive NSCLC.

  14. Apprasial of the diagnostic value of combined detection of serum tumor markers (AFP, CEA, SF, TSA) for common malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Jingyin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess the detection rate of common malignancies with combined determination of four serum tumor markers (AFP, CEA, SF, TSA). Methods: Serum AFP, CEA, SF (with RIA) and TSA (with biochemical method) contents were determined in 612 patients with various kinds of proved malignancies. Results: Positive rates of combined determination of these four tumor markers for detection of common malignancies were: 95.2%(79/83) for liver carcinoma, 92.6% (125/135) for lung carcinoma, 88.5% (115/130) for gastric cancer, 83.3% (60/72) for colorectal cancer, 84.2% (85/101) for breast cancer, 90.0% (9/10) for chorionepithelioma and 88.9% (72/81) for ovarian cancer. Conclusion: Combined determination of these four tumor markers for screening malignancies is simple, cheap, practical and worth popularization. (authors)

  15. Detection of Tumor Markers in Prostate Cancer and Comparison of Sensitivity between Real Time and Nested PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Takayuki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kawabata, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate and compare the sensitivity in conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR and western blots for detection of prostate cancer tumor markers using prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We performed conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR, and western blots using 5 kinds of PCa cells. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and androgen receptor (AR) were compared for their detection sensitivi...

  16. Digital PCR analysis of circulating tumor DNA: a biomarker for chondrosarcoma diagnosis, prognostication, and residual disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutteridge, Alice; Rathbone, Victoria M; Gibbons, Rebecca; Bi, Mark; Archard, Nicholas; Davies, Kate E J; Brown, Jake; Plagnol, Vincent; Pillay, Nischalan; Amary, Fernanda; O'Donnell, Paul; Gupta, Manu; Tirabosco, Roberto; Flanagan, Adrienne M; Forshew, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Conventional chondrosarcoma is the most common primary bone tumor in adults. Prognosis corresponds with tumor grade but remains variable, especially for individuals with grade (G) II disease. There are currently no biomarkers available for monitoring or prognostication of chondrosarcoma. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) has recently emerged as a promising biomarker for a broad range of tumor types. To date, little has been done to study the presence of ctDNA and its potential utility in the management of sarcomas, including chondrosarcoma. In this study, we have assessed ctDNA levels in a cohort of 71 patients, 32 with sarcoma, including 29 individuals with central chondrosarcoma (CS) and 39 with locally aggressive and benign bone and soft tissue tumors, using digital PCR. In patients with CS, ctDNA was detected in pretreatment samples in 14/29 patients, which showed clear correlation with tumor grade as demonstrated by the detection of ctDNA in all patients with GIII and dedifferentiated disease (n = 6) and in 8/17 patients with GII disease, but never associated with GI CS. Notably detection of ctDNA preoperatively in GII disease was associated with a poor outcome. A total of 14 patients with CS had ctDNA levels assessed at multiple time points and in most patients there was a clear reduction following surgical removal. This research lays the foundation for larger studies to assess the utility of ctDNA for chondrosarcoma diagnosis, prognostication, early detection of residual disease and monitoring disease progression. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cervical Lymph Node Metastases of Unknown Origin: Primary Tumor Detection with Whole-Body Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nassenstein, K.; Veit-Haibach, P.; Stergar, H.; Gutzeit, A.; Freudenberg, L.; Kuehl, H.; Fischer, M.; Barkhausen, J.; Bockisch, A.; Antoch, G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Identification of primary tumor in patients with cervical lymph node metastasis of unknown primary (MUO) has a great impact on therapy approach and potentially on patient prognosis. Purpose: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of combined positron emission tomography (PET)/computer tomography (CT) for primary tumor detection in cervical metastases of unknown origin compared to PET, CT, and PET+CT side-by-side evaluation. Material and Methods: 39 consecutive patients (eight women, 31 men; mean age 59.9±11.2 years) with MUO were enrolled in this study. PET/CT images were obtained 1 hour after injection of 350 MBq of fluorodeoxyglucose. Oral and intravenous contrast agents were administered in all patients to ensure diagnostic CT data. Fused PET/CT data were evaluated for primary tumor detection. Diagnostic accuracy was calculated and compared with CT alone, PET alone, and side-by-side PET+CT evaluation. Statistical analysis of differences in diagnostic performance between the different imaging procedures was based on the McNemar test. Results: Fused PET/CT depicted the primary tumor in 11 of 39 (28%) patients. In 28 (72%) patients, the primary tumor remained occult. CT revealed the primary in five (13%), PET alone in 10 (26%), and side-by-side evaluation of PET+CT in 10 (26%) of 39 patients. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences between the imaging modalities. Conclusion: PET, side-by-side PET+CT, and PET/CT revealed similar detection rates for primary tumors in cervical MUO patients. Therefore, cervical metastases of an unknown primary may be assessed with either of these imaging modalities. Detection rates with CT were substantially lower. Thus, inclusion of functional data for assessment of cervical MUO patients must be recommended

  18. Mammographic density and histopathologic characteristics of screen-detected tumors in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshina, Nataliia; Ursin, Giske; Hoff, Solveig Roth; Akslen, Lars A; Roman, Marta; Sebuødegård, Sofie; Hofvind, Solveig

    2015-01-01

    High mammographic density might mask breast tumors, resulting in delayed diagnosis or missed cancers. To investigate the association between mammographic density and histopathologic tumor characteristics (histologic type, size, grade, and lymph node status) among women screened in the Norwegian Breast Cancer Screening Program. Information about 1760 screen-detected ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 7366 invasive breast cancers diagnosed among women aged 50–69 years, 1996–2010, was analyzed. The screening mammograms were classified subjectively according to the amount of fibroglandular tissue into fatty, medium dense, and dense by breast radiologists. Chi-square test was used to compare the distribution of tumor characteristics by mammographic density. Odds ratio (OR) of tumor characteristics by density was estimated by means of logistic regression, adjusting for screening mode (screen-film and full-field digital mammography), and age. Mean and median tumor size of invasive breast cancers was 13.8 and 12 mm, respectively, for women with fatty breasts, and 16.2 and 14 mm for those with dense breasts. Lymph node positive tumors were identified among 20.6% of women with fatty breasts compared with 27.2% of those with dense breasts (P < 0.001). The proportion of DCIS was significantly lower for women with fatty (15.8%) compared with dense breasts (22.0%). Women with dense breasts had an increased risk of large (OR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.18–1.73) and lymph node positive tumors (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05–1.51) compared with women with fatty and medium dense breasts. High mammographic density was positively associated with tumor size and lymph node positive tumors

  19. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  20. Investigations for a multi-marker RT-PCR to improve sensitivity of disseminated tumor cell detection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlems, F.A.; Diepstra, J.H.S.; Cornelissen, I.M.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Wobbes, Th.; Punt, C.J.A.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Ruers, T.J.M.; Muijen, G.N.P. van

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to develop a multi-marker RT-PCR, which as such may be more sensitive than a single marker assay for the detection of disseminated tumor cells, we evaluated six RT-PCR markers: cytokeratin 20 (CK20), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), epidermal growth

  1. Investigations for a multi-marker RT-PCR to improve sensitivity of disseminated tumor cell detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlems, F. A.; Diepstra, J. H. S.; Cornelissen, I. M. H. A.; Ligtenberg, M. J. L.; Wobbes, Th; Punt, C. J. A.; van Krieken, J. H. J. M.; Ruers, T. J. M.; van Muijen, G. N. P.

    2003-01-01

    In order to develop a multi-marker RT-PCR, which as such may be more sensitive than a single marker assay for the detection of disseminated tumor cells, we evaluated six RT-PCR markers: cytokeratin 20 (CK20), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), epidermal growth factor receptor

  2. Whole-body MRI in comparison to skeletal scintigraphy for detection of skeletal metastases in patients with solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, N.; Altehoefer, C.; Winterer, J.; Schaefer, O.; Bley, T.A.; Langer, M.; Kelly, T.; Moser, E.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) as a new and rapid examination technique with skeletal scintigraphy for detection of skeletal metastases from solid tumors. In 129 patients with solid malignant tumors, WB-MRI was performed for individual comparison with skeletal scintigraphy. Examinations were performed with the innovative AngioSURF trademark rolling table with integrated phased array surface coil and coronary TIRM sequences for different body regions. The results for WB-MRI and skeletal scintigraphy were concordant in 81% of the cases, whereby both procedures excluded skeletal metastases in 43%. WB-MRI and skeletal scintigraphy demonstrated skeletal metastases in 38% of the cases, whereby WB-MRI provided more comprehensive findings in 45%. In 12% of the cases, skeletal scintigraphy was superior to WB-MRI and in 19% the findings were discordant, whereby WB-MRI detected skeletal metastases in 15 cases which had not been found on skeletal scintigraphy. In nine cases, skeletal scintigraphy was positive when the WB-MRI was negative. In 60% of the cases, WB-MRI evidenced tumor-associated findings. WB-MRI represents a promising new staging technique for detection of skeletal metastases, which is more sensitive in many cases than skeletal scintigraphy in detecting and assessing the extent of skeletal metastases - and tumor-associated findings that are relevant for treatment strategy. (orig.) [de

  3. Swarm Intelligence-Enhanced Detection of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Tumor-Educated Platelets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, Myron G.; Sol, Nik; In ‘t Veld, Sjors G.J.G.; Vancura, Adrienne; Muller, Mirte; Niemeijer, Anna Larissa N.; Fejes, Aniko V.; Tjon Kon Fat, Lee Ann; Huis in 't Veld, Anna E; Leurs, Cyra; Le Large, Tessa Y.; Meijer, Laura L.; Kooi, Irsan E.; Rustenburg, François; Schellen, Pepijn; Verschueren, Heleen; Post, Edward; Wedekind, Laurine E.; Bracht, Jillian; Esenkbrink, Michelle; Wils, Leon; Favaro, Francesca; Schoonhoven, Jilian D.; Tannous, Jihane; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kazemier, Geert; Giovannetti, Elisa; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Idema, Sander; Killestein, Joep; Heger, Michal; de Jager, Saskia C.; Urbanus, Rolf T.; Hoefer, Imo E.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Mannhalter, Christine; Gomez-Arroyo, Jose; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Noske, David P.; Vandertop, W. Peter; van den Broek, Daan; Ylstra, Bauke; Nilsson, R. Jonas A; Wesseling, Pieter; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael; Lee-Lewandrowski, Elizabeth; Lewandrowski, Kent B.; Tannous, Bakhos A.; de Langen, Adrianus J.; Smit, Egbert F.; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Blood-based liquid biopsies, including tumor-educated blood platelets (TEPs), have emerged as promising biomarker sources for non-invasive detection of cancer. Here we demonstrate that particle-swarm optimization (PSO)-enhanced algorithms enable efficient selection of RNA biomarker panels from

  4. Droplet digital PCR for detection and quantification of circulating tumor DNA in plasma of head and neck cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Joost H; Huibers, Manon M H; van Es, Robert J J; de Bree, Remco; Willems, Stefan M

    2017-06-19

    During posttreatment surveillance of head and neck cancer patients, imaging is insufficiently accurate for the early detection of relapsing disease. Free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may serve as a novel biomarker for monitoring tumor burden during posttreatment surveillance of these patients. In this exploratory study, we investigated whether low level ctDNA in plasma of head and neck cancer patients can be detected using Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR). TP53 mutations were determined in surgically resected primary tumor samples from six patients with high stage (II-IV), moderate to poorly differentiated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Subsequently, mutation specific ddPCR assays were designed. Pretreatment plasma samples from these patients were examined on the presence of ctDNA by ddPCR using the mutation-specific assays. The ddPCR results were evaluated alongside clinicopathological data. In all cases, plasma samples were found positive for targeted TP53 mutations in varying degrees (absolute quantification of 2.2-422 mutational copies/ml plasma). Mutations were detected in wild-type TP53 background templates of 7667-156,667 copies/ml plasma, yielding fractional abundances of down to 0.01%. Our results show that detection of tumor specific TP53 mutations in low level ctDNA from HNSCC patients using ddPCR is technically feasible and provide ground for future research on ctDNA quantification for the use of diagnostic biomarkers in the posttreatment surveillance of HNSCC patients.

  5. Detection of EWS/FLI-1 fusion in non-Ewing soft tissue tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trancău, I O; Huică, R; Surcel, M; Munteanu, A; Ursaciuc, C

    2015-01-01

    EWS/FLI-1 fusion mainly appears in Ewing's sarcoma or the primitive neuroectodermal tumors and represents a genomic marker for these tumors. However, it can appear with lower frequency in other soft tissue tumors. The paper investigates the presence of EWS/FLI-1 fusion in clinically diagnosed sarcoma belonging to different non-Ewing connective tissue tumors in order to search for a possible new biomarker valuable for investigators. 20 patients with soft tissue tumors, who underwent surgery, were tested. Intra-operative samples of normal and tumor tissue were collected for histopathological diagnosis and genetics determinations. The patients' RNA from tumor and normal peritumoral tissue was extracted and EWS/FLI-1 fusion screened by quantitative real-time PCR. The relative expression of the fusion in the tumor sample was compared to the similar expression in normal tissue. The amplification in the threshold zone was shown by 5 samples (25%): 2 clear cell sarcoma, 1 fibrosarcoma, 1 malignant tumor of nerve sheath, 1 metastatic adenocarcinoma. We differentiated between the unspecific amplification and concluded that these are weak positive results. Genomic investigation may establish the tumor malignancy and its possible affiliation earlier than histopathology. It can support the screening of EWS/FLI-1 fusion in a larger variety of clinically diagnosed soft tissue tumors.

  6. NF2 tumor suppressor gene: a comprehensive and efficient detection of somatic mutations by denaturing HPLC and microarray-CGH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szijan, Irene; Rochefort, Daniel; Bruder, Carl; Surace, Ezequiel; Machiavelli, Gloria; Dalamon, Viviana; Cotignola, Javier; Ferreiro, Veronica; Campero, Alvaro; Basso, Armando; Dumanski, Jan P; Rouleau, Guy A

    2003-01-01

    The NF2 tumor suppressor gene, located in chromosome 22q12, is involved in the development of multiple tumors of the nervous system, either associated with neurofibromatosis 2 or sporadic ones, mainly schwannomas and meningiomas. In order to evaluate the role of the NF2 gene in sporadic central nervous system (CNS) tumors, we analyzed NF2 mutations in 26 specimens: 14 meningiomas, 4 schwannomas, 4 metastases, and 4 other histopathological types of neoplasms. Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (denaturing HPLC) and comparative genomic hybridization on a DNA microarray (microarray- CGH) were used as scanning methods for small mutations and gross rearrangements respectively. Small mutations were identified in six out of seventeen meningiomas and schwannomas, one mutation was novel. Large deletions were detected in six meningiomas. All mutations were predicted to result in truncated protein or in the absence of a large protein domain. No NF2 mutations were found in other histopathological types of CNS tumors. These results provide additional evidence that mutations in the NF2 gene play an important role in the development of sporadic meningiomas and schwannomas. Denaturing HPLC analysis of small mutations and microarray-CGH of large deletions are complementary, fast, and efficient methods for the detection of mutations in tumor tissues.

  7. Do tumor size or patient age influence the accuracy of sentinel lymph node (Sn) detection in breast cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortes, M.; Fernandez, A.; Benito, E.; Azpeitia, D.; Ricart, Y.; Escobedo, A.; Martin-Comin, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The aim was to analyze the influence of the age of the patient and tumor size on the accuracy to identify SN in patients with breast cancer. The whole population are 250 patients with breast cancer. In 236 data on size and age were available. Mean age was 53.6 years, range 28-87 years. Patients were classified 1) depending an age: 40 60 years: 73 p and 2) depending on tumor size (mm): 30: 46 p. Examination protocol: All patients received a peritumoral injection of 111 MBq (3mCi) of 99mTc-HSA-nanocolloid in 1 - 3 ml. 2 h later 300 seconds anterior and lateral thoracic scans were obtained. A 57-Co flood phantom was positioned back to the patient to outline the anatomical contour and help to localize SN. SN was marked on the skin with permanent ink. Intraoperative SN localization was performed using a gamma probe. Histopathologic analysis of SN was done with haematoxylin/eosin, immunohistochemistry and PCR. Histopathology of the SN was compared to the histopathology of all the other lymph nodes drawn out by the surgeon. SN were identified by lymphoscintigraphy in 227 cases of 250 (91 %). 221 of them (97 %) were localized in axyla. In 210 of 221 SN could be localized and drawn out at surgery. The no detection and false negative rate were much higher in patients aged > 60 (29 and 33 %) and in tumors > 30 mm (32 and 19 %) than in patients 60 y and tumors > 30 mm (46 %) and the highest false negative rate appears in patients >60 and tumors > 30 mm (33 %) 1) No FN were found in patients with tumor size <10 mm. 2) No FN were found in patients aged under 40 years. 3) FN rate seems to be higher in older patients. 4) The age of patients and the size of tumor seem to influence an the SN detection rates. (author)

  8. Detection of T790M, the acquired resistance EGFR mutation, by tumor biopsy versus noninvasive blood-based analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaresan, Tilak K.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Heymach, John V.; Riely, Gregory J.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Koch, Walter H.; Sullivan, James P.; Fox, Douglas B.; Maher, Robert; Muzikansky, Alona; Webb, Andrew; Tran, Hai T.; Giri, Uma; Fleisher, Martin; Yu, Helena A.; Wei, Wen; Johnson, Bruce E.; Barber, Thomas A.; Walsh, John R.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.; Stott, Shannon L.; Kapur, Ravi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The T790M gatekeeper mutation in the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is acquired by some EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) as they become resistant to selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). As third generation EGFR TKIs that overcome T790M-associated resistance become available, noninvasive approaches to T790M detection will become critical to guide management. Experimental Design As part of a multi-institutional Stand-Up-To-Cancer collaboration, we performed an exploratory analysis of 40 patients with EGFR-mutant tumors progressing on EGFR TKI therapy. We compared the T790M genotype from tumor biopsies with analysis of simultaneously collected circulating tumor cells (CTC) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA). Results T790M genotypes were successfully obtained in 30 (75%) tumor biopsies, 28 (70%) CTC samples and 32 (80%) ctDNA samples. The resistance-associated mutation was detected in 47–50% of patients using each of the genotyping assays, with concordance among them ranging from 57–74%. While CTC- and ctDNA-based genotyping were each unsuccessful in 20–30% of cases, the two assays together enabled genotyping in all patients with an available blood sample, and they identified the T790M mutation in 14 (35%) patients in whom the concurrent biopsy was negative or indeterminate. Conclusion Discordant genotypes between tumor biopsy and blood-based analyses may result from technological differences, as well as sampling different tumor cell populations. The use of complementary approaches may provide the most complete assessment of each patient’s cancer, which should be validated in predicting response to T790M-targeted inhibitors. PMID:26446944

  9. ⁶⁸Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT detects heart metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Sundin, Anders; Falhammar, Henrik

    2014-09-01

    Metastases from ileal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) to the myocardium are rare and generally seen in patients with widespread metastatic NET disease. The objectives of this investigation were to describe the frequency of intracardiac metastases in ileal NET patients examined by (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT and to describe the cases in detail. All (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT examinations performed at the Karolinska University Hospital since 2010 until April 2012 were reviewed. In all, 128 out of 337 examinations were in patients with ileal NETs. Four patients had seven myocardiac metastases, yielding a frequency of 4.3 % in patients with ileal NETs. One patient had cardiac surgery while three were treated with somatostatin analogs. The cardiac metastases did not affect the patients' activity of daily life. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT is an established imaging modality in identifying cardiac metastases in ileal NETs. Prospective studies are needed to confirm the true clinical value of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET/CT in detecting cardiac metastases in both ileal and non-ileal NETs.

  10. Biochemical Stability Analysis of Nano Scaled Contrast Agents Used in Biomolecular Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jennifer; Kyung, Richard

    Imaging contrast agents are materials used to improve the visibility of internal body structures in the imaging process. Many agents that are used for contrast enhancement are now studied empirically and computationally by researchers. Among various imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a major diagnostic tool in many clinical specialties due to its non-invasive characteristic and its safeness in regards to ionizing radiation exposure. Recently, researchers have prepared aqueous fullerene nanoparticles using electrochemical methods. In this paper, computational simulations of thermodynamic stabilities of nano scaled contrast agents that can be used in biomolecular imaging detection of tumor cells are presented using nanomaterials such as fluorescent functionalized fullerenes. In addition, the stability and safety of different types of contrast agents composed of metal oxide a, b, and c are tested in the imaging process. Through analysis of the computational simulations, the stabilities of the contrast agents, determined by optimized energies of the conformations, are presented. The resulting numerical data are compared. In addition, Density Functional Theory (DFT) is used in order to model the electron properties of the compound.

  11. Nanodiamond-Manganese dual mode MRI contrast agents for enhanced liver tumor detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Weixin; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Lissa Nurrul; Yvonne, Tay Wei Zheng; Lee, Kuan J; Guenther, Ilonka; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2017-04-01

    Contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is critical for the diagnosis and monitoring of a number of diseases, including cancer. Certain clinical applications, including the detection of liver tumors, rely on both T1 and T2-weighted images even though contrast agent-enhanced MR imaging is not always reliable. Thus, there is a need for improved dual mode contrast agents with enhanced sensitivity. We report the development of a nanodiamond-manganese dual mode contrast agent that enhanced both T1 and T2-weighted MR imaging. Conjugation of manganese to nanodiamonds resulted in improved longitudinal and transverse relaxivity efficacy over unmodified MnCl 2 as well as clinical contrast agents. Following intravenous administration, nanodiamond-manganese complexes outperformed current clinical contrast agents in an orthotopic liver cancer mouse model while also reducing blood serum concentration of toxic free Mn 2+ ions. Thus, nanodiamond-manganese complexes may serve as more effective dual mode MRI contrast agent, particularly in cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of epidermal growth factor receptor in radiation-induced lung tumors in Beagle dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillett, N A; Haley, P J; Hahn, F F

    1988-12-01

    Increased levels of epidermal growth factor receptor have been reported in a variety of tumors, including pulmonary squamous cell carcinomas in man. The purpose of this study was to determine if increased levels of epidermal growth factor (EGFR) were present in lung tumors from Beagle dogs that had been exposed to {sup 239}PuO{sub 2}- Using immunohistochemical techniques, sections from 17 lung tumors were examined for the presence of EGFR. Seven of the tumors were strongly positive for EGFR; the remainder of the tumors and the normal lung sections were negative. The positive immunostaining could not be correlated with the histologic phenotype of the tumors. Work is in progress to determine the level of EGFR in preneoplastic, proliferative epithelial foci in the Iung. (author)

  13. Detection of tumor markers in prostate cancer and comparison of sensitivity between real time and nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takayuki; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yamamichi, Fukashi; Fujisawa, Masato; Kawabata, Masato; Shirakawa, Toshiro

    2012-06-27

    The objective of this study is to investigate and compare the sensitivity in conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR and western blots for detection of prostate cancer tumor markers using prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We performed conventional PCR, quantitative real time PCR, nested PCR, and western blots using 5 kinds of PCa cells. Prostate specific antigen (PSA), prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), and androgen receptor (AR) were compared for their detection sensitivity by real time PCR and nested PCR. In real time PCR, there was a significant correlation between cell number and the RNA concentration obtained (R(2)=0.9944) for PSA, PSMA, and AR. We found it possible to detect these markers from a single LNCaP cell in both real time and nested PCR. By comparison, nested PCR reached a linear curve in fewer PCR cycles than real time PCR, suggesting that nested PCR may offer PCR results more quickly than real time PCR. In conclusion, nested PCR may offer tumor maker detection in PCa cells more quickly (with fewer PCR cycles) with the same high sensitivity as real time PCR. Further study is necessary to establish and evaluate the best tool for PCa tumor marker detection.

  14. Innovative multimodal DOTA/NODA nanoparticles for MRI and PET imaging for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truillet, Charles; Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsoukalas, Charalambos; Sancey, Lucie; Denat, Franck; Boschetti, Frédéric; Stellas, Dimitris; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Moulopoulos, Lia A; Lux, François; Perriat, P; Tillement, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of the exact tumor stage is essential to adapt therapeutic strategies or to follow the evolution of the tumor after therapy in order to increase the survival chance. The multi-tasking diagnostics that combine techniques such as PET and MRI could really improve imaging tumor stage. PET mainly offers functional information about the disease with high sensitivity. MRI offers predominantly morphological information, able to provide an excellent soft tissue contrasts due to its high resolution.

  15. Innovative multimodal DOTA/NODA nanoparticles for MRI and PET imaging for tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truillet, Charles [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Matériaux Ingénierie et Science, INSA Lyon, CNRS, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsoukalas, Charalambos [Radiochemistry Studies Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Athens (Greece); Sancey, Lucie [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Denat, Franck [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de l’Université de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 6302, University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Boschetti, Frédéric [CheMatech, 21000 Dijon (France); Stellas, Dimitris [Department of Cancer Biology, Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D [Center for Experimental Surgery, Clinical and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Moulopoulos, Lia A [Department of Radiology, University of Athens Medical School, Areteion Hospital, Athens (Greece); Lux, François [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Perriat, P [Matériaux Ingénierie et Science, INSA Lyon, CNRS, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Tillement, Olivier [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-29

    The knowledge of the exact tumor stage is essential to adapt therapeutic strategies or to follow the evolution of the tumor after therapy in order to increase the survival chance. The multi-tasking diagnostics that combine techniques such as PET and MRI could really improve imaging tumor stage. PET mainly offers functional information about the disease with high sensitivity. MRI offers predominantly morphological information, able to provide an excellent soft tissue contrasts due to its high resolution.

  16. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers with a rapid and sensitive multicolor quantum dots based immunochromatographic test strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunying; Hou, Fei; Ma, Yicai

    2015-06-15

    A novel multicolor quantum dots (QDs) based immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS) was developed for simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers, by utilizing alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as models. The immunosensor could realize simultaneous quantitative detection of tumor markers with only one test line and one control line on the nitrocellulose membrane (NC membrane) due to the introduction of multicolor QDs. In this method, a mixture of mouse anti-AFP McAb and mouse anti-CEA McAb was coated on NC membrane as test line and goat anti-mouse IgG antibody was coated as control line. Anti-AFP McAb-QDs546 conjugates and anti-CEA McAb-QDs620 conjugates were mixed and applied to the conjugate pad. Simultaneous quantitative detection of multiple tumor markers was achieved by detecting the fluorescence intensity of captured QDs labels on test line and control line using a test strip reader. Under the optimum conditions, AFP and CEA could be detected as low as 3 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL in 15 min with a sample volume of 80 μL, and no obvious cross-reactivity was observed. The immunosensor was validated with 130 clinical samples and in which it exhibited high sensitivity (93% for AFP and 87% for CEA) and specificity (94% for AFP and 97% for CEA). The immunosensor also demonstrated high recoveries (87.5-113% for AFP and 90-97.3% for CEA) and low relative standard deviations (RSDs) (2.8-6.2% for AFP and 4.9-9.6% for CEA) when testing spiked human serum. This novel multicolor QDs based ICTS provides an easy and rapid, simultaneous quantitative detecting strategy for point-of-care testing of tumor markers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Endoscopic tattooing of early colon carcinoma enhances detection of lymph nodes most prone to harbor tumor burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldecoa, Iban; Montironi, Carla; Planell, Nuria; Pellise, Maria; Fernandez-Esparrach, Gloria; Gines, Angels; Delgado, Salvadora; Momblan, Dulce; Moreira, Leticia; Lopez-Ceron, Maria; Rakislova, Natalia; Martinez-Palli, Graciela; Balust, Jaume; Bombi, Josep Antoni; de Lacy, Antonio; Castells, Antoni; Balaguer, Francesc; Cuatrecasas, Miriam

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening programs result in the detection of early-stage asymptomatic carcinomas suitable to be surgically cured. Lymph nodes (LN) from early CRC are usually small and may be difficult to collect. Still, at least 12 LNs should be analyzed from colectomies, to ensure a reliable pN0 stage. Presurgical endoscopic tattooing improves LN procurement. In addition, molecular detection of occult LN tumor burden in histologically pN0 CRC patients is associated with a decreased survival rate. We aimed to study the impact of presurgical endoscopic tattooing on the molecular detection of LN tumor burden in early colon neoplasms. A prospective cohort study from a CRC screening-based population was performed at a tertiary academic hospital. LNs from colectomies with and without preoperative endoscopic tattooing were assessed by two methods, hematoxylin and eosin (HE), and RT-LAMP, to detect tumor cytokeratin 19 (CK19) mRNA. We compared the amount of tumor burden and LN yields from tattooed and non-tattooed specimens. HE and RT-LAMP analyses of 936 LNs were performed from 71 colectomies containing early carcinomas and endoscopically unresectable adenomas (8 pT0, 17 pTis, 27 pT1, 19 pT2); 47 out of 71 (66.2 %) were tattooed. Molecular positivity correlated with the presence of tattoo in LN [p < 0.001; OR 3.1 (95 % CI 1.7-5.5)]. A significantly higher number of LNs were obtained in tattooed specimens (median 17 LN vs. 14.5 LN; p = 0.019). Endoscopic tattooing enables the analysis of those LNs most prone to harbor tumor cells and improves the number of LN harvested.

  18. DNA methylation patterns in bladder cancer and washing cell sediments: a perspective for tumor recurrence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negraes, Priscilla D; Favaro, Francine P; Camargo, João Lauro V; Oliveira, Maria Luiza CS; Goldberg, José; Rainho, Cláudia A; Salvadori, Daisy MF

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are a hallmark of human cancer. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether aberrant DNA methylation of cancer-associated genes is related to urinary bladder cancer recurrence. A set of 4 genes, including CDH1 (E-cadherin), SFN (stratifin), RARB (retinoic acid receptor, beta) and RASSF1A (Ras association (RalGDS/AF-6) domain family 1), had their methylation patterns evaluated by MSP (Methylation-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction) analysis in 49 fresh urinary bladder carcinoma tissues (including 14 cases paired with adjacent normal bladder epithelium, 3 squamous cell carcinomas and 2 adenocarcinomas) and 24 cell sediment samples from bladder washings of patients classified as cancer-free by cytological analysis (control group). A third set of samples included 39 archived tumor fragments and 23 matched washouts from 20 urinary bladder cancer patients in post-surgical monitoring. After genomic DNA isolation and sodium bisulfite modification, methylation patterns were determined and correlated with standard clinic-histopathological parameters. CDH1 and SFN genes were methylated at high frequencies in bladder cancer as well as in paired normal adjacent tissue and exfoliated cells from cancer-free patients. Although no statistically significant differences were found between RARB and RASSF1A methylation and the clinical and histopathological parameters in bladder cancer, a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 71% were observed for RARB methylation (Fisher's Exact test (p < 0.0001; OR = 48.89) and, 58% and 17% (p < 0.05; OR = 0.29) for RASSF1A gene, respectively, in relation to the control group. Indistinct DNA hypermethylation of CDH1 and SFN genes between tumoral and normal urinary bladder samples suggests that these epigenetic features are not suitable biomarkers for urinary bladder cancer. However, RARB and RASSF1A gene methylation appears to be an initial event in urinary bladder carcinogenesis and should be considered as defining a

  19. Non-invasive thermal IR detection of breast tumor development in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Jason R.; Young, Madison A.; Dréau, D.; Trammell, Susan R.

    2015-03-01

    Lumpectomy coupled with radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy comprises the treatment of breast cancer for many patients. We are developing an enhanced thermal IR imaging technique that can be used in real-time to guide tissue excision during a lumpectomy. This novel enhanced thermal imaging method is a combination of IR imaging (8- 10 μm) and selective heating of blood (~0.5 °C) relative to surrounding water-rich tissue using LED sources at low powers. Post-acquisition processing of these images highlights temporal changes in temperature and is sensitive to the presence of vascular structures. In this study, fluorescent and enhanced thermal imaging modalities were used to estimate breast cancer tumor volumes as a function of time in 19 murine subjects over a 30-day study period. Tumor volumes calculated from fluorescent imaging follow an exponential growth curve for the first 22 days of the study. Cell necrosis affected the tumor volume estimates based on the fluorescent images after Day 22. The tumor volumes estimated from enhanced thermal imaging show exponential growth over the entire study period. A strong correlation was found between tumor volumes estimated using fluorescent imaging and the enhanced IR images, indicating that enhanced thermal imaging is capable monitoring tumor growth. Further, the enhanced IR images reveal a corona of bright emission along the edges of the tumor masses. This novel IR technique could be used to estimate tumor margins in real-time during surgical procedures.

  20. Combined FDG-PET/CT for the detection of unknown primary tumors: systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwee, Thomas C.; Kwee, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review and meta-analyze published data on the diagnostic performance of combined 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in the detection of primary tumors in patients with cancer of unknown primary (CUP). A systematic search for relevant studies was performed of the PubMed/MEDLINE and Embase databases. Methodological quality of the included studies was assessed. Reported detection rates, sensitivities and specificities were meta-analyzed. Subgroup analyses were performed if results of individual studies were heterogeneous. The 11 included studies, comprising a total sample size of 433 patients with CUP, had moderate methodological quality. Overall primary tumor detection rate, pooled sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT were 37%, 84% (95% CI 78-88%) and 84% (95% CI 78-89%), respectively. Sensitivity was heterogeneous across studies (P = 0.0001), whereas specificity was homogeneous across studies (P = 0.2114). Completeness of diagnostic workup before FDG-PET/CT, location of metastases of unknown primary, administration of CT contrast agents, type of FDG-PET/CT images evaluated and way of FDG-PET/CT review did not significantly influence diagnostic performance. In conclusion, FDG-PET/CT can be a useful method for unknown primary tumor detection. Future studies are required to prove the assumed advantage of FDG-PET/CT over FDG-PET alone and to further explore causes of heterogeneity. (orig.)

  1. Differential diagnostic value of combined detection of serum CA153, CEA and TPA levels in patients with breast tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the differential diagnostic value of combined detection of serum CA153, CEA and TPA levels in patients with breast tumor. Methods: Serum levels of CA153, CEA and TPA were measured with RIA in 269 patients with breast tumor and 150 controls. Results: The serum levels of CA153, CEA and TPA in patients with breast cancer were significantly higher than those in the patients with benign breast tumor and controls. The positive rate of CA153 was 63.8% in the patients with breast cancer and that of CEA and TPA was 22.4% and 62.1% respectively, with combined detection of CA153 and CEA, the positive rate was 69.8%, with CA153 and TPA combined, the positive rate was 87.1%, with the three marker combined, the positive rate was 90.5%. The specificity was 77.9% with CA153, 77.9% with CA153 and CEA, 71.9% with CA153 and TPA, and 73.4% with all the three markers combined. Conclusion: The positive rate was increased remarkably with combined detection of CA153, CEA and TPA, however the specificity was not much changed, so the combined detection was valuable for differential diagnosis. (authors)

  2. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neurologie; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Detsch, Oliver [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Schwindt, Wolfram [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  3. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul; Detsch, Oliver; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim; Schwindt, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  4. Detection of tumor cell-specific mRNA and protein in exosome-like microvesicles from blood and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jieping; Wei, Fang; Schafer, Christopher; Wong, David T W

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of disease-specific biomarkers in oral fluids has revealed a new dimension in molecular diagnostics. Recent studies have reported the mechanistic involvement of tumor cells derived mediators, such as exosomes, in the development of saliva-based mRNA biomarkers. To further our understanding of the origins of disease-induced salivary biomarkers, we here evaluated the hypothesis that tumor-shed secretory lipidic vesicles called exosome-like microvesicles (ELMs) that serve as protective carriers of tissue-specific information, mRNAs, and proteins, throughout the vasculature and bodily fluids. RNA content was analyzed in cell free-saliva and ELM-enriched fractions of saliva. Our data confirmed that the majority of extracellular RNAs (exRNAs) in saliva were encapsulated within ELMs. Nude mice implanted with human lung cancer H460 cells expressing hCD63-GFP were used to follow the circulation of tumor cell specific protein and mRNA in the form of ELMs in vivo. We were able to identify human GAPDH mRNA in ELMs of blood and saliva of tumor bearing mice using nested RT-qPCR. ELMs positive for hCD63-GFP were detected in the saliva and blood of tumor bearing mice as well as using electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM). Altogether, our results demonstrate that ELMs carry tumor cell-specific mRNA and protein from blood to saliva in a xenografted mouse model of human lung cancer. These results therefore strengthen the link between distal tumor progression and the biomarker discovery of saliva through the ELMs.

  5. Detection of tumor cell-specific mRNA and protein in exosome-like microvesicles from blood and saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieping Yang

    Full Text Available The discovery of disease-specific biomarkers in oral fluids has revealed a new dimension in molecular diagnostics. Recent studies have reported the mechanistic involvement of tumor cells derived mediators, such as exosomes, in the development of saliva-based mRNA biomarkers. To further our understanding of the origins of disease-induced salivary biomarkers, we here evaluated the hypothesis that tumor-shed secretory lipidic vesicles called exosome-like microvesicles (ELMs that serve as protective carriers of tissue-specific information, mRNAs, and proteins, throughout the vasculature and bodily fluids. RNA content was analyzed in cell free-saliva and ELM-enriched fractions of saliva. Our data confirmed that the majority of extracellular RNAs (exRNAs in saliva were encapsulated within ELMs. Nude mice implanted with human lung cancer H460 cells expressing hCD63-GFP were used to follow the circulation of tumor cell specific protein and mRNA in the form of ELMs in vivo. We were able to identify human GAPDH mRNA in ELMs of blood and saliva of tumor bearing mice using nested RT-qPCR. ELMs positive for hCD63-GFP were detected in the saliva and blood of tumor bearing mice as well as using electric field-induced release and measurement (EFIRM. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ELMs carry tumor cell-specific mRNA and protein from blood to saliva in a xenografted mouse model of human lung cancer. These results therefore strengthen the link between distal tumor progression and the biomarker discovery of saliva through the ELMs.

  6. A novel SNP analysis method to detect copy number alterations with an unbiased reference signal directly from tumor samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LaFramboise William A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability in cancer leads to abnormal genome copy number alterations (CNA as a mechanism underlying tumorigenesis. Using microarrays and other technologies, tumor CNA are detected by comparing tumor sample CN to normal reference sample CN. While advances in microarray technology have improved detection of copy number alterations, the increase in the number of measured signals, noise from array probes, variations in signal-to-noise ratio across batches and disparity across laboratories leads to significant limitations for the accurate identification of CNA regions when comparing tumor and normal samples. Methods To address these limitations, we designed a novel "Virtual Normal" algorithm (VN, which allowed for construction of an unbiased reference signal directly from test samples within an experiment using any publicly available normal reference set as a baseline thus eliminating the need for an in-lab normal reference set. Results The algorithm was tested using an optimal, paired tumor/normal data set as well as previously uncharacterized pediatric malignant gliomas for which a normal reference set was not available. Using Affymetrix 250K Sty microarrays, we demonstrated improved signal-to-noise ratio and detected significant copy number alterations using the VN algorithm that were validated by independent PCR analysis of the target CNA regions. Conclusions We developed and validated an algorithm to provide a virtual normal reference signal directly from tumor samples and minimize noise in the derivation of the raw CN signal. The algorithm reduces the variability of assays performed across different reagent and array batches, methods of sample preservation, multiple personnel, and among different laboratories. This approach may be valuable when matched normal samples are unavailable or the paired normal specimens have been subjected to variations in methods of preservation.

  7. Clinical value of combined detection of tumor markers in effusion fluid for diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion and ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jiangang; Ji Zhigu; Cui Xuejun; Zhu Zili

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical usefulness of combined detection of tumor markers in effusion fluid in patients with malignant pleural effusion or ascites. Methods: Combined detection of six tumor markers (CA125, CA50, CA15-3, CYFRA21-1, βHCG, HCG) in effusion fluid was performed in 92 patients with malignant pleural effusion and 78 patients with malignant ascites as well as 100 control benign specimens. These tumor markers were examined with CLIA, except CA50, which was examined with RIA. Exfoliative cytology was also examined in the malignant specimens. Results: The positive rate of these markers was highest with CA125, followed by CA50, CA15-3, CYFRA21-1, βHCG and HCG in order. βHCG and HCG, though with quite low positive rate, were still useful markers due to the almost zero false-positive rate, i.e. very high specificity. For combined determination of two markers, CA15 + CYFRA21-1 or CA125 + CA50 would result in the highest positive rate. For highly suspected but undetermined cases, the following criteria for malignancy would be helpful: (1) two or more positive among CA125, CA50, CA15-3, CYFRA21-1 (2) One of the four CAs positive + either βHCG or HCG (3) Both βHCG and HCG positive. Tumor markers positiveness would be supplementary to doubtful cytological studies. Conclusion: Combined detection of tumor markers in effusion fluid would be very helpful for diagnosis of malignancy. (authors)

  8. [Development of a Computer-aided Diagnosis System to Distinguish between Benign and Malignant Mammary Tumors in Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Images: Automatic Detection of the Position with the Strongest Washout Effect in the Tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yoshiaki; Tabata, Nobuyuki; Taroura, Tomomi; Shinozaki, Kenji; Kubo, Yuichiro; Tokunaga, Eriko; Taguchi, Kenichi

    We propose a computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) system that uses time-intensity curves to distinguish between benign and malignant mammary tumors. Many malignant tumors show a washout pattern in time-intensity curves. Therefore, we designed a program that automatically detects the position with the strongest washout effect using the technique, such as the subtraction technique, which extracts only the washout area in the tumor, and by scanning data in 2×2 pixel region of interest (ROI). Operation of this independently developed program was verified using a phantom system that simulated tumors. In three cases of malignant tumors, the washout pattern detection rate in images with manually set ROI was ≤6%, whereas the detection rate with our novel method was 100%. In one case of a benign tumor, when the same method was used, we checked that there was no washout effect and detected the persistent pattern. Thus, the distinction between benign and malignant tumors using our method was completely consistent with the pathological diagnoses made. Our novel method is therefore effective for differentiating between benign and malignant mammary tumors in dynamic magnetic resonance images.

