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Sample records for tumor volume gtv

  1. A Method to Automate the Segmentation of the GTV and ITV for Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, Eric D.; Bzdusek, Karl; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2009-01-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is a useful tool in the treatment of tumors that undergo significant motion. To fully utilize 4D-CT motion information in the treatment of mobile tumors such as lung cancer, autosegmentation methods will need to be developed. Using autosegmentation tools in the Pinnacle 3 v8.1t treatment planning system, 6 anonymized 4D-CT data sets were contoured. Two test indices were developed that can be used to evaluate which autosegmentation tools to apply to a given gross tumor volume (GTV) region of interest (ROI). The 4D-CT data sets had various phase binning error levels ranging from 3% to 29%. The appropriate autosegmentation method (rigid translational image registration and deformable surface mesh) was determined to properly delineate the GTV in all of the 4D-CT phases for the 4D-CT data sets with binning errors of up to 15%. The ITV was defined by 2 methods: a mask of the GTV in all 4D-CT phases and the maximum intensity projection. The differences in centroid position and volume were compared with manual segmentation studies in literature. The indices developed in this study, along with the autosegmentation tools in the treatment planning system, were able to automatically segment the GTV in the four 4D-CTs with phase binning errors of up to 15%.

  2. Study of limiting dosimetric parameters on lung pathology. Differences in the use of the lung-gtv and lung-ptv volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granero Cabanero, D.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Garcia Hernanez, T.; Vicedo gonzalez, A.; Brualla, L.; Hernandez, A.; Solera, C.; Serrano, A.; Rosello, J.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work is to study the differences between the use of the volume of lung-GTV and lung-PTV to assess pulmonary toxicity and also to study the relationships between parameters V13, V20, V30, and mean dose of volumes lung, lung-PTV and lung-GTV. It was studied also the possible relationship between volumes of GTV, PTV and volume of lung with the dosimetric parameters described above. (Author)

  3. Study of limiting dosimetric parameters on lung pathology. Differences in the use of the lung-gtv and lung-ptv volumes; Estudio de los parametros dosimetricos limitantes en la patologia de pulmon diferencias en ul uso de los volumenes pulmon-gtv y pulmo-ptv

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.; Almendros Blanco, P.; Garcia Hernanez, T.; Vicedo gonzalez, A.; Brualla, L.; Hernandez, A.; Solera, C.; Serrano, A.; Rosello, J.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this work is to study the differences between the use of the volume of lung-GTV and lung-PTV to assess pulmonary toxicity and also to study the relationships between parameters V13, V20, V30, and mean dose of volumes lung, lung-PTV and lung-GTV. It was studied also the possible relationship between volumes of GTV, PTV and volume of lung with the dosimetric parameters described above. (Author)

  4. Correlation between the treated volume, the GTV and the CTV at the time of brachytherapy and the histopathologic findings in 33 patients with operable cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muschitz, S.; Petrow, P.; Briot, E.; Petit, C.; De Crevoisier, R.; Duvillard, P.; Morice, P.; Haie-Meder, C.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study correlates the treated volume, the GTV and the CTV at the time of intracavitary brachytherapy (BT) with the histopathological findings obtained by surgery (S) in 33 patients (pts) with cervix carcinoma. Patients and methods: Sixteen pts (group I), FIGO stage IB1 (1), IB2 (4), IIB (10), IIIB (1), received external beam radiotherapy (EBT) with a total dose of 45 Gy in 5 weeks and concomitant CISPLATIN 40 mg/m 2 weekly, followed by BT up to a total dose of 15 Gy. S was performed 6-8 weeks thereafter. Seventeen pts (group II), FIGO IA2 (1), IB1 (14), IIB (2), were treated by BT alone with a total dose of 60 Gy and S after 6-8 weeks. All pts had a MRI examination after BT with a moulded applicator in situ for exact delineation of GTV, CTV and critical organs and a 3D dosimetry directly from MRI data. Results: In group I (EBT+BT+S), the histopathological findings showed complete tumour sterilization (CR) in 56% of pts. Residual disease (RD) was found in 43%. Dosimetric data showed in pts with CR a larger mean treated volume (213 vs. 166 cm 3 ) and a better mean coverage of the GTV and the CTV by the reference isodose (99 and 91%) as in pts with RD (85 and 77%). In group II (BT+S), CR was found in 52%, RD in 41%. Dosimetric data showed a larger mean treated volume (154 vs. 109 cm 3 ) for pts with RD and a mean coverage of the GTV and the CTV by the reference isodose of 97 and 84% vs. 89 and 80% for pts with CR. Conclusions: An incomplete coverage of the GTV and/or the CTV by the reference isodose is an important risk factor for RD at the time of surgery. Furthermore, for pts who received BT alone, tumour size seemed to be a limiting factor for an accurate coverage of the CTV by the reference isodose

  5. Comparison of imaging-based gross tumor volume and pathological volume determined by whole-mount serial sections in primary cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ying Zhang,1,* Jing Hu,1,* Jianping Li,1 Ning Wang,1 Weiwei Li,1 Yongchun Zhou,1 Junyue Liu,1 Lichun Wei,1 Mei Shi,1 Shengjun Wang,2 Jing Wang,2 Xia Li,3 Wanling Ma4 1Department of Radiation Oncology, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Radiology, Xijing Hospital, Xi'an, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workObjective: To investigate the accuracy of imaging-based gross tumor volume (GTV compared with pathological volume in cervical cancer.Methods: Ten patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I–II cervical cancer were eligible for investigation and underwent surgery in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT scans were taken the day before surgery. The GTVs under MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT (GTV-MRI, GTV-PET, GTV-CT were calculated automatically by Eclipse treatment-planning systems. Specimens of excised uterine cervix and cervical cancer were consecutively sliced and divided into whole-mount serial sections. The tumor border of hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections was outlined under a microscope by an experienced pathologist. GTV through pathological image (GTV-path was calculated with Adobe Photoshop.Results: The GTVs (average ± standard deviation delineated and calculated under CT, MRI, PET, and histopathological sections were 19.41 ± 11.96 cm3, 12.66 ± 10.53 cm3, 11.07 ± 9.44 cm3, and 10.79 ± 8.71 cm3, respectively. The volume of GTV-CT or GTV-MR was bigger than GTV-path, and the difference was statistically significant (P 0.05. Spearman correlation analysis showed that GTV-CT, GTV-MRI, and GTV-PET were significantly correlated with GTV-path (P < 0.01. There was no significant difference in the lesion coverage factor among the three modalities.Conclusion: The present study showed that GTV defined under 40% of maximum standardized

  6. Optimal gross tumor volume definition in lung-sparing intensity modulated radiotherapy for pleural mesothelioma: an in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticella, Angela; Defraene, Gilles; Nackaerts, Kristiaan; Deroose, Christophe M; Coolen, Johan; Nafteux, Philippe; Peeters, Stephanie; Ricardi, Umberto; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2016-12-01

    The gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is ill-defined. We therefore investigated which imaging modality is optimal: computed tomography (CT) with intravenous contrast (IVC), positron emission tomography-CT (PET/CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Sixteen consecutive patients with untreated stage I-IV MPM were included. Patients with prior pleurodesis were excluded. CT with IVC, 18FDG-PET/CT and MRI (T2 and contrast-enhanced T1) were obtained. CT was rigidly co-registered with PET/CT and with MRI. Three sets of pleural GTVs were defined: GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI . Quantitative and qualitative evaluations of the contoured GTVs were performed. Compared to CT-based GTV definition, PET/CT identified additional tumor sites (defined as either separate nodules or greater extent of a known tumor) in 12/16 patients. Compared to either CT or PET/CT, MRI identified additional tumor sites in 15/16 patients (p = .7). The mean GTV CT , GTV CT+PET/CT and GTV CT+MRI [±standard deviation (SD)] were 630.1 cm 3 (±302.81), 640.23 cm 3 (±302.83) and 660.8 cm 3 (±290.8), respectively. Differences in mean volumes were not significant. The mean Jaccard Index was significantly lower in MRI-based contours versus all the others. As MRI identified additional pleural disease sites in the majority of patients, it may play a role in optimal target volume definition.

  7. Deviations in delineated GTV caused by artefacts in 4DCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Brink, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is used for breathing-adapted radiotherapy planning. Irregular breathing, large tumour motion or interpolation of images can cause artefacts in the 4DCT. This study evaluates the impact of artefacts on gross tumour volume (GTV......-expiration GTV size (GTVexp) was considered as reference for GTV size. Intra-session delineation error was estimated by re-delineation of GTV in eight of the 4DCT scans. RESULTS: In 16 of the 4DCT scans the maximum deviations from GTVexp were larger than could be explained by delineation error. The deviations...... in GTV size throughout the 4DCT scans. Awareness of the error introduced by artefacts is important especially if radiotherapy planning is based on a single 4DCT bin....

  8. 3 Tesla multiparametric MRI for GTV-definition of Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions in patients with Prostate Cancer – an interobserver variability study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rischke, Hans Christian; Grosu, Anca L; Jilg, Cordula A; Nestle, Ursula; Fechter, Tobias; Doll, Christian; Volegova-Neher, Natalja; Henne, Karl; Scholber, Jutta; Knippen, Stefan; Kirste, Simon

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the interobserver variability of gross tumor volume (GTV) - delineation of Dominant Intraprostatic Lesions (DIPL) in patients with prostate cancer using published MRI criteria for multiparametric MRI at 3 Tesla by 6 different observers. 90 GTV-datasets based on 15 multiparametric MRI sequences (T2w, diffusion weighted (DWI) and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)) of 5 patients with prostate cancer were generated for GTV-delineation of DIPL by 6 observers. The reference GTV-dataset was contoured by a radiologist with expertise in diagnostic imaging of prostate cancer using MRI. Subsequent GTV-delineation was performed by 5 radiation oncologists who received teaching of MRI-features of primary prostate cancer before starting contouring session. GTV-datasets were contoured using Oncentra Masterplan® and iplan® Net. For purposes of comparison GTV-datasets were imported to the Artiview® platform (Aquilab®), GTV-values and the similarity indices or Kappa indices (KI) were calculated with the postulation that a KI > 0.7 indicates excellent, a KI > 0.6 to < 0.7 substantial and KI > 0.5 to < 0.6 moderate agreement. Additionally all observers rated difficulties of contouring for each MRI-sequence using a 3 point rating scale (1 = easy to delineate, 2 = minor difficulties, 3 = major difficulties). GTV contouring using T2w (KI-T2w = 0.61) and DCE images (KI-DCE = 0.63) resulted in substantial agreement. GTV contouring using DWI images resulted in moderate agreement (KI-DWI = 0.51). KI-T2w and KI-DCE was significantly higher than KI-DWI (p = 0.01 and p = 0.003). Degree of difficulty in contouring GTV was significantly lower using T2w and DCE compared to DWI-sequences (both p < 0.0001). Analysis of delineation differences revealed inadequate comparison of functional (DWI, DCE) to anatomical sequences (T2w) and lack of awareness of non-specific imaging findings as a source of erroneous delineation. Using T2w and DCE sequences at 3 Tesla for GTV-definition of DIPL in

  9. Influence of Residual Tumor Volume and Radiation Dose Coverage in Outcomes for Clival Chordoma

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    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moore, Michael G.; Ting, Jonathan Y. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Shah, Mitesh V. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors associated with tumor control in clival chordomas. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 39 patients treated with surgery and proton therapy for clival chordomas between 2004 and 2014 was performed. The median prescribed dose was 77.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]); range was 70.2-79.2 Gy (RBE). Minimum and median doses to gross tumor volume (GTV), radiation dose received by 1 cm{sup 3} of GTV (D1cm{sup 3}), and the equivalent uniform dose were calculated. Receiver operating characteristics curves evaluated the predictive sensitivity and specificity for local failure of potential cutpoint values for GTV and D1cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year estimate of local control (LC) was 69.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.0%-89.2%), and overall survival (OS) was 81.4% (95% CI: 65.3%-97.5%). Tumor histology, GTV at the time of radiation, and prescribed radiation dose were significantly associated with local control on multivariate analysis, whereas D1cm{sup 3} was associated with overall survival. Compared to those patients whose conditions remained controlled, patients experiencing tumor failure had statistically significant larger GTVs and lower D1cm{sup 3}, and prescribed and median doses to GTV. A subset of 21 patients with GTV of ≤20 cm{sup 3} and D1cm{sup 3} of >67 Gy (RBE) had a median follow-up of 47 months. The 5-year estimate of local control in this subset was 81.1% (95% CI: 61.7%-100%; P=.004, overall comparison by GTV ≤20 cm{sup 3} stratified by D1cm{sup 3}). A D1cm{sup 3} of 74.5 Gy (RBE) had 80% sensitivity for local control and 60% specificity, whereas a GTV of 9.3 cm{sup 3} had 80% sensitivity for local control and 66.7% specificity. Conclusions: Local control of clival chordomas was associated with both smaller size of residual tumor and more complete high-dose coverage of residual tumor. Multidisciplinary care should seek

  10. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies

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    Wang Dian, E-mail: dwang@mcw.edu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Bosch, Walter [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Roberge, David [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wolfson, Aaron H. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on computed tomography (CT) images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results: A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. The GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. Fusion of magnetic resonance and images is recommended to delineate the GTV. The CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes the GTV plus 3-cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm, including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone, or skin surface. Conclusion: The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images and in a descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment.

  11. Changes in Tumor Volumes and Spatial Locations Relative to Normal Tissues During Cervical Cancer Radiotherapy Assessed by Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjuan; Bai, Penggang; Pan, Jianji; Xu, Yuanji; Chen, Kaiqiang

    2017-04-01

    To assess changes in the volumes and spatial locations of tumors and surrounding organs by cone beam computed tomography during treatment for cervical cancer. Sixteen patients with cervical cancer had intensity-modulated radiotherapy and off-line cone beam computed tomography during chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV-T) and clinical target volumes (CTVs) were contoured on the planning computed tomography and weekly cone beam computed tomography image, and changes in volumes and spatial locations were evaluated using the volume difference method and Dice similarity coefficients. The GTV-T was 79.62 cm 3 at prior treatment (0f) and then 20.86 cm 3 at the end of external-beam chemoradiation. The clinical target volume changed slightly from 672.59 cm 3 to 608.26 cm 3 , and the uterine volume (CTV-T) changed slightly from 83.72 cm 3 to 80.23 cm 3 . There were significant differences in GTV-T and CTV-T among the different groups ( P .05). The mean percent volume changes ranged from 23.05% to 70.85% for GTV-T, 4.71% to 6.78% for CTV-T, and 5.84% to 9.59% for clinical target volume, and the groups were significantly different ( P < .05). The Dice similarity coefficient of GTV-T decreased during the course of radiation therapy ( P < .001). In addition, there were significant differences in GTV-T among different groups ( P < .001), and changes in GTV-T correlated with the radiotherapy ( P < .001). There was a negative correlation between volume change rate (DV) and Dice similarity coefficient in the GTV-T and organs at risk ( r < 0; P < .05). The volume, volume change rate, and Dice similarity coefficient of GTV-T were all correlated with increase in radiation treatment. Significant variations in tumor regression and spatial location occurred during radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Adaptive radiotherapy approaches are needed to improve the treatment accuracy for cervical cancer.

  12. Assessment of various strategies for 18F-FET PET-guided delineation of target volumes in high-grade glioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vees, Hansjörg; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Miralbell, Raymond; Weber, Damien C; Ratib, Osman; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to assess the contribution of (18)F-fluoro-ethyl-tyrosine ((18)F-FET) positron emission tomography (PET) in the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) in patients with high-grade gliomas compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alone. The study population consisted of 18 patients with high-grade gliomas. Seven image segmentation techniques were used to delineate (18)F-FET PET GTVs, and the results were compared to the manual MRI-derived GTV (GTV(MRI)). PET image segmentation techniques included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)), a 2.5 standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoff (GTV(2.5)), a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio (SBR)-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), gradient find (GTV(GF)), and region growing (GTV(RG)). Overlap analysis was also conducted to assess geographic mismatch between the GTVs delineated using the different techniques. Contours defined using GTV(2.5) failed to provide successful delineation technically in three patients (18% of cases) as SUV(max) segmentation algorithm is crucial, since it impacts both the volume and shape of the resulting GTV. The 2.5 SUV isocontour and GF segmentation techniques performed poorly and should not be used for GTV delineation. With adequate setting, the SBR-based PET technique may add considerably to conventional MRI-guided GTV delineation.

  13. Artifacts in conventional computed tomography (CT) and free breathing four-dimensional CT induce uncertainty in gross tumor volume determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Af Rosenschöld, Per Munck

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to com......PURPOSE: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study...... was to compare delineated gross tumor volume (GTV) sizes in 3DCT, 4DCT, and BHCT scans of patients with lung tumors. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A total of 36 patients with 46 tumors referred for stereotactic radiotherapy of lung tumors were included. All patients underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, 4DCT......, and BHCT scans. GTVs in all CT scans of individual patients were delineated during one session by a single physician to minimize systematic delineation uncertainty. The GTV size from the BHCT was considered the closest to true tumor volume and was chosen as the reference. The reference GTV size...

  14. Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietzel, Eike; Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV MIV s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, ±5 mm in geometric extent, and ±0.5 ± 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states

  15. Comparative evaluation of 11C-MET PET-CT and MRI for GTV delineation in precision radiotherapy for gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ru; Qian Liting; Wang Shicun; Liu Wei; Luo Wenguang; Zhang Hongbo; Li Guanghu; Hu Zhigang; Liu Lei

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the difference between MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation in the precision radiotherapy for gliomas. Methods: Six patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of gliomas were selected for target delineation. Five physicians in our department were called to delineate the GTV based on the preoperative MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT images of these patients. The GTVs based on the two methods were compared. Results: There was no significant difference between the GTVs based on MRI and 11 C-MET PET-CT (P=0.917), and their coefficients of variation were also similar (P=0.600). The coincidences of GTVs were different among the patients, with a maximum value of 73.0% and a minimum value of 51.8%. GTV showed no significant difference when defined by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT (P=0.709); the biggest difference was 27.66 cm 3 on PET-CT and 40.37 cm 3 on MRI. Conclusions: The boundaries of gliomas defined on MRI and PET-CT are different. The GTVs delineated by different physicians on MRI and PET-CT are similar, and the biggest difference on PET-CT is smaller than that on MRI, which suggests that 11 C-MET PET-CT is a more direct way for displaying GTV. (authors)

  16. Tumor volume delineation in head and neck cancer with 18-fluor-fluorodeoxiglucose positron emission tomography: adaptive thresholding method applied to primary tumors and metastatic lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Romasanta, Luis Alberto; Bellon-Guardia, Maria; Torres-Donaire, Javier; Lozano-Martin, Eva; Sanz-Martin, Miguel; Velasco-Jimenez, Joaquin

    2013-04-01

    There are several potential advantages of using 18-fluor-fluorodeoxiglucose (18F-FDG) PET for target volume contouring, but before PET-based gross tumor volumes (GTVs) can reliably and reproducibly be incorporated into high-precision radiotherapy planning, operator-independent segmentation tools have to be developed and validated. The purpose of the present work was to apply the adaptive to the signal/background ratio (R(S/B)) thresholding method for head and neck tumor delineation, and compare these GTV(PET) to reference GTV(CT) volumes in order to assess discrepancies. A cohort of 19 patients (39 lesions) with a histological diagnosis of head and neck cancer who would undergo definitive concurrent radiochemotherapy or radical radiotherapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy technique (IMRT), were enrolled in this prospective study. Contouring on PET images was accomplished through standardized uptake value (SUV)-threshold definition. The threshold value was adapted to R(S/B). To determine the relationship between the threshold and the R(S/B), we performed a phantom study. A discrepancy index (DI) between both imaging modalities, overlap fraction (OF) and mismatch fraction (MF) were calculated for each lesion and imaging modality. The median DI value for lymph nodes was 2.67 and 1.76 for primary lesions. The OF values were larger for CT volumes than for PET volumes (p < 0.001), for both types of lesions. The MF values were smaller for CT volumes than for PET volumes (p < 0.001), for both types of lesions. The GTV(PET) coverage (OF(PET)) was strongly correlated with the lesion volume (GTV(CT)) for metastatic lymph nodes (Pearson correlation = 0.665; p < 0.01). For smaller lesions, despite the GTV volumes were relatively larger on PET than in CT contours, the coverage was poorer. Accordingly, the MF(PET/CT) was negatively correlated with the lesion volume for metastatic lymph nodes. The present study highlights the considerable challenges involved in using FDG PET

  17. Investigation of the relationship between gross tumor volume location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L; Liao, Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K

    2012-04-01

    Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior-inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman-Kutcher-Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose-volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant improvement in the fit of the pneumonitis model. Copyright

  18. Investigation of the Relationship Between Gross Tumor Volume Location and Pneumonitis Rates Using a Large Clinical Database of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Tucker, Susan L.; Liao Zhongxing; Martel, Mary K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have suggested that function may vary throughout the lung, and that patients who have tumors located in the base of the lung are more susceptible to radiation pneumonitis. The purpose of our study was to investigate the relationship between gross tumor volume (GTV) location and pneumonitis rates using a large clinical database of 547 patients with non–small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: The GTV centroids of all patients were mapped onto one common coordinate system, in which the boundaries of the coordinate system were defined by the extreme points of each individual patient lung. The data were qualitatively analyzed by graphing all centroids and displaying the data according to the presence of severe pneumonitis, tumor stage, and smoking status. The centroids were grouped according to superior–inferior segments, and the pneumonitis rates were analyzed. In addition, we incorporated the GTV centroid information into a Lyman–Kutcher–Burman normal tissue complication probability model and tested whether adding spatial information significantly improved the fit of the model. Results: Of the 547 patients analyzed, 111 (20.3%) experienced severe radiation pneumonitis. The pneumonitis incidence rates were 16%, 23%, and 21% for the superior, middle, and inferior thirds of the lung, respectively. Qualitatively, the GTV centroids of nonsmokers were notably absent from the superior portion of the lung. In addition, the GTV centroids of patients who had Stage III and IV clinical staging were concentrated toward the medial edge of the lung. The comparison between the GTV centroid model and the conventional dose–volume model did not yield a statistically significant difference in model fit. Conclusions: Lower pneumonitis rates were noted for the superior portion of the lung; however the differences were not statistically significant. For our patient cohort, incorporating GTV centroid information did not lead to a statistically significant

  19. Motion and volumetric change as demonstrated by 4DCT: The effects of abdominal compression on the GTV, lungs, and heart in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Abdullah; Jabbour, Salma K; Rosenberg, Stephen; Patel, Ajay; Goyal, Sharad; Haffty, Bruce G; Yue, Ning J; Khan, Alvin

    2016-01-01

    Lung tumors move during respiration, complicating radiation therapy. The abdominal compression plate (ACP) is thought to reduce respiratory motion. This study quantifies ACP efficacy on respiratory-induced motion by using 4-dimensional computed tomography to evaluate volume and displacement changes of the heart, lungs, and tumor with and without ACP. Lung cancer patients (n = 17) received 4-dimensional computed tomography simulations (10 computed tomography scans from 0% to 90% breathing phases) with and without ACP under maximally tolerated diaphragmatic pressure. Gross tumor volume (GTV), heart, and lungs were contoured in treatment planning software for each phase. Structures were exported for analysis. For each phase, with and without ACP, tumor and organ absolute centroid range of motion and volume were calculated. ACP did not significantly affect GTV, heart, or lung motion on the sample as a whole, but instead demonstrated patient-specific results. ACP reduced GTV motion in 3 (17.6%; 3 upper lobe tumors) by 2.9 mm (P lung range of motion was 7.4 mm, 11.8 mm, and 11.9 mm, respectively, without compression and 4.5 mm, 8.4 mm, and 10.9 mm, respectively, with compression. Averaged across the sample, ACP did not exhibit any axis-specific effect. ACP efficacy was patient-specific, possibly because of pre-existing factors including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity, chest wall elasticity, tumor location, and patient comfort. Tumor lobe location does not predetermine compression efficacy; therefore, patients should be simulated with and without ACP, regardless of tumor location. GTV motion seems most important in determining suitability for compression. Alternative motion control should be considered in patients not benefited by compression. In patients who benefited, ACP may enhance tumor coverage while minimizing toxicity. Larger scale studies are necessary for definitive treatment recommendations. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation

  20. Gross tumor volume dependency on phase sorting methods of four-dimensional computed tomography images for lung cancer

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    Lee, Soo Yong; Lim, Sang Wook; Ma, Sun Young; Yu, Je Sang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    To see the gross tumor volume (GTV) dependency according to the phase selection and reconstruction methods, we measured and analyzed the changes of tumor volume and motion at each phase in 20 cases with lung cancer patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) images in 20 cases of 19 patients who underwent image-guided radiotherapy. The 4D-CT images were reconstructed by the maximum intensity projection (MIP) and the minimum intensity projection (Min-IP) method after sorting phase as 40%–60%, 30%–70%, and 0%–90%. We analyzed the relationship between the range of motion and the change of GTV according to the reconstruction method. The motion ranges of GTVs are statistically significant only for the tumor motion in craniocaudal direction. The discrepancies of GTV volume and motion between MIP and Min-IP increased rapidly as the wider ranges of duty cycles are selected. As narrow as possible duty cycle such as 40%–60% and MIP reconstruction was suitable for lung cancer if the respiration was stable. Selecting the reconstruction methods and duty cycle is important for small size and for large motion range tumors.

  1. Inter-Fraction Tumor Volume Response during Lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Correlated to Patient Variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Salamekh

    Full Text Available Analyze inter-fraction volumetric changes of lung tumors treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT and determine if the volume changes during treatment can be predicted and thus considered in treatment planning.Kilo-voltage cone-beam CT (kV-CBCT images obtained immediately prior to each fraction were used to monitor inter-fraction volumetric changes of 15 consecutive patients (18 lung nodules treated with lung SBRT at our institution (45-54 Gy in 3-5 fractions in the year of 2011-2012. Spearman's (ρ correlation and Spearman's partial correlation analysis was performed with respect to patient/tumor and treatment characteristics. Multiple hypothesis correction was performed using False Discovery Rate (FDR and q-values were reported.All tumors studied experienced volume change during treatment. Tumor increased in volume by an average of 15% and regressed by an average of 11%. The overall volume increase during treatment is contained within the planning target volume (PTV for all tumors. Larger tumors increased in volume more than smaller tumors during treatment (q = 0.0029. The volume increase on CBCT was correlated to the treatment planning gross target volume (GTV as well as internal target volumes (ITV (q = 0.0085 and q = 0.0039 respectively and could be predicted for tumors with a GTV less than 22 mL. The volume increase was correlated to the integral dose (ID in the ITV at every fraction (q = 0.0049. The peak inter-fraction volume occurred at an earlier fraction in younger patients (q = 0.0122.We introduced a new analysis method to follow inter-fraction tumor volume changes and determined that the observed changes during lung SBRT treatment are correlated to the initial tumor volume, integral dose (ID, and patient age. Furthermore, the volume increase during treatment of tumors less than 22mL can be predicted during treatment planning. The volume increase remained significantly less than the overall PTV expansion, and radiation

  2. Interobserver variability in gross tumor volume delineation for hepatocellular carcinoma. Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 1207 study

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    Kim, Young Suk [Jeju National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won; Lee, Ik Jae [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Won Sup [Korea University Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Ansan Hospital, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Min Kyu [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyun [National Cancer Center, Center for Liver Cancer, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Sik [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Chul [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Hong Seok; Kay, Chul Seung [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang Min [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi-Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jinsil [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Severance Hospital, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    There has been increasing use of external beam radiotherapy for localized treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with both palliative and curative intent. Quality control of target delineation in primary HCC is essential to deliver adequate doses of radiation to the primary tumor while preserving adjacent healthy organs. We analyzed interobserver variability in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for HCC. Twelve radiation oncologists specializing in liver malignancy participated in a multi-institutional contouring dummy-run study of nine HCC cases and independently delineated GTV on the same set of provided computed tomography images. Quantitative analysis was performed using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) with kappa statistics calculating agreement between physicians. To quantify the interobserver variability of GTV delineations, the ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume (STAPLE), the ratio of the common and encompassing volumes, and the coefficient of variation were calculated. The median kappa agreement level was 0.71 (range 0.28-0.86). The ratio of the actual delineated volume to the estimated consensus volume ranged from 0.19 to 1.93 (median 0.94) for all cases. The ratio of the common and encompassing volumes ranged from 0.001 to 0.56 (median 0.25). The coefficient of variation for GTV delineation ranged from 8 to 57 % (median 26 %). The interobserver variability in target delineation of HCC GTV in this study is noteworthy. Multi-institution studies involving radiotherapy for HCC require appropriate quality assurance programs for target delineation. (orig.) [German] Die externe kurative Strahlentherapie ist zunehmend bei der lokalisierten Behandlung hepatozellulaerer Karzinome (HCC) in palliativer und kurativer Absicht in Gebrauch. Eine Qualitaetskontrolle der Zielabgrenzung beim primaeren HCC ist entscheidend, um die passende Dosis fuer die

  3. 18F-FDG PET/CT-based gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy in head and neck Cancer: a correlation study between suitable uptake value threshold and tumor parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Chia-Hung

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To define a suitable threshold setting for gross tumor volume (GTV when using 18Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography and computed tomogram (PET/CT for radiotherapy planning in head and neck cancer (HNC. Methods Fifteen HNC patients prospectively received PET/CT simulation for their radiation treatment planning. Biological target volume (BTV was derived from PET/CT-based GTV of the primary tumor. The BTVs were defined as the isodensity volumes when adjusting different percentage of the maximal standardized uptake value (SUVmax, excluding any artifact from surrounding normal tissues. CT-based primary GTV (C-pGTV that had been previously defined by radiation oncologists was compared with the BTV. Suitable threshold level (sTL could be determined when BTV value and its morphology using a certain threshold level was observed to be the best fitness of the C-pGTV. Suitable standardized uptake value (sSUV was calculated as the sTL multiplied by the SUVmax. Results Our result demonstrated no single sTL or sSUV method could achieve an optimized volumetric match with the C-pGTV. The sTL was 13% to 27% (mean, 19%, whereas the sSUV was 1.64 to 3.98 (mean, 2.46. The sTL was inversely correlated with the SUVmax [sTL = -0.1004 Ln (SUVmax + 0.4464; R2 = 0.81]. The sSUV showed a linear correlation with the SUVmax (sSUV = 0.0842 SUVmax + 1.248; R2 = 0.89. The sTL was not associated with the value of C-pGTVs. Conclusion In PET/CT-based BTV for HNC, a suitable threshold or SUV level can be established by correlating with SUVmax rather than using a fixed threshold.

  4. PET-CT-Based Auto-Contouring in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Correlates With Pathology and Reduces Interobserver Variability in the Delineation of the Primary Tumor and Involved Nodal Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baardwijk, Angela van; Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Buijsen, Jeroen; Wanders, Stofferinus; Hochstenbag, Monique; Suylen, Robert-Jan van; Dekker, Andre; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Houben, Ruud; Bentzen, Soren M.; Kroonenburgh, Marinus van; Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare source-to-background ratio (SBR)-based PET-CT auto-delineation with pathology in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to investigate whether auto-delineation reduces the interobserver variability compared with manual PET-CT-based gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. Methods and Materials: Source-to-background ratio-based auto-delineation was compared with macroscopic tumor dimensions to assess its validity in 23 tumors. Thereafter, GTVs were delineated manually on 33 PET-CT scans by five observers for the primary tumor (GTV-1) and the involved lymph nodes (GTV-2). The delineation was repeated after 6 months with the auto-contour provided. This contour was edited by the observers. For comparison, the concordance index (CI) was calculated, defined as the ratio of intersection and the union of two volumes (A intersection B)/(A union B). Results: The maximal tumor diameter of the SBR-based auto-contour correlated strongly with the macroscopic diameter of primary tumors (correlation coefficient = 0.90) and was shown to be accurate for involved lymph nodes (sensitivity 67%, specificity 95%). The median auto-contour-based target volumes were smaller than those defined by manual delineation for GTV-1 (31.8 and 34.6 cm 3 , respectively; p = 0.001) and GTV-2 (16.3 and 21.8 cm 3 , respectively; p 0.02). The auto-contour-based method showed higher CIs than the manual method for GTV-1 (0.74 and 0.70 cm 3 , respectively; p 3 , respectively; p = 0.11). Conclusion: Source-to-background ratio-based auto-delineation showed a good correlation with pathology, decreased the delineated volumes of the GTVs, and reduced the interobserver variability. Auto-contouring may further improve the quality of target delineation in NSCLC patients

  5. Tumor motion and deformation during external radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotz, Heidi T.; Pos, Floris J.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.; Duppen, Joop C.; Remeijer, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: First, to quantify bladder-tumor motion in 3 dimensions during a 4-week to 5-week course of external radiotherapy. Second, to relate the motion to the tumor location on the bladder wall. Third, to extensively evaluate gross tumor volume (GTV) shape and volume changes during the course of the treatment. Methods and Materials: Multiple repeat computed tomography (CT) images were obtained for 21 bladder cancer patients. These scans were matched to the rigid bony anatomy. For each patient, the main direction and magnitude of the tumor movement was determined by use of principle-component analysis. To study GTV shape changes, all GTVs were registered to the GTV in the planning CT scan, and the residual shape errors were determined by measurement of edge variations perpendicular to the median surface. Results: Gross tumor volume translations were largest in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior direction (SD, 0.1 to ∼0.9 cm). The translations were strongly correlated with the tumor location on the bladder wall. The average value of the local standard deviations of the GTV shape ranged from 0.1 to approximately 0.35 cm. Conclusions: Despite large differences in bladder filling, variations in GTV shape were small compared with variations in GTV position. Geometric uncertainties in the GTV position depended strongly on the tumor location on the bladder wall

  6. Lipiodol injections for optimization of target volume delineation in a patient with a second tumor of the oropharynx. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haderlein, Marlen; Merten, Ricarda; Stojanovic, Andrea; Speer, Stefan; Fietkau, Rainer; Ott, Oliver J. [University Hospitals of Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Scherl, Claudia [University Hospitals of Erlangen, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Lipiodol injections were administered in the head and neck area to improve gross tumor volume (GTV) definition for small-volume re-irradiation of a 63-year-old previously irradiated patient with a second tumor of the oropharynx in the posterior wall with longitudinal ligament infiltration (cT4cN0cM0). The patient had dialysis-depending renal failure. On diagnostic computed tomography (CT), which was performed with intravenous contrast agent, the tumor in the oropharynx was not detectable. Because of dialysis-depending renal failure comorbidity, no contrast agent was applied in the planning CT and in the diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. In each cross-sectional imaging study performed, the GTV, especially in craniocaudal extensions, was not safely delineable. Therefore, craniocaudal tumor margins were pharyngoscopically marked with Lipiodol injections, an iodine-containing contrast agent. In a second planning CT, the GTV could be defined with the help of the Lipiodol marks and small-volume re-irradiation was performed. No Lipiodol-associated side effects occurred in the patient. In the present case, the use of Lipiodol injections at the tumor margins facilitated the definition of the GTV. (orig.) [German] Anwendung von Lipiodolinjektionen im Kopf-Hals-Bereich zur Verbesserung der GTV-Definition bei einer kleinvolumigen Re-Bestrahlung eines 63-jaehrigen, vorbestrahlten Patienten mit einem Zweitmalignom im Oropharynx mit Infiltration des hinteren Laengsbandes (cT4cN0cM0). Nebenbefundlich bestand bei dem Patienten eine dialysepflichtige Niereninsuffizienz. Im initialen diagnostischen Kontrastmittel-CT der Hals und Thoraxregion war der Tumor nicht abgrenzbar, so dass das Bestrahlungsplanungs-CT in Anbetracht des diagnostischen CTs und der bekannten Niereninsuffizienz ohne intravenoeses Kontrastmittel durchgefuehrt wurde. Das diagnostische MRT (vgl. Abb. 1) wurde ebenfalls ohne intravenoeses Kontrastmittel durchgefuehrt wurden. In allen durchgefuehrten