  9. The role of tumor marker CA 15-3 in detection of breast cancer relapse after curative mastectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, In Young; Kim, In Ho; Lee, Moon Hee; Kim, Chul Soo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the utility of tumor marker CA 15-3 in the following: the diagnosis of breast cancer relapse after curative mastectomy, and the differentiation of the value of tumor marker by site of metastases. Two hundred two patients (median age 48 years) with breast cancer included in the follow-up after curative mastectomy. The tumor marker CA 15-3 was determined by IRMA (CIS BIO INTERNATIONAl, France). Test values > 30 U/ml were considered elevated (positive). Among 202 patients, recurrent diseases were found in 16 patients. CA 15-3 was elevated in 5 of 16 patients with recurrences. There was no false-positive patients who had elevated CA 15-3. Sensitivity and specificity of CA 15-3 for detection of breast cancer recurrence were 31%, and 100%. CA 15-3 was elevated in all of the 4 patients with liver metastases. CA 15-3 was elevated in none of the patients who relapsed with metastasis to bone-only or contralateral breast-only. The tumor marker CA 15-3 in the detection of breast cancer relapse after curative mastectomy is specific, but not sensitive. However, it is useful to rule out liver metastases of breast cancer, which indicates bad prognosis

  10. Continuous representation of tumor microvessel density and detection of angiogenic hotspots in histological whole-slide images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Marx, Alexander; Reyes-Aldasoro, Constantino Carlos; Schad, Lothar R; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit; Weis, Cleo-Aron

    2015-08-07

    Blood vessels in solid tumors are not randomly distributed, but are clustered in angiogenic hotspots. Tumor microvessel density (MVD) within these hotspots correlates with patient survival and is widely used both in diagnostic routine and in clinical trials. Still, these hotspots are usually subjectively defined. There is no unbiased, continuous and explicit representation of tumor vessel distribution in histological whole slide images. This shortcoming distorts angiogenesis measurements and may account for ambiguous results in the literature. In the present study, we describe and evaluate a new method that eliminates this bias and makes angiogenesis quantification more objective and more efficient. Our approach involves automatic slide scanning, automatic image analysis and spatial statistical analysis. By comparing a continuous MVD function of the actual sample to random point patterns, we introduce an objective criterion for hotspot detection: An angiogenic hotspot is defined as a clustering of blood vessels that is very unlikely to occur randomly. We evaluate the proposed method in N=11 images of human colorectal carcinoma samples and compare the results to a blinded human observer. For the first time, we demonstrate the existence of statistically significant hotspots in tumor images and provide a tool to accurately detect these hotspots.

  11. Early detection of tumor relapse/regrowth by consecutive minimal residual disease monitoring in high-risk neuroblastoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Satoshi; Saitoh, Atsuro; Hartomo, Tri Budi; Kozaki, Aiko; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Iijima, Kazumoto; Nishio, Hisahide; Nishimura, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor accounting for ~15% of cancer-associated mortalities in children. Despite the current intensive therapy, >50% of high-risk patients experience tumor relapse or regrowth caused by the activation of minimal residual disease (MRD). Although several MRD detection protocols using various reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) markers have been reported to evaluate the therapeutic response and disease status of neuroblastoma patients, their clinical significance remains elusive. The present study reports two high-risk neuroblastoma patients, whose MRD was consecutively monitored using 11 RT-qPCR markers (CHRNA3, CRMP1, DBH, DCX, DDC, GABRB3, GAP43, ISL1, KIF1A, PHOX2B and TH) during their course of treatment. The two patients initially responded to the induction therapy and reached MRD-negative status. The patients' MRD subsequently became positive with no elevation of their urinary homovanillic acid, urinary vanillylmandelic acid and serum neuron-specific enolase levels at 13 or 19 weeks prior to the clinical diagnosis of tumor relapse or regrowth. The present cases highlight the possibility of consecutive MRD monitoring using 11 markers to enable an early detection of tumor relapse or regrowth in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27446404

  12. Comparison of 1H-MRS-detected metabolic characteristics in single metastatic brain tumors of different origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernov, M.F.; Ono, Yuko; Kubo, Osami; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2006-01-01

    Various types of intracranial metastases exhibit different growth patterns, which can be reflected in their metabolic characteristics and investigated noninvasively by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). The objective of the present study was comparison of the 1 H-MRS-detected metabolic parameters in brain metastases of different origin. Twenty-five patients (15 men and 10 women; mean age, 62.0 years) with single, previously nontreated metastatic brain tumors were investigated by long-echo single-voxel volume-selected 1 H-MRS. The primary cancer was located in the lungs (10 cases), colon and rectum (8 cases), breast (3 cases), kidney (2 cases), prostate (1 case), and cardiac muscle (1 case). Comparison of clinical and radiological variables, including type of tumor contrast enhancement and extension of peritumoral edema, did not disclose statistically significant differences in metastatic brain tumors of different origin. At the same time, comparison of 1 H-MRS-detected metabolic characteristics revealed that metastases of colorectal carcinoma have greater content of mobile lipids (Lip) compared to other neoplasms. In conclusion, high Lip content in the viable brain metastases of colorectal carcinoma can be used as an additional diagnostic clue for noninvasive identification of these tumors and should be taken into consideration in cases of 1 H-MRS-based differentiation of their recurrence and radiation-induced necrosis after radiosurgical or radiotherapeutic treatment. (author)

  13. Molecular detection of peripheral blood breast cancer mRNA transcripts as a surrogate biomarker for circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Lasa

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are becoming a scientifically recognized indicator of primary tumors and/or metastasis. These cells can now be accurately detected and characterized as the result of technological advances. We analyzed the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR using a panel of selected genes. The analysis of a single marker, without an EpCAM based enrichment approach, allowed the positive identification of 35% of the metastatic breast cancer patients. The analysis of five genes (SCGB2, TFF1, TFF3, Muc1, KRT20 performed in all the samples increased the detection to 61%. We describe a sensitive, reproducible and easy to implement approach to characterize CTC in patients with metastasic breast cancer.

  14. Clinical Significance of Tumor Marker Detection in Patients 
with Advanced Squamous Cell Carcimoma of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping LIANG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Due to it's concealment and no obvious symptoms, lung squamous carcimoma often has advanced disease when diagnosed. The aims of this study were to describe the characteristics of the disease, to evaluate the clinical importance of detection of multiple tumor markers in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Methods The characteristics of all patients with advanced squamous cell lung cancer treated in Beijing Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences during Jan. 2011 to Dec. 2015 were identified by cases reviewing and data extracting. The characteristics, detection levels and sensitivity of multiple tumor makers among patients were described. Results The 260 patients were treated with mean age of (59.4±9.2 years, 85.8% (n=223 of them were male, 14.2% (n=37 of them were female. 78.1% (n=203 of all were smokers and 3.1% (n=8 of patients had family history of tumor. The positive rate of cytokerantin 19 fragment (CYFRA21-1 was 71.2%, which was the highest among five tumor markers. The five tumor markers median level had no statistical significance between different tumor (T stages and node (N stages (all P>0.05, only the positive rate of SCC had statistical significance between different T stages (P=0.035. The combination measurement of CYFRA21-1+carcinogen-embryonic antigen (CEA, CYFRA21-1+CEA+cancer antigen (CA125, CA125+CYFRA21-1+CEA+neuron specific enolase (NSE, and CA125+CYFRA21-1+NSE+CEA+squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC were better and had higher clinical values, the positive rates were 82.7%, 84.6%, 85.0% and 86.2%, respectively. Conclusion The positive rate of CYFRA21-1 was the highest and the sensitivity of single test of five tumor markers was low, the combination of multiple tumor markers increased the sensitivity of diagnosis of SQCLC, the combination of CA125, CYFRA21-1 and CEA was the best choice.

  15. New Approaches for Early Detection of Breast Tumor Invasion or Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Man, Yan-Gao

    2003-01-01

    To assess interactions between epithelial (EP) and myoepithelial (ME) cells in association with breast tumor progression and invasion, a double immunostaining technique with antibodies to smooth muscle actin (SMA...

  16. A case of a desmoid tumor with an uretertumoral fisttula detected on renal scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hyun Woo; Lee, Kyu Taek; Lee, Sang Mi [Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Desmoid tumors are rare benign tumors with aggressive fibroblastic proliferation. Although desmoid tumors do not metastasize, they have locally aggressive features and can cause a urinary fistula. Here, we report a case of a 35-year-old woman with Gardner syndrome who was diagnosed with an intra-abdominal desmoid tumor 1 year previously and who presented with a newly developed cystic mass lesion on a computed tomography scan. The cystic mass lesion was clinically diagnosed as an urinoma from the right ureterotumoral fistula; thus, surgical resection of the mass lesion was planned. However, Tc-99m diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid renal scintigraphy revealed bilateral ureterotumoral fistulas; hence, the treatment plan was changed to conservative management.

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of receptor activator nuclear κB ligand and osteoprotegerin in odontogenic cysts and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Matos, Felipe Rodrigues; de Moraes, Maiara; das Neves Silva, Emília Beatriz; Galvão, Hébel Cavalcanti; de Almeida Freitas, Roseana

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the immunohistochemical detection of receptor activator nuclear κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in radicular cysts (RCs), dentigerous cysts (DCs), solid ameloblastomas (SAs), and keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KOTs). A total of 20 RCs, 20 DCs, 20 KOTs, 14 dental follicles (DFs), and 18 SAs were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using anti-RANKL and anti-OPG antibodies. The analysis was quantitative, and the number of positive cells was counted in 10 microscopic high-power fields (400×). The DFs, KOTs, and SAs showed higher expression of RANKL than did the RCs and DCs in the epithelium (P < .05). The epithelial expression of OPG was higher in the DFs, KOTs, RCs, and DCs than in the SAs (P < .05). The ratio of OPG less than RANKL was more frequent in SAs and OPG greater than RANKL in DCs (P < .05). Our results have shown differences in RANKL and OPG detection in the odontogenic cysts and tumors studied. The higher RANKL and lower OPG detection in SA could play a role in bone resorption, compatible with the tumor's biologic behavior. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a double-antibody radioimmunoassay for detecting ovarian tumor-associated antigen fraction OCA in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knauf, S.; Urbach, G.I.

    1978-01-01

    Ovarian tumor-associated antigen isolated from human tumor tissue was shown to have a different mobility from that of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in both acrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis in agarose. The ovarian tumor antigen is composed of six species with different electrophoretic mobility in acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Three of these species were detected in Sephadex G-100 ovarian fraction OCA (from the void volume peak) and the other three species of lower apparent molecular weight were detected in fraction OCD (from the second peak). Fractions OCA and OCD did not share common antigenic determinants as determined by immunodiffusion. CEA was shown to share antigenic determinants with both OCA and OCD. A double-antibody radioimmunoassay capable of detecting nanogram quantities of plasma OCA was developed. In a preliminary study of ovarian cancer patients, OCA appeared to be a more sensitive marker for ovarian cancer than CEA. There was virtually no correlation (r 2 = 0.1) between OCA and CEA levels in these patients, as determined by radioimmunoassay

  19. Comparing the outcomes of two strategies for colorectal tumor detection: policy-promoted screening program versus health promotion service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Min; Liao, Chao-Sheng; Chang, Hung-Chuen; Chen, Yu-Hung; Yang, Kuo-Ching; Shih, Chia-Hui

    2013-06-01

    The Taiwanese government has proposed a population-based colorectal tumor detection program for the average-risk population. This study's objectives were to understand the outcomes of these screening policies and to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. We compared two databases compiled in one medical center. The "policy-promoted cancer screening" (PPS) database was built on the basis of the policy of the Taiwan Bureau of National Health Insurance for cancer screening. The "health promotion service" (HPS) database was built to provide health check-ups for self-paid volunteers. Both the PPS and HPS databases employ the immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT) and colonoscopy for colorectal tumor screening using different strategies. A comparison of outcomes between the PPS and HPS included: (1) quality indicators-compliance rate, cecum reaching rate, and tumor detection rate; and (2) validity indicators-sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values for detecting colorectal neoplasms. A total of 10,563 and 1481 individuals were enrolled in PPS and HPS, respectively. Among quality indicators, there was no statistically significant difference in the cecum reaching rate between PPS and HPS. The compliance rates were 56.1% for PPS and 91.8% for HPS (p performance. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. [Identification of Circulating Tumor Cell(CTC)in Breast Cancer Patients Using a Newly Established CTC Detecting System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Takuya; Ohnaga, Takashi; Lu, Xiao Long; Watanabe, Toru; Hirano, Katsuhisa; Okumura, Tomoyuki; Tsukada, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a new circulating tumor cell (CTC) chip in order to identify CTCs in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. In this study, we aimed to identify CTCs in the blood of breast cancer patients by using this CTC detecting system. In addition, we used this system to evaluate the response to anticancer agents. We were able to identify CTCs in 5 of 6 patients. In addition, the system showed that the number of CTCs had decreased after chemotherapy. Thus, the CTC detecting system was useful in the identification of CTCs in the breast cancer patients and in the early prediction of response to anticancer agents.

  1. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cell detection in bladder and urothelial cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Msaouel, Pavlos; Koutsilieris, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic value and prognostic significance of circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection in patients with bladder cancer is controversial. We performed a meta-analysis to consolidate current evidence regarding the use of CTC detection assays to diagnose bladder and other urothelial cancers and the association of CTC positivity with advanced, remote disease. Studies that investigated the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with bladder cancer and/or urothelial cancer were identified and reviewed. Sensitivities, specificities, and positive (LR+) and negative likelihood ratios (LR-) of CTC detection in individual studies were calculated and meta-analyzed by random effects model. Overall odds ratio of CTC positivity in patients with advanced disease versus those with organ-confined cancer was also calculated. Overall sensitivity of CTC detection assays was 35.1% (95%CI, 32.4-38%); specificity, LR+, and LR- was 89.4% (95%CI, 87.2-91.3%), 3.77 (95%CI, 1.95-7.30) and 0.72 (95%CI, 0.64-0.81). CTC-positive patients were significantly more likely to have advanced (stage III-IV) disease compared with CTC-negative patients (OR, 5.05; 95%CI, 2.49-10.26). CTC evaluation can confirm tumor diagnosis and identify patients with advanced bladder cancer. However, due to the low overall sensitivity, CTC detection assays should not be used as initial screening tests

  2. Correlation between language function and the left arcuate fasciculus detected by diffusion tensor imaging tractography after brain tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Masashi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2012-11-01

    Disturbance of the arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere is thought to be associated with language-processing disorders, including conduction aphasia. Although the arcuate fasciculus can be visualized in vivo with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, its involvement in functional processes associated with language has not been shown dynamically using DTI tractography. In the present study, to clarify the participation of the arcuate fasciculus in language functions, postoperative changes in the arcuate fasciculus detected by DTI tractography were evaluated chronologically in relation to postoperative changes in language function after brain tumor surgery. Preoperative and postoperative arcuate fasciculus area and language function were examined in 7 right-handed patients with a brain tumor in the left hemisphere located in proximity to part of the arcuate fasciculus. The arcuate fasciculus was depicted, and its area was calculated using DTI tractography. Language functions were measured using the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB). After tumor resection, visualization of the arcuate fasciculus was increased in 5 of the 7 patients, and the total WAB score improved in 6 of the 7 patients. The relative ratio of postoperative visualized area of the arcuate fasciculus to preoperative visualized area of the arcuate fasciculus was increased in association with an improvement in postoperative language function (p = 0.0039). The role of the left arcuate fasciculus in language functions can be evaluated chronologically in vivo by DTI tractography after brain tumor surgery. Because increased postoperative visualization of the fasciculus was significantly associated with postoperative improvement in language functions, the arcuate fasciculus may play an important role in language function, as previously thought. In addition, postoperative changes in the arcuate fasciculus detected by DTI tractography could represent a predicting factor for postoperative language

  3. Neural - levelset shape detection segmentation of brain tumors in dynamic susceptibility contrast enhanced and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayakumar, C.; Bhargava, Sunil; Gharpure, Damayanti Chandrashekhar

    2008-01-01

    A novel Neuro - level set shape detection algorithm is proposed and evaluated for segmentation and grading of brain tumours. The algorithm evaluates vascular and cellular information provided by dynamic contrast susceptibility magnetic resonance images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps. The proposed neural shape detection algorithm is based on the levels at algorithm (shape detection algorithm) and utilizes a neural block to provide the speed image for the level set methods. In this study, two different architectures of level set method have been implemented and their results are compared. The results show that the proposed Neuro-shape detection performs better in differentiating the tumor, edema, necrosis in reconstructed images of perfusion and diffusion weighted magnetic resonance images. (author)

  4. Comparison of the sensitivity and specificity of CT and MR imaging in the detection of cervical nodal tumor necrosis and extracapsular tumor spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousem, D.M.; Som, P.M.; Schjwaibold, F.; Hendrix, R.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates if MR imaging can achieve the sensitivity and specificity of enhanced CT in detecting tumoral nodal necrosis (TNN) and extracapsular tumor spread (ETS). Enhanced CT scans and unenhanced and enhanced MR images were retrospectively and separately reviewed by a study-blinded radiologist. Fifty-eight lymph nodes were evaluated for TNN and ETS. Readings were given for CT, T1-weighted MR, T2-weighted MR, T1-weighted and T2-weighted MR, enhanced T1-weighted fat-suppressed MR, and T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and enhanced fat suppressed T1-weighted MR. Pathology proof was used to assess TNN; CT and used to assess ETS. Enhanced CT had the highest sensitivity for TNN. The sensitivity of unenhanced MR ranged from 33% to 50%; that of enhanced MR was 47%. All MR sequences and cT had specificities for TNN >92%. The highest accuracy of MR for TNN was the unenhanced T1-weighted and T2-weighted images alone; CT accuracy was 90%. MR sensitivity for ETS was maximal with T1-weighted images; all sequences had specificities >90%. Gadolinium-enhanced images did not improve accuracy in TNN or ETS

  5. KRAS detection in colonic tumors by DNA extraction from FTA paper: the molecular touch-prep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petras, Melissa L; Lefferts, Joel A; Ward, Brian P; Suriawinata, Arief A; Tsongalis, Gregory J

    2011-12-01

    DNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is usually more degraded and contains more polymerase chain reaction (PCR) inhibitors than DNA isolated from nonfixed tissue. In addition, the tumor size and cellular heterogeneity found in tissue sections can often impact testing for molecular biomarkers. As a potential remedy to this situation, we evaluated the use of Whatman FTA paper cards for collection of colorectal tumor samples before tissue fixation and for isolation of DNA for use in a real-time PCR-based KRAS mutation assay. Eleven colon tumor samples were collected by making a cut into the fresh tumor and applying the Whatman FTA paper to the cut surface. Matched FFPE tissue blocks from these tumors were also collected for comparison. KRAS mutation analysis was carried out using the Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast Real-time PCR System using 7 independent custom TaqMan PCR assays. Of the 11 colon tumors sampled, 6 were positive for KRAS mutations in both the Whatman FTA paper preparations and corresponding FFPE samples. Whatman FTA paper cards for collection of colorectal tumor samples before tissue fixation and for isolation of DNA have many advantages including ease of use, intrinsic antimicrobial properties, long storage potential (stability of DNA over time), and a faster turnaround time for results. Extracted DNA should be suitable for most molecular diagnostic assays that use PCR techniques. This novel means of DNA preservation from surgical specimens would benefit from additional study and validation as a dependable and practical technique to preserve specimens for molecular testing.

  6. US-Cut: interactive algorithm for rapid detection and segmentation of liver tumors in ultrasound acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Voglreiter, Philip; Dokter, Mark; Hofmann, Michael; Chen, Xiaojun; Zoller, Wolfram G.; Schmalstieg, Dieter; Hann, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound (US) is the most commonly used liver imaging modality worldwide. It plays an important role in follow-up of cancer patients with liver metastases. We present an interactive segmentation approach for liver tumors in US acquisitions. Due to the low image quality and the low contrast between the tumors and the surrounding tissue in US images, the segmentation is very challenging. Thus, the clinical practice still relies on manual measurement and outlining of the tumors in the US images. We target this problem by applying an interactive segmentation algorithm to the US data, allowing the user to get real-time feedback of the segmentation results. The algorithm has been developed and tested hand-in-hand by physicians and computer scientists to make sure a future practical usage in a clinical setting is feasible. To cover typical acquisitions from the clinical routine, the approach has been evaluated with dozens of datasets where the tumors are hyperechoic (brighter), hypoechoic (darker) or isoechoic (similar) in comparison to the surrounding liver tissue. Due to the interactive real-time behavior of the approach, it was possible even in difficult cases to find satisfying segmentations of the tumors within seconds and without parameter settings, and the average tumor deviation was only 1.4mm compared with manual measurements. However, the long term goal is to ease the volumetric acquisition of liver tumors in order to evaluate for treatment response. Additional aim is the registration of intraoperative US images via the interactive segmentations to the patient's pre-interventional CT acquisitions.

  7. Optimization of input parameters of supra-threshold stochastic resonance image processing algorithm for the detection of abdomino-pelvic tumors on PET/CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Saroha, Kartik; Patel, C.D.; Bal, C.S.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Administration of diuretics increases the urine output to clear radioactive urine from kidneys and bladder. Hence post-diuretic pelvic PET/CT scan enhances the probability of detection of abdomino-pelvic tumor. However, it causes discomfort in patients and has some side effects also. Application of supra threshold stochastic resonance (SSR) image processing algorithm on Pre-diuretic PET/CT scan may also increase the probability of detection of these tumors. Amount of noise and threshold are two variable parameters that effect the final image quality. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of these two variable parameters on the detection of abdomen-pelvic tumor

  8. Radiosensitivity evaluation of human tumor cell lines by detecting 4977 bp deletion in mitochondrial DNA and comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Liping; Liu Qiang; Wang Qin; Li Jin; Yue Jingyin; Mu Chuanjie; Fan Feiyue

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of determining radiosensitivity of human tumor cell lines in vitro using the assay of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and comet assay. Methods: Three human tumor cell lines were selected in this study, HepG 2 , EC-9706 and MCF-7. The surviving fraction(SF), the ratio of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion and DNA damage were detected by MTY assay, nested PCR technique and comet assay, respectively. Results: The results of MTT assay showed that the radiosensitivity of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. The ratio of mtDNA 4977 bp deletion of HepG 2 and EC-9706 was higher significantly than that of MCF-7 (P 2 and EC-9706 was higher than that of MCF-7. The difference of radiosensitivity among these three tumor cell lines was significant after 8 Gy γ-ray irradiation. Conclusions: Combination of many biological parameter is helpful to evaluate the radiosensitivity of tumor cells more accurately. (authors)

  9. Complex microcirculation patterns detected by confocal indocyanine green angiography predict time to growth of small choroidal melanocytic tumors: MuSIC Report II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Arthur J; Freeman, William R; Schaller, Ulrich C; Kampik, Anselm; Folberg, Robert

    2002-12-01

    Multiple independent laboratories have confirmed the histologic observation that some tumor microcirculation patterns (MCPs) in uveal melanomas are associated strongly with death resulting from metastatic disease. Because these patterns are imageable with confocal indocyanine green angiography (ICG), we designed a prospective study to evaluate whether these angiographically detectable MCPs predict time to tumor growth. Observational case series, prospective, non-randomized. Ninety-eight patients with unilateral, small, choroidal melanocytic tumors. The following information and tumor characteristics were recorded for each patient: demographic parameters, best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, related visual symptoms, location and dimension of tumor, pigmentation, orange pigment, drusen, tumor-associated hemorrhage, subretinal fluid, and confocal ICG angiographically determined microcirculation patterns-silent (avascularity), normal (preexisting normal choroidal vessels within the tumor), straight vessels, parallel without and with cross-linking, arcs without and with branching, loops, and networks. Time to growth of the tumor, with growth defined as an increase in the maximal apical tumor height of 0.5 mm measured by standardized A-scan ultrasonography, photographic documentation of an increase of the largest basal diameter of at least 1.5 mm, advancement of one tumor border of at least 0.75 mm, or a combination thereof. Twenty-eight of the 98 tumors in this study (29%) met the predetermined criteria for tumor growth. The median time to growth was 127 days (range, 51-625 days). The following tumor characteristics were significantly associated with time to tumor growth: flashes (P = 0.0224), orange pigment (P = 0.012), subretinal fluid (P < 0.001), maximum basal tumor diameter at initial examination (P = 0.015), maximum apical tumor height (P < 0.001), parallel with cross-linking MCP (P < 0.001), arcs with branching MCP (P = 0.006), loops (P < 0

  10. Automatic T1 bladder tumor detection by using wavelet analysis in cystoscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Nuno R.; Vieira, Pedro M.; Lima, Estevão; Lima, Carlos S.

    2018-02-01

    Correct classification of cystoscopy images depends on the interpreter’s experience. Bladder cancer is a common lesion that can only be confirmed by biopsying the tissue, therefore, the automatic identification of tumors plays a significant role in early stage diagnosis and its accuracy. To our best knowledge, the use of white light cystoscopy images for bladder tumor diagnosis has not been reported so far. In this paper, a texture analysis based approach is proposed for bladder tumor diagnosis presuming that tumors change in tissue texture. As is well accepted by the scientific community, texture information is more present in the medium to high frequency range which can be selected by using a discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Tumor enhancement can be improved by using automatic segmentation, since a mixing with normal tissue is avoided under ideal conditions. The segmentation module proposed in this paper takes advantage of the wavelet decomposition tree to discard poor texture information in such a way that both steps of the proposed algorithm segmentation and classification share the same focus on texture. Multilayer perceptron and a support vector machine with a stratified ten-fold cross-validation procedure were used for classification purposes by using the hue-saturation-value (HSV), red-green-blue, and CIELab color spaces. Performances of 91% in sensitivity and 92.9% in specificity were obtained regarding HSV color by using both preprocessing and classification steps based on the DWT. The proposed method can achieve good performance on identifying bladder tumor frames. These promising results open the path towards a deeper study regarding the applicability of this algorithm in computer aided diagnosis.

  11. A curcumin-based TPA four-branched copper(II) complex probe for in vivo early tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pi, Zongxin [Department of Chemical and Chemical Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei 230001 (China); Wang, Jiafeng; Jiang, Bo [Department of Pharmacy, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230038 (China); Cheng, Gang [Department of Chemical and Chemical Engineering, Hefei Normal University, Hefei 230001 (China); Zhou, Shuangsheng, E-mail: zshuangsheng@126.com [Department of Pharmacy, Anhui University of Chinese Medicine, Hefei 230038 (China); Center of Modern Experimental Technology, Anhui University, Hefei 230038 (China)

    2015-01-01

    A multibranched Cu(II) complex CuL{sub 2} curcumin-based was synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The photophysical properties of the complex have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The results show that the target complex exhibits higher quantum yield and larger two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-section in the near infrared (NIR) region compared with its free ligand. The cell imaging studies in vitro and in vivo reveal that the complex shows good photostability and excellent tumor targeting capability to tested cancerous cells, which can be potentially used for early tumor detection. - Graphical abstract: A multibranched Cu(II) complex was prepared from curcumin. The photophysical properties of the obtained complex have been investigated. The results exhibit that the complex has high capability to test cancerous cells and can distinguish between the cancerous and noncancerous cells, which should be potentially used for early tumor detection. - Highlights: • A novel multi-branched copper complex was synthesized. • The obtained compounds exhibited obvious TPA in high polar solvents. • The complex is a low toxicity at low-micromolar concentrations. • The complex exhibits larger TPA cross-section and brighter TPF imaging. • The complex has excellent targeting capability to tested cancerous cells.

  12. Accurate and reproducible invasive breast cancer detection in whole-slide images: A Deep Learning approach for quantifying tumor extent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gilmore, Hannah; Basavanhally, Ajay; Feldman, Michael; Ganesan, Shridar; Shih, Natalie N. C.; Tomaszewski, John; González, Fabio A.; Madabhushi, Anant

    2017-04-01

    With the increasing ability to routinely and rapidly digitize whole slide images with slide scanners, there has been interest in developing computerized image analysis algorithms for automated detection of disease extent from digital pathology images. The manual identification of presence and extent of breast cancer by a pathologist is critical for patient management for tumor staging and assessing treatment response. However, this process is tedious and subject to inter- and intra-reader variability. For computerized methods to be useful as decision support tools, they need to be resilient to data acquired from different sources, different staining and cutting protocols and different scanners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of a deep learning-based method to automatically identify the extent of invasive tumor on digitized images. Here, we present a new method that employs a convolutional neural network for detecting presence of invasive tumor on whole slide images. Our approach involves training the classifier on nearly 400 exemplars from multiple different sites, and scanners, and then independently validating on almost 200 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our approach yielded a Dice coefficient of 75.86%, a positive predictive value of 71.62% and a negative predictive value of 96.77% in terms of pixel-by-pixel evaluation compared to manually annotated regions of invasive ductal carcinoma.

  13. Merkel cell polyomavirus detection in Merkel cell cancer tumors in Northern Germany using PCR and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Miriam; Stieler, Kristin; Grundhoff, Adam; Moll, Ingrid; Brandner, Johanna M; Fischer, Nicole

    2014-10-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma is a highly malignant skin cancer which predominantly occurs in elderly and immunocompromised persons. The identification of the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has inaugurated a new understanding of Merkel cell carcinoma pathogenesis. The frequent detection of the virus in Merkel cell carcinoma tissue (70-90%), its monoclonal integration in the tumor cells and the expression of viral oncogenes highly suggest that MCPyV is causally linked to the pathogenesis of the majority of Merkel cell cancer (MCC) cases. Using qualitative and quantitative PCR together with immunohistochemical staining this study aimed at characterizing the presence of MCPyV sequences and viral early gene expression in a cohort of MCC cases (n = 32) selected in Northern Germany. 40-57% of the cases were identified as MCPyV positive with 40.6% of the cases positive by immunohistochemical staining and 51.6-57.6% positive by PCR. Interestingly, in the majority (64%) of LT-Antigen positive tumors only 25-50% of tumor cells express LT-Antigen. These data are in accord with published studies describing heterogeneity in MCPyV viral loads and suggest that detection of MCPyV in Merkel cell carcinoma by PCR should be undertaken using multiple primer pairs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Profiling tumor-associated markers for early detection of malignant mesothelioma: an epidemiologic study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Amati, M.; Tomasetti, M.; Scartozzi, M.; Mariotti, L.; Alleva, R.; Pignotti, E.; Borghi, B.; Valentino, M.; Governa, M.; Neužil, Jiří; Santarelli, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2008), s. 163-170 ISSN 1055-9965 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500520602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : malignant mesothelioma * tumor markers * asbestos Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.770, year: 2008

  15. Autofluorescence lifetime imaging during transoral robotic surgery: a clinical validation study of tumor detection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarto, João. L.; Phipps, Jennifer E.; Unger, Jakob; Faller, Leta M.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong M.; Bec, Julien; Moore, Michael G.; Bewley, Arnaud F.; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Sorger, Jonathan M.; Farwell, Gregory D.; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    Autofluorescence lifetime spectroscopy is a promising non-invasive label-free tool for characterization of biological tissues and shows potential to report structural and biochemical alterations in tissue owing to pathological transformations. In particular, when combined with fiber-optic based instruments, autofluorescence lifetime measurements can enhance intraoperative diagnosis and provide guidance in surgical procedures. We investigate the potential of a fiber-optic based multi-spectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy instrument to characterize the autofluorescence fingerprint associated with histologic, morphologic and metabolic changes in tissue that can provide real-time contrast between healthy and tumor regions in vivo and guide clinicians during resection of diseased areas during transoral robotic surgery. To provide immediate feedback to the surgeons, we employ tracking of an aiming beam that co-registers our point measurements with the robot camera images and allows visualization of the surgical area augmented with autofluorescence lifetime data in the surgeon's console in real-time. For each patient, autofluorescence lifetime measurements were acquired from normal, diseased and surgically altered tissue, both in vivo (pre- and post-resection) and ex vivo. Initial results indicate tumor and normal regions can be distinguished based on changes in lifetime parameters measured in vivo, when the tumor is located superficially. In particular, results show that autofluorescence lifetime of tumor is shorter than that of normal tissue (p robot assisted cancer removal interventions.

  16. Combined approach of perioperative 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging and intraoperative 18F-FDG handheld gamma probe detection for tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knopp Michael V

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT has become an established method for detecting hypermetabolic sites of known and occult disease and is widely used in oncology surgical planning. Intraoperatively, it is often difficult to localize tumors and verify complete resection of tumors that have been previously detected on diagnostic PET/CT at the time of the original evaluation of the cancer patient. Therefore, we propose an innovative approach for intraoperative tumor localization and verification of complete tumor resection utilizing 18F-FDG for perioperative PET/CT imaging and intraoperative gamma probe detection. Methods Two breast cancer patients were evaluated. 18F-FDG was administered and PET/CT was acquired immediately prior to surgery. Intraoperatively, tumors were localized and resected with the assistance of a handheld gamma probe. Resected tumors were scanned with specimen PET/CT prior to pathologic processing. Shortly after the surgical procedure, patients were re-imaged with PET/CT utilizing the same preoperatively administered 18F-FDG dose. Results One patient had primary carcinoma of breast and a metastatic axillary lymph node. The second patient had a solitary metastatic liver lesion. In both cases, preoperative PET/CT verified these findings and demonstrated no additional suspicious hypermetabolic lesions. Furthermore, intraoperative gamma probe detection, specimen PET/CT, and postoperative PET/CT verified complete resection of the hypermetabolic lesions. Conclusion Immediate preoperative and postoperative PET/CT imaging, utilizing the same 18F-FDG injection dose, is feasible and image quality is acceptable. Such perioperative PET/CT imaging, along with intraoperative gamma probe detection and specimen PET/CT, can be used to verify complete tumor resection. This innovative approach demonstrates promise for assisting the oncologic surgeon in localizing and

  17. Application of detecting cerebrospinal fluid circulating tumor cells in the diagnosis of meningeal metastasis of non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rong JIANG; Chun-hua MA; Zi-long ZHU; Jin-duo LI; Bin WANG; Li-wei SUN; Yuan LÜ

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe a new technology for the detection and enumeration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with meningeal metastasis (MM).  Methods Five cases of NSCLC with MM that were diagnosed by CSF cytology were selected, and 20 ml CSF samples were obtained by lumbar puncture for every patient. The tumor marker immunostaining-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TM-iFISH) technology was adapted to detect...

  18. Optimization of Diagnostic Elisa - Based Tests for the Detection of Auto-Antibodies Against Tumor Antigens in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Štefatić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancer types worldwide and it continues to be a serious public health problem. Early detection and diagnosis are of great importance in cancer management. At present, diagnostic blood tests are based on the detection of tumor-associated markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, the cancer antigen CA19-9 for gastrointestinal cancer, CA15-3 for breast cancer or CA125 for ovarian cancer. The lack of sensitivity and specificity of these markers prevents their general use in cancer screening of an average risk population. Therefore, new cancer biomarkers or better screening methods are necessary to improve the diagnostics of the disease. This study was directed to the optimization of a diagnostic, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA based test to identify and validate new serum markers, such as extracellular Protein Kinase A (ecPKA and Nicotinamide A-Meth- yltransferase (NNMT. In this type of assay, the cancer antigens are quantified indirectly - by detecting the presence of auto-antibodies against tumor proteins in human serum. The result of the optimization and validation process was in the case of ecPKA a reproducible and stable assay. In case of NNMT the assay was probably not sensitive enough.

  19. Fluorescence imaging of bombesin and transferrin receptor expression is comparable to 18F-FDG PET in early detection of sorafenib-induced changes in tumor metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Chieh Tseng

    Full Text Available Physical measurement of tumor volume reduction is the most commonly used approach to assess tumor progression and treatment efficacy in mouse tumor models. However, it is relatively insensitive, and often requires long treatment courses to achieve gross physical tumor destruction. As alternatives, several non-invasive imaging methods such as bioluminescence imaging (BLI, fluorescence imaging (FLI and positron emission tomography (PET have been developed for more accurate measurement. As tumors have elevated glucose metabolism, 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG has become a sensitive PET imaging tracer for cancer detection, diagnosis, and efficacy assessment by measuring alterations in glucose metabolism. In particular, the ability of 18F-FDG imaging to detect drug-induced effects on tumor metabolism at a very early phase has dramatically improved the speed of decision-making regarding treatment efficacy. Here we demonstrated an approach with FLI that offers not only comparable performance to PET imaging, but also provides additional benefits, including ease of use, imaging throughput, probe stability, and the potential for multiplex imaging. In this report, we used sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor clinically approved for cancer therapy, for treatment of a mouse tumor xenograft model. The drug is known to block several key signaling pathways involved in tumor metabolism. We first identified an appropriate sorafenib dose, 40 mg/kg (daily on days 0-4 and 7-10, that retained ultimate therapeutic efficacy yet provided a 2-3 day window post-treatment for imaging early, subtle metabolic changes prior to gross tumor regression. We then used 18F-FDG PET as the gold standard for assessing the effects of sorafenib treatment on tumor metabolism and compared this to results obtained by measurement of tumor size, tumor BLI, and tumor FLI changes. PET imaging showed ~55-60% inhibition of tumor uptake of 18F-FDG as early as days 2 and 3 post-treatment, without

  20. Paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 autoantibodies as specific blood biomarkers for detection of early recurrence of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tao; Hurtig, Monica; Elgue, Graciela; Li, Su-Chen; Veronesi, Giulia; Essaghir, Ahmed; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Öberg, Kjell; Giandomenico, Valeria

    2010-12-30

    Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs) belong to a rare group of cancers. Most patients have developed metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, for which there is currently no cure. The delay in diagnosis is a major issue in the clinical management of the patients and new markers are urgently needed. We have previously identified paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 (PNMA2) as a novel SI-NET tissue biomarker. Therefore, we evaluated whether Ma2 autoantibodies detection in the blood stream is useful for the clinical diagnosis and recurrence of SI-NETs. A novel indirect ELISA was set up to detect Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples of patients with SI-NET at different stages of disease. The analysis was extended to include typical and atypical lung carcinoids (TLC and ALC), to evaluate whether Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood stream become a general biomarker for NETs. In total, 124 blood samples of SI-NET patients at different stages of disease were included in the study. The novel Ma2 autoantibody ELISA showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy with ROC curve analysis underlying an area between 0.734 and 0.816. Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood from SI-NET patients were verified by western blot and sequential immunoprecipitation. Serum antibodies of patients stain Ma2 in the tumor tissue and neurons. We observed that SI-NET patients expressing Ma2 autoantibody levels below the cutoff had a longer progression and recurrence-free survival compared to those with higher titer. We also detected higher levels of Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples from TLC and ALC patients than from healthy controls, as previously shown in small cell lung carcinoma samples. Here we show that high Ma2 autoantibody titer in the blood of SI-NET patients is a sensitive and specific biomarker, superior to chromogranin A (CgA) for the risk of recurrence after radical operation of these tumors.

  1. Not All Next Generation Sequencing Diagnostics are Created Equal: Understanding the Nuances of Solid Tumor Assay Design for Somatic Mutation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Phillip N., E-mail: pgray@ambrygen.com; Dunlop, Charles L.M.; Elliott, Aaron M. [Ambry Genetics, 15 Argonaut, Aliso Viejo, CA 92656 (United States)

    2015-07-17

    The molecular characterization of tumors using next generation sequencing (NGS) is an emerging diagnostic tool that is quickly becoming an integral part of clinical decision making. Cancer genomic profiling involves significant challenges including DNA quality and quantity, tumor heterogeneity, and the need to detect a wide variety of complex genetic mutations. Most available comprehensive diagnostic tests rely on primer based amplification or probe based capture methods coupled with NGS to detect hotspot mutation sites or whole regions implicated in disease. These tumor panels utilize highly customized bioinformatics pipelines to perform the difficult task of accurately calling cancer relevant alterations such as single nucleotide variations, small indels or large genomic alterations from the NGS data. In this review, we will discuss the challenges of solid tumor assay design/analysis and report a case study that highlights the need to include complementary technologies (i.e., arrays) and germline analysis in tumor testing to reliably identify copy number alterations and actionable variants.

  2. Detection of hepatic VX2 tumors in rabbits: comparison of conventional US and phase- inversion harmonic US during the liver- specific late phase of contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Youk, Ji Hyun; Lee, Young Hwan; Kim, Young Kon; Kim, Chong Soo; Li, Chun Ai

    2003-01-01

    To compare phase-inversion sonography during the liver-specific phase of contrast enhancement using a microbubble contrast agent with conventional B-mode sonography for the detection of VX2 liver tumors. Twenty-three rabbits, 18 of which had VX2 liver tumor implants, received a bolus injection of 0.6 g of Levovist (200 mg/ml). During the liver-specific phase of this agent, they were evaluated using both conventional sonography and contrast-enhanced phase-inversion harmonic imaging (CEPIHI). Following sacrifice of the animals, pathologic analysis was performed and the reference standard thus obtained. The conspicuity, size and number of the tumors before and after contrast administration, as determined by a sonographer, were compared between the two modes and with the pathologic findings. CE-PIHI demonstrated marked hepatic parenchymal enhancement in all rabbits. For VX2 tumors detected at both conventional US and CE- PIHI, conspicuity was improved by contrast-enhanced PIHI. On examination of gross specimens, 52 VX2 tumors were identified. Conventional US correctly detected 18 of the 52 (34.6%), while PIHI detected 35 (67.3%) (p < 0.05). In particular, conventional US detected only three (8.3%) of the 36 tumors less than 10 mm in diameter, but CE-PIHI detected 19 such tumors (52.8%) (p < 0.05). Compared to conventional sonography, PIHI performed during the liver-specific phase after intravenous injection of Levovist is markedly better at detecting VX2 liver tumors

  3. Bioluminescent human breast cancer cell lines that permit rapid and sensitive in vivo detection of mammary tumors and multiple metastases in immune deficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Darlene E; Hornig, Yvette S; Oei, Yoko; Dusich, Joan; Purchio, Tony

    2005-01-01

    Our goal was to generate xenograft mouse models of human breast cancer based on luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 tumor cells that would provide rapid mammary tumor growth; produce metastasis to clinically relevant tissues such as lymph nodes, lung, and bone; and permit sensitive in vivo detection of both primary and secondary tumor sites by bioluminescent imaging. Two clonal cell sublines of human MDA-MB-231 cells that stably expressed firefly luciferase were isolated following transfection of the parental cells with luciferase cDNA. Each subline was passaged once or twice in vivo to enhance primary tumor growth and to increase metastasis. The resulting luciferase-expressing D3H1 and D3H2LN cells were analyzed for long-term bioluminescent stability, primary tumor growth, and distal metastasis to lymph nodes, lungs, bone and soft tissues by bioluminescent imaging. Cells were injected into the mammary fat pad of nude and nude-beige mice or were delivered systemically via intracardiac injection. Metastasis was also evaluated by ex vivo imaging and histologic analysis postmortem. The D3H1 and D3H2LN cell lines exhibited long-term stable luciferase expression for up to 4–6 months of accumulative tumor growth time in vivo. Bioluminescent imaging quantified primary mammary fat pad tumor development and detected early spontaneous lymph node metastasis in vivo. Increased frequency of spontaneous lymph node metastasis was observed with D3H2LN tumors as compared with D3H1 tumors. With postmortem ex vivo imaging, we detected additional lung micrometastasis in mice with D3H2LN mammary tumors. Subsequent histologic evaluation of tissue sections from lymph nodes and lung lobes confirmed spontaneous tumor metastasis at these sites. Following intracardiac injection of the MDA-MB-231-luc tumor cells, early metastasis to skeletal tissues, lymph nodes, brain and various visceral organs was detected. Weekly in vivo imaging data permitted longitudinal analysis of metastasis at

  4. CA 19-9 Pancreatic Tumor Marker Fluorescence Immunosensing Detection via Immobilized Carbon Quantum Dots Conjugated Gold Nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarfaj, Nawal Ahmad; El-Tohamy, Maha Farouk; Oraby, Hesham Farouk

    2018-04-11

    The clinical detection of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), a tumor marker in biological samples, improves and facilitates the rapid screening and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. A simple, low cost, fast, and green synthesis method to prepare a viable carbon quantum dots/gold (CQDs/Au) nanocomposite fluorescence immunosensing solution for the detection of CA 19-9 was reported. The present method is conducted by preparing glucose-derived CQDs using a microwave-assisted method. CQDs were employed as reducing and stabilizing agents for the preparation of a CQDs/Au nanocomposite. The immobilized anti-CA 19-9-labeled horseradish peroxidase enzyme (Ab-HRP) was anchored to the surface of a CQDs/Au nanocomposite by a peptide interaction between the carboxylic and amine active groups. The CA 19-9 antigen was trapped by another monoclonal antibody that was coated on the surface of microtiter wells. The formed sandwich capping antibody-antigen-antibody enzyme complex had tunable fluorescence properties that were detected under excitation and emission wavelengths of 420 and 530 nm. The increase in fluorescence intensities of the immunoassay sensing solution was proportional to the CA 19-9 antigen concentration in the linear range of 0.01-350 U mL -1 and had a lower detection limit of 0.007 U mL -1 . The proposed CQDs/Au nanocomposite immunoassay method provides a promising tool for detecting CA 19-9 in human serum.

  5. Swarm Intelligence-Enhanced Detection of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using Tumor-Educated Platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Myron G; Sol, Nik; In 't Veld, Sjors G J G; Vancura, Adrienne; Muller, Mirte; Niemeijer, Anna-Larissa N; Fejes, Aniko V; Tjon Kon Fat, Lee-Ann; Huis In 't Veld, Anna E; Leurs, Cyra; Le Large, Tessa Y; Meijer, Laura L; Kooi, Irsan E; Rustenburg, François; Schellen, Pepijn; Verschueren, Heleen; Post, Edward; Wedekind, Laurine E; Bracht, Jillian; Esenkbrink, Michelle; Wils, Leon; Favaro, Francesca; Schoonhoven, Jilian D; Tannous, Jihane; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Kazemier, Geert; Giovannetti, Elisa; Reijneveld, Jaap C; Idema, Sander; Killestein, Joep; Heger, Michal; de Jager, Saskia C; Urbanus, Rolf T; Hoefer, Imo E; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Mannhalter, Christine; Gomez-Arroyo, Jose; Bogaard, Harm-Jan; Noske, David P; Vandertop, W Peter; van den Broek, Daan; Ylstra, Bauke; Nilsson, R Jonas A; Wesseling, Pieter; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael; Lee-Lewandrowski, Elizabeth; Lewandrowski, Kent B; Tannous, Bakhos A; de Langen, Adrianus J; Smit, Egbert F; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Wurdinger, Thomas

    2017-08-14

    Blood-based liquid biopsies, including tumor-educated blood platelets (TEPs), have emerged as promising biomarker sources for non-invasive detection of cancer. Here we demonstrate that particle-swarm optimization (PSO)-enhanced algorithms enable efficient selection of RNA biomarker panels from platelet RNA-sequencing libraries (n = 779). This resulted in accurate TEP-based detection of early- and late-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 518 late-stage validation cohort, accuracy, 88%; AUC, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92-0.96; p swarm intelligence may also benefit the optimization of diagnostics readout of other liquid biopsy biosources. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of new MHC mutations in mice by skin grafting, tumor transplantation and monoclonal antibodies: a comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, I.K.; Egorov, O.S.

    1988-01-01

    Two mechanisms of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mutations have been described in mice: gene conversion and homologous but unequal recombination. However, the knowledge of mutations in MHC is incomplete because studies have been limited almost exclusively to two haplotypes, H-2/sup b/ and H-2/sup d/, while hundreds of haplotypes exist in nature; it has been biased by the use of only one procedure of screening for mutation, skin grafting. The authors used three procedures to screen for MHC mutations: (1) conventional techniques of skin grafting, (2) syngeneic tumor transplantation and (3) typing with monoclonal anti-MHC antibodies (mAbs) and complement. The faster technique of tumor transplantation detected mutants similar to those discovered by skin grafting technique. Screening with mAbs allowed us to detect both mutants that are capable of rejecting standard skin grafts and those that are silent in skin grafting tests, and which therefore resulted in a higher apparent mutation frequency. Two mutants of the H-2/sup a/ haplotype were found that carry concomitant class I and class II antigenic alterations. Both MHC mutants silent in skin grafting tests and mutants carrying concomitant class I and class II alterations have never been studied before and are expected to reveal new mechanisms of generating MHC mutations. 1-Ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) failed to induce de novo MHC mutations in our skin grafting series

  7. DW MRI at 3.0 T versus FDG PET/CT for detection of malignant pulmonary tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Cui, Long-Biao; Tang, Xing; Ren, Xin-Ling; Shi, Jie-Ran; Yang, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Yan; Li, Zhi-Kui; Wu, Chang-Gui; Jian, Wen; Zhao, Feng; Ti, Xin-Yu; Yin, Hong

    2014-02-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) could be useful for tumor detection with N and M staging of lung cancer in place of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT). DW MRI at 3.0 T and FDG PET/CT were performed before therapy in 113 patients with pulmonary nodules. Mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax ) and Ki-67 scores were assessed. Quantitatively, specificity and accuracy of ADC (91.7 and 92.9%, respectively) were significantly higher than those of SUVmax (66.7 and 77.9% respectively, p 0.05). Qualitatively, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of DW MRI (96.1, 83.3 and 92.0%, respectively) were also not significantly different from that of FDG PET/CT (88.3, 83.3 and 86.7%, respectively, p > 0.05). Significant negative correlation was found between Ki-67 score and ADC (r = -0.66, p 0.05). In conclusion, quantitative and qualitative assessments for detection of malignant pulmonary tumors with DW MRI at 3.0 T are superior to those with FDG PET/CT. Furthermore, ADC could predict the malignancy of lung cancer. © 2013 UICC.

  8. Glomus Tumor of the Neck Detected With 99mTc EDDA HYNIC-TOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Neva; Bogović-Crnčić, Tatjana; Grbac-Ivanković, Svjetlana; Valković-Zujić, Petra

    2017-10-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to thyroid evaluation because of a lump on the left side of the neck. Ultrasound exam did not show any thyroid abnormality, but highly perfused nodule at the left common carotid artery bifurcation was found. Because of the specific location, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with Tc EDDA HYNIC-TOC was performed, starting with perfusion images and followed with SPECT/CT imaging at 2 and 4 hours. Well-perfused nodule with intensive accumulation and no other visible pathology in the body raised suspicion of a glomus tumor, consistent with MR exam performed later. Subsequent surgical removal confirmed carotid paraganglioma.

  9. Tumor Budding Detection by Immunohistochemical Staining is Not Superior to Hematoxylin and Eosin Staining for Predicting Lymph Node Metastasis in pT1 Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Takuma; Shimada, Yoshifumi; Nogami, Hitoshi; Kameyama, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Takashi; Kosugi, Shin-ichi; Wakai, Toshifumi; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2016-05-01

    Tumor budding is recognized as an important risk factor for lymph node metastasis in pT1 colorectal cancer. Immunohistochemical staining for cytokeratin has the potential to improve the objective diagnosis of tumor budding over detection based on hematoxylin and eosin staining. However, it remains unclear whether tumor budding detected by immunohistochemical staining is a significant predictor of lymph node metastasis in pT1 colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study was to clarify the clinical significance of tumor budding detected by immunohistochemical staining in comparison with that detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining. This was a retrospective study. The study was conducted at Niigata University Medical & Dental Hospital. We enrolled 265 patients with pT1 colorectal cancer who underwent surgery with lymph node dissection. Tumor budding was evaluated by both hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining with the use of CAM5.2 antibody. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses were conducted to determine the optimal cutoff values for tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin and CAM5.2 staining. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the significant factors for predicting lymph node metastasis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses revealed that the cutoff values for tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin and CAM5.2 staining for predicting lymph node metastases were 5 and 8. On multivariate analysis, histopathological differentiation (OR, 6.21; 95% CI, 1.16-33.33; p = 0.03) and tumor budding detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining (OR, 4.91; 95% CI, 1.64-14.66; p = 0.004) were significant predictors for lymph node metastasis; however, tumor budding detected by CAM5.2 staining was not a significant predictor. This study was limited by potential selection bias because surgically resected specimens were collected instead of endoscopically resected specimens. Tumor budding detected by

  10. APOMAB, a La-specific monoclonal antibody, detects the apoptotic tumor response to life-prolonging and DNA-damaging chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antineoplastic therapy may impair the survival of malignant cells to produce cell death. Consequently, direct measurement of tumor cell death in vivo is a highly desirable component of therapy response monitoring. We have previously shown that APOMAB representing the DAB4 clone of a La/SSB-specific murine monoclonal autoantibody is a malignant cell-death ligand, which accumulates preferentially in tumors in an antigen-specific and dose-dependent manner after DNA-damaging chemotherapy. Here, we aim to image tumor uptake of APOMAB (DAB4 and to define its biological correlates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Brisk tumor cell apoptosis is induced in the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with DNA-damaging cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy. Tumor and normal organ accumulation of Indium 111 ((111In-labeled La-specific DAB4 mAb as whole IgG or IgG fragments was quantified by whole-body static imaging and organ assay in tumor-bearing mice. Immunohistochemical measurements of tumor caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage, which are indicators of early and late apoptosis, respectively, were correlated with tumor accumulation of DAB4. Increased tumor accumulation of DAB4 was associated directly with both the extent of chemotherapy-induced tumor cell death and DAB4 binding per dead tumor cell. Tumor DAB4 accumulation correlated with cumulative caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage as tumor biomarkers of apoptosis and was directly related to the extended median survival time of tumor-bearing mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Radiolabeled La-specific monoclonal antibody, DAB4, detected dead tumor cells after chemotherapy, rather than chemosensitive normal tissues of gut and bone marrow. DAB4 identified late apoptotic tumor cells in vivo. Hence, radiolabeled DAB4 may usefully image responses to human carcinoma therapy because DAB4 would capture the protracted cell death of carcinoma. We believe that the

  11. ICG-fluorescence imaging for detection of peritoneal metastases and residual tumoral scars in locally advanced ovarian cancer: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veys, Isabelle; Pop, Florin-Catalin; Vankerckhove, Sophie; Barbieux, Romain; Chintinne, Marie; Moreau, Michel; Nogaret, Jean-Marie; Larsimont, Denis; Donckier, Vincent; Bourgeois, Pierre; Liberale, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    No intraoperative imaging techniques exist for detecting tumor nodules or tumor scar tissues in patients treated with upfront or interval cytoreductive surgery (CS) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence imaging (FI) for the detection of peritoneal metastases (PM) and evaluate whether it can be used to detect remnant tumor cells in scar tissue. Patients with PM from ovarian cancer admitted for CS were included. ICG, at 0.25 mg per kg of patient weight, was injected intraoperatively after explorative laparotomy before CS. A total of 108 peritoneal lesions, including 25 scars, were imaged in 20 patients. Seventy-three were malignant (67.6%) and 35 benign (32.4%). The mean Tumor to Background Ratio (ex vivo) was 1.8 (SD 1.3) in malignant and 1.0 (SD 0.79) in benign nodules (P = 0.007). Of 25 post-NAC scars, the mean Tumor to Background Ratio (TBR) (in vivo) was 2.06 (SD 1.15) in malignant and 1.21 (SD 0.50) in benign nodules (P = 0.26). The positive predictive value of ICG-FI to detect tumor cells in scars was 57.1%. ICG-FI is accurate to demonstrate PM in ovarian cancer but unable to discriminate between benign and malignant post-NAC. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Neratinib Efficacy and Circulating Tumor DNA Detection of HER2 Mutations in HER2 Nonamplified Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cynthia X; Bose, Ron; Gao, Feng; Freedman, Rachel A; Telli, Melinda L; Kimmick, Gretchen; Winer, Eric; Naughton, Michael; Goetz, Matthew P; Russell, Christy; Tripathy, Debu; Cobleigh, Melody; Forero, Andres; Pluard, Timothy J; Anders, Carey; Niravath, Polly Ann; Thomas, Shana; Anderson, Jill; Bumb, Caroline; Banks, Kimberly C; Lanman, Richard B; Bryce, Richard; Lalani, Alshad S; Pfeifer, John; Hayes, Daniel F; Pegram, Mark; Blackwell, Kimberly; Bedard, Philippe L; Al-Kateb, Hussam; Ellis, Matthew J C

    2017-10-01

    Purpose: Based on promising preclinical data, we conducted a single-arm phase II trial to assess the clinical benefit rate (CBR) of neratinib, defined as complete/partial response (CR/PR) or stable disease (SD) ≥24 weeks, in HER2 mut nonamplified metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity, and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) HER2 mut detection. Experimental Design: Tumor tissue positive for HER2 mut was required for eligibility. Neratinib was administered 240 mg daily with prophylactic loperamide. ctDNA sequencing was performed retrospectively for 54 patients (14 positive and 40 negative for tumor HER2 mut ). Results: Nine of 381 tumors (2.4%) sequenced centrally harbored HER2 mut (lobular 7.8% vs. ductal 1.6%; P = 0.026). Thirteen additional HER2 mut cases were identified locally. Twenty-one of these 22 HER2 mut cases were estrogen receptor positive. Sixteen patients [median age 58 (31-74) years and three (2-10) prior metastatic regimens] received neratinib. The CBR was 31% [90% confidence interval (CI), 13%-55%], including one CR, one PR, and three SD ≥24 weeks. Median PFS was 16 (90% CI, 8-31) weeks. Diarrhea (grade 2, 44%; grade 3, 25%) was the most common adverse event. Baseline ctDNA sequencing identified the same HER2 mut in 11 of 14 tumor-positive cases (sensitivity, 79%; 90% CI, 53%-94%) and correctly assigned 32 of 32 informative negative cases (specificity, 100%; 90% CI, 91%-100%). In addition, ctDNA HER2 mut variant allele frequency decreased in nine of 11 paired samples at week 4, followed by an increase upon progression. Conclusions: Neratinib is active in HER2 mut , nonamplified MBC. ctDNA sequencing offers a noninvasive strategy to identify patients with HER2 mut cancers for clinical trial participation. Clin Cancer Res; 23(19); 5687-95. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. PASSIVE CAVITATION DETECTION DURING PULSED HIFU EXPOSURES OF EX VIVO TISSUES AND IN VIVO MOUSE PANCREATIC TUMORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been demonstrated to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rarefactional focal pressures (1–12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms, pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KPC mice and closely recapitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50 % cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5–10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but ex vivo it decreased rapidly and stopped over the first few pulses

  14. Passive cavitation detection during pulsed HIFU exposures of ex vivo tissues and in vivo mouse pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-07-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been shown to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitation detection were introduced: cavitation probability, cavitation persistence and the level of the broadband acoustic emissions. These metrics were used to characterize cavitation activity in several ex vivo tissue types (bovine tongue and liver and porcine adipose tissue and kidney) and gel phantoms (polyacrylamide and agarose) at varying peak-rare factional focal pressures (1-12 MPa) during the following pHIFU protocol: frequency 1.1 MHz, pulse duration 1 ms and pulse repetition frequency 1 Hz. To evaluate the relevance of the measurements in ex vivo tissue, cavitation metrics were also investigated and compared in the ex vivo and in vivo murine pancreatic tumors that develop spontaneously in transgenic KrasLSL.G12 D/+; p53 R172 H/+; PdxCretg/+ (KPC) mice and closely re-capitulate human disease in their morphology. The cavitation threshold, defined at 50% cavitation probability, was found to vary broadly among the investigated tissues (within 2.5-10 MPa), depending mostly on the water-lipid ratio that characterizes the tissue composition. Cavitation persistence and the intensity of broadband emissions depended both on tissue structure and lipid concentration. Both the cavitation threshold and broadband noise emission level were similar between ex vivo and in vivo pancreatic tumor tissue. The largest difference between in vivo and ex vivo settings was found in the pattern of cavitation occurrence throughout pHIFU exposure: it was sporadic in vivo, but it decreased rapidly and stopped

  15. The detection rates and tumor clinical/pathological stages of whole-body FDG-PET cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Ken; Omagari, Junichi; Ochiai, Reiji; Yoshida, Tsuyoshi; Kitagawa, Mami; Kobayashi, Hisashi; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) has been used for cancer screening, mainly in East-Asia, and cancers are found not infrequently. However, their stages have not been clarified. We examined the detection rates of various cancers using whole-body PET for the screening of cancers in asymptomatic individuals, focusing on their clinical and pathological stages. Whole-body PET was obtained as a part of our cancer screening program among 3,426 healthy subjects. All subjects participated in a course of PET examination in conjunction with conventional examinations including a medical questionnaire, tumor markers, immunological fecal occult blood test, neck and abdominal ultrasonography and whole body computed tomography. A diagnosis and staging was obtained by an analysis of the pathological findings or by an analysis of the clinical follow-up data. Malignant tumors were discovered in 65 lesions found in 3,426 participants (1.90%). The PET findings were true-positive in 46 of the 65 cancer cases. The cancers were found in the following organs: the colon 14; thyroid gland 10; stomach 7; lung 5; liver 3; breast 2; and one each in the kidney, gallbladder, esophagus, pancreas and retroperitoneum. The stages were as follows: stage 0 5, stage I 17, stage II 10, stage III 7, and stage IV 6. One was an unknown primary. There were 19 false-negative findings (0.6%) on PET. Six cancers (0.18%) were missed in our screening program. PET imaging has the potential to detect a wide variety of cancers at potentially curative stages. Most PET-negative cancers are early stage cancers, and thus can be detected using other conventional examinations such as endoscopy. (author)

  16. Detection of tumor-associated cells in cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples for retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Peixuan; Stanton, Melissa L; Castle, Erik P; Joseph, Richard W; Adams, Daniel L; Li, Shuhong; Amstutz, Platte; Tang, Cha-Mei; Ho, Thai H

    2016-07-02

    Cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) are commonly collected in biobanks. However, little data exist regarding the preservation of tumor-associated cells in cryopreserved collections. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of using the CellSieve™ microfiltration assay for the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating cancer-associated macrophage-like cells (CAMLs) from cryopreserved PBMC samples. Blood samples spiked with breast (MCF-7), prostate (PC-3), and renal (786-O) cancer cell lines were used to establish analytical accuracy, efficiency, and reproducibility after cryopreservation. The spiked samples were processed through Ficoll separation, and cryopreservation was followed by thawing and microfiltration. MCF-7 cells were successfully retrieved with recovery efficiencies of 90.5 % without cryopreservation and 87.8 and 89.0 %, respectively, on day 7 and day 66 following cryopreservation. The corresponding recovery efficiencies of PC-3 cells were 83.3 % without cryopreservation and 85.3 and 84.7 %, respectively, after cryopreservation. Recovery efficiencies of 786-O cells were 92.7 % without cryopreservation, and 82.7 and 81.3 %, respectively, after cryopreservation. The recovered cells retained the morphologic characteristics and immunohistochemical markers that had been observed before freezing. The protocols were further validated by quantitation of CAMLs in blood samples from two patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The recovery rates of CTCs and CAMLs from cryopreserved samples were not statistically significant different (P > 0.05) from matched fresh samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report that CAMLs could be cryopreserved and analyzed after thawing with microfiltration technology. The application of microfiltration technology to cryopreserved samples will enable much greater retrospective study of cancer patients in relation to long-term outcomes.

  17. Identification of novel candidate target genes in amplicons of Glioblastoma multiforme tumors detected by expression and CGH microarray profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández-Moneo Jose-Luis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conventional cytogenetic and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH studies in brain malignancies have shown that glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by complex structural and numerical alterations. However, the limited resolution of these techniques has precluded the precise identification of detailed specific gene copy number alterations. Results We performed a genome-wide survey of gene copy number changes in 20 primary GBMs by CGH on cDNA microarrays. A novel amplicon at 4p15, and previously uncharacterized amplicons at 13q32-34 and 1q32 were detected and are analyzed here. These amplicons contained amplified genes not previously reported. Other amplified regions containg well-known oncogenes in GBMs were also detected at 7p12 (EGFR, 7q21 (CDK6, 4q12 (PDGFRA, and 12q13-15 (MDM2 and CDK4. In order to identify the putative target genes of the amplifications, and to determine the changes in gene expression levels associated with copy number change events, we carried out parallel gene expression profiling analyses using the same cDNA microarrays. We detected overexpression of the novel amplified genes SLA/LP and STIM2 (4p15, and TNFSF13B and COL4A2 (13q32-34. Some of the candidate target genes of amplification (EGFR, CDK6, MDM2, CDK4, and TNFSF13B were tested in an independent set of 111 primary GBMs by using FISH and immunohistological assays. The novel candidate 13q-amplification target TNFSF13B was amplified in 8% of the tumors, and showed protein expression in 20% of the GBMs. Conclusion This high-resolution analysis allowed us to propose novel candidate target genes such as STIM2 at 4p15, and TNFSF13B or COL4A2 at 13q32-34 that could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of these tumors and which would require futher investigations. We showed that overexpression of the amplified genes could be attributable to gene dosage and speculate that deregulation of those genes could be important in the development

  18. Paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 autoantibodies as specific blood biomarkers for detection of early recurrence of small intestine neuroendocrine tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Small intestine neuroendocrine tumors (SI-NETs belong to a rare group of cancers. Most patients have developed metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, for which there is currently no cure. The delay in diagnosis is a major issue in the clinical management of the patients and new markers are urgently needed. We have previously identified paraneoplastic antigen Ma2 (PNMA2 as a novel SI-NET tissue biomarker. Therefore, we evaluated whether Ma2 autoantibodies detection in the blood stream is useful for the clinical diagnosis and recurrence of SI-NETs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A novel indirect ELISA was set up to detect Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples of patients with SI-NET at different stages of disease. The analysis was extended to include typical and atypical lung carcinoids (TLC and ALC, to evaluate whether Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood stream become a general biomarker for NETs. In total, 124 blood samples of SI-NET patients at different stages of disease were included in the study. The novel Ma2 autoantibody ELISA showed high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy with ROC curve analysis underlying an area between 0.734 and 0.816. Ma2 autoantibodies in the blood from SI-NET patients were verified by western blot and sequential immunoprecipitation. Serum antibodies of patients stain Ma2 in the tumor tissue and neurons. We observed that SI-NET patients expressing Ma2 autoantibody levels below the cutoff had a longer progression and recurrence-free survival compared to those with higher titer. We also detected higher levels of Ma2 autoantibodies in blood samples from TLC and ALC patients than from healthy controls, as previously shown in small cell lung carcinoma samples. CONCLUSION: Here we show that high Ma2 autoantibody titer in the blood of SI-NET patients is a sensitive and specific biomarker, superior to chromogranin A (CgA for the risk of recurrence after radical operation of these tumors.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging-based detection of glial brain tumors in mice after antiangiogenic treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claes, A.; Gambarota, G.; Hamans, B.C.; Tellingen, O. van; Wesseling, P.; Maass, C.N.; Heerschap, A.; Leenders, W.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Proper delineation of gliomas using contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) poses a problem in neuro-oncology. The blood brain barrier (BBB) in areas of diffuse-infiltrative growth may be intact, precluding extravasation and subsequent MR-based detection of the contrast agent

  20. Image-guided diagnosis of prostate cancer can increase detection of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the largest prospective study to date of image-guided technology for identifying suspicious regions of the prostate to biopsy, researchers compared the ability of this technology to detect high-risk prostate cancer with that of the current standard of

  1. A Theoretical Methodology and Prototype Implementation for Detection Segmentation Classification of Digital Mammogram Tumor by Machine Learning and Problem Solving Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Raman Valliappan; Sumari Putra; Rajeswari Mandava

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be a significant public health problem in the world. Early detection is the key for improving breast cancer prognosis. The CAD systems can provide such help and they are important and necessary for breast cancer control. Microcalcifications and masses are the two most important indicators of malignancy, and their automated detection is very valuable for early breast cancer diagnosis. The main objective of this paper is to detect, segment and classify the tumor from ...

  2. Detection of tumor-specific cytotoxic drug activity in vitro using the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay and primary cultures of tumor cells from patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygren, P; Fridborg, H; Csoka, K; Sundström, C; de la Torre, M; Kristensen, J; Bergh, J; Hagberg, H; Glimelius, B; Rastad, J

    1994-03-01

    The semi-automated fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA), based on the measurement of fluorescence generated from cellular hydrolysis of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) by viable cells, was employed for cytotoxic drug sensitivity testing of tumor cells from patients with hematological or solid tumors. In total, 390 samples from 20 diagnoses were tested with up to 12 standard cytotoxic drugs. The technical success rate for different tumor types ranged from 67 to 95%. Fluorescence was linearly related to cell number but variably steep depending on tumor type. Samples from most solid tumors thus showed higher signal-to-noise ratios than hematological samples. A wide spectrum of in vitro drug activity was obtained, with acute leukemias and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas being sensitive to almost all tested drugs, whereas renal and adrenocortical carcinomas were essentially totally resistant. Between these extremes were samples of breast and ovarian carcinomas and sarcomas. When in vitro response was compared with known clinical response patterns, a good correspondence was observed. The results indicate that the FMCA is a rapid and efficient method for in vitro measurement of tumor-specific drug activity both in hematological and in solid tumors. The assay may be suitable for new drug development and direction of phase-2 trials to suitable patients.

  3. The discovery of putative urine markers for the specific detection of prostate tumor by integrative mining of public genomic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    Full Text Available Urine has emerged as an attractive biofluid for the noninvasive detection of prostate cancer (PCa. There is a strong imperative to discover candidate urinary markers for the clinical diagnosis and prognosis of PCa. The rising flood of various omics profiles presents immense opportunities for the identification of prospective biomarkers. Here we present a simple and efficient strategy to derive candidate urine markers for prostate tumor by mining cancer genomic profiles from public databases. Prostate, bladder and kidney are three major tissues from which cellular matters could be released into urine. To identify urinary markers specific for PCa, upregulated entities that might be shed in exosomes of bladder cancer and kidney cancer are first excluded. Through the ontology-based filtering and further assessment, a reduced list of 19 entities encoding urinary proteins was derived as putative PCa markers. Among them, we have found 10 entities closely associated with the process of tumor cell growth and development by pathway enrichment analysis. Further, using the 10 entities as seeds, we have constructed a protein-protein interaction (PPI subnetwork and suggested a few urine markers as preferred prognostic markers to monitor the invasion and progression of PCa. Our approach is amenable to discover and prioritize potential markers present in a variety of body fluids for a spectrum of human diseases.

  4. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity for melanome tumor cells: detection by a (3H)proline release assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saal, J.G.; Rieber, E.P.; Riethmueller, G.

    1976-01-01

    An in vitro lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity assay using [ 3 H]proline-labelled target cells is described. The assay, modified from an original procedure of Bean et al., assesses the release of [ 3 H]proline by filtering the total culture fluid containing both trypsinised tumor cells and effector cells. Filtration is performed with a semiautomatic harvesting device using low suction pressure and large-diameter glass filters. Pretreatment of filters with whole serum diminishes adsorption of cell-free radioactive material considerably and thus increases the sensitivity of the assay. Nearly 100% of the radioactivity could be recovered with this harvesting device. The technique allowed the detection of cytolytic activities of lymphocytes after 6 h of incubation. Lymphocytes from patients with primary malignant melanoma showed a significantly higher cytolytic reactivity (p > 0.001) than normal donors' lymphocytes against three different melanoma cell lines. In a series of parallel experiments on 36 patients and 18 normal donors, this modification of the [ 3 ]proline test was compared with three different assays: the conventional microcytotoxicity test of Takasugi and Klein, the original [ 3 H]proline microcytotoxicity test of Bean et al., and the viability count of tumor cells. (Auth.)

  5. Evaluation of Two Different Analytical Methods for Circulating Tumor Cell Detection in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Primary Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. S. Jaeger

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evidence is accumulating that circulating tumor cells (CTC out of peripheral blood can serve as prognostic marker not only in metastatic but also in early breast cancer (BC. Various methods are available to detect CTC. Comparisons between the different techniques, however, are rare. Material and Methods. We evaluate two different methods for CTC enrichment and detection in primary BC patients: the FDA-approved CellSearch System (CSS; Veridex, Warren, USA and a manual immunocytochemistry (MICC. The cut-off value for positivity was ≥1 CTC. Results. The two different nonoverlapping patient cohorts evaluated with one or the other method were well balanced regarding common clinical parameters. Before adjuvant CHT 21.1% (416 out of 1972 and 20.6% (247 out of 1198 of the patients were CTC-positive, while after CHT 22.5% (359 out of 1598 and 16.6% (177 out of 1066 of the patients were CTC-positive using CSS or MICC, respectively. CTC positivity rate before CHT was thus similar and not significantly different (P=0.749, while CTC positivity rate immediately after CHT was significantly lower using MICC compared to CSS (P<0.001. Conclusion. Using CSS or MICC for CTC detection, we found comparable prevalence of CTC before but not after adjuvant CHT.

  6. A graphene oxide-based fluorescent aptasensor for the turn-on detection of epithelial tumor marker mucin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yue; Lin, Yi; Tang, Hongwu; Pang, Daiwen

    2012-03-21

    Mucin 1 (MUC1) which presents in epithelial malignancies, is a well-known tumor biomarker. In this paper, a highly sensitive and selective fluorescent aptasensor for Mucin 1 (MUC1) detection is constructed, utilizing graphene oxide (GO) as a quencher which can quench the fluorescence of single-stranded dye-labeled MUC1 specific aptamer. In the absence of MUC1, the adsorption of the dye-labeled aptamer on GO brings the dyes in close proximity to the GO surface resulting in high efficiency quenching of dye fluorescence. Therefore, the fluorescence of the designed aptasensor is completely quenched by GO, and the system shows very low background fluorescence. Conversely, and very importantly, upon the adding of MUC1, the quenched fluorescence is recovered significantly, and MUC1 can be detected in a wide range of 0.04-10 μM with a detection limit of 28 nM and good selectivity. Moreover, the results have also been verified for real sample application by testing 2% serum containing buffer solution spiked with a series of concentrations of MUC1. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  7. HaloPlex Targeted Resequencing for Mutation Detection in Clinical Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Tumor Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Lotte N J; Falk-Sörqvist, Elin; Ljungström, Viktor; Mattsson, Johanna; Sundström, Magnus; La Fleur, Linnéa; Mathot, Lucy; Micke, Patrick; Nilsson, Mats; Botling, Johan

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the advent of massively parallel next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled substantial advances in the study of human diseases. Combined with targeted DNA enrichment methods, high sequence coverage can be obtained for different genes simultaneously at a reduced cost per sample, creating unique opportunities for clinical cancer diagnostics. However, the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) process of tissue samples, routinely used in pathology departments, results in DNA fragmentation and nucleotide modifications that introduce a number of technical challenges for downstream biomolecular analyses. We evaluated the HaloPlex target enrichment system for somatic mutation detection in 80 tissue fractions derived from 20 clinical cancer cases with paired tumor and normal tissue available in both FFPE and fresh-frozen format. Several modifications to the standard method were introduced, including a reduced target fragment length and two strand capturing. We found that FFPE material can be used for HaloPlex-based target enrichment and next-generation sequencing, even when starting from small amounts of DNA. By specifically capturing both strands for each target fragment, we were able to reduce the number of false-positive errors caused by FFPE-induced artifacts and lower the detection limit for somatic mutations. We believe that the HaloPlex method presented here will be broadly applicable as a tool for somatic mutation detection in clinical cancer settings. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Chromosomal imbalances detected in primary bone tumors by comparative genomic hybridization and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization

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    Marcelo Razera Baruffi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied a combination of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, to characterize the genetic aberrations in three osteosarcomas (OS and one Ewing's sarcoma. CGH identified recurrent chromosomal losses at 10p14-pter and gains at 8q22.3-24.1 in OS. Interphase FISH allowed to confirm 8q gain in two cases. A high amplification level of 11q12-qter was detected in one OS. The Ewing's sarcoma showed gain at 1p32-36.1 as the sole chromosome alteration. These studies demonstrate the value of molecular cytogenetic methods in the characterization of recurrent genomic alterations in bone tumor tissue.

  9. CT detection of thyroid pyramidal lobe in preoperative patients with thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Gi Won; Kim, Dong Won

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid pyramidal lobe (TPL) is a normal variant of the thyroid gland, but few imaging studies of TPL have been published. The purpose of this study is to investigate the frequency, location, size (length, maximal AP diameter, maximal transverse diameter), and upper end level of TPL with its separation from the main thyroid gland on preoperative neck CT and to compare them with operative findings in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of neck CT for detection TPL. 46 patients, who underwent preoperative neck CT before thyroidectomy, were included in the study. The frequency, location, size, and upper end level of TPL with its separation from the main thyroid gland on the neck CT was analyzed by a single radiologist. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy of neck CT for detecting TPL was 77.8%, 89.5%, 91.3%, 73.9% and 82.6%. There was a significant difference in maximal AP diameter, location, upper end level, and its separation from main thyroid gland between CT and operative findings (p 0.05). Diagnostic accuracy of neck CT for detecting TPL was high, and the neck CT may be useful for evaluating TPL in the suprahyoid neck.

  10. Clinical validation of an ultra high-throughput spiral microfluidics for the detection and enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Luan Khoo

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are cancer cells that can be isolated via liquid biopsy from blood and can be phenotypically and genetically characterized to provide critical information for guiding cancer treatment. Current analysis of CTCs is hindered by the throughput, selectivity and specificity of devices or assays used in CTC detection and isolation.Here, we enriched and characterized putative CTCs from blood samples of patients with both advanced stage metastatic breast and lung cancers using a novel multiplexed spiral microfluidic chip. This system detected putative CTCs under high sensitivity (100%, n = 56 (Breast cancer samples: 12-1275 CTCs/ml; Lung cancer samples: 10-1535 CTCs/ml rapidly from clinically relevant blood volumes (7.5 ml under 5 min. Blood samples were completely separated into plasma, CTCs and PBMCs components and each fraction were characterized with immunophenotyping (Pan-cytokeratin/CD45, CD44/CD24, EpCAM, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH (EML4-ALK or targeted somatic mutation analysis. We used an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometry based system to highlight the presence of an EGFR-activating mutation in both isolated CTCs and plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA, and demonstrate concordance with the original tumor-biopsy samples.We have clinically validated our multiplexed microfluidic chip for the ultra high-throughput, low-cost and label-free enrichment of CTCs. Retrieved cells were unlabeled and viable, enabling potential propagation and real-time downstream analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS or proteomic analysis.

  11. Detection of polyomavirus simian virus 40 tumor antigen DNA in AIDS-related systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilchez, Regis A.; Lednicky, John A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; White, Zoe S.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    Systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (S-NHL) is a common malignancy during HIV infection, and it is hypothesized that infectious agents may be involved in the etiology. Epstein-Barr virus DNA is found in <40% of patients with AIDS-related S-NHL, suggesting that other oncogenic viruses, such as polyomaviruses, may play a role in pathogenesis. We analyzed AIDS-related S-NHL samples, NHL samples from HIV-negative patients, peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected and -uninfected patients without NHL, and lymph nodes without tumors from HIV-infected patients. Specimens were examined by polymerase chain reaction analysis with use of primers specific for an N-terminal region of the oncoprotein large tumor antigen ( T-ag ) gene conserved among all three polyomaviruses (simian virus 40 [SV40], JC virus, and BK virus). Polyomavirus T-ag DNA sequences, proven to be SV40-specific, were detected more frequently in AIDS-related S-NHL samples (6 of 26) than in peripheral blood leukocytes from HIV-infected patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 69; p =.0001), NHL samples from HIV-negative patients (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 10; p =.09), or lymph nodes (6 of 26 vs. 0 of 7; p =.16). Sequences of C-terminal T-ag DNA from SV40 were amplified from two AIDS-related S-NHL samples. Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences were detected in 38% (10 of 26) AIDS-related S-NHL samples, 50% (5 of 10) HIV-negative S-NHL samples, and 57% (4 of 7) lymph nodes. None of the S-NHL samples were positive for both Epstein-Barr virus DNA and SV40 DNA. Further studies of the possible role of SV40 in the pathogenesis of S-NHL are warranted.

  12. Sensitive and Specific Biomimetic Lipid Coated Microfluidics to Isolate Viable Circulating Tumor Cells and Microemboli for Cancer Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yang Chen

    Full Text Available Here we presented a simple and effective membrane mimetic microfluidic device with antibody conjugated supported lipid bilayer (SLB "smart coating" to capture viable circulating tumor cells (CTCs and circulating tumor microemboli (CTM directly from whole blood of all stage clinical cancer patients. The non-covalently bound SLB was able to promote dynamic clustering of lipid-tethered antibodies to CTC antigens and minimized non-specific blood cells retention through its non-fouling nature. A gentle flow further flushed away loosely-bound blood cells to achieve high purity of CTCs, and a stream of air foam injected disintegrate the SLB assemblies to release intact and viable CTCs from the chip. Human blood spiked cancer cell line test showed the ~95% overall efficiency to recover both CTCs and CTMs. Live/dead assay showed that at least 86% of recovered cells maintain viability. By using 2 mL of peripheral blood, the CTCs and CTMs counts of 63 healthy and colorectal cancer donors were positively correlated with the cancer progression. In summary, a simple and effective strategy utilizing biomimetic principle was developed to retrieve viable CTCs for enumeration, molecular analysis, as well as ex vivo culture over weeks. Due to the high sensitivity and specificity, it is the first time to show the high detection rates and quantity of CTCs in non-metastatic cancer patients. This work offers the values in both early cancer detection and prognosis of CTC and provides an accurate non-invasive strategy for routine clinical investigation on CTCs.

  13. Detection and recurrence rate of transurethral resection of bladder tumors by narrow-band imaging: Prospective, randomized comparison with white light cystoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Bin Kim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of narrow-band imaging (NBI as a diagnostic tool for detecting bladder tumors during cystoscopy compared with white light cystoscopy (WLC. Materials and Methods: From December 2013 to June 2017, a randomized prospective study was conducted on 198 patients underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor by a single surgeon. The patients were divided into two groups according to diagnostic method. In Group I, WLC only was performed. In Group II, NBI was additionally performed after WLC. We analyzed the rate of detection of bladder tumors as a primary endpoint. In addition, we evaluated rates of recurrence in each group. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in characteristics except hypertension. In the analysis of rates of detection, the probability of diagnosing cancer was 80.9% (114/141 in the WLC group, and the probability of diagnosing cancer using WLC in the NBI group was 85.5% (159/186. After switching from WLC to NBI for second-look cystoscopy in the NBI group, NBI was shown to detect additional tumors with a detection rate of 35.1% (13/37 from the perspective of the patients and 42.2% (27/64 from the perspective of the tumors. The 1-year recurrence-free rate was 72.2% in the WLC group and 85.2% in the NBI group (p=0.3. Conclusions: NBI had benefits for detecting tumors overlooked by WLC. Although the difference in the 1-year recurrence-free rate was not statistically significant, our results showed a trend for higher recurrence in the NBI group.

  14. Advantage of highly immunoreactive monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoscintigraphy for tumor detection, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kunihiko

    1988-01-01

    Immunoreactivity (IR) is the fraction of a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) preparation capable of binding to an excess of a specific antigen. One of the most important requirements for successful radioimmunoscintigraphy is to use a highly immunoreactive MoAb. To assess the effect of an antibody IR on biodistribution, a fast and simple purification method has been developed using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system equipped with a hydroxylapatite (HA) column. The column was eluted at ambient temperature with 0.12 M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 6.8). With this system, the F ab fragments from the MoAb 96.5 against the human melanoma associated p97 antigen were separated into two well-resolved peaks at retention times of 6 and 16 min. FEM-XII cells (human skin melanoma cell line) were used in a cell binding assay (CBA) to determine the maximal percent IR and the affinity constant of each HA-HPLC peak. The second peak from an 125 I-F ab 96.5 showed approximately two times greater maximal binding than did the first peak, whereas the affinity constant for the two was the same. This indicated that the F ab 96.5 preparations used in this study were a mixture of more active and less active components. Moreover, prior to the HA-HPLC experiments, these preparations were analyzed with a gel filtration HPLC showing a single molecular weight peak. This suggested that the HA-HPLC separation was not based on molecular weight differences although the separation mechanism of HA has not yet been fully understood. Thereby, it is concluded that the HA-HPLC is a powerful tool to purify MoAbs into the higher immunoreactive fraction which has a potential advantage in tumor targeting. (author)

  15. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Ji Hye [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Kon, E-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sanghyeok [Department of Radiology, Guri Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Guri (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain.