  7. A Gaussian mixture model for definition of lung tumor volumes in positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, Michalis; Penney, Bill C.; Martel, Mary K.; Pelizzari, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    The increased interest in 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in radiation treatment planning in the past five years necessitated the independent and accurate segmentation of gross tumor volume (GTV) from FDG-PET scans. In some studies the radiation oncologist contours the GTV based on a computed tomography scan, while incorporating pertinent data from the PET images. Alternatively, a simple threshold, typically 40% of the maximum intensity, has been employed to differentiate tumor from normal tissue, while other researchers have developed algorithms to aid the PET based GTV definition. None of these methods, however, results in reliable PET tumor segmentation that can be used for more sophisticated treatment plans. For this reason, we developed a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) based segmentation technique on selected PET tumor regions from non-small cell lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a GMM-based tumor volume definition in a robust, reliable and reproducible way. A GMM relies on the idea that any distribution, in our case a distribution of image intensities, can be expressed as a mixture of Gaussian densities representing different classes. According to our implementation, each class belongs to one of three regions in the image; the background (B), the uncertain (U) and the target (T), and from these regions we can obtain the tumor volume. User interaction in the implementation is required, but is limited to the initialization of the model parameters and the selection of an ''analysis region'' to which the modeling is restricted. The segmentation was developed on three and tested on another four clinical cases to ensure robustness against differences observed in the clinic. It also compared favorably with thresholding at 40% of the maximum intensity and a threshold determination function based on tumor to background image intensities proposed in a recent paper. The parts of the

  8. Comparison of investigator-delineated gross tumor volumes and quality assurance in pancreatic cancer: Analysis of the pretrial benchmark case for the SCALOP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Clifford, Charlotte; Spezi, Emiliano; Joseph, George; Branagan, Jennifer; Hurt, Chris; Nixon, Lisette; Abrams, Ross; Staffurth, John; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the variation in investigator-delineated volumes and assess plans from the radiotherapy trial quality assurance (RTTQA) program of SCALOP, a phase II trial in locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Participating investigators (n=25) outlined a pre-trial benchmark case as per RT protocol, and the accuracy of investigators' GTV (iGTV) and PTV (iPTV) was evaluated, against the trials team-defined gold standard GTV (gsGTV) and PTV (gsPTV), using both qualitative and geometric analyses. The median Jaccard Conformity Index (JCI) and Geographical Miss Index (GMI) were calculated. Participating RT centers also submitted a radiotherapy plan for this benchmark case, which was centrally reviewed against protocol-defined constraints. Twenty-five investigator-defined contours were evaluated. The median JCI and GMI of iGTVs were 0.57 (IQR: 0.51-0.65) and 0.26 (IQR: 0.15-0.40). For iPTVs, these were 0.75 (IQR: 0.71-0.79) and 0.14 (IQR: 0.11-0.22) respectively. Qualitative analysis showed largest variation at the tumor edges and failure to recognize a peri-pancreatic lymph node. There were no major protocol deviations in RT planning, but three minor PTV coverage deviations were identified. . SCALOP demonstrated considerable variation in iGTV delineation. RTTQA workshops and real-time central review of delineations are needed in future trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Definition of gross tumor volume in lung cancer: inter-observer variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Steene, Jan; Linthout, Nadine; Mey, Johan de; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Claassens, Cornelia; Noppen, Marc; Bel, Arjan; Storme, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the inter-observer variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition in lung cancer, and its clinical relevance. Material and methods: Five clinicians involved in lung cancer were asked to define GTV on the planning CT scan of eight patients. Resulting GTVs were compared on the base of geometric volume, dimensions and extensions. Judgement of invasion of lymph node (LN) regions was evaluated using the ATS/LCSG classification of LN. Clinical relevance of the variation was studied through 3D-dosimetry of standard conformal plans: volume of critical organs (heart, lungs, esophagus, spinal cord) irradiated at toxic doses, 95% isodose volumes of GTVs, normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) and tumor control probabilities (TCP) were compared for evaluation of observer variability. Results: Before evaluation of observer variability, critical review of planning CT scan led to up- (two cases) and downstaging (one case) of patients as compared to the respective diagnostic scans. The defined GTVs showed an inter-observer variation with a ratio up to more than 7 between maximum and minimum geometric content. The dimensions of the primary tumor had inter-observer ranges of 4.2 (transversal), 7.9 (cranio-caudal) and 5.4 (antero-posterior) cm. Extreme extensions of the GTVs (left, right, cranial, caudal, anterior and posterior) varied with ranges of 2.8-7.3 cm due to inter-observer variation. After common review, only 63% of involved lymph node regions were delineated by the clinicians (i.e. 37% are false negative). Twenty-two percent of drawn in lymph node regions were accepted to be false positive after review. In the conformal plans, inter-observer ranges of irradiated normal tissue volume were on average 12%, with a maximum of 66%. The probability (in the population of all conformal plans) of irradiating at least 95% of the GTV with at least 95% of the nominal treatment dose decreased from 96 to 88% when swapping the matched GTV

  10. Volumetric tumor burden and its effect on brachial plexus dosimetry in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Kovalchuk, Nataliya; Truong, Minh Tam, E-mail: mitruong@bu.edu

    2014-07-01

    To determine the effect of gross tumor volume of the primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) disease on planned radiation dose to the brachial plexus (BP) in head and neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Overall, 75 patients underwent definitive IMRT to a median total dose of 69.96 Gy in 33 fractions. The right BP and left BP were prospectively contoured as separate organs at risk. The GTV was related to BP dose using the unpaired t-test. Receiver operating characteristics curves were constructed to determine optimized volumetric thresholds of GTV-P and GTV-N corresponding to a maximum BP dose cutoff of > 66 Gy. Multivariate analyses were performed to account for factors associated with a higher maximal BP dose. A higher maximum BP dose (> 66 vs ≤ 66 Gy) correlated with a greater mean GTV-P (79.5 vs 30.8 cc; p = 0.001) and ipsilateral GTV-N (60.6 vs 19.8 cc; p = 0.014). When dichotomized by the optimized nodal volume, patients with an ipsilateral GTV-N ≥ 4.9 vs < 4.9 cc had a significant difference in maximum BP dose (64.2 vs 59.4 Gy; p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed that an ipsilateral GTV-N ≥ 4.9 cc was an independent predictor for the BP to receive a maximal dose of > 66 Gy when adjusted individually for BP volume, GTV-P, the use of a low anterior neck field technique, total planned radiation dose, and tumor category. Although both the primary and the nodal tumor volumes affected the BP maximal dose, the ipsilateral nodal tumor volume (GTV-N ≥ 4.9 cc) was an independent predictor for high maximal BP dose constraints in head and neck IMRT.

  11. Comparison of the gross tumor volume in end-expiration/end-inspiration (2 Phase) and summated all phase volume captured in four-dimensional computed tomography in carcinoma lung patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Srivastava, Roopam; Munshi, Anusheel; Chomal, Manish; Saini, Gagan; Garg, Madhur; Manjhi, Jayanand; Rai, D V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the delineation and treatment planning of 2 Phase based (end-expiration and end-inspiration) internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) with 10-phase based (four-dimensional [4D]) IGTV. Patients with lung tumors at different sites were selected for the study. The location of the tumor in Groups A, B, C were at the upper lobe (attached to the chest wall), middle lobe, and lower lobe, respectively. We contoured the GTV on each of the 10 respiratory phases of the 4D computed tomography (4DCT) data set. The combination of these GTVs produced the IGTV "All Phases." GTV was also generated on the extreme respiratory phases. The combination of these two GTVs produced IGTV "2 Phases." Treatment planning was done, and dose to organs at risks (OARs) were compared in both cases. The average volume of IGTV "2 Phases" and IGTV "All Phases" for Group A were nearly same. However, for Group B and Group C, IGTV "2 Phases" were smaller than the IGTV "All Phases." Lung-GTV doses were less in "exp-insp" phases than in "4DCT" for Groups B, C, whereas it was same for "expiration-inspiration" and "4DCT" in Patient A. Patients with tumor upper lobe tumor have no difference in tumor coverage and OARs sparing in the 2 Phase and all phases but middle lobe and lower lobe have a greater excursion during respiration and hence greater all phases IGTV.

  12. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  13. A comparison of perfusion computed tomography and contrast enhanced computed tomography on radiation target volume delineation using rabbit VX2 brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Changjin; Luo Yunxiu; Yu Jinming; Lu Haibo; Li Chao; Zhang Dekang; Huang Jianming; Wang Jie; Lang Jinyi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of blood volume perfusion imaging (perfusion CT)with contrast enhanced 64-slice spiral computed tomography (CECT) in the evaluation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) using rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. Methods: Perfusion CT and CECT were performed in 20 rabbits with VX2 brain tumor. The GTV and CTV calculated with the maximal and minimal diameter of each tumor in the blood volume (BV) maps and CECT were measured and compared to those in pathological specimens. Results: The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of GTV was (8.19 ± 2.29) mm and (4.83 ± 1.31) mm in pathological specimens, (11.98 ±3.29) mm and (7.03±1.82) mm in BV maps, while (6.36±3.85) mm and (3.17±1.93) mm in CECT images, which were significantly different (pathological specimen vs. BV map, t = 7.17, P =0.000;pathological specimen vs. CECT, t = 8.37, P = 0.000, respectively). The mean value of the maximal and minimal diameter of CTV in pathologic specimens was (12.87 ± 3.74) mm and (7.71 ± 2.15) mm, which was significantly different from that of GTV and CTV in CECT (t = - 3. 18, P = 0. 005 and t = - 4.24, P =0.000; t= -11.59,P=0.000 and t= -9.39, P=0.000), while similar with that of GTV in BV maps (t = - 1.95,P = 0. 067; t = - 2. 06, P = 0. 054). For CECT, the margin from GTV to CTV was 81.83% ±40.33% for the maximal diameter and 276.73% ± 131.46% for the minimal. While for BV maps, the margin was 7.93% ± 17. 84% and 12.52% ± 27. 83%, which was significant different from that for CECT images (t=7.36, P=0. 000 and t= -8.78, P=0.000). Conclusions: Compared with CECT, the BV map from 64-slice spiral CT perfusion imaging might have higher accuracy in target volume delineation for brain tumor. (authors)

  14. Impact of Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus-DNA and Tumor Volume on Prognosis of Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study aims to examine the association of plasma Epstein-Barr virus- (EBV- DNA levels with the tumor volume and prognosis in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A total of 165 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced NPC were identified from September 2011 to July 2012. EBV-DNA was detected using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification. The tumor volume was calculated by the systematic summation method of computer software. The median copy number of plasma EBV-DNA before treatment was 3790 copies/mL. The median gross tumor volume of the primary nasopharyngeal tumor (GTVnx, the lymph node lesions (GTVnd, and the total GTV before treatment were 72.46, 23.26, and 106.25 cm3, respectively; the EBV-DNA levels were significantly correlated with the GTVnd and the total GTV (P<0.01. The 2-year overall survival (OS rates in patients with positive and negative pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA were 100% and 98.4% (P=1.000, and the disease-free survival (DFS rates were 94.4% and 80.8% (P=0.044, respectively. These results indicate that high pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA levels in patients with locally advanced NPC are associated with the degree of lymph node metastasis, tumor burden, and poor prognosis.

  15. Early Prediction of Outcome in Advanced Head-and-Neck Cancer Based on Tumor Blood Volume Alterations During Therapy: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yue; Popovtzer, Aron; Li, Diana; Chepeha, Douglas B.; Moyer, Jeffrey S.; Prince, Mark E.; Worden, Francis; Teknos, Theodoros; Bradford, Carol; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether alterations in tumor blood volume (BV) and blood flow (BF) during the early course of chemo-radiotherapy (chemo-RT) for head-and-neck cancer (HNC) predict treatment outcome. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients receiving concomitant chemo-RT for nonresectable, locally advanced HNC underwent dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI scans before therapy and 2 weeks after initiation of chemo-RT. The BV and BF were quantified from DCE MRI. Preradiotherapy BV and BF, as well as their changes during RT, were evaluated separately in the primary gross tumor volume (GTV) and nodal GTV for association with outcomes. Results: At a median follow-up of 10 months (range, 5-27 months), 9 patients had local-regional controlled disease. One patient had regional failure, 3 had local failures, and 1 had local-regional failure. Reduction in tumor volume after 2 weeks of chemo-RT did not predict for local control. In contrast, the BV in the primary GTV after 2 weeks of chemo-RT was increased significantly in the local control patients compared with the local failure patients (p < 0.03). Conclusions: Our data suggest that an increase in available primary tumor blood for oxygen extraction during the early course of RT is associated with local control, thus yielding a predictor with potential to modify treatment. These findings require validation in larger studies

  16. Gross tumor volume and clinical target volume in prostate cancer: How do satellites relate to the index lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Birgit G; van Triest, Baukelien; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Groenendaal, Greetje; de Jong, Jeroen; van der Poel, Henk G; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2015-04-01

    There is an increasing interest for dose differentiation in prostate radiotherapy. The purpose of our study was to analyze the spatial distribution of tumor satellites inside the prostate. 61 prostatectomy specimens were stained with H&E. Tumor regions were delineated by the uro-pathologist. Volumes, distances and cell densities of all delineated tumor regions were measured and further analyzed. Multifocal disease was seen in 84% of the patients. The median number of tumor foci was 3. The median distance between the index lesion and the satellites was 1.0 cm, with a maximum of 4.4 cm. The index lesions accounted for 88% of the total tumor volume. The contribution of tumor focisatellites, regardless of size, were significantly higher than that of the prostate. Satellites do not appear in a limited margin around the index lesion (GTV). Consequently, a fixed CTV margin would not effectively cover all satellites. Thus if the aim is to treat all tumor foci, the entire prostate gland should be considered CTV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tumor volume regression during preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: a prospective observational study with weekly MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Begin, Robbe; Kleijnen, Jean-Paul; Engels, Benedikt; Philippens, Marielle; van Asselen, Bram; Raaymakers, Bas; Reerink, Onne; De Ridder, Mark; Intven, Martijn

    2017-11-20

    Few data is available on rectal tumor shrinkage during preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). This regression pattern is interesting to optimize timing of dose escalation on the tumor. Gross tumor volumes (GTV) were contoured by two observers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained before, weekly during, 2-4 weeks after, and 7-8 weeks after a 5-week course of concomitant CRT for rectal cancer. Overall, 120 MRIs were acquired in 15 patients. A statistically significant tumor volume reduction is seen from the first week, and between any two time points (p < .007). At the end of CRT, 46.3% of the initial tumor volume remained, and 32.4% at time of surgery. PTV measured 61.2% at the end of treatment. Tumor shrinkage is the fastest in the beginning of treatment (26%/week), slows down to 7%/week in the last 2 weeks of CRT, and finally to 1.3%/week in the last 5 weeks before surgery. The main rectal tumor regression occurs during CRT course itself, and mostly in the first half, with shrinking speed decreasing over the course. This suggests that a sequential boost is preferably done after the elective fields, yielding an average PTV-reduction of 39%. A simultaneous integrated boost strategy could benefit from adaptive planning during the course.

  18. Comparison of three approaches to delineate internal gross tumor volume based on four-dimensional CT simulation images of non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengxiang; Li Jianbin; Zhang Yingjie; Shang Dongping; Liu Tonghai; Tian Shiyu; Xu Min; Ma Changsheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare positional and volumetric differences of internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) delineated separately by three approaches based on four-dimensional CT (4DCT) for the primary tumor of non-small cell lung cancer (NLCLC). Methods: Twenty-one patients with NLCLC underwent big bore 4DCT simulation scan of the thorax. IGTVs of the primary tumor of NSCLC were delineated using three approaches as followed: (1) the gross tumor volume (GTV) on each of the ten the respiratory phases of the 4DCT image set were delineated and the ten GTV were fused to produce IGTV 10 ; (2) the GTV delineated separately based on 0% and 50% phase were fused to produce IGTV EI+EE ; (3) the visible tumor on the MIP images were delineated to produce IGTV MIP . The position of the target center, the volume of target, the degree of inclusion (DI) and the matching index (MI) were compared reciprocally between IGTV 10 , IGTV EI+EE and IGTV MIP . Results: Average differences between the position of the center of IGTVs on direction of x, y and z axes were less than 1 mm, with no statistically significant difference. The volume of IGTV 10 was larger than that of IGTV EI+EE , the difference was statistically significant (t=2.37, P=0.028); the volume of IGTV 10 was larger than that of IGTV MIP , but the difference was not statistically significant (t=1.95, P=0.065). The ratio of IGTV EI+EE with IGTV 10 , IGTV MIP with IGTV 10 were 0.85±0.08 and 0.92±0.11, respectively. DI of IGTV EI+EE in IGTV 10 , IGTV MIP in IGTV 10 were 84.78% ± 8. 95% and 88.47% ±9.04%. MI between IGTV 10 and IGTV EI+EE , IGTV 10 and IGTV MIP were 0.85 ±0.09, 0.86±0.09, respectively. Conclusions: The center displacement of the IGTVs delineated separately by the three different techniques based on 4DCT images are not obvious; IGTV EI+EE and IGTV MIP can not replace IGTV 10 , however, IGTV MIP is more close to IGTV 10 comparing to IGTV EI+EE . The ratio of GTV EI+EE with IGTV 10 is correlated to the tumor motion

  19. SU-C-BRA-05: Delineating High-Dose Clinical Target Volumes for Head and Neck Tumors Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardenas, C; Wong, A; Mohamed, A; Fuller, C; Yang, J; Court, L; Aristophanous, M; Rao, A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and test population-based machine learning algorithms for delineating high-dose clinical target volumes (CTVs) in H&N tumors. Automating and standardizing the contouring of CTVs can reduce both physician contouring time and inter-physician variability, which is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in H&N radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-five node-negative patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were selected (6 right base of tongue, 11 left and 9 right tonsil). All patients had GTV and CTVs manually contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist prior to treatment. This contouring process, which is driven by anatomical, pathological, and patient specific information, typically results in non-uniform margin expansions about the GTV. Therefore, we tested two methods to delineate high-dose CTV given a manually-contoured GTV: (1) regression-support vector machines(SVM) and (2) classification-SVM. These models were trained and tested on each patient group using leave-one-out cross-validation. The volume difference(VD) and Dice similarity coefficient(DSC) between the manual and auto-contoured CTV were calculated to evaluate the results. Distances from GTV-to-CTV were computed about each patient’s GTV and these distances, in addition to distances from GTV to surrounding anatomy in the expansion direction, were utilized in the regression-SVM method. The classification-SVM method used categorical voxel-information (GTV, selected anatomical structures, else) from a 3×3×3cm3 ROI centered about the voxel to classify voxels as CTV. Results: Volumes for the auto-contoured CTVs ranged from 17.1 to 149.1cc and 17.4 to 151.9cc; the average(range) VD between manual and auto-contoured CTV were 0.93 (0.48–1.59) and 1.16(0.48–1.97); while average(range) DSC values were 0.75(0.59–0.88) and 0.74(0.59–0.81) for the regression-SVM and classification-SVM methods, respectively. Conclusion: We developed two novel machine learning methods to delineate

  20. SU-C-BRA-05: Delineating High-Dose Clinical Target Volumes for Head and Neck Tumors Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, C [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Wong, A [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); School of Medicine, The University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Mohamed, A; Fuller, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Yang, J; Court, L; Aristophanous, M [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rao, A [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and test population-based machine learning algorithms for delineating high-dose clinical target volumes (CTVs) in H&N tumors. Automating and standardizing the contouring of CTVs can reduce both physician contouring time and inter-physician variability, which is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in H&N radiotherapy. Methods: Twenty-five node-negative patients treated with definitive radiotherapy were selected (6 right base of tongue, 11 left and 9 right tonsil). All patients had GTV and CTVs manually contoured by an experienced radiation oncologist prior to treatment. This contouring process, which is driven by anatomical, pathological, and patient specific information, typically results in non-uniform margin expansions about the GTV. Therefore, we tested two methods to delineate high-dose CTV given a manually-contoured GTV: (1) regression-support vector machines(SVM) and (2) classification-SVM. These models were trained and tested on each patient group using leave-one-out cross-validation. The volume difference(VD) and Dice similarity coefficient(DSC) between the manual and auto-contoured CTV were calculated to evaluate the results. Distances from GTV-to-CTV were computed about each patient’s GTV and these distances, in addition to distances from GTV to surrounding anatomy in the expansion direction, were utilized in the regression-SVM method. The classification-SVM method used categorical voxel-information (GTV, selected anatomical structures, else) from a 3×3×3cm3 ROI centered about the voxel to classify voxels as CTV. Results: Volumes for the auto-contoured CTVs ranged from 17.1 to 149.1cc and 17.4 to 151.9cc; the average(range) VD between manual and auto-contoured CTV were 0.93 (0.48–1.59) and 1.16(0.48–1.97); while average(range) DSC values were 0.75(0.59–0.88) and 0.74(0.59–0.81) for the regression-SVM and classification-SVM methods, respectively. Conclusion: We developed two novel machine learning methods to delineate

  1. A quantitative comparison of gross tumor volumes delineated on [18F]-FDG-PET/CT scan and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan in locally advanced head and neck carcinoma treated with Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjuna Burela

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate tumor diagnosis is important in highly conformal techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT, which aims for high therapeutic ratio. We compared Gross Tumor Volume (GTV (primary and nodal delineated on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]-FDG-PET scan to those delineated on contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT scan and its impact on staging treated by IMRT. A total of 30 consecutive patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck were included in this study. FDG-PET and CECT scans were performed with dedicated positron emission tomography–computed tomography (PET/CT scanner in a single session as part of radiotherapy treatment planning for IMRT. After treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, all patients were followed for one year. Three out of 30 patients were excluded from the final analysis, as there was complete remission in PET/CT after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. For remaining 27 cases, the primary sites were 17 oropharynx, 2 hypopharynx, 7 larynx and 1 unknown primary with secondary neck node. PET–CT resulted in changes of CT-based staging in 25% patients (up-staged in 3 and down-staged in 4. GTV delineated on PET vs CT scan was GTV-PET (primary of 20.15 cm3 vs GTV-CT (primary of 18.75 cm3, p = 0.803; and GTV-PET (nodes of 28.45 cm3 vs GTV-CT (nodes of 21.56 cm3, p = 0.589. The mismatch between two target volumes was statistically insignificant (p = 0.635 for GTV primary, p = 0.187 for nodes. The mean GTV-PET outside CT for primary was 5.83 cm3, and for node was 8.47 cm3. Median follow-up was 12 months. One-year loco-regional control was 92%. The target delineation of GTV can be improved with functional imaging [18F]-FDG-PET/CT.

  2. Interobserver and intermodality variability in GTV delineation on simulation CT, FDG-PET, and MR Images of Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carryn M; Sun, Wenqing; Buatti, John M; Maley, Joan E; Policeni, Bruno; Mott, Sarah L; Bayouth, John E

    2014-09-01

    To compare the interobserver and intermodality differences in image-based identification of head and neck primary site gross tumor volumes (GTV). Modalities compared include: contrast-enhanced CT, F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced MRI. Fourteen patients were simulated after immobilization for all 3 imaging modalities (CT, PET/CT, MRI). Three radiation oncologists (RO) contoured GTVs as seen on each modality. The GTV was contoured first on the contrast-enhanced CT (considered the standard), then on PET/CT, and finally on post-contrast T1 MRI. Interobserver and intermodality variability were analyzed by volume, intersection, union, and volume overlap ratio (VOR). Analysis of RO contours revealed the average volume for CT-, PET/CT-, and MRI-derived GTVs were 45cc, 35cc and 49cc, respectively. In 93% of cases PET/CT-derived GTVs had the smallest volume and in 57% of cases MRI-derived GTVs had the largest volume. CT showed the largest variation in target definition (standard deviation amongst observers 35%) compared to PET/CT (28%) and MRI (27%). The VOR was largest (indicating greatest interobserver agreement) in PET/CT (46%), followed by MRI (36%), followed by CT (34%). For each observer, the least agreement in GTV definition occurred between MRI & PET/CT (average VOR = 41%), compared to CT & PET/CT (48%) and CT & MRI (47%). A nonsignificant interobserver difference in GTVs for each modality was seen. Among three modalities, CT was least consistent, while PET/CT-derived GTVs had the smallest volumes and were most consistent. MRI combined with PET/CT provided the least agreement in GTVs generated. The significance of these differences for head & neck cancer is important to explore as we move to volume-based treatment planning based on multi-modality imaging as a standard method for treatment delivery.

  3. Pancreatic gross tumor volume contouring on computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): Results of an international contouring conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, William A; Heerkens, Hanne D; Paulson, Eric S; Meijer, Gert J; Kotte, Alexis N; Knechtges, Paul; Parikh, Parag J; Bassetti, Michael F; Lee, Percy; Aitken, Katharine L; Palta, Manisha; Myrehaug, Sten; Koay, Eugene J; Portelance, Lorraine; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Erickson, Beth A

    Accurate identification of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in pancreatic adenocarcinoma is challenging. We sought to understand differences in GTV delineation using pancreatic computed tomography (CT) compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twelve attending radiation oncologists were convened for an international contouring symposium. All participants had a clinical and research interest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. CT and MRI scans from 3 pancreatic cases were used for contouring. CT and MRI GTVs were analyzed and compared. Interobserver variability was compared using Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC), Hausdorff distances, and Jaccard indices. Mann-Whitney tests were used to check for significant differences. Consensus contours on CT and MRI scans and constructed count maps were used to visualize the agreement. Agreement regarding the optimal method to determine GTV definition using MRI was reached. Six contour sets (3 from CT and 3 from MRI) were obtained and compared for each observer, totaling 72 contour sets. The mean volume of contours on CT was significantly larger at 57.48 mL compared with a mean of 45.76 mL on MRI, P = .011. The standard deviation obtained from the CT contours was significantly larger than the standard deviation from the MRI contours (P = .027). The mean DSC was 0.73 for the CT and 0.72 for the MRI (P = .889). The conformity index measurement was similar for CT and MRI (P = .58). Count maps were created to highlight differences in the contours from CT and MRI. Using MRI as a primary image set to define a pancreatic adenocarcinoma GTV resulted in smaller contours compared with CT. No differences in DSC or the conformity index were seen between MRI and CT. A stepwise method is recommended as an approach to contour a pancreatic GTV using MRI. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. GTV delineation in supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma: interobserver agreement of CT versus CT-MR delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Elise Anne; Kasperts, Nicolien; Caldas-Magalhaes, Joana; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Pameijer, Frank A; Terhaard, Chris H J; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P J

    2015-01-23

    GTV delineation is the first crucial step in radiotherapy and requires high accuracy, especially with the growing use of highly conformal and adaptive radiotherapy techniques. If GTV delineations of observers concord, they are considered to be of high accuracy. The aim of the study is to determine the interobserver agreement for GTV delineations of supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma on CT and on CT combined with MR-images and to determine the effect of adding MR images to CT-based delineation on the delineated volume and the interobserver agreement. Twenty patients with biopsy proven T1-T4 supraglottic laryngeal cancer, treated with curative intent were included. For all patients a contrast enhanced planning CT and a 1.5-T MRI with gadolinium were acquired in the same head-and-shoulder mask for fixation as used during treatment. For MRI, a two element surface coil was used as a receiver coil. Three dedicated observers independently delineated the GTV on CT. After an interval of 2 weeks, a set of co-registered CT and MR-images was provided to delineate the GTV on CT. Common volumes (C) and encompassing volumes (E) were calculated and C/E ratios were determined for each pair of observers. The conformity index general (CIgen) was used to quantify the interobserver agreement. In general, a large variation in interobserver agreement was found for CT (range: 0.29-0.77) as well as for CT-MR delineations (range: 0.17-0.80). The mean CIgen for CT (0.61) was larger compared to CT-MR (0.57) (p = 0.032). Mean GTV volume delineated on CT-MR (6.6 cm(3)) was larger compared to CT (5.6 cm(3)) (p = 0.002). Delineation on CT with co-registered MR-images resulted in a larger mean GTV volume and in a decrease in interobserver agreement compared to CT only delineation for supraglottic laryngeal carcinoma.

  5. Interfraction Liver Shape Variability and Impact on GTV Position During Liver Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Abdominal Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccles, Cynthia L.; Dawson, Laura A.; Moseley, Joanne L.; Brock, Kristy K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: For patients receiving liver stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), abdominal compression can reduce organ motion, and daily image guidance can reduce setup error. The reproducibility of liver shape under compression may impact treatment delivery accuracy. The purpose of this study was to measure the interfractional variability in liver shape under compression, after best-fit rigid liver-to-liver registration from kilovoltage (kV) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans to planning computed tomography (CT) scans and its impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) position. Methods and Materials: Evaluable patients were treated in a Research Ethics Board-approved SBRT six-fraction study with abdominal compression. Kilovoltage CBCT scans were acquired before treatment and reconstructed as respiratory sorted CBCT scans offline. Manual rigid liver-to-liver registrations were performed from exhale-phase CBCT scans to exhale planning CT scans. Each CBCT liver was contoured, exported, and compared with the planning CT scan for spatial differences, by use of in house-developed finite-element model-based deformable registration (MORFEUS). Results: We evaluated 83 CBCT scans from 16 patients with 30 GTVs. The mean volume of liver that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 21.7%. Excluding 1 outlier, the maximum volume that deformed by greater than 3 mm was 36.3% in a single patient. Over all patients, the absolute maximum deformations in the left-right (LR), anterior-posterior (AP), and superior-inferior directions were 10.5 mm (SD, 2.2), 12.9 mm (SD, 3.6), and 5.6 mm (SD, 2.7), respectively. The absolute mean predicted impact of liver volume displacements on GTV by use of center of mass displacements was 0.09 mm (SD, 0.13), 0.13 mm (SD, 0.18), and 0.08 mm (SD, 0.07) in the left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions, respectively. Conclusions: Interfraction liver deformations in patients undergoing SBRT under abdominal compression after rigid liver

  6. Validated guidelines for tumor delineation on magnetic resonance imaging for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, Elise Anne; Ligtenberg, Hans; Caldas-Magalhaes, Joana; Schakel, Tim; Philippens, Marielle E; Pameijer, Frank A; Kasperts, Nicolien; Willems, Stefan M; Terhaard, Christiaan H; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P

    2016-11-01

    Validation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and development of guidelines for the delineation of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is of utmost importance to benefit from the visibility of anatomical details on MR images and to achieve an accurate GTV delineation. In the ideal situation, the GTV delineation corresponds to the histopathologically determined 'true tumor volume'. Consequently, we developed guidelines for GTV delineation of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumors on MRI and determined the accuracy of the resulting delineation of the tumor outline on histopathology as gold standard. Twenty-seven patients with T3 or T4 laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer underwent a MRI scan before laryngectomy. Hematoxylin and eosin sections were obtained from surgical specimens and tumor was delineated by one pathologist. GTV was delineated on MR images by three independent observers in two sessions. The first session (del1) was performed according to clinical practice. In the second session (del2) guidelines were used. The reconstructed specimen was registered to the MR images for comparison of the delineated GTVs to the tumor on histopathology. Volumes and overlap parameters were analyzed. A target margin needed to assure tumor coverage was determined. The median GTVs (del1: 19.4 cm 3 , del2: 15.8 cm 3 ) were larger than the tumor volume on pathology (10.5 cm 3 ). Comparable target margins were needed for both delineation sessions to assure tumor coverage. By adding these margins to the GTVs, the target volumes for del1 (median: 81.3 cm 3 ) were significantly larger than for del2 (median: 64.2 cm 3 ) (p ≤ 0.0001) with similar tumor coverage. In clinical radiotherapy practice, the delineated GTV on MRI is twice as large as the tumor volume. Validated delineation guidelines lead to a significant decrease in the overestimation of the tumor volume.

  7. GTV-based prescription in SBRT for lung lesions using advanced dose calculation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacornerie, Thomas; Lisbona, Albert; Mirabel, Xavier; Lartigau, Eric; Reynaert, Nick

    2014-10-16

    The aim of current study was to investigate the way dose is prescribed to lung lesions during SBRT using advanced dose calculation algorithms that take into account electron transport (type B algorithms). As type A algorithms do not take into account secondary electron transport, they overestimate the dose to lung lesions. Type B algorithms are more accurate but still no consensus is reached regarding dose prescription. The positive clinical results obtained using type A algorithms should be used as a starting point. In current work a dose-calculation experiment is performed, presenting different prescription methods. Three cases with three different sizes of peripheral lung lesions were planned using three different treatment platforms. For each individual case 60 Gy to the PTV was prescribed using a type A algorithm and the dose distribution was recalculated using a type B algorithm in order to evaluate the impact of the secondary electron transport. Secondly, for each case a type B algorithm was used to prescribe 48 Gy to the PTV, and the resulting doses to the GTV were analyzed. Finally, prescriptions based on specific GTV dose volumes were evaluated. When using a type A algorithm to prescribe the same dose to the PTV, the differences regarding median GTV doses among platforms and cases were always less than 10% of the prescription dose. The prescription to the PTV based on type B algorithms, leads to a more important variability of the median GTV dose among cases and among platforms, (respectively 24%, and 28%). However, when 54 Gy was prescribed as median GTV dose, using a type B algorithm, the variability observed was minimal. Normalizing the prescription dose to the median GTV dose for lung lesions avoids variability among different cases and treatment platforms of SBRT when type B algorithms are used to calculate the dose. The combination of using a type A algorithm to optimize a homogeneous dose in the PTV and using a type B algorithm to prescribe the

  8. Variability of Gross Tumor Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jiang

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to evaluate the variability of gross tumor volume (GTV using 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG PET/CT images for nasopharyngeal carcinomas boundary definition. Assessment consisted of inter-observer and inter-modality variation analysis. Four radiation oncologists were invited to manually contour GTV by using PET/CT fusion obtained from a cohort of 12 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC and who underwent both 11C-Choline and 18F-FDG scans. Student's paired-sample t-test was performed for analyzing inter-observer and inter-modality variability. Semi-automatic segmentation methods, including thresholding and region growing, were also validated against the manual contouring of the two types of PET images. We observed no significant variation in the results obtained by different oncologists in terms of the same type of PET/CT volumes. Choline fusion volumes were significantly larger than the FDG volumes (p < 0.0001, mean ± SD = 18.21 ± 8.19. While significantly consistent results were obtained between the oncologists and the standard references in Choline volumes compared with those in FDG volumes (p = 0.0025. Simple semi-automatic delineation methods indicated that 11C-Choline PET images could provide better results than FDG volumes (p = 0.076, CI = [-0.29, 0.025]. 11C-Choline PET/CT may be more advantageous in GTV delineation for the radiotherapy of NPC than 18F-FDG. Phantom simulations and clinical trials should be conducted to prove the possible improvement of the treatment outcome.

  9. A method to combine target volume data from 3D and 4D planned thoracic radiotherapy patient cohorts for machine learning applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Corinne; Price, Gareth; Khalifa, Jonathan; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Dekker, Andre; Moore, Christopher; van Herk, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    The gross tumour volume (GTV) is predictive of clinical outcome and consequently features in many machine-learned models. 4D-planning, however, has prompted substitution of the GTV with the internal gross target volume (iGTV). We present and validate a method to synthesise GTV data from the iGTV,

  10. WE-AB-202-10: Modelling Individual Tumor-Specific Control Probability for Hypoxia in Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S; Warren, DR; Wilson, JM; Muirhead, R; Hawkins, MA; Maughan, T; Partridge, M [University of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate hypoxia-guided dose-boosting for increased tumour control and improved normal tissue sparing using FMISO-PET images Methods: Individual tumor-specific control probability (iTSCP) was calculated using a modified linear-quadratic model with rectal-specific radiosensitivity parameters for three limiting-case assumptions of the hypoxia / FMISO uptake relationship. {sup 18}FMISO-PET images from 2 patients (T3N0M0) from the RHYTHM trial (Investigating Hypoxia in Rectal Tumours NCT02157246) were chosen to delineate a hypoxic region (GTV-MISO defined as tumor-to-muscle ratio > 1.3) within the anatomical GTV. Three VMAT treatment plans were created in Eclipse (Varian): STANDARD (45Gy / 25 fractions to PTV4500); BOOST-GTV (simultaneous integrated boost of 60Gy / 25fr to GTV +0.5cm) and BOOST-MISO (60Gy / 25fr to GTV-MISO+0.5cm). GTV mean dose (in EQD2), iTSCP and normal tissue dose-volume metrics (small bowel, bladder, anus, and femoral heads) were recorded. Results: Patient A showed small hypoxic volume (15.8% of GTV) and Patient B moderate hypoxic volume (40.2% of GTV). Dose escalation to 60Gy was achievable, and doses to femoral heads and small bowel in BOOST plans were comparable to STANDARD plans. For patient A, a reduced maximum bladder dose was observed in BOOST-MISO compared to BOOST-GTV (D0.1cc 49.2Gy vs 54.0Gy). For patient B, a smaller high dose volume was observed for the anus region in BOOST-MISO compared to BOOST-GTV (V55Gy 19.9% vs 100%), which could potentially reduce symptoms of fecal incontinence. For BOOST-MISO, the largest iTSCPs (A: 95.5% / B: 90.0%) assumed local correlation between FMISO uptake and hypoxia, and approached iTSCP values seen for BOOST-GTV (A: 96.1% / B: 90.5%). Conclusion: Hypoxia-guided dose-boosting is predicted to improve local control in rectal tumors when FMISO is spatially correlated to hypoxia, and to reduce dose to organs-at-risk compared to boosting the whole GTV. This could lead to organ

  11. Addition of MRI for CT-based pancreatic tumor delineation: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J.; Versteijne, Eva; van der Horst, Astrid; Lens, Eelco; Rütten, Heidi; Heerkens, Hanne D.; Paardekooper, Gabriel M. R. M.; Berbee, Maaike; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Stoker, Jaap; Engelbrecht, Marc R. W.; van Herk, Marcel; Nederveen, Aart J.; Klaassen, Remy; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W. M.; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Bel, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    To assess the effect of additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) alongside the planning computed tomography (CT) scan on target volume delineation in pancreatic cancer patients. Eight observers (radiation oncologists) from six institutions delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV) on 3DCT, and

  12. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging tumor volume with histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L; Linehan, W Marston; Wood, Bradford J; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm(3)) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p = 0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r(2) = 0.401, p histopathology were 0.949 (p histopathology. Magnetic resonance imaging can accurately estimate index tumor volume as determined by histology. Magnetic resonance imaging has better accuracy in predicting histopathology tumor volume in tumors larger than 0.5 cm(3) than prostate specific antigen and age. Index tumor volume as

  13. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  14. A general methodology for three-dimensional analysis of variation in target volume delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remeijer, P.; Rasch, C.; Lebesque, J. V.; van Herk, M.