  16. Prediction of microvascular invasion of hepatocellular carcinomas with gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging: Impact of intra-tumoral fat detected on chemical-shift images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Ji Hye; Kim, Young Kon; Lim, Sanghyeok; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Choi, Dongil; Lee, Won Jae

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC. • Alfa-fetoprotein, tumor size, and fat component were associated with MVI of HCC. • Chemical shift MRI should be considered for the evaluation of HCC. - Abstract: Purpose: To investigate the impact of intra-tumoral fat detected by chemical-shift MR imaging in predicting the MVI of HCC. Materials and methods: Gadoxetic acid-enhanced MR imaging of 365 surgically proven HCCs from 365 patients (306 men, 59 women; mean age, 55.6 years) were evaluated. HCCs were classified into two groups, fat-containing and non-fat-containing, based on the presence of fat on chemical-shift images. Fat-containing HCCs were subdivided into diffuse or focal fatty change groups. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify clinical and MR findings associated with MVI. Results: Based on MR imaging, 66 tumors were classified as fat-containing HCCs and 299 as non-fat-containing HCCs. Among the 66 fat-containing HCCs, 38 (57.6%) showed diffuse fatty changes and 28 (42.4%) showed focal fatty changes. MVI was present in 18 (27.3%) fat-containing HCCs and in 117 (39.1%) non-fat-containing HCCs (P = 0.07). Univariate analysis revealed that serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and tumor size were significantly associated with MVI (P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that log AFP (odds ratio 1.178, P = 0.0016), tumor size (odds ratio 1.809, P < 0.001), and intra-tumoral fat (odds ratio 0.515, P = 0.0387) were independent variables associated with MVI. Conclusion: Intra-tumoral fat detected with MR imaging may suggest lower risk for MVI of HCC and, therefore, a possibly more favorable prognosis, but the clinical value of this finding is uncertain

  17. A rare case of extremely high counts of circulating tumor cells detected in a patient with an oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xianglei; Mastronicola, Romina; Tu, Qian; Faure, Gilbert Charles; De Carvalho Bittencourt, Marcelo; Dolivet, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Despite aggressive regimens, the clinical outcome of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains poor. The detection of circulating tumor cells could potentially improve the management of patients with disseminated cancer, including diagnosis, treatment strategies, and surveillance. Currently, CellSearch ® is the most widely used and the only Food and Drug Administration-cleared system for circulating tumor cells detection in patients with metastatic breast, colorectal, or prostate cancer. In most cases of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, only low counts of circulating tumor cells have been reported. A 56-year-old white male with no particular medical history, was diagnosed with a squamous cell carcinoma of oral cavity. According to the imaging results (computed tomography and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography / computed tomography) and panendoscopy, the TNM staging was classified as T4N2M0. A non-interruptive pelvimandibulectomy was conducted according to the multidisciplinary meeting advices and the postoperative observations were normal. The patient complained of a painful cervical edema and a trismus 6 weeks after the surgery. A relapse was found by computed tomography and the patient died two weeks later. The search for circulating tumor cells in peripheral venous blood by using the CellSearch ® system revealed a very high count compared with published reports at three time points (pre-operative: 400; intra-operative: 150 and post-operative day 7: 1400 circulating tumor cells). Of note, all detected circulating tumor cells were epidermal growth factor receptor negative. We report here for the first time a rare case of oral squamous cell carcinoma with extremely high circulating tumor cells counts using the CellSearch ® system. The absolute number of circulating tumor cells might predict a particular phase of cancer development as well as a poor survival, potentially contributing to a personalized healthcare

  18. Technetium-99m glucoheptonate in brain-tumor detection: an important advance in radiotracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveille, J.; Pison, C.; Karakand, Y.; Lemieux, R.; Vallieres, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    We have compared [Tc-99m] sodium pertechnetate with Tc-99m glucoheptonate in 52 patients studied for various brain lesions. Flow studies as well as delayed scans were performed in all. Especially in primary and metastatic lesions of the posterior fossa, the diagnostic yield was improved by the delayed glucoheptonate (GH) scans. In contrast, no advantage of GH over pertechnetate could be detected in the study of infarcts or other ischemic lesions. Various hypotheses are discussed to explain the observed differences in behavior between the two tracers

  19. Role of 18F-FDG PET-CT in detection of primary tumors in patients with cervical/extra cervical metastases of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soundararajan, Ramya; Naswa, Niraj; Nazar, Aftab Hasan; Kumar, Rakesh; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Bandopadhyaya, Guru; Malhotra, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) is a heterogeneous group of histologically proven metastatic malignancies for which the primary tumor could not be detected despite thorough diagnostic evaluation. CUP accounts for 2.3-4.2% of cancer in both sexes and follows an aggressive behavior with a median survival less than 1 year. Identification of a primary tumor has an impact on therapy and life expectancy and it is often detected only in 10-35% of all cases by conventional imaging modalities. Hence there is clearly a need of whole body, non invasive imaging modality with a high diagnostic yield

  20. Statistical performance of image cytometry for DNA, lipids, cytokeratin, & CD45 in a model system for circulation tumor cell detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futia, Gregory L; Schlaepfer, Isabel R; Qamar, Lubna; Behbakht, Kian; Gibson, Emily A

    2017-07-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a blood sample is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of the biomarker panel used to identify CTCs over other blood cells. In this work, we present Bayesian theory that shows how test sensitivity and specificity set the rarity of cell that a test can detect. We perform our calculation of sensitivity and specificity on our image cytometry biomarker panel by testing on pure disease positive (D + ) populations (MCF7 cells) and pure disease negative populations (D - ) (leukocytes). In this system, we performed multi-channel confocal fluorescence microscopy to image biomarkers of DNA, lipids, CD45, and Cytokeratin. Using custom software, we segmented our confocal images into regions of interest consisting of individual cells and computed the image metrics of total signal, second spatial moment, spatial frequency second moment, and the product of the spatial-spatial frequency moments. We present our analysis of these 16 features. The best performing of the 16 features produced an average separation of three standard deviations between D + and D - and an average detectable rarity of ∼1 in 200. We performed multivariable regression and feature selection to combine multiple features for increased performance and showed an average separation of seven standard deviations between the D + and D - populations making our average detectable rarity of ∼1 in 480. Histograms and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves for these features and regressions are presented. We conclude that simple regression analysis holds promise to further improve the separation of rare cells in cytometry applications. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  1. Enhanced diffusometric immunosensing with grafted gold nanoparticles for detection of diabetic retinopathy biomarker tumor necrosis factor-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Ju; Cheng, Hui-Pin

    2018-03-15

    Diffusometry is sensitive to geometric changes of particles. Target antigens can be detected through diffusivity changes resulting from their immunoreactions by functionalizing particle surface with a specific antibody. Considering that Brownian motion is a self-driven phenomenon, diffusometric immunosensing features several characteristics, such as no-washing steps, rapid detection, high flexibility, and high sensitivity. Until recently, this technique has been applied to many biomedical fields, such as monitoring of microorganism motility and diagnosis of diseases with biomarkers. Despite the abovementioned advantages, diffusivity changes in conventional diffusometry can be compromised at low-abundance antigens because proteins are much smaller than capture particles. To overcome such restriction, we present an improved diffusometric immunosensing technique by grafting additional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to capture particles to enhance size changes. A diabetic retinopathy (DR) biomarker, tumor necrosis factor-α was selected to evaluate the proposed immunosensing technique. Spherical AuNPs showed better enhancement than rod-like AuNPs during measurement. Limit of detection was improved by at least 100-fold down to 10pg/mL. A dichotomous method was also developed to enable rapid detection and avoid tedious calibration. The relationship of concentrations between the two solutions used can be explicitly determined by comparing diffusivity of an unknown concentration of target molecules with that of a reference solution. Minimum discernible concentration reached as low as twofold higher or lower than basal concentration. Tear samples were collected from four volunteers, including three healthy subjects and one proliferative DR patient to prove the concept in diagnosis of the disease. All data showed good agreement with preset conditions. The technique eventually provides an insight into rapid diagnoses of diseases in the early stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  2. Real-time detection system for tumor localization during minimally invasive surgery for gastric and colon cancer removal: In vivo feasibility study in a swine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Jung; Moon, Jin-Hee; Min, Jae Seok; Song, Yong Keun; Lee, Seung A; Ahn, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Hun; Jung, Ha Chul

    2018-03-01

    During minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it is impossible to directly detect marked clips around tumors via palpation. Therefore, we developed a novel method and device using Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) technology to detect the position of clips during minimally invasive gastrectomy or colectomy. The feasibility of the RFID-based detection system was evaluated in an animal experiment consisting of seven swine. The primary outcome was to successfully detect the location of RFID clips in the stomach and colon. The secondary outcome measures were to detect time (time during the intracorporeal detection of the RFID clip), and accuracy (distance between the RFID clip and the detected site). A total of 25 detection attempts (14 in the stomach and 11 in the colon) using the RFID antenna had a 100% success rate. The median detection time was 32.5 s (range, 15-119 s) for the stomach and 28.0 s (range, 8-87 s) for the colon. The median detection distance was 6.5 mm (range, 4-18 mm) for the stomach and 6.0 mm (range, 3-13 mm) for the colon. We demonstrated favorable results for a RFID system that detects the position of gastric and colon tumors in real-time during MIS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Detection of hepatic tumor by means of single photon emission computed tomography, gray scale ultrasonography, and x-ray computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumoto, Yasuhiro; Jinno, Kenji; Tokuyama, Katsuyuki [Shikoku National Cancer Center Hospital, Matsuyama (Japan)

    1984-07-01

    We have studied the detection of hepatic tumor by single photon emmision computed tomography (SPECT) using rotatory chair and gamma camera. SPECT were taken by multiple section slice not in transaxial but also in frontal and sagital view. The detectability of SPECT turned out to be superior to the conventional liver scintiphoto. By SPECT, minute hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of 1.9 cm in diameter was detectable. Simultaneous interpretation of SPECT, US and XCT was more helpful than each independent interpertation. Subject comprised 108 patients with focal hepatic lesions including 48 cases of HCC and 44 cases of metastatic liver tumor. SPECT and celiac angiography on a 63-year-old female with liver cirrhosis revealed hepatic mass lesion in subphrenic region in right hepatic lobe, but XCT or US could not detect any lesion of hepatic tumor. Operated specimen showed confluent-massive type of HCC according to Nakashima's classification with 7 x 7 x 6.5 cm in size, representing replacing proliferation by histological examination. Both sensitivity and false positive rate of detectability of HCC were superior in decreasing order as combined three modalities, US XCT and SPECT. The diagnosis by combined three modalities shows 99% of sensitivity rate with 1% of false negative rate and 0% of false positive rate and 99.5% of accuracy. Differenciation of HCC from metastatic liver cancer or another benign tumor was possible with sensitivity rate of 94.8% and specificity rate of 90.0% by three combined modalities.

  4. Streptavidin Modified ZnO Film Bulk Acoustic Resonator for Detection of Tumor Marker Mucin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dan; Guo, Peng; Xiong, Juan; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-09-01

    A ZnO-based film bulk acoustic resonator has been fabricated using a magnetron sputtering technology, which was employed as a biosensor for detection of mucin 1. The resonant frequency of the thin-film bulk acoustic resonator was located near at 1503.3 MHz. The average electromechanical coupling factor {K}_{eff}^2 and quality factor Q were 2.39 % and 224, respectively. Using the specific binding system of avidin-biotin, the streptavidin was self-assembled on the top gold electrode as the sensitive layer to indirectly test the MUC1 molecules. The resonant frequency of the biosensor decreases in response to the mass loading in range of 20-500 nM. The sensor modified with the streptavidin exhibits a high sensitivity of 4642.6 Hz/nM and a good selectivity.

  5. Detection of circulating tumor lysate-reactive CD4+ T cells in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladekarl, Morten; Agger, Ralf; Fleischer, Charlotte C

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: We wanted to study whether an allogeneic melanoma lysate would be a feasible stimulatory antigen source for detection of a peripheral CD4+ T-cell immune response in patients with medically untreated malignant melanoma. The lysate was produced from a melanoma cell line (FM3.29) which...... was found in 1 of 4 patients radically operated for localized disease, whereas no responders were seen among 7 healthy donors. The fraction of circulating lysate-activated T cells ranged from 0.0037% to 0.080% of the CD4+ population. A negative result of the assay was found occasionally, especially...... expresses high amounts of melanoma antigens. METHODS: Fresh peripheral blood was incubated with and without lysate for 6 h in the presence of anti-CD28/anti-CD49d MoAb (for costimulation). After flow cytometric estimation of the frequency of CD69+/IFN-gamma+ cells in the CD4+ population, the response...

  6. Coupled Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Human Lymphotropic Tumor Viruses: Insights on the Detection and Discovery of Viral Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresang, Lindsay R.; Teuton, Jeremy R.; Feng, Huichen; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Li, Zhihua; Smith, Richard D.; Sugden, Bill; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2011-12-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are related human tumor viruses that cause primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) and Burkitt's lymphomas (BL), respectively. Viral genes expressed in naturally-infected cancer cells contribute to disease pathogenesis; knowing which viral genes are expressed is critical in understanding how these viruses cause cancer. To evaluate the expression of viral genes, we used high-resolution separation and mass spectrometry coupled with custom tiling arrays to align the viral proteomes and transcriptomes of three PEL and two BL cell lines under latent and lytic culture conditions. Results The majority of viral genes were efficiently detected at the transcript and/or protein level on manipulating the viral life cycle. Overall the correlation of expressed viral proteins and transcripts was highly complementary in both validating and providing orthogonal data with latent/lytic viral gene expression. Our approach also identified novel viral genes in both KSHV and EBV, and extends viral genome annotation. Several previously uncharacterized genes were validated at both transcript and protein levels. Conclusions This systems biology approach coupling proteome and transcriptome measurements provides a comprehensive view of viral gene expression that could not have been attained using each methodology independently. Detection of viral proteins in combination with viral transcripts is a potentially powerful method for establishing virus-disease relationships.

  7. Evaluation of 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 as an agent for pancreas tumor detection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.N. Carlesso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is important in oncology because of its high mortality rate. Deaths may be avoided if an early diagnosis could be achieved. Several types of tumors overexpress gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr, including pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, a radiolabeled peptide derivative of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP may be useful as a specific imaging probe. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 as an imaging probe for Capan-1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Xenographic pancreatic tumor was developed in nude mice and characterized by histopathological analysis. Biodistribution studies and scintigraphic images were carried out in tumor-bearing nude mice. The two methods showed higher uptake by pancreatic tumor when compared to muscle (used as control, and the tumor-to-muscle ratio indicated that 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 uptake was four-fold higher in tumor cells than in other tissues. Scintigraphic images also showed a clear signal at the tumor site. The present data indicate that 99mTc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin(7-14 may be useful for the detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  8. Evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} as an agent for pancreas tumor detection in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlesso, F.N.; Fuscaldi, L.L.; Araujo, R.S.; Teixeira, C.S.; Oliveira, M.C.; Fernandes, S.O.A.; Cassali, G.D.; Reis, D.C.; Barros, A.L.B.; Cardoso, V.N., E-mail: valbertcardoso@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is important in oncology because of its high mortality rate. Deaths may be avoided if an early diagnosis could be achieved. Several types of tumors overexpress gastrin-releasing peptide receptors (GRPr), including pancreatic cancer cells. Thus, a radiolabeled peptide derivative of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) may be useful as a specific imaging probe. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of using {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC--βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} as an imaging probe for Capan-1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Xenographic pancreatic tumor was developed in nude mice and characterized by histopathological analysis. Biodistribution studies and scintigraphic images were carried out in tumor-bearing nude mice. The two methods showed higher uptake by pancreatic tumor when compared to muscle (used as control), and the tumor-to-muscle ratio indicated that {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC--βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} uptake was four-fold higher in tumor cells than in other tissues. Scintigraphic images also showed a clear signal at the tumor site. The present data indicate that {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC--βAla-Bombesin{sub (7-14)} may be useful for the detection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. (author)

  9. Detection of alkaline phosphatase in canine cells previously stained with Wright-Giemsa and its utility in differentiating osteosarcoma from other mesenchymal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryseff, Julia K; Bohn, Andrea A

    2012-09-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is a common primary bone tumor in dogs. Demonstration of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) reactivity by tumor cells on unstained slides is useful in differentiating osteosarcoma from other types of sarcoma. However, unstained slides are not always available. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the diagnostic utility of detecting ALP expression in differentiating osteosarcoma from other sarcomas in dogs using cytologic material previously stained with Wright-Giemsa stain and to assess the sensitivity and specificity of ALP expression for diagnosing osteosarcoma using a specific protocol. Archived aspirates of histologically confirmed sarcomas in dogs that had been previously stained with Wright-Giemsa stain were treated with 5-bromo, 4-chloro, 3-indolyl phosphate/nitroblue tetrazolium (BCIP/NBT) as a substrate for ALP. Cells were evaluated for expression of ALP after incubation with BCIP/NBT for 1 hour. Sensitivity and specificity of ALP expression for diagnosis of OSA were calculated. In samples from 83 dogs, cells from 15/17 OSAs and from 4/66 tumors other than OSA (amelanotic melanoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, collision tumor, and anaplastic sarcoma) expressed ALP. Sensitivity and specificity of ALP expression detected using BCIP/NBT substrate applied to cells previously stained with Wright-Giemsa stain for OSA were 88 and 94%, respectively. ALP expression detected using BCIP/NBT substrate applied to previously stained cells is useful in differentiating canine OSA from other mesenchymal neoplasms. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  10. 1H MRS can detect dose dependent effects in irradiated tumor cells and spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grande, S.; Viti, V.; Guidoni, L.; Luciani, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: 1 H MR spectra of tumour cells are often characterised by the presence of intense signals from the methylene fatty acid chains of mobile lipids (ML), mostly triglycerides (TG). In previous work (Magnetic Resonance in Medicine ,1999, 42:248-257), we showed that the intensity of these signals is modulated by cell proliferation. Polyunsaturation levels of the fatty acid chains were also found higher when mobile lipid signals were intense, in agreement with independent findings by other authors (Nat. Med . 1999, 5:1323-1327). Cells from breast carcinoma (MCF 7) were irradiated at increasing doses (5 - 40 Gy) to detect spectral differences in irradiated cells and to relate them to the metabolic breakdown accompanying cell death. Early and late, metabolism mediated , effects were observed. The main effect observed shortly after treatment was a decrease in ML peak intensity, probably from the oxidative damage to the involved lipid structures. On the other hand, when cells were observed after 24, 48 and 72 hours, irradiated cells displayed more intense ML peaks, with a maximum effect after 48 hours, irrespective of the initial intensity of ML signals. The effect was found dose dependent. Also peaks from lipid polyunsaturation were found higher in irradiated samples. Moreover, also phosphorylcholine and glutathione signals were affected by irradiation. Similar effects were found in multicellular spheroids from the same cell strain. Association of the observed changes with apoptotic death is currently under consideration

  11. Comparison of three different methods for the detection of circulating tumor cells in mice with lung metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weifeng; Wu, Bing; Fu, Lengxi; Chen, Junying; Wang, Zeng; Huang, Fei; Chen, Jinrong; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhenhuan; Lin, Jingan; Lan, Ruilong; Chen, Ruiqing; Chen, Wei; Chen, Long; Hong, Jinsheng; Zhang, Weijian; Ding, Yuxiong; Okunieff, Paul; Lin, Jianhua; Zhang, Lurong

    2017-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) represent the key step of cancer cell dissemination. The alteration of CTCs correlates with the treatment outcome and prognosis. To enrich and identify CTCs from billions of blood cells renders a very challenging task, which triggers development of several methods, including lysis of RBC plus negative or positive enrichment using antibodies, and filter membrane or spiral microfluidics to capture CTCs. To compare the advantages of different enrichment methods for CTCs, we utilized the 4T1 breast cancer cells transfected with both green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase to trace CTCs in the experimental lung metastasis model. Three methods were used to detect CTCs at the same time: bioluminescence assay, smearing method, and membrane filter method. The in vivo alive mouse imaging was used to dynamically monitor the growth of lung metastases. The sensitivity and accuracy of three detection methods were compared side-by-side. Our results showed that 1) the sensitivity of bioluminescence assay was the highest, but there was no information of CTC morphology; 2) the smearing method and membrane filter method could observe the detail of CTC morphology, such as in single or in cluster, while their sensitivity was lower than bioluminescence assay; 3) A dynamic observation at a 7-day intervals, the lung metastatic cancer grew at a log speed, while CTCs were increased at a low speed. This might be due to the activated immune cells eliminating the CTCs at a speed much faster than CTCs were generated. This comparison of three CTC detection methods in mouse model suggests that bioluminescence assay could be used in quantitative study of the effect of certain agent on the suppression of CTCs, while GFP-based morphological assays could be used to study the dissemination mechanism of CTCs. The combination of both bioluminescence assay and GFP-based assay would generate more information for quantity and quality of CTCs.

  12. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  13. High purity microfluidic sorting and analysis of circulating tumor cells: towards routine mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autebert, Julien; Coudert, Benoit; Champ, Jérôme; Saias, Laure; Guneri, Ezgi Tulukcuoglu; Lebofsky, Ronald; Bidard, François-Clément; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Farace, Françoise; Descroix, Stéphanie; Malaquin, Laurent; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2015-05-07

    A new generation of the Ephesia cell capture technology optimized for CTC capture and genetic analysis is presented, characterized in depth and compared with the CellSearch system as a reference. This technology uses magnetic particles bearing tumour-cell specific EpCAM antibodies, self-assembled in a regular array in a microfluidic flow cell. 48,000 high aspect-ratio columns are generated using a magnetic field in a high throughput (>3 ml h(-1)) device and act as sieves to specifically capture the cells of interest through antibody-antigen interactions. Using this device optimized for CTC capture and analysis, we demonstrated the capture of epithelial cells with capture efficiency above 90% for concentrations as low as a few cells per ml. We showed the high specificity of capture with only 0.26% of non-epithelial cells captured for concentrations above 10 million cells per ml. We investigated the capture behavior of cells in the device, and correlated the cell attachment rate with the EpCAM expression on the cell membranes for six different cell lines. We developed and characterized a two-step blood processing method to allow for rapid processing of 10 ml blood tubes in less than 4 hours, and showed a capture rate of 70% for as low as 25 cells spiked in 10 ml blood tubes, with less than 100 contaminating hematopoietic cells. Using this device and procedure, we validated our system on patient samples using an automated cell immunostaining procedure and a semi-automated cell counting method. Our device captured CTCs in 75% of metastatic prostate cancer patients and 80% of metastatic breast cancer patients, and showed similar or better results than the CellSearch device in 10 out of 13 samples. Finally, we demonstrated the possibility of detecting cancer-related PIK3CA gene mutation in 20 cells captured in the chip with a good correlation between the cell count and the quantitation value Cq of the post-capture qPCR.

  14. Glomus Tumor of the Larynx: A Rare Synchronous Paraganglioma in a Patient with Bilateral Carotid Body Tumor Detected on 68Ga-DOTANOC PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Sarthak; Mukherjee, Anirban; Singh, Chirom A; Jat, Bhinyaram; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Paragangliomas are neoplasms arising from extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue. They frequently cause symptoms by overproduction of catecholamines with known predilection to multicentricity. We describe the case of a patient with bilateral carotid body tumor who underwent a baseline 68 Gallium labeled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-NaI3-Octreotide.

  15. How Do CD4+ T Cells Detect and Eliminate Tumor Cells That Either Lack or Express MHC Class II Molecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haabeth, Ole Audun Werner; Tveita, Anders Aune; Fauskanger, Marte; Schjesvold, Fredrik; Lorvik, Kristina Berg; Hofgaard, Peter O.; Omholt, Hilde; Munthe, Ludvig A.; Dembic, Zlatko; Corthay, Alexandre; Bogen, Bjarne

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor-specific antigen by host antigen-presenting cells (APCs) appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315), where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR-transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-γ stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed. PMID:24782871

  16. How do CD4+ T cells detect and eliminate tumor cells that either lack or express MHC class II molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Audun Werner Haabeth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor specific antigen by host antigen presenting cells (APCs appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315, where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-g stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed.

  17. Modulation of in vivo distribution through chelator: Synthesis and evaluation of a 2-nitroimidazole-dipicolylamine-(99m)Tc(CO)3 complex for detecting tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallia, Madhava B; Mittal, Sweety; Sarma, Haladhar D; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have clearly demonstrated strong correlation between in vivo distribution and blood clearance of radiopharmaceuticals for the detection of hypoxia. Present study describes an attempt to improve the in vivo distribution of a previously reported 2-nitroimidazole-(99m)Tc(CO)3 complex by tuning its blood clearance pattern through structural modification of the ligand. Herein, a 2-nitroimidazole-dipicolylamine ligand (2-nitroimidazole-DPA) was synthesized in a two-step procedure and radiolabeled with (99m)Tc(CO)3 core. Subsequently, the complex was evaluated in Swiss mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumor. As intended by its design, 2-nitroimidazole-DPA-(99m)Tc(CO)3 complex was more lipophilic than previously reported 2-nitroimidazole-DETA-(99m)Tc(CO)3 complex (DETA-diethylenetriamine) and showed slower blood clearance. Consequently it showed higher tumor uptake than 2-nitroimidazole-DETA-(99m)Tc(CO)3 complex. Significantly, despite structural modifications, other parameters such as the tumor to blood ratio and tumor to muscle ratio of the 2-nitroimidazole-DPA-(99m)Tc(CO)3 complex remained comparable to that of 2-nitroimidazole-DETA-(99m)Tc(CO)3 complex. Present study demonstrates the feasibility of structural modifications for improving in vivo tumor uptake of hypoxia detecting radiopharmaceuticals. This might encourage researchers to improve suboptimal properties of a potential radiopharmaceuticals rather than ignoring it altogether. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome caused by SMARCB1 constitutional deletion: prenatal detection of new case of recurrence in siblings due to gonadal mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Laura; Paganini, Irene; Frontali, Marina; Ciabattoni, Serena; Sangiuolo, Federica Carla; Papi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdoid tumors are aggressive malignancies that show loss-of-function mutations of SMARCB1 gene, a member of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex controlling gene transcription. One-third of patients affected by rhabdoid tumor harbor a germ-line mutation of SMARCB1 defining a rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome. The occurrence of a second somatic mutation determines the development of neoplasia in a two-hit model. Most germ-line mutations occur de novo, and few cases of recurrence in a sibship have been described. Here we report on a new Italian family with recurrence of SMARCB1 germ-line deletion in two siblings due to gonadal mosaicism. The deletion was identified in the 9-month-old proband with malignant rhabdoid tumor of the right kidney and disseminated metastases. Testing of both parents confirmed the de novo origin of the mutation, but recurrence was then detected prenatally in a new pregnancy. This is the sixth family with malignant rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome with the recurrence of the same germ-line SMARCB1 mutation in the sibship but not in healthy parents, suggesting that gonadal mosaicism is a less rare event than supposed. The clinical outcome in our patient confirms previous data of poorer outcome in patients with rhabdoid tumor predisposition syndrome.

  19. Combining Optical Reporter Proteins with Different Half-lives to Detect Temporal Evolution of Hypoxia and Reoxygenation in Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Danhier

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Here we have developed a hypoxia response element driven imaging strategy that combined the hypoxia-driven expression of two optical reporters with different half-lives to detect temporal changes in hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF activity. For this purpose, human prostate cancer PC3 cells were transfected with the luciferase gene fused with an oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD-luc and a variant of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. Both ODD-luciferase and EGFP were under the promotion of a poly-hypoxia-response element sequence (5xHRE. The cells constitutively expressed tdTomato red fluorescent protein. For validating the imaging strategy, cells were incubated under hypoxia (1% O2 for 48 hours and then reoxygenated. The luciferase activity of PC3-HRE-EGFP/HRE-ODD-luc/tdtomato cells detected by bioluminescent imaging rapidly decreased after reoxygenation, whereas EGFP levels in these cells remained stable for several hours. After in vitro validation, PC3-HRE-EGFP/HRE-ODD-luc/tdtomato tumors were implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically in nude male mice and imaged in vivo and ex vivo using optical imaging in proof-of-principle studies to demonstrate differences in optical patterns between EGFP expression and bioluminescence. This novel "timer" imaging strategy of combining the short-lived ODD-luciferase and the long-lived EGFP can provide a time frame of HRE activation in PC3 prostate cancer cells and will be useful to understand the temporal changes in hypoxia and HIF activity during cancer progression and following treatments including HIF targeting strategies.

  20. Detecting early response to cyclophosphamide treatment of RIF-1 tumors using selective multiple quantum spectroscopy (SelMQC) and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poptani, Harish; Bansal, Navin; Graham, Robert A; Mancuso, Anthony; Nelson, David S; Glickson, Jerry D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable, noninvasive method for early detection of tumor response to therapy that would facilitate optimization of treatment regimens to the needs of the individual patient. In the present study, the effects of cyclophosphamide (Cp, a widely used alkylating agent) were monitored in a murine radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) using in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy and imaging to evaluate the potential of these techniques towards early detection of treatment response. Steady-state lactate levels and Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics were measured using selective multiple quantum coherence (Sel-MQC) transfer spectroscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging, respectively in RIF-1 tumors before, 24 and 72 h after 300 mg/kg of Cp administration. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts of the tumor were correlated with lactate and glucose concentrations determined enzymatically. In vivo NMR experiments showed a decrease in steady-state lactate to water ratios (5.4 +/- 1.6 to 0.6 +/- 0.5, p < 0.05) and an increase in Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics following treatment response. The data indicate that decreases in lactate result from decreased glycolytic metabolism and an increase in tumor perfusion/permeability. Perchloric acid extracts confirmed the lower lactate levels seen in vivo in treated tumors and also indicated a higher glycerophosphocholine/phosphocholine (GPC/PC) integrated intensity ratio (1.39 +/- 0.09 vs 0.97 +/- 0.04, p < 0.01), indicative of increased membrane degradation following Cp treatment. Steady-state lactate levels provide metabolic information that correlates with changes in tumor physiology measured by Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics with high spatial and temporal resolution. Both of these parameters may be useful for monitoring early tumor response to therapy. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. In vitro detection of circulating tumor cells compared by the CytoTrack and CellSearch methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, T.; Horn, P.; Nygaard, Ann-Britt

    2015-01-01

    .23/p = 0.09). Overall, the recovery of CytoTrack and CellSearch was 68.8 +/- 3.9 %/71.1 +/- 2.9 %, respectively (p = 0.58). In spite of different methodologies, CytoTrack and CellSearch found similar number of CTCs, when spiking was performed with the EpCAM and pan cytokeratin-positive cell line MCF-7......Comparison of two methods to detect circulating tumor cells (CTC) CytoTrack and CellSearch through recovery of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, spiked into blood collected from healthy donors. Spiking of a fixed number of EpCAM and pan-cytokeratin positive MCF-7 cells into 7.5 mL donor blood...... was performed by FACSAria flow sorting. The samples were shipped to either CytoTrack or CellSearch research facilities within 48 h, where evaluation of MCF-7 recovery was performed. CytoTrack and CellSearch analyses were performed simultaneously. Recoveries of MCF-7 single cells, cells in clusters, and clusters...

  2. Subclassification and Detection of New Markers for the Discrimination of Primary Liver Tumors by Gene Expression Analysis Using Oligonucleotide Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Holger G; Vogel, Ulrich; Scheurlen, Michael; Jobst, Jürgen

    2017-12-26

    The failure to correctly differentiate between intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma [CC] and hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC] is a significant clinical problem, particularly in terms of the different treatment goals for both cancers. In this study a specific gene expression profile to discriminate these two subgroups of liver cancer was established and potential diagnostic markers for clinical use were analyzed. To evaluate the gene expression profiles of HCC and intrahepatic CC, Oligonucleotide arrays ( Affymetrix U133A) were used. Overexpressed genes were checked for their potential use as new markers for discrimination and their expression values were validated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry analyses. 695 genes/expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in HCC (245 up-/450 down-regulated) and 552 genes/ESTs in CC (221 up-/331 down-regulated) were significantly dysregulated (p〈0.05, fold change >2, ≥70%). Using a supervised learning method, and one-way analysis of variance a specific 270-gene expression profile that enabled rapid, reproducible differentiation between both tumors and non-malignant liver tissues was established. A panel of 12 genes (e.g. HSP90β, ERG1, GPC3, TKT, ACLY, and NME1 for HCC; SPT2, T4S3, CNX43, TTD1, HBD01 for CC) were detected and partly described for the first time as potential discrimination markers. A specific gene expression profile for discrimination of primary liver cancer was identified and potential marker genes with feasible clinical impact were described.

  3. Fluorinated glucose analog, 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (F-18): nontoxic tracer for rapid tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Som, P.; Atkins, H.L.; Bandoypadhyay, D.

    1980-01-01

    Rapid uptake of F-18 FDG was observed in a variety of transplanted and spontaneous tumors in animals. The tumor uptake reached a peak by 30 min and remained relatively constant up to 60 min, with a very slow wash-out of F-18 activity from the tumor thereafter. Tumor-to-normal tissue and tumor-to-blood ratios ranged from 2.10 to 9.15 and 2.61 to 17.82, respectively, depending on the type of tumor. A scintiscan of a seminoma in a dog showed very high uptake in the viable part and lack of uptake in the necrotic mass. Toxicological studies in mice using 1000 times human tracer dose (HTD) per week for 3 weeks and in dogs using 50 times HTD per week for 3 weeks did not show any evidence of acute or chronic toxicity

  4. Assessment of the image quality and tumor detectability of breath-hold T2-weighted imaging of liver tumors using a fast gradient MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kotaro; Suto, Yuji; Sugihara, Shuji; Tokuda, Yukiko

    1996-01-01

    Fourteen patients with various types of focal liver tumors were imaged with turbo spin-echo (TSE), breath-hold TSE (BH-TSE) and half-Fourier single-shot TSE (HASTE) pulse sequences using a fast gradient magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. We compared the T2-weighted images of the liver with the TSE, BH-TSE, HASTE and conventional spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences in order to determine whether those fast T2-weighted images, including fat suppressed images, could replace SE images. In quantitative and qualitative analysis, the fast T2-weighted images were slightly superior to the SE images, but they were inferior in the conspicuousness of liver tumor to the SE images. These findings suggest that the fast T2-weighted images can shorten the examination time of the liver MRI, but cannot replace the T2-weighted SE images because of the low conspicuousness. (author)

  5. Clinical value of multi-tumor markers detection with (CEA, CA19-9, CA72-4) for diagnosis of gastric malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yun; Li Jiangang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of multi-tumor markers detection with (CEA, CA19-9, CA72-4) for diagnosis of gastric malignancy. Methods: Serum CEA, CA19-9, CA72-4 contents were measured with IRMA in 228 patients with gastric malignancies, 152 patients with benign gastric disorders and 200 controls. Results: The positive rates of single marker detection were all above 70% and that of CA72-4 was the highest (84.21%), next was CA19-9 (75.43%). Three tumor markers were all negative in only 4 cases (false negative rate was 1.75% ). So combined detection of 3 tumor markers could improve the positive rate to 98.25%. With combined determination of two markers, double positive rate for different sets of combinations was: 61.84% for CA72-4 + CA19-9, 51.31% for CA72-4 + CEA and 48.24% for CEA + CA19-9. Conclusion: It was suggested that for screening, CA72-4 was the first choice in single marker detections, and CA72-4 + CA19-9 was the first choice for combined detections of two markers. For follow-up, a combination of 2 markers with highest positive rate for the specific histopathologic type (i. e. carcinoma, leiomyosarcoma or lymphosarcoma) should be used throughout the study. (authors)

  6. A Comparison between Radiolabeled Fluorodeoxyglucose Uptake and Hyperpolarized 13C-Labeled Pyruvate Utilization as Methods for Detecting Tumor Response to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H. Witney

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Detection of early tumor responses to treatment can give an indication of clinical outcome. Positron emission tomography measurements of the uptake of the glucose analog, [18F] 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG, have demonstrated their potential for detecting early treatment response in the clinic. We have shown recently that 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging measurements of the uptake and conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate into [1-13C]lactate can be used to detect treatment response in a murine lymphoma model. The present study compares these magnetic resonance measurements with changes in FDG uptake after chemotherapy. A decrease in FDG uptake was found to precede the decrease in flux of hyperpolarized 13C label between pyruvate and lactate, both in tumor cells in vitro and in tumors in vivo. However, the magnitude of the decrease in FDG uptake and the decrease in pyruvate to lactate flux was comparable at 24 hours after drug treatment. In cells, the decrease in FDG uptake was shown to correlate with changes in plasma membrane expression of the facilitative glucose transporters, whereas the decrease in pyruvate to lactate flux could be explained by an increase in poly(ADP-ribose polymerase activity and subsequent depletion of the NAD(H pool. These results show that measurement of flux between pyruvate and lactate may be an alternative to FDG-positron emission tomography for imaging tumor treatment response in the clinic.

  7. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for detection of skeletal metastases in children and young people with primary solid tumors - systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smets, A.M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Slager, T.J.E.; Stoker, J.; Bipat, S. [Academic Medical Center (AMC), Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-02-15

    Many solid neoplasms have a propensity for osteomedullary metastases of which detection is important for staging and subsequent treatment. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has been shown to accurately detect osteomedullary metastases in adults, but these findings cannot be unconditionally extrapolated to staging of children with malignant solid tumors. To conduct a literature review on the sensitivity of WB-MRI for detecting skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors. Searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to 15 May 2017 were performed to identify studies on the diagnostic value of WB-MRI. Inclusion criteria were children and adolescents (age <21 years) with a primary solid tumor who were evaluated for skeletal metastases by WB-MRI and compared to any type of reference standard. The number of included patients had to be at least five and data on true positives, true negatives, false-positives and false-negatives had to be extractable. Five studies including 132 patients (96 patients with solid tumors) were eligible. Patient groups and used reference tests were heterogeneous, producing unclear or high risk of bias. Sensitivity of WB-MRI ranged between 82% and 100%. The positive predictive value of WB-MRI was variable among the studies and influenced by the used reference standard. Although WB-MRI may seem a promising radiation-free technique for the detection of skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors, published studies are small and too heterogeneous to provide conclusive evidence that WB-MRI can be an alternative to currently used imaging techniques. (orig.)

  8. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging for detection of skeletal metastases in children and young people with primary solid tumors - systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smets, A.M.; Deurloo, E.E.; Slager, T.J.E.; Stoker, J.; Bipat, S.

    2018-01-01

    Many solid neoplasms have a propensity for osteomedullary metastases of which detection is important for staging and subsequent treatment. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) has been shown to accurately detect osteomedullary metastases in adults, but these findings cannot be unconditionally extrapolated to staging of children with malignant solid tumors. To conduct a literature review on the sensitivity of WB-MRI for detecting skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors. Searches in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases up to 15 May 2017 were performed to identify studies on the diagnostic value of WB-MRI. Inclusion criteria were children and adolescents (age <21 years) with a primary solid tumor who were evaluated for skeletal metastases by WB-MRI and compared to any type of reference standard. The number of included patients had to be at least five and data on true positives, true negatives, false-positives and false-negatives had to be extractable. Five studies including 132 patients (96 patients with solid tumors) were eligible. Patient groups and used reference tests were heterogeneous, producing unclear or high risk of bias. Sensitivity of WB-MRI ranged between 82% and 100%. The positive predictive value of WB-MRI was variable among the studies and influenced by the used reference standard. Although WB-MRI may seem a promising radiation-free technique for the detection of skeletal metastases in children with solid tumors, published studies are small and too heterogeneous to provide conclusive evidence that WB-MRI can be an alternative to currently used imaging techniques. (orig.)

  9. A novel CXCR4-targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe (Peptide R-NIR750) specifically detects CXCR4 expressing tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santagata, Sara; Portella, Luigi; Napolitano, Maria; Greco, Adelaide; D'Alterio, Crescenzo; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Luciano, Antonio; Gramanzini, Matteo; Auletta, Luigi; Arra, Claudio; Zannetti, Antonella; Scala, Stefania

    2017-05-31

    C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is over-expressed in multiple human cancers and correlates with tumor aggressiveness, poor prognosis and increased risk for distant metastases. Imaging agents for CXCR4 are thus highly desirable. We developed a novel CXCR4-targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probe (Peptide R-NIR750) conjugating the new developed CXCR4 peptidic antagonist Peptide R with the NIR fluorescent dye VivoTag-S750. Specific CXCR4 binding was obtained in cells overexpressing human CXCR4 (B16-hCXCR4 and human melanoma cells PES43), but not in CXCR4 low expressing cells (FB-1). Ex vivo evaluation demonstrated that PepR-NIR750 specifically detects B16-hCXCR4-derived subcutaneous tumors and lung metastases. Fluorescence Molecular Tomography (FMT) in vivo imaging was performed on mice carrying subcutaneous CHO and CHO-CXCR4 tumors. PepR-NIR750 accumulates only in CXCR4-positive expressing subcutaneous tumors. Additionally, an intense NIR fluorescence signal was detected in PES43-derived lung metastases of nude mice injected with PepR-NIR750 versus mice injected with VivoTag-S750. With a therapeutic intent, mice bearing PES43-derived lung metastases were treated with Peptide R. A the dramatic reduction in PES43-derived lung metastases was detected through a decrease of the PepR-NIR750 signal. PepR-NIR750 is a specific probe for non-invasive detection of human high CXCR4-expressing tumors and metastatic lesion and thus a valuable tool for cancer molecular imaging.

  10. An exceptional collision tumor: gastric calcified stromal tumor and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The authors report an exceptional case of collision tumor comprised of a gastric calcified stromal tumor and a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The pancreatic tumor was detected fortuitously on the histological exam of resection specimen. Key words: Collision tumor, stromal tumor, adenocarcinoma ...

  11. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a child's general health and to detect any adverse side effects (such as low red or white blood cell ... medicine needed, which helps reduce long-term side effects. The most common ... can be completely removed by surgery. About 41% of all Wilms tumors are stage ...

  12. Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT to detect occult mesenchymal tumor-inducing osteomalacia: A case series of three patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Chi Long [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disease that manifests with paraneoplasic syndrome and overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), leading to renal phosphate wasting and hyperphosphaturia, eventually leading to acquired hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. Diagnosis of this disease is often challenging because of the small size of the lesion, which can be localized in bone or soft tissue anywhere in the body. Detecting these occult mesenchymal tumors (OMT) is of great importance as they are potentially curable after tumor resection. The purpose of this case series is to provide some insight into the diagnosis and localization of OMT associated with osteomalacia, particularly using functional imaging with Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT scans.

  13. Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT to detect occult mesenchymal tumor-inducing osteomalacia: A case series of three patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Chi Long

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disease that manifests with paraneoplasic syndrome and overproduction of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23), leading to renal phosphate wasting and hyperphosphaturia, eventually leading to acquired hypophosphatemic osteomalacia. Diagnosis of this disease is often challenging because of the small size of the lesion, which can be localized in bone or soft tissue anywhere in the body. Detecting these occult mesenchymal tumors (OMT) is of great importance as they are potentially curable after tumor resection. The purpose of this case series is to provide some insight into the diagnosis and localization of OMT associated with osteomalacia, particularly using functional imaging with Ga68-DOTA peptide PET/CT scans

  14. Mutation Detection in Patients With Advanced Cancer by Universal Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes in Tumor and Normal DNA vs Guideline-Based Germline Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Zhang, Liying; Kemel, Yelena; Stadler, Zsofia K; Joseph, Vijai; Zehir, Ahmet; Pradhan, Nisha; Arnold, Angela; Walsh, Michael F; Li, Yirong; Balakrishnan, Anoop R; Syed, Aijazuddin; Prasad, Meera; Nafa, Khedoudja; Carlo, Maria I; Cadoo, Karen A; Sheehan, Meg; Fleischut, Megan H; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Trottier, Magan; Lipkin, Steven M; Lincoln, Anne; Mukherjee, Semanti; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Cambria, Roy; Galle, Jesse; Abida, Wassim; Arcila, Marcia E; Benayed, Ryma; Shah, Ronak; Yu, Kenneth; Bajorin, Dean F; Coleman, Jonathan A; Leach, Steven D; Lowery, Maeve A; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Kantoff, Philip W; Sawyers, Charles L; Dickler, Maura N; Saltz, Leonard; Motzer, Robert J; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Scher, Howard I; Baselga, Jose; Klimstra, David S; Solit, David B; Hyman, David M; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth

    2017-09-05

    Guidelines for cancer genetic testing based on family history may miss clinically actionable genetic changes with established implications for cancer screening or prevention. To determine the proportion and potential clinical implications of inherited variants detected using simultaneous sequencing of the tumor and normal tissue ("tumor-normal sequencing") compared with genetic test results based on current guidelines. From January 2014 until May 2016 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 10 336 patients consented to tumor DNA sequencing. Since May 2015, 1040 of these patients with advanced cancer were referred by their oncologists for germline analysis of 76 cancer predisposition genes. Patients with clinically actionable inherited mutations whose genetic test results would not have been predicted by published decision rules were identified. Follow-up for potential clinical implications of mutation detection was through May 2017. Tumor and germline sequencing compared with the predicted yield of targeted germline sequencing based on clinical guidelines. Proportion of clinically actionable germline mutations detected by universal tumor-normal sequencing that would not have been detected by guideline-directed testing. Of 1040 patients, the median age was 58 years (interquartile range, 50.5-66 years), 65.3% were male, and 81.3% had stage IV disease at the time of genomic analysis, with prostate, renal, pancreatic, breast, and colon cancer as the most common diagnoses. Of the 1040 patients, 182 (17.5%; 95% CI, 15.3%-19.9%) had clinically actionable mutations conferring cancer susceptibility, including 149 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations; 101 patients tested (9.7%; 95% CI, 8.1%-11.7%) would not have had these mutations detected using clinical guidelines, including 65 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations. Frequency of inherited mutations was related to case mix, stage, and founder mutations. Germline findings led to discussion or initiation of

  15. Assessment of survey radiography and comparison with x-ray computed tomography for detection of hyperfunctioning adrenocortical tumors in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voorhout, G.; Stolp, R.; Rijnberk, A.; Waes, P.F.G.M. van

    1990-01-01

    Results of abdominal survey radiography and x-ray computed tomography (CT) were compared in 13 dogs with hyperadrenocorticism histologically attributed to adrenocortical tumors. X-ray computed tomography enabled accurate localization of the tumor in all 13 dogs. Apart from 2 poorly demarcated irregular-shaped and mineralized carcinomas, there were no differences between adenoma (n = 3) and carcinoma (n = 10) on CT images. In 1 dog, invasion of the caudal vena cava by the tumor was suggested on CT images and was confirmed during surgery. Suspicion of adhesions between tumors of the right adrenal gland and the caudal vena cava on the basis of CT images was confirmed during surgery in only 2 of 6 dogs. Survey radiography allowed accurate localization of the tumor in 7 dogs (4 on the right side and 3 on the left). In 6 of these dogs, the tumor was visible as a well-demarcated soft tissue mass and, in the other dog, as a poorly demarcated mineralized mass. The smallest tumor visualized on survey radiographs had a diameter of 20 mm on CT images. Six tumors with diameter less than or equal to 20 mm were not visualized on survey radiographs. In 1 of these dogs, a mineralized nodule was found in the left adrenal region, without evidence of a mass. In a considerable number of cases, survey radiography can provide presurgical localization of adrenocortical tumors in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism; CT is redundant in these instances. In the absence of positive radiographic findings, CT is valuable for localization of adrenocortical tumors

  16. Preclinical Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-Minigastrin for the Detection of Cholecystokinin-2/Gastrin Receptor–Positive Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Maarten; Joosten, Lieke; Laverman, Peter; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Béhé, Martin; Gotthardt, Martin; Boerman, Otto C.