    1999-01-01

    A generic method for three-dimensional (3-D) evaluation of target volume delineation in multiple imaging modalities is presented. The evaluation includes geometrical and statistical methods to estimate observer differences and variability in defining the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) in relation to the

  15. Analysis of parotid gland and target volume variations during the head neck cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Jingwei; Fu Weihua; Xu Guozhen; Gao Li; Yan Di; Wu Qiuwen

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes in gross tumor volume (GTV) and parotid gland volume dur- ing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck cancer. Methods: Five patients with head and neck squamous carcinoma were treated by IMRT. Cone beam CT was done every week during the whole course of radiotherapy. All images were fused with cone beam CT pictures and the initial CT pictures. The contouring was on normal parotid gland and gas cavity in each slide of cone beam CT. The changes of parotid gland and gas volume in GTV were calculated. Results: The parotid gland volume decreased, and gas volume in the GTV increased throughout the course of IMRT. At the end of radiotherapy, the parotid gland volume decreased to 90.1%- 52.3% compared with the volume before IMRT, gas cavity volume increased and took up to 3.7%-16.8% of GTV at the beginning of radiotherapy. Conclusion: Normal parotid gland volume and GTV is changed during IMRT in head and neck cancer. Cone beam CT can be used to find these changes which are helpful in carrying out the second IMRT plan. (authors)

  16. Cervical cancer outcome prediction to high-dose rate brachytherapy using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging analysis of tumor response to external beam radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkoff, David; Gill, Beant S.; Kang, John; Beriwal, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: In order to assess tumor regression and outcomes, a volumetric analysis was conducted for cervical cancer patients treated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT). Materials and methods: Consecutive patients with FIGO stage IB1–IVA cervical cancer receiving chemoradiation from 2007 to 2013 were identified, excluding patients with perineal template-based interstitial brachytherapy or without undergoing MRI. A ring and tandem applicator ± interstitial needles was used. T2-weighted imaging was completed following applicator insertion. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were retrospectively contoured: initial GTV (GTV Pre-EBRT ), GTV at first brachytherapy (GTV IGBT ) and percent residual GTV at first brachytherapy (% GTV Residual ). Results: Eighty-four patients were identified. With 20.8-month median follow-up, two-year estimates of local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 91.3, 79.8, and 85.0%, respectively. Multivariate Cox regression revealed adenocarcinoma (HR 5.88, p = 0.03) and GTV IGBT (HR 1.17, p < 0.01) as predictors for local failure. GTV IGBT > 7.5 cc was associated with inferior 2-year LC (75.0 vs. 96.6%, p < 0.01), DFS (42.6 vs. 91.6%, p < 0.01) and OS (65.2 vs. 91.5%, p < 0.01). No difference in mean HRCTV D 90 EQD 2 was seen between the groups (p = 0.61). Conclusion: Aside from known benefits of IGBT, MRI-based planning allows for assessment of tumor regression and prognosticates patients

  17. Analysis of Target Volume Definition Using CT, MRI and FDG-PET in Radiotherapy Treatment Planning of Anal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, E.; Hendel, H. Westergreen; Johannesen, H. Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    -PETs. Although the GTV-CT were larger, it did not always cover the GTVs of MRI and PET. The GTV-CT increased if overlaying GTV-MRI or one of the GTV-PETs. Based on our study, our recommendations are not to use CT solely for delineating anal tumors; MRI or PET should be considered as a second imaging modality....

  18. Localization Accuracy of the Clinical Target Volume During Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Badawi, Ahmed; Orton, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the position and shape of the originally defined clinical target volume (CTV) over the treatment course, and to assess the impact of gross tumor volume (GTV)-based online computed tomography (CT) guidance on CTV localization accuracy. Methods and Materials: Weekly breath-hold CT scans were acquired in 17 patients undergoing radiotherapy. Deformable registration was used to propagate the GTV and CTV from the first weekly CT image to all other weekly CT images. The on-treatment CT scans were registered rigidly to the planning CT scan based on the GTV location to simulate online guidance, and residual error in the CTV centroids and borders was calculated. Results: The mean GTV after 5 weeks relative to volume at the beginning of treatment was 77% ± 20%, whereas for the prescribed CTV, it was 92% ± 10%. The mean absolute residual error magnitude in the CTV centroid position after a GTV-based localization was 2.9 ± 3.0 mm, and it varied from 0.3 to 20.0 mm over all patients. Residual error of the CTV centroid was associated with GTV regression and anisotropy of regression during treatment (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively; Spearman rank correlation). A residual error in CTV border position greater than 2 mm was present in 77% of patients and 50% of fractions. Among these fractions, residual error of the CTV borders was 3.5 ± 1.6 mm (left-right), 3.1 ± 0.9 mm (anterior-posterior), and 6.4 ± 7.5 mm (superior-inferior). Conclusions: Online guidance based on the visible GTV produces substantial error in CTV localization, particularly for highly regressing tumors. The results of this study will be useful in designing margins for CTV localization or for developing new online CTV localization strategies.

  19. Improving the Definition of Tumor Bed Boost With the Use of Surgical Clips and Image Registration in Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, Youlia M.; Castro Pena, Pablo; Hijal, Tarek; Fournier-Bidoz, Nathalie; Laki, Fatima; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Dendale, Remi; Bollet, Marc A.; Campana, Francois; Fourquet, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a boost technique. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients underwent tumorectomy with placement of two or more clips in the surgical cavity before breast remodeling. Preoperative and postoperative computed tomography scans, with match-point registration, were performed on all patients. The relationship between the location of the gross tumor volume (GTV), defined on the preoperative scan, and clip clinical target volume (CTV) (clips with a 5-mm margin on the postoperative scan) was then studied, by use of commercial volume analysis software. Results: Of the patients, 4 had two clips, 2 had three clips, 8 had four clips, and 8 had five clips. The median GTV was 1.06 mL (range, 0.2-5.3 mL); clip CTV ranged from 2.4 to 21.5 mL. Volumetric analysis showed that in 7 cases (32%), there was no intersection between the GTV and the clip CTV, with the following distribution: 4 patients with two clips, 1 patient with three clips, 1 patient with four clips, and 1 patient with five clips. The common contoured volume was defined as the percent ratio between the intersection of the GTV and clip CTV and the GTV. It was found to be significantly increased if three or more clips were used vs. only two clips (common contoured volume, 35.45% vs. 0.73%; p = 0.028). Finally, the GTV and clip CTV volume relationship can be presented as follows: 12.5% to 33% overlap in 8 patients (36.4%), 50% to 75% in 5 patients (22.7%), and greater than 90% in 2 patients (9%). Conclusions: The use of three or more clips during tumorectomy increases the accuracy of tumor bed delineation.

  20. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Chapman, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rao, Aarti [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Davis, School of Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Shen, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, Irvine, CA (United States); Quinlan-Davidson, Sean [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, McMaster University, Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Filion, Edith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Departement de Medecine, Service de Radio-Oncologie, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Whyte, Richard I. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Division of General Thoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  1. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18–25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume ≥12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED ≥100 Gy (total dose, 50–60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  2. Decision Trees Predicting Tumor Shrinkage for Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Adaptive Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surucu, Murat; Shah, Karan K; Mescioglu, Ibrahim; Roeske, John C; Small, William; Choi, Mehee; Emami, Bahman

    2016-02-01

    To develop decision trees predicting for tumor volume reduction in patients with head and neck (H&N) cancer using pretreatment clinical and pathological parameters. Forty-eight patients treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, oropharynx, oral cavity, or hypopharynx were retrospectively analyzed. These patients were rescanned at a median dose of 37.8 Gy and replanned to account for anatomical changes. The percentages of gross tumor volume (GTV) change from initial to rescan computed tomography (CT; %GTVΔ) were calculated. Two decision trees were generated to correlate %GTVΔ in primary and nodal volumes with 14 characteristics including age, gender, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), site, human papilloma virus (HPV) status, tumor grade, primary tumor growth pattern (endophytic/exophytic), tumor/nodal/group stages, chemotherapy regimen, and primary, nodal, and total GTV volumes in the initial CT scan. The C4.5 Decision Tree induction algorithm was implemented. The median %GTVΔ for primary, nodal, and total GTVs was 26.8%, 43.0%, and 31.2%, respectively. Type of chemotherapy, age, primary tumor growth pattern, site, KPS, and HPV status were the most predictive parameters for primary %GTVΔ decision tree, whereas for nodal %GTVΔ, KPS, site, age, primary tumor growth pattern, initial primary GTV, and total GTV volumes were predictive. Both decision trees had an accuracy of 88%. There can be significant changes in primary and nodal tumor volumes during the course of H&N chemoradiotherapy. Considering the proposed decision trees, radiation oncologists can select patients predicted to have high %GTVΔ, who would theoretically gain the most benefit from adaptive radiotherapy, in order to better use limited clinical resources. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Target Volume Delineation in Oropharyngeal Cancer: Impact of PET, MRI, and Physical Examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiagarajan, Anuradha; Caria, Nicola; Schöder, Heiko; Iyer, N. Gopalakrishna; Wolden, Suzanne; Wong, Richard J.; Sherman, Eric; Fury, Matthew G.; Lee, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sole utilization of computed tomography (CT) scans in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation for head-and-neck cancers is subject to inaccuracies. This study aims to evaluate contributions of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and physical examination (PE) to GTV delineation in oropharyngeal cancer (OPC). Methods: Forty-one patients with OPC were studied. All underwent contrast-enhanced CT simulation scans (CECTs) that were registered with pretreatment PETs and MRIs. For each patient, three sets of primary and nodal GTV were contoured. First, reference GTVs (GTVref) were contoured by the treating radiation oncologist (RO) using CT, MRI, PET, and PE findings. Additional GTVs were created using fused CT/PET scans (GTVctpet) and CT/MRI scans (GTVctmr) by two other ROs blinded to GTVref. To compare GTVs, concordance indices (CI) were calculated by dividing the respective overlap volumes by overall volumes. To evaluate the contribution of PE, composite GTVs derived from CT, MRI, and PET (GTVctpetmr) were compared with GTVref. Results: For primary tumors, GTVref was significantly larger than GTVctpet and GTVctmr (p 0.75), indicating that although the modalities were complementary, the added benefit was small in the context of CECTs. In addition, PE did not aid greatly in nodal GTV delineation. Conclusion: PET and MRI are complementary and combined use is ideal. However, the low CI (ctpetmr vs. ref) particularly for primary tumors underscores the limitations of defining GTVs using imaging alone. PE is invaluable and must be incorporated.

  4. FDG-PET/CT imaging for staging and target volume delineation in conformal radiotherapy of anal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krengli, Marco; Inglese, Eugenio; Milia, Maria E; Turri, Lucia; Mones, Eleonora; Bassi, Maria C; Cannillo, Barbara; Deantonio, Letizia; Sacchetti, Gianmauro; Brambilla, Marco

    2010-01-01

    FDG-PET/CT imaging has an emerging role in staging and treatment planning of various tumor locations and a number of literature studies show that also the carcinoma of the anal canal may benefit from this diagnostic approach. We analyzed the potential impact of FDG-PET/CT in stage definition and target volume delineation of patients affected by carcinoma of the anal canal and candidates for curative radiotherapy. Twenty seven patients with biopsy proven anal carcinoma were enrolled. Pathology was squamous cell carcinoma in 20 cases, cloacogenic carcinoma in 3, adenocarcinoma in 2, and basal cell carcinoma in 2. Simulation was performed by PET/CT imaging with patient in treatment position. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) were drawn on CT and on PET/CT fused images. PET-GTV and PET-CTV were respectively compared to CT-GTV and CT-CTV by Wilcoxon rank test for paired data. PET/CT fused images led to change the stage in 5/27 cases (18.5%): 3 cases from N0 to N2 and 2 from M0 to M1 leading to change the treatment intent from curative to palliative in a case. Based on PET/CT imaging, GTV and CTV contours changed in 15/27 (55.6%) and in 10/27 cases (37.0%) respectively. PET-GTV and PET-CTV resulted significantly smaller than CT-GTV (p = 1.2 × 10 -4 ) and CT-CTV (p = 2.9 × 10 -4 ). PET/CT-GTV and PET/CT-CTV, that were used for clinical purposes, were significantly greater than CT-GTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ) and CT-CTV (p = 6 × 10 -5 ). FDG-PET/CT has a potential relevant impact in staging and target volume delineation of the carcinoma of the anal canal. Clinical stage variation occurred in 18.5% of cases with change of treatment intent in 3.7%. The GTV and the CTV changed in shape and in size based on PET/CT imaging

  5. Prognostic Value of Tumor Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun

    2005-01-01

    Tumor bulk has been recognized as an important prognostic factor in the treatment of malignancy. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the prognostic value of tumor volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Sixty patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were included in this study. Tumor contour was outlined on each of the computed tomography (CT) images using an image analyzer. The primary tumor volume (PTV) and nodal tumor volume (NTV) were calculated by a summation-of-areas technique, and the maximal perimeter of primary tumor (MPP) was measured. The loco-regional control rates and disease-specific survival rates were analyzed according to several variables. The patients had a 5-year local control rate of 75.5%, 5-year nodal control rate of 74.6%, and 5-year disease-specific survival rate of 60.2%. Large PTV (> 30 cm3) was associated with a significantly lower local control (p=0.005). Large NTV (> 5 cm3) was associated with a significantly lower nodal control (p=0.019) and lower disease-specific survival (p=0.046). Large MPP (> 18 cm) was associated with a significantly lower local control (p=0.017). In multivariate analysis, the PTV and NTV were found to be independent factors in predicting the local (p=0.015) and nodal (p=0.039) control, respectively. The NTV (p=0.012) and cranial nerve involvement (p=0.009) were factors that predicted disease-specific survival. Our results suggest that the estimation of tumor volume may identify a subgroup of patients with a greater risk of loco-regional failure and can be used to refine the current staging system. PMID:15861494

  6. SU-G-BRA-04: Simulation of Errors in Maximal Intensity Projection (MIP)-Based Lung Tumor Internal Target Volumes (ITV) Using Real-Time 2D MRI and Deformable Image Registration Based Lung Tumor Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, D; Kishan, A; Santhanam, A; Min, Y; O’Connell, D; Lamb, J; Cao, M; Agazaryan, N; Yang, Y; Lee, P; Low, D [University of California, Los Angeles, Ca (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion on the error in four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximal intensity projection (MIP)–based lung tumor internal target volumes (ITV), using deformable image registration of real-time 2D-sagital cine-mode MRI acquired during lung SBRT treatments. Methods: Five lung tumor patients underwent free breathing SBRT treatment on the ViewRay, with dose prescribed to PTV (4DCT MIP-based ITV+3–6mm margin). Sagittal slice cine-MR images (3.5×3.5mm pixels) were acquired through the center of the tumor at 4 frames per second throughout the treatments (3–4 fractions of 21–32 minutes duration). Tumor GTVs were contoured on the first frame of the cine and tracked throughout the treatment using off-line optical-flow based deformable registration implemented on a GPU cluster. Pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITVs were generated from MIPs of the deformed GTV contours limited to short segments of image data. All possible pseudo-4DCT MIP-based ITV volumes were generated with 1s resolution and compared to the ITV volume of the entire treatment course. Varying pseudo-4DCT durations from 10-50s were analyzed. Results: Tumors were covered in their entirety by PTV in the patients analysed here. However, pseudo-4DCT based ITV volumes were observed that were as small as 29% of the entire treatment-ITV, depending on breathing irregularity and the duration of pseudo-4DCT. With an increase in duration of pseudo-4DCT from 10–50s the minimum volume acquired from 95% of all pseudo-4DCTs increased from 62%–81% of the treatment ITV. Conclusion: A 4DCT MIP-based ITV offers a ‘snap-shot’ of breathing motion for the brief period of time the tumor is imaged on a specific day. Real time MRI over prolonged periods of time and over multiple treatment fractions shows that the accuracy of this snap-shot varies according to inter- and intra-fractional tumor motion. Further work is required to investigate the dosimetric

  7. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  8. SU-F-T-254: Dose Volume Histogram (DVH) Analysis of Breath Hold Vs Free Breathing Techniques for Esophageal Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badkul, R; Doke, K; Pokhrel, D; Aguilera, N; Lominska, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Lung and heart doses and associated toxicity are of concern in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. This study evaluates the dosimetry of deep-inspiration-breath-hold (DIBH) technique as compared to freebreathing( FB) using 3D-conformal treatment(3D-CRT) of esophageal cancer. Methods: Eight patients were planned with FB and DIBH CT scans. DIBH scans were acquired using Varian RPM system. FB and DIBH CTs were contoured per RTOG-1010 to create the planning target volume(PTV) as well as organs at risk volumes(OAR). Two sets of gross target volumes(GTV) with 5cm length were contoured for each patient: proximal at the level of the carina and distal at the level of gastroesophageal junction and were enlarged with appropriate margin to generate Clinical Target Volume and PTV. 3D-CRT plans were created on Eclipse planning system for 45Gy to cover 95% of PTV in 25 fractions for both proximal and distal tumors on FB and DIBH scans. For distal tumors celiac nodes were covered electively. DVH parameters for lung and heart OARs were generated and analyzed. Results: All DIBH DVH parameters were normalized to FB plan values. Average of heart-mean and heart-V40 was 0.70 and 0.66 for proximal lesions. For distal lesions ratios were 1.21 and 2.22 respectively. For DIBH total lung volume increased by 2.43 times versus FB scan. Average of lung-mean, V30, V20, V10, V5 are 0.82, 0.92, 0.76, 0.77 and 0.79 for proximal lesions and 1.17,0.66,0.87,0.93 and 1.03 for distal lesions. Heart doses were lower for breath-hold proximal lesions but higher for distal lesions as compared to free-breathing plans. Lung doses were lower for both proximal and distal breath-hold lesions except mean lung dose and V5 for distal lesions. Conclusion: This study showed improvement of OAR doses for esophageal lesions at mid-thoracic level utilizing DIBH vs FB technique but did not show consistent OAR sparing with DIBH for distal lesions.

  9. Consequences of tumor planning target volume reduction in treatment of T2-T4 laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vugts, Cornelia A J M; Terhaard, Chris H J; Philippens, Marielle E P; Pameijer, Frank A; Kasperts, Nicolien; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P J

    2014-09-04

    Since lymph nodes volumes are generally four times the volume of the primary PTV, the advantage of using tight margins around the primary PTV is not clear. Therefore treatment margins of T2-T4 laryngeal carcinoma for IMRT are generally chosen in such a way that the PTV is comparable to that in conventional radiotherapy. The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of volume reduction of the primary PTV of T2-T4 laryngeal carcinoma with regard to late toxicity despite elective irradiation of lymph node levels II to IV. Two treatment plans based on conservative (GTV-PTV = 15 mm and 20 mm cranial), and on evidence-based tight margins (GTV-PTV = 8 mm) were calculated for 16 patients. Toxicity effects were estimated based on the dose distributions. Compared to conservative margins, using tight margins resulted in: 1) significant reduction of the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for swallowing muscles and submandibular glands, 2) significant reduction of the mean dose in all organs at risk (OAR), 3) a mean dose smaller than 60 Gy for all OARs except for the laryngeal cartilages. When the lymph node levels II to IV were prescribed with an elective dose, an NTCP reduction of 53% for the swallowing muscles and of 23% for the submandibular glands was found by using tight instead of conservative margins. When positive nodes were present, NTCP reduction amounted to 29% and 15%, respectively. There is a potential benefit in realizing evidence-based tight margins for laryngeal cancer patients despite elective irradiation of lymph node levels II to IV.

  10. Estimation of rat mammary tumor volume using caliper and ultrasonography measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana; Oliveira, Paula A; Pinho-Oliveira, Jacinta; Teixeira-Guedes, Catarina; Soares-Maia, Ruben; da Costa, Rui Gil; Colaço, Bruno; Pires, Maria João; Colaço, Jorge; Ferreira, Rita; Ginja, Mário

    2013-06-01

    Mammary tumors similar to those observed in women can be induced in rats by intraperitoneal administration of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. Determining tumor volume is a useful and quantitative way to monitor tumor progression. In this study, the authors measured dimensions of rat mammary tumors using a caliper and using real-time compound B-mode ultrasonography. They then used different formulas to calculate tumor volume from these tumor measurements and compared the calculated tumor volumes with the real tumor volume to identify the formulas that gave the most accurate volume calculations. They found that caliper and ultrasonography measurements were significantly correlated but that tumor volumes calculated using different formulas varied substantially. Mammary tumors seemed to take on an oblate spheroid geometry. The most accurate volume calculations were obtained using the formula V = (W(2) × L)/2 for caliper measurements and the formula V = (4/3) × π × (L/2) × (L/2) × (D/2) for ultrasonography measurements, where V is tumor volume, W is tumor width, L is tumor length and D is tumor depth.

  11. MR-based volumetric analysis of small tumor volumes: accuracy of phantom examinations of simulated eye tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemke, A.-J.; Kazi, I.; Felix, R.; Hosten, N.; Bechrakis, N.E.; Foerster, M.H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The determination of tumor volume in ocular tumors is very important for the planning and success of radiation therapy. This study uses an animal model to evaluate the accuracy of MR-based volumetry of ocular tumors. Materials and methods: In a total of 25 porcine eyes obtained from the slaughterhouse, ocular tumors were produced by injecting a mixture of hand creme and Gd-DTPA under ophthalmoscopic guidance. The injected volume varied between 0.05 ml and 2.7 ml. The eyes were examined with a 1.5 Tesla scanner and a 4 cm circular surface coil especially developed for ocular MRI. After data transfer to a separate workstation, volumetric analysis was carried out by three independent radiologists using semiautomated software. The determined volume was compared with the injected volume. Results: Of the 25 prepared porcine eyes, 23 were suitable for volumetric analysis. The injection of the mixture of hand creme and GD-DTPA produced two different types of tumors. Ophthalmoscopically, 14 ellipsoid and 9 lobulated to mushroom-shaped tumors were found and confirmed by MRI. Minor deviation was found between injected volume and volume calculated by MRI, with a correlation coefficient of 0.96. Conclusion: Using appropriate technique, MRI is capable of determining small tumor volumes with high accuracy in an animal model. Minor differences can be expected when transferring the results to clinical studies. (orig.) [de

  12. A simple, quantitative method using alginate gel to determine rat colonic tumor volume in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Amy A; Young, Lindsay B; Pleiman, Jennifer K; Konrath, Michael J; Marzella, Blake; Nonte, Michael; Cacciatore, Justin; Ford, Madeline R; Clipson, Linda; Amos-Landgraf, James M; Dove, William F

    2014-04-01

    Many studies of the response of colonic tumors to therapeutics use tumor multiplicity as the endpoint to determine the effectiveness of the agent. These studies can be greatly enhanced by accurate measurements of tumor volume. Here we present a quantitative method to easily and accurately determine colonic tumor volume. This approach uses a biocompatible alginate to create a negative mold of a tumor-bearing colon; this mold is then used to make positive casts of dental stone that replicate the shape of each original tumor. The weight of the dental stone cast correlates highly with the weight of the dissected tumors. After refinement of the technique, overall error in tumor volume was 16.9% ± 7.9% and includes error from both the alginate and dental stone procedures. Because this technique is limited to molding of tumors in the colon, we utilized the Apc(Pirc/+) rat, which has a propensity for developing colonic tumors that reflect the location of the majority of human intestinal tumors. We have successfully used the described method to determine tumor volumes ranging from 4 to 196 mm³. Alginate molding combined with dental stone casting is a facile method for determining tumor volume in vivo without costly equipment or knowledge of analytic software. This broadly accessible method creates the opportunity to objectively study colonic tumors over time in living animals in conjunction with other experiments and without transferring animals from the facility where they are maintained.

  13. A correlation study on position and volume variation of primary lung cancer during respiration by four-dimensional CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yingjie; Li Jianbin; Tian Shiyu; Li Fengxiang; Fan Tingyong; Shao Qian; Xu Min; Lu Jie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlation of position movement of primary tumor with interested organs and skin markers, and to investigate the correlation of volume variation of primary tumors and lungs during different respiration phases for patients with lung cancer at free breath condition scanned by four-dimensional CT (4DCT) simulation. Methods: 16 patients with lung cancer were scanned at free breath condition by simulation 4DCT which connected to a respiration-monitoring system. A coordinate system was created based on image of T 5 phase,gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal tissue structures of 10 phases were contoured. The three dimensional position variation of them were measured and their correlation were analyzed, and the same for the volume variation of GTV and lungs of 10 respiratory phases. Results: Movement range of lung cancer in different lobe differed extinct: 0.8 - 5.0 mm in upper lobe, 5.7 -5.9 mm in middle lobe and 10.2 - 13.7 mm in lower lobe, respectively. Movement range of lung cancer in three dimensional direction was different: z-axis 4.3 mm ± 4.3 mm > y-axis 2.2 mm ± 1.0 mm > x-axis 1.7 mm ± 1.5 mm (χ 2 =16.22, P =0.000), respectively. There was no statistical significant correlation for movement vector of GTV and interested structures (r =-0.50 - -0.01, P =0.058 - -0.961), nor for volume variation of tumor and lung (r =0.23, P =0.520). Conclusions: Based on 4DCT, statistically significant differences of GTV centroid movement are observed at different pulmonary lobes and in three dimensional directions. So individual 4DCT measurement is necessary for definition of internal target volume margin for lung cancer. (authors)

  14. Microinvasion of liver metastases from colorectal cancer: predictive factors and application for determining clinical target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Yang; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Ji, Yuan; Xiao, Yin-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the microscopic characteristics of liver metastases from colorectal cancer (LMCRC) invasion and provides a reference for expansion from gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical targeting volume (CTV). Data from 129 LMCRC patients treated by surgical resection at our hospital between January 2008 and September 2009 were collected for study. Tissue sections used for pathology and clinical data were reviewed. Patient information used for the study included gender, age, original tumor site, number of tumors, tumor size, levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and carbohydrate antigen 199 (CA199), synchronous or metachronous liver metastases, and whether patients received chemotherapy. The distance of liver microinvasion from the tumor boundary was measured microscopically by two senior pathologists. Of 129 patients evaluated, 81 (62.8 %) presented microinvasion distances from the tumor boundary ranging between 1.0 − 7.0 mm. A GTV-to-CTV expansion of 5, 6.7, or 7.0 mm was required to provide a 95, 99, or 100 % probability, respectively, of obtaining clear resection margins by microscopic observation. The extent of invasion was not related to gender, age, synchronous or metachronous liver metastases, tumor size, CA199 level, or chemotherapy. The extent of invasion was related to original tumor site, CEA level, and number of tumors. A scoring system was established based on the latter three positive predictors. Using this system, an invasion distance less than 3 mm was measured in 93.4 % of patients with a score of ≤1 point, but in only 85.7 % of patients with a score of ≤2 points. The extent of tumor invasion in our LMCRC patient cohort correlated with original tumor site, CEA level, and number of tumors. These positive predictors may potentially be used as a scoring system for determining GTV-to-CTV expansion

  15. Stereological quantification of tumor volume, mean nuclear volume and total number of melanoma cells correlated with morbidity and mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke-Behrndtz, Marie Louise; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Damsgaard, Tine Engberg

    2008-01-01

    potential indicators of prognosis. Sixty patients who underwent surgery at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, from 1991 to 1994 were included in the study. Total tumor volume was estimated by the Cavalieri technique, total number of tumor cells by the optical dissector principle...... showed a significant impact on both disease-free survival (p=0.001) and mortality (p=0.009). In conclusion, tumor volume and total number of cancer cells were highly reproducible but did not add additional, independent prognostic information regarding the study population.......Stereological quantification of tumor volume, total number of tumor cells and mean nuclear volume provides unbiased data, regardless of the three-dimensional shape of the melanocytic lesion. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether these variables are reproducible and may represent...

  16. A New Brain Positron Emission Tomography Scanner With Semiconductor Detectors for Target Volume Delineation and Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Norio, E-mail: noriwokatoh@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Yasuda, Koichi [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shiga, Tohru [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Hasegawa, Masakazu; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shimizu, Shinichi [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Tamaki, Nagara [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PET{sub CONV}WB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PET{sub NEW}BR). Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PET{sub NEW}BR and the PET{sub CONV}WB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PET{sub CONV}WB and PET{sub NEW}BR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PET{sub CONV}WB (GTV{sub CONV}) images or PET{sub NEW}BR (GTV{sub NEW}) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. Results: The average absolute volume ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) of GTV{sub NEW} was 15.7 ml ({+-}9.9) ml, and that of GTV{sub CONV} was 34.0 ({+-}20.5) ml. The average GTV{sub NEW} was significantly smaller than that of GTV{sub CONV} (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLAN{sub NEW}) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Conclusion: Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy

  17. A new brain positron emission tomography scanner with semiconductor detectors for target volume delineation and radiotherapy treatment planning in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Norio; Yasuda, Koichi; Shiga, Tohru; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-03-15

    We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PET(CONV)WB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PET(NEW)BR). Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [(18)F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PET(NEW)BR and the PET(CONV)WB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PET(CONV)WB and PET(NEW)BR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PET(CONV)WB (GTV(CONV)) images or PET(NEW)BR (GTV(NEW)) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. The average absolute volume (±standard deviation [SD]) of GTV(NEW) was 15.7 ml (±9.9) ml, and that of GTV(CONV) was 34.0 (±20.5) ml. The average GTV(NEW) was significantly smaller than that of GTV(CONV) (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLAN(NEW)) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy treatment planning. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. SU-F-R-54: CT-Texture Based Early Tumor Treatment Response Assessment During Radiation Therapy Delivery: Small Cell Versus Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J; Gore, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor treatment response may potentially be assessed during radiation therapy (RT) by analyzing changes in CT-textures. We investigated the different early RT-responses between small cell (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as assessed by CT-texture. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during routine CT-guided RT using a CT-on-Rails for 13-NSCLC and 5-SCLC patients were analyzed. These patient had ages ranging from 45–78 and 38–63 years, respectively, for NSCLC and SCLC groups, and tumor-stages ranging from T2-T4, and were treated with either RT or chemotherapy and RT with 45–66Gy/ 20–34 fractions. Gross-tumor volume (GTV) contour was generated on each daily CT by populating GTV contour from simulation to daily CTs with manual editing if necessary. CT-texture parameters, such as Hounsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and short-run high-gray level emphasis (SRHGLE), were calculated in GTV from each daily CT-set using an in house software tool. Difference in changes of these texture parameters during RT between NSCLC and SCLC was analyzed and compared with GTV volume changes. Results: Radiation-induced changes in CT-texture were different between SCLC and NSCLC. Average changes from first to the last fractions for NSCLC and SCLC in GTV were 28±10(12–44) and 30±15(11–47) HU (mean HU reduction), 12.7% and 18.3% (entropy), 50% and 55% (SRHGLE), 19% and 22% (kurtosis), and 5.2% and 22% (skewness), respectively. Good correlation in kurtosis changes and GTV was seen (R{sup 2}=0.8923) for SCLC, but not for NSCLC (R{sup 2}=0.4748). SCLC had better correlations between GTV volume reduction and entropy (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.847; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.6485), skewness (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.935; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.7666), or SRHGLE (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.9619; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.787). Conclusion: NSCLC and SCLC exhibited different early RT-responses as assessed by CT-texture changes during RT-delivery. The observed larger changes in

  19. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  20. Aberrant paramagnetic signals outside the tumor volume on routine surveillance MRI of brain tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yust-Katz, Shlomit; Inbar, Edna; Michaeli, Natalia; Limon, Dror; Siegal, Tali

    2017-09-01

    Late complications of cerebral radiation therapy (RT) involve vascular injury with acquired cavernous malformation, telangiectasias and damage to vascular walls which are well recognized in children. Its incidence in adults is unknown. Blood products and iron deposition that accompany vascular injury create paramagnetic effects on MRI. This study retrospectively investigated the frequency of paramagnetic lesions on routine surveillance MRI of adult brain tumor patients. MRI studies of 115 brain tumor patients were reviewed. Only studies containing sequences of either susceptibility weighted images or gradient echo or blood oxygenation level dependent imaging were included. Lesions inside the tumor volume were not considered. 68 studies fulfilled the above criteria and included 48 patients with previous RT (35 followed for >2 years and 13 for 1 year) and 20 patients who were not treated with RT. The median age at time of irradiation was 47 years. Aberrant paramagnetic lesions were found in 23/35 (65%) patients followed for >2 years after RT and in only 1/13 (8%) patients followed for 1-year after radiation (p = 0.03). The 1-year follow-up group did not differ from the control group [2/20 (9%)]. Most lesions were within the radiation field and none of the patients had related symptomatology. The number and incidence of these lesions increased with time and amounted to 75% over 3 years post RT. MRI paramagnetic signal aberrations are common findings in adult brain tumor patients that evolve over time after RT. The clinical significance of these lesions needs further investigation.

  1. Comparison of dose-volume histograms for Tomo therapy, linear accelerator-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Youn-Sang; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Kim, Chang-Bok; Choi, Seong-Kwan; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lee, Jong-Woong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Evaluation of DVH from 3D CRT, IMRT and Tomo therapy was conducted for tumor therapy. → The doses of GTV and CTV were compared using DVHs from 3D CRT, IMRT and Tomo therapy. → The GTV was higher when Tomo therapy was used, while the doses of critical organ were low. → They said that Tomo therapy satisfied the goal of radiation therapy more than the others. - Abstract: Evaluation of dose-volume histograms from three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and Tomo therapy was conducted. These three modalities are among the diverse treatment systems available for tumor therapy. Three patients who received tumor therapy for a malignant oligodendroglioma in the cranium, nasopharyngeal carcinoma in the cervical neck, and prostate cancer in the pelvis were selected as study subjects. Therapy plans were made for the three patients before dose-volume histograms were obtained. The doses of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and the clinical target volume (CTV) were compared using the dose-volume histograms obtained from the LINAC-based 3D CRT, IMRT planning station (Varian Eclipse-Varian, version 8.1), and Tomo therapy planning station. In addition, the doses of critical organs in the cranium, cervix, and pelvis that should be protected were compared. The GTV was higher when Tomo therapy was used compared to 3D CRT and the LINAC-based IMRT, while the doses of critical organ tissues that required protection were low. These results demonstrated that Tomo therapy satisfied the ultimate goal of radiation therapy more than the other therapies.