    2011-01-01

    In comparison to somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, gastrin receptor scintigraphy using 111In-DTPA-minigastrin (MG0) showed added value in diagnosing neuroendocrine tumors. We investigated whether the 68Ga-labeled gastrin analogue DOTA-MG0 is suited for positron emission tomography (PET), which could improve image quality. Targeting of cholecystokinin-2 (CCK2)/gastrin receptor–positive tumor cells with DOTA-MG0 labeled with either 111In or 68Ga in vitro was investigated using the AR42J rat tumor cell line. Biodistribution was examined in BALB/c nude mice with a subcutaneous AR42J tumor. In vivo PET imaging was performed using a preclinical PET–computed tomographic scanner. DOTA-MG0 showed high receptor affinity in vitro. Biodistribution studies revealed high tumor uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-MG0: 4.4 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 1 hour postinjection. Coadministration of an excess unlabeled peptide blocked the tumor uptake (0.7 ± 0.1 %ID/g), indicating CCK2/gastrin receptor–mediated uptake (p = .0005). The biodistribution of 68Ga-DOTA-MG0 was similar to that of 111In-DOTA-MG0. Subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumors were clearly visualized by small-animal PET imaging with 5 MBq 68Ga-DOTA-MG0. 111In- and 68Ga-labeled DOTA-MG0 specifically accumulate in CCK2/gastrin receptor–positive AR42J tumors with similar biodistribution apart from the kidneys. AR42J tumors were clearly visualized by microPET. Therefore, 68Ga-DOTA-MG0 is a promising tracer for PET imaging of CCK2/gastrin receptor–positive tumors in humans. PMID:21439259

  17. Preclinical Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-Minigastrin for the Detection of Cholecystokinin-2/Gastrin Receptor-Positive Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Brom

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In comparison to somatostatin receptor scintigraphy, gastrin receptor scintigraphy using 111In-DTPA-minigastrin (MG0 showed added value in diagnosing neuroendocrine tumors. We investigated whether the 68Ga-labeled gastrin analogue DOTA-MG0 is suited for positron emission tomography (PET, which could improve image quality. Targeting of cholecystokinin-2 (CCK2/gastrin receptor-positive tumor cells with DOTA-MG0 labeled with either 111In or 68Ga in vitro was investigated using the AR42J rat tumor cell line. Biodistribution was examined in BALB/c nude mice with a subcutaneous AR42J tumor. In vivo PET imaging was performed using a preclinical PET-computed tomographic scanner. DOTA-MG0 showed high receptor affinity in vitro. Biodistribution studies revealed high tumor uptake of 68Ga-DOTA-MG0: 4.4 ± 1.3 %ID/g at 1 hour postinjection. Coadministration of an excess unlabeled peptide blocked the tumor uptake (0.7 ± 0.1 %ID/g, indicating CCK2/gastrin receptor-mediated uptake (p = .0005. The biodistribution of 68Ga-DOTA-MG0 was similar to that of 111In-DOTA-MG0. Subcutaneous and intraperitoneal tumors were clearly visualized by small-animal PET imaging with 5 MBq 68Ga-DOTA-MG0. 111In- and 68Ga-labeled DOTA-MG0 specifically accumulate in CCK2/gastrin receptor-positive AR42J tumors with similar biodistribution apart from the kidneys. AR42J tumors were clearly visualized by microPET. Therefore, 68Ga-DOTA-MG0 is a promising tracer for PET imaging of CCK2/gastrin receptor-positive tumors in humans.

  18. Performance characteristics of a reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay for the detection of tumor-specific fusion transcripts from archival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Michael K; Bridge, Julia A; Schuster, Amy E; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Argani, Pedram

    2003-01-01

    Pediatric small round cell tumors still pose tremendous diagnostic problems. In difficult cases, the ability to detect tumor-specific gene fusion transcripts for several of these neoplasms, including Ewing sarcoma/peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET), synovial sarcoma (SS), alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS), and desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), can be extremely helpful. Few studies to date, however, have systematically examined several different tumor types for the presence of multiple different fusion transcripts in order to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the RT-PCR method, and no study has addressed this issue for formalin-fixed material. The objectives of this study were to address the specificity, sensitivity, and practicality of such an assay applied strictly to formalin-fixed tissue blocks. Our results demonstrate that, for these tumors, the overall sensitivity for detecting each fusion transcript is similar to that reported in the literature for RT-PCR on fresh or formalin-fixed tissues. The specificity of the assay is very high, being essentially 100% for each primer pair when interpreting the results from visual inspection of agarose gels. However, when these same agarose gels were examined using Southern blotting, a small number of tumors also yielded reproducibly detectable weak signals for unexpected fusion products, in addition to a strong signal for the expected fusion product. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies in one such case indicated that a rearrangement that would account for the unexpected fusion was not present, while another case was equivocal. The overall specificity for each primer pair used in this assay ranged from 94 to 100%. Therefore, RT-PCR using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections can be used to detect chimeric transcripts as a reliable, highly sensitive, and highly specific diagnostic assay. However, we

  19. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Microfluidic bead-based multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification for detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood using quantum dots labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, He, E-mail: mzhang_he@126.com; Fu, Xin; Hu, Jiayi; Zhu, Zhenjun

    2013-05-24

    Graphical abstract: A microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dots labels was developed. The chip-based CTCs analysis could detect reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell (e.g. CEA expressing cell) in 1 mL blood sample. This microfluidic beads-based nucleic acid sensor is a promising platform for disease-related nucleic acid molecules at the lowest level at their earliest incidence. -- Highlights: •Combination of microfluidic bead-based platform and enzyme–probe–AuNPs is proposed. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to 5 fM of tumor associated DNA. •Microfluidic platform and multienzyme-labeled AuNPs greatly enhanced sensitivity. •The developed nucleic acid sensor could respond to RT-PCR products of tumor cell as low as 1 tumor cell in 1 mL blood sample. •We report a sensitive nucleic acid sensor for detection of circulating tumor cells. -- Abstract: This study reports the development of a microfluidic bead-based nucleic acid sensor for sensitive detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples using multienzyme-nanoparticle amplification and quantum dot labels. In this method, the microbeads functionalized with the capture probes and modified electron rich proteins were arrayed within a microfluidic channel as sensing elements, and the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with the horseradish peroxidases (HRP) and DNA probes were used as labels. Hence, two signal amplification approaches are integrated for enhancing the detection sensitivity of circulating tumor cells. First, the large surface area of Au nanoparticle carrier allows several binding events of HRP on each nanosphere. Second, enhanced mass transport capability inherent from microfluidics leads to higher capture efficiency of targets because continuous flow within micro

  1. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jenna L; Harmany, Zachary T; Mito, Jeffrey K; Kennedy, Stephanie A; Kim, Yongbaek; Dodd, Leslie; Geradts, Joseph; Kirsch, David G; Willett, Rebecca M; Brown, J Quincy; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2013-01-01

    To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features. TISSUE EXCISED FROM A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MOUSE MODEL OF SARCOMA WAS IMAGED USING A SUBCELLULAR RESOLUTION MICROENDOSCOPE AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF A FLUORESCENT ANATOMICAL CONTRAST AGENT: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA) and the circle transform (CT) was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma. Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity). For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach. The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue.

  2. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing Lei

    2013-01-01

    accuracy during treatment. Results: The algorithm was able to accurately localize the fiducial position on MV images with success rates of more than 90% per case. The percentage of images in which each fiducial was localized in the studied cases varied between 23% and 65%, with at least one fiducial having been localized between 40% and 95% of the images. This depended mainly on the modulation of the plan and fiducial blockage. The prostate movement in the presented cases varied between 0.8 and 3.5 mm (mean values). The maximum displacement detected among all patients was of 5.7 mm. Conclusions: An algorithm for automatic detection of fiducial markers in cine MV images has been developed and tested with five clinical cases. Despite the challenges posed by complex beam aperture shapes, fiducial localization close to the field edge, partial occlusion of fiducials, fast leaf and gantry movement, and inherently low MV image quality, good localization results were achieved in patient images. This work provides a technique for enabling real-time accurate fiducial detection and tumor tracking during VMAT treatments without the use of extra imaging dose.

  3. Detection of circulating tumor cells with CK20 RT-PCR is an independent negative prognostic marker in colon cancer patients - a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Sebastian; Hendricks, Alexander; Wittig, Amke; Schafmayer, Clemens; Tepel, Jürgen; Kalthoff, Holger; Becker, Thomas; Röder, Christian

    2017-01-13

    Detection of circulating (CTC) or disseminated tumor cells (DTC) has been associated with negative prognosis and outcome in patients with colorectal cancer, though testing for these cells is not yet part of clinical routine. There are several different methodological approaches to detect tumor cells but standardized detection assays are not implemented so far. In this prospective monocentric study 299 patients with colon cancer were included. CTC and DTC were detected using CK20 RT-PCR as well as immunocytochemistry staining with anti-pan-keratin and anti-EpCAM antibodies. The primary endpoints were: Evaluation of CTC and DTC at the time of surgery and correlation with main tumor characteristics and overall (OS) and disease free survival (DFS). Patients with detectable CTC had a 5-year OS rate of 68% compared to a 5-year OS rate of 85% in patients without detectable CTC in the blood (p = 0.002). Detection of DTC in the bone marrow with CK20 RT-PCR was not associated with a worse OS or DFS. Detection of pan-cytokeratin positive DTC in the bone marrow correlated with a significantly reduced 5-year OS rate (p = 0.048), but detection of DTC in the bone marrow with the anti-EpCAM antibody did not significantly influence the 5-year OS rate (p = 0.958). By multivariate analyses only detection of CTC with CK20 RT-PCR in the blood was revealed to be an independent predictor of worse OS (HR1.94; 95% CI 1.0-3.7; p = 0.04) and DFS (HR 1.94; 95% CI 1.1-3.7; p = 0.044). Detection of CTC with CK20 RT-PCR is a highly specific and independent prognostic marker in colon cancer patients. Detection of DTC in the bone marrow with CK20 RT-PCR or immunohistochemistry with anti-EpCAM antibody is not associated with a negative prognostic influence.

  4. Real-time viability and apoptosis kinetic detection method of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids using the Celigo Image Cytometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Sarah; Cribbes, Scott; Bonasu, Surekha; Rice, William; Qiu, Jean; Chan, Leo Li-Ying

    2017-09-01

    The development of three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroid models for cancer drug discovery research has increased in the recent years. The use of 3D tumor spheroid models may be more representative of the complex in vivo tumor microenvironments in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) assays. Currently, viability of 3D multicellular tumor spheroids has been commonly measured on standard plate-readers using metabolic reagents such as CellTiter-Glo® for end point analysis. Alternatively, high content image cytometers have been used to measure drug effects on spheroid size and viability. Previously, we have demonstrated a novel end point drug screening method for 3D multicellular tumor spheroids using the Celigo Image Cytometer. To better characterize the cancer drug effects, it is important to also measure the kinetic cytotoxic and apoptotic effects on 3D multicellular tumor spheroids. In this work, we demonstrate the use of PI and caspase 3/7 stains to measure viability and apoptosis for 3D multicellular tumor spheroids in real-time. The method was first validated by staining different types of tumor spheroids with PI and caspase 3/7 and monitoring the fluorescent intensities for 16 and 21 days. Next, PI-stained and nonstained control tumor spheroids were digested into single cell suspension to directly measure viability in a 2D assay to determine the potential toxicity of PI. Finally, extensive data analysis was performed on correlating the time-dependent PI and caspase 3/7 fluorescent intensities to the spheroid size and necrotic core formation to determine an optimal starting time point for cancer drug testing. The ability to measure real-time viability and apoptosis is highly important for developing a proper 3D model for screening tumor spheroids, which can allow researchers to determine time-dependent drug effects that usually are not captured by end point assays. This would improve the current tumor spheroid analysis method to potentially better

  5. PASSIVE CAVITATION DETECTION DURING PULSED HIFU EXPOSURES OF EX VIVO TISSUES AND IN VIVO MOUSE PANCREATIC TUMORS

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tong; Chen, Hong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Wang, Yak-Nam; Kreider, Wayne; He, Xuemei; Hwang, Joo Ha

    2014-01-01

    Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) has been demonstrated to enhance vascular permeability, disrupt tumor barriers and enhance drug penetration into tumor tissue through acoustic cavitation. Monitoring of cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments and knowing the ultrasound pressure levels sufficient to reliably induce cavitation in a given tissue are therefore very important. Here, three metrics of cavitation activity induced by pHIFU and evaluated by confocal passive cavitatio...

  6. Ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of tumor cells based on multiple layer CdS quantum dots-functionalized polystyrene microspheres and graphene oxide - polyaniline composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jidong; Wang, Xiaoyu; Tang, Hengshan; Gao, Zehua; He, Shengquan; Li, Jian; Han, Shumin

    2018-02-15

    In this work, a novel ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor was developed for the detection of K562 cell by a signal amplification strategy based on multiple layer CdS QDs functionalized polystyrene microspheres(PS) as bioprobe and graphene oxide(GO) -polyaniline(PANI) composite as modified materials of capture electrode. Due to electrostatic force of different charge, CdS QDs were decorated on the surface of PS by PDDA (poly(diallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride)) through a layer-by-layer(LBL) assemble technology, in which the structure of multiple layer CdS QDs increased the detection signal intensity. Moreover, GO-PANI composite not only enhanced the electron transfer rate, but also increased tumor cells load ratio. The resulting electrochemical biosensor was used to detect K562 cells with a lower detection limit of 3 cellsmL -1 (S/N = 3) and a wider linear range from 10 to 1.0 × 10 7 cellsmL -1 . This sensor was also used for mannosyl groups on HeLa cells and Hct116 cells, which showed high specificity and sensitivity. This signal amplification strategy would provide a novel approach for detection, diagnosis and treatment for tumor cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessment of a six gene panel for the molecular detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood of female cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obermayr, Eva; Heinze, Georg; Tong, Dan; Zeillinger, Robert; Sanchez-Cabo, Fatima; Tea, Muy-Kheng M; Singer, Christian F; Krainer, Michael; Fischer, Michael B; Sehouli, Jalid; Reinthaller, Alexander; Horvat, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the peripheral blood of cancer patients has been described for various solid tumors and their clinical relevance has been shown. CTC detection based on the analysis of epithelial antigens might be hampered by the genetic heterogeneity of the primary tumor and loss of epithelial antigens. Therefore, we aimed to identify new gene markers for the PCR-based detection of CTC in female cancer patients. Gene expression of 38 cancer cell lines (breast, ovarian, cervical and endometrial) and of 10 peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from healthy female donors was measured using microarray technology (Applied Biosystems). Differentially expressed genes were identified using the maxT test and the 50% one-sided trimmed maxT-test. Confirmatory RT-qPCR was performed for 380 gene targets using the AB TaqMan ® Low Density Arrays. Then, 93 gene targets were analyzed using the same RT-qPCR platform in tumor tissues of 126 patients with primary breast, ovarian or endometrial cancer. Finally, blood samples from 26 healthy women and from 125 patients (primary breast, ovarian, cervical, or endometrial cancer, and advanced breast cancer) were analyzed following OncoQuick enrichment and RNA pre-amplification. Likewise, hMAM and EpCAM gene expression was analyzed in the blood of breast and ovarian cancer patients. For each gene, a cut-off threshold value was set at three standard deviations from the mean expression level of the healthy controls to identify potential markers for CTC detection. Six genes were over-expressed in blood samples from 81% of patients with advanced and 29% of patients with primary breast cancer. EpCAM gene expression was detected in 19% and 5% of patients, respectively, whereas hMAM gene expression was observed in the advanced group (39%) only. Multimarker analysis using the new six gene panel positively identified 44% of the cervical, 64% of the endometrial and 19% of the ovarian cancer patients. The

  8. Quantitative Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Heterogeneous Tissue: Application to the Detection of Residual Disease in Tumor Margins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna L Mueller

    Full Text Available To develop a robust tool for quantitative in situ pathology that allows visualization of heterogeneous tissue morphology and segmentation and quantification of image features.TISSUE EXCISED FROM A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED MOUSE MODEL OF SARCOMA WAS IMAGED USING A SUBCELLULAR RESOLUTION MICROENDOSCOPE AFTER TOPICAL APPLICATION OF A FLUORESCENT ANATOMICAL CONTRAST AGENT: acriflavine. An algorithm based on sparse component analysis (SCA and the circle transform (CT was developed for image segmentation and quantification of distinct tissue types. The accuracy of our approach was quantified through simulations of tumor and muscle images. Specifically, tumor, muscle, and tumor+muscle tissue images were simulated because these tissue types were most commonly observed in sarcoma margins. Simulations were based on tissue characteristics observed in pathology slides. The potential clinical utility of our approach was evaluated by imaging excised margins and the tumor bed in a cohort of mice after surgical resection of sarcoma.Simulation experiments revealed that SCA+CT achieved the lowest errors for larger nuclear sizes and for higher contrast ratios (nuclei intensity/background intensity. For imaging of tumor margins, SCA+CT effectively isolated nuclei from tumor, muscle, adipose, and tumor+muscle tissue types. Differences in density were correctly identified with SCA+CT in a cohort of ex vivo and in vivo images, thus illustrating the diagnostic potential of our approach.The combination of a subcellular-resolution microendoscope, acriflavine staining, and SCA+CT can be used to accurately isolate nuclei and quantify their density in anatomical images of heterogeneous tissue.

  9. Profiling of tryptophan-related plasma indoles in patients with carcinoid tumors by automated, on-line, solid-phase extraction and HPLC with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kema, I P; Meijer, W G; Meiborg, G; Ooms, B; Willemse, P H; de Vries, E G

    2001-10-01

    Profiling of the plasma indoles tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) is useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with carcinoid tumors. We describe an automated method for the profiling of these indoles in protein-containing matrices as well as the plasma indole concentrations in healthy controls and patients with carcinoid tumors. Plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, and tissue homogenates were prepurified by automated on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) in Hysphere Resin SH SPE cartridges containing strong hydrophobic polystyrene resin. Analytes were eluted from the SPE cartridge by column switching. Subsequent separation and detection were performed by reversed-phase HPLC combined with fluorometric detection in a total cycle time of 20 min. We obtained samples from 14 healthy controls and 17 patients with metastasized midgut carcinoid tumors for plasma indole analysis. In the patient group, urinary excretion of 5-HIAA and serotonin was compared with concentrations of plasma indoles. Within- and between-series CVs for indoles in platelet-rich plasma were 0.6-6.2% and 3.7-12%, respectively. Results for platelet-rich plasma serotonin compared favorably with those obtained by single-component analysis. Plasma 5-HIAA, but not 5-HTP was detectable in 8 of 17 patients with carcinoid tumors. In the patient group, platelet-rich plasma total tryptophan correlated negatively with platelet-rich plasma serotonin (P = 0.021; r = -0.56), urinary 5-HIAA (P = 0.003; r = -0.68), and urinary serotonin (P manual, single-component analyses.

  10. Comparison of neuroendocrine tumor detection and characterization using DOTATOC-PET in correlation with contrast enhanced CT and delayed contrast enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giesel, F.L.; Kratochwil, C.; Mehndiratta, A.; Wulfert, S.; Moltz, J.H.; Zechmann, C.M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Haberkorn, U.; Ley, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the rate of successful characterization of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) present with an increased somatostatin receptor, comparing CE-CT with CE-MRI, each in correlation with DOTATOC-PET. Methods and materials: 8 patients with GEP-NET were imaged using CE-MRI (Gd-EOB-DTPA), CE-CT (Imeron 400) and DOTATOC-PET. Contrast-enhancement of normal liver-tissue and metastasis was quantified with ROI-technique. Tumor delineation was assessed with visual-score in blind-read-analysis by two experienced radiologists. Results: Out of 40 liver metastases in patients with NETs, all were detected by CE-MRI and the lesion extent could be adequately assessed, whereas CT failed to detect 20% of all metastases. The blind-read-score of CT in arterial and portal phase was median −0.65 and −1.4, respectively, and 2.7 for delayed-MRI. The quantitative ROI-analysis presented an improved contrast-enhancement-ratio with a median of 1.2, 1.6 and 3.3 for CE-CT arterial, portal-phase and delayed-MRI respectively. Conclusion: Late CE-MRI was superior to CE-CT in providing additionally morphologic characterization and exact lesion extension of hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumor detected with DOTATOC-PET. Therefore, late enhanced Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI seems to be the adequate imaging modality for combination with DOTATOC-PET to provide complementary (macroscopic and molecular) tumor characterization in hepatic metastasized NETs

  11. Gd-labeled glycol chitosan as a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging agent for detecting acidic tumor microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwe, Kido; Huang, Ching-Hui; Tsourkas, Andrew

    2013-10-24

    Neoplastic lesions can create a hostile tumor microenvironment with low extracellular pH. It is commonly believed that these conditions can contribute to tumor progression as well as resistance to therapy. We report the development and characterization of a pH-responsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for imaging the acidic tumor microenvironment. The preparation included the conjugation of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid 1-(2,5-dioxo-1-pyrrolidinyl) ester (DOTA-NHS) to the surface of a water-soluble glycol chitosan (GC) polymer, which contains pH-titrable primary amines, followed by gadolinium complexation (GC-NH2-GdDOTA). GC-NH2-GdDOTA had a chelate-to-polymer ratio of approximately1:24 and a molar relaxivity of 9.1 mM(-1) s(-1). GC-NH2-GdDOTA demonstrated pH-dependent cellular association in vitro compared to the control. It also generated a 2.4-fold enhancement in signal in tumor-bearing mice 2 h postinjection. These findings suggest that glycol chitosan coupled with contrast agents can provide important diagnostic information about the tumor microenvironment.

  12. Experimental research of 99Tcm-MIBI SPECT in detecting multidrug resistance status on tumor nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xudong; Ji Cheng; Wang Xiaoyue; Xu Jiaying; Fan Saijun; Yang Guoren

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To analyze 99 Tc m -MIBI images separately before and after VPL in nude mice bearing human lung tumors in order to find a feasible way in evaluating MDR status of tumor with 99 Tc m -MIBI image. Methods: Analysis of 99 Tc m -MIBI images was performed at 15 min, 60 min and 120 min after injecting 99 Tc m -MIBI 7.4 MBq in female BALB/c nude mice bearing human lung tumors. The tumor uptake rate (TUR) and retention rate (RI) were calculated and the data were analyzed. P-gp albumen ex-pression was determined by flow cytometry. Results: Significance difference in TUR was observed for at the 15th, 60th or 120th min between the imaging in the control group versus in the second imaging in VPL reverse group as well as between the first imaging and the second imaging in the reverse group. Furthermore, there was negative correlation between retention rate (RI) and P-gp albumen expression. Conclusion: These results for the first time demonstrate that the results of 99 Tc m -MIBI imaging exhibits a negative correlation to P-gp albumen expression, indicating that analysis of 99 Tc m -MIBI imaging may be a potential indicator for MDR status of tumor and can be used to monitoring the role of VPL in reverting the multidrug resistance. (authors)

  13. Development of a Microfluidic-Based Optical Sensing Device for Label-Free Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs Through Their Lactic Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Keng Chiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study reports a microfluidic-based optical sensing device for label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, a rare cell species in blood circulation. Based on the metabolic features of cancer cells, live CTCs can be quantified indirectly through their lactic acid production. Compared with the conventional schemes for CTC detection, this label-free approach could prevent the biological bias due to the heterogeneity of the surface antigens on cancer cells. In this study, a microfluidic device was proposed to generate uniform water-in-oil cell-encapsulating micro-droplets, followed by the fluorescence-based optical detection of lactic acid produced within the micro-droplets. To test its feasibility to quantify cancer cells, experiments were carried out. Results showed that the detection signals were proportional to the number of cancer cells within the micro-droplets, whereas such signals were insensitive to the existence and number of leukocytes within. To further demonstrate its feasibility for cancer cell detection, the cancer cells with known cell number in a cell suspension was detected based on the method. Results revealed that there was no significant difference between the detected number and the real number of cancer cells. As a whole, the proposed method opens up a new route to detect live CTCs in a label-free manner.

  14. Migration of iron-labeled KHYG-1 natural killer cells to subcutaneous tumors in nude mice, as detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Christiane L; McFadden, Catherine; Chen, Yuhua; Foster, Paula J

    2012-07-01

    A novel cell line of cytotoxic natural killer (NK) cells, KHYG-1, was examined in vivo for immunotherapy against prostate cancer. The feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tracking to monitor the fate of injected NK cells following intravenous (i.v.), intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) administration was assessed. PC-3M human prostate cancer cells were injected s.c. into the flank of nude mice (day 0). KHYG-1 NK cells were labeled with an iron oxide contrast agent and injected s.c., i.v. or i.p. on day 8. Mice were imaged by MRI on days 7, 9 and 12. Tumor sections were examined with fluorescence microscopy and immunohistologic staining for NK cells. NK cells were detected in the tumors by histology after all three administration routes. NK cells and fluorescence from the iron label were co-localized. Signal loss was seen in the areas around the tumors and between the tumor lobes in the s.c. group. We are the first to label this cell line of NK cells with an iron oxide contrast agent. Accumulation of NK cells was visualized by MRI after s.c. injection but not after i.v. and i.p. injection.

  15. Polyomavirus-Negative Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A More Aggressive Subtype Based on Analysis of 282 Cases Using Multimodal Tumor Virus Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ata S; Doumani, Ryan; Yelistratova, Lola; Blom, Astrid; Lachance, Kristina; Shinohara, Michi M; Delaney, Martha; Chang, Oliver; McArdle, Susan; Thomas, Hannah; Asgari, Maryam M; Huang, Meei-Li; Schwartz, Stephen M; Nghiem, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the proportion of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) that contain the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) and the clinical significance of tumor viral status. To address these controversies, we detected MCPyV large T antigen using immunohistochemistry with two distinct antibodies and MCPyV DNA using quantitative PCR. Tumors were called MCPyV-positive if two or more of these three assays indicated presence of this virus. A total of 53 of 282 (19%) MCC tumors in this cohort were virus-negative using this multimodal system. Immunohistochemistry with the CM2B4 antibody had the best overall performance (sensitivity = 0.882, specificity = 0.943) compared with the multimodal classification. Multivariate analysis including age, sex, and immunosuppression showed that, relative to MCC patients with virus-positive tumors, virus-negative MCC patients had significantly increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio = 1.77, 95% confidence interval = 1.20-2.62) and death from MCC (hazard ratio = 1.85, 95% confidence interval = 1.19-2.89). We confirm that approximately 20% of MCCs are not driven by MCPyV and that such virus-negative MCCs, which can be quite reliably identified by immunohistochemistry using the CM2B4 antibody alone, represent a more aggressive subtype that warrants closer clinical follow-up. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  17. Giant tumor thrombus in the right atrium clearly detected by /sup 111/In-oxine labeled platelet scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T; Ishikawa, N; Satoh, A; Masuda, Y; Hiramatsu, Y; Akisada, M; Sakakibara, Y

    1985-07-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to hospital with a 3-month history of progressive dyspnea with coughing. A giant right atrial mass, originating from a hepatocellular carcinoma, was visualized by computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography. The volume if the right atrial mass was increasing rapidly. It was therefore essential to determine whether this giant mass was a tumor thrombus or a multiplication of the hepatocellular carcinoma. /sup 111/In-oxine labeled platelet scintigraphy revealed active accumulation in the right atrium caused by the presence of active platelet deposition, and slight accumulation in the lung fields probably due to embolic showers originating from the tumor thrombus in the right atrium. This is the first case report showing that /sup 111/In-oxine labeled platelet scintigraphy can aid in confirming the nature of a giant tumor thrombus in the right atrium and can clarify the pathogenesis of the respiratory symptoms.

  18. Detection of tumor-like inclusions embedded within human liver tissue using a short-pulsed near-infrared laser beam: Parallel simulations with radiative transfer equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Addoum, Ahmad; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    An efficient solution to detect tumor-like inclusions embedded within a human liver tissue model is presented, using illumination by a short-pulsed laser beam. Light propagation was accurately solved using the time-dependent radiative transfer equation, with multithreaded parallel computing. A modified finite volume method based on unstructured grids and the fourth-order Runge–Kutta approach was employed to solve the equation in the (2-D/3-D) spatial and time domains. The normalization technique applied to the Henyey–Greenstein phase function was adopted to ensure numerical stability for values of the anisotropy factor that were close to unity. The presence of one or two circular/spherical inclusions was analyzed from the time and spatially resolved reflectance on the medium bounding surface. The results allowed a minimal size and a maximum distance for the detection of the inclusion to be highlighted. - Highlights: • We detect tumor-like inclusions embedded within a (2D/3D) human liver tissue model. • The technique is based on a short-pulsed near-infrared laser beam. • We solve the (2D/3D) time-dependent RTE, with multithreaded parallel computing. • The presence of one or two circular/spherical inclusions is analyzed. • The results allows a minimal size and a maximum distance for the detection

  19. Utility of bolus dynamic CT for the detection of hypervascular malignant hepatic tumors. Mainly referring to the comparison with delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Hiromichi; Abe, Kimihiko; Freeny, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    In order to analyze the usefulness of dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, 84 patients who had hepatocellular carcinoma or suspected hypervascular metastases were studied with conventional incremental dynamic CT (CID-CT) or double helical CT (DH-CT). Delayed phase contrast-enhanced CT studies were consecutively performed in all patients. Thirty-six of 84 patients had malignant hepatic neoplasms; six had hepatocellular carcinoma and 30 had metastatic tumors. At first, the detectability of hepatic lesions was evaluated with bolus dynamic CT and delayed phase CT. Dynamic CT has detected more lesions than delayed CT. Some hepatic lesions described as isodensity were missed on CID-CT. Therefore, delayed phase CT cannot be eliminated when CID-CT is performed. Secondly, hepatic lesion detectability with CID-CT was compared with that of DH-CT. DH-CT did not miss the hepatic lesions picked up by delayed phase CT and was expected to provide excellent detectability of hypervascular hepatic neoplasms. In addition, first helical CT showed most hepatic lesions as areas of obvious hyperdensity, while CID-CT did not show their correct vascularities. So-called hypervascular hepatic tumors, however, were not always hypervascular and were demonstrated as areas of iso-hypodensity even on initial helical scanning. Second helical CT was useful to detect these so-called hypervascular, but actually hypovascular lesions. In conclusion, dynamic CT was helpful in detecting hypervascular hepatic malignant neoplasms, and DH-CT was more accurate than-CID-CT for the detection of hepatic lesions and the evaluation of vascular lesion. (author)

  20. Leukemia and colon tumor detection based on microarray data classification using momentum backpropagation and genetic algorithm as a feature selection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisesty, Untari N.; Warastri, Riris S.; Puspitasari, Shinta Y.

    2018-03-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of mordibility and mortality problems in the worldwide. Therefore, the need of a system that can analyze and identify a person suffering from a cancer by using microarray data derived from the patient’s Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA). But on microarray data has thousands of attributes, thus making the challenges in data processing. This is often referred to as the curse of dimensionality. Therefore, in this study built a system capable of detecting a patient whether contracted cancer or not. The algorithm used is Genetic Algorithm as feature selection and Momentum Backpropagation Neural Network as a classification method, with data used from the Kent Ridge Bio-medical Dataset. Based on system testing that has been done, the system can detect Leukemia and Colon Tumor with best accuracy equal to 98.33% for colon tumor data and 100% for leukimia data. Genetic Algorithm as feature selection algorithm can improve system accuracy, which is from 64.52% to 98.33% for colon tumor data and 65.28% to 100% for leukemia data, and the use of momentum parameters can accelerate the convergence of the system in the training process of Neural Network.

  1. Clinical value of combined detection of serum tumor markers and whole body bone scan for diagnosis of bone metastases from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Chao; Zhao Jing; Liu Desheng; Zhang Jingchuan; Ji Xuejing; Hou Xiancun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical value of serum tumor marker determination and whole body bone scan for diagnosis of bone metastases from breast cancer. Methods: Serum tumor markers (CA15-3, CEA, TSGF)were detected with GLIA and whole body bone scan were investigated by SPECT in 124 breast cancer patients. Results: In 124 patients, 38 patients were diagnosed as positive for bone metastases with whole body bone scan. The positive predicting values of CA15-3, CEA, TSGF were 76.78%, 80% and 82.14%, and the negative predicting values of CA15-3, GEA, TSGF were 82.41%, 86.74% and 84.29% respectively. The levels of CA15-3, CEA, TSGF in patients with bone metastases were significantly higher than those in patients without metastasis and the controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: Determination of levels of serum tumor markers CA15-3, CEA, TSGF is helpful for diagnosis of bone metastases from breast cancer. Combined detection of GA15-3, CEA, TSGF could increase the sensitivity and accuracy of diagnosing bone metastases. (authors)

  2. Efficient detection of human circulating tumor cells without significant production of false-positive cells by a novel conditionally replicating adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuminori Sakurai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are promising biomarkers in several cancers, and thus methods and apparatuses for their detection and quantification in the blood have been actively pursued. A novel CTC detection system using a green fluorescence protein (GFP–expressing conditionally replicating adenovirus (Ad (rAd-GFP was recently developed; however, there is concern about the production of false-positive cells (GFP-positive normal blood cells when using rAd-GFP, particularly at high titers. In addition, CTCs lacking or expressing low levels of coxsackievirus–adenovirus receptor (CAR cannot be detected by rAd-GFP, because rAd-GFP is constructed based on Ad serotype 5, which recognizes CAR. In order to suppress the production of false-positive cells, sequences perfectly complementary to blood cell–specific microRNA, miR-142-3p, were incorporated into the 3′-untranslated region of the E1B and GFP genes. In addition, the fiber protein was replaced with that of Ad serotype 35, which recognizes human CD46, creating rAdF35-142T-GFP. rAdF35-142T-GFP efficiently labeled not only CAR-positive tumor cells but also CAR-negative tumor cells with GFP. The numbers of false-positive cells were dramatically lower for rAdF35-142T-GFP than for rAd-GFP. CTCs in the blood of cancer patients were detected by rAdF35-142T-GFP with a large reduction in false-positive cells.

  3. Noncontact measurement of elasticity for the detection of soft-tissue tumors using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography combined with a focused air-puff system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shang; Li, Jiasong; Manapuram, Ravi Kiran; Menodiado, Floredes M; Ingram, Davis R; Twa, Michael D; Lazar, Alexander J; Lev, Dina C; Pollock, Raphael E; Larin, Kirill V

    2012-12-15

    We report on an optical noncontact method for the detection of soft-tissue tumors based on the measurement of their elasticity. A focused air-puff system is used to excite surface waves (SWs) on soft tissues with transient static pressure. A high-speed phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography system is used to measure the SWs as they propagate from the point of excitation. To evaluate the stiffness of soft tissues, the Young's modulus is quantified based on the group velocity of SWs. Pilot experiments were performed on ex vivo human myxoma and normal fat. Results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method to measure elasticity and differentiate soft-tissue tumors from normal tissues.

  4. Correlation of in vivo tumor response and singlet oxygen luminescence detection in mTHPC-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excited-state singlet oxygen (1O2, generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT, is believed to be the primary cytotoxic agent with a number of clinically approved photosensitizers. Its relative concentration in cells or tissues can be measured directly through its near-infrared (NIR luminescence emission, which has correlated well with in vitro cell and in vivo normal skin treatment responses. Here, its correlation with the response of tumor tissue in vivo is examined, using the photosensitizer meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC in an animal model comprising luciferase- and green fluorescent protein (GFP-transduced gliosarcoma grown in a dorsal window chamber. The change in the bioluminescence signal, imaged pretreatment and at 2, 5 and 9 d post treatment, was used as a quantitative measure of the tumor response, which was classified in individual tumors as "non", "moderate" and "strong" in order to reduce the variance in the data. Plotting the bioluminescence-based response vs the 1O2 counts demonstrated clear correlation, indicating that 1O2 luminescence provides a valid dosimetric technique for PDT in tumor tissue.

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor subtypes sst1 and sst2A in human somatostatin receptor positive tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Hofland (Leo); Q. Liu; P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter); J. Zuijderwijk; F. van der Ham (Frieda); R.R. de Krijger (Ronald); A. Schonbrunn; S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractAlthough in situ hybridization has been used to examine the distribution of messenger RNA for somatostatin receptor subtypes (sst) in human tumors, the cellular localization of sst1 and sst2A receptors has not been reported. In this study, we describe the

  6. Molecular detection, quantification, and isolation of Streptococcus gallolyticus bacteria colonizing colorectal tumors: inflammation-driven potential of carcinogenesis via IL-1, COX-2, and IL-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulamir Ahmed S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC has long been associated with bacteremia and/or endocarditis by Streptococcus gallolyticus member bacteria (SGMB but the direct colonization of SGMB along with its molecular carcinogenic role, if any, has not been investigated. We assessed the colonization of SGMB in CRC patients with history of bacteremia (CRC-w/bac and without history of bacteremia (CRC-wo/bac by isolating SGMB from feces, mucosal surfaces of colorectum, and colorectal tissues and detecting SGMB DNA, via PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH assays targeting SodA gene in colorectal tissues. Moreover, mRNA of IL1, IL-8, COX-2, IFN-γ, c-Myc, and Bcl-2 in colorectal tissues of studied groups was assessed via ISH and RT-PCR. Results SGMB were found to be remarkably isolated in tumorous (TU and non-tumorous (NTU tissues of CRC-w/bac, 20.5% and 17.3%, and CRC-wo/bac, 12.8% and 11.5%, respectively while only 2% of control tissues revealed SGMB (P 10 CN/g respectively, showed higher colonization in TU than in NTU and in CRC-w/bac than in CRC-wo/bac (P Conclusions The current study indicated that colorectal cancer is remarkably associated with SGMB; moreover, molecular detection of SGMB in CRC was superior to link SGMB with CRC tumors highlighting a possible direct and active role of SGMB in CRC development through most probably inflammation-based sequel of tumor development or propagation via, but not limited to, IL-1, COX-2, and IL-8.

  7. Testis tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.L.; Maier, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical trials are evaluating new combinations of drugs with the goal of diminishing the toxicity associated with the current regimens while not compromising the chance for cure. The evolution of information and staging studies such as tumor markers, CT scanning and MR scanning has made possible the detection of residual metastatic disease while obviating the need for surgical staging procedures. This has made less treatment possible for a large number of patients. The regularity of follow-up studies has made early detection of recurrences a possibility, so that effective and curative treatment is generally possible

  8. Significance and management of computed tomography detected pulmonary nodules: a report from the National Wilms Tumor Study Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisel, Jay A.; Guthrie, Katherine A.; Breslow, Norman E.; Donaldson, Sarah S.; Green, Daniel M.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To define the optimal treatment for children with Wilms tumor who have pulmonary nodules identified on chest computed tomography (CT) scan, but have a negative chest radiograph, we evaluated the outcome of all such patients randomized or followed on National Wilms Tumor Study (NWTS)-3 and -4. Patients and Methods: We estimated the event-free and overall survival percentages of 53 patients with favorable histology tumors and pulmonary densities identified only by CT scan (CT-only) who were treated as Stage IV with intensive doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy and whole-lung irradiation, and compared these to the event-free and overall survival percentages of 37 CT-only patients who were treated less aggressively based on the extent of locoregional disease with 2 or 3 drugs, and without whole-lung irradiation. Results: The 4-year event-free and overall survival percentages of the 53 patients with CT-only nodules and favorable histology Wilms tumor who were treated as Stage IV were 89% and 91%, respectively. The 4-year event-free and overall survival percentages for the 37 patients with CT-only nodules and favorable histology who were treated according to the extent of locoregional disease were 80% and 85%, respectively. The differences observed between the 2 groups were not statistically significant. Among the patients who received whole-lung irradiation, there were fewer pulmonary relapses, but more deaths attributable to lung toxicity. Conclusions: The current data raise the possibility that children with Wilms tumor and CT-only pulmonary nodules who receive whole lung irradiation have fewer pulmonary relapses, but a greater number of deaths due to treatment toxicity. The role of whole lung irradiation in the treatment of this group of patients cannot be definitively determined based on the present data. Prolonged follow-up of this group of patients is necessary to accurately estimate the frequency of late, treatment-related mortality

  9. Nondestructive Analysis of Tumor-Associated Membrane Protein Integrating Imaging and Amplified Detection in situ Based on Dual-Labeled DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jing; Chen, Tianshu; Gao, Tao; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Genxi

    2018-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the expression level and location of tumor-associated membrane proteins (TMPs) is of vital importance for the profiling of tumor cells. Currently, two kinds of independent techniques, i.e. ex situ detection and in situ imaging, are usually required for the quantification and localization of TMPs respectively, resulting in some inevitable problems. Methods: Herein, based on a well-designed and fluorophore-labeled DNAzyme, we develop an integrated and facile method, in which imaging and quantification of TMPs in situ are achieved simultaneously in a single system. The labeled DNAzyme not only produces localized fluorescence for the visualization of TMPs but also catalyzes the cleavage of a substrate to produce quantitative fluorescent signals that can be collected from solution for the sensitive detection of TMPs. Results: Results from the DNAzyme-based in situ imaging and quantification of TMPs match well with traditional immunofluorescence and western blotting. In addition to the advantage of two-in-one, the DNAzyme-based method is highly sensitivity, allowing the detection of TMPs in only 100 cells. Moreover, the method is nondestructive. Cells after analysis could retain their physiological activity and could be cultured for other applications. Conclusion: The integrated system provides solid results for both imaging and quantification of TMPs, making it a competitive method over some traditional techniques for the analysis of TMPs, which offers potential application as a toolbox in the future.