  2. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S.; Dehnad, Homan; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Braunius, Weibel; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured (‘volumetric approach’) and assessed as ‘in-field’, ‘marginal’, or ‘out-field’. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as ‘in-field’, ‘marginal’, or ‘out-field’. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The COM model is practical and specific for

  3. Origin of Tumor Recurrence After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raktoe, Sawan A.S. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Dehnad, Homan, E-mail: h.dehnad@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Braunius, Weibel [Department of ENT Head and Neck Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terhaard, Chris H.J. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To model locoregional recurrences of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) treated with primary intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in order to find the origins from which recurrences grow and relate their location to original target volume borders. Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective analysis of OSCC treated with primary IMRT between January 2002 and December 2009. Locoregional recurrence volumes were delineated on diagnostic scans and coregistered rigidly with treatment planning computed tomography scans. Each recurrence was analyzed with two methods. First, overlapping volumes of a recurrence and original target were measured ('volumetric approach') and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Then, the center of mass (COM) of a recurrence volume was assumed as the origin from where a recurrence expanded, the COM location was compared with original target volume borders and assessed as 'in-field', 'marginal', or 'out-field'. Results: One hundred thirty-one OSCC were assessed. For all patients alive at the end of follow-up, the mean follow-up time was 40 months (range, 12-83 months); 2 patients were lost to follow-up. The locoregional recurrence rate was 27%. Of all recurrences, 51% were local, 23% were regional, and 26% had both local and regional recurrences. Of all recurrences, 74% had imaging available for assessment. Regarding volumetric analysis of local recurrences, 15% were in-field gross tumor volume (GTV), and 65% were in-field clinical tumor volume (CTV). Using the COM approach, we found that 70% of local recurrences were in-field GTV and 90% were in-field CTV. Of the regional recurrences, 25% were volumetrically in-field GTV, and using the COM approach, we found 54% were in-field GTV. The COM of local out-field CTV recurrences were maximally 16 mm outside CTV borders, whereas for regional recurrences, this was 17 mm. Conclusions: The

  4. Laryngeal tumor volume measurements determined with CT: a study on intra- and interobserver variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermans, Robert; Feron, Michel; Bellon, Erwin; Dupont, Patrick; Van den Bogaert, Walter; Baert, Albert L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the intra- and interobserver variability of computed tomography-based volume measurements of laryngeal tumors. Methods and Materials: The volume of 13 laryngeal tumors was repeatedly measured by five independent observers in four different sessions, using the summation-of-areas technique. Mean tumor volume and its standard deviation were calculated for each tumor. Statistical analysis was done with analysis of variance, Spearman rank correlation, and linear regression. Results: Both the effect of the observers (p < 0.0001) and the effect of the session (p < 0.01) on tumor volume was statistically significant. Interobserver variability was the most important component of total variability (89.3%). A significant rank correlation was found between mean volume and standard deviation (p < 0.01); the relationship between mean tumor volume and standard deviation can be described using linear regression [standard deviation = 0.28 volume + 0.35 (R = 0.79)]. Conclusion: Total variability in the computed tomography-based measurement of laryngeal tumor volume can be reduced by having the measurements done by a single trained observer

  5. Forecasting longitudinal changes in oropharyngeal tumor morphology throughout the course of head and neck radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To create models that forecast longitudinal trends in changing tumor morphology and to evaluate and compare their predictive potential throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Two morphology feature vectors were used to describe 35 gross tumor volumes (GTVs) throughout the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal tumors. The feature vectors comprised the coordinates of the GTV centroids and a description of GTV shape using either interlandmark distances or a spherical harmonic decomposition of these distances. The change in the morphology feature vector observed at 33 time points throughout the course of treatment was described using static, linear, and mean models. Models were adjusted at 0, 1, 2, 3, or 5 different time points (adjustment points) to improve prediction accuracy. The potential of these models to forecast GTV morphology was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and the accuracy of the models was compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Adding a single adjustment point to the static model without any adjustment points decreased the median error in forecasting the position of GTV surface landmarks by the largest amount (1.2 mm). Additional adjustment points further decreased the forecast error by about 0.4 mm each. Selection of the linear model decreased the forecast error for both the distance-based and spherical harmonic morphology descriptors (0.2 mm), while the mean model decreased the forecast error for the distance-based descriptor only (0.2 mm). The magnitude and statistical significance of these improvements decreased with each additional adjustment point, and the effect from model selection was not as large as that from adding the initial points. Conclusions: The authors present models that anticipate longitudinal changes in tumor morphology using various models and model adjustment schemes. The accuracy of these models depended on their form, and the utility of these models

  6. [Relationship between tumor volume and PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Momose, Akishi; Okamoto, Akiko; Yamamoto, Hayato; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Iwabuchi, Ikuya; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Ohyama, Chikara

    2010-02-01

    We examined whether the tumor volume (TV) is a good predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Data were collected for 158 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer undergoing radical prostatectomy without neoadjuvant hormonal therapy in our hospital since April 2005 to September 2007. Along with the routine pathological assessment, TV was assessed in all prostatectomy specimens. PSA recurrence was defined as PSA levels of greater than 0.2 ng/ml. The TVs were 1.81+/-1.66 ml (mean +/-SD) ranging from 0.02 to 8.20 ml. The TV in cT1c was 1.77+/-1.64, and 1.89+/-1.72 ml in cT2 (not significant). Significant differences were observed between TV and pT. The TVs in pT2a, pT2b and pT3/4 were 0.54+/-0.54, 1.63+/-1.47 and 2.67+/-1.80 ml, respectively. The median follow-up period was 32.3 months (range from 15 to 45) after radical prostatectomy, and PSA recurrence was observed in 32 cases. Patients with smaller TV (TV TV (TV > or = 1.3 ml, 66.7%) with a significant difference atp TV, pT, Gleason Score (GS), and surgical margins. Significant differences were observed for GS, and surgical margins, but not for TV. Clinically organ-confined disease in Japanese patients with prostate cancer included various cancers from clinically insignificant to locally advanced ones. In our series, TV was not regarded as a predictor of PSA recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

  7. Measurement of Tumor Volumes Improves RECIST-Based Response Assessments in Advanced Lung Cancer1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozley, P David; Bendtsen, Claus; Zhao, Binsheng; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Thorn, Matthias; Rong, Yuanxin; Zhang, Luduan; Perrone, Andrea; Korn, René; Buckler, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to characterize the reproducibility of measurement for tumor volumes and their longest tumor diameters (LDs) and estimate the potential impact of using changes in tumor volumes instead of LDs as the basis for response assessments. METHODS: We studied patients with advanced lung cancer who have been observed longitudinally with x-ray computed tomography in a multinational trial. A total of 71 time points from 10 patients with 13 morphologically complex target lesions were analyzed. A total of 6461 volume measurements and their corresponding LDs were made by seven independent teams using their own work flows and image analysis tools. Interteam agreement and overall interrater concurrence were characterized. RESULTS: Interteam agreement between volume measurements was better than between LD measurements (ı = 0.945 vs 0.734, P = .005). The variability in determining the nadir was lower for volumes than for LDs (P = .005). Use of standard thresholds for the RECIST-based method and use of experimentally determined cutoffs for categorizing responses showed that volume measurements had a significantly greater sensitivity for detecting partial responses and disease progression. Earlier detection of progression would have led to earlier changes in patient management in most cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that measurement of changes in tumor volumes is adequately reproducible. Using tumor volumes as the basis for response assessments could have a positive impact on both patient management and clinical trials. More authoritative work to qualify or discard changes in volume as the basis for response assessments should proceed. PMID:22348172

  8. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P.; Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P.

    2001-01-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the corresponding posterior mediastinum. In

  9. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-21

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient's 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  10. Iterative volume morphing and learning for mobile tumor based on 4DCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Songan; Wu, Huanmei; Sandison, George; Fang, Shiaofen

    2017-02-01

    During image-guided cancer radiation treatment, three-dimensional (3D) tumor volumetric information is important for treatment success. However, it is typically not feasible to image a patient’s 3D tumor continuously in real time during treatment due to concern over excessive patient radiation dose. We present a new iterative morphing algorithm to predict the real-time 3D tumor volume based on time-resolved computed tomography (4DCT) acquired before treatment. An offline iterative learning process has been designed to derive a target volumetric deformation function from one breathing phase to another. Real-time volumetric prediction is performed to derive the target 3D volume during treatment delivery. The proposed iterative deformable approach for tumor volume morphing and prediction based on 4DCT is innovative because it makes three major contributions: (1) a novel approach to landmark selection on 3D tumor surfaces using a minimum bounding box; (2) an iterative morphing algorithm to generate the 3D tumor volume using mapped landmarks; and (3) an online tumor volume prediction strategy based on previously trained deformation functions utilizing 4DCT. The experimental performance showed that the maximum morphing deviations are 0.27% and 1.25% for original patient data and artificially generated data, which is promising. This newly developed algorithm and implementation will have important applications for treatment planning, dose calculation and treatment validation in cancer radiation treatment.

  11. Treatment Planning and Volumetric Response Assessment for Yttrium-90 Radioembolization: Semiautomated Determination of Liver Volume and Volume of Tumor Necrosis in Patients with Hepatic Malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsky, Wayne L.; Garza, Armando S.; Kim, Isaac; Loh, Shaun; Lin, Tzu-Chun; Li Chinshang; Fisher, Jerron; Sandhu, Parmbir; Sidhar, Vishal; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Lin, Frank; Deutsch, Larry-Stuart; Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The primary purpose of this study was to demonstrate intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility for novel semiautomated measurements of hepatic volume used for Yttrium-90 dose calculations as well as whole-liver and necrotic-liver (hypodense/nonenhancing) tumor volume after radioembolization. The secondary aim was to provide initial comparisons of tumor volumetric measurements with linear measurements, as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, and survival outcomes. Methods: Between 2006 and 2009, 23 consecutive radioembolization procedures were performed for 14 cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and 9 cases of hepatic metastases. Baseline and follow-up computed tomography obtained 1 month after treatment were retrospectively analyzed. Three observers measured liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volumes twice using semiautomated software. Results: Good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility was demonstrated (intraclass correlation [ICC] > 0.9) for tumor and liver volumes. Semiautomated measurements of liver volumes were statistically similar to those obtained with manual tracing (ICC = 0.868), but they required significantly less time to perform (p 0.05). Dose, change in tumor diameters, tumor volume, and necrotic volume did not correlate with survival (p > 0.05 in all instances). However, Kaplan–Meier curves suggest that a >10% increase in necrotic volume correlated with survival (p = 0.0472). Conclusion: Semiautomated volumetric analysis of liver, whole-tumor, and tumor-necrosis volume can be performed with good intraobserver/interobserver reproducibility. In this small retrospective study, measurements of tumor necrosis were suggested to correlate with survival.

  12. SU-E-J-224: Multimodality Segmentation of Head and Neck Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aristophanous, M; Yang, J; Beadle, B

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Develop an algorithm that is able to automatically segment tumor volume in Head and Neck cancer by integrating information from CT, PET and MR imaging simultaneously. Methods: Twenty three patients that were recruited under an adaptive radiotherapy protocol had MR, CT and PET/CT scans within 2 months prior to start of radiotherapy. The patients had unresectable disease and were treated either with chemoradiotherapy or radiation therapy alone. Using the Velocity software, the PET/CT and MR (T1 weighted+contrast) scans were registered to the planning CT using deformable and rigid registration respectively. The PET and MR images were then resampled according to the registration to match the planning CT. The resampled images, together with the planning CT, were fed into a multi-channel segmentation algorithm, which is based on Gaussian mixture models and solved with the expectation-maximization algorithm and Markov random fields. A rectangular region of interest (ROI) was manually placed to identify the tumor area and facilitate the segmentation process. The auto-segmented tumor contours were compared with the gross tumor volume (GTV) manually defined by the physician. The volume difference and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) between the manual and autosegmented GTV contours were calculated as the quantitative evaluation metrics. Results: The multimodality segmentation algorithm was applied to all 23 patients. The volumes of the auto-segmented GTV ranged from 18.4cc to 32.8cc. The average (range) volume difference between the manual and auto-segmented GTV was −42% (−32.8%–63.8%). The average DSC value was 0.62, ranging from 0.39 to 0.78. Conclusion: An algorithm for the automated definition of tumor volume using multiple imaging modalities simultaneously was successfully developed and implemented for Head and Neck cancer. This development along with more accurate registration algorithms can aid physicians in the efforts to interpret the multitude of

  13. Volume of preclinical xenograft tumors is more accurately assessed by ultrasound imaging than manual caliper measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Gregory D; McKinley, Eliot T; Zhao, Ping; Fritz, Jordan M; Metry, Rebecca E; Deal, Brenton C; Adlerz, Katrina M; Coffey, Robert J; Manning, H Charles

    2010-06-01

    The volume of subcutaneous xenograft tumors is an important metric of disease progression and response to therapy in preclinical drug development. Noninvasive imaging technologies suitable for measuring xenograft volume are increasingly available, yet manual calipers, which are susceptible to inaccuracy and bias, are routinely used. The goal of this study was to quantify and compare the accuracy, precision, and inter-rater variability of xenograft tumor volume assessment by caliper measurements and ultrasound imaging. Subcutaneous xenograft tumors derived from human colorectal cancer cell lines (DLD1 and SW620) were generated in athymic nude mice. Experienced independent reviewers segmented 3-dimensional ultrasound data sets and collected manual caliper measurements resulting in tumor volumes. Imaging- and caliper-derived volumes were compared with the tumor mass, the reference standard, determined after resection. Bias, precision, and inter-rater differences were estimated for each mouse among reviewers. Bootstrapping was used to estimate mean and confidence intervals of variance components, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and confidence intervals for each source of variation. The average deviation from the true volume and inter-rater differences were significantly lower for ultrasound volumes compared with caliper volumes (P = .0005 and .001, respectively). Reviewer ICCs for ultrasound and caliper measurements were similarly low (1%), yet caliper volume variance was 1.3-fold higher than for ultrasound. Ultrasound imaging more accurately, precisely, and reproducibly reflects xenograft tumor volume than caliper measurements. These data suggest that preclinical studies using the xenograft burden as a surrogate end point measured by ultrasound imaging require up to 30% fewer animals to reach statistical significance compared with analogous studies using caliper measurements.

  14. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary

  15. Correlation between tumor regression grade and rectal volume in neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hong Seok; Choi, Doo Ho; Park, Hee Chul; Park, Won; Yu, Jeong Il; Chung, Kwang Zoo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To determine whether large rectal volume on planning computed tomography (CT) results in lower tumor regression grade (TRG) after neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in rectal cancer patients. We reviewed medical records of 113 patients treated with surgery following neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer between January and December 2012. Rectal volume was contoured on axial images in which gross tumor volume was included. Average axial rectal area (ARA) was defined as rectal volume divided by longitudinal tumor length. The impact of rectal volume and ARA on TRG was assessed. Average rectal volume and ARA were 11.3 mL and 2.9 cm². After completion of neoadjuvant CCRT in 113 patients, pathologic results revealed total regression (TRG 4) in 28 patients (25%), good regression (TRG 3) in 25 patients (22%), moderate regression (TRG 2) in 34 patients (30%), minor regression (TRG 1) in 24 patients (21%), and no regression (TRG0) in 2 patients (2%). No difference of rectal volume and ARA was found between each TRG groups. Linear correlation existed between rectal volume and TRG (p = 0.036) but not between ARA and TRG (p = 0.058). Rectal volume on planning CT has no significance on TRG in patients receiving neoadjuvant CCRT for rectal cancer. These results indicate that maintaining minimal rectal volume before each treatment may not be necessary.

  16. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer Does Not Underdose the Microscopic Disease and has the Potential to Increase Tumor Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guckenberger, Matthias; Richter, Anne; Wilbert, Juergen; Flentje, Michael; Partridge, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate doses to the microscopic disease (MD) in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) for locally advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and to model tumor control probability (TCP). Methods and Materials: In a retrospective planning study, three-dimensional conformal treatment plans for 13 patients with locally advanced NSCLC were adapted to shape and volume changes of the gross tumor volume (GTV) once or twice during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy with total doses of 66 Gy; doses in the ART plans were escalated using an iso-mean lung dose (MLD) approach compared to non-adapted treatment. Dose distributions to the volumes of suspect MD were simulated for a scenario with synchronous shrinkage of the MD and GTV and for a scenario of a stationary MD despite GTV shrinkage; simulations were performed using deformable image registration. TCP calculations considering doses to the GTV and MD were performed using three different models. Results: Coverage of the MD at 50 Gy was not compromised by ART. Coverage at 60 Gy in the scenario of a stationary MD was significantly reduced from 92% ± 10% to 73% ± 19% using ART; however, the coverage was restored by iso-MLD dose escalation. Dose distributions in the MD were sufficient to achieve a TCP >80% on average in all simulation experiments, with the clonogenic cell density the major factor influencing TCP. The combined TCP for the GTV and MD was 19.9% averaged over all patients and TCP models in non-adaptive treatment with 66 Gy. Iso-MLD dose escalation achieved by ART increased the overall TCP by absolute 6% (adapting plan once) and by 8.7% (adapting plan twice) on average. Absolute TCP values were significantly different between the TCP models; however, all TCP models suggested very similar TCP increase by using ART. Conclusions: Adaptation of radiotherapy to the shrinking GTV did not compromise dose coverage of volumes of suspect microscopic disease and has the potential to increase TCP by >40% compared

  17. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials: Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during millivolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results: The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions: Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  18. SU-E-T-287: Dose Verification On the Variation of Target Volume and Organ at Risk in Preradiation Chemotherapy IMRT for Nasopharyngeal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X; Kong, L; Wang, J; Hu, W; Chen, Z [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the target volume and organ at risk of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients with preradiation chemotherapy based on CT scanned during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and recalculate the dose distribution. Methods: Seven patients with NPC and preradiation chemotherapy, treated with IMRT (35 to 37 fractions) were reviewed. Repeat CT scanning was required to all of the patients during the radiotherapy, and the number of repeat CTs varies from 2 to 6. The plan CT and repeat CT were generated by different CT scanner. To ensure crespectively on the same IMPT plan. The real dose distribution was calculated by deformable registration and weighted method in Raystation (v 4.5.1). The fraction of each dose is based on radiotherapy record. The volumetric and dose differences among these images were calculated for nascIpharyngeal tumor and retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes (GTV-NX), neck lymph nodes(GTV-ND), and parotid glands. Results: The volume variation in GTV-NX from CT1 to CT2 was 1.15±3.79%, and in GTV-LN −0.23±4.93%. The volume variation in left parotid from CT1 to CT2 was −6.79±11.91%, and in right parotid −3.92±8.80%. In patient 2, the left parotid volume were decreased remarkably, as a Result, the V30 and V40 of it were increased as well. Conclusion: The target volume of patients with NPC varied lightly during IMRT. It shows that preradiation chemotherapy can control the target volume variation and perform a good dose repeatability. Also, the decreasing volume of parotid in some patient might increase the dose of it, which might course potential complications.

  19. Towards a Novel Approach for Tumor Volume Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Kharbach

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In medical image processing, evaluating the variations of lesion volume plays a major role in many medical applications. It helps radiologists to follow-up with patients and examine the effects of therapy. Several approaches have been proposed to meet with medical expectations. The present work comes within this context. We present a new approach based on the local dissimilarity volume (LDV that is a 3D representation of the local dissimilarity map (LDM. This map presents a useful means to compare two images, offering a localization of information. We proved the effectiveness of this method (LDV compared to medical techniques used by radiologists. The result of simulations shows that we can quantify lesion volume by using the LDV method, which is an efficient way to calculate and localize the volume variation of anomalies. It allowed a time savings with the compete satisfaction of an expert during the medical treatment.

  20. Correlation of Tumor and Peritumoral Edema Volumes with Survival in Patients with Cerebral Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Bauer, Marlies; Popovscaia, Marina; Grams, Astrid E; Thomé, Claudius; Freyschlag, Christian F

    2017-02-01

    Surgical resection in combination with radiotherapy in selected cases remains the best option for patients with cerebral metastases. Postoperative relapse of brain metastases occurs frequently and can be reduced by postoperative whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Continuous spread of tumor cells from the primary lesions is debated as a cause of recurrence. It is well known that in gliomas, infiltration takes place within the surrounding edema. Obviously, most brain metastases are usually associated with peritumoral edema, which may act as an indicator of infiltration and more aggressive tumor biology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the correlation of tumor and edema volumes with overall survival in patients with cerebral metastases. A total of 143 patients diagnosed with brain metastasis (male:female=1.1:1) who underwent surgical resection were included retrospectively in this analysis. Clinical data were retrieved from electronic patient files. The volumes of tumor and edema calculated by manual delineation. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was calculated, leading to dichotomization of the patients. The median tumor volume was 20.1 cc (range=0.8-90.8 cc) and the median volume of edema 49.5 cc (range=0-179.9 cc). The volume of metastases did not significantly correlate with overall survival. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was also not a prognostic factor in terms of overall survival. Only surgical resection, preoperative recursive partitioning analysis class, and postoperative addition of WBRT, as well as female sex, demonstrated beneficial effects. The extent of edema surrounding cerebral metastases does not appear to influence overall survival in patients suffering from brain metastases, although it seems to be responsible for most of the patients' symptoms. The hypothesis that the extent of edema was disadvantageous concerning survival was supported by our data. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios

  1. Estimation of tumor volume and its prognostic significance to study the biological behavior of carcinoma of cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelavathi Dawson

    2016-01-01

    Results: The median age of the patients in this group was 47.5 years, with a range of 30–80 years. The major histological type of carcinoma among 40 cases is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC (in 90% of cases, and 10% had adenocarcinoma. Pathological staging of the carcinoma cervix showed stage Ib, IIa, IIb, and IVa (35%, 20%, 40%, and 5%. Tumor volume estimated on pathological specimens of 40 cases ranged from 230 cumm to 49,760 cumm with a mean of 14,844 cumm. 12 (30% cases had tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm, 12 (30% cases had tumor volume <5000 cumm and 16 (40% cases had tumor volume between 5000 and 15,000 cumm. 17% of the tumors with tumor volume <5000 cumm showed lymph node metastases, whereas 67% (out of 12cases of cases with tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm showed lymph node metastases. 67% of the tumors with tumor volume <5000 cumm showed 0/4 organs involvement, whereas all cases with tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm showed more than one organ involvement among vagina, uterus, parametrium or bladder/rectum. Fibronectin positivity was seen in 22 out of 44 cases (55%. Macrophages were seen surrounding the group of tumor cells by LN5 immunostaining. Conclusion: Tumor volume can be considered as an independent prognostic factor to assess the spread of the tumor. Cases with tumor volume <5000 cumm show low risk in terms of parametrial involvement and lymph node metastasis and those with tumor volume more than 15,000 cumm showed more organ spread. Fibronectin positivity carries some importance in low-risk cases. For macrophages, further detailed study needs to be carried out.

  2. Contour propagation using non-uniform cubic B-splines for lung tumor delineation in 4D-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchuan; Jin, Renchao; Chen, Mi; Song, Enmin; Xu, Xiangyang; Zhang, Sheng; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2016-12-01

    Accurate target delineation is a critical step in radiotherapy. In this study, a robust contour propagation method is proposed to help physicians delineate lung tumors in four-dimensional computer tomography (4D-CT) images efficiently and accurately. The proposed method starts with manually delineated contours on the reference phase. Each contour is fitted by a non-uniform cubic B-spline curve, and its deformation on the target phase is achieved by moving its control vertexes such that the intensity similarity between the two contours is maximized. Since contour is usually the boundary of lesion or tissue which may deform quite differently from the tissues outside the boundary, the proposed method treats each contour as a deformable entity, a non-uniform cubic B-spline curve, and focuses on the registration of contour entity instead of the entire image to avoid the deformation of contour to be smoothed by its surrounding tissues, meanwhile to greatly reduce the time consumption while keeping the accuracy of the contour propagation. Eighteen 4D-CT cases with 444 gross tumor volume (GTV) contours manually delineated slice by slice on the maximal inhale and exhale phases are used to verify the proposed method. The Jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC) between the propagated GTV and the manually delineated GTV is 0.885 ± 0.026, and the Hausdorff distance (HD) is [Formula: see text] mm. In addition, the time for propagating GTV to all the phases is 3.67 ± 3.41 minutes. The results are better than fast adaptive stochastic gradient descent (FASGD) B-spline method, 3D+t B-spline method and diffeomorphic Demons method. The proposed method is useful to help physicians delineate target volumes efficiently and accurately.

  3. Optimal definition of biological tumor volume using positron emission tomography in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ingrid; Wang, Hao; Huso, David; Wahl, Richard L

    2015-12-01

    -value-threshold tumor contouring using (18)F-FDG-PET is able to accurately delineate the viable portion of a tumor. 30 and 35 % of Cmax, 30 and 35 % of Cpeak, and 6 × Cliver + 2 × SD are three appropriate threshold values to delineate viable tumor volume in our animal model. The commonly used threshold value of 50 % of Cmax or Cpeak failed to detect one third of the viable tumor volume in our model.

  4. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishino, Mizuki, E-mail: Mizuki_Nishino@DFCI.HARVARD.EDU [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States); Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin [Department of Medical Oncology and Department of Medicine Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital 450 Brookline Ave., Boston MA, 02215 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  5. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Sacher, Adrian G.; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra; Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E.; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-kin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Role of co-clinical studies in precision cancer medicine is increasingly recognized. • This study compared tumor volume in co-clinical trials of ALK-rearranged NSCLC. • Similarities and differences of tumor volume changes in mice and humans were noted. • The study provides insights to optimize murine co-clinical trial designs. - Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. Results: The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was −40.4% (range: −79.5%–+11.7%) in mice, and −72.9% (range: −100%–+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p = 0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. Conclusion: The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation.

  6. Prospective Randomized Double-Blind Pilot Study of Site-Specific Consensus Atlas Implementation for Rectal Cancer Target Volume Delineation in the Cooperative Group Setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop C.; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G.N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Variations in target volume delineation represent a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the effect of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring the target volumes. Methods and Materials: A representative case was contoured (Scan 1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert with and without target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV), and two clinical target volumes (CTVA, including the internal iliac, presacral, and perirectal nodes, and CTVB, which included the external iliac nodes) were contoured. The observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group A) or nonreceipt (Group B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers and then instructed to recontour the same case/images (Scan 2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using the conformation number (CN, where CN = 1 equals total agreement). Results: Of 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert and 7 Group A and 6 Group B observers), greater agreement was found for the GTV (mean CN, 0.75) than for the CTVs (mean CN, 0.46-0.65). Atlas exposure for Group A led to significantly increased interobserver agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN, 0.68, after atlas use, 0.76; p = .03) and increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN, 0.58; after atlas use, 0.69; p = .02). For the GTV and CTVB, neither the interobserver nor the expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion: Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in interobserver agreement and a greater approximation of expert volumes for the CTVA but not for the GTV or CTVB in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal RT.

  7. Prospective randomized double-blind pilot study of site-specific consensus atlas implementation for rectal cancer target volume delineation in the cooperative group setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Nijkamp, Jasper; Duppen, Joop; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Thomas, Charles R.; Wang, Samuel J.; Okunieff, Paul; Jones, William E.; Baseman, Daniel; Patel, Shilpen; Demandante, Carlo G. N.; Harris, Anna M.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Katz, Alan W.; McGann, Camille; Harper, Jennifer L.; Chang, Daniel T.; Smalley, Stephen; Marshall, David T.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Kachnic, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Variation in target volume delineation represents a significant hurdle in clinical trials involving conformal radiotherapy. We sought to determine the impact of a consensus guideline-based visual atlas on contouring of target volumes. Methods A representative case and target volume delineation instructions derived from a proposed rectal cancer clinical trial involving conformal radiotherapy were contoured (Scan1) by 14 physician observers and a reference expert. Gross tumor volume (GTV), and 2 clinical target volumes (CTVA, comprising internal iliac, pre-sacral, and peri-rectal nodes, and CTVB, external iliac nodes) were contoured. Observers were randomly assigned to receipt (Group_A) /non-receipt (Group_B) of a consensus guideline and atlas for anorectal cancers, then instructed to re-contour the same case/images (Scan2). Observer variation was analyzed volumetrically using conformation number (CN, where CN=1 equals a total agreement). Results In 14 evaluable contour sets (1 expert, 7 Group_A, 6 Group_B), there was greater agreement for GTV (mean CN 0.75) than CTVs (mean CN 0.46–0.65). Atlas exposure for Group_A led to a significant increased inter-observer agreement for CTVA (mean initial CN 0.68, post-atlas 0.76; p=0.03), as well as increased agreement with the expert reference (initial mean CN 0.58, 0.69 post-atlas; p=0.02). For GTV and CTVB, neither inter-observer nor expert agreement was altered after atlas exposure. Conclusion Consensus guideline atlas implementation resulted in a detectable difference in inter-observer agreement and greater approximation of expert volumes for CTVA, but not GTV or CTVB, in the specified case. Visual atlas inclusion should be considered as a feature in future clinical trials incorporating conformal radiotherapy. PMID:20400244

  8. Pilot study in the treatment of endometrial carcinoma with 3D image-based high-dose-rate brachytherapy using modified Heyman packing: Clinical experience and dose-volume histogram analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitmann, Hajo Dirk; Poetter, Richard; Waldhaeusl, Claudia; Nechvile, Elisabeth; Kirisits, Christian; Knocke, Tomas Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate dose distribution within uterus (clinical target volume [CTV]) and tumor (gross tumor volume [GTV]) and the resulting clinical outcome based on systematic three-dimensional treatment planning with dose-volume adaptation. Dose-volume assessment and adaptation in organs at risk and its impact on side effects were investigated in parallel. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with either locally confined endometrial carcinoma (n = 15) or adenocarcinoma of uterus and ovaries after bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (n = 1) were included. Heyman packing was performed with mean 11 Norman-Simon applicators (3-18). Three-dimensional treatment planning based on computed tomography (n = 29) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 18) was done in all patients with contouring of CTV, GTV, and organs at risk. Dose-volume adaptation was achieved by dwell location and time variation (intensity modulation). Twelve patients treated with curative intent received five to seven fractions of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (7 Gy per fraction) corresponding to a total dose of 60 Gy (2 Gy per fraction and α/β of 10 Gy) to the CTV. Four patients had additional external beam radiotherapy (range, 10-40 Gy). One patient had salvage brachytherapy and 3 patients were treated with palliative intent. A dose-volume histogram analysis was performed in all patients. On average, 68% of the CTV and 92% of the GTV were encompassed by the 60 Gy reference volume. Median minimum dose to 90% of CTV and GTV (D90) was 35.3 Gy and 74 Gy, respectively. Results: All patients treated with curative intent had complete remission (12/12). After a median follow-up of 47 months, 5 patients are alive without tumor. Seven patients died without tumor from intercurrent disease after median 22 months. The patient with salvage treatment had a second local recurrence after 27 months and died of endometrial carcinoma after 57 months. In patients treated with palliative intent

  9. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  10. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  11. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy; Les volumes-cibles de la radiotherapie des adenocarcinomes gastriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Cancerologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P. [Hopital Clarac, Service de Radiotherapie et de Cancerologie, 97 - Fort de France (France)

    2001-10-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the

  12. Gold markers for tumor localization and target volume delineation in radiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorwerk, Hilke; Christiansen, Hans; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Hermann, Robert Michael; Liersch, Thorsten; Ghadimi, Michael; Rothe, Hilka

    2009-01-01

    In locally advanced rectal cancer, neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy is indicated. To improve target volume definition for radiotherapy planning, the potential of implanted gold markers in the tumor region was evaluated. In nine consecutive patients, two to three gold markers were implanted in the tumor region during rigid rectoscopy. Computed tomography scans were performed during treatment planning. All electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) recorded during treatment series were analyzed. All patients underwent complete tumor resection with meticulous histopathologic examination. The gold markers could easily be implanted into the mesorectal tissue at the caudal tumor border without any complications. They were helpful in identifying the inferior border of the planning target volume in order to spare normal tissue (in particular anal structures). No significant shift of the markers was found during the course of therapy. Marker matching of the EPIDs did not improve patient positioning in comparison to bone structure matching. The former position of at least one marker could be identified in all patients during histopathologic examination. The use of gold marker enables a more precise definition of the target volume for radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer. This could eventually allow a better protection of anal structures of patients with a tumor localization = 5 cm cranial of the anal sphincter. The implantation of the gold markers improved communication between the surgeon, the radiooncologist and the pathologist resulting in intensified exchange of relevant informations. (orig.)

  13. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value <5%, p < 0.01), especially in case of tumor late responses, which can hardly be handled by models entailing a constant radiosensitivity, failing to model changes from initial severe hypoxia to aerobic conditions during the treatment course. The model predictive capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level).

  14. Calculation of Lung Cancer Volume of Target Based on Thorax Computed Tomography Images using Active Contour Segmentation Method for Treatment Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra Yosandha, Fiet; Adi, Kusworo; Edi Widodo, Catur

    2017-06-01

    In this research, calculation process of the lung cancer volume of target based on computed tomography (CT) thorax images was done. Volume of the target calculation was done in purpose to treatment planning system in radiotherapy. The calculation of the target volume consists of gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OAR). The calculation of the target volume was done by adding the target area on each slices and then multiply the result with the slice thickness. Calculations of area using of digital image processing techniques with active contour segmentation method. This segmentation for contouring to obtain the target volume. The calculation of volume produced on each of the targets is 577.2 cm3 for GTV, 769.9 cm3 for CTV, 877.8 cm3 for PTV, 618.7 cm3 for OAR 1, 1,162 cm3 for OAR 2 right, and 1,597 cm3 for OAR 2 left. These values indicate that the image processing techniques developed can be implemented to calculate the lung cancer target volume based on CT thorax images. This research expected to help doctors and medical physicists in determining and contouring the target volume quickly and precisely.

  15. Audiovisual biofeedback guided breath-hold improves lung tumor position reproducibility and volume consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Lee, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be used to improve the reproducibility and consistency of breath-hold lung tumor position and volume, respectively. These results may provide a pathway to achieve more accurate lung cancer radiation treatment in addition to improving various medical imaging and treatments by using breath-hold procedures.

  16. Impact of primary tumor volume on local control after definitive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendenhall, William M.; Mancuso, Anthony A.; Strojan, Primoz; Beitler, Jonathan J.; Suarez, Carlos; Lee, Tsair-Fwu; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Corry, June; Eisbruch, Avraham; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    Background. The impact of primary tumor volume (pTV) on local control after definitive radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is unclear. Methods. Pertinent literature was reviewed to address the impact of pTV on local control after definitive RT for HNSCC. Results.