  10. Prospective Study of 68Ga-DOTATATE Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography for Detecting Gastro-Entero-Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors and Unknown Primary Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Samira M; Neychev, Vladimir; Millo, Corina; Shih, Joanna; Nilubol, Naris; Herscovitch, Peter; Pacak, Karel; Marx, Stephen J; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-02-20

    Gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEPNETs) are increasing in incidence, and accurate staging is important for selecting the appropriate treatment. (68)Ga-DOTATATE imaging is a promising approach for detecting GEPNETs and could help in selecting optimal therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to prospectively determine the clinical utility of (68)Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in detecting unknown primary and metastatic GEPNETs. One hundred thirty-one patients were enrolled in a prospective study of patients undergoing (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, (111)In-pentetreotide single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT and multiphasic CT scan, and/or magnetic resonance imaging in a blinded fashion with comprehensive biochemical testing. The primary outcome measure was the detection of lesions by each imaging study. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT imaging detected 95.1% of lesions (95% CI, 92.4% to 96.8%) with an average maximum standardized uptake value of 65.4 ± 47 (range, 6.9 to 244), anatomic imaging detected 45.3% of lesions (95% CI, 37.9% to 52.9%), and (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT detected 30.9% of lesions (95% CI, 25.0% to 37.5%), with a significant difference between imaging modalities (P < .001). In four of 14 patients (28.6%), (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT found a previously unknown primary tumor, and detected primary GEPNET, lymph node, and distant metastases correctly in 72 of 113 lesions (63.7%) when compared with histopathology, with 22.1% and 38.9% detected by using (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT and anatomic imaging, respectively. On the basis of findings with (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT, 43 of 131 patients (32.8%) had a change in management recommendation. In patients with carcinoid symptoms but negative biochemical testing, (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT detected lesions in 65.2% of patients, 40% of which were detected neither by anatomic imaging nor by (111)In-pentetreotide SPECT/CT. (68)Ga-DOTATATE PET

  11. The Value of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Combination With Conventional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Improving Tumor Detection for Early Cervical Carcinoma Treated With Fertility-Sparing Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiulei; Wang, Ling; Li, Yong; Song, Peiji

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in combination with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for improving tumor detection in young patients treated with fertility-sparing surgery because of early cervical carcinoma. Fifty-four patients with stage Ia or Ib1 cervical carcinoma were enrolled into this study. Magnetic resonance examinations were performed for these patients using conventional MRI (including T1-weighted imaging, T2-weighted imaging, and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI) and DWI. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of cervical carcinoma were analyzed quantitatively and compared with that of adjacent epithelium. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, and accuracy of 2 sets of MRI sequences were calculated on the basis of histologic results, and the diagnostic ability of conventional MRI/DWI combinations was compared with that of conventional MRI. The mean ADC value from cervical carcinoma (mean, 786 × 10 mm/s ± 100) was significantly lower than that from adjacent epithelium (mean, 1352 × 10 mm/s ± 147) (P = 0.01). When the threshold ADC value set as 1010 × 10 mm/s, the sensitivity and specificity for differentiating cervical carcinoma from nontumor epithelium were 78.2% and 67.2%, respectively. The sensitivity and accuracy of conventional MRI for tumor detection were 76.0% and 70.4%, whereas the sensitivity and accuracy of conventional MRI/DWI combinations were 91.7% and 90.7%, respectively. Conventional MRI/DWI combinations revealed a positive predictive value of 97.8% and only 4 false-negative findings. The addition of DWI to conventional MRI considerably improves the sensitivity and accuracy of tumor detection in young patients treated with fertility-sparing surgery, which supports the inclusion quantitative analysis of ADC value in routine MRI protocol before fertility-sparing surgery.

  12. Proseek single-plex protein assay kit system to detect sAxl and Gas6 in serological material of brain tumor patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Jaksch-Bogensperger

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available • The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK Axl and its ligand Gas6 are critically involved in the pathogenesis of high-grade glioma (HGG. Both proteins were found to be overexpressed e.g. in tumor cells, mediating cell proliferation and migration as well as tumor angiogenesis and neuroinflammation. The extracellular domain of Axl (sAxl and Gas6 were found in the peri-tumoral edema and blood of animals as well as in human glioma tissue. Therefore, we monitored the level of sAxl and Gas6 in human blood samples. To increase the sensitivity of protein detection beyond commonly used standard methods we preliminary tested the innovative Proseek Single-Plex Protein Assay Kit System from Olink Bioscience together with new antibodies against the soluble RTK sAxl and its ligand Gas6. We conclude that the Proseek method is a highly sensitive and fast procedure that can be used as a possible powerful tool compared to routinely used ELISA-methods.

  13. Staging of primary head and neck tumors and detection of recurrences; Staging und Rezidivdiagnostik von Tumoren im Kopf-Hals-Bereich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S. [Klinikum der Ruhr-Univ. Bochum, Marienhospital, Herne (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin; Baum, R.P. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin/PET-Zentrum; Knecht, R. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Zentrum fuer Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde; Hoer, G. [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt/Main (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-04-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas represent the vast majority of all malignant tumors of the head and neck region. Lymph node involvement is the most important prognostic factor affecting survival of patients with head and neck cancer. The effectiveness of surgical treatment depends on the complete excision of all tumor tissue and an accurate preoperative diagnosis. Tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging is therefore mandatory. In comparison to positron emission tomography with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET), morphological imaging modalities (CT, MRI) have been applied for the localization of primary head and neck tumors because of their better anatomical resolution. Metabolic tumor imaging using FDG PET is superior to morphological imaging by CT and MRI in the detection of small cervical lymph node metastases (Class 1a indication). Increased FDG utpake has also been observed in benign inflammatory lesions after radiation therapy, therefore detection of local recurrence with FDG PET can be problematic. To ensure a high diagnostic accuracy it is been suggested to perform FDG PET not earlier than 3 months after radiation therapy (Class 1a indication for the diagnosis of local recurrence). (orig.) [German] Plattenepithelkarzinome stellen mit 90% den ueberwiegenden Anteil von malignen Tumoren des Kopf-Hals-Bereiches dar. Ein wesentlicher prognostischer Faktor ist das Vorhandensein von Lymphknotenmetastasen. Die Entscheidung ueber das richtige therapeutische Vorgehen ist von der genauen Festlegung des primaeren Tumorstadiums abhaengig. Die Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) unter Verwendung von {sup 18}F-markierter 2-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glukose (FDG) ist fuer das T-Staging gegenueber den morphologisch orientierten Verfahren (CT, MRT) im allgemeinen ohne klinischen Nutzen. Als funktionsorientiertes Verfahren ist die FDG-PET bei der Diagnostik von Lymphknotenmetastasen den anatomisch orientierten Untersuchungsverfahren ueberlegen (Klasse-1a-Indikation), da sie nicht alleine

  14. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  15. Use of magnetic resonance imaging to detect neoplastic meningitis: Limited use in leukemia and lymphoma but convincing results in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauls, Sandra; Fischer, Ann-Cathrin; Brambs, Hans-Jürgen; Fetscher, Sebastian; Höche, Wolfram; Bommer, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: An early diagnosis of meningitis is important to improve patients’ survival. Data about a direct comparison of cerebrospinal fluid cytology (CSF-cytology) and MRI are very limited. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare these two diagnostic modalities in diagnosing meningitis in patients with hematopoietic and solid malignancies. Methods: In 68 patients suspicious for neoplastic meningitis, cytology and MRI (1.5 T) was performed. The meningeal, pial or intraparenchymal hyperintense signal or contrast enhancement was correlated to the final CNS diagnosis and to cytology. Results: 44 patients (64.7%) had neoplastic meningitis, 21 patients (30.9%) had non-neoplastic meningitis. The sensitivity to diagnose meningeal disease was 49.2% for MRI and 95.4% for cytology (p < 0.001). In patients with neoplastic meningitis, sensitivity was 45.5% for MRI and 93.2% for cytology (p < 0.001). In patients with infectious meningitis, sensitivity was 57.1% for MRI and 100% for cytology (p = 0.0013). In patients with solid tumors, the sensitivity was 84.6% for both diagnostic methods. The sensitivity for MRI was low in patients with leukemia (20.0%) and lymphoma (37.5%). The positive predictive value (PPV) for MRI to differentiate infectious from neoplastic meningitis was high in patients with infectious meningitis (75.0%), in patients with lymphoma (83.3%), and in patients with solid tumors (72.7%). Ppv was low in patients with leukemia (33.3%). Conclusion: Diagnostic value of MRI for diagnosing meningitis is especially limited in patients with hematopoietic malignancies. MRI better detected leptomeningeal involvement caused by solid tumors than by leukemia or lymphoma. The ppv to specify neoplastic meningitis depends on tumor subtype.

  16. Successful application of technetium-99m-labeled octreotide acetate scintigraphy in the detection of ectopic adrenocorticotropin-producing bronchial carcinoid lung tumor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fallahi Babak

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The diagnostic efficacy of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy labeling with 111 indium in the localization of tumors has been assessed in a limited number of patients with contradictory outcomes. Here, we describe the case of a patient with an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing bronchial carcinoid tumor diagnosed preoperatively using technetium-99m-labeled octreotide acetate scintigraphy. Case presentation A 29-year-old Asian man presented to our hospital with the typical clinical features of Cushing's syndrome, which he had had for a duration of 18 months. The results of a biochemical evaluation revealed he had adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome. The results of a spiral abdominal computed tomography scan showed he had bilateral adrenal hypertrophy. A magnetic resonance image of the patient's brain showed he had a normal hypophysis. Whole body technetium-99m-labeled octreotide acetate scintigraphy was performed to check for the presence of an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing tumor. The scan results showed a small focal increase in uptake in the lower lobe of our patient's right lung, just above his diaphragm. A spiral chest computed tomography scan also revealed a small non-specific lesion in the same region. A transthoracic biopsy was then performed. Pathological evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of a carcinoid tumor, of the adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing type. After surgical removal, the patient's symptoms resolved and significant clinical improvement was achieved. Conclusions This case report shows that technetium-99m-labeled octreotide acetate scintigraphy can effectively detect an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing bronchial carcinoid.

  17. Comparing the outcomes of two strategies for colorectal tumor detection: Policy-promoted screening program versus health promotion service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hsiu Wu

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: In comparison with the outcomes of the HPS database, the screening efficacy of the PPS database is even for detecting colorectal carcinoma but is limited in detecting advanced adenoma. HPS may provide comprehensive validity indicators and will be helpful in adjusting current policies for improving screening performance.

  18. Tumor markers in the early detection of tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients: CA 125, CYFRA 21-1, HER2 shed antigen, LDH and CRP in combination with CEA and CA 15-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gioia, Dorit; Blankenburg, Irene; Nagel, Dorothea; Heinemann, Volker; Stieber, Petra

    2016-10-01

    Kinetics of CA 15-3 and CEA have a high specificity in the early detection of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). However, this high specificity is associated with a lack of sensitivity. To decrease the number of false negative patients, the additional diagnostic potential of an extended panel of biomarkers was evaluated. This analysis was performed as part of a large follow-up study (1998-2010) evaluating 813 patients with a median follow-up of 63months. After primary therapy, all patients underwent tumor marker monitoring for CEA and CA 15-3 at 6-week intervals. A reproducible previously defined increase (≥100%) based on the individual baseline value of each patient was considered as a strong indicator of MBC. For the present analysis, we retrospectively evaluated 1011 blood samples from 95 patients. Forty-seven of these had metastatic disease for the first time at the time of this evaluation, while the remaining 48 patients showed no evidence of disease. The sera of these patients were additionally assessed for the following parameters: cancer antigen (CA) 125, cytokeratin-19 soluble fragment (CYFRA 21-1), HER2 shed antigen, lactate-dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP). 26 of 47 patients with MBC showed a reproducible tumor marker increase of at least CEA and/or CA 15-3 (55.3%, true-positive). The remaining 21 patients with MBC showed no increase in CEA or CA 15-3 (44.7%, false negative, FN). By combining all markers mentioned above, 41 of 47 patients with MBC showed a reproducible marker increase with a sensitivity of 87.2% and specificity of 100%. This retrospective analysis indicates that a panel of biomarkers can increase the sensitivity of the CA 15-3/CEA combination without loss of specificity. The combined use is therefore helpful for early detection of MBC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical value of 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting viable tumor, recurrence and metastases of hepato-cellular carcinoma after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Silong; Zhang Yingjian; Zhu Beiling; Shi Wei; Men Zhiqiang; Li Peilen; Jiang Guoliang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Accurate evaluation of treatment result of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by conventional imaging is difficult. The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT for detecting residual viable tumor, recurrence and metastases in patients with HCC after TACE. Methods: Twenty-two patients with HCC after TACE were investigated with 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The accuracy of FDG PET/CT was determined by the histopathological results or evidences of clinical follow-up. Results: Of all 22 HCC patients after TACE, 18 had intra- and (or) extrahepatic lesions, detected by FDG PET/CT. Six-teen patients had intrahepatic FDG-avid lesion(s). Of the 16 patients, five had intrahepatic FDG-avid lesions located at both lipiodol-rich and -deprive regions, 13 had associated extrahepatic metastases. Of the two HCC patients who had no intrahepatic FDG-avid lesion, there were extrahepatic FDG-avid lesions at the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. In all, 15 HCC had extrahepatic lesions identified by FDG PET/CT. There were lung and lymph nodes (n = 9), bone (n = 2), tumor thrombus at portal vein (n - 1) and diaphragm crus (n = 1). Two patients were false negative. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy of FDG PET/CT in detecting intra- and (or) extrahepatic lesions after TACE were 88.9% (16/18) vs 94.7 % (18/19), 4/4 vs 3/3, and 90.9% (20/22) vs 95.5% (21/22), respectively. Conclusion: 18 F-FDG PET/CT is potential useful for detection both intra- and (or) extrahepatic lesions in HCC patients after TACE. (authors)

  20. Retrospective analysis of a Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) system in full-field digital mammography in correlation to tumor histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obenauer, S.; Sohns, C.; Grabbe, E.; Werner, C.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the usefulness of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system in full-field digital mammography in correlation to tumor histology. Material and methods: a total of 476 patients (226 patients with histologically proven malignant tumors, 250 healthy women) took part in this study. The mammograms were studied retrospectively, using the CAD system Image Checker. For 226 patients digital mammograms in MLO-projection were available. For 186 of these patients the CC-projection was also available. CAD markers that correlated with histologically proven carcinomas were considered to be true-positive markers. All other CAD markers were considered to be false-positive. Histologically proven carcinomas without markers were false-negative results. The dependence of the CAD markers placement upon the different carcinoma histologies was studied using the Chi-square test. Results: no significant difference could be proven for the detectability of malignant breast lesions of different histologic types. For the detectability of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC), lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS), tubular carcinoma and ductulo-lobular carcinoma, the true positives were 71.1%, 75%, 70.7%, 70%, 60% and 80%, respectively, in the MLO projection and 83.9%, 75.9%, 81.8%, 77.8%, 87.5% and 33.3%, respectively, in the CC projection. There was an average of 0.5 false-positive markers per mammographic image. Conclusion: The histologic type of carcinoma seems to have no influence on detectability when using the CAD system. The high rate of false-positive markers shows, however, the limited specificity of the CAD system and that improvements are necessary. (orig.)

  1. The correlation of background parenchymal enhancement in the contralateral breast with patient and tumor characteristics of MRI-screen detected breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreemann, Suzan; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Borelli, Cristina; Bult, Peter; Karssemeijer, Nico; Mann, Ritse M

    2018-01-01

    Higher background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) could be used for stratification of MRI screening programs since it might be related to a higher breast cancer risk. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to correlate BPE to patient and tumor characteristics in women with unilateral MRI-screen detected breast cancer who participated in an intermediate and high risk screening program. As BPE in the affected breast may be difficult to discern from enhancing cancer, we assumed that BPE in the contralateral breast is a representative measure for BPE in women with unilateral breast cancer. This retrospective study was approved by our local institutional board and a waiver for consent was granted. MR-examinations of women with unilateral breast cancers screen-detected on breast MRI were evaluated by two readers. BPE in the contralateral breast was rated according to BI-RADS. Univariate analyses were performed to study associations. Observer variability was computed. Analysis included 77 breast cancers in 76 patients (age: 48±9.8 years), including 62 invasive and 15 pure ductal carcinoma in-situ cases. A negative association between BPE and tumor grade (p≤0.016) and a positive association with progesterone status (p≤0.021) was found. The correlation was stronger when only considering invasive disease. Inter-reader agreement was substantial. Lower BPE in the contralateral breast in women with unilateral breast cancer might be associated to higher tumor grade and progesterone receptor negativity. Great care should be taken using BPE for stratification of patients to tailored screening programs.

  2. Systematic identification and validation of candidate genes for detection of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood specimens of colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findeisen, Peter; Röckel, Matthias; Nees, Matthias; Röder, Christian; Kienle, Peter; Von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kalthoff, Holger; Neumaier, Michael

    2008-11-01

    The presence of tumor cells in peripheral blood is being regarded increasingly as a clinically relevant prognostic factor for colorectal cancer patients. Current molecular methods are very sensitive but due to low specificity their diagnostic value is limited. This study was undertaken in order to systematically identify and validate new colorectal cancer (CRC) marker genes for improved detection of minimal residual disease in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of colorectal cancer patients. Marker genes with upregulated gene expression in colorectal cancer tissue and cell lines were identified using microarray experiments and publicly available gene expression data. A systematic iterative approach was used to reduce a set of 346 candidate genes, reportedly associated with CRC to a selection of candidate genes that were then further validated by relative quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Analytical sensitivity of RT-PCR assays was determined by spiking experiments with CRC cells. Diagnostic sensitivity as well as specificity was tested on a control group consisting of 18 CRC patients compared to 12 individuals without malignant disease. From a total of 346-screened genes only serine (or cysteine) proteinase inhibitor, clade B (ovalbumin), member 5 (SERPINB5) showed significantly elevated transcript levels in peripheral venous blood specimens of tumor patients when compared to the nonmalignant control group. These results were confirmed by analysis of an enlarged collective consisting of 63 CRC patients and 36 control individuals without malignant disease. In conclusion SERPINB5 seems to be a promising marker for detection of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients.

  3. A high-risk 70-gene signature is not associated with the detection of tumor cell dissemination to the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Vincent P; Taran, Florin-Andrei; Wallwiener, Markus; Walter, Christina; Grischke, Eva-Maria; Wallwiener, Diethelm; Brucker, Sara Y; Hartkopf, Andreas D

    2018-06-01

    The 70-gene signature (70-GS) is a prognostic tool, grouping patients in risk groups to assess their need for adjuvant chemotherapy. Tumor cell dissemination to the bone marrow is a marker of minimal residual disease and associated with impaired survival. In this study, we aimed to evaluate whether 70-GS is associated with the presence of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in the bone marrow of patients with early breast cancer. In patients with hormone receptor-positive HER2-negative early breast cancer, the 70-GS was obtained and the presence of DTCs was immunohistochemically evaluated using cytokeratin staining with the A45-B/B3 antibody. 149 patients were included into the analysis. 40 (27%) had a high-risk 70-GS and 35 (23%) had detectable DTCs in their bone marrow. 9 (22%) of the 40 patients with high-risk 70-GS and 26 (24%) of the 109 patients with a low-risk 70-GS were positive for DTCs (p = 0.863). As both 70-GS and DTC detection are known prognostic factors but do not seem to correlate, a follow-up on a larger cohort is warranted to evaluate if a combination of the two is able to better stratify the relapse risk in early breast cancer patients.

  4. Positive detection of exfoliated colon cancer cells on linear stapler cartridges was associated with depth of tumor invasion and preoperative bowel preparation in colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikehara, Kishiko; Endo, Shungo; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Hidaka, Eiji; Ishida, Fumio; Tanaka, Jun-Ichi; Kudo, Shin-Ei

    2016-08-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate exfoliated cancer cells (ECCs) on linear stapler cartridges used for anastomotic sites in colon cancer. We prospectively analyzed ECCs on linear stapler cartridges used for anastomosis in 100 colon cancer patients who underwent colectomy. Having completed the functional end-to-end anastomosis, the linear stapler cartridges were irrigated with saline, which was collected for cytological examination and cytological diagnoses were made by board-certified pathologists based on Papanicolaou staining. The detection rate of ECCs on the linear stapler cartridges was 20 %. Positive detection of ECCs was significantly associated with depth of tumor invasion (p = 0.012) and preoperative bowel preparation (p = 0.003). There were no marked differences between ECC-positive and ECC-negative groups in terms of the operation methods, tumor location, histopathological classification, and surgical margins. Since ECCs were identified on the cartridge of the linear stapler used for anastomosis, preoperative mechanical bowel preparation using polyethylene glycol solution and cleansing at anastomotic sites using tumoricidal agents before anastomosis may be necessary to decrease ECCs in advanced colon cancer.

  5. Combination of panoramic and fluorescence endoscopic images to obtain tumor spatial distribution information useful for bladder cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijnyk, S.; Hernández Mier, Y.; Blondel, W. C. P. M.; Daul, C.; Wolf, D.; Bourg-Heckly, G.

    2007-07-01

    Bladder cancer is widely spread. Moreover, carcinoma in situ can be difficult to diagnose as it may be difficult to see, and become invasive in 50 % of case. Non invasive diagnosis methods like photodynamic or autofluorescence endoscopy allow enhancing sensitivity and specificity. Besides, bladder tumors can be multifocal. Multifocality increases the probability of recurrence and infiltration into bladder muscle. Analysis of spatial distribution of tumors could be used to improve diagnosis. We explore the feasibility to combine fluorescence and spatial information on phantoms. We developed a system allowing the acquisition of consecutive images under white light or UV excitation alternatively and automatically along the video sequence. We also developed an automatic image processing algorithm to build a partial panoramic image from a cystoscopic sequence of images. Fluorescence information is extracted from wavelength bandpass filtered images and superimposed over the cartography. Then, spatial distribution measures of fluorescent spots can be computed. This cartography can be positioned on a 3D generic shape of bladder by selecting some reference points. Our first results on phantoms show that it is possible to obtain cartography with fluorescent spots and extract quantitative information of their spatial distribution on a "wide" field of view basis.

  6. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Norio; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  7. Numerical and structural genomic aberrations are reliably detectable in tissue microarrays of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples by fluorescence in-situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Horn

    Full Text Available Few data are available regarding the reliability of fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH, especially for chromosomal deletions, in high-throughput settings using tissue microarrays (TMAs. We performed a comprehensive FISH study for the detection of chromosomal translocations and deletions in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE tumor specimens arranged in TMA format. We analyzed 46 B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL specimens with known karyotypes for translocations of IGH-, BCL2-, BCL6- and MYC-genes. Locus-specific DNA probes were used for the detection of deletions in chromosome bands 6q21 and 9p21 in 62 follicular lymphomas (FL and six malignant mesothelioma (MM samples, respectively. To test for aberrant signals generated by truncation of nuclei following sectioning of FFPE tissue samples, cell line dilutions with 9p21-deletions were embedded into paraffin blocks. The overall TMA hybridization efficiency was 94%. FISH results regarding translocations matched karyotyping data in 93%. As for chromosomal deletions, sectioning artefacts occurred in 17% to 25% of cells, suggesting that the proportion of cells showing deletions should exceed 25% to be reliably detectable. In conclusion, FISH represents a robust tool for the detection of structural as well as numerical aberrations in FFPE tissue samples in a TMA-based high-throughput setting, when rigorous cut-off values and appropriate controls are maintained, and, of note, was superior to quantitative PCR approaches.

  8. Evolution in a transmissible cancer: a study of the chromosomal changes in devil facial tumor (DFT) as it spreads through the wild Tasmanian devil population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Anne-Maree; Swift, Kate; Hodson, Pamela; Hua, Bobby; McCallum, Hamish; Pyecroft, Stephen; Taylor, Robyn; Eldridge, Mark D B; Belov, Katherine

    2012-03-01

    Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are the largest extant marsupial carnivores. This species, now confined to Tasmania, is endangered from the emergence of a transmissible cancer, devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). In the present study, we use cytogenetic and molecular techniques to examine the stability of devil facial tumor (DFT) cell lines across time and space. This article describes disease progression from February 2004 to June 2011. We demonstrate evolutionary changes in the disease, which affects devils in different sites across Tasmania and over a period of several years, producing several chromosomal variants (strains) that are capable of transmission between devils. We describe the evolution of DFTs in the field and speculate on the possible impacts on the disease, including (1) development of less aggressive forms of the disease; (2) development of more aggressive forms of the disease; (3) development of forms capable of affecting closely related species of dasyurids (e.g., quolls); (4) extinction of the disease as it acquires additional deleterious mutations that affect either cell viability or transmissibility; and (5) co-evolution of the disease and the host. We also speculate about the future of the Tasmanian devil in the wild. We note that although DFTs are regarded as unstable by comparison with another much older transmissible cancer, canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT), the potential for development of less aggressive forms of DFTs or for development of resistance in devils is limited by devils' small numbers, low genetic diversity, and restricted geographical distribution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Concordance of mutation detection in circulating tumor DNA in early clinical trials using different blood collection protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlborn, Lise B.; Madsen, Mette; Jonson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in a clinical setting. Here we investigate the concordance between standard blood collection for molecular analysis using immediate separation of plasma, compared to the use of collection tubes allowing for delayed processing. Methods: In this study, we measured the fractional abundance of tumor specific...... patients with advanced solid cancers enrolled in early clinical trials. Results: Concordance in the fractional abundance of mutations in ctDNA isolated from blood collected in either K3EDTA or BCT tubes from patients with different solid cancers was observed. Conclusions: This study indicates that BCT...... mutations (BRAF p.V600E and PIK3CA p.H1047R) in ctDNA isolated from blood samples collected in either cell-stabilizing Cell-Free DNA BCT tubes (delayed processing within 72 hours) or standard K3EDTA tubes (immediate processing within 15 minutes). Twenty-five blood sample pairs (EDTA/BCT) were collected from...

  10. TumorNext-Lynch-MMR: a comprehensive next generation sequencing assay for the detection of germline and somatic mutations in genes associated with mismatch repair deficiency and Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Phillip N; Tsai, Pei; Chen, Daniel; Wu, Sitao; Hoo, Jayne; Mu, Wenbo; Li, Bing; Vuong, Huy; Lu, Hsiao-Mei; Batth, Navanjot; Willett, Sara; Uyeda, Lisa; Shah, Swati; Gau, Chia-Ling; Umali, Monalyn; Espenschied, Carin; Janicek, Mike; Brown, Sandra; Margileth, David; Dobrea, Lavinia; Wagman, Lawrence; Rana, Huma; Hall, Michael J; Ross, Theodora; Terdiman, Jonathan; Cullinane, Carey; Ries, Savita; Totten, Ellen; Elliott, Aaron M

    2018-04-17

    The current algorithm for Lynch syndrome diagnosis is highly complex with multiple steps which can result in an extended time to diagnosis while depleting precious tumor specimens. Here we describe the analytical validation of a custom probe-based NGS tumor panel, TumorNext-Lynch-MMR, which generates a comprehensive genetic profile of both germline and somatic mutations that can accelerate and streamline the time to diagnosis and preserve specimen. TumorNext-Lynch-MMR can detect single nucleotide variants, small insertions and deletions in 39 genes that are frequently mutated in Lynch syndrome and colorectal cancer. Moreover, the panel provides microsatellite instability status and detects loss of heterozygosity in the five Lynch genes; MSH2 , MSH6 , MLH1 , PMS2 and EPCAM . Clinical cases are described that highlight the assays ability to differentiate between somatic and germline mutations, precisely classify variants and resolve discordant cases.

  11. In-Vivo Detection and Tracking of T Cells in Various Organs in a Melanoma Tumor Model by 19F-Fluorine MRS/MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Gonzales

    Full Text Available 19F-MRI and 19F-MRS can identify specific cell types after in-vitro or in-vivo 19F-labeling. Knowledge on the potential to track in-vitro 19F-labeled immune cells in tumor models by 19F-MRI/MRS is scarce.To study 19F-based MR techniques for in-vivo tracking of adoptively transferred immune cells after in-vitro 19F-labeling, i.e. to detect and monitor their migration non-invasively in melanoma-bearing mice.Splenocytes (SP were labeled in-vitro with a perfluorocarbon (PFC and IV-injected into non-tumor bearing mice. In-vitro PFC-labeled ovalbumin (OVA-specific T cells from the T cell receptor-transgenic line OT-1, activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies (Tact or OVA-peptide pulsed antigen presenting cells (TOVA-act, were injected into B16 OVA melanoma-bearing mice. The distribution of the 19F-labelled donor cells was determined in-vivo by 19F-MRI/MRS. In-vivo 19F-MRI/MRS results were confirmed by ex-vivo 19F-NMR and flow cytometry.SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro yielding 3x1011-1.4x1012 19F-atoms/cell in the 3 groups. Adoptively transferred 19F-labeled SP, TOVA-act, and Tact were detected by coil-localized 19F-MRS in the chest, abdomen, and left flank in most animals (corresponding to lungs, livers, and spleens, respectively, with highest signal-to-noise for SP vs TOVA-act and Tact, p<0.009 for both. SP and Tact were successfully imaged by 19F-MRI (n = 3; liver. These in-vivo data were confirmed by ex-vivo high-resolution 19F-NMR-spectroscopy. By flow cytometric analysis, however, TOVA-act tended to be more abundant versus SP and Tact (liver: p = 0.1313; lungs: p = 0.1073; spleen: p = 0.109. Unlike 19F-MRI/MRS, flow cytometry also identified transferred immune cells (SP, Tact, and TOVA-act in the tumors.SP, Tact, and TOVA-act were successfully PFC-labeled in-vitro and detected in-vivo by non-invasive 19F-MRS/MRI in liver, lung, and spleen. The portion of 19F-labeled T cells in the adoptively transferred cell

  12. Prognostic value of circulating tumor cells detected with the CellSearch System in patients with gastric cancer: evidence from a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang C

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chaogang Yang,1–3,* Kun Zou,4,* Zewei Yuan,1–3 Tangxi Guo,1–3 Bin Xiong1–3 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery & Department of Gastric and Colorectal Surgical Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, 2Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors, 3Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, 4Department of Oncology, Central Hospital of Wuhan, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs have been proposed as a marker for predicting the prognosis of cancer. However, the prognostic value of CTCs detected with the CellSearch System in patients with gastric cancer (GC remains controversial. We performed a meta-analysis of available studies to investigate this topic.Methods: Two authors systematically searched the studies independently in PubMed, Science Citation Index, Cochrane Database, Embase, and the references in relevant studies (up to September 2017 using keywords. Our meta-analysis was performed in Stata software, version 12.0 (2011; Stata Corp, College Station, TX, USA, with the risk ratio (RR, hazard ratio (HR, and 95% CI as the effect measures. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression were also conducted.Results: Seven studies (including eight sets of data containing 579 patients with GC from four countries were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled results showed CTC-positive status detected by the CellSearch System was significantly associated with poor overall survival (HR =2.09, 95% CI [1.71, 2.55], P<0.001, I2=31.5% and progression-free survival (HR =2.11, 95% CI [1.25, 3.57], P=0.005, I2=75.6% of patients with GC, regardless of sampling time. The disease control rate of CTC-positive group was lower than that of CTC-negative group for both baseline and intra-therapy, although no statistical difference existed at both sampling time points (baseline: 69.5% versus 81.8%, RR=0.79, 95% CI [0.54, 1.16], P=0.23, I2=68.0%; intra

  13. Pulse sequence optimization for superparamagnetic iron oxide-enhaced MR imaging in the detection of hepatic VX2 tumors in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Hyun Jung; Han, Joon Koo; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Se Hyung; Choi, Byung Ihn; Kim, Tae Kyoung

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to determine the optimal pulse sequences for SPIO-enhanced MR imaging in the evaluation of multiple hepatic tumors. Twelve rabbits with multiple VX2 liver tumors underwent SPOI-enhanced MRI using the following nine pulse sequences: TSE T2-weighted imaging (T2W1), TSE proton density-weighted imaging(PDWI), and GRE T2*-weighted imaging (T2*W1) with seven different echo times (TE). Liver-lesion contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) were calculated, and images were also assessed qualitatively by two radiologists, who reached a consensus as to lesion conspicuity and imaging artifacts using a four-level scale. By means of pathologic correlation, the sensitivity and positive predictive value of each sequence was calculated. TSE T2W1 and long-TE (35 msec) FLASH T2*W1 showed the highest liver-lesion CNR. The best lesion conspicuity was seen at TSE T2W1 and medium-TE (12 msec) GRE T2*W1. Short TE GRE T2*W1 showed the least imaging artifacts. The four sequences which demonstrated the best sensitivity were medium-TE (12 msec), GRE T2*W1 (FLASH, 84%; FISP, 82%), TSE W2T1 (79%), and TSE PDWI (76%). All nine sequences showed overall high positive predictive value (86-97%), with no statistically significant difference (p>0.05). In terms of image quality and the detection of sensitivity, TSE T2W1 and medium TE (12 msec) GRE T2*W1 were the top two pulse sequences among the various sequences used for no SPIO-enhanced MRI. They are thus considered to be optimal sequences for evaluating multiple malignant hepatic tumors

  14. Extensive tumor thrombus of hepatocellular carcinoma in the entire portal venous system detected on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Puranik, Ameya; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Detection of thrombus is usually an incidental finding on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography studies. Nevertheless this is an important finding in terms of disease prognostication and in planning the treatment strategy. We herein report a case of a 50-years-old male, a diagnosed case of hepatocellular carcinoma with extensive hypermetabolic thrombus involving the entire portal venous system. (author)

  15. Evaluation of 68Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for the detection of duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgat, Clement; Mazere, Joachim; Hindie, Elif; Fernandez, Philippe; Velayoudom-Cephise, Fritz-Line; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Tabarin, Antoine; Schwartz, Paul; Guyot, Martine; Gaye, Delphine; Vimont, Delphine; Schulz, Juergen; Smith, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with 111 In-pentetreotide (SRS) is used to detect duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (dpNETs) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). However, SRS has limited sensitivity for this purpose. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC has a higher rate of sporadic dpNETs detection than SRS but there is little data for dpNETs detection in MEN1. To compare the performances of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) to diagnose dpNETs in MEN1. Single-institution prospective comparative study Nineteen consecutive MEN1 patients (aged 47 ± 13 years) underwent 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT within 2 months in random order. Blinded readings of images were performed separately by experienced physicians. Unblinded analysis of CE-CT, combined with additional magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic-ultrasound, 18 F-2-fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET/CT or histopathology results served as reference standard for dpNETs diagnosis. The sensitivity of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT was 76, 20, and 60 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). All the true-positive lesions detected by SRS were also depicted on 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT detected lesions of smaller size than SRS (10.7 ± 7.6 and 15.2 ± 5.9 mm, respectively, p < 0.03). False negatives of 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT included small dpNETs (<10 mm) and 18 F-FDG PET/CT positive aggressive dpNETs. No false positives were recorded. In addition, whole-body mapping with 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT identified extra-abdominal MEN1-related tumors including one neuroendocrine thymic carcinoma identified by the three imaging procedures, one bronchial carcinoid undetected by CE-CT and three meningiomas undetected by SRS. Owing to higher diagnostic performance, 68 Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT (or alternative 68 Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues) should replace 111 In-pentetreotide in the investigation of MEN1

  16. Early Detection and Treatment of Neuroblastic Tumor with Opsoclonus-Myoclonus Syndrome Improve Neurological Outcome: A Review of Five Cases at a Single Institution in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takama, Yuichi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Nakaoka, Tatsuo; Higashio, Atsushi; Santo, Kenji; Kuki, Ichiro; Kawawaki, Hisashi; Tomiwa, Kiyotaka; Hara, Junichi

    2016-02-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a paraneoplastic neurological disorder associated with neuroblastic tumor (NT) in childhood. Half of patients have neurological sequelae after the neurological and oncological treatment. We reviewed the neurological and oncological outcomes of NT with OMS, and discussed whether the treatment of NT would contribute to improving the neurological prognosis. We retrospectively assessed NT patients with OMS from January 2001 to December 2013 at a single institution in Japan. Demographic data, neurological and oncological status, histopathology, treatments, prognosis, and diagnosis and treatment timing were retrospectively reviewed from the records. The timings assessed were the interval between OMS onset and NT detection, initial NT therapy, and initial OMS therapy, the interval between NT therapy and OMS remission, and duration of OMS. A total of 73 patients with NT were treated during the study period, and 5 of 73 patients were diagnosed as having NT with OMS. The median age at onset of OMS was 22 months (range, 18-30 months). The median age at detection of NT was 29 months (range, 21-33 months). Three of five cases showed no uptake on meta-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy. The tumor histopathology was neuroblastoma in two patients, ganglioneuroblastoma in two patients, and ganglioneuroma in one patient. Primary resection was performed in three cases. All patients survived. Two of five cases presented with atypical neurological symptoms without opsoclonus. The initial neurological therapy was started within a mean of 20 days (range, 3-76 days) from the onset of OMS in all cases. Four patients received intravenous immunoglobulin, and one with persistent neurological problems received rituximab. Neurological symptoms resolved in three cases. The mean interval between the onset of OMS and the detection of NT in case without neurological sequelae was 57 days (range, 25-113 days), while in case with neurological sequelae it was 365

  17. Evaluation of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for the detection of duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgat, Clement; Mazere, Joachim; Hindie, Elif; Fernandez, Philippe [CNRS, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University of Bordeaux, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bordeaux (France); Velayoudom-Cephise, Fritz-Line; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Tabarin, Antoine [USN Haut-Leveque, Department of Endocrinology, Pessac (France); Schwartz, Paul; Guyot, Martine [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bordeaux (France); Gaye, Delphine [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Radiology, Pessac (France); Vimont, Delphine; Schulz, Juergen [CNRS, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); University of Bordeaux, INCIA, Bordeaux (France); Smith, Denis [University Hospital of Bordeaux, Department of Oncology, Bordeaux (France)

    2016-07-15

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with {sup 111}In-pentetreotide (SRS) is used to detect duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (dpNETs) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). However, SRS has limited sensitivity for this purpose. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC has a higher rate of sporadic dpNETs detection than SRS but there is little data for dpNETs detection in MEN1. To compare the performances of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) to diagnose dpNETs in MEN1. Single-institution prospective comparative study Nineteen consecutive MEN1 patients (aged 47 ± 13 years) underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT within 2 months in random order. Blinded readings of images were performed separately by experienced physicians. Unblinded analysis of CE-CT, combined with additional magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic-ultrasound, {sup 18}F-2-fluoro-deoxy-d-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) PET/CT or histopathology results served as reference standard for dpNETs diagnosis. The sensitivity of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT was 76, 20, and 60 %, respectively (p < 0.0001). All the true-positive lesions detected by SRS were also depicted on {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT. {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT detected lesions of smaller size than SRS (10.7 ± 7.6 and 15.2 ± 5.9 mm, respectively, p < 0.03). False negatives of {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT included small dpNETs (<10 mm) and {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT positive aggressive dpNETs. No false positives were recorded. In addition, whole-body mapping with {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT identified extra-abdominal MEN1-related tumors including one neuroendocrine thymic carcinoma identified by the three imaging procedures, one bronchial carcinoid undetected by CE-CT and three meningiomas undetected by SRS. Owing to higher diagnostic performance, {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT (or alternative {sup 68}Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues

  18. Cascaded strand displacement for non-enzymatic target recycling amplification and label-free electronic detection of microRNA from tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Kai; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun, E-mail: yunatswu@swu.edu.cn

    2016-04-15

    The monitoring of microRNA (miRNA) expression levels is of great importance in cancer diagnosis. In the present work, based on two cascaded toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions (TSDRs), we have developed a label- and enzyme-free target recycling signal amplification approach for sensitive electronic detection of miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cells. The junction probes containing the locked G-quadruplex forming sequences are self-assembled on the senor surface. The presence of the target miRNA-21 initiates the first TSDR and results in the disassembly of the junction probes and the release of the active G-quadruplex forming sequences. Subsequently, the DNA fuel strand triggers the second TSDR and leads to cyclic reuse of the target miRNA-21. The cascaded TSDRs thus generate many active G-quadruplex forming sequences on the sensor surface, which associate with hemin to produce significantly amplified current response for sensitive detection of miRNA-21 at 1.15 fM. The sensor is also selective and can be employed to monitor miRNA-21 from human breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Amplified and sensitive detection of microRNA from tumor cells is achieved. • Signal amplification is realized by two cascaded strand displacement reactions. • The developed sensor is selective and label-free without involving any enzymes.