  17. Clinical application of tumor volume in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma to predict outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ching-Chih; Huang, Tze-Ta; Lee, Moon-Sing; Hsiao, Shih-Hsuan; Lin, Hon-Yi; Su, Yu-Chieh; Hsu, Feng-Chun; Hung, Shih-Kai

    2010-01-01

    Current staging systems have limited ability to adjust optimal therapy in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This study aimed to delineate the correlation between tumor volume, treatment outcome and chemotherapy cycles in advanced NPC. A retrospective review of 110 patients with stage III-IV NPC was performed. All patients were treated first with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, then concurrent chemoradiation, and followed by adjuvant chemotherapy as being the definitive therapy. Gross tumor volume of primary tumor plus retropharyngeal nodes (GTVprn) was calculated to be an index of treatment outcome. GTVprn had a close relationship with survival and recurrence in advanced NPC. Large GTVprn (≧13 ml) was associated with a significantly poorer local control, lower distant metastasis-free rate, and poorer survival. In patients with GTVprn ≧ 13 ml, overall survival was better after ≧4 cycles of chemotherapy than after less than 4 cycles. The incorporation of GTVprn can provide more information to adjust treatment strategy

  18. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  19. Comparison with dose-volume histograms of two conformal irradiation techniques used for the treatment of T2N0M0 nasopharyngeal cancer, one with association of photons and protons and another with photons alone; Comparaison par les histogrammes dose-volume de deux techniques d'irradiation conformationnelle des cancers du nasopharynx classes T4N0M0, l'une par photons et protons et l'autre par photons seuls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel, G.; Ferrand, R.; Desblancs, C.L.; Mazeron, J.J. [Centre de protontherapie, 91 - Orsay (France); Boisserie, G.; Dessard-Diana, B.; Gasowski, M.; Simon, J.M.; Baillet, F.; Mazeron, J.J. [Groupe Hospitalier la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service des Tumeurs, 75 - Paris (France); Hasboun, D. [Groupe Hospitalier la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Radiologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2002-12-01

    There is a relationship between the local control rate of the nasopharyngeal cancer and the total dose delivered within tue tumoral volume. In contrast, the relation between the dose and the irradiated volume and the risk of complication is not clearly defined. That is why, in patients presenting with a locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer, we compared the dose-volume distribution of irradiated tissues, obtained from two 3D conformal irradiation techniques. Between January 2000 and June 2001, 5 patients, 3 males and 2 females, with a median age of 32 years and presenting with a T4N0M0 nasopharyngeal cancer received a chemoradiotherapy. Radiotherapy combined photons and protons beams and the platin-based chemotherapy was delivered in three intravenous injections at d1, 22, 43 of the irradiation. To calculate the dosimetry, a CT scan and a MRI were performed in all the patients. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated from the imagery, three clinical tumor volumes were defined, the CTV1 was the GTV and the whole nasopharynx, the CTV2 was the CTV plus a 10 mm-margin and the CTV3 was the CTV2 and the nodes areas (cervical and sub-clavicular). Prophylactic dose within node areas was 44 Gy. Prescribed doses within CTV2 and GTV or CTV1 were 54 Gy/CGE (Cobalt Gy Equivalent, for an EBR = 1,1) and 70 Gy/CGE, respectively. Irradiation was delivered with fractions of 1.8 or 2.0 Gy/CGE, with 44 Gy by photons and with 16 or 26 CGE by protons. According to dose-volume histograms obtained from the dosimetry planning by protons and photons and from the theoretical dosimetry by photons lonely, for the different volumes of interest, GTV, CTV2, and organs at risk (optic nerves, chiasm, internal ears, brainstem, temporal lobes), we compared the averages of the maximum, minimum and mean doses and the averages of the volumes of organs of interest encompassed by different isodoses. Calculated averages of minimum, maximum and mean doses delivered within GTV were superior for the

  20. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma Target Volume and Organ at Risk Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Bosch, Walter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roberge, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Haas, Rick L.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Catton, Charles N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Indelicato, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Medical Center, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Deville, Curtiland [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Translational Research Consortium, 21st Century Oncology, Scottsdale, Arizona (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wang, Dian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the variability in target volume and organ at risk (OAR) contour delineation for retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Radiation planning computed tomography (CT) scans for 2 cases of RPS were distributed among 12 sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions for contouring gross tumor volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), high-risk CTV (HR CTV: area judged to be at high risk of resulting in positive margins after resection), and OARs: bowel bag, small bowel, colon, stomach, and duodenum. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results: Ten radiation oncologists contoured both RPS cases, 1 contoured only RPS1, and 1 contoured only RPS2 such that each case was contoured by 11 radiation oncologists. The first case (RPS 1) was a patient with a de-differentiated (DD) liposarcoma (LPS) with a predominant well-differentiated (WD) component, and the second case (RPS 2) was a patient with DD LPS made up almost entirely of a DD component. Contouring agreement for GTV and CTV contours was high. However, the agreement for HR CTVs was only moderate. For OARs, agreement for stomach, bowel bag, small bowel, and colon was high, but agreement for duodenum (distorted by tumor in one of these cases) was fair to moderate. Conclusions: For preoperative treatment of RPS, sarcoma radiation oncologists contoured GTV, CTV, and most OARs with a high level of agreement. HR CTV contours were more variable. Further clarification of this volume with the help of sarcoma surgical oncologists is necessary to reach consensus. More attention to delineation of the duodenum is also needed.

  1. Urokinase receptor cleavage correlates with tumor volume in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurison, Tine; Almholt, Kasper; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    PAR(I)]. The level of muPAR(I) is significantly increased in mammary tumor-bearing mice compared to controls and, notably, there is a strong correlation to tumor volume. In contrast, the tumor volume is only weakly correlated to the level of intact muPAR(I-III), indicating that cleavage of muPAR is a more specific...... marker for cancer than increased expression of muPAR per se. The levels of the muPAR forms are dramatically affected by in vivo challenge with a urokinase -blocking antibody, demonstrating a functional role of uPA in uPAR cleavage. The levels of the muPAR forms are, however, unaffected by u......PA-deficiency, suggesting that redundant proteases maintains the task of cleaving uPAR(I-III) when uPA is absent. Our findings emphasize the significance of the cleaved uPAR forms as cancer biomarkers. The strong correlation between muPAR(I) and the tumor volume in our experimental setup may motivate investigations...

  2. A Treatment Planning Comparison of Combined Photon-Proton Beams Versus Proton Beams-Only for the Treatment of Skull Base Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feuvret, Loic; Noel, Georges; Weber, Damien C.; Pommier, Pascal; Ferrand, Regis; De Marzi, Ludovic; Dhermain, Frederic; Alapetite, Claire; Mammar, Hamid; Boisserie, Gilbert; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To compare treatment planning between combined photon-proton planning (CP) and proton planning (PP) for skull base tumors, so as to assess the potential limitations of CP for these tumors. Methods and Materials: Plans for 10 patients were computed for both CP and PP. Prescribed dose was 67 cobalt Gray equivalent (CGE) for PP; 45 Gy (photons) and 22 CGE (protons) for CP. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were calculated for gross target volume (GTV), clinical target volume (CTV), normal tissues (NT), and organs at risk (OARs) for each plan. Results were analyzed using DVH parameters, inhomogeneity coefficient (IC), and conformity index (CI). Results: Mean doses delivered to the GTVs and CTVs with CP (65.0 and 61.7 CGE) and PP (65.3 and 62.2 Gy CGE) were not significantly different (p > 0.1 and p = 0.72). However, the dose inhomogeneity was drastically increased with CP, with a mean significant incremental IC value of 10.5% and CP of 6.8%, for both the GTV (p = 0.01) and CTV (p = 0.04), respectively. The CI 80% values for the GTV and CTV were significantly higher with PP compared with CP. Compared with CP, the use of protons only led to a significant reduction of NT and OAR irradiation, in the intermediate-to-low dose (≤80% isodose line) range. Conclusions: These results suggest that the use of CP results in levels of target dose conformation similar to those with PP. Use of PP significantly reduced the tumor dose inhomogeneity and the delivered intermediate-to-low dose to NT and OARs, leading us to conclude that this treatment is mainly appropriate for tumors in children

  3. Intra-tumour 18F-FDG uptake heterogeneity decreases the reliability on target volume definition with positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinzhe; Wu, Peipei; Sun, Xiaorong; Li, Wenwu; Wan, Honglin; Yu, Jinming; Xing, Ligang

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to explore whether the intra-tumour (18) F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake heterogeneity affects the reliability of target volume definition with FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and squamous cell oesophageal cancer (SCEC). Patients with NSCLC (n = 50) or SCEC (n = 50) who received (18)F-FDG PET/CT scanning before treatments were included in this retrospective study. Intra-tumour FDG uptake heterogeneity was assessed by visual scoring, the coefficient of variation (COV) of the standardised uptake value (SUV) and the image texture feature (entropy). Tumour volumes (gross tumour volume (GTV)) were delineated on the CT images (GTV(CT)), the fused PET/CT images (GTV(PET-CT)) and the PET images, using a threshold at 40% SUV(max) (GTV(PET40%)) or the SUV cut-off value of 2.5 (GTV(PET2.5)). The correlation between the FDG uptake heterogeneity parameters and the differences in tumour volumes among GTV(CT), GTV(PET-CT), GTV(PET40%) and GTV(PET2.5) was analysed. For both NSCLC and SCEC, obvious correlations were found between uptake heterogeneity, SUV or tumour volumes. Three types of heterogeneity parameters were consistent and closely related to each other. Substantial differences between the four methods of GTV definition were found. The differences between the GTV correlated significantly with PET heterogeneity defined with the visual score, the COV or the textural feature-entropy for NSCLC and SCEC. In tumours with a high FDG uptake heterogeneity, a larger GTV delineation difference was found. Advance image segmentation algorithms dealing with tracer uptake heterogeneity should be incorporated into the treatment planning system. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  4. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology

  5. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.

  6. A simulation model investigating the impact of tumor volume doubling time and mammographic tumor detectability on screening outcomes in women aged 40-49 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Stephanie L; Sigal, Bronislava M; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-08-18

    Compared with women aged 50-69 years, the lower sensitivity of mammographic screening in women aged 40-49 years is largely attributed to the lower mammographic tumor detectability and faster tumor growth in the younger women. We used a Monte Carlo simulation model of breast cancer screening by age to estimate the median tumor size detectable on a mammogram and the mean tumor volume doubling time. The estimates were calculated by calibrating the predicted breast cancer incidence rates to the actual rates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database and the predicted distributions of screen-detected tumor sizes to the actual distributions obtained from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC). The calibrated parameters were used to estimate the relative impact of lower mammographic tumor detectability vs faster tumor volume doubling time on the poorer screening outcomes in younger women compared with older women. Mammography screening outcomes included sensitivity, mean tumor size at detection, lifetime gained, and breast cancer mortality. In addition, the relationship between screening sensitivity and breast cancer mortality was investigated as a function of tumor volume doubling time, mammographic tumor detectability, and screening interval. Lowered mammographic tumor detectability accounted for 79% and faster tumor volume doubling time accounted for 21% of the poorer sensitivity of mammography screening in younger women compared with older women. The relative contributions were similar when the impact of screening was evaluated in terms of mean tumor size at detection, lifetime gained, and breast cancer mortality. Screening sensitivity and breast cancer mortality reduction attributable to screening were almost linearly related when comparing annual or biennial screening with no screening. However, when comparing annual with biennial screening, the greatest reduction in breast cancer mortality attributable to screening did not

  7. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  8. Intravitreal bevacizumab combined with plaque brachytherapy reduces melanoma tumor volume and enhances resolution of exudative detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston SK

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Samuel K Houston,1 Nisha V Shah,1 Christina Decatur,1 Marcela Lonngi,1 William Feuer,1 Arnold M Markoe,2 Timothy G Murray1–31Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 3Murray Ocular Oncology and Retina, Miami, FL, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate intravitreal bevacizumab as an adjuvant treatment to plaque brachytherapy in the treatment of choroidal melanoma.Methods: This was a retrospective, consecutive study of 124 patients treated from 2007 to 2009 for choroidal melanoma with plaque brachytherapy. Patients were treated with I-125 plaque brachytherapy with 2 mm margins and 85 Gy to the tumor apex. Consecutive patients were injected intravitreally with 2.5 mg/0.1 mL bevacizumab at a site away from the primary tumor and immediately following plaque removal. Choroidal melanomas were observed using indirect ophthalmoscopy, wide-angle photography, and ultrasound. The main outcome measures were tumor volume, resolution of exudative retinal detachment, and visual acuity.Results: One hundred and twenty-four patients met our inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. The mean patient age was 65.7 years, and the mean apical tumor height was 4.0 ± 2.7 mm and basal diameter was 12.7 ± 3.0 mm. Mean follow-up was 24 months. Prior to treatment, 100% of tumors had exudative retinal detachment, and pretreatment visual acuity was 20/55 (median 20/40. Tumor control was 100%, metastasis was 0% at last follow-up, and 89.8% had complete resolution of exudative retinal detachment, with a mean time to resolution of 3.36 months. At one month, 43% had complete resolution of exudative retinal detachment, which increased to 73% at 4 months. Visual acuity was 20/62 (median 20/40 at 4 months, with stabilization to 20/57 (median 20/40 at 8 months, 20/56 (median 20/30 at 12 months, and 20/68 (median 20/50 at 24 months. Tumor

  9. Assessment of tumor grade and angiogenesis in colorectal cancer: whole-volume perfusion CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongliang; Xu, Yanyan; Yang, Qiang; Wang, Wu

    2014-06-01

    The preoperative evaluation of tumor grading and angiogenesis has important clinical implications in the treatment and prognosis of patients with colorectal cancers (CRCs). The aim of the present study was to assess tumor perfusion with 256-slice computed tomography (CT) using whole-volume perfusion technology before surgery, and to investigate the differences in the perfusion parameters among tumor grades and the correlation between perfusion parameters and pathologic results in CRC. Thirty-seven patients with CRC confirmed by endoscopic pathology underwent whole-volume perfusion CT assessments with a 256-slice CT and surgery. Quantitative values for blood flow, blood volume, and time to peak were determined using commercial software. After surgery, resected specimens were analyzed immunohistochemically with CD105 antibodies for the quantification of microvessel density (MVD). The difference in CT perfusion parameters and MVD among different tumor differentiation grades was evaluated by the Student-Newman-Keuls test. The correlations between CT perfusion parameters and MVD were evaluated using the Pearson correlation analysis. The mean blood flow was significantly different among well, moderately, and poorly differentiated groups (61.17 ± 17.97, 34.80 ± 13.06, and 22.24 ± 9.31 mL/minute/100 g, respectively; P .05). There was no significant correlation between CT perfusion parameters and MVD (r = 0.201, 0.295, and -0.178, respectively; P = .233, .076, and .292, respectively). CT whole-volume perfusion technology has the potential to evaluate pathologic differentiation grade of CRC before surgery. However, preoperative perfusion CT parameters do not reflect the MVD of CRC. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B.; Hejduk, B.; Kolosza, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm 3 ) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm 3 (range 0.15-21.68 cm 3 ). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  11. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume and other quantitative variables in supratentorial brain tumors. Practical technique and use in prognostic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Braendgaard, H; Chistiansen, A O

    1991-01-01

    The use of morphometry and modern stereology in malignancy grading of brain tumors is only poorly investigated. The aim of this study was to present these quantitative methods. A retrospective feasibility study of 46 patients with supratentorial brain tumors was carried out to demonstrate...... the practical technique. The continuous variables were correlated with the subjective, qualitative WHO classification of brain tumors, and the prognostic value of the parameters was assessed. Well differentiated astrocytomas (n = 14) had smaller estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume and mean...... techniques in the prognostic evaluation of primary brain tumors....

  12. Volume change determination of metastatic lung tumors in CT images using 3-D template matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Robert D.; Wang, Peng; O'Dell, Walter G.

    2009-02-01

    The ability of a clinician to properly detect changes in the size of lung nodules over time is a vital element to both the diagnosis of malignant growths and the monitoring of the response of cancerous lesions to therapy. We have developed a novel metastasis sizing algorithm based on 3-D template matching with spherical tumor appearance models that were created to match the expected geometry of the tumors of interest while accounting for potential spatial offsets of nodules in the slice thickness direction. The spherical template that best-fits the overall volume of each lung metastasis was determined through the optimization of the 3-D normalized cross-correlation coefficients (NCCC) calculated between the templates and the nodules. A total of 17 different lung metastases were extracted manually from real patient CT datasets and reconstructed in 3-D using spherical harmonics equations to generate simulated nodules for testing our algorithm. Each metastasis 3-D shape was then subjected to 10%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 90% scaling of its volume to allow for 5 possible volume change combinations relative to the original size per each reconstructed nodule and inserted back into CT datasets with appropriate blurring and noise addition. When plotted against the true volume change, the nodule volume changes calculated by our algorithm for these 85 data points exhibited a high degree of accuracy (slope = 0.9817, R2 = 0.9957). Our results demonstrate that the 3-D template matching method can be an effective, fast, and accurate tool for automated sizing of metastatic tumors.

  13. Impact of removed tumor volume and location on patient outcome in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Al-Wala; Karsy, Michael; Sanai, Nader; Spetzler, Robert; Zhang, Yue; Xu, Yizhe; Mahan, Mark A

    2017-10-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive primary brain tumor with devastatingly poor prognosis. Multiple studies have shown the benefit of wider extent of resection (EOR) on patient overall survival (OS) and worsened survival with larger preoperative tumor volumes. However, the concomitant impact of postoperative tumor volume and eloquent location on OS has yet to be fully evaluated. We performed a retrospective chart review of adult patients treated for glioblastoma from January 2006 through December 2011. Adherence to standardized postoperative chemoradiation protocols was used as an inclusion criterion. Detailed volumetric and location analysis was performed on immediate preoperative and immediate postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Cox proportional hazard modeling approach was employed to explore the modifying effects of EOR and eloquent location after adjusting for various confounders and associated characteristics, such as preoperative tumor volume and demographics. Of the 471 screened patients, 141 were excluded because they did not meet all inclusion criteria. The mean (±SD) age of the remaining 330 patients (60.6% male) was 58.9 ± 12.9 years; the mean preoperative and postoperative Karnofsky performance scores (KPSs) were 76.2 ± 10.3 and 80.0 ± 16.6, respectively. Preoperative tumor volume averaged 33.2 ± 29.0 ml, postoperative residual was 4.0 ± 8.1 ml, and average EOR was 88.6 ± 17.6%. The observed average follow-up was 17.6 ± 15.7 months, and mean OS was 16.7 ± 14.4 months. Survival analysis showed significantly shorter survival for patients with lesions in periventricular (16.8 ± 1.7 vs. 21.5 ± 1.4 mo, p = 0.03), deep nuclei/basal ganglia (11.6 ± 1.7 vs. 20.6 ± 1.2, p = 0.002), and multifocal (12.0 ± 1.4 vs. 21.3 ± 1.3 months, p = 0.0001) locations, but no significant influence on survival was seen for eloquent cortex sites (p = 0.14, range 0.07-0.9 for all individual

  14. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm 3 , 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm 3 this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm 3 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm 3 (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10 10 cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm 3 (∝1 cm in diameter with 10 9 cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  15. Inter-observer agreement of MRI-based tumor delineation for preoperative radiotherapy boost in locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbach, Johannes Peter Maarten; Kleijnen, Jean-Paul Johannes; Reerink, Onne; Seravalli, Enrica; Philippens, Marielle E P; Schakel, Tim; van Asselen, Bram; Raaymakers, Bas W; van Vulpen, Marco; Intven, Martijn

    2016-02-01

    While surgery remains the cornerstone of rectal cancer treatment, organ-preservation is upcoming. Therefore, neo-adjuvant treatment should be optimized. By escalating doses, response can be increased. To limit toxicity of boost, accurate gross tumor volume (GTV) definition is required. MRI, especially undeformed fast spin echo diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), looks promising for delineation. However, inconsistencies between observers should be quantified before clinical implementation. We aim to find which MRI sequence (T2w, DWI or combination) is optimal and clinically useful for GTV definition by evaluating inter-observer agreement. Locally advanced rectal cancer patients (tumors 0.61). Average HD was largest on T2 (18.60mm, max 31.40 mm, min 9.20mm). Delineation on DWI resulted in delineation of the smallest volumes with similar consistency and mean distances, but with slightly lower Hausdorff distances compared to T2 and Combi. However, with lack of a gold standard it remains difficult to establish if delineations also represent true tumor. Study strengths were DWI adaptation to exclude geometrical distortions and training-set. DWI shows great potential for delineation purposes as long as sufficient experience exists and geometrical distortions are eliminated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlation between tumor size and blood volume in lung tumors. A prospective study on dual-energy gemstone spectral CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Masahiko; Takai, Yoshihiro; Narita, Yuichiro

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor size and blood volume for patients with lung tumors, using dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and a gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) viewer. During the period from March 2011 to March 2013, 50 patients with 57 medically inoperable lung tumors underwent DECT before stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of 50-60 Gy in 5-6 fractions. DECT was taken for pretreatment evaluation. The region-of-interest for a given spatial placement of the tumors was set, and averages for CT value, water density and iodine density were compared with tumor size. The average values for iodine density in tumors of ≤ 2 cm, 2-3 cm, and > 3 cm maximum diameter were 24.7, 19.6 and 16.0 (100 μg/cm 3 ), respectively. The average value of the iodine density was significantly lower in larger tumors. No significant correlation was detected between tumor size and average CT value or between tumor size and average water density. Both the average water density and the average CT value were affected by the amount of air in the tumor, but the average iodine density was not affected by air in the tumor. The average water density and the average CT value were significantly correlated, but the average iodine density and the average CT value showed no significant correlation. The blood volume of tumors can be indicated by the average iodine density more accurately than it can by the average CT value. The average iodine density as assessed by DECT might be a non-invasive and quantitative assessment of the radio-resistance ascribable to the hypoxic cell population in a tumor. (author)

  17. Increased Delay Between Gadolinium Chelate Administration and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Acquisition Increases Contrast-Enhancing Tumor Volumes and T1 Intensities in Brain Tumor Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechotta, Paula L; Bonekamp, David; Sill, Martin; Wick, Antje; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Kickingereder, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of delayed T1-weighted (T1-w) MRI acquisition after gadolinium chelate administration on brain tumor volumes and T1-w intensities. Fifty-five patients with histologically confirmed, contrast-enhancing intra-axial brain tumors were analyzed in this prospective test-retest study. Patients underwent 2 consecutive 3 T MRI scans (separated by a 1-minute break) during routine follow-up with contrast-enhanced T1 (ceT1-w), T2, and FLAIR acquisition. Macrocyclic gadolinium chelate-based contrast agent was only administered before the first ceT1-w acquisition; median latency to ceT1-w acquisition was 6.72 minutes (IQR, 6.53-6.92) in the first and 16.27 minutes (IQR, 15.49-17.26) in the second scan. Changes in tumor volumes and relative ceT1-w intensities between the 2 acquisitions were quantitatively assessed following semiautomated tumor segmentation (separately for contrast-enhancement [CE], necrosis [NEC], and nonenhancing [NE] tumor). Semiautomatically segmented CE tumor volumes were significantly larger in the second acquisition (median +32% [1.2 cm]; IQR, 16%-62%; P < 0.01), which corresponded to a 10% increase in CE tumor diameter (+0.3 cm). Contrarily, NEC and NE tumor volumes were significantly smaller (median -24% [IQR, -36% to -54%], P < 0.01 for NEC and -2% [IQR, -1% to -3%], P = 0.02 for NE tumor). Bland-Altman plots confirmed a proportional bias toward higher CE and lower NEC volumes for the second ceT1-w acquisition. Relative ceT1-w intensities for both early- (regions already enhancing in the first scan) and late-enhancing (newly enhancing regions in the second scan) tumor were significantly increased in the second acquisition (by 5.8% and 27.3% [P < 0.01, respectively]). Linear-mixed effects modeling confirmed that the increase in CE volumes and CE intensities is a function of the interval between contrast agent injection and ceT1-w acquisition (P < 0.01 each). Our study indicates that the maximum extent of CE

  18. MRI versus {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT for gross tumour volume delineation in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamboglou, Constantinos; Kirste, Simon; Fechter, Tobias; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Wieser, Gesche [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Hennies, Steffen [University Medical Center Goettingen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Goettingen (Germany); Rempel, Irene; Soschynski, Martin; Langer, Mathias [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, Hans Christian [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg (Germany); Jilg, Cordula A. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Urology, Freiburg (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Bock, Michael [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); University Medical Center Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) is widely used in radiation treatment planning of primary prostate cancer (PCA). Focal dose escalation to the dominant intraprostatic lesions (DIPL) may lead to improved PCA control. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in most PCAs. {sup 68}Ga-labelled PSMA inhibitors have demonstrated promising results in detection of PCA with PET/CT. The aim of this study was to compare {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT with MRI for gross tumour volume (GTV) definition in primary PCA. This retrospective study included 22 patients with primary PCA analysed after {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI. GTVs were delineated on MR images by two radiologists (GTV-MRIrad) and two radiation oncologists separately. Both volumes were merged leading to GTV-MRIint. GTVs based on PET/CT were delineated by two nuclear medicine physicians in consensus (GTV-PET). Laterality (left, right, and left and right prostate lobes) on mpMRI, PET/CT and pathological analysis after biopsy were assessed. Mean GTV-MRIrad, GTV-MRIint and GTV-PET were 5.92, 3.83 and 11.41 cm{sup 3}, respectively. GTV-PET was significant larger then GTV-MRIint (p = 0.003). The MRI GTVs GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint showed, respectively, 40 % and 57 % overlap with GTV-PET. GTV-MRIrad and GTV-MRIint included the SUVmax of GTV-PET in 12 and 11 patients (54.6 % and 50 %), respectively. In nine patients (47 %), laterality on mpMRI, PET/CT and histopathology after biopsy was similar. Ga-PSMA PET/CT and mpMRI provided concordant results for delineation of the DIPL in 47 % of patients (40 % - 54 % of lesions). GTV-PET was significantly larger than GTV-MRIint. {sup 68}Ga-PSMA PET/CT may have a role in radiation treatment planning for focal radiation to the DIPL. Exact correlation of PET and MRI images with histopathology is needed. (orig.)

  19. Plasma uric acid and tumor volume are highly predictive of outcome in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients receiving intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hui; Lin, Huan-Xin; Ge, Nan; Wang, Hong-Zhi; Sun, Rui; Hu, Wei-Han

    2013-01-01

    The combined predictive value of plasma uric acid and primary tumor volume in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has not yet been determined. In this retrospective study, plasma uric acid level was measured after treatment in 130 histologically-proven NPC patients treated with IMRT. Tumor volume was calculated from treatment planning CT scans. Overall (OS), progression-free (PFS) and distant metastasis-free (DMFS) survival were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log rank test, and Cox multivariate and univariate regression models were created. Patients with a small tumor volume (<27 mL) had a significantly better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a large tumor volume. Patients with a high post-treatment plasma uric acid level (>301 μmol/L) had a better DMFS, PFS and OS than patients with a low post-treatment plasma uric acid level. Patients with a small tumor volume and high post-treatment plasma uric acid level had a favorable prognosis compared to patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level (7-year overall OS, 100% vs. 48.7%, P <0.001 and PFS, 100% vs. 69.5%, P <0.001). Post-treatment plasma uric acid level and pre-treatment tumor volume have predictive value for outcome in NPC patients receiving IMRT. NPC patients with a large tumor volume and low post-treatment plasma uric acid level may benefit from additional aggressive treatment after IMRT

  20. Quantitative study on lung volume and lung perfusion using SPECT and CT in thoracal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer-Enke, S.A.; Goerich, J.; Strauss, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    22 patients with space occupying lesions in the thoracal region were investigated by computer tomography and by perfusion scintigraphy using SPECT. In order to evaluate the CT images quantitatively, the lung volume was determined using approximation method and compared with the perfusion in the SPECT study. For this, anatomically equivalent transaxial SPECT slices had been coordinated to the CT slices. Between the determined lung volumes and the activity in the ocrresponding layers, a statistically significant correlation was found. It could be shown that the stronger perfusion, frequently observed at the right side of the healthy lung, may be explained by an higher volume of the right pulmonary lobe. Whereas in benign displacing processes the relation activity to volume was similar to the one of the healthy lung, a strongly reduced perfusion together with inconspicuous lung volumes became apparent with malignant tumors. In addition to the great morphological evidence of CT and SPECT studies, additional informations regarding the dignity of displacing processes may be derived from the quantitative evaluation of both methods. (orig.) [de

  1. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: −11.6%–23.8%) and 14.6% (range: −7.3%–27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: −6.8%–40.3%) and 13.1% (range: −1.5%–52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: −11.1%–20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. Conclusions: A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography

  2. Contour propagation for lung tumor delineation in 4D-CT using tensor-product surface of uniform and non-uniform closed cubic B-splines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Renchao; Liu, Yongchuan; Chen, Mi; Zhang, Sheng; Song, Enmin

    2018-01-01

    A robust contour propagation method is proposed to help physicians delineate lung tumors on all phase images of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) by only manually delineating the contours on a reference phase. The proposed method models the trajectory surface swept by a contour in a respiratory cycle as a tensor-product surface of two closed cubic B-spline curves: a non-uniform B-spline curve which models the contour and a uniform B-spline curve which models the trajectory of a point on the contour. The surface is treated as a deformable entity, and is optimized from an initial surface by moving its control vertices such that the sum of the intensity similarities between the sampling points on the manually delineated contour and their corresponding ones on different phases is maximized. The initial surface is constructed by fitting the manually delineated contour on the reference phase with a closed B-spline curve. In this way, the proposed method can focus the registration on the contour instead of the entire image to prevent the deformation of the contour from being smoothed by its surrounding tissues, and greatly reduce the time consumption while keeping the accuracy of the contour propagation as well as the temporal consistency of the estimated respiratory motions across all phases in 4D-CT. Eighteen 4D-CT cases with 235 gross tumor volume (GTV) contours on the maximal inhale phase and 209 GTV contours on the maximal exhale phase are manually delineated slice by slice. The maximal inhale phase is used as the reference phase, which provides the initial contours. On the maximal exhale phase, the Jaccard similarity coefficient between the propagated GTV and the manually delineated GTV is 0.881 +/- 0.026, and the Hausdorff distance is 3.07 +/- 1.08 mm. The time for propagating the GTV to all phases is 5.55 +/- 6.21 min. The results are better than those of the fast adaptive stochastic gradient descent B-spline method, the 3D  +  t B

  3. Comparison of tumor volumes derived from glucose metabolic rate maps and SUV maps in dynamic 18F-FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Eric P; Philippens, Mariëlle E P; Kienhorst, Laura; Kaanders, Johannes H A M; Corstens, Frans H M; de Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee; Oyen, Wim J G

    2008-06-01

    Tumor delineation using noninvasive medical imaging modalities is important to determine the target volume in radiation treatment planning and to evaluate treatment response. It is expected that combined use of CT and functional information from 18F-FDG PET will improve tumor delineation. However, until now, tumor delineation using PET has been based on static images of 18F-FDG standardized uptake values (SUVs). 18F-FDG uptake depends not only on tumor physiology but also on blood supply, distribution volume, and competitive uptake processes in other tissues. Moreover, 18F-FDG uptake in tumor tissue and in surrounding healthy tissue depends on the time after injection. Therefore, it is expected that the glucose metabolic rate (MRglu) derived from dynamic PET scans gives a better representation of the tumor activity than does SUV. The aim of this study was to determine tumor volumes in MRglu maps and to compare them with the values from SUV maps. Twenty-nine lesions in 16 dynamic 18F-FDG PET scans in 13 patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma were analyzed. MRglu values were calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis using the standard 2-compartment 18F-FDG model with trapping in the linear approximation (Patlak analysis). The blood input function was obtained by arterial sampling. Tumor volumes were determined in SUV maps of the last time frame and in MRglu maps using 3-dimensional isocontours at 50% of the maximum SUV and the maximum MRglu, respectively. Tumor volumes based on SUV contouring ranged from 1.31 to 52.16 cm3, with a median of 8.57 cm3. Volumes based on MRglu ranged from 0.95 to 37.29 cm3, with a median of 3.14 cm3. For all lesions, the MRglu volumes were significantly smaller than the SUV volumes. The percentage differences (defined as 100% x (V MRglu - V SUV)/V SUV, where V is volume) ranged from -12.8% to -84.8%, with a median of -32.8%. Tumor volumes from MRglu maps were significantly smaller than SUV-based volumes. These findings can be of

  4. Neurocognitive status in patients with newly-diagnosed brain tumors in good neurological condition: The impact of tumor type, volume, and location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Hans, Elisa; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Simgen, Andreas; Oertel, Joachim; Karbach, Julia

    2017-05-01

    Neurocognitive function is of great importance in patients with brain tumors. Even patients in good neurological condition may suffer from neurocognitive dysfunction that affects their daily living. The purpose of the present study was to identify risk factors for neurocognitive dysfunction in patients suffering from common supratentorial brain tumors with minor neurological deficits. A prospective study evaluating neurocognitive dysfunction in patients with a newly-diagnosed brain tumor in good neurological condition was performed at a major German academic institution. Patients underwent extensive neurocognitive testing assessing perceptual speed, executive function, visual-spatial and verbal working memory, short- and long-term memory, verbal fluency, fluid intelligence, anxiety, and depression. For each patient, a healthy control was pair-matched based on age, sex, handedness, and profession. A total of 46 patients and 46 healthy controls underwent neurocognitive testing. Patients suffered from glioblastoma multiforme (10), cerebral metastasis (10), pituitary adenoma (13), or meningioma (13). There was neither any difference in age, educational level, fluid intelligence, neurological deficits, and anxiety nor in any depression scores between tumor subgroups. Overall, neurocognitive performance was significantly worse in patients compared to healthy controls. Larger tumor volume, frontal location, and left/dominant hemisphere were associated with worse executive functioning and verbal fluency. Additionally, larger tumors and left/dominant location correlated with impairments on perceptual speed tasks. Frontal tumor location was related to worse performance in visual-spatial and short- and long-term memory. Tumor type, clinical presentation, and patient self-awareness were not associated with specific neurocognitive impairments. Patients suffering from newly-diagnosed brain tumors presenting in good neurological condition display neurocognitive impairments in

  5. Dose and volume specification for reporting NCT. An ICRU-IAEA initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Whitmore, G.; Levin, C.V.

    2000-01-01

    The present recommendations result from of an ICRU-IAEA initiative for harmonization of reporting NCT (Neutron Capture Therapy). As stated by the ISNCT, harmonization of reporting is required to understand what has actually been done and interpret the clinical results on the basis of reliable information. Prescription of a treatment remains the responsibility of the radiation oncologist in charge of the patient. Complete oncological data should be reported, including Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) as well as Planning Target Volume (PTV), Treated Volume and Organs/Structures at Risk. A reference point for reporting dose should be selected in the central part of the PTV/CTV. At each point of interest, the four components contributing to the absorbed dose and the weighting factors applied to take account of the RBE (Relative Biological Effectiveness) differences should be specified. (author)

  6. A volume-equivalent spherical necrosis-tumor-normal liver model for estimating absorbed dose in yttrium-90 microsphere therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Hui; Liao, Yi-Jen; Lin, Tzung-Yi; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Sun, Shung-Shung; Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh; Hsu, Shih-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumors are highly malignant tumors in Asia. The incidence of fatal liver cancer is also increasing in the United States. The aim of this study was to establish a spherical tumor model and determine its accuracy in predicting the absorbed dose in yttrium-90 (Y-90) microsphere therapy for liver cancer. Liver morphology can be approximated by a spherical model comprising three concentric regions representing necrotic, tumor, and normal liver tissues. The volumes of these three regions represent those in the actual liver. A spherical tumor model was proposed to calculate the absorbed fractions in the spherical tumor, necrotic, and normal tissue regions. The THORplan treatment planning system and Monte Carlo N-particle extended codes were used for this spherical tumor model. Using the volume-equivalent method, a spherical tumor model was created to calculate the total absorbed fraction [under different tumor-to-healthy-liver ratios (TLRs)]. The patient-specific model (THORplan) results were used to verify the spherical tumor model results. The results for both the Y-90 spectrum and the Y-90 mean energy indicated that the absorbed fraction was a function of the tumor radius and mass. The absorbed fraction increased with tumor radius. The total absorbed fractions calculated using the spherical tumor model for necrotic, liver tumor, and normal liver tissues were in good agreement with the THORplan results, with differences of less than 3% for TLRs of 2-5. The results for the effect of TLR indicate that for the same tumor configuration, the total absorbed fraction decreased with increasing TLR; for the same shell tumor thickness and TLR, the total absorbed fraction was approximately constant; and for tumors with the same radius, the total fraction absorbed by the tumor increased with the shell thickness. The results from spherical tumor models with different tumor-to-healthy-liver ratios were highly consistent with the

  7. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J.; Vieira, Igor F.

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments

  8. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  9. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knybel, Lukas; Cvek, Jakub; Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  10. Utilization and incorporation of tumor volume data in staging and prognostication of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Parveen Ahlawat; Sheh Rawat; Anjali Kakria; Manoj Pal; Deepika Chauhan; Ruparna Khurana; Sarthak Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC) are a group of heterogeneous tumors, evident by their diverse behavior and natural history. The largest diameter of tumor measured for T classification may not necessarily reflect the true tumor dimension. There is a need to take into account certain other feature(s) of these tumors other than the maximum single dimension which can reflect the true tumor burden more accurately. Tumor volume has been shown to be a useful and accurate tool burden beca...

  11. Tumor control probability and the utility of 4D vs 3D dose calculations for stereotactic body radiotherapy for lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, Gilmer, E-mail: gilmer.valdes@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Robinson, Clifford [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lee, Percy [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Morel, Delphine [Department of Biomedical Engineering, AIX Marseille 2 University, Marseille (France); Department of Medical Physics, Joseph Fourier University, Grenoble (France); Low, Daniel; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Four-dimensional (4D) dose calculations for lung cancer radiotherapy have been technically feasible for a number of years but have not become standard clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to determine if clinically significant differences in tumor control probability (TCP) exist between 3D and 4D dose calculations so as to inform the decision whether 4D dose calculations should be used routinely for treatment planning. Radiotherapy plans for Stage I-II lung cancer were created for 8 patients. Clinically acceptable treatment plans were created with dose calculated on the end-exhale 4D computed tomography (CT) phase using a Monte Carlo algorithm. Dose was then projected onto the remaining 9 phases of 4D-CT using the Monte Carlo algorithm and accumulated onto the end-exhale phase using commercially available deformable registration software. The resulting dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the gross tumor volume (GTV), planning tumor volume (PTV), and PTV{sub setup} were compared according to target coverage and dose. The PTV{sub setup} was defined as a volume including the GTV and a margin for setup uncertainties but not for respiratory motion. TCPs resulting from these DVHs were estimated using a wide range of alphas, betas, and tumor cell densities. Differences of up to 5 Gy were observed between 3D and 4D calculations for a PTV with highly irregular shape. When the TCP was calculated using the resulting DVHs for fractionation schedules typically used in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), the TCP differed at most by 5% between 4D and 3D cases, and in most cases, it was by less than 1%. We conclude that 4D dose calculations are not necessary for most cases treated with SBRT, but they might be valuable for irregularly shaped target volumes. If 4D calculations are used, 4D DVHs should be evaluated on volumes that include margin for setup uncertainty but not respiratory motion.

  12. Pathologic Validation of a Model Based on Diffusion-Weighted Imaging and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Tumor Delineation in the Prostate Peripheral Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groenendaal, Greetje, E-mail: G.Groenendaal-2@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Borren, Alie; Moman, Maaike R. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Monninkhof, Evelyn [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Diest, Paul J. van [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Vulpen, Marco van; Heide, Uulke A. van der [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: For focal boost strategies in the prostate, the robustness of magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor delineations needs to be improved. To this end we developed a statistical model that predicts tumor presence on a voxel level (2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 2.5 mm3) inside the peripheral zone. Furthermore, we show how this model can be used to derive a valuable input for radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: The model was created on 87 radiotherapy patients. For the validation of the voxelwise performance of the model, an independent group of 12 prostatectomy patients was used. After model validation, the model was stratified to create three different risk levels for tumor presence: gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), and low-risk CTV. Results: The model gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.70 for the prediction of tumor presence in the prostatectomy group. When the registration error between magnetic resonance images and pathologic delineation was taken into account, the area under the curve further improved to 0.89. We propose that model outcome values with a high positive predictive value can be used to define the GTV. Model outcome values with a high negative predictive value can be used to define low-risk CTV regions. The intermediate outcome values can be used to define a high-risk CTV. Conclusions: We developed a logistic regression with a high diagnostic performance for voxelwise prediction of tumor presence. The model output can be used to define different risk levels for tumor presence, which in turn could serve as an input for dose planning. In this way the robustness of tumor delineations for focal boost therapy can be greatly improved.

  13. Pathologic validation of a model based on diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for tumor delineation in the prostate peripheral zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenendaal, Greetje; Borren, Alie; Moman, Maaike R; Monninkhof, Evelyn; van Diest, Paul J; Philippens, Marielle E P; van Vulpen, Marco; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2012-03-01

    For focal boost strategies in the prostate, the robustness of magnetic resonance imaging-based tumor delineations needs to be improved. To this end we developed a statistical model that predicts tumor presence on a voxel level (2.5×2.5×2.5 mm3) inside the peripheral zone. Furthermore, we show how this model can be used to derive a valuable input for radiotherapy treatment planning. The model was created on 87 radiotherapy patients. For the validation of the voxelwise performance of the model, an independent group of 12 prostatectomy patients was used. After model validation, the model was stratified to create three different risk levels for tumor presence: gross tumor volume (GTV), high-risk clinical target volume (CTV), and low-risk CTV. The model gave an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.70 for the prediction of tumor presence in the prostatectomy group. When the registration error between magnetic resonance images and pathologic delineation was taken into account, the area under the curve further improved to 0.89. We propose that model outcome values with a high positive predictive value can be used to define the GTV. Model outcome values with a high negative predictive value can be used to define low-risk CTV regions. The intermediate outcome values can be used to define a high-risk CTV. We developed a logistic regression with a high diagnostic performance for voxelwise prediction of tumor presence. The model output can be used to define different risk levels for tumor presence, which in turn could serve as an input for dose planning. In this way the robustness of tumor delineations for focal boost therapy can be greatly improved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengpeng, E-mail: zhangp@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Rimner, Andreas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  15. Observation of Interfractional Variations in Lung Tumor Position Using Respiratory Gated and Ungated Megavoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jenghwa; Mageras, Gig S.; Yorke, Ellen; De Arruda, Fernando; Sillanpaa, Jussi; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Hertanto, Agung; Pham, Hai; Seppi, Edward; Pevsner, Alex; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) to measure interfractional variation in lung tumor position. Methods and Materials: Eight non-small-cell lung cancer patients participated in the study, 4 with respiratory gating and 4 without. All patients underwent MV CBCT scanning at weekly intervals. Contoured planning CT and MV CBCT images were spatially registered based on vertebral anatomy, and displacements of the tumor centroid determined. Setup error was assessed by comparing weekly portal orthogonal radiographs with digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from planning CT images. Hypothesis testing was performed to test the statistical significance of the volume difference, centroid displacement, and setup uncertainty. Results: The vertebral bodies and soft tissue portions of tumor within lung were visible on the MV CBCT scans. Statistically significant systematic volume decrease over the course of treatment was observed for 1 patient. The average centroid displacement between simulation CT and MV CBCT scans were 2.5 mm, -2.0 mm, and -1.5 mm with standard deviations of 2.7 mm, 2.7 mm, and 2.6 mm in the right-left, anterior-posterior and superior-inferior directions. The mean setup errors were smaller than the centroid shifts, while the standard deviations were comparable. In most cases, the gross tumor volume (GTV) defined on the MV CBCT was located on average at least 5 mm inside a 10 mm expansion of the GTV defined on the planning CT scan. Conclusions: The MV CBCT technique can be used to image lung tumors and may prove valuable for image-guided radiotherapy. Our conclusions must be verified in view of the small patient number

  16. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan and Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan); Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  17. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Yuichi; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas-Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV Potential). The concordance between ITV Potential and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV 4DCT) was evaluated using the Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). The distance between blood vessel positions

  18. Overlap of highly FDG-avid and FMISO hypoxic tumor subvolumes in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönnich, David; Thorwarth, Daniela; Leibfarth, Sara; Pfannenberg, Christina; Reischl, Gerald; Mauz, Paul-Stefan; Nikolaou, Konstantin; la Fougère, Christian; Zips, Daniel; Welz, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    PET imaging may be used to personalize radiotherapy (RT) by identifying radioresistant tumor subvolumes for RT dose escalation. Using the tracers [ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [ 18 F]-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO), different aspects of tumor biology can be visualized. FDG depicts various biological aspects, e.g., proliferation, glycolysis and hypoxia, while FMISO is more hypoxia specific. In this study, we analyzed size and overlap of volumes based on the two markers for head-and-neck cancer patients (HNSCC). Twenty five HNSCC patients underwent a CT scan, as well as FDG and dynamic FMISO PET/CT prior to definitive radio-chemotherapy in a prospective FMISO dose escalation study. Three PET-based subvolumes of the primary tumor (GTV prim ) were segmented: a highly FDG-avid volume V FDG , a hypoxic volume on the static FMISO image acquired four hours post tracer injection (V H ) and a retention/perfusion volume (V M ) using pharmacokinetic modeling of dynamic FMISO data. Absolute volumes, overlaps and distances to agreement (DTA) were evaluated. Sizes of PET-based volumes and the GTV prim are significantly different (GTV prim >V FDG >V H >V M ; p DTAs are small (mean coverage 74.4%, mean DTA 1.4 mm). Coverage of V M is less pronounced. With respect to V FDG and V H , the mean coverage is 48.7% and 43.1% and the mean DTA is 5.3 mm and 6.3 mm, respectively. For two patients, DTAs were larger than 2 cm. Hypoxic subvolumes from static PET imaging are typically covered by or in close proximity to highly FDG-avid subvolumes. Therefore, dose escalation to FDG positive subvolumes should cover the static hypoxic subvolumes in most patients, with the disadvantage of larger volumes, resulting in a higher risk of dose-limiting toxicity. Coverage of subvolumes from dynamic FMISO PET is less pronounced. Further studies are needed to explore the relevance of mismatches in functional imaging.

  19. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjaer; Binderup, Tina

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate...... and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. METHODS: Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume...... (n = 20) was determined in vivo by external caliper, microCT and 18F-FDG-PET and subsequently reference volume was determined ex vivo. Intra-observer reproducibility of the microCT and caliper methods were determined by acquiring 10 repeated volume measurements. Volumes of a group of tumors (n = 10...

  20. Design of 4D treatment planning target volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rietzel, Eike; Liu, Arthur K. Ph.D.; Doppke, Karen P.; Wolfgang, John A.; Chen, Aileen B.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: When using non-patient-specific treatment planning margins, respiratory motion may lead to geometric miss of the target while unnecessarily irradiating normal tissue. Imaging different respiratory states of a patient allows patient-specific target design. We used four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) to characterize tumor motion and create treatment volumes in 10 patients with lung cancer. These were compared with standard treatment volumes. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional CT and free breathing helical CT data of 10 patients were acquired. Gross target volumes (GTV) were delineated on the helical scan as well as on each phase of the 4D data. Composite GTVs were defined on 4DCT. Planning target volumes (PTV) including clinical target volume, internal margin (IM), and setup margin were generated. 4DPTVs with different IMs and standard PTVs were compared by computing centroid positions, volumes, volumetric overlap, and bounding boxes. Results: Four-dimensional PTVs and conventional PTVs differed in volume and centroid positions. Overlap between 4DPTVs generated from two extreme tumor positions only compared with 10 respiratory phases was 93.7%. Comparing PTVs with margins of 15 mm (IM 5 mm) on composite 4D target volumes to PTVs with 20 mm (IM 10 mm) on helical CT data resulted in a decrease in target volume sizes by 23% on average. Conclusion: With patient-specific characterization of tumor motion, it should be possible to decrease internal margins. Patient-specific treatment volumes can be generated using extreme tumor positions on 4DCT. To date, more than 150 patients have been treated using 4D target design

  1. Understanding PSA and its derivatives in prediction of tumor volume: Addressing health disparities in prostate cancer risk stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinea, Felix M; Lyapichev, Kirill; Epstein, Jonathan I; Kwon, Deukwoo; Smith, Paul Taylor; Pollack, Alan; Cote, Richard J; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N

    2017-03-28

    To address health disparities in risk stratification of U.S. Hispanic/Latino men by characterizing influences of prostate weight, body mass index, and race/ethnicity on the correlation of PSA derivatives with Gleason score 6 (Grade Group 1) tumor volume in a diverse cohort. Using published PSA density and PSA mass density cutoff values, men with higher body mass indices and prostate weights were less likely to have a tumor volume PSA derivatives when predicting for tumor volume. In receiver operator characteristic analysis, area under the curve values for all PSA derivatives varied across race/ethnicity with lower optimal cutoff values for Hispanic/Latino (PSA=2.79, PSA density=0.06, PSA mass=0.37, PSA mass density=0.011) and Non-Hispanic Black (PSA=3.75, PSA density=0.07, PSA mass=0.46, PSA mass density=0.008) compared to Non-Hispanic White men (PSA=4.20, PSA density=0.11 PSA mass=0.53, PSA mass density=0.014). We retrospectively analyzed 589 patients with low-risk prostate cancer at radical prostatectomy. Pre-operative PSA, patient height, body weight, and prostate weight were used to calculate all PSA derivatives. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for each PSA derivative per racial/ethnic group to establish optimal cutoff values predicting for tumor volume ≥0.5 cm3. Increasing prostate weight and body mass index negatively influence PSA derivatives for predicting tumor volume. PSA derivatives' ability to predict tumor volume varies significantly across race/ethnicity. Hispanic/Latino and Non-Hispanic Black men have lower optimal cutoff values for all PSA derivatives, which may impact risk assessment for prostate cancer.

  2. A tri-modality image fusion method for target delineation of brain tumors in radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Guo

    Full Text Available To develop a tri-modality image fusion method for better target delineation in image-guided radiotherapy for patients with brain tumors.A new method of tri-modality image fusion was developed, which can fuse and display all image sets in one panel and one operation. And a feasibility study in gross tumor volume (GTV delineation using data from three patients with brain tumors was conducted, which included images of simulation CT, MRI, and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET examinations before radiotherapy. Tri-modality image fusion was implemented after image registrations of CT+PET and CT+MRI, and the transparency weight of each modality could be adjusted and set by users. Three radiation oncologists delineated GTVs for all patients using dual-modality (MRI/CT and tri-modality (MRI/CT/PET image fusion respectively. Inter-observer variation was assessed by the coefficient of variation (COV, the average distance between surface and centroid (ADSC, and the local standard deviation (SDlocal. Analysis of COV was also performed to evaluate intra-observer volume variation.The inter-observer variation analysis showed that, the mean COV was 0.14(± 0.09 and 0.07(± 0.01 for dual-modality and tri-modality respectively; the standard deviation of ADSC was significantly reduced (p<0.05 with tri-modality; SDlocal averaged over median GTV surface was reduced in patient 2 (from 0.57 cm to 0.39 cm and patient 3 (from 0.42 cm to 0.36 cm with the new method. The intra-observer volume variation was also significantly reduced (p = 0.00 with the tri-modality method as compared with using the dual-modality method.With the new tri-modality image fusion method smaller inter- and intra-observer variation in GTV definition for the brain tumors can be achieved, which improves the consistency and accuracy for target delineation in individualized radiotherapy.

  3. Whole-tumor histogram analysis of the cerebral blood volume map: tumor volume defined by 11C-methionine positron emission tomography image improves the diagnostic accuracy of cerebral glioma grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rongli; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Arisawa, Atsuko; Takahashi, Hiroto; Tanaka, Hisashi; Fujimoto, Yasunori; Watabe, Tadashi; Isohashi, Kayako; Hatazawa, Jun; Tomiyama, Noriyuki

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to compare the tumor volume definition using conventional magnetic resonance (MR) and 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET/PET) images in the differentiation of the pre-operative glioma grade by using whole-tumor histogram analysis of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) maps. Thirty-four patients with histopathologically proven primary brain low-grade gliomas (n = 15) and high-grade gliomas (n = 19) underwent pre-operative or pre-biopsy MET/PET, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery, dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted at 3.0 T. The histogram distribution derived from the nCBV maps was obtained by co-registering the whole tumor volume delineated on conventional MR or MET/PET images, and eight histogram parameters were assessed. The mean nCBV value had the highest AUC value (0.906) based on MET/PET images. Diagnostic accuracy significantly improved when the tumor volume was measured from MET/PET images compared with conventional MR images for the parameters of mean, 50th, and 75th percentile nCBV value (p = 0.0246, 0.0223, and 0.0150, respectively). Whole-tumor histogram analysis of CBV map provides more valuable histogram parameters and increases diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of pre-operative cerebral gliomas when the tumor volume is derived from MET/PET images.

  4. Automated measurements of metabolic tumor volume and metabolic parameters in lung PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orologas, F.; Saitis, P.; Kallergi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Patients with lung tumors or inflammatory lung disease could greatly benefit in terms of treatment and follow-up by PET/CT quantitative imaging, namely measurements of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), standardized uptake values (SUVs) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). The purpose of this study was the development of an unsupervised or partially supervised algorithm using standard image processing tools for measuring MTV, SUV, and TLG from lung PET/CT scans. Automated metabolic lesion volume and metabolic parameter measurements were achieved through a 5 step algorithm: (i) The segmentation of the lung areas on the CT slices, (ii) the registration of the CT segmented lung regions on the PET images to define the anatomical boundaries of the lungs on the functional data, (iii) the segmentation of the regions of interest (ROIs) on the PET images based on adaptive thresholding and clinical criteria, (iv) the estimation of the number of pixels and pixel intensities in the PET slices of the segmented ROIs, (v) the estimation of MTV, SUVs, and TLG from the previous step and DICOM header data. Whole body PET/CT scans of patients with sarcoidosis were used for training and testing the algorithm. Lung area segmentation on the CT slices was better achieved with semi-supervised techniques that reduced false positive detections significantly. Lung segmentation results agreed with the lung volumes published in the literature while the agreement between experts and algorithm in the segmentation of the lesions was around 88%. Segmentation results depended on the image resolution selected for processing. The clinical parameters, SUV (either mean or max or peak) and TLG estimated by the segmented ROIs and DICOM header data provided a way to correlate imaging data to clinical and demographic data. In conclusion, automated MTV, SUV, and TLG measurements offer powerful analysis tools in PET/CT imaging of the lungs. Custom-made algorithms are often a better approach than the manufacturer

  5. Segmentation-free direct tumor volume and metabolic activity estimation from PET scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghanaki, Saeid Asgari; Duggan, Noirin; Ma, Hillgan; Hou, Xinchi; Celler, Anna; Benard, Francois; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2018-01-01

    Tumor volume and metabolic activity are two robust imaging biomarkers for predicting early therapy response in F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), which is a modality to image the distribution of radiotracers and thereby observe functional processes in the body. To date, estimation of these two biomarkers requires a lesion segmentation step. While the segmentation methods requiring extensive user interaction have obvious limitations in terms of time and reproducibility, automatically estimating activity from segmentation, which involves integrating intensity values over the volume is also suboptimal, since PET is an inherently noisy modality. Although many semi-automatic segmentation based methods have been developed, in this paper, we introduce a method which completely eliminates the segmentation step and directly estimates the volume and activity of the lesions. We trained two parallel ensemble models using locally extracted 3D patches from phantom images to estimate the activity and volume, which are derivatives of other important quantification metrics such as standardized uptake value (SUV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). For validation, we used 54 clinical images from the QIN Head and Neck collection on The Cancer Imaging Archive, as well as a set of 55 PET scans of the Elliptical Lung-Spine Body Phantom™with different levels of noise, four different reconstruction methods, and three different background activities, namely; air, water, and hot background. In the validation on phantom images, we achieved relative absolute error (RAE) of 5.11 % ±3.5% and 5.7 % ±5.25% for volume and activity estimation, respectively, which represents improvements of over 20% and 6% respectively, compared with the best competing methods. From the validation performed using clinical images, we found that the proposed method is capable of obtaining almost the same level of agreement with a group of trained experts, as a single trained

  6. Postoperative radiotherapy for glioma: improved delineation of the clinical target volume using the geodesic distance calculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DanFang Yan

    Full Text Available OBJECTS: To introduce a new method for generating the clinical target volume (CTV from gross tumor volume (GTV using the geodesic distance calculation for glioma. METHODS: One glioblastoma patient was enrolled. The GTV and natural barriers were contoured on each slice of the computer tomography (CT simulation images. Then, a graphic processing unit based on a parallel Euclidean distance transform was used to generate the CTV considering natural barriers. Three-dimensional (3D visualization technique was applied to show the delineation results. Speed of operation and precision were compared between this new delineation method and the traditional method. RESULTS: In considering spatial barriers, the shortest distance from the point sheltered from these barriers equals the sum of the distance along the shortest path between the two points; this consists of several segments and evades the spatial barriers, rather than being the direct Euclidean distance between two points. The CTV was generated irregularly rather than as a spherical shape. The time required to generate the CTV was greatly reduced. Moreover, this new method improved inter- and intra-observer variability in defining the CTV. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with the traditional CTV delineation, this new method using geodesic distance calculation not only greatly shortens the time to modify the CTV, but also has better reproducibility.

  7. Are there differences in zonal distribution and tumor volume of prostate cancer in patients with a positive family history?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade J. Sexton

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine if there are any differences in the zonal distribution and tumor volumes of familial and sporadic prostate cancers (PC in men undergoing radical prostatectomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 839 patients underwent a radical prostatectomy in the absence of prior neoadjuvant therapy between 1987 and 1996. Telephone interviews were conducted to obtain an updated family history. A positive family history was defined as the diagnosis of PC in at least one first degree relative. Prostatectomy specimens were examined to determine the number of tumor foci, zonal origin of the dominant tumor focus, tumor volume of the largest cancer focus, total tumor volume, Gleason score and stage, and the surgical margin status. Results were stratified according to family history and ethnicity. RESULTS: We successfully contacted 437 patients (52%. Prostatectomy specimens from 55 patients were excluded from review due to a history of prior transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26 or uncertain pathological stage (n = 29. Of the remaining 382 patients, 76 (20% reported having a first-degree relative with PC. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in the pathologic variables between the two groups of patients with or without a family history of PC. CONCLUSIONS: Familial and sporadic PC share similar characteristics. No histopathological differences account for the increased positive predictive value of PC screening tests among patients with a family history of PC.

  8. Functional Response of Tumor Vasculature to PaCO2: Determination of Total and Microvascular Blood Volume by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. Packard

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify differences in functional activity, we compared the reactivity of glioma vasculature and the native cerebral vasculature to both dilate and constrict in response to altered PaCO2. Gliomas were generated by unilateral implantation of U87MGdEGFR human glioma tumor cells into the striatum of adult female athymic rats. Relative changes in total and microvascular cerebral blood volume were determined by steady state contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for transitions from normocarbia to hypercarbia and hypocarbia. Although hypercarbia induced a significant increase in both total and microvascular blood volume in normal brain and glioma, reactivity of glioma vasculature was significantly blunted in comparison to normal striatum; glioma total CBV increased by 0.6±0.1%/mm Hg CO2 whereas normal striatum increased by 1.5±0.2%/mm Hg CO2, (P < .0001, group t-test. Reactivity of microvascular blood volume was also significantly blunted. In contrast, hypocarbia decreased both total and microvascular blood volumes more in glioma than in normal striatum. These results indicate that cerebral blood vessels derived by tumor-directed angiogenesis do retain reactivity to CO2. Furthermore, reduced reactivity of tumor vessels to a single physiological perturbation, such as hypercarbia, should not be construed as a generalized reduction of functional activity of the tumor vascular bed.

  9. CyberKnife with tumor tracking: An effective alternative to wedge resection for high-risk surgical patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eCollins

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Published data suggests that wedge resection for stage I NSCLC results in improved overall survival compared to stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. We report CyberKnife outcomes for high-risk surgical patients with biopsy-proven stage I NSCLC. PET/CT imaging was completed for staging. Three-to-five gold fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors to serve as targeting references. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows; the margins were expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. Treatment plans were designed using hundreds of pencil beams. Doses delivered to the PTV ranged from 42-60 Gy in 3 fractions. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1cm from the GTV to eradicate microscopic disease. Treatments were delivered using the CyberKnife system with tumor tracking. Examination and PET/CT imaging occurred at 3-month follow-up intervals. Forty patients (median age 76 with a median maximum tumor diameter of 2.6 cm (range, 1.4-5.0 cm and a mean post-bronchodilator percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 of 57% (range, 21 - 111% were treated. A mean dose of 50 Gy was delivered to the PTV over 3 to 13 days (median, 7 days. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended a mean 1.9 cm from the GTV. At a median 44 months (range, 12 -72 months follow-up, the 3-year Kaplan-Meier locoregional control and overall survival estimates compare favorably with contemporary wedge resection outcomes at 91% and 75% , respectively. CyberKnife is an effective treatment approach for stage I NSCLC that is similar to wedge resection, eradicating tumors with 1 to 2 cm margins in order to preserve lung function. Prospective randomized trials comparing CyberKnife with wedge resection are necessary to confirm equivalence.

  10. Datamining approaches for modeling tumor control probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqa, Issam El; Deasy, Joseph O; Mu, Yi; Huang, Ellen; Hope, Andrew J; Lindsay, Patricia E; Apte, Aditya; Alaly, James; Bradley, Jeffrey D

    2010-11-01

    Tumor control probability (TCP) to radiotherapy is determined by complex interactions between tumor biology, tumor microenvironment, radiation dosimetry, and patient-related variables. The complexity of these heterogeneous variable interactions constitutes a challenge for building predictive models for routine clinical practice. We describe a datamining framework that can unravel the higher order relationships among dosimetric dose-volume prognostic variables, interrogate various radiobiological processes, and generalize to unseen data before when applied prospectively. Several datamining approaches are discussed that include dose-volume metrics, equivalent uniform dose, mechanistic Poisson model, and model building methods using statistical regression and machine learning techniques. Institutional datasets of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are used to demonstrate these methods. The performance of the different methods was evaluated using bivariate Spearman rank correlations (rs). Over-fitting was controlled via resampling methods. Using a dataset of 56 patients with primary NCSLC tumors and 23 candidate variables, we estimated GTV volume and V75 to be the best model parameters for predicting TCP using statistical resampling and a logistic model. Using these variables, the support vector machine (SVM) kernel method provided superior performance for TCP prediction with an rs=0.68 on leave-one-out testing compared to logistic regression (rs=0.4), Poisson-based TCP (rs=0.33), and cell kill equivalent uniform dose model (rs=0.17). The prediction of treatment response can be improved by utilizing datamining approaches, which are able to unravel important non-linear complex interactions among model variables and have the capacity to predict on unseen data for prospective clinical applications.

  11. Diagnostic performance of whole brain volume perfusion CT in intra-axial brain tumors: Preoperative classification accuracy and histopathologic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xyda, Argyro, E-mail: argyro.xyda@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Department of Radialogy, University Hospital of Heraklion, Voutes, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Haberland, Ulrike, E-mail: ulrike.haberland@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Klotz, Ernst, E-mail: ernst.klotz@siemens.com [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Computed Tomography, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Jung, Klaus, E-mail: kjung1@uni-goettingen.de [Department of Medical Statistics, Georg-August University, Humboldtallee 32, 37073 Goettingen (Germany); Bock, Hans Christoph, E-mail: cbock@gmx.de [Department of Neurosurgery, Johannes Gutenberg University Hospital of Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55101 Mainz (Germany); Schramm, Ramona, E-mail: ramona.schramm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Knauth, Michael, E-mail: michael.knauth@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany); Schramm, Peter, E-mail: p.schramm@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Georg-August University, University Hospital of Goettingen, Robert-Koch Strasse 40, 37075 Goettingen (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Background: To evaluate the preoperative diagnostic power and classification accuracy of perfusion parameters derived from whole brain volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in patients with cerebral tumors. Methods: Sixty-three patients (31 male, 32 female; mean age 55.6 ± 13.9 years), with MRI findings suspected of cerebral lesions, underwent VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were marked circumscript around the tumor according to maximum intensity projection volumes, and then mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability Ktrans perfusion datasets. A second VOI was placed in the contra lateral cortex, as control. Correlations among perfusion values, tumor grade, cerebral hemisphere and VOIs were evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic power of VPCT parameters, by means of positive and negative predictive value, was analyzed. Results: Our cohort included 32 high-grade gliomas WHO III/IV, 18 low-grade I/II, 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, 4 metastases and 3 tumor-like lesions. Ktrans demonstrated the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value, with a cut-off point of 2.21 mL/100 mL/min, for both the comparisons between high-grade versus low-grade and low-grade versus primary cerebral lymphomas. However, for the differentiation between high-grade and primary cerebral lymphomas, CBF and CBV proved to have 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value, identifying preoperatively all the histopathologically proven high-grade gliomas. Conclusion: Volumetric perfusion data enable the hemodynamic assessment of the entire tumor extent and provide a method of preoperative differentiation among intra-axial cerebral tumors with promising diagnostic accuracy.

  12. Diagnostic performance of whole brain volume perfusion CT in intra-axial brain tumors: Preoperative classification accuracy and histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xyda, Argyro; Haberland, Ulrike; Klotz, Ernst; Jung, Klaus; Bock, Hans Christoph; Schramm, Ramona; Knauth, Michael; Schramm, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the preoperative diagnostic power and classification accuracy of perfusion parameters derived from whole brain volume perfusion CT (VPCT) in patients with cerebral tumors. Methods: Sixty-three patients (31 male, 32 female; mean age 55.6 ± 13.9 years), with MRI findings suspected of cerebral lesions, underwent VPCT. Two readers independently evaluated VPCT data. Volumes of interest (VOIs) were marked circumscript around the tumor according to maximum intensity projection volumes, and then mapped automatically onto the cerebral blood volume (CBV), flow (CBF) and permeability Ktrans perfusion datasets. A second VOI was placed in the contra lateral cortex, as control. Correlations among perfusion values, tumor grade, cerebral hemisphere and VOIs were evaluated. Moreover, the diagnostic power of VPCT parameters, by means of positive and negative predictive value, was analyzed. Results: Our cohort included 32 high-grade gliomas WHO III/IV, 18 low-grade I/II, 6 primary cerebral lymphomas, 4 metastases and 3 tumor-like lesions. Ktrans demonstrated the highest sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value, with a cut-off point of 2.21 mL/100 mL/min, for both the comparisons between high-grade versus low-grade and low-grade versus primary cerebral lymphomas. However, for the differentiation between high-grade and primary cerebral lymphomas, CBF and CBV proved to have 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value, identifying preoperatively all the histopathologically proven high-grade gliomas. Conclusion: Volumetric perfusion data enable the hemodynamic assessment of the entire tumor extent and provide a method of preoperative differentiation among intra-axial cerebral tumors with promising diagnostic accuracy.

  13. Pretreatment tumor SUV{sub max} predicts disease-specific and overall survival in patients with head and neck soft tissue sarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Seung Cheol; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Choi, Seung-Ho; Nam, Soon Yuhl; Kim, Sang Yoon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungsu S.; Moon, Hyojeong; Kim, Jae Seung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Nuclear Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Ja [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Head and neck soft tissue sarcoma (HNSTS) is a rare type of tumor with various histological presentations and clinical behaviors. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT is being increasingly used for staging, grading, and predicting treatment outcomes in various types of human cancers, although this modality has been rarely studied in the survival prediction of HNSTS. Here we examined the prognostic value of tumor metabolic parameters measured using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in patients with HNSTS. This study included 36 consecutive patients with HNSTS who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scanning prior to treatment at our institution. Tumor gross total volume (GTV) was measured from pretreatment contrast-enhanced CT scans, and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}), metabolic tumor volume (MTV), and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were measured using pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to identify associations between imaging parameters and disease-specific survival (DSS) or overall survival (OS). Univariate analyses showed that SUV{sub max}, MTV, and TLG, but not GTV, were significantly associated with DSS and OS (all P < 0.05). After controlling for clinicopathological factors, SUV{sub max}, MTV, and TLG were significantly associated with DSS and OS (all P < 0.05). Patients with a tumor SUV{sub max} value of >7.0 experienced an approximately fivefold increase in mortality in terms of DSS and OS relative to those with a tumor SUV{sub max} <7.0. Quantitative metabolic measurements on pretreatment {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT can yield values that are significantly predictive of survival after treatment for HNSTS. (orig.)

  14. Estimation of Tumor Volumes by 11C-MeAIB and 18F-FDG PET in an Orthotopic Glioblastoma Rat Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, Bo; Thisgaard, Helge; Hvidsten, Svend

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Brain tumor volume assessment is a major challenge. Molecular imaging using PET may be a promising option because it reflects the biologically active cells. We compared the agreement between PET- and histology-derived tumor volumes in an orthotopic glioblastoma rat model with a noninf...

  15. Viable tumor volume: Volume of interest within segmented metastatic lesions, a pilot study of proposed computed tomography response criteria for urothelial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folio, Les Roger, E-mail: Les.folio@nih.gov [Lead Radiologist for CT, NIH Radiology and Imaging Sciences, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Turkbey, Evrim B., E-mail: evrimbengi@yahoo.com [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Steinberg, Seth M., E-mail: steinbes@mail.nih.gov [Head, Biostatistics and Data Management Section, Office of the Clinical Director, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, 9609 Medical Center Drive, Room 2W334, MSC 9716, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Apolo, Andrea B. [Genitourinary Malignancies Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • It is clear that 2D axial measurements are incomplete assessments in metastatic disease; especially in light of evolving antiangiogenic therapies that can result in tumor necrosis. • Our pilot study demonstrates that taking volumetric density into account can better predict overall survival when compared to RECIST, volumetric size, MASS and Choi. • Although volumetric segmentation and further density analysis may not yet be feasible within routine workflows, the authors believe that technology advances may soon make this possible. - Abstract: Objectives: To evaluate the ability of new computed tomography (CT) response criteria for solid tumors such as urothelial cancer (VTV; viable tumor volume) to predict overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic bladder cancer treated with cabozantinib. Materials and methods: We compared the relative capabilities of VTV, RECIST, MASS (morphology, attenuation, size, and structure), and Choi criteria, as well as volume measurements, to predict OS using serial follow-up contrast-enhanced CT exams in patients with metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Kaplan–Meier curves and 2-tailed log-rank tests compared OS based on early RECIST 1.1 response against each of the other criteria. A Cox proportional hazards model assessed response at follow-up exams as a time-varying covariate for OS. Results: We assessed 141 lesions in 55CT scans from 17 patients with urothelial metastasis, comparing VTV, RECIST, MASS, and Choi criteria, and volumetric measurements, for response assessment. Median follow-up was 4.5 months, range was 2–14 months. Only the VTV criteria demonstrated a statistical association with OS (p = 0.019; median OS 9.7 vs. 3.5 months). Conclusion: This pilot study suggests that VTV is a promising tool for assessing tumor response and predicting OS, using criteria that incorporate tumor volume and density in patients receiving antiangiogenic therapy for urothelial cancer. Larger studies are warranted to

  16. Chemically Modified Plastic Tube for High Volume Removal and Collection of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Gaitas

    Full Text Available In this preliminary effort, we use a commercially available and chemically modified tube to selectively capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the blood stream by immobilizing human anti-EpCAM antibodies on the tube's interior surface. We describe the requisite and critical steps required to modify a tube into a cancer cell-capturing device. Using these simple modifications, we were able to capture or entrap about 85% of cancer cells from suspension and 44% of cancer cells from spiked whole blood. We also found that the percentage of cells captured was dependent on the tube's length and also the number of cancer cells present. It is our strong belief that with the utilization of appropriate tube lengths and procedures, we can ensure capture and removal of nearly the entire CTC population in whole blood. Importantly after a patient's entire blood volume has circulated through the tube, the tube can then be trypsinized to release the captured live CTCs for further analysis and testing.

  17. Tumor Volume Predicts Survival Rate of Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated with Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Wu, Fang; Lu, Heming; Wei, Bo; Li, Guisheng; Wang, Rensheng

    2016-10-01

    To delineate the prognostic value of primary gross tumor volume (GTVp) for patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Analysis of prognostic variables in a prospective cohort. Department of Radiotherapy, First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University, China. Between January 2006 and August 2008, 249 patients with stage III-IVb NPC, all treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy, were included in this multicenter prospective study. GTVp was measured with treatment-planning computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging scans. GTVp was significantly associated with locoregional control, distant metastasis, and overall survival for patients with advanced NPC. Furthermore, T classification was not an independent prognostic factor. In receiver operator receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 33 mL was determined as the cutoff points of GTVp for OS and locoregional control. Patients with a GTVp ≥33 mL had poorer OS, worse locoregional control, and more distant metastasis than patients with a GTVp <33 mL (P = .006, .009, .002, and .007, respectively). GTVp had significant prognostic value for patients with advanced NPC. The incorporation of GTVp could improve the current TNM classification system. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  18. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Binderup, Tina; Kjær, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. Meth...

  19. Target volume and position variations during intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan W

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Wenyong Tan,* Yanping Li,* Guang Han, Jiaozhen Xu, Xiaohong Wang, Ying Li, Desheng HuDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workPurpose: Considerable anatomical changes occur during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. This study aimed to quantify volumetric and positional variations of the target volume during IMRT.Materials and methods: Twenty patients with locally advanced NPC who received concurrent (13 patients or sequential (seven patients chemoradiotherapy were prospectively recruited and underwent planning computed tomography (CT and six repeat CTs (every five fractions. Each repeat CT was rigidly registered to the planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV and elective clinical target volume (CTV were manually delineated on each axial CT image. CTVs of the primary tumor and lymph nodes were expanded with 5 mm margins to corresponding GTVs, with necessary modifications. Volume loss, system and random errors, and the mean and three-dimensional vector displacements were calculated and compared statistically.Results: Volumes of the primary tumor and small (>1 cm, ≤3 cm and large (>3 cm positive neck lymph nodes decreased at a rate of 2.6%, 3.7%, and 3.9% per treatment day, respectively. CTVs of the primary tumor, lymph nodes, and elective region decreased 1.5%, 2.3%, and 0.3% per treatment day, respectively. Average displacements of the GTVs and CTVs were <1.3 mm in all directions. GTVs and CTVs of the large and small lymph nodes shifted medially by 0.8–1.3 and 0.6–1.2 mm, respectively, on average. Average three-dimensional displacements of the GTVs and CTVs were 3.4–4.3 mm and 2.5–3.7 mm, respectively. Volume loss and displacements in most directions were significantly larger in patients receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy than in those receiving sequential therapy. Volume loss and displacements of the

  20. Deregulation of apoptotic volume decrease and ionic movements in multidrug-resistant tumor cells: role of chloride channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Kristian Arild; Andersen, E C; Hansen, C F

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cell volume and ion gradients across the plasma membrane play a pivotal role in the initiation of apoptosis. Here we explore the kinetics of apoptotic volume decrease (AVD) and ion content dynamics in wild-type (WT) and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC). In WT...... EATC, induction of apoptosis with cisplatin (5 muM) leads to three distinctive AVD stages: an early AVD(1) (4-12 h), associated with a 30% cell water loss; a transition stage AVD(T) ( approximately 12 to 32 h), where cell volume is partly recovered; and a secondary AVD(2) (past 32 h), where cell volume...... was further reduced. AVD(1) and AVD(2) were coupled to net loss of Cl(-), K(+), Na(+), and amino acids (ninhydrin-positive substances), whereas during AVD(T), Na(+) and Cl(-) were accumulated. MDR EATC was resistant to cisplatin, showing increased viability and less caspase 3 activation. Compared with WT EATC...