  19. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis detects a much higher rate of thyroid tumors with clonal cytogenetic deviations of the main cytogenetic subgroups than conventional cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieschner, Norbert; Rippe, Volkhard; Laabs, Anne; Dittberner, Lea; Nimzyk, Rolf; Junker, Klaus; Rommel, Birgit; Kiefer, Yvonne; Belge, Gazanfer; Bullerdiek, Jörn; Sendt, Wolfgang

    2011-07-01

    In benign thyroid lesions, three main cytogenetic subgroups, characterized by trisomy 7 or structural aberrations involving either chromosomal region 19q13.4 or 2p21, can be distinguished by conventional cytogenetics (CC). As a rule, these aberrations seem to be mutually exclusive. Interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) analysis on benign as well as malignant thyroid neoplasias has been performed in the past, but rarely in combination with CC. In the present paper, we have analyzed 161 benign thyroid lesions both with CC and I-FISH on touch preparations by using a multi-target, triple-color FISH assay as well as dual-color break-apart probes for detection of the main cytogenetic subgroups. Within the samples, I-FISH detected tumors belonging to either of the subgroups more frequently than CC (23 vs. 11.4%), either due to small subpopulations of aberrant cells or to cryptic chromosomal rearrangements (three cases). Thus, I-FISH seems to be more sensitive than CC, particularly in the detection of subpopulations of cells harboring cytogenetic aberrations that may be overlooked by CC. In summary, I-FISH on touch preparations of benign thyroid lesions seems to be a favorable method for cytogenetic subtyping of thyroid lesions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. In Situ Detection and Quantification of AR-V7, AR-FL, PSA, and KRAS Point Mutations in Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Heliebi, Amin; Hille, Claudia; Laxman, Navya; Svedlund, Jessica; Haudum, Christoph; Ercan, Erkan; Kroneis, Thomas; Chen, Shukun; Smolle, Maria; Rossmann, Christopher; Krzywkowski, Tomasz; Ahlford, Annika; Darai, Evangelia; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Alsdorf, Winfried; König, Frank; Löhr, Matthias; de Kruijff, Inge; Riethdorf, Sabine; Gorges, Tobias M; Pantel, Klaus; Bauernhofer, Thomas; Nilsson, Mats; Sedlmayr, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Liquid biopsies can be used in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) to detect androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7), a splicing product of the androgen receptor. Patients with AR-V7-positive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have greater benefit of taxane chemotherapy compared with novel hormonal therapies, indicating a treatment-selection biomarker. Likewise, in those with pancreatic cancer (PaCa), KRAS mutations act as prognostic biomarkers. Thus, there is an urgent need for technology investigating the expression and mutation status of CTCs. Here, we report an approach that adds AR-V7 or KRAS status to CTC enumeration, compatible with multiple CTC-isolation platforms. We studied 3 independent CTC-isolation devices (CellCollector, Parsortix, CellSearch) for the evaluation of AR-V7 or KRAS status of CTCs with in situ padlock probe technology. Padlock probes allow highly specific detection and visualization of transcripts on a cellular level. We applied padlock probes for detecting AR-V7, androgen receptor full length (AR-FL), and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in CRPC and KRAS wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) transcripts in PaCa in CTCs from 46 patients. In situ analysis showed that 71% (22 of 31) of CRPC patients had detectable AR-V7 expression ranging from low to high expression [1-76 rolling circle products (RCPs)/CTC]. In PaCa patients, 40% (6 of 15) had KRAS mut expressing CTCs with 1 to 8 RCPs/CTC. In situ padlock probe analysis revealed CTCs with no detectable cytokeratin expression but positivity for AR-V7 or KRAS mut transcripts. Padlock probe technology enables quantification of AR-V7, AR-FL, PSA, and KRAS mut/wt transcripts in CTCs. The technology is easily applicable in routine laboratories and compatible with multiple CTC-isolation devices. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  1. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  2. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shuo Wang, Wanming Li, Dezheng Yuan, Jindan Song, Jin Fang Department of Cell Biology, Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, Ministry of Public Health, and Key Laboratory of Medical Cell Biology, Ministry of Education, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The large external antigen (LEA is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605 conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05, indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of

  3. Evaluation of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT for the detection of duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with MEN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgat, Clément; Vélayoudom-Céphise, Fritz-Line; Schwartz, Paul; Guyot, Martine; Gaye, Delphine; Vimont, Delphine; Schulz, Jürgen; Mazère, Joachim; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Smith, Denis; Hindié, Elif; Fernandez, Philippe; Tabarin, Antoine

    2016-07-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy with (111)In-pentetreotide (SRS) is used to detect duodenopancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (dpNETs) in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). However, SRS has limited sensitivity for this purpose. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC has a higher rate of sporadic dpNETs detection than SRS but there is little data for dpNETs detection in MEN1. To compare the performances of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) to diagnose dpNETs in MEN1. Single-institution prospective comparative study Nineteen consecutive MEN1 patients (aged 47 ± 13 years) underwent (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT within 2 months in random order. Blinded readings of images were performed separately by experienced physicians. Unblinded analysis of CE-CT, combined with additional magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic-ultrasound, (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT or histopathology results served as reference standard for dpNETs diagnosis. The sensitivity of (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT, SRS, and CE-CT was 76, 20, and 60 %, respectively (p TOC PET/CT. (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT detected lesions of smaller size than SRS (10.7 ± 7.6 and 15.2 ± 5.9 mm, respectively, p TOC PET/CT included small dpNETs (TOC PET/CT identified extra-abdominal MEN1-related tumors including one neuroendocrine thymic carcinoma identified by the three imaging procedures, one bronchial carcinoid undetected by CE-CT and three meningiomas undetected by SRS. Owing to higher diagnostic performance, (68)Ga-DOTA-TOC PET/CT (or alternative (68)Ga-labeled somatostatin analogues) should replace (111)In-pentetreotide in the investigation of MEN1 patients.

  4. Bi-module sensing device to in situ quantitatively detect hydrogen peroxide released from migrating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yu

    Full Text Available Cell migration is one of the key cell functions in physiological and pathological processes, especially in tumor metastasis. However, it is not feasible to monitor the important biochemical molecules produced during cell migrations in situ by conventional cell migration assays. Herein, for the first time a device containing both electrochemical sensing and trans-well cell migration modules was fabricated to sensitively quantify biochemical molecules released from the cell migration process in situ. The fully assembled device with a multi-wall carbon nanotube/graphene/MnO2 nanocomposite functionalized electrode was able to successfully characterize hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production from melanoma A375 cells, larynx carcinoma HEp-2 cells and liver cancer Hep G2 under serum established chemotaxis. The maximum concentration of H2O2 produced from A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 in chemotaxis was 130 ± 1.3 nM, 70 ± 0.7 nM and 63 ± 0.7 nM, respectively. While the time required reaching the summit of H2O2 production was 3.0, 4.0 and 1.5 h for A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2, respectively. By staining the polycarbonate micropore membrane disassembled from the device, we found that the average migration rate of the A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 cells were 98 ± 6%, 38 ± 4% and 32 ± 3%, respectively. The novel bi-module cell migration platform enables in situ investigation of cell secretion and cell function simultaneously, highlighting its potential for characterizing cell motility through monitoring H2O2 production on rare samples and for identifying underlying mechanisms of cell migration.

  5. Detection of MDM2/CDK4 amplification in lipomatous soft tissue tumors from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue: comparison of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creytens, David; van Gorp, Joost; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Speel, Ernst-Jan; Libbrecht, Louis

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the detection of MDM2 and CDK4 amplification was evaluated in lipomatous soft tissue tumors using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), a PCR-based technique, in comparison with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These 2 techniques were evaluated in a series of 77 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lipomatous tumors (27 benign adipose tumors, 28 atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated liposarcomas, 18 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, and 4 pleomorphic liposarcomas). Using MLPA, with a cut-off ratio of >2, 36/71 samples (22 atypical lipomatous tumors/well-differentiated liposarcomas, and 14 dedifferentiated liposarcomas) showed MDM2 and CDK4 amplification. Using FISH as gold standard, MLPA showed a sensitivity of 90% (36/40) and a specificity of 100% (31/31) in detecting amplification of MDM2 and CDK4 in lipomatous soft tissue tumors. In case of high-level amplification (MDM2-CDK4/CEP12 ratio >5), concordance was 100%. Four cases of atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (4/26, 15%) with a low MDM2 and CDK4 amplification level (MDM2-CDK4/CEP12 ratio ranging between 2 and 2.5) detected by FISH showed no amplification by MLPA, although gain of MDM2 and CDK4 (ratios ranging between 1.6 and 1.9) was seen with MLPA. No amplification was detected in benign lipomatous tumors and pleomorphic liposarcomas. Furthermore, there was a very high concordance between the ratios obtained by FISH and MLPA. In conclusion, MLPA proves to be an appropriate and straightforward technique for screening MDM2/CDK4 amplification in lipomatous tumors, especially when a correct cut-off value and reference samples are chosen, and could be considered a good alternative to FISH to determine MDM2 and CDK4 amplification in liposarcomas. Moreover, because MLPA, as a multiplex technique, allows simultaneous detection of multiple chromosomal changes of interest, it could be in the future a very reliable and fast molecular analysis on

  6. Comparison of abdominal MRI with diffusion-weighted imaging to {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT in detection of neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid-Tannwald, Christine; Schmid-Tannwald, Christoph M.; Neumann, Ralph; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Schramm, Nicolai; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Rist, Carsten [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Morelli, John N. [Scott and White Hospital Temple, Department of Radiology, Temple, TX (United States); Haug, Alexander R.; Jansen, Nathalie [Ludwig Maximilians University Hospital Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI (DW MRI), and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in the detection of intermediate to well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the pancreas. Eighteen patients with pathologically proven pancreatic NET who underwent MRI including DW MRI and PET/CT within 6 weeks of each other were included in this retrospective study. Two radiologists evaluated T2-weighted (T2w), T2w + DW MRI, T2w + contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE T1w) MR images, and PET/CT for NET detection. The sensitivity and level of diagnostic confidence were compared among modalities using McNemar's test and a Wilcoxon signed rank test. Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) of pancreatic NETs and normal pancreatic tissue were compared with Student's t test. Of the NETs, 8/23 (34.8 %) and 9/23 (39.1 %) were detected on T2w images by observers 1 and 2, respectively. Detection rates improved significantly by combining T2w images with DW MRI (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05) or CE T1w images (observer 1: 14/23 = 61 %; observer 2: 15/23 = 65.2 %; p < 0.05). Detection rates of pancreatic NET with PET/CT (both observers: 23/23 = 100 %) were statistically significantly higher than with MRI (p < 0.05). The mean ADC value of NET (1.02 {+-} 0.26 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) was statistically significantly lower than that of normal pancreatic tissue (1.48 {+-} 0.39 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s). DW MRI is a valuable adjunct to T2w imaging and comparable to CE T1w imaging in pancreatic NET detection, quantitatively differentiating between NET and normal pancreatic tissue with ADC measurements. {sup 68}Ga-DOTATATE PET/CT is more sensitive than MRI in the detection of pancreatic NET. (orig.)

  7. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  8. A visible light photoelectrochemical sensor for tumor marker detection using tin dioxide quantum dot-graphene as labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanhu; Li, Meng; Zhu, Yuanna; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua; Yan, Mei; Song, Xianrang

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, a simple and sensitive sandwich-type photoelectrochemical (PEC) immunosensor for measurement of biomarkers on a gold nanoparticle-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode through electrodeposition for point-of-care testing was developed by using a tin dioxide quantum dot-graphene nanocomposite (G-SnO2) as an excellent label with amplification techniques. The capture antibody (Ab1) was firstly immobilized on the gold nanoparticle-modified ITO electrode due to the covalent conjugation, then the antigen and the AuNP/PDDA-G-SnO2 nanocomposite nanoparticle labeled signal antibody (Ab2) were conjugated successively to form a sandwich-type immunocomplex through a specific interaction. Under irradiation with a common ultraviolet lamp (∼365 nm, price $50), the SnO2 NPs were excited and underwent charge-separation to yield electrons (e(-)) and holes (h(+)). As the holes were scavenged by ascorbic acid (AA), the electrons were transferred to the ITO electrode through RGO to generate a photocurrent. The photocurrents were proportional to the CEA concentrations, and the linear range of the developed immunosensor was from 0.005 to 10 ng mL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.036 pg mL(-1). The proposed sensor shows high sensitivity, stability, reproducibility, and can become a promising platform for other biomolecular detection.

  9. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected tumor response for locally advanced rectal cancer predicts survival outcomes: MERCURY experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Uday B; Taylor, Fiona; Blomqvist, Lennart; George, Christopher; Evans, Hywel; Tekkis, Paris; Quirke, Philip; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Moran, Brendan; Heald, Richard; Guthrie, Ashley; Bees, Nicola; Swift, Ian; Pennert, Kjell; Brown, Gina

    2011-10-01

    To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic staging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer in a prospectively enrolled, multicenter study. In a prospective cohort study, 111 patients who had rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant therapy were assessed for response by MRI and pathology staging by T, N and circumferential resection margin (CRM) status. Tumor regression grade (TRG) was also assessed by MRI. Overall survival (OS) was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine associations between staging of good and poor responders on MRI or pathology and survival outcomes after controlling for patient characteristics. On multivariate analysis, the MRI-assessed TRG (mrTRG) hazard ratios (HRs) were independently significant for survival (HR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.65 to 11.7) and disease-free survival (DFS; HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.22 to 8.80). Five-year survival for poor mrTRG was 27% versus 72% (P = .001), and DFS for poor mrTRG was 31% versus 64% (P = .007). Preoperative MRI-predicted CRM independently predicted local recurrence (LR; HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.45 to 12.51). Five-year survival for poor post-treatment pathologic T stage (ypT) was 39% versus 76% (P = .001); DFS for the same was 38% versus 84% (P = .001); and LR for the same was 27% versus 6% (P = .018). The 5-year survival for involved pCRM was 30% versus 59% (P = .001); DFS, 28 versus 62% (P = .02); and LR, 56% versus 10% (P = .001). Pathology node status did not predict outcomes. MRI assessment of TRG and CRM are imaging markers that predict survival outcomes for good and poor responders and provide an opportunity for the multidisciplinary team to offer additional treatment options before planning definitive surgery. Postoperative histopathology assessment of ypT and CRM but not post-treatment N status were important postsurgical predictors of outcome.

  11. Preliminary experience on the use of the Adnatest® system for detection of circulating tumor cells in prostate cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todenhöfer, Tilman; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Feyerabend, Susan; Aufderklamm, Stefan; Mischinger, Johannes; Kühs, Ursula; Gerber, Valentina; Fetisch, Jasmin; Schilling, David; Hauch, Siegfried; Stenzl, Arnulf; Schwentner, Christian

    2012-08-01

    The Adnatest® system combines immunomagnetic enrichment of epithelial cells with polymerase chain reaction for prostate cancer (PC)-specific transcripts for the detection circulating tumor cells (CTCs). We evaluated the Adnatest® in patients with castration-resistant PC receiving docetaxel chemotherapy. CTCs were assessed in 16 patients with castration-resistant PC before cycles one and three of chemotherapy. Furthermore, markers of stem cells and epithelial-mesenchymal transition were assessed. Treatment response was assessed by imaging and prostate-specific antigen measurements. Before chemotherapy, 11 patients were Adnatest®-positive whereas five patients were Adnatest®-positive before cycle three. A positive Adnatest® correlated with radiological progression (p=0.02). Rates of disease progression in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive and -negative patients were 100% and 7.7% (p=0.03). In this preliminary study, the Adnatest® detected CTCs in a considerable proportion of patients with castration-resistant PC. First data on certain markers (EGFR and aldehyd dehydrogenase 1) encourage future studies investigating transcripts predicting treatment response.

  12. The role of three-dimensional multidetector CT gastrography in the preoperative imaging of stomach cancer: Emphasis on detection and localization of the tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Woong; Shin, Sang Soo; Heo, Suk Hee; Lim, Hyo Soon; Park, Young Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Nam Yeol [Dept. of Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) gastrography has been regarded as a promising technique for the preoperative imaging of gastric cancer. It has the ability to produce various three-dimensional (3D) images. Because 3D reconstruction images are more effective and intuitive for recognizing abnormal changes in the gastric folds and subtle mucosal nodularity than two-dimensional images, 3D MDCT gastrography can enhance the detection rate of early gastric cancer, which, in turn, contributes to the improvement of the accuracy of preoperative tumor (T) staging. In addition, shaded surface display and tissue transition projection images provide a global view of the stomach, with the exact location of gastric cancer, which may replace the need for barium studies. In this article, we discuss technical factors in producing high-quality MDCT gastrographic images and present cases demonstrating the usefulness of MDCT gastrography for the detection and T staging of gastric cancer while emphasizing the significance of preoperative localization of gastric cancer in terms of surgical margin.

  13. Development of Spontaneous Mammary Tumors in BALB/c-p53+-Mice: Detection of Early Genetic Alterations and the Mapping of BALB/c Susceptibility Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blackburn, Anneke

    2002-01-01

    The TP53 tumor suppressor gene is defective in the majority of sporadic breast cancers, and breast cancer is the most frequent tumor type in women with Li-Fraumeni syndrome who inherit germline mutations in TP53...

  14. Development of Spontaneous Mammary Tumors in BALB/c-p53+/-Mice: Detection of Early Genetic Alterations and the Mapping of BALB/c Susceptibility Genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Sallie

    2004-01-01

    The TP53 tumor suppressor gene is defective in the majority of sporadic breast cancers, and breast cancer is the most frequent tumor type in women with Li-Fraumeni syndrome and bear germline mutations in TP53...

  15. Electrodeposition of gold-platinum alloy nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes as electrochemical sensing interface for sensitive detection of tumor marker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ya [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Yuan Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Chai Yaqin; Song Zhongju [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2011-07-30

    Graphical abstract: Electrodeposition of gold-platinum alloy (Au-PtNPs) on carbon nanotubes as electrochemical sensing interface and HRP as blocking agent for the fabrication of high sensitive immunosensor. Display Omitted Highlights: > In this work, we proposed a novel electrochemical sensing surface. > The sensing surface possessed larger electro-active areas and higher conductivity due to the introduction of MWCNTs. > The signal could be amplified effectively by synergetic catalysis effect of Au-PtNPs and HRP towards the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. > Biomolecules could be immobilized on the surface of Au-PtNPs tightly with the bioactivity kept well. > The simple fabrication method provided a new potential for the future development of practical devices for clinical diagnosis application. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical sensing interface, electrodeposition of gold-platinum alloy nanoparticles (Au-PtNPs) on carbon nanotubes, was proposed and used to fabricate a label-free amperometric immunosensor. On the one hand, the multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) could increase active area of the electrode and enhance the electron transfer ability between the electrode and redox probe; on the other hand, the Au-PtNPs not only could be used to assemble biomolecules with bioactivity kept well, but also could further facilitate the shuttle of electrons. In the meanwhile, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) instead of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was employed to block the possible remaining active sites and avoid the nonspecific adsorption. With the synergetic catalysis effect of Au-PtNPs and HRP towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), the signal could be amplified and the sensitivity could be enhanced. Using alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) as model analyte, the fabricated immunosensor exhibited two wide linear ranges in the concentration ranges of 0.5-20 ng mL{sup -1} and 20-200 ng mL{sup -1} with a detection limit of 0.17 ng mL{sup -1} at a signal-to-noise of

  16. Combining a wavelet transform with a channelized Hotelling observer for tumor detection in 3D PET oncology imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lartizien, Carole; Tomei, Sandrine; Maxim, Voichita; Odet, Christophe

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates new observer models for 3D whole-body Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging based on a wavelet sub-band decomposition and compares them with the classical constant-Q CHO model. Our final goal is to develop an original method that performs guided detection of abnormal activity foci in PET oncology imaging based on these new observer models. This computer-aided diagnostic method would highly benefit to clinicians for diagnostic purpose and to biologists for massive screening of rodents populations in molecular imaging. Method: We have previously shown good correlation of the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) using a constant-Q model with human observer performance for 3D PET oncology imaging. We propose an alternate method based on combining a CHO observer with a wavelet sub-band decomposition of the image and we compare it to the standard CHO implementation. This method performs an undecimated transform using a biorthogonal B-spline 4/4 wavelet basis to extract the features set for input to the Hotelling observer. This work is based on simulated 3D PET images of an extended MCAT phantom with randomly located lesions. We compare three evaluation criteria: classification performance using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), computation efficiency and visual quality of the derived 3D maps of the decision variable λ. The SNR is estimated on a series of test images for a variable number of training images for both observers. Results: Results show that the maximum SNR is higher with the constant-Q CHO observer, especially for targets located in the liver, and that it is reached with a smaller number of training images. However, preliminary analysis indicates that the visual quality of the 3D maps of the decision variable λ is higher with the wavelet-based CHO and the computation time to derive a 3D λ-map is about 350 times shorter than for the standard CHO. This suggests that the wavelet-CHO observer is a good candidate for use in our guided

  17. Imaging findings of sacral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Ho; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Sung Hye; Chung, Hye Won; Choi, Jung Ah; Kang, Heung Sik

    2003-01-01

    The various pathologic conditions detected at CT and MRI and subsumed by the term 'sacral tumor' include primary bone tumors, sacral canal tumors and metastases. Among these, metastases are much more common than primary bone tumors, of which chordoma is the most common. Although the imaging findings of sacral tumors are nonspecific, a patient's age and sex, and specific findings such as calcification or fluid-fluid levels, can help radiologists in their differential diagnosis. We describe the imaging findings of primary sacral tumors, emphasizing the MRI findings

  18. Multidetector computed tomography enteroclysis (MDCT-E) with neutral enteral and IV contrast enhancement in tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romano, Stefania; Lutio, Elisabetta de; Romano, Luigia [Cardarelli Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Naples (Italy); Rollandi, Gian Andrea [San Martino Hospital, 2. Service of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Grassi, Roberto [Second University of Naples, Institute of Radiology, Naples (Italy); Maglinte, Dean D.T. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2005-06-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the reliability of MDCT-enteroclysis (MDCT-E), an emerging technique of small bowel examination that combines the advantages of MDCT examination of the abdomen and the enteral volume challenge of enteroclysis, in evaluation of small bowel neoplasms. In our institutions, MDCT-E was used to study 456 patients (age range 21-84 years, mean 53 years) admitted for suspicion of small bowel disease. All examinations were done on multichannel CT units, 129 on a 16-slice scanner and 327 on a four-slice scanner. Post-processing and multiplanar reformatting and interpretation were performed on dedicated workstations. After adequate gastrointestinal preparation and naso-enteric intubation, small bowel was distended by methylcellulose infused by a peristaltic pump. One volumetric MDCT acquisition was obtained after 120-130 ml of intravenous contrast medium. Multiplanar reformatting was based on the image reconstruction parameters from 3 to 4 mm. Forty-five small bowel neoplasms were found; in the remaining cases, 223 Crohn's diseases and 149 other abnormalities were detected. All findings were confirmed by surgery, endoscopy or clinical follow-up. In our experience, MDCT-E with neutral enteral and IV contrast seems to be a reliable method in the diagnosis of small bowel neoplasms. (orig.)

  19. Clinical Value of Dual-energy CT in Detection of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: Investigation of the Best Pancreatic Tumor Contrast to Noise Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong-Lan; Zhang, Da-Ming; Xue, Hua-Dan; Jin, Zheng-Yu

    2013-01-01

    found using muscle as the noise background (mono-energetic image vs. 100 kVp image: P=0.246; mono-energetic image vs. non-liner blending image: P=0.044; others: P<0.01). Conclusion Compared with mono-energetic datasets and low kVp datasets, non-linear blending image at automatically chosen blending width/window provides better tumor to the pancreas CNR, which might be beneficial for better detection of pancreatic tumors.

  20. Clinical Application of Picodroplet Digital PCR Technology for Rapid Detection of EGFR T790M in Next-Generation Sequencing Libraries and DNA from Limited Tumor Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsu, Laetitia; Intrieri, Julie; Thampi, Linta; Yu, Helena; Riely, Gregory; Nafa, Khedoudja; Chandramohan, Raghu; Ladanyi, Marc; Arcila, Maria E

    2016-11-01

    Although next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a robust technology for comprehensive assessment of EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas with acquired resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, it may not provide sufficiently rapid and sensitive detection of the EGFR T790M mutation, the most clinically relevant resistance biomarker. Here, we describe a digital PCR (dPCR) assay for rapid T790M detection on aliquots of NGS libraries prepared for comprehensive profiling, fully maximizing broad genomic analysis on limited samples. Tumor DNAs from patients with EGFR-mutant lung adenocarcinomas and acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors were prepared for Memorial Sloan-Kettering-Integrated Mutation Profiling of Actionable Cancer Targets sequencing, a hybrid capture-based assay interrogating 410 cancer-related genes. Precapture library aliquots were used for rapid EGFR T790M testing by dPCR, and results were compared with NGS and locked nucleic acid-PCR Sanger sequencing (reference high sensitivity method). Seventy resistance samples showed 99% concordance with the reference high sensitivity method in accuracy studies. Input as low as 2.5 ng provided a sensitivity of 1% and improved further with increasing DNA input. dPCR on libraries required less DNA and showed better performance than direct genomic DNA. dPCR on NGS libraries is a robust and rapid approach to EGFR T790M testing, allowing most economical utilization of limited material for comprehensive assessment. The same assay can also be performed directly on any limited DNA source and cell-free DNA. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT in neuroendocrine tumors: detection of additional lesions and effects on quantitative parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnsak, Mariana; Bärwolf, Robert; Freesmeyer, Martin

    2016-11-08

    Respiratory motion during PET/CT acquisition generates artifacts in the form of breath-related blurring, which influences the lesion detectability and diagnostic accuracy. The goal of this study was to verify whether breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT (bhPET) allows detection of additional foci compared to free-breathing PET/CT (fbPET), and to assess the impact of breath-holding on standard uptake values (SUV) and isocontoured volume (Vic40) in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Patients with NET (n=39) were included in this study. BhPET and fbPET characteristics of 96 lesions were compared, and correlated with standard contrast-enhanced (ce) CT and MRI for lesion verification. Quantitative parameters SUV (max and mean) and Vic40 were assessed for both methods and evaluated by linear regression and Spearman's correlation. The impact of lesion size, localization and time interval between investigations was also analyzed. bhPET identified one additional metastasis not seen at fbPET but visible at ceMRI. Another additional bhPET focus did not have a morphological correlate. At bhPET, the SUVmax and SUVmean proved significantly higher and the Vic40 significantly lower than at fbPET. Lesion size, localization and time intervals did not impact significantly on SUV or Vic40. Currently, routine use of breath-hold [68Ga]DOTA-TOC PET/CT cannot be recommended as only one additional lesion was identified. Therefore, bhPET has currently no indication in patients with NET. If technical improvements regarding PET/CT scanner sensitivity are available, bhPET should be reevaluated in the future.

  2. Cation-exchange antibody labeling for simultaneous electrochemical detection of tumor markers CA15-3 and CA19-9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guangjie; Qing, Yi; Shan, Jinlu; Jin, Feng; Wang, Dong; Yuan, Ruo

    2013-01-01

    We report on a new kind of non-covalent multi-label electrochemical immunoassay that was applied to simultaneously quantify the tumor markers CA15-3 and CA19-9. The method employs a nanohybrid composed of an ionomer and conductive titanium dioxide nanoparticles that act as a matrix support for the antibodies. The two antibodies (anti-CA153 and anti-CA199) were labeled (a) with a cobaltous dipyridine complex, and (b) with methylene blue. Labeling is based on cation-exchange interaction rather than on covalent conjugation. The redox potentials of the two labels are separated by an interval of 0.3 V. The resulting sandwich-type immunosensor was read out by differential pulse voltammetry. The potential sites and currents of the two redox probes reflect the concentration of the two analytes. The two analytes were determined with a detection limit of 1.6 U mL −1 for CA19-9, and of 0.3 U mL −1 for CA15-3 (author)

  3. Detection of Tumor Cell-Specific mRNA in the Peripheral Blood of Patients with Breast Cancer — Evaluation of Several Markers with Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Andergassen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known that cells from epithelial tumors, e.g., breast cancer, detach from their primary tissue and enter blood circulation. We show that the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in samples of patients with primary and metastatic breast cancer can be detected with an array of selected tumor-marker-genes by reverse transcription real-time PCR. The focus of the presented work is on detecting differences in gene expression between healthy individuals and adjuvant and metastatic breast cancer patients, not an accurate quantification of these differences. Therefore, total RNA was isolated from blood samples of healthy donors and patients with primary or metastatic breast cancer after enrichment of mononuclear cells by density gradient centrifugation. After reverse transcription real-time PCR was carried out with a set of marker genes (BCSP, CK8, Her2, MGL, CK18, CK19. B2M and GAPDH were used as reference genes. Blood samples from patients with metastatic disease revealed increased cytokine gene levels in comparison to normal blood samples. Detection of a single gene was not sufficient to detect CTCs by reverse transcription real-time PCR. Markers used here were selected based on a recent study detecting cancer cells on different protein levels. The combination of such a marker array leads to higher and more specific discovery rates, predominantly in metastatic patients. Identification of CTCs by PCR methods may lead to better diagnosis and prognosis and could help to choose an adequate therapy.

  4. Sinus Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RESOURCES Medical Societies Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > CONDITIONS > Sinus Tumors Adult Sinusitis Pediatric ... and they vary greatly in location, size and type. Care for these tumors is individualized to each ...

  5. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  6. Wilms tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  7. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  8. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  9. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Discovery and prevalidation of salivary extracellular microRNA biomarkers panel for the noninvasive detection of benign and malignant parotid gland tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matse, J.H.; Yoshizawa, J.; Wang, X.; Elashoff, D.; Bolscher, J.G.M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Bloemena, E.; Wong, D.T.W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was conducted to explore the differences in salivary microRNA (miRNA) profiles between patients with malignant or benign parotid gland tumors as a potential preoperative diagnostic tool of tumors in the salivary glands. Experimental Design: Whole saliva samples from patients with

  11. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  12. Promising markers for the detection of premature senescence tumor cells induced by ionizing radiation: Cathepsin D and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Seon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Recently, it has been proved that induction of senescence could be a promising way of tumor treatment. Senescence was originally described in normal human cells undergoing a finite number of divisions before permanent growth arrest. It has now become regarded more broadly as a general biological program of terminal growth arrest. A variety of stresses such as ionizing radiation (IR), oxidative stress, oncogenic transformation, DNA damaging agents triggers stress-induced premature senescence, i.e. rapid and permanent cell growth arrest. Therefore, premature senescence is bona fide barrier to tumorigenesis and hallmark of premalignant tumors. However, there is lack of obvious markers for senescent tumor cells. To identify useful premature senescence markers for tumor cells, we monitored the changes of protein expression profile in IR-induced premature senescence MCF7 human breast cancer cells. We identified biomarkers which evidently changed their expression levels in ionizing radiation-induced senescenct tumor cells.

  13. Promising markers for the detection of premature senescence tumor cells induced by ionizing radiation: Cathepsin D and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it has been proved that induction of senescence could be a promising way of tumor treatment. Senescence was originally described in normal human cells undergoing a finite number of divisions before permanent growth arrest. It has now become regarded more broadly as a general biological program of terminal growth arrest. A variety of stresses such as ionizing radiation (IR), oxidative stress, oncogenic transformation, DNA damaging agents triggers stress-induced premature senescence, i.e. rapid and permanent cell growth arrest. Therefore, premature senescence is bona fide barrier to tumorigenesis and hallmark of premalignant tumors. However, there is lack of obvious markers for senescent tumor cells. To identify useful premature senescence markers for tumor cells, we monitored the changes of protein expression profile in IR-induced premature senescence MCF7 human breast cancer cells. We identified biomarkers which evidently changed their expression levels in ionizing radiation-induced senescenct tumor cells

  14. Central nervous system tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, P.R.; Fike, J.R.; Hoopes, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tumors are relatively common in veterinary medicine, with most diagnoses occurring in the canine and feline species. Numerous tumor types from various cells or origins have been identified with the most common tumors being meningiomas and glial cell tumors. Radiation therapy is often used as an aid to control the clinical signs associated with these neoplasms. In general, these tumors have a very low metastatic potential, such that local control offers substantial benefit. Experience in veterinary radiation oncology would indicate that many patients benefit from radiation treatment. Current practice indicates the need for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging studies. These highly beneficial studies are used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and to monitor treatment response. Improvements in treatment planning and radiation delivered to the tumor, while sparing the normal tissues, should improve local control and decrease potential radiation related problems to the CNS. When possible, multiple fractions of 3 Gy or less should be used. The tolerance dose to the normal tissue with this fractionation schedule is 50 to 55 Gy. The most common and serious complications of radiation for CNS tumors is delayed radiation myelopathy and necrosis. Medical management of the patient during radiation therapy requires careful attention to anesthetic protocols, and medications to reduce intracranial pressure that is often elevated in these patients. Canine brain tumors have served as an experimental model to test numerous new treatments. Increased availability of advanced imaging modalities has spawned increased detection of these neoplasms. Early detection of these tumors with appropriate aggressive therapy should prove beneficial to many patients

  15. Tunable and Linker Free Nanogaps in Core-Shell Plasmonic Nanorods for Selective and Quantitative Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells by SERS

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Peng; Madathumpady Abubaker, Habeeb Muhammed; Alsaiari, Shahad K.; Moosa, Basem; AlMalik, Abdulaziz; Kumar, Anjli; Ringe, Emilie; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2017-01-01

    Controlling the size, number, and shape of nanogaps in plasmonic nanostructures is of significant importance for the development of novel quantum plasmonic devices and quantitative sensing techniques such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we introduce a new synthetic method based on coordination interactions and galvanic replacement to prepare core-shell plasmonic nanorods with tunable enclosed nanogaps. Decorating Au nanorods with Raman reporters that strongly coordinate Ag+ ions (e.g., 4-mercaptopyridine) afforded uniform nucleation sites to form a sacrificial Ag shell. Galvanic replacement of the Ag shell by HAuCl4 resulted in Au-AgAu core-shell structure with a uniform intra-nanoparticle gap. The size (length and width) and morphology of the core-shell plasmonic nanorods as well as the nanogap size depends on the concentration of the coordination complexes formed between Ag+ ions and 4-mercaptopyridine. Moreover, encapsulating Raman reporters within the nanogaps afforded an internal standard for sensitive and quantitative SERS analysis. To test the applicability, core-shell plasmonic nanorods were functionalized with aptamers specific to circulating tumor cells such as MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7, breast cancer cell line). This system could selectively detect as low as 20 MCF-7 cells in a blood mimicking fluid employing SERS. The linking DNA duplex on core-shell plasmonic nanorods can also intercalate hydrophobic drug molecules such as Doxorubicin, thereby increasing the versatility of this sensing platform to include drug delivery. Our synthetic method offers the possibility of developing multifunctional SERS-active materials with a wide range of applications including bio sensing, imaging and therapy.

  16. Natural single amino acid polymorphism (F19Y) in human galectin-8: detection of structural alterations and increased growth-regulatory activity on tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Federico M; Scholz, Barbara A; Buzamet, Eliza; Kopitz, Jürgen; André, Sabine; Menéndez, Margarita; Romero, Antonio; Solís, Dolores; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-01

    Natural amino acid substitution by single-site nucleotide polymorphism can become a valuable tool for structure-activity correlations, especially if evidence for association to disease parameters exists. Focusing on the F19Y change in human galectin-8, connected clinically to rheumatoid arthritis, we here initiate the study of consequences of a single-site substitution in the carbohydrate recognition domain of this family of cellular effectors. We apply a strategically combined set of structural and cell biological techniques for comparing properties of the wild-type and variant proteins. The overall hydrodynamic behavior of the full-length protein and of the separate N-domain is not noticeably altered, but displacements in the F0 β-strand of the β-sandwich fold in the N-domain are induced, as evidenced by protein crystallography. Analysis of thermal stability by circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed perceptible differences for the full-length proteins, pointing to an impact of the substitution beyond the N-domain. In addition, small differences in thermodynamic parameters of carbohydrate binding are detected. On the level of two types of tumor cells, characteristics of binding appeared rather similar. In further comparison of the influence on proliferation, the variant proved to be more active as growth regulator in the six tested lines of neuroblastoma, erythroleukemia and colon adenocarcinoma. The seemingly subtle structural change identified here thus has functional implications in vitro, encouraging further analysis in autoimmune regulation and, in a broad context, in work with other natural single-site variants, using the documented combined strategy. The atomic coordinates and structure factors (codes 4BMB, 4BME) have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank. © 2014 FEBS.

  17. Tunable and Linker Free Nanogaps in Core-Shell Plasmonic Nanorods for Selective and Quantitative Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells by SERS

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Yang

    2017-10-09

    Controlling the size, number, and shape of nanogaps in plasmonic nanostructures is of significant importance for the development of novel quantum plasmonic devices and quantitative sensing techniques such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we introduce a new synthetic method based on coordination interactions and galvanic replacement to prepare core-shell plasmonic nanorods with tunable enclosed nanogaps. Decorating Au nanorods with Raman reporters that strongly coordinate Ag+ ions (e.g., 4-mercaptopyridine) afforded uniform nucleation sites to form a sacrificial Ag shell. Galvanic replacement of the Ag shell by HAuCl4 resulted in Au-AgAu core-shell structure with a uniform intra-nanoparticle gap. The size (length and width) and morphology of the core-shell plasmonic nanorods as well as the nanogap size depends on the concentration of the coordination complexes formed between Ag+ ions and 4-mercaptopyridine. Moreover, encapsulating Raman reporters within the nanogaps afforded an internal standard for sensitive and quantitative SERS analysis. To test the applicability, core-shell plasmonic nanorods were functionalized with aptamers specific to circulating tumor cells such as MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7, breast cancer cell line). This system could selectively detect as low as 20 MCF-7 cells in a blood mimicking fluid employing SERS. The linking DNA duplex on core-shell plasmonic nanorods can also intercalate hydrophobic drug molecules such as Doxorubicin, thereby increasing the versatility of this sensing platform to include drug delivery. Our synthetic method offers the possibility of developing multifunctional SERS-active materials with a wide range of applications including bio sensing, imaging and therapy.

  18. [Detection and clinical value of epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) mRNA positive circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Cheng, Jian-ping; Di, Li-jun; Song, Guo-hong; Ren, Jun

    2012-04-18

    To test for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) relying on epithelial cellular adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression in metastatic breast cancer by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. In the study,47 metastatic breast cancer patients were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR for detecting EpCAM mRNA. In addition, analyses were carried out for their correlation with patients' clinicopathologic features, response, and the time to progression (TTP). The sensitivity of EpCAM mRNA in the metastatic breast cancer patients was about 40%. However, the specificity of EpCAM mRNA for 20 healthy controls was 100%. TTP was calculated, and compared with that between EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative groups. For the retrospective study, the median TTP was 7.1 months and 11.1 months (P=0.013) for patients with EpCAM mRNA-positive and EpCAM mRNA-negative, respectively, after the first cycle chemotherapy. Moreover, a statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between EpCAM mRNA and TTP in patients who underwent the first or the second-line chemotherapy (P=0.018), but there was no significance in the patients pretreated with two or more previous chemotherapy lines (P=0.471). This study provides evidence of the presence of EpCAM mRNA in approximately 40% of patients with metastatic breast cancer. There is a strong correlation between EpCAM mRNA results after the first cycle therapy and TTP in metastatic breast cancer patients, and EpCAM mRNA positive after chemotherapy may predict shorter TTP.

  19. Effective detection of the tumors causing osteomalacia using [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hongli; Li, Fang; Zhuang, Hongming; Wang, Zhenghua; Tian, Jian; Xing, Xiaoping; Jin, Jin; Zhong, Dingrong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2013-11-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an endocrine disorder caused by tumors producing excessive fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). The causative tumors are generally small, slow-growing benign mesenchymal tumors. The only cure of the disease depends on resection of the tumors, which are extremely difficult to localize due to their small sizes and rare locations. Since these tumors are known to express somatostatin receptors, this research was undertaken to evaluate efficacy of [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body imaging in this clinical setting Images of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scans and clinical chart from 183 patients with hypophosphatemia and clinically suspected TIO were retrospectively reviewed. The scan findings were compared to the results of histopathological examinations and clinical follow-ups. Among 183 patients, 72 were confirmed to have TIO while 103 patients were found to have other causes of hypophosphatemia. The possibility of TIO could not be either diagnosed or excluded in the remaining 8 patients. For analytical purposes, these 8 patients who could neither be diagnosed nor excluded as having TIO were regarded as having the disease, bringing the total of TIO patients to 80. The 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scan identified 69 tumors in 80 patients with TIO, which rendered a sensitivity of 86.3% (69/80). 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy excluded 102 patients without TIO with a specificity of 99.1% (102/103). The overall accuracy of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC whole body scan in the localization of tumors responsible for osteomalacia is 93.4% (171/183). Whole body 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC imaging is effective in the localization of occult tumors causing TIO. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effective detection of the tumors causing osteomalacia using [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Hongli; Li, Fang; Zhuang, Hongming; Wang, Zhenghua; Tian, Jian; Xing, Xiaoping; Jin, Jin; Zhong, Dingrong; Zhang, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an endocrine disorder caused by tumors producing excessive fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). The causative tumors are generally small, slow-growing benign mesenchymal tumors. The only cure of the disease depends on resection of the tumors, which are extremely difficult to localize due to their small sizes and rare locations. Since these tumors are known to express somatostatin receptors, this research was undertaken to evaluate efficacy of [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body imaging in this clinical setting Methods: Images of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scans and clinical chart from 183 patients with hypophosphatemia and clinically suspected TIO were retrospectively reviewed. The scan findings were compared to the results of histopathological examinations and clinical follow-ups. Results: Among 183 patients, 72 were confirmed to have TIO while 103 patients were found to have other causes of hypophosphatemia. The possibility of TIO could not be either diagnosed or excluded in the remaining 8 patients. For analytical purposes, these 8 patients who could neither be diagnosed nor excluded as having TIO were regarded as having the disease, bringing the total of TIO patients to 80. The 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scan identified 69 tumors in 80 patients with TIO, which rendered a sensitivity of 86.3% (69/80). 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy excluded 102 patients without TIO with a specificity of 99.1% (102/103). The overall accuracy of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC whole body scan in the localization of tumors responsible for osteomalacia is 93.4% (171/183). Conclusions: Whole body 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC imaging is effective in the localization of occult tumors causing TIO

  1. Effective detection of the tumors causing osteomalacia using [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, Hongli, E-mail: annsmile1976@sina.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Li, Fang, E-mail: lifang@pumch.cn [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhuang, Hongming, E-mail: zhuang@email.chop.edu [Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 34th and Civic Ctr Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Wang, Zhenghua, E-mail: ccq1214@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Tian, Jian, E-mail: tianjian4809@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Xing, Xiaoping, E-mail: xingxp@126.com [Department of Endocrinology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Jin, Jin, E-mail: jinjin9010@126.com [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhong, Dingrong, E-mail: ZhongDR@pumch.cn [Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhang, Jingjing, E-mail: zhangjingjingtag@163.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is an endocrine disorder caused by tumors producing excessive fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). The causative tumors are generally small, slow-growing benign mesenchymal tumors. The only cure of the disease depends on resection of the tumors, which are extremely difficult to localize due to their small sizes and rare locations. Since these tumors are known to express somatostatin receptors, this research was undertaken to evaluate efficacy of [Tc-99m]-HYNIC-octreotide (99mTc-HYNIC-TOC) whole body imaging in this clinical setting Methods: Images of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scans and clinical chart from 183 patients with hypophosphatemia and clinically suspected TIO were retrospectively reviewed. The scan findings were compared to the results of histopathological examinations and clinical follow-ups. Results: Among 183 patients, 72 were confirmed to have TIO while 103 patients were found to have other causes of hypophosphatemia. The possibility of TIO could not be either diagnosed or excluded in the remaining 8 patients. For analytical purposes, these 8 patients who could neither be diagnosed nor excluded as having TIO were regarded as having the disease, bringing the total of TIO patients to 80. The 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scan identified 69 tumors in 80 patients with TIO, which rendered a sensitivity of 86.3% (69/80). 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC scintigraphy excluded 102 patients without TIO with a specificity of 99.1% (102/103). The overall accuracy of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC whole body scan in the localization of tumors responsible for osteomalacia is 93.4% (171/183). Conclusions: Whole body 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC imaging is effective in the localization of occult tumors causing TIO.

  2. Bone tumors in R30 dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, J.P.; Pool, R.R.

    1980-01-01

    Radiographic and histologic findings from a mid-level group (38 dogs) of radium toxicity dogs showed 49 primary bone tumors with a high frequency of tumors within the axial skeleton. Additional primary bone tumors, bone tumors metastatic to bone, soft tissue metastases, and lung metastases were detected. No bone tumors were identified in 3 dogs. Lesions described as radiation osteodystrophy were found in all but 2 dogs

  3. Radioimmunoassays for tumor diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dressler, J.

    1983-01-01

    Aside from imaging techniques several (radio-)immunological analyses are used for tumor diagnosis. Oncofetal antigens, for instance the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), have become the most important substances for many malignancies. However, nearly all of the so-called tumor markers are not suitable for early diagnosis or screening either because of low sensitivity or low tumor specifity. On the other hand follow-up measurements give a very sensitive index of the success of treatment and may indicate tumor progression when other signs are still not present. In some carcinomas and under some clinical circumstances tumorspecific markers are available and mandatory for detection and/or staging: AFP in hepatoma, acid phosphatase in metastasizing carcinoma of the prostate and serum thyreoglobulin in differentiated thyroid cancer. (orig.) [de

  4. Reliability of using circulating tumor cells for detecting epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu F

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Fang Hu,* Xiaowei Mao,* Yujun Zhang, Xiaoxuan Zheng, Ping Gu, Huimin Wang, Xueyan ZhangDepartment of Pulmonary Medicine, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: To evaluate the clinical value of circulating tumor cells as a surrogate to detect epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients.Methods: We searched the electronic databases, and all articles meeting predetermined selection criteria were included in this study. The pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio were calculated. The evaluation indexes of the diagnostic performance were the summary receiver operating characteristic curve and area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve.Results: Eight eligible publications with 255 advanced NSCLC patients were included in this meta-analysis. Taking tumor tissues as reference, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, negative likelihood ratio, and diagnostic odds ratio of circulating tumor cells for detecting the epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status were found to be 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50–0.95, 0.95 (95% CI: 0.24–1.00, 16.81 (95% CI: 0.33–848.62, 0.19 (95% CI: 0.06–0.64, and 86.81 (95% CI: 1.22–6,154.15, respectively. The area under the summary receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.92 (95% CI: 0.89–0.94. The subgroup analysis showed that the factors of blood volume, histological type, EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy, and circulating tumor cell and tissue test methods for EGFR accounted for the significant difference of the pooled specificity. No significant difference was found between the pooled sensitivity of the subgroup.Conclusion: Our meta-analysis confirmed that circulating tumor cells are a good surrogate for

  5. Evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD SPECT for the detection of brain tumor. Comparison with {sup 201}Tl SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Motoo; Sasaki, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Yoshirou; Kaminaga, Tatsuro; Furui, Shigeru [Teikyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Medicine; Konoeda, Kouichi; Karigome, Masato; Yoshida, Katsuhiko

    1997-01-01

    For the evaluation of brain tumor (n=15), we performed both dynamic and static {sup 99m}Tc-ECD (ECD) SPECT studies. {sup 201}Tl SPECT was also used for comparison with the results of ECD SPECT. Dynamic ECD SPECT was obtained following the injection of 600 MBq of ECD. Five min after the injection of ECD, static ECD SPECT was performed. {sup 201}Tl SPECT was obtained 10 min after the injection of 74 MBq. Abnormal uptake was recognized in 7 of 15 tumors with dynamic ECD; 5 of 7 meningiomas, 1 of 1 glioblastoma and 1 of 1 astrocytoma. However, no abnormal uptake was seen in 3 of 3 benign tumors (1 low grade astrocytoma, 1 hemangioma, 1 craniopharyngioma) and in 2 of 2 brain metastases. In contrast abnormal uptake was seen in 11 of 15 tumors with {sup 201}Tl; 7 of 7 meningiomas, 2 of 2 brain metastases, 1 of 1 glioblastoma and 1 of 1 craniopharyngioma. No abnormal uptake was seen in 3 of 3 benign tumors (1 hemangioma and 2 low grade astrocytomas). Equivocal uptake was seen in 1 low grade astrocytoma with dynamic ECD and {sup 201}Tl. The mechanism of the accumulation of dynamic ECD to brain tumor is unclear. However, it may reflect not only blood flow, but also metabolism. (author)

  6. Tumor cell surface proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennel, S.J.; Braslawsky, G.R.; Flynn, K.; Foote, L.J.; Friedman, E.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Huang, A.H.L.; Lankford, P.K.

    1982-01-01

    Cell surface proteins mediate interaction between cells and their environment. Unique tumor cell surface proteins are being identified and quantified in several tumor systems to address the following questions: (i) how do tumor-specific proteins arise during cell transformation; (ii) can these proteins be used as markers of tumor cell distribution in vivo; (iii) can cytotoxic drugs be targeted specifically to tumor cells using antibody; and (iv) can solid state radioimmunoassay of these proteins provide a means to quantify transformation frequencies. A tumor surface protein of 180,000 M/sub r/ (TSP-180) has been identified on cells of several lung carcinomas of BALB/c mice. TSP-180 was not detected on normal lung tissue, embryonic tissue, or other epithelial or sarcoma tumors, but it was found on lung carcinomas of other strains of mice. Considerable amino acid sequence homology exists among TSP-180's from several cell sources, indicating that TSP-180 synthesis is directed by normal cellular genes although it is not expressed in normal cells. The regulation of synthesis of TSP-180 and its relationship to normal cell surface proteins are being studied. Monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to TSP-180 have been developed. The antibodies have been used in immunoaffinity chromatography to isolate TSP-180 from tumor cell sources. This purified tumor antigen was used to immunize rats. Antibody produced by these animals reacted at different sites (epitopes) on the TSP-180 molecule than did the original MoAb. These sera and MoAb from these animals are being used to identify normal cell components related to the TSP-180 molecule

  7. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  8. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  9. Tumor scintigram, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Shunichi; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa; Shimura, Kazuo; Ifuka, Keijiro

    1975-01-01

    In various cases of malignant tumors, especially those of lung cancer and liver cancer, scans were made with 57 Co-bleomycin(BLM), and its diagnostic significance was evaluated. Tumors were visualized with 57 Co-BLM in 22 of the 26 cases of lung cancer (84.6%). Concentrations of the RI were noted in all of the cases of squamous epithelium cancer, adenoid cancer and cellule-type undifferentiated cancer. The smallest tumor that could be detected was a 2 x 2 cm adenoid cancer. Tumors were imaged in 19 of the 27 cases of liver cancer (70.4%). This detection rate was increased by a combination of 57 Co-BLM and 198 Au-colloid scanning. The authors believe that 57 Co-BLM will help to establish the diagnosis of lung cancer or liver cancer. Tumors were also imaged in 6 of the 15 cases of breast cancer, but no distinct concentration was noted in the 7 cases of thyroid cancer. (Ueda, J.)

  10. Detection of Local Tumor Recurrence After Definitive Treatment of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Histogram Analysis of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced T1-Weighted Perfusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Choi, Young Jun; Park, Ji Eun; Sung, Yu Sub; Kim, Namkug; Baek, Jung Hwan

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the added value of histogram analysis of the ratio of initial to final 90-second time-signal intensity AUC (AUCR) for differentiating local tumor recurrence from contrast-enhancing scar on follow-up dynamic contrast-enhanced T1-weighted perfusion MRI of patients treated for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AUCR histogram parameters were assessed among tumor recurrence (n = 19) and contrast-enhancing scar (n = 27) at primary sites and compared using the t test. ROC analysis was used to determine the best differentiating parameters. The added value of AUCR histogram parameters was assessed when they were added to inconclusive conventional MRI results. Histogram analysis showed statistically significant differences in the 50th, 75th, and 90th percentiles of the AUCR values between the two groups (p Histogram analysis of AUCR can improve the diagnostic yield for local tumor recurrence during surveillance after treatment for HNSCC.

  11. [Active surveillance for prostate cancer: usefulness of endorectal MR at 1.5 Tesla with pelvic phased array coil in detecting significant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyckx, F; Hallouin, P; Barré, C; Aillet, G; Chauveau, P; Hétet, J-F; Bouchot, O; Rigaud, J

    2011-02-01

    To describe and assess MRI signs of significant tumor in a series of patients who all underwent radical prostatectomy and also fulfilled criteria to choose active surveillance according to French "SurAcaP" protocol. The clinical reports of 681 consecutive patients operated on for prostate cancer between 2002 and 2007 were reviewed retrospectively. All patients had endorectal MR (1.5 Tesla) with pelvic phased array coil. (1.5 T erMR PPA). Sixty-one patients (8.9%) fulfilled "SurAcaP" protocol criteria. Preoperative data (MR+core biopsy) were assessed by comparison to whole-mount step section pathology. 85.3% of the 61 patients entering SurAcaP protocol had significant tumor at pathology. (Non Organ Confined Disease (Non OCD)=8.2%, Gleason sum score>6=39.2%). A new exclusion criterion has been assessed: T3MRI±NPS>1 as a predictor tool of significant tumor. ("T3MRI±NPS>1"=Non OCD at MR±number of positive sextants involved in tumor at MR and/or Core Biopsy > to 1). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV of the criterion "T3MRI±NPS>1" in predicting significant tumor were, respectively: 77%, 33%, 86%, 20%. Adding this criterion to other criteria of the "SurAcaP" protocol could allow the exclusion of all Non OCD, and a decrease in Gleason sum Score>6 rates (20%). Endorectal MR at 1.5 Tesla with pelvic-phased array coil should be considered when selecting patients for active surveillance in the management of prostate cancer. A criterion based upon MR and core biopsy findings, called "T3MR±NSP>1" may represent an exclusion citeria due to its ability to predict significant tumor. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Tumor markers in clinical oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, S.

    2004-01-01

    The subtle differences between normal and tumor cells are exploited in the detection and treatment of cancer. These differences are designated as tumor markers and can be either qualitative or quantitative in their nature. That means that both the structures that are produced by tumor cells as well as the structures that are produced in excessive amounts by host tissues under the influence of tumor cells can function as tumor markers. Speaking in general, the tumor markers are the specific molecules appearing in the blood or tissues and the occurrence of which is associated with cancer. According to their application, tumor markers can be roughly divided as markers in clinical oncology and markers in pathology. In this review, only tumor markers in clinical oncology are going to be discussed. Current tumor markers in clinical oncology include (i) oncofetal antigens, (ii) placental proteins, (iii) hormones, (iv) enzymes, (v) tumor-associated antigens, (vi) special serum proteins, (vii) catecholamine metabolites, and (viii) miscellaneous markers. As to the literature, an ideal tumor marker should fulfil certain criteria - when using it as a test for detection of cancer disease: (1) positive results should occur in the early stages of the disease, (2) positive results should occur only in the patients with a specific type of malignancy, (3) positive results should occur in all patients with the same malignancy, (4) the measured values should correlate with the stage of the disease, (5) the measured values should correlate to the response to treatment, (6) the marker should be easy to measure. Most tumor markers available today meet several, but not all criteria. As a consequence of that, some criteria were chosen for the validation and proper selection of the most appropriate marker in a particular malignancy, and these are: (1) markers' sensitivity, (2) specificity, and (3) predictive values. Sensitivity expresses the mean probability of determining an elevated tumor

  13. Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer by Molecular Targeted Ultrasound Imaging Together with Serum Markers of Tumor-Associated Nuclear Change and Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    cells of the tumor also expressed IL-16 ( red arrows). Compared with normal (A), more IL-16+ cells are seen in the stroma of the ovaries with tumor. S...6):538- 50. doi: 10.1111/ aji .12172. Epub 2013 Nov 5. PMID: 24188693. (appended in pages 65-77). Meeting presentations: Abstract published and...S) and surface layer of ovary. B, Section of benign ovarian Tu. C, Section of early-stage ovarian Tu. D, section of late-stage ovarian Tu. Red arrows

  14. Desmoid tumor within lesser sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čolović Radoje

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors or fibromatoses comprise a number of benign fibrous proliferative lesions that have local infiltrative growth and tendency to recur after incomplete excision. They never metastasize. The authors present a 31-year old woman who, due to epigastric pain and palpable mass detected on presentation, underwent the excision of firm tumorous mass, 210x140x115mm in diameter, from the lesser sac. Compressing the splenic vein, the tumor caused left-sided portal hypertension which subsided after the mass was removed. The recovery was uneventful. The histological examination verified typical desmoid tumor. Twelve years after surgery, the patient remained symptom-free with no signs of recurrence.

  15. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association (ABTA) International RadioSurgery Association National Brain Tumor Society National Institute of Child Health and Human Development ... Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  16. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the brain to reduce spinal fluid pressure. Risks of radiation therapy include damage to healthy brain cells when tumor cells are destroyed. Common side effects from chemotherapy include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue.

  17. Profiling of tryptophan-related plasma indoles in patients with carcinoid tumors by automated, on-line, solid-phase extraction and HPLC with fluorescence detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kema, IP; Meijer, WG; Meiborg, G; Ooms, B; Willemse, PHB; de Vries, EGE

    2001-01-01

    Background: Profiling of the plasma indoles tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), serotonin, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) is useful in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with carcinoid tumors. We describe an automated method for the profiling of these indoles in protein-containing

  18. Libraries of RGD analogs, labeled through ReO3+ or TcO3+ coordination, targeting αVβ3 integrin: development of tracers for the early detection of tumor neo-angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufort, M.

    2008-11-01

    Integrins form a family of hetero-dimeric integral glycoproteins which play a central role in cell-cell adhesion and cell-matrix interactions. In particular, they are over expressed during tumor neo-angiogenesis. About 10 of them recognize a structured RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence. Analogs of this sequence can be used for the early detection of tumors and metastases. We developed new tracers, labeled with 99m Tc, for the molecular imaging of α V β 3 integrin. Until recently, there was no reliable ab initio structure prediction of complex molecules containing Re and Tc chelates. Therefore, we preferred a combinatorial approach to develop potential ligands of α V β 3 integrin and we attempted to identify efficient tracers by in vivo screening. This method would account for biodistribution and pharmacokinetics properties in the early steps of the study. Tracers were obtained according two strategies: i) cyclization of linear RGD analogs; ii) combinatorial assembling of independent modules through metal core coordination by the well-known NS 2 +S motif. After synthesis and labeling, the stability of the tracers was investigated in presence of glutathione and in murine plasma. In vitro screening on purified integrin showed that a cyclic rhenium coordinate binds specifically α V β 3 . A tumor model (U87-MG tumor on nude mice) was validated in the laboratory and a method was developed to analyze in vivo experiments. Biodistribution data and percentage of activity found in tumors are encouraging for cyclic compounds though identification of efficient tracers is difficult due to their instability in the conditions of analyses. (author)

  19. In vitro gene imaging by luciferase to detect the expression and effect of human tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand in lung cancer A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Na; Cui Jianling; Guo Zhiyuan; Guo Zhiping; Sun Yingcai; Liu Jicun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To detect the expression and effect of human tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand(hTRAIL) in vitro by using a novel double expressing adenoviral vector encoding hTRAIL and firefly luciferase (luc) gene (Ad-hTRAIL-luc), in which luc was used as reporter gene. Methods: A549 cells were transduced with the adenoviral vector encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene (Ad-EGFP) at variable multiplicity of infection (MOI). Adenoviral transduction efficiency was determined 48 h later. A549 cells were transduced with Ad-hTRAIL-luc at variable MOI, and the following tests were performed 48h later, respectively: the expressive ratio of hTRAIL and the apoptotic ratio of A549 cells were measured by flow cytometer; counts per minute (cpm) of luminescence were measured by scintillation counters. A549 cells were transduced with Ad-luc at variable MOI, and cpm of luminescence was measured by scintillation counters 48 h later. After A549 cells were transduced with Ad-hTRAIL-luc, the expressive ratio of hTRAIL, the apoptotic ratio of A549 cells and cpm of luminescence were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. The positive ratio of EGFP and cpm of luminescence (Ad-luc) were analyzed by nonparametric ANOVA. Results: After A549 cells were transfected with Ad-hTRAIL-luc, the expressive ratio of hTRAIL on the cell membrane of the groups were (2.37±0.04)%, (3.16±0.03)%, (3.64± 0.03)%, (3.96±0.02)%, (4.24±0.02)%, (4.34±0.02)% respectively, which showed significant difference between each other (P<0.01); and the apoptotic ratio of A549 cells were (1.52±0.04)%, (2.93±0.02)%, (3.39±0.02)%, (3.64±0.02)%, (3.86±0.02)%, (4.08±0.02)%, (4.20± 0.02)%, respectively, and it showed significant difference between each other (P<0.01); cpm of luminescence were 465 561 ± 26 801, 1 038 576 ± 29 417, 937 655 ± 23 197, 786 432 ± 20 028, 524 288 ± 16 338, 401 566 ± 15 961, respectively, and it also showed significant difference between each other (P<0

  20. Stages of Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tumors: Yolk sac tumors make a hormone called alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). They can form in the ovary, testicle, ... are used to detect extracranial germ cell tumors: Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG). For ...

  1. Primary malignant small bowel tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyung Seung; Suh, Ho Jong; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk [Kosin College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Small bowel tumors are rarely detected unless there is intestinal obstruction or bleeding. In the seven years 1982-1988, at Kosin Medical Center, 25 primary malignant small bowel tumors were studied radiographically with barium and / or computed tomography (CT). CT revealed gastrointestinal abnormalities in 20 patients. In ten, lesion were identified by upper G-I series, in 15 by small bowel series, and in addition, in 3 by colon enema. The most common malignant small bowel tumor was adenocarcinoma (N=15) and was next common lymphoma (N=7). On barium study, primary adenocarcinoma appeared as an irregular stricture (66.7%) and polypoid mass with intussusception was most prominent finding in lymphoma. Leiomyosarcoma appeared as an exophytic mass with excavation or ulceration. CT was found to be accurate in detecting wall thickening, complications and other associated findings. In conclusion, barium study was useful in the diagnosis of primary malignant small bowel tumor and CT was more accurate in detecting secondary findings.

  2. Primary malignant small bowel tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Kyung Seung; Suh, Ho Jong; Kim, So Sun; Kim, Ho Joon; Chun, Byung Hee; Joh, Young Duk

    1990-01-01

    Small bowel tumors are rarely detected unless there is intestinal obstruction or bleeding. In the seven years 1982-1988, at Kosin Medical Center, 25 primary malignant small bowel tumors were studied radiographically with barium and / or computed tomography (CT). CT revealed gastrointestinal abnormalities in 20 patients. In ten, lesion were identified by upper G-I series, in 15 by small bowel series, and in addition, in 3 by colon enema. The most common malignant small bowel tumor was adenocarcinoma (N=15) and was next common lymphoma (N=7). On barium study, primary adenocarcinoma appeared as an irregular stricture (66.7%) and polypoid mass with intussusception was most prominent finding in lymphoma. Leiomyosarcoma appeared as an exophytic mass with excavation or ulceration. CT was found to be accurate in detecting wall thickening, complications and other associated findings. In conclusion, barium study was useful in the diagnosis of primary malignant small bowel tumor and CT was more accurate in detecting secondary findings

  3. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May cause excessive secretion of hormones Common among men and women in their 50s-80s Accounts for about 13 percent of all brain tumors Symptoms Headache Depression Vision loss Nausea or vomiting Behavioral and cognitive ...

  4. Detección de anticuerpos contra los antígenos de diferenciación tumoral proteinasa 3 (PR3 y mieloperoxidasa (MPO en la leucemia promielocítica Detection of antibodies to antigens of proteinase 3 (PR3 tumor differentiations and myeloperoxidase (MPO in cases of promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada A. Arce Hernández

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La leucemia promielocítica (LPM subtipo M3 representa del 5-15 % en la clasificación FAB de las leucemias mieloides agudas (LMA. Está asociada con características genéticas únicas que incluyen la translocación recíproca t(15;17(q22;q12. El mecanismo por el que ocurre la t(15;17 no se conoce. Las leucemias de estirpe mieloide expresan diversos antígenos de diferenciación tumoral como son la proteinasa 3 (PR 3 y la mieloperoxidasa (MPO que se encuentran sobreexpresados en el promielocito. Se plantea que participan en la maduración y en la regulación de la división celular. Existe poca información acerca de la respuesta inmune de pacientes con LPM dirigida contra las células tumorales. En nuestro trabajo se detectó la presencia de anticuerpos contra los antígenos de diferenciación tumoral PR3 y MPO en diferentes fases del tratamiento de la enfermedad, mediante inmunofluorescencia indirecta. Los anticuerpos anti PR3 y anti MPO se detectaron en aquellos pacientes sin tratar y en fase de inducción, no así en la consolidación y mantenimiento, de ahí su posible utilidad como marcadores de diferenciación celular.ABSTRACT Promyelocytic leukemia (PML subtype M3 represents the 5-15 % in the FAB classification of acute myeloid leukemias (AML. It is associated with the unique genetic features including the reciprocal t-translocation (15;17 (q22;q12. The mechanism of t is unknown. The myeloid leukemias express different tumoral differentiation antigens such as the proteinase 3 (PR 3 and myeloperoxidase (MPO which are over-expressed in promyelocyte. It is involved in maturation and regulation of cell division. There is scarce information on the immune response of patients with PLM against tumor cells. In our paper we detected presence of antibodies to RP3 and MPO tumor differentiation antigens in different phases of disease treatment by indirect immunofluorescence. Anti-MPO and anti-PR3 antibodies were detected in those patients without

  5. Computed tomography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, Nadir; Altehoefer, Carsten; Winterer, Jan; Schaefer, Oliver; Springer, Oliver; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Furtwaengler, Alex

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the imaging characteristics of primary and recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in computed tomography with respect to the tumor size. Computed tomography was performed in 35 patients with histologically confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumors and analyzed retrospectively by two experienced and independent radiologist. The following morphologic tumor characteristics of primary (n=20) and (n=16) recurrent tumors were evaluated according to tumor size, shape, homogeneity, density compared with liver, contrast enhancement, presence of calcifications, ulcerations, fistula or distant metastases and the anatomical relationship to the intestinal wall, and the infiltration of adjacent visceral organs. Small GIST ( 5-10 cm) demonstrated an irregular shape, inhomogeneous density on unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images, a combined intra- and extraluminal tumor growth with aggressive findings, and infiltration of adjacent organs in 9 primary diagnosed and 2 recurrent tumors. Large GIST (>10 cm), which were observed in 8 primary tumors and 11 recurrent tumors, showed an irregular margin with inhomogeneous density and aggressive findings, and were characterized by signs of malignancy such as distant and peritoneal metastases. Small recurrent tumors had a similar appearance as compared with large primary tumors. Computed tomography gives additional information with respect to the relationship of gastrointestinal stromal tumor to the gastrointestinal wall and surrounding organs, and it detects distant metastasis. Primary and recurrent GIST demonstrate characteristic CT imaging features which are related to tumor size. Aggressive findings and signs of malignancy are found in larger tumors and in recurrent disease. Computed tomography is useful in detection and characterization of primary and recurrent tumors with regard to tumor growth pattern, tumor size, and varied appearances of gastrointestinal stromal tumors, and indirectly

  6. In vivo detection of the effects of preconditioning on LNCaP tumors by a TNF-α nanoparticle construct using MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Iltis, Isabelle; Choi, Jeunghwan; Vollmers, Manda; Shenoi, Mithun; Bischof, John; Metzger, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The outcome of systemic and local therapies (e.g., chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery, focal ablation) for prostate cancer can be significantly improved by using tumor-specific adjuvants prior to treatment (“preconditioning”). We propose to use dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to monitor the in vivo response of a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with a vascular disruptive agent, TNF-α, delivered on a gold nanoparticle (NP-TNF). Six male nude mice bearing 4...

  7. Multiparametric classification links tumor microenvironments with tumor cell phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Gligorijevic

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While it has been established that a number of microenvironment components can affect the likelihood of metastasis, the link between microenvironment and tumor cell phenotypes is poorly understood. Here we have examined microenvironment control over two different tumor cell motility phenotypes required for metastasis. By high-resolution multiphoton microscopy of mammary carcinoma in mice, we detected two phenotypes of motile tumor cells, different in locomotion speed. Only slower tumor cells exhibited protrusions with molecular, morphological, and functional characteristics associated with invadopodia. Each region in the primary tumor exhibited either fast- or slow-locomotion. To understand how the tumor microenvironment controls invadopodium formation and tumor cell locomotion, we systematically analyzed components of the microenvironment previously associated with cell invasion and migration. No single microenvironmental property was able to predict the locations of tumor cell phenotypes in the tumor if used in isolation or combined linearly. To solve this, we utilized the support vector machine (SVM algorithm to classify phenotypes in a nonlinear fashion. This approach identified conditions that promoted either motility phenotype. We then demonstrated that varying one of the conditions may change tumor cell behavior only in a context-dependent manner. In addition, to establish the link between phenotypes and cell fates, we photoconverted and monitored the fate of tumor cells in different microenvironments, finding that only tumor cells in the invadopodium-rich microenvironments degraded extracellular matrix (ECM and disseminated. The number of invadopodia positively correlated with degradation, while the inhibiting metalloproteases eliminated degradation and lung metastasis, consistent with a direct link among invadopodia, ECM degradation, and metastasis. We have detected and characterized two phenotypes of motile tumor cells in vivo, which

  8. Brain's tumor image processing using shearlet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Luis; Espinosa, Nikolai; Cadena, Franklin; Korneeva, Anna; Kruglyakov, Alexey; Legalov, Alexander; Romanenko, Alexey; Zotin, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Brain tumor detection is well known research area for medical and computer scientists. In last decades there has been much research done on tumor detection, segmentation, and classification. Medical imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of brain tumors and nowadays uses methods non-invasive, high-resolution techniques, especially magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans. Edge detection is a fundamental tool in image processing, particularly in the areas of feature detection and feature extraction, which aim at identifying points in a digital image at which the image has discontinuities. Shearlets is the most successful frameworks for the efficient representation of multidimensional data, capturing edges and other anisotropic features which frequently dominate multidimensional phenomena. The paper proposes an improved brain tumor detection method by automatically detecting tumor location in MR images, its features are extracted by new shearlet transform.

  9. Tumor immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Lise, Mario; Nitti, Donato

    2007-01-01

    Advances in tumor immunology are supporting the clinical implementation of several immunological approaches to cancer in the clinical setting. However, the alternate success of current immunotherapeutic regimens underscores the fact that the molecular mechanisms underlying immune-mediated tumor rejection are still poorly understood. Given the complexity of the immune system network and the multidimensionality of tumor/host interactions, the comprehension of tumor immunology might greatly benefit from high-throughput microarray analysis, which can portrait the molecular kinetics of immune response on a genome-wide scale, thus accelerating the discovery pace and ultimately catalyzing the development of new hypotheses in cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of microarray technology in tumor immunology studies has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to an effective immune response against cancer. Although the general principles of microarray-based gene profiling have rapidly spread in the scientific community, the need for mastering this technique to produce meaningful data and correctly interpret the enormous output of information generated by this technology is critical and represents a tremendous challenge for investigators, as outlined in the first section of this book. In the present Chapter, we report on some of the most significant results obtained with the application of DNA microarray in this oncology field.

  10. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors; Peptic ulcer - islet cell tumor; Hypoglycemia - islet cell tumor ... stomach acid. Symptoms may include: Abdominal pain Diarrhea ... and small bowel Vomiting blood (occasionally) Glucagonomas make ...

  11. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  12. Imaging of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaensler, E H.L. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.).

  13. Preliminary Therapy Evaluation of 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) Demonstrates that Cerenkov Radiation Derived from 225Ac Daughter Decay Can Be Detected by Optical Imaging for In Vivo Tumor Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Darpan N.; Hantgan, Roy; Budzevich, Mikalai M.; Kock, Nancy D.; Morse, David L.; Batista, Izadora; Mintz, Akiva; Li, King C.; Wadas, Thaddeus J.

    2016-01-01

    The theranostic potential of 225Ac-based radiopharmaceuticals continues to increase as researchers seek innovative ways to harness the nuclear decay of this radioisotope for therapeutic and imaging applications. This communication describes the evaluation of 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) in both biodistribution and Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) studies. Initially, La-DOTA-c(RGDyK) was prepared as a non-radioactive surrogate to evaluate methodologies that would contribute to an optimized radiochemical synthetic strategy and estimate the radioactive conjugate's affinity for αvβ3, using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy studies revealed the IC50 and Ki of La-DOTA-c(RGDyK) to be 33 ± 13 nM and 26 ± 11 nM, respectively, and suggest that the complexation of the La3+ ion to the conjugate did not significantly alter integrin binding. Furthermore, use of this surrogate allowed optimization of radiochemical synthesis strategies to prepare 225Ac-DOTA-c(RGDyK) with high radiochemical purity and specific activity similar to other 225Ac-based radiopharmaceuticals. This radiopharmaceutical was highly stable in vitro. In vivo biodistribution studies confirmed the radiotracer's ability to target αvβ3 integrin with specificity; specificity was detected in tumor-bearing animals using Cerenkov luminescence imaging. Furthermore, tumor growth control was achieved using non-toxic doses of the radiopharmaceutical in U87mg tumor-bearing nude mice. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the CLI of αvβ3+ tumors in live animals using the daughter products derived from 225Ac decay in situ. This concept holds promise to further enhance development of targeted alpha particle therapy. PMID:27022417

  14. Detection of Gene Rearrangements in Circulating Tumor Cells: Examples of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-Rearrangements in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and ERG-Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelain, Cyril; Pailler, Emma; Oulhen, Marianne; Faugeroux, Vincent; Pommier, Anne-Laure; Farace, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise as biomarkers to aid in patient treatment stratification and disease monitoring. Because the number of cells is a critical parameter for exploiting CTCs for predictive biomarker's detection, we developed a FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) method for CTCs enriched on filters (filter-adapted FISH [FA-FISH]) that was optimized for high cell recovery. To increase the feasibility and reliability of the analyses, we combined fluorescent staining and FA-FISH and developed a semi-automated microscopy method for optimal FISH signal identification in filtration-enriched CTCs . Here we present these methods and their use for the detection and characterization of ALK-, ROS1-, RET-rearrangement in CTCs from non-small-cell lung cancer and ERG-rearrangements in CTCs from prostate cancer patients.

  15. Diagnostic evaluatuin of gastrointestinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, R.; Tatsch, K.

    1998-01-01

    Prior to surgery of gastrointestinal tumors exact information about tumor localization, extent and possible infiltration in adjacent structures are important. The task for radiological and scintigraphic methods is predominantly the preoperative tumor staging. The upper (esophagus, stomach, duodenum) and the lower (colon, rectum) gastrointestinal tract should be routinely investigated by endoscopy and endosonography. CT or MRI imaging may add information about tumor extent, infiltration in adjacent structures and pathologically enlarged lymph nodes. The latter may be detected with similar or higher sensitivity by PET as well. Furthermore, with PET it is possible to differentiate a tumor recurrence from postoperative scar tissue earlier than with conventional morphological imaging techniques, for example in colorectal cancer. Liver tumors should primarily be inspected sonographically followed by an MRI scan if dignity is uncertain. The receptor scintigraphy with radioactive ligands allows to further characterize a detected tumor. Benigne liver lesions can be distinguished from malignant tumors (metastasis, hepatocellular carcinoma [HCC]) by the neogalactoalbumin-(NGA-)scintigraphy, because NGA binds exclusively to the liver galactose receptors of normally functioning hepatocytes. For the differentiation between liver metastasis and HCC insulin scintigraphy can be used, since insulin binds significantly in HCC due to an overexpression of insulin receptors in these tumors. If a malignant process is suspected, additionally CT-arterioportography may be recommended, because this newer radiological technique is capable to visualize lesions smaller than 1 cm. In such cases PET is sensitive as well and due to increased glucose metabolism even small foci can be detected with comparably high sepcificity. The method of choice for the detection of a pancreatic tumor is endoscopic sonography. In most cases the dignity of the tumor can be verified by ERCP, but sometimes it is very

  16. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moylan, D.J.; Yelovich, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Primary bone malignancies are relatively rare with less than 4,000 new cases per year. Multiple myeloma (more correctly a hematologic malignancy) accounts for 40%; osteosarcomas, 28%; chondrosarcomas, 13%; fibrosarcomas arising in bone, 4%; and Ewing's sarcoma, 7%. The authors discuss various treatments for bone tumors, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery

  17. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  18. Detection of SYT and EWS gene rearrangements by dual-color break-apart CISH in liquid-based cytology samples of synovial sarcoma and Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Arisa; Motoi, Toru; Tsuji, Kaori; Imamura, Tetsuo; Fukusato, Toshio

    2010-08-01

    To improve cytologic diagnostic accuracy for translocation-associated sarcomas, we explored dual-color break-apart (dc) chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) on liquid-based cytology (LBC) samples of 2 prototypic sarcomas: synovial sarcoma (SS) and Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor (ES/PNET). LBC samples of 10 cases of SS and 9 cases of ES/PNET were subjected to dc-CISH using probes for the specifically rearranged genes in each tumor entity: SYT in SS and EWS in ES/PNET. Rearranged SYT was successfully detected in all SSs but not in any ES/PNETs. In contrast, EWS rearrangement was identified in all ES/PNETs but not in any SSs. These results were validated by dc-fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. dc-CISH on LBC samples is a reliable modality to detect gene rearrangements in sarcomas. This system has a clear advantage over other methods, enabling simultaneous visualization of the genetic abnormality and well-preserved, nonoverlapping cytomorphologic features with clear background under bright-field microscope.

  19. A 40 GHz fully integrated circuit with a vector network analyzer and a coplanar-line-based detection area for circulating tumor cell analysis using 65 nm CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Taiki; Matsunaga, Maya; Kobayashi, Atsuki; Nakazato, Kazuo; Niitsu, Kiichi

    2018-03-01

    A 40-GHz fully integrated CMOS-based circuit for circulating tumor cells (CTC) analysis, consisting of an on-chip vector network analyzer (VNA) and a highly sensitive coplanar-line-based detection area is presented in this paper. In this work, we introduce a fully integrated architecture that eliminates unwanted parasitic effects. The proposed analyzer was designed using 65 nm CMOS technology, and SPICE and MWS simulations were used to validate its operation. The simulation confirmed that the proposed circuit can measure S-parameter shifts resulting from the addition of various types of tumor cells to the detection area, the data of which are provided in a previous study: the |S 21| values for HepG2, A549, and HEC-1-A cells are -0.683, -0.580, and -0.623 dB, respectively. Additionally, the measurement demonstrated an S-parameters reduction of -25.7% when a silicone resin was put on the circuit. Hence, the proposed system is expected to contribute to cancer diagnosis.

  20. Post-mortem testing; germline BRCA1/2 variant detection using archival FFPE non-tumor tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Annabeth Høgh; Jørgensen, Mads Malik Aagaard; Nielsen, Henriette Roed

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of cancer risk in HBOC families often requires BRCA1/2 testing, but this may be impossible in deceased family members. Previous, testing archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue for germline BRCA1/2 variants was unsuccessful, except for the Jewish founder mutat...... samples from non-tumor tissue. Accurate genetic counseling is achievable in families where variant testing would otherwise be impossible.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 6 January 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.268....

  1. Hürthle cell tumor dwelling in hot thyroid nodules: preoperative detection with technetium-99m-MIBI dual-phase scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattimo, A; Bertelli, P; Cintorino, M; Burroni, L; Volterrani, D; Vella, A; Lazzi, S

    1998-05-01

    Single injection dual-phase scintigraphy (early and late acquisitions) with 99mTc-MIBI was used to differentiate benign and malignant hot thyroid nodules. Thirteen euthyroid and two hyperthyroid patients displaying a hot thyroid nodule on the 99mTc scan due to an autonomously functioning thyroid nodule (AFTN) underwent early (15-30 min) and late (3-4 hr) thyroid scintigraphy after the administration of 740-1000 MBq 99mTc-MIBI. Visual scoring was done to assess nodular tracer uptake and retention. In addition, the nodular-to-thyroid (N/T) uptake ratio in the early and late image and the washout rates (WO) from the nodule and thyroidal tissue were measured. All patients underwent thyroid surgery. Histopathology revealed a Hürthle cell tumor in three nodules, a benign adenoma with oxyphilic metaplasia in two nodules and a benign adenoma without oxyphilic cells in the remaining 10 nodules. The Hürthle cell tumor nodules displayed intense and persistent uptake of 99mTc-MIBI (N/T was 2.81 +/- 0.52 and 5.53 +/- 1.06 in early and late images, respectively; WO from the nodule was 12.33 +/- 0.47, WO from the thyroidal tissue was 22.00 +/- 3.56). The benign nodules showed intense uptake in the early image and intense uptake to absent retention in the late image (N/T was 2.94 +/- 1.31 and 1.62 +/- 0.50 in the early and late images, respectively; WO from the nodule was 20.25 +/- 2.92, WO from the thyroidal tissue was 20.33 +/- 2.92). Single injection dual-phase 99mTc-MIBI scintigraphy of the thyroid with AFTN can identify nodules as a result of the activity of a Hürthle cell tumor, since these tumors cause intense and persistent tracer uptake in contrast with a benign AFTN.

  2. Tumor markers in colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Luís César [UNIFESP; Matos, Delcio [UNIFESP

    2002-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a clinical entity of a persistent relevance in clinical practice and its early diagnosis is a determinant factor to obtain better therapeutic results. Tumor markers are helpful means for a better approach to individuals with such neoplasm. In the present review, the authors analyze the phases in which surgical-clinical treatment markers must be used: diagnosis, determination of tumor stage, establishment of prognosis and detection of recurrence. Current and future markers...

  3. Intravital imaging of cancer stem cell plasticity in mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zomer, A.; Ellenbroek, S.I.; Ritsma, L.; Beerling, E.; Vrisekoop, N.; van Rheenen, J.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely debated whether all tumor cells in mammary tumors have the same potential to propagate and maintain tumor growth or whether there is a hierarchical organization. Evidence for the latter theory is mainly based on the ability or failure of transplanted tumor cells to produce detectable

  4. Tumor-specific detection of an optically targeted antibody combined with a quencher-conjugated neutravidin "quencher-chaser": a dual "quench and chase" strategy to improve target to nontarget ratios for molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2009-01-01

    In vivo molecular cancer imaging with monoclonal antibodies has great potential not only for cancer detection, but also for cancer characterization. However, the prolonged retention of intravenously injected antibody in the blood causes low target tumor-to-background ratio (TBR). Avidin has been used as a "chase" to clear the unbound, circulating biotinylated antibody and decrease the background signal. Here, we utilize a combined approach of a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) quenched antibody with an "avidin chase" to increase TBR. Trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), was biotinylated and conjugated with the near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore Alexa680 to synthesize Tra-Alexa680-biotin. Next, the FRET quencher, QSY-21, was conjugated to avidin, neutravidin (nAv), or streptavidin (sAv), thus creating Av-QSY21, nAv-QSY21, or sAv-QSY21 as "chasers". The fluorescence was quenched in vitro by binding Tra-Alexa680-biotin to Av-QSY21, nAv-QSY21, or sAv-QSY21. To evaluate if the injection of quencher-conjugated avidin derivatives can improve target TBR by using a dual "quench and chase" strategy, both target (3T3/HER2+) and nontarget (Balb3T3/ZsGreen) tumor-bearing mice were employed. The "FRET quench" effect induced by all the QSY21 avidin-based conjugates reduced but did not totally eliminate background signal from the blood pool. The addition of nAv-QSY21 administration increased target TBR mainly because of the "chase" effect where unbound conjugated antibody was preferentially cleared to the liver. The relatively slow clearance of unbound nAv-QSY21 leads to further reductions in background signal by leaking out of the vascular space and binding to unbound antibodies in the extravascular space of tumors, resulting in decreased nontarget tumor-to-background ratios but increased target TBR due to the "FRET quench" effect, because target-bound antibodies were internalized and could not bind

  5. Tumor Specific Detection of an Optically Targeted Antibody Combined with a Quencher-conjugated Neutravidin “Quencher-Chaser”: A Dual “Quench and Chase” Strategy to Improve Target to Non-target Ratios for Molecular Imaging of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Mikako; Kosaka, Nobuyuki; Choyke, Peter L; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2009-01-01

    In vivo molecular cancer imaging with monoclonal antibodies has great potential not only for cancer detection but also for cancer characterization. However, the prolonged retention of intravenously injected antibody in the blood causes low target tumor-to-background ratio (TBR). Avidin has been used as a “chase” to clear the unbound, circulating biotinylated antibody and decrease the background signal. Here, we utilize a combined approach of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) quenched antibody with an “avidin chase” to increase TBR. Trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2), was biotinylated and conjugated with the near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore Alexa680 to synthesize Tra-Alexa680-biotin. Next, the FRET quencher, QSY-21, was conjugated to avidin, neutravidin (nAv) or streptavidin (sAv), thus creating Av-QSY21, nAv-QSY21 or sAv-QSY21 as “chasers”. The fluorescence was quenched in vitro by binding Tra-Alexa680-biotin to Av-QSY21, nAv-QSY21 or sAv-QSY21. To evaluate if the injection of quencher-conjugated avidin-derivatives can improve target TBR by using a dual “quench and chase” strategy, both target (3T3/HER2+) and non-target (Balb3T3/ZsGreen) tumor bearing mice were employed. The “FRET quench” effect induced by all the QSY21 avidin-based conjugates reduced but did not totally eliminate background signal from the blood pool. The addition of nAv-QSY21 administration increased target TBR mainly due to the “chase” effect where unbound conjugated antibody was preferentially cleared to the liver. The relatively slow clearance of unbound nAv-QSY21 leads to further reductions in background signal by leaking out of the vascular space and binding to unbound antibodies in the extravascular space of tumors resulting in decreased non-target tumor-to-background ratios but increased target TBR due to the “FRET quench” effect because target-bound antibodies were internalized

  6. "Cancer tumor".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  7. Preparation and assessment of [99mTc]technetium aquacarbonyl complexes with 1,2-diaminoethane-N-substituted ligands for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radin, Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Over least 15 years the complex [[ 99m Tc](H 2 0) 3 (CO) 3 ] + has been used as an intermediary to obtain technetium radiopharmaceuticals for applications in cardiology, neurology and oncology. Two important characteristics of this molecule are: the facility for obtaining that compound from aqueous solutions and the easiness of substituting H 2 O molecules by atoms of other ligand molecules. In this project we prepared new complexes [[ 99m Tc](CMN S001-3 )(H 2 O)(CO) 3 ] + , where (CMNS001) = N-[(4-methoxy) benzyl]-1,2-diaminoethane, (CMNS003) = N,N'-bis-[(4-methoxy)benzyl]-1,2-diaminoethane, and assessed the uptake of these complexes in murine melanoma cancer cell B16F10 and breast cells MCF-7 and MDA-MD-231, and compared with [[ 99m ](MIBI) 6 ] + uptake. In vitro uptake for both new technetium complex reached values close to 5%, for all cell lines, whereas the [[ 99m Tc](MIBI) 6 ] + uptake was close to 1 %. The assessment of subcellular