  1. Non-invasive pre-clinical MR imaging of prostate tumor hypoxia for radiation therapy prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek White

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the usefulness of Oxygen-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (OE-MRI changes in signal intensity related to oxygen challenge for predicting tumor response to radiation therapy.Methods: Dynamic MR signal changes were acquired using Varian 4.7T small animal MR scanner prior to image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT of small (n = 6 and large subcutaneous (n = 5 prostate tumors in adult male rats. An interleaved blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD and tissue-oxygen level dependent (TOLD data acquisition or (IBT was performed using a baseline of medical air as positive control and using medical oxygen as a breathing challenge. BOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo with multi-echo sequence. TOLD used a 2-D multi-slice spoiled gradient-echo sequence. Voxel changes in signal intensity were determined by a correlation coefficient mapping technique. Irradiation technique planned consisted of 1F × 15 Gy AP/PA or 2F × 7.5 Gy AP/PA to the gross tumor volume (GTV. Tumor growth measurements were recorded over time to assess the response to IGRT.Results: BOLD and TOLD signals variously illustrated positive or negative impulse responses in the tumor ROI due to inhaling medical oxygen. Correlation coefficient mapping demonstrated heterogeneity in tumors after inhaling medical oxygen. BOLD and TOLD signals exhibited increased changes in signal intensities after the first fraction of dose. Multi-fractionation had minimum effect until the second fraction of dose was applied. Tumor growth delays were observed when inhaling medical oxygen during IGRT.Conclusion: OE-MRI is a non-invasive imaging modality that can provide insight to the oxygen status of tumors. Observed increase percent changes in BOLD and TOLD signal intensities after the first fraction of dose suggest tumors experienced reoxygenation. OE-MRI could be used for predicting tumor response to IGRT when using medical oxygen for increasing GTV radiosensitivity, suggesting

  2. Dose escalation to high-risk sub-volumes based on non-invasive imaging of hypoxia and glycolytic activity in canine solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Malene M.; Hansen, Anders Elias; af Rosenschold, Per Munck

    2013-01-01

    defined by a threshold based method. FDG sub-volumes were delineated at 40% (FDG40) and 50% (FDG50) of SUVmax. The size of sub-volumes, intersection and biological target volume (BTV) were measured in a treatment planning software. By varying the average dose prescription to the tumor from 66 to 85 Gy...

  3. Assessment of CAD-generated tumor volumes measured using MRI in breast cancers before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuna, E-mail: kazunat@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kanao, Shotaro, E-mail: kanaos@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Okada, Tomohisa, E-mail: tomokada@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kataoka, Masako, E-mail: makok@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ueno, Takayuki, E-mail: takayuki@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Breast Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Toi, Masakazu, E-mail: toi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Breast Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ishiguro, Hiroshi, E-mail: hishimd@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Outpatient Oncology Unit, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Mikami, Yoshiki, E-mail: mika@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Pathology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Togashi, Kaori, E-mail: ktogashi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, 54 Shogoin Kawaharacho, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2012-10-15

    Objective: To evaluate inter-observer agreement and the predictive value of tumor size measurements using MRI for breast cancer under neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) by comparing the measurements of the longest diameters (LD), total enhanced volumes (TEV) and washout volumes (WOV). Methods: Thirty-seven female breast cancer patients were prospectively enrolled from August 2008 to October 2010. Two of these patients had locally advanced disease. MRI examinations were acquired within 2 weeks before and after NAC. Interim scans were also conducted in 30 patients. Tumor resection was undertaken within 2 weeks after the cessation of NAC. MRI images were independently measured for LD, TEV and WOV by two experienced radiologists. Inter-observer agreement was evaluated using concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs). Tumor sizes after NAC were evaluated relative to their initial sizes for early prediction of a pathological complete response (pCR). Results: The CCCs were 0.93 (CI: 0.90–0.95) for LD, 0.98 (CI: 0.97–0.98) for TEV and 0.99 (CI: 0.991–0.996) for WOV. All measurements had high inter-observer agreement, but the CCCs were significantly increased in the aforementioned order (P < 0.0001). WOV measured after the completion of chemotherapy had significant discriminating ability (P = 0.0056) when evaluated using receiver operating characteristic analysis, and was found to be superior to LD (P = 0.045). The average WOV size was significantly smaller in pCR cases than in non-pCR cases (P = 0.016). Conclusion: Computer-aided detection-generated tumor volumes had significantly higher inter-observer concordance than conventional LD measurements. WOV measurements had the highest concordance, and WOV could better predict pCR after NAC at smaller tumor sizes.

  4. SU-F-T-538: CyberKnife with MLC for Treatment of Large Volume Tumors: A Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichay, T; Mayville, A [Mercy Health, Saint Mary’s, Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: CyberKnife is a well-documented modality for SRS and SBRT treatments. Typical tumors are small and 1–5 fractions are usually used. We determined the feasibility of using CyberKnife, with an InCise multileaf collimator option, for larger tumors undergoing standard dose and fractionation. The intent was to understand the limitation of using this modality for other external beam radiation treatments. Methods: Five tumors from different anatomical sites with volumes from 127.8 cc to 1,320.5 cc were contoured and planned on a Multiplan V5.1 workstation. The target average diameter ranged from 7 cm to 13 cm. The dose fractionation was 1.8–2.0 Gy/fraction and 25–45 fractions for total doses of 45–81 Gy. The sites planned were: pancreas, head and neck, prostate, anal, and esophagus. The plans were optimized to meet conventional dose constraints based on various RTOG protocols for conventional fractionation. Results: The Multiplan treatment planning system successfully generated clinically acceptable plans for all sites studied. The resulting dose distributions achieved reasonable target coverage, all greater than 95%, and satisfactory normal tissue sparing. Treatment times ranged from 9 minutes to 38 minutes, the longest being a head and neck plan with dual targets receiving different doses and with multiple adjacent critical structures. Conclusion: CyberKnife, with the InCise multileaf collimation option, can achieve acceptable dose distributions in large volume tumors treated with conventional dose and fractionation. Although treatment times are greater than conventional accelerator time; target coverage and dose to critical structures can be kept within a clinically acceptable range. While time limitations exist, when necessary CyberKnife can provide an alternative to traditional treatment modalities for large volume tumors.

  5. Early Significant Tumor Volume Reduction After Radiosurgery in Brain Metastases From Renal Cell Carcinoma Results in Long-Term Survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wook Ha; Kim, Dong Gyu; Han, Jung Ho; Paek, Sun Ha; Chung, Hyun-Tai; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Jin Wook; Jung, Hee-Won

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate survival of patients with brain metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) after radiosurgery. Patients and Methods: Between 1998 and 2010, 46 patients were treated with radiosurgery, and the total number of lesions was 99. The mean age was 58.9 years (range, 33–78 years). Twenty-six patients (56.5%) had a single brain metastasis. The mean tumor volume was 3.0 cm 3 (range, 0.01–35.1 cm 3 ), and the mean marginal dose prescribed was 20.8 Gy (range, 12–25 Gy) at the 50% isodose line. A patient was classified into the good-response group when the sum of the volume of the brain metastases decreased to less than 75% of the original volume at a 1-month follow-up evaluation using MRI. Results: As of December 28, 2010, 39 patients (84.8%) had died, and 7 (15.2%) survived. The overall median survival time was 10.0 ± 0.4 months (95% confidence interval, 9.1–10.8). After treatment, local tumor control was achieved in 72 (84.7%) of the 85 tumors assessed using MRI after radiosurgery. The good-response group survived significantly longer than the poor-response group (median survival times of 18.0 and 9.0 months, respectively; p = 0.025). In a multivariate analysis, classification in the good-response group was the only independent prognostic factor for longer survival (p = 0.037; hazard ratio = 0.447; 95% confidence interval, 0.209–0.953). Conclusions: Radiosurgery seems to be an effective treatment modality for patients with brain metastases from RCC. The early significant tumor volume reduction observed after radiosurgery seems to result in long-term survival in RCC patients with brain metastases.

  6. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjaer; Binderup, Tina; Kjaer, Andreas

    2008-10-16

    In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume (n = 20) was determined in vivo by external caliper, microCT and 18F-FDG-PET and subsequently reference volume was determined ex vivo. Intra-observer reproducibility of the microCT and caliper methods were determined by acquiring 10 repeated volume measurements. Volumes of a group of tumors (n = 10) were determined independently by two observers to assess inter-observer variation. Tumor volume measured by microCT, PET and caliper all correlated with reference volume. No significant bias of microCT measurements compared with the reference was found, whereas both PET and caliper had systematic bias compared to reference volume. Coefficients of variation for intra-observer variation were 7% and 14% for microCT and caliper measurements, respectively. Regression coefficients between observers were 0.97 for microCT and 0.91 for caliper measurements. MicroCT was more accurate than both caliper and 18F-FDG-PET for in vivo volumetric measurements of subcutaneous tumors in mice.18F-FDG-PET was considered unsuitable for determination of tumor size. External caliper were inaccurate and encumbered with a significant and size dependent bias. MicroCT was also the most reproducible of the methods.

  7. IGF-II transgenic mice display increased aberrant colon crypt multiplicity and tumor volume after 1,2-dimethylhydrazine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oesterle Doris

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In colorectal cancer insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II is frequently overexpressed. To evaluate, whether IGF-II affects different stages of tumorigenesis, we induced neoplastic alterations in the colon of wild-type and IGF-II transgenic mice using 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH. Aberrant crypt foci (ACF served as markers of early lesions in the colonic mucosa, whereas adenomas and carcinomas characterized the endpoints of tumor development. DMH-treatment led initially to significantly more ACF in IGF-II transgenic than in wild-type mice. This increase in ACF was especially prominent for those consisting of ≥three aberrant crypts (AC. Nevertheless, adenomas and adenocarcinomas of the colon, present after 34 weeks in both genetic groups, were not found at different frequency. Tumor volumes, however, were significantly higher in IGF-II transgenic mice and correlated with serum IGF-II levels. Immunohistochemical staining for markers of proliferation and apoptosis revealed increased cell proliferation rates in tumors of IGF-II transgenic mice without significant affection of apoptosis. Increased proliferation was accompanied by elevated localization of β-catenin in the cytosol and cell nuclei and reduced appearance at the inner plasma membrane. In conclusion, we provide evidence that IGF-II, via activation of the β-catenin signaling cascade, promotes growth of ACF and tumors without affecting tumor numbers.

  8. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. Methods: A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. Results: In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1±4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. Conclusions: A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  9. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta [Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Rozzano, 20089 Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, Reggio, 42100 Emilia (Italy); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, 20089 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Department of Medical Physics, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20133 Milan (Italy); Medical Physics Unit, Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, 6504 Bellinzona (Switzerland); Department of Radiotherapy, IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, 20089 Rozzano, Milano (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. Methods: A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. Results: In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1{+-}4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. Conclusions: A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  10. Semiautomatic technique for defining the internal gross tumor volume of lung tumors close to liver/spleen cupola by 4D-CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancosu, Pietro; Sghedoni, Roberto; Bettinardi, Valentino; Aquilina, Mark Anthony; Navarria, Piera; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzi, Luca; Scorsetti, Marta

    2010-09-01

    It has been shown that in cases of lung tumors close to the liver cupola, the four dimensional (4D)-CT postprocessing maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm does not fully recover the radiotherapy internal gross tumor volume (IGTV). In this work, a semiautomatic technique was evaluated by which the residual IGTV that was not included into the IGTV by MIP algorithm was actually added. A moving phantom and five selected patients were considered. The various IGTVs produced by the semiautomatic approach were compared to those generated by 4D-CT manual contouring. In all cases, the radiation oncologist qualitatively concurred with the semiautomatic IGTV. A quantitative difference in volume of 2.6% was found in the phantom study, whereas a mean difference of 0.1 +/- 4.6% was obtained in the patient studies. A semiautomatic technique to include the residual part of IGTV covered by liver/spleen cupola when using MIP algorithm was validated on phantom and on selected patients, revealing the possibility of defining the IGTV for patients with lesions located near liver/spleen cupola by performing only the contours on the MIP series.

  11. Automated and Semiautomated Segmentation of Rectal Tumor Volumes on Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Can It Replace Manual Volumetry?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heeswijk, Miriam M. van [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J., E-mail: d.lambregts@nki.nl [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Griethuysen, Joost J.M. van [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Stanley [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Rao, Sheng-Xiang [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Graaff, Carla A.M. de [Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Vliegen, Roy F.A. [Atrium Medical Centre Parkstad/Zuyderland Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Surgery, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Papanikolaou, Nikos [Laboratory of Computational Medicine, Institute of Computer Science, FORTH, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Radiology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tumor volumetry is promising for rectal cancer response assessment, but an important drawback is that manual per-slice tumor delineation can be highly time consuming. This study investigated whether manual DWI-volumetry can be reproduced using a (semi)automated segmentation approach. Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included DWI (highest b value [b1000 or b1100]) before and after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Tumor volumes were assessed on b1000 (or b1100) DWI before and after CRT by means of (1) automated segmentation (by 2 inexperienced readers), (2) semiautomated segmentation (manual adjustment of the volumes obtained by method 1 by 2 radiologists), and (3) manual segmentation (by 2 radiologists); this last assessment served as the reference standard. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice similarity indices (DSI) were calculated to evaluate agreement between different methods and observers. Measurement times (from a radiologist's perspective) were recorded for each method. Results: Tumor volumes were not significantly different among the 3 methods, either before or after CRT (P=.08 to .92). ICCs compared to manual segmentation were 0.80 to 0.91 and 0.53 to 0.66 before and after CRT, respectively, for the automated segmentation and 0.91 to 0.97 and 0.61 to 0.75, respectively, for the semiautomated method. Interobserver agreement (ICC) pre and post CRT was 0.82 and 0.59 for automated segmentation, 0.91 and 0.73 for semiautomated segmentation, and 0.91 and 0.75 for manual segmentation, respectively. Mean DSI between the automated and semiautomated method were 0.83 and 0.58 pre-CRT and post-CRT, respectively; DSI between the automated and manual segmentation were 0.68 and 0.42 and 0.70 and 0.41 between the semiautomated and manual segmentation, respectively. Median measurement time for the radiologists was 0 seconds (pre- and post-CRT) for the

  12. Automated and Semiautomated Segmentation of Rectal Tumor Volumes on Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Can It Replace Manual Volumetry?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeswijk, Miriam M. van; Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Griethuysen, Joost J.M. van; Oei, Stanley; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Graaff, Carla A.M. de; Vliegen, Roy F.A.; Beets, Geerard L.; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tumor volumetry is promising for rectal cancer response assessment, but an important drawback is that manual per-slice tumor delineation can be highly time consuming. This study investigated whether manual DWI-volumetry can be reproduced using a (semi)automated segmentation approach. Methods and Materials: Seventy-nine patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) that included DWI (highest b value [b1000 or b1100]) before and after chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Tumor volumes were assessed on b1000 (or b1100) DWI before and after CRT by means of (1) automated segmentation (by 2 inexperienced readers), (2) semiautomated segmentation (manual adjustment of the volumes obtained by method 1 by 2 radiologists), and (3) manual segmentation (by 2 radiologists); this last assessment served as the reference standard. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and Dice similarity indices (DSI) were calculated to evaluate agreement between different methods and observers. Measurement times (from a radiologist's perspective) were recorded for each method. Results: Tumor volumes were not significantly different among the 3 methods, either before or after CRT (P=.08 to .92). ICCs compared to manual segmentation were 0.80 to 0.91 and 0.53 to 0.66 before and after CRT, respectively, for the automated segmentation and 0.91 to 0.97 and 0.61 to 0.75, respectively, for the semiautomated method. Interobserver agreement (ICC) pre and post CRT was 0.82 and 0.59 for automated segmentation, 0.91 and 0.73 for semiautomated segmentation, and 0.91 and 0.75 for manual segmentation, respectively. Mean DSI between the automated and semiautomated method were 0.83 and 0.58 pre-CRT and post-CRT, respectively; DSI between the automated and manual segmentation were 0.68 and 0.42 and 0.70 and 0.41 between the semiautomated and manual segmentation, respectively. Median measurement time for the radiologists was 0 seconds (pre- and post-CRT) for the

  13. The relation between flocculus volume and tinnitus after cerebellopontine angle tumor surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennink, Lilian M; Van Dijk, J Marc C; Van Der Laan, Bernard F A M; Metzemaekers, Jan D M; Van Laar, Peter Jan; Van Dijk, Pim

    PURPOSE: Chronic tinnitus is a common symptom after cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumor removal. Sometimes, the tinnitus is gaze-modulated. In that case, patients can change the loudness or pitch of their tinnitus by ocular movements. During tumor removal by a retrosigmoid craniotomy, the cerebellar

  14. Significance of primary tumor volume and T-stage on prognosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanben; Fei, Zhaodong; Pan, Jianji; Bai, Penggang; Chen, Lisha

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the primary tumor volume on prognosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Between August 2003 and April 2005, 112 patients with Stage I-IVB nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy were included. Measurement of the primary tumor volume was based on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans before treatment. A receiver operating characteristics curve was used to determine the best cut-off point of the primary tumor volume. The mean primary tumor volume for 112 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma was 33.9 ± 28.7 ml. Within the framework of UICC T-staging, all patients were divided into four groups according to the primary tumor volume. We call it the volume stage (V1 50.55 ml). The 5-year overall survival rates for V1, V2, V3 and V4 were 88.5, 83.3, 82.4 and 54.5% (P = 0.014), respectively. The cumulative survival curves for V1, V2 and V3 were very close, but clearly separated from V4. In addition, Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis showed that a primary tumor volume >50 ml was an independent risk factor for radiotherapy (risk ratio = 3.485, P = 0.025). This study demonstrated that the primary tumor volume had significantly impacted on the prognosis of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. We proposed that the primary tumor volume should be considered as an additional stage indicator in the new revision of the clinical stage of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  15. The use of phase sequence image sets to reconstruct the total volume occupied by a mobile lung tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, Isabelle M.; Robinson, Don M.; Halperin, Ross; Roa, Wilson

    2005-01-01

    The use of phase sequence image (PSI) sets to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target is presented. Isocontrast composite clinical target volumes (CCTVs) may be constructed from PSI sets in order to reveal the total volume occupied by a mobile target during the course of its travel. The ability of the CCTV technique to properly account for target motion is demonstrated by comparison to contours of the true total volume occupied (TVO) for a number of experimental phantom geometries. Finally, using real patient data, the clinical utility of the CCTV technique to properly account for internal tumor motion while minimizing the volume of healthy lung tissue irradiated is assessed by comparison to the standard approach of applying safety margins. Results of the phantom study reveal that CCTV cross sections constructed at the 20% isocontrast level yield good agreement with the total cross sections (TXO) of mobile targets. These CCTVs conform well to the TVOs of the moving targets examined whereby the addition of small uniform margins ensures complete circumscription of the TVO with the inclusion of minimal amounts of surrounding external volumes. The CCTV technique is seen to be clearly superior to the common practice of the addition of safety margins to individual CTV contours in order to account for internal target motion. Margins required with the CCTV technique are eight to ten times smaller than those required with individual CTVs

  16. Target volume definition for 18F-FDG PET-positive lymph nodes in radiotherapy of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer-Schuler, Andrea; Kremp, Stephanie; Groeschel, Andreas; Hellwig, Dirk; Rübe, Christian; Kirsch, Carl-Martin

    2007-04-01

    FDG PET is increasingly used in radiotherapy planning. Recently, we demonstrated substantial differences in target volumes when applying different methods of FDG-based contouring in primary lung tumours (Nestle et al., J Nucl Med 2005;46:1342-8). This paper focusses on FDG-positive mediastinal lymph nodes (LN(PET)). In our institution, 51 NSCLC patients who were candidates for radiotherapy prospectively underwent staging FDG PET followed by a thoracic PET scan in the treatment position and a planning CT. Eleven of them had 32 distinguishable non-confluent mediastinal or hilar nodal FDG accumulations (LN(PET)). For these, sets of gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were generated at both acquisition times by four different PET-based contouring methods (visual: GTV(vis); 40% SUVmax: GTV40; SUV=2.5: GTV2.5; target/background (T/B) algorithm: GTV(bg)). All differences concerning GTV sizes were within the range of the resolution of the PET system. The detectability and technical delineability of the GTVs were significantly better in the late scans (e.g. p = 0.02 for diagnostic application of SUVmax = 2.5; p = 0.0001 for technical delineability by GTV2.5; p = 0.003 by GTV40), favouring the GTV(bg) method owing to satisfactory overall applicability and independence of GTVs from acquisition time. Compared with CT, the majority of PET-based GTVs were larger, probably owing to resolution effects, with a possible influence of lesion movements. For nodal GTVs, different methods of contouring did not lead to clinically relevant differences in volumes. However, there were significant differences in technical delineability, especially after early acquisition. Overall, our data favour a late acquisition of FDG PET scans for radiotherapy planning, and the use of a T/B algorithm for GTV contouring.

  17. Target volume definition for 18F-FDG PET-positive lymph nodes in radiotherapy of patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nestle, Ursula; Schaefer-Schuler, Andrea; Hellwig, Dirk; Kirsch, Carl-Martin; Kremp, Stephanie; Ruebe, Christian; Groeschel, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    FDG PET is increasingly used in radiotherapy planning. Recently, we demonstrated substantial differences in target volumes when applying different methods of FDG-based contouring in primary lung tumours (Nestle et al., J Nucl Med 2005;46:1342-8). This paper focusses on FDG-positive mediastinal lymph nodes (LN PET ). In our institution, 51 NSCLC patients who were candidates for radiotherapy prospectively underwent staging FDG PET followed by a thoracic PET scan in the treatment position and a planning CT. Eleven of them had 32 distinguishable non-confluent mediastinal or hilar nodal FDG accumulations (LN PET ). For these, sets of gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were generated at both acquisition times by four different PET-based contouring methods (visual: GTV vis ; 40% SUV max : GTV 40 ; SUV=2.5: GTV 2.5 ; target/background (T/B) algorithm: GTV bg ). All differences concerning GTV sizes were within the range of the resolution of the PET system. The detectability and technical delineability of the GTVs were significantly better in the late scans (e.g. p 0.02 for diagnostic application of SUV max = 2.5; p = 0.0001 for technical delineability by GTV 2.5 ; p = 0.003 by GTV 40 ), favouring the GTV bg method owing to satisfactory overall applicability and independence of GTVs from acquisition time. Compared with CT, the majority of PET-based GTVs were larger, probably owing to resolution effects, with a possible influence of lesion movements. For nodal GTVs, different methods of contouring did not lead to clinically relevant differences in volumes. However, there were significant differences in technical delineability, especially after early acquisition. Overall, our data favour a late acquisition of FDG PET scans for radiotherapy planning, and the use of a T/B algorithm for GTV contouring. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of six methods of segmentation of tumor volume on the 18F-F.D.G. PET scan with reference histological volume in non small cell bronchopulmonary cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venel, Y.; Garhi, H.; Baulieu, J.L.; Prunier-Aesch, C.; Muret, A. de; Barillot, I.

    2008-01-01

    The 18 F-F.D.G. PET has demonstrated its importance in oncology, for initial extension and efficacy of anti tumoral therapeutics. Several studies have attempted to prove its utility to define tumoral volumes for conformational radiotherapy in non small cell lung cancers. Some authors have suggested the use of threshold of tumor intensity uptake with 40 or 50% of maximal intensity. Black et al. have determined contouring with linear regression formula of mean semi-quantitative index of tumor uptake (standard uptake value): SUV threshold = 0.307 Sub average + 0.588. Nestle et al. have taken into account the background noise intensity and mean intensity of the tumor: I threshold = β I average +I noise with β 0.15. Our study was done in collaboration with Inserm U618 team and has compared volumes defined on PET scan defined according to different methods based on intensity or S.U.V. to the tumour volume determined on CT scan by radio physicist. We have compared those volumes with histological volume that we considered for reference. Four patients have been included. They had 18 F-F.D.G. PET scan followed by complete tumoral removal surgery. Specific histological procedure allowed to define complete size of the tumor in re expanded lung. Comparatively to pathology, the volumes obtained using I max 40 and I max 50 are all underestimated. The volumes defined by Black's et al. method are under evaluated for the two largest tumours (15.8% to 22%) and overestimated for the two smallest ones (17.9 to 82.9%). Nestle's et al. method, using β = 0.15, correctly estimates two tumor volumes over 2 cm, but overestimates the two small tumors (79.6 to 124%). Finally, the corrected Nestle's et al. formula (using β = 0.264) overestimates three tumours. Volumes defined on CT scan by radio physicist are correct for one lesion, underestimated for one and overestimated for two other ones (44 and 179.5%). Nestle's et al. method seems to be the most accurate for tumours over 2 cm of

  19. Utilization and incorporation of tumor volume data in staging and prognostication of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Ahlawat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell cancers (HNSCC are a group of heterogeneous tumors, evident by their diverse behavior and natural history. The largest diameter of tumor measured for T classification may not necessarily reflect the true tumor dimension. There is a need to take into account certain other feature(s of these tumors other than the maximum single dimension which can reflect the true tumor burden more accurately. Tumor volume has been shown to be a useful and accurate tool burden because it is a measurement of tumor burden in all three dimensions. This review article has compiled and reviewed the literature published in past on impact of tumor volumes (TVs on the prognosis of head and neck cancers. A comprehensive literature search was performed in PubMed for terms "clonogens," "TV" or "primary TV (PTV" or "nodal volume" or "total TV (TTV" or "volumetric analysis of TV in head and neck" or "predicting response in head and neck cancer" "prognostic factors head and neck cancers" and "outcome in head and neck cancer." We identified 33 studies which have commented on the impact of TV in HNSCC on treatment outcome, 9 of these had analyzed PTV, 11 studies had analyzed total nodal volume, and 14 studies have analyzed TTV. Besides these, we have dealt with laryngeal cancers separately with 9 studies. This review article is also aimed to enhance our knowledge further regarding how best a physician can incorporate TV data in staging and predicting response to radiotherapy.

  20. Carbogen Breathing Differentially Enhances Blood Plasma Volume and 5-Fluorouracil Uptake in Two Murine Colon Tumor Models with a Distinct Vascular Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanneke W.M. van Laarhoven

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available For the systemic treatment of colorectal cancer, 5-fluorouracil (FU-based chemotherapy is the standard. However, only a subset of patients responds to chemotherapy. Breathing of carbogen (95% O2 and 5% CO2 may increase the uptake of FU through changes in tumor physiology. This study aims to monitor in animal models in vivo the effects of carbogen breathing on tumor blood plasma volume, pH, and energy status, and on FU uptake and metabolism in two colon tumor models C38 and C26a, which differ in their vascular structure and hypoxic status. Phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS was used to assess tumor pH and energy status, and fluorine-19 MRS was used to follow FU uptake and metabolism. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging methods using ultrasmall particles of iron oxide were performed to assess blood plasma volume. The results showed that carbogen breathing significantly decreased extracellular pH and increased tumor blood plasma volume and FU uptake in tumors. These effects were most significant in the C38 tumor line, which has the largest relative vascular area. In the C26a tumor line, carbogen breathing increased tumor growth delay by FU. In this study, carbogen breathing also enhanced systemic toxicity by FU.

  1. Effect of tumor volume on the enhancement pattern of parathyroid adenoma on parathyroid four-dimensional CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Kyoung [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Dongguk University Ilsan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Ji-hoon; Kang, Koung Mi; Choi, Seung Hong; Sohn, Chul-Ho [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Eun; Kim, Su-jin [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Jae-Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of tumor volume on the enhancement pattern of parathyroid adenoma (PTA) on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). We analyzed the enhancement patterns of PTA on four-phase 4D-CT in 44 patients. Dependency of the changes of Hounsfield unit values (ΔHU) on the tumor volumes and clinical characteristics was evaluated using linear regression analyses. In addition, an unpaired t test was used to compare ΔHU of PTAs between PTA volume ≥1 cm{sup 3} and <1 cm{sup 3}, thyroid gland, and lymph node. PTA volume based on CT was the strongest factor on the ΔHU{sub Pre} {sub to} {sub Arterial} and ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Venous} and ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Delayed} (R {sup 2} = 0.34, 0.25, and 0.32, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). PTA ≥1 cm {sup 3} had statistically significant greater enhancement between the unenhanced phase and the arterial phase than PTA <1 cm {sup 3} (mean values ± standard deviations (SDs) of ΔHU{sub Pre} {sub to} {sub Arterial}, 102.7 ± 33.7 and 57.5 ± 28.8, respectively, P < 0.001). PTA ≥1 cm {sup 3} showed an early washout pattern on the venous phase, whereas PTA <1 cm {sup 3} showed a progressive enhancement pattern on the venous phase (mean values ± SDs of ΔHU{sub Arterial} {sub to} {sub Venous}, -13.2 ± 31.6 and 14.4 ± 32.7, respectively; P = 0.009). The enhancement pattern of PTA on 4D-CT is variable with respect to PTA volume based on CT. Therefore, the enhancement pattern of PTA on 4D-CT requires careful interpretation concerning the tumor volume, especially in cases of PTA <1 cm {sup 3}. (orig.)

  2. Toward Semi-automated Assessment of Target Volume Delineation in Radiotherapy Trials: The SCOPE 1 Pretrial Test Case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwynne, Sarah; Spezi, Emiliano; Wills, Lucy; Nixon, Lisette; Hurt, Chris; Joseph, George; Evans, Mererid; Griffiths, Gareth; Crosby, Tom; Staffurth, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate different conformity indices (CIs) for use in the analysis of outlining consistency within the pretrial quality assurance (Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance [RTTQA]) program of a multicenter chemoradiation trial of esophageal cancer and to make recommendations for their use in future trials. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Research Institute SCOPE 1 trial is an ongoing Cancer Research UK-funded phase II/III randomized controlled trial of chemoradiation with capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for esophageal cancer. The pretrial RTTQA program included a detailed radiotherapy protocol, an educational package, and a single mid-esophageal tumor test case that were sent to each investigator to outline. Investigator gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were received from 50 investigators in 34 UK centers, and CERR (Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research) was used to perform an assessment of each investigator GTV against a predefined gold-standard GTV using different CIs. A new metric, the local conformity index (l-CI), that can localize areas of maximal discordance was developed. Results: The median Jaccard conformity index (JCI) was 0.69 (interquartile range, 0.62-0.70), with 14 of 50 investigators (28%) achieving a JCI of 0.7 or greater. The median geographical miss index was 0.09 (interquartile range, 0.06-0.16), and the mean discordance index was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.30). The l-CI was highest in the middle section of the volume, where the tumor was bulky and more easily definable, and identified 4 slices where fewer than 20% of investigators achieved an l-CI of 0.7 or greater. Conclusions: The available CIs analyze different aspects of a gold standard–observer variation, with JCI being the most useful as a single metric. Additional information is provided by the l-CI and can focus the efforts of the RTTQA team in these areas, possibly leading to semi-automated outlining assessment.

  3. Comparison of three dosimetric techniques to take in account lung tumor motion: gating-like technique results lead to advice the use of gating device even in the cases of pre-operative irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beneyton, V.; Billaud, G.; Niederst, C.; Meyer, P.; Schumacher, C.; Karamanoukian, D.; Noel, G.; Bourhala, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of three dosimetric techniques of lung tumor delineation to integrate tumor motion during breathing. Patients and method: Nineteen patients with T1-3N0M0 malignant lung tumor were treated with definitive chemoradiotherapy (14 cases) or pre-surgery chemo radiation. Doses were, respectively, 66 and 46 Gy. CT-scan for delineation was performed during three phases of breathing: free breathing and deep breath-hold inspiration and expiration. G.T.V. (gross tumor volume) was delineated on the three sequences. The classic technique included G.T.V. from the free-breathing sequence plus a C.T.V. (clinical target volume) margin of 5 to 8 mm plus a P.T.V. (planning target volume) margin of 7 to 10 mm (including I.T.V. [internal target volume] margin and set-up margin). The gating-like technique included G.T.V. from the deep breath-hold inspiration sequence plus a C.T.V. margin of 5 to 8 mm plus a P.T.V. margin of 2 mm. The three-volume technique, included G.T.V. as a result of the fusion of G.T.V.s from the three sequences plus a C.T.V. margin of 5 to 8 mm plus a P.T.V. margin of 2 mm. Dosimetry was calculated for the three P.T.V.s, if possible, with the same fields number and position. Dose constraints and rules were imposed to accept dosimetries: firstly spinal cord maximal dose less than 45 Gy, followed by V95 % for P.T.V. greater than or equal to 95 %, and V20 GY Gy for lung less than or equal to 30 %, V30 GY Gy for lung less than or equal to 20 %. Results: G.T.V.s were not statistically different between the three methods of delineation. P.T.V.s were significantly lower with the gating-like technique. V95% of the P.T.V. were not different between the three techniques. With the classic-, the gating-like- and the 3-volume techniques, dosimetry was considered as acceptable, respectively in 15, 18 and 15 cases. Comparisons of constraint values showed that the gating-like method gave the best results. In the case of pre-operative management, the gating

  4. Target volume delineation for head and neck cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy; Delineation des volumes cibles des cancers des voies aerodigestives superieures en radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapeyre, M.; Toledano, I.; Bourry, N. [Departement de radiotherapie, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France); Bailly, C. [Unite de radiodiagnostic, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France); Cachin, F. [Unite de medecine nucleaire, centre Jean-Perrin, 58, rue Montalembert, BP 5026, 63011 Clermont-Ferrand cedex 1 (France)

    2011-10-15

    This article describes the determination and the delineation of the target volumes for head-and-neck cancers treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The delineation of the clinical target volumes (CTV) on the computerized tomography scanner (CT scan) requires a rigorous methodology due to the complexity of head-and-neck anatomy. The clinical examination with a sketch of pretreatment tumour extension, the surgical and pathological reports and the adequate images (CT scan, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) are necessary for the delineation. The target volumes depend on the overall strategy: sequential IMRT or simultaneous integrated boost-IMRT (SIB-IMRT). The concept of selectivity of the potential subclinical disease near the primary tumor and the selection of neck nodal targets are described according to the recommendations and the literature. The planing target volume (PTV), mainly reflecting setup errors (random and systematic), results from a uniform 4-5 mm expansion around the CTV. We propose the successive delineation of: (1) the gross volume tumour (GTV); (2) the 'high risk' CTV1 around the GTV or including the postoperative tumour bed in case of positive margins or nodal extra-capsular spread (65-70 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (3) the CTV2 'intermediate risk' around the CTV1 for SIB-IMRT (59-63 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (4) the 'low-risk' CTV3 (54-56 Gy in 30-35 fractions); (5) the PTVs. (authors)

  5. Impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor volume segmentation on patient-specific targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry using CLR1404

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besemer, Abigail E.; Titz, Benjamin; Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Kuo, John S.; Robins, H. Ian; Hall, Lance T.; Bednarz, Bryan P.

    2017-08-01

    Variations in tumor volume segmentation methods in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) may lead to dosimetric uncertainties. This work investigates the impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor segmentation on TRT dosimetry in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. In this study, PET/CT images of five brain cancer patients were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h post-injection of 124I-CLR1404. The tumor volume was segmented using two standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold levels, two tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) threshold levels, and a T1 Gadolinium-enhanced MRI threshold. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC), and overlap volume (OV) metrics were calculated to compare differences in the MRI and PET contours. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 voxel-level dose distribution was calculated from the 124I-CLR1404 activity distribution using RAPID, a Geant4 Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform. The TBR, SUV, and MRI tumor volumes ranged from 2.3-63.9 cc, 0.1-34.7 cc, and 0.4-11.8 cc, respectively. The average  ±  standard deviation (range) was 0.19  ±  0.13 (0.01-0.51), 0.30  ±  0.17 (0.03-0.67), and 0.75  ±  0.29 (0.05-1.00) for the JSC, DSC, and OV, respectively. The DSC and JSC values were small and the OV values were large for both the MRI-SUV and MRI-TBR combinations because the regions of PET uptake were generally larger than the MRI enhancement. Notable differences in the tumor dose volume histograms were observed for each patient. The mean (standard deviation) 131I-CLR1404 tumor doses ranged from 0.28-1.75 Gy GBq-1 (0.07-0.37 Gy GBq-1). The ratio of maximum-to-minimum mean doses for each patient ranged from 1.4-2.0. The tumor volume and the interpretation of the tumor dose is highly sensitive to the imaging modality, PET enhancement metric, and threshold level used for tumor volume segmentation. The large variations in tumor doses clearly demonstrate the need for standard

  6. Estimates of nuclear volume in plaque and tumor-stage mycosis fungoides. A new prognostic indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1994-01-01

    biopsies of cutaneous plaque and tumor-stage MF. The value of nucl vV in the first sampled biopsy, as well as the average and highest values, were determined in biopsies from each patient. The patients were divided into two groups, either above or below the group median. There was a strong positive......V evolution in the patients with multiple biopsies, but the impact of various therapeutic regimens cannot be assessed. Certain estimates of nucl vV appear to be good prognostic indicators in plaque and tumor-stage MF, but further study of a larger series of patients is needed to corroborate these results...

  7. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N; Kwon, D; Ishkanian, F; Markoe, A; Maudsley, A; Stoyanova, R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: High-throughput extraction of imaging and metabolomic quantitative features from MRI and MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) results in tens of variables per patient. In radiotherapy (RT) of GBM, the relevant metabolic tumor volumes (MTVs) are related to aberrant levels of N-acetyl Aspartate (NAA) and Choline (Cho). Corresponding Clinical Target Volumes (CTVs) for RT planning are based on Contrast Enhancing T1-weighted MRI (CE-T1w) and T2-weighted/Fluid Attenuated Inversion Recovery (FLAIR) MRI. The objective is to build a framework for investigation of associations between imaging, CTV, and MTV features better understanding of the underlying information in the CTVs and dependencies between these volumes. Methods: Necrotic portions, enhancing lesion and edema were manually contoured on T1w/T2w images for 17 GBM patients. CTVs and MTVs for NAA (MTV NAA ) and Cho (MTV Cho ) were constructed. Tumors were scored categorically for ten semantic imaging traits by neuroradiologist. All features were investigated for redundancy. Two-way correlations between imaging and RT/MTV features were visualized as heat maps. Associations between MTV NAA , MTV Cho and imaging features were studied using Spearman correlation. Results: 39 imaging features were computed per patient. Half of the imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. 21 features were extracted from MTVs/CTVs. There were a high number (43) of significant correlations of imaging with CTVs/MTV NAA while very few (10) significant correlations were with CTVs/MTV Cho . MTV NAA was found to be closely associated with MRI volumes, MTV Cho remains elusive for characterization with imaging. Conclusion: A framework for investigation of co-dependency between MRI and RT/metabolic features is established. A series of semantic imaging traits were replaced with automatically extracted continuous variables. The approach will allow for exploration of relationships

  8. Observer variation in target volume delineation of lung cancer related to radiation oncologist-computer interaction: A 'Big Brother' evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenbakkers, Roel J.H.M.; Duppen, Joop C.; Fitton, Isabelle; Deurloo, Kirsten E.I.; Zijp, Lambert; Uitterhoeve, Apollonia L.J.; Rodrigus, Patrick T.R.; Kramer, Gijsbert W.P.; Bussink, Johan; Jaeger, Katrien De; Belderbos, Jose S.A.; Hart, Augustinus A.M.; Nowak, Peter J.C.M.; Herk, Marcel van; Rasch, Coen R.N.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the process of target volume delineation in lung cancer for optimization of imaging, delineation protocol and delineation software. Patients and methods: Eleven radiation oncologists (observers) from five different institutions delineated the Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) including positive lymph nodes of 22 lung cancer patients (stages I-IIIB) on CT only. All radiation oncologist-computer interactions were recorded with a tool called 'Big Brother'. For each radiation oncologist and patient the following issues were analyzed: delineation time, number of delineated points and corrections, zoom levels, level and window (L/W) settings, CT slice changes, use of side windows (coronal and sagittal) and software button use. Results: The mean delineation time per GTV was 16 min (SD 10 min). The mean delineation time for lymph node positive patients was on average 3 min larger (P=0.02) than for lymph node negative patients. Many corrections (55%) were due to L/W change (e.g. delineating in mediastinum L/W and then correcting in lung L/W). For the lymph node region, a relatively large number of corrections was found (3.7 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that it was difficult to delineate lymph nodes. For the tumor-atelectasis region, a relative small number of corrections was found (1.0 corr/cm 2 ), indicating that including or excluding atelectasis into the GTV was a clinical decision. Inappropriate use of L/W settings was frequently found (e.g. 46% of all delineated points in the tumor-lung region were delineated in mediastinum L/W settings). Despite a large observer variation in cranial and caudal direction of 0.72 cm (1 SD), the coronal and sagittal side windows were not used in 45 and 60% of the cases, respectively. For the more difficult cases, observer variation was smaller when the coronal and sagittal side windows were used. Conclusions: With the 'Big Brother' tool a method was developed to trace the delineation process. The differences between

  9. Potential dosimetric benefits of adaptive tumor tracking over the internal target volume concept for stereotactic body radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karava, Konstantina; Ehrbar, Stefanie; Riesterer, Oliver; Roesch, Johannes; Glatz, Stefan; Klöck, Stephan; Guckenberger, Matthias; Tanadini-Lang, Stephanie

    2017-11-09

    Radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer has two major challenges: (I) the tumor is adjacent to several critical organs and, (II) the mobility of both, the tumor and its surrounding organs at risk (OARs). A treatment planning study simulating stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for pancreatic tumors with both the internal target volume (ITV) concept and the tumor tracking approach was performed. The two respiratory motion-management techniques were compared in terms of doses to the target volume and organs at risk. Two volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans (5 × 5 Gy) were created for each of the 12 previously treated pancreatic cancer patients, one using the ITV concept and one the tumor tracking approach. To better evaluate the overall dose delivered to the moving tumor volume, 4D dose calculations were performed on four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scans. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) size for each technique was analyzed. Target and OAR dose parameters were reported and analyzed for both 3D and 4D dose calculation. Tumor motion ranged from 1.3 to 11.2 mm. Tracking led to a reduction of PTV size (max. 39.2%) accompanied with significant better tumor coverage (p<0.05, paired Wilcoxon signed rank test) both in 3D and 4D dose calculations and improved organ at risk sparing. Especially for duodenum, stomach and liver, the mean dose was significantly reduced (p<0.05) with tracking for 3D and 4D dose calculations. By using an adaptive tumor tracking approach for respiratory-induced pancreatic motion management, a significant reduction in PTV size can be achieved, which subsequently facilitates treatment planning, and improves organ dose sparing. The dosimetric benefit of tumor tracking is organ and patient-specific.

  10. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herschtal, Alan, E-mail: Alan.Herschtal@petermac.org [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Te Marvelde, Luc [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Mengersen, Kerrie [School of Mathematical Sciences, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Caine, Hannah [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  11. PET CT Thresholds for Radiotherapy Target Definition in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: How Close are we to the Pathologic Findings?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kailiang; Ung, Yee C.; Hornby, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Optimal target delineation threshold values for positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) radiotherapy planning is controversial. In this present study, different PET CT threshold values were used for target delineation and then compared pathologically. Methods and Materials: A total of 31 non-small-cell lung cancer patients underwent PET CT before surgery. The maximal diameter (MD) of the pathologic primary tumor was obtained. The CT-based gross tumor volumes (GTV CT ) were delineated for CT window-level thresholds at 1,600 and -300 Hounsfield units (HU) (GTV CT1 ); 1,600 and -400 (GTV CT2 ); 1,600 and -450 HU (GTV CT3 ); 1,600 and -600 HU (GTV CT4 ); 1,200 and -700 HU (GTV CT5 ); 900 and -450 HU (GTV CT6 ); and 700 and -450 HU (GTV CT7 ). The PET-based GTVs (GTV PET ) were autocontoured at 20% (GTV 20 ), 30% (GTV 30 ), 40% (GTV 40 ), 45% (GTV 45 ), 50% (GTV 50 ), and 55% (GTV 55 ) of the maximal intensity level. The MD of each image-based GTV in three-dimensional orientation was determined. The MD of the GTV PET and GTV CT were compared with the pathologically determined MD. Results: The median MD of the GTV CT changed from 2.89 (GTV CT2 ) to 4.46 (GTV CT7 ) as the CT thresholds were varied. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT compared with the pathologically determined MD ranged from 0.76 to 0.87. The correlation coefficient of the GTV CT1 was the best (r = 0.87). The median MD of GTV PET changed from 5.72cm to 2.67cm as the PET thresholds increased. The correlation coefficient of the GTV PET compared with the pathologic finding ranged from 0.51 to 0.77. The correlation coefficient of GTV 50 was the best (r = 0.77). Conclusion: Compared with the MD of GTV PET , the MD of GTV CT had better correlation with the pathologic MD. The GTV CT1 and GTV 50 had the best correlation with the pathologic results.

  12. Optimization of the fractionated irradiation scheme considering physical doses to tumor and organ at risk based on dose–volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, Yasutaka; Mizuta, Masahiro; Takao, Seishin; Shirato, Hiroki; Sutherland, Kenneth L.; Date, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy of solid tumors has been performed with various fractionation regimens such as multi- and hypofractionations. However, the ability to optimize the fractionation regimen considering the physical dose distribution remains insufficient. This study aims to optimize the fractionation regimen, in which the authors propose a graphical method for selecting the optimal number of fractions (n) and dose per fraction (d) based on dose–volume histograms for tumor and normal tissues of organs around the tumor. Methods: Modified linear-quadratic models were employed to estimate the radiation effects on the tumor and an organ at risk (OAR), where the repopulation of the tumor cells and the linearity of the dose-response curve in the high dose range of the surviving fraction were considered. The minimization problem for the damage effect on the OAR was solved under the constraint that the radiation effect on the tumor is fixed by a graphical method. Here, the damage effect on the OAR was estimated based on the dose–volume histogram. Results: It was found that the optimization of fractionation scheme incorporating the dose–volume histogram is possible by employing appropriate cell surviving models. The graphical method considering the repopulation of tumor cells and a rectilinear response in the high dose range enables them to derive the optimal number of fractions and dose per fraction. For example, in the treatment of prostate cancer, the optimal fractionation was suggested to lie in the range of 8–32 fractions with a daily dose of 2.2–6.3 Gy. Conclusions: It is possible to optimize the number of fractions and dose per fraction based on the physical dose distribution (i.e., dose–volume histogram) by the graphical method considering the effects on tumor and OARs around the tumor. This method may stipulate a new guideline to optimize the fractionation regimen for physics-guided fractionation

  13. Prognosis value of the active tumoral volume in {sup 18}F-F.D.G. for the esophagus cancer and influence of the tumor delimitation methodology; Valeur pronostique du volume tumoral actif en {sup 18}F-FDG pour le cancer de l'oesophage et influence de la methodologie de contourage de la tumeur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatt, M. [LaTIM Inserm U650, 29 - Brest (France); Cheze Le Rest, C. [CHU Morvan, departement de medecine nucleaire, 29 - Brest (France); Albarghach, M.N. [CHU Morvan, departement de radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: compare the predictive value for survival and response to the treatment of the active tumor volume automatically measured on the PET with {sup 18}F-F.D.G. images by different methods to this one of S.U.V., in the esophagus cancer. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the tumor volume is a pertinent information of which prognosis value in the esophagus cancer is clearly superior to this one of S.U.V. (maximum or average), at the condition to be measured with accuracy, what Fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian (F.L.A.B.) allows contrary to the thresholding methods. The predictive value of total glycolysis volume (T.G.V.) is still superior and it is less influenced by the method used, F.L.A.B. offering a better differentiation, for the different responses to the treatment or for survival. (N.C.)

  14. Estimates of nuclear volume in plaque and tumor-stage mycosis fungoides. A new prognostic indicator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Thestrup-Pedersen, K

    1994-01-01

    It is well documented that mycosis fungoides (MF), a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, has a variable clinical course. Unbiased stereological estimates of three-dimensional volume-weighted mean nuclear size (nucl vV) of mycosis cells were obtained in a retrospective study of 18 patients with a total of ...

  15. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose-Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Metropolitan Hospital, Athens (Greece); Schmid, Maximilian P., E-mail: maximilian.schmid@akhwien.at [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiotherapy, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45-50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 10 Gy for tumor; {alpha}/{beta} = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV ({+-} 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 ({+-}30) cm{sup 3}, and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 ({+-}14) cm{sup 3}. The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 ({+-}13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 ({+-}20) Gy, 76 ({+-}16) Gy, 70 ({+-}9) Gy, and 60 ({+-}9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19-87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and

  16. Treatment of Locally Advanced Vaginal Cancer With Radiochemotherapy and Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Adaptive Brachytherapy: Dose–Volume Parameters and First Clinical Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimopoulos, Johannes C.A.; Schmid, Maximilian P.; Fidarova, Elena; Berger, Daniel; Kirisits, Christian; Pötter, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical feasibility of magnetic resonance image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for patients with locally advanced vaginal cancer and to report treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thirteen patients with vaginal cancer were treated with external beam radiotherapy (45–50.4 Gy) plus IGABT with or without chemotherapy. Distribution of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages among patients were as follows: 4 patients had Stage II cancer, 5 patients had Stage III cancer, and 4 patients had Stage IV cancer. The concept of IGABT as developed for cervix cancer was transferred and adapted for vaginal cancer, with corresponding treatment planning and reporting. Doses were converted to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy, applying the linear quadratic model (α/β = 10 Gy for tumor; α/β = 3 for organs at risk). Endpoints studied were gross tumor volume (GTV), dose-volume parameters for high-risk clinical target volume (HRCTV), and organs at risk, local control (LC), adverse side effects, and survival. Results: The mean GTV (± 1 standard deviation) at diagnosis was 45.3 (±30) cm 3 , and the mean GTV at brachytherapy was 10 (±14) cm 3 . The mean D90 for the HRCTV was 86 (±13) Gy. The mean D2cc for bladder, urethra, rectum, and sigmoid colon were 80 (±20) Gy, 76 (±16) Gy, 70 (±9) Gy, and 60 (±9) Gy, respectively. After a median follow-up of 43 months (range, 19–87 months), one local recurrence and two distant metastases cases were observed. Actuarial LC and overall survival rates at 3 years were 92% and 85%. One patient with Stage IVA and 1 patient with Stage III disease experienced fistulas (one vesicovaginal, one rectovaginal), and 1 patient developed periurethral necrosis. Conclusions: The concept of IGABT, originally developed for treating cervix cancer, appears to be applicable to vaginal cancer treatment with only minor adaptations. Dose-volume parameters for HRCTV and organs at risk are in a comparable

  17. Registration of clinical volumes to beams-eye-view images for real-time tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Jonathan H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Lewis, John H.; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross I., E-mail: rberbeco@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors combine the registration of 2D beam’s eye view (BEV) images and 3D planning computed tomography (CT) images, with relative, markerless tumor tracking to provide automatic absolute tracking of physician defined volumes such as the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: During treatment of lung SBRT cases, BEV images were continuously acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operating in cine mode. For absolute registration of physician-defined volumes, an intensity based 2D/3D registration to the planning CT was performed using the end-of-exhale (EoE) phase of the four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). The volume was converted from Hounsfield units into electron density by a calibration curve and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for each beam geometry. Using normalized cross correlation between the DRR and an EoE BEV image, the best in-plane rigid transformation was found. The transformation was applied to physician-defined contours in the planning CT, mapping them into the EPID image domain. A robust multiregion method of relative markerless lung tumor tracking quantified deviations from the EoE position. Results: The success of 2D/3D registration was demonstrated at the EoE breathing phase. By registering at this phase and then employing a separate technique for relative tracking, the authors are able to successfully track target volumes in the BEV images throughout the entire treatment delivery. Conclusions: Through the combination of EPID/4DCT registration and relative tracking, a necessary step toward the clinical implementation of BEV tracking has been completed. The knowledge of tumor volumes relative to the treatment field is important for future applications like real-time motion management, adaptive radiotherapy, and delivered dose calculations.

  18. MRI and CT imaging for preoperative target volume delineation in breast-conserving therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartogh, Mariska D; Philippens, Marielle E P; van Dam, Iris E; Kleynen, Catharina E; Tersteeg, Robbert J H A; Pijnappel, Ruud M; Kotte, Alexis N T J; Verkooijen, Helena M; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; van Vulpen, Marco; van Asselen, Bram; van den Bongard, Hjg Desirée

    2014-02-26

    Accurate tumor bed delineation after breast-conserving surgery is important. However, consistency among observers on standard postoperative radiotherapy planning CT is low and volumes can be large due to seroma formation. A preoperative delineation of the tumor might be more consistent. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the consistency of preoperative target volume delineation on CT and MRI for breast-conserving radiotherapy. Tumors were delineated on preoperative contrast-enhanced (CE) CT and newly developed 3D CE-MR images, by four breast radiation oncologists. Clinical target volumes (CTVs) were created by addition of a 1.5 cm margin around the tumor, excluding skin and chest wall. Consistency in target volume delineation was expressed by the interobserver variability. Therefore, the conformity index (CI), center of mass distance (dCOM) and volumes were calculated. Tumor characteristics on CT and MRI were scored by an experienced breast radiologist. Preoperative tumor delineation resulted in a high interobserver agreement with a high median CI for the CTV, for both CT (0.80) and MRI (0.84). The tumor was missed on CT in 2/14 patients (14%). Leaving these 2 patients out of the analysis, CI was higher on MRI compared to CT for the GTV (p<0.001) while not for the CTV (CT (0.82) versus MRI (0.84), p=0.123). The dCOM did not differ between CT and MRI. The median CTV was 48 cm3 (range 28-137 cm3) on CT and 59 cm3 (range 30-153 cm3) on MRI (p<0.001). Tumor shapes and margins were rated as more irregular and spiculated on CE-MRI. This study showed that preoperative target volume delineation resulted in small target volumes with a high consistency among observers. MRI appeared to be necessary for tumor detection and the visualization of irregularities and spiculations. Regarding the tumor delineation itself, no clinically relevant differences in interobserver variability were observed. These results will be used to study the potential for future MRI

  19. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  20. Effect of Uniform and Non-uniform High-z Nanoparticles Distribution in Tumor Volume on Dose Enhancement Factor During 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Zabihzadeh

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: increase of atomic number and concentrations of NPs enhance the absorbed dose due to increased possibility of photoelectric phenomena. Non-uniform distribution of NPs underestimated dose compared to uniform distribution; therefore, considering accurate NPs distribution inside the tumor volume is crucial to calculation of dose enhancement. Targeted labeling of NPs for the maximum absorption by tumor and for the minimal penetration into peripheral tissues has potential to increase radiation therapeutic ratio.

  1. SU-G-BRA-11: Tumor Tracking in An Iterative Volume of Interest Based 4D CBCT Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, R; Pan, T; Ahmad, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: 4D CBCT can allow evaluation of tumor motion immediately prior to radiation therapy, but suffers from heavy artifacts that limit its ability to track tumors. Various iterative and compressed sensing reconstructions have been proposed to reduce these artifacts, but are costly time-wise and can degrade the image quality of bony anatomy for alignment with regularization. We have previously proposed an iterative volume of interest (I4D VOI) method which minimizes reconstruction time and maintains image quality of bony anatomy by focusing a 4D reconstruction within a VOI. The purpose of this study is to test the tumor tracking accuracy of this method compared to existing methods. Methods: Long scan (8–10 mins) CBCT data with corresponding RPM data was collected for 12 lung cancer patients. The full data set was sorted into 8 phases and reconstructed using FDK cone beam reconstruction to serve as a gold standard. The data was reduced in way that maintains a normal breathing pattern and used to reconstruct 4D images using FDK, low and high regularization TV minimization (λ=2,10), and the proposed I4D VOI method with PTVs used for the VOI. Tumor trajectories were found using rigid registration within the VOI for each reconstruction and compared to the gold standard. Results: The root mean square error (RMSE) values were 2.70mm for FDK, 2.50mm for low regularization TV, 1.48mm for high regularization TV, and 2.34mm for I4D VOI. Streak artifacts in I4D VOI were reduced compared to FDK and images were less blurred than TV reconstructed images. Conclusion: I4D VOI performed at least as well as existing methods in tumor tracking, with the exception of high regularization TV minimization. These results along with the reconstruction time and outside VOI image quality advantages suggest I4D VOI to be an improvement over existing methods. Funding support provided by CPRIT grant RP110562-P2-01

  2. SU-G-BRA-11: Tumor Tracking in An Iterative Volume of Interest Based 4D CBCT Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R; Pan, T [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahmad, M [Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: 4D CBCT can allow evaluation of tumor motion immediately prior to radiation therapy, but suffers from heavy artifacts that limit its ability to track tumors. Various iterative and compressed sensing reconstructions have been proposed to reduce these artifacts, but are costly time-wise and can degrade the image quality of bony anatomy for alignment with regularization. We have previously proposed an iterative volume of interest (I4D VOI) method which minimizes reconstruction time and maintains image quality of bony anatomy by focusing a 4D reconstruction within a VOI. The purpose of this study is to test the tumor tracking accuracy of this method compared to existing methods. Methods: Long scan (8–10 mins) CBCT data with corresponding RPM data was collected for 12 lung cancer patients. The full data set was sorted into 8 phases and reconstructed using FDK cone beam reconstruction to serve as a gold standard. The data was reduced in way that maintains a normal breathing pattern and used to reconstruct 4D images using FDK, low and high regularization TV minimization (λ=2,10), and the proposed I4D VOI method with PTVs used for the VOI. Tumor trajectories were found using rigid registration within the VOI for each reconstruction and compared to the gold standard. Results: The root mean square error (RMSE) values were 2.70mm for FDK, 2.50mm for low regularization TV, 1.48mm for high regularization TV, and 2.34mm for I4D VOI. Streak artifacts in I4D VOI were reduced compared to FDK and images were less blurred than TV reconstructed images. Conclusion: I4D VOI performed at least as well as existing methods in tumor tracking, with the exception of high regularization TV minimization. These results along with the reconstruction time and outside VOI image quality advantages suggest I4D VOI to be an improvement over existing methods. Funding support provided by CPRIT grant RP110562-P2-01.

  3. Noninvasive Evaluation of Metabolic Tumor Volume in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Tumor-Bearing C57BL/6 Mice with Micro-PET and the Radiotracers 18F-Alfatide and 18F-FDG: A Comparative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Wei

    Full Text Available To explore the value of a new simple lyophilized kit for labeling PRGD2 peptide (18F-ALF-NOTA-PRGD2, denoted as 18F-alfatide in the determination of metabolic tumor volume (MTV with micro-PET in lewis lung carcinoma (LLC tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice verified by pathologic examination and compared with those using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG PET.All LLC tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice underwent two attenuation-corrected whole-body micro-PET scans with the radiotracers 18F-alfatide and 18F-FDG within two days. 18F-alfatide metabolic tumor volume (VRGD and 18F-FDG metabolic tumor volume (VFDG were manually delineated slice by slice on PET images. Pathologic tumor volume (VPath was measured in vitro after the xenografts were removed.A total of 37 mice with NSCLC xenografts were enrolled and 33 of them underwent 18F-alfatide PET, and 35 of them underwent 18F-FDG PET and all underwent pathological examination. The mean ± standard deviation of VPath, VRGD, and VFDG were 0.59±0.32 cm3 (range,0.13~1.64 cm3, 0.61±0.37 cm3 (range,0.15~1.86 cm3, and 1.24±0.53 cm3 (range,0.17~2.20 cm3, respectively. VPath vs. VRGD, VPath vs. VFDG, and VRGD vs. VFDG comparisons were t = -0.145, P = 0.885, t = -6.239, P<0.001, and t = -5.661, P<0.001, respectively. No significant difference was found between VPath and VRGD. VFDG was much larger than VRGD and VPath. VRGD seemed more approximate to the pathologic gross tumor volume. Furthermore, VPath was more strongly correlated with VRGD (R = 0.964,P<0.001 than with VFDG (R = 0.584,P<0.001.18F-alfatide PET provided a better estimation of gross tumor volume than 18F-FDG PET in LLC tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

  4. Effect of serum testosterone and percent tumor volume on extra-prostatic extension and biochemical recurrence after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eu Chang Hwang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have revealed that the preoperative serum testosterone and percent tumor volume (PTV predict extra-prostatic extension (EPE and biochemical recurrence (BCR after radical prostatectomy. This study investigated the prognostic significance of serum testosterone and PTV in relation to EPE and BCR after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. We reviewed 520 patients who underwent LRP between 2004 and 2012. PTV was determined as the sum of all visually estimated tumor foci in every section. BCR was defined as two consecutive increases in the postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA >0.2 ng ml−1 . The threshold for serum total testosterone was 3.0 ng ml−1 . Multivariate logistic regression was used to define the effect of variables on the risk of EPE and BCR. A low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 was associated with a high serum PSA, Gleason score, positive core percentage of the prostate biopsy, PTV, and all pathological variables. On multivariate analysis, similar to previous studies, the serum PSA, biopsy positive core percentage, Gleason score, and pathological variables predicted EPE and BCR. In addition, low serum testosterone (<3.0 ng ml−1 , adjusted OR, 8.52; 95% CI, 5.04-14.4, P= 0.001 predicted EPE and PTV (adjusted OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05, P= 0.046 predicted BCR. In addition to previous predictors of EPE and BCR, low serum testosterone and PTV are valuable predictors of EPE and BCR after LRP.

  5. Postoperative HDR afterloading brachytherapy: Vaginal tumor recurrence rates in patients with endometrial carcinoma dependent on treatment volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloetzer, K.H.; Guenther, R.; Wendt, T.

    1997-01-01

    Patients and Method: At Jena University, Department of Radiotherapy, from 1981 to 1990 108 patients with endometrical carcinoma were postoperatively treated with high dose radiation brachytherapy of the vagina without additional percutaneous radiotherapy. Histology showed more or less differenciated adenocarcinoma in 90% of all patients, all patients were postoperatively stage I or II without proven lymphatic metastases. Dependent on individual figures patients were distributed to 3 different gorups: group A: 4 x 10 Gy, tissue-thickness of 1 cm (vaginal apex) respectively 0.5 cm (lower vaginal walls); group B: 4 x 10 Gy, tissue thickness of 1 cm (upper vaginal wall); group C: 4 x 10 Gy, tissue-thickness of 0.5 cm (both excluding the lower vaginal walls). Results: Both 3-year survival rates (group A: 96.6%, group B: 96.9%, group C: 97.7%) and tumor relapse rates of the vaginal apex (group A: 0, group B: 3.1%, group C: 2.2%) don't show significant differences. No case of local tumor recurrence was seen in the upper 2/3 of the vagina and the pelvic walls. Late side effects concerning bladder and rectum (grade III to IV, EORTC/RTOG) could be minimized by reducing the treatment volume (group A: 6.8%/12.6%, group B: 6,2%/3.1%, group C: 2.2%/0). (orig./AJ) [de

  6. High-Frequency Jet Ventilation for Complete Target Immobilization and Reduction of Planning Target Volume in Stereotactic High Single-Dose Irradiation of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Lung Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, Peter; Kraus, Hans-Joerg; Muehlnickel, Werner; Sassmann, Volker; Hering, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of complete target immobilization by means of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV); and to show that the saving of planning target volume (PTV) on the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) under HFJV, compared with SBRT with respiratory motion, can be predicted with reliable accuracy by computed tomography (CT) scans at peak inspiration phase. Methods and Materials: A comparison regarding different methods for defining the PTV was carried out in 22 patients with tumors that clearly moved with respiration. A movement span of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by fusing respiration-correlated CT scans. The PTV enclosed the GTV positions with a safety margin throughout the breathing cycle. To create a PTV from CT scans acquired under HFJV, the same margins were drawn around the immobilized target. In addition, peak inspiration phase CT images (PIP-CTs) were used to approximate a target immobilized by HFJV. Results: The resulting HFJV-PTVs were between 11.6% and 45.4% smaller than the baseline values calculated as respiration-correlated CT-PTVs (median volume reduction, 25.4%). Tentative planning by means of PIP-CT PTVs predicted that in 19 of 22 patients, use of HFJV would lead to a reduction in volume of ≥20%. Using this threshold yielded a positive predictive value of 0.89, as well as a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.5. Conclusions: In all patients, SBRT under HFJV provided a reliable immobilization of the GTVs and achieved a reduction in PTVs, regardless of patient compliance. Tentative planning facilitated the selection of patients who could better undergo radiation in respiratory standstill, both with greater accuracy and lung protection.

  7. Three-dimensional conformal radiation may deliver considerable dose of incidental nodal irradiation in patients with early stage node-negative non-small cell lung cancer when the tumor is large and centrally located

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Lujun; Chen Ming; Haken, Randall ten; Chetty, Indrin; Chapet, Olivier; Hayman, James A.; Kong Fengming

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To determine the dose to regional nodal stations in patients with T 1-3 N 0 M 0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) without intentional elective nodal irradiation (ENI). Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with medically inoperable T 1-3 N 0 M 0 NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT without ENI. Hilar and mediastinal nodal regions were contoured on planning CT. The prescription dose was normalized to 70 Gy. Equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and other dosimetric parameters (e.g., V 40 ) were calculated for each nodal station. Results: The median EUD for the whole group ranged from 0.4 to 4.4 Gy for all elective nodal regions. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and the relationship between GTV and hilum were significantly correlated with irradiation dose to ipsilateral hilar nodal regions (P 3 (diameter ∼ 4 cm) and or having any overlap with hilum, the median EUDs were 9.6, 22.6, and 62.9 Gy for ipsilateral lower paratracheal, subcarinal, and ipsilateral hilar regions, respectively. The corresponding median V 40 were 32.5%, 39.3%, and 97.6%, respectively. Conclusions: Although incidental nodal irradiation dose is low in the whole group, the dose to high-risk nodal regions is considerable in patients with T 1-3 N 0 NSCLC when the primary is large and/or centrally located

  8. Effect of steroid on brain tumors and surround edemas : observation with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps of perfusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Ju Youl; Sun, Joo Sung; Kim, Sun Yong; Kim, Ji Hyung; Suh, Jung Ho; Cho, Kyung Gi; Kim, Jang Sung

    2000-01-01

    To observe the hemodynamic change in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas after steroid treatment, and then investigate the clinical usefulness of perfusion MRI. We acquired conventional and perfusion MR images in 15 patients with various intracranial tumors (4 glioblastoma multiformes, 4 meningiomas, 3 metastatic tumors, 1 anaplastic ependymoma, 1 anaplastic astrocytoma, 1 hemangioblastoma, and 1 pilocytic astrocytoma). For perfusion MR imaging, a 1.5T unit employing the gradient-echo EPI technique was used, and further perfusion MR images were obtained 2-10 days after intravenous steroid therapy. After processing of the raw data, regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) maps were reconstructed. The maps were visually evaluated by comparing relative perfusion in brain tumors and peritumoral edemas with that in contralateral white matter. Objective evaluations were performed by comparing the perfusion ratios of brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Visual evaluations of rCBV maps, showed that in most brain tumors (67%, 10/15), perfusion was high before steroid treatment and showed in (80%, 12/15) decreased afterwards. Objective evaluation, showed that in all brain tumors, perfusion decreased. Visual evaluation of perfusion change in peritumoral edemas revealed change in only one case, but objective evaluation indicated that perfusion decreased significantly in all seven cases. rCBV maps acquired by perfusion MR imaging can provide hemodynamic information about brain tumors and peritumoral edemas. Such maps could prove helpful in the preoperative planning of brain tumor surgery and the monitoring of steroid effects during conservative treatment. (author)

  9. Impact of Pretreatment Tumor Growth Rate on Outcome of Early-Stage Lung Cancer Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atallah, Soha; Cho, B.C. John; Allibhai, Zishan; Taremi, Mojgan; Giuliani, Meredith [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Le, Lisa W. [Department of Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Brade, Anthony; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hope, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.hope@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the influence of pretreatment tumor growth rate on outcomes in patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: A review was conducted on 160 patients with T1-T2N0M0 NSCLC treated with SBRT at single institution. The patient's demographic and clinical data, time interval (t) between diagnostic and planning computed tomography (CT), vital status, disease status, and cause of death were extracted from a prospectively kept database. Differences in gross tumor volume between diagnostic CT (GTV1) and planning CT (GTV2) were recorded, and growth rate was calculated by use of specific growth rate (SGR). Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed for overall survival (OS). Differences between groups were compared with a log-rank test. Multivariate analyses were performed by use of the Cox proportional hazard model with SGR and other relevant clinical factors. Cumulative incidence was calculated for local, regional, and distant failures by use of the competing risk approach and was compared with Gray's test. Results: The median time interval between diagnostic and planning CT was 82 days. The patients were divided into 2 groups, and the median SGR was used as a cut-off. The median survival times were 38.6 and 27.7 months for the low and high SGR groups, respectively (P=.03). Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (P=.01), sex (P=.04), SGR (P=.03), and GTV2 (P=.002) were predictive for OS in multivariable Cox regression analysis and, except sex, were similarly predictive for failure-free survival (FFS). The 3-year cumulative incidences of regional failure were 19.2% and 6.0% for the high and low SGR groups, respectively (P=.047). Conclusion: High SGR was correlated with both poorer OS and FFS in patients with early-stage NSCLC treated with SBRT. If validated, this measurement may be useful in identifying patients most likely to benefit from

  10. Hippocampal volume and auditory attention on a verbal memory task with adult survivors of pediatric brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakar, Reema; King, Tricia Z; Morris, Robin; Na, Sabrina

    2015-03-01

    We examined the nature of verbal memory deficits and the possible hippocampal underpinnings in long-term adult survivors of childhood brain tumor. 35 survivors (M = 24.10 ± 4.93 years at testing; 54% female), on average 15 years post-diagnosis, and 59 typically developing adults (M = 22.40 ± 4.35 years, 54% female) participated. Automated FMRIB Software Library (FSL) tools were used to measure hippocampal, putamen, and whole brain volumes. The California Verbal Learning Test-Second Edition (CVLT-II) was used to assess verbal memory. Hippocampal, F(1, 91) = 4.06, ηp² = .04; putamen, F(1, 91) = 11.18, ηp² = .11; and whole brain, F(1, 92) = 18.51, ηp² = .17, volumes were significantly lower for survivors than controls (p memory indices of auditory attention list span (Trial 1: F(1, 92) = 12.70, η² = .12) and final list learning (Trial 5: F(1, 92) = 6.01, η² = .06) were significantly lower for survivors (p auditory attention, but none of the other CVLT-II indices. Secondary analyses for the effect of treatment factors are presented. Volumetric differences between survivors and controls exist for the whole brain and for subcortical structures on average 15 years post-diagnosis. Treatment factors seem to have a unique effect on subcortical structures. Memory differences between survivors and controls are largely contingent upon auditory attention list span. Only hippocampal volume is associated with the auditory attention list span component of verbal memory. These findings are particularly robust for survivors treated with radiation. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Optical Quantification of Cellular Mass, Volume, and Density of Circulating Tumor Cells Identified in an Ovarian Cancer Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Velasco, Carmen Ruiz; Li, Julia; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn; Bethel, Kelly; Duggan, Bridgette; Kuhn, Peter; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical studies have demonstrated that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present in the blood of cancer patients with known metastatic disease across the major types of epithelial malignancies. Recent studies have shown that the concentration of CTCs in the blood is prognostic of overall survival in breast, prostate, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer. This study characterizes CTCs identified using the high-definition (HD)-CTC assay in an ovarian cancer patient with stage IIIC disease. We characterized the physical properties of 31 HD-CTCs and 50 normal leukocytes from a single blood draw taken just prior to the initial debulking surgery. We utilized a non-interferometric quantitative phase microscopy technique using brightfield imagery to measure cellular dry mass. Next we used a quantitative differential interference contrast microscopy technique to measure cellular volume. These techniques were combined to determine cellular dry mass density. We found that HD-CTCs were more massive than leukocytes: 33.6 ± 3.2 pg (HD-CTC) compared to 18.7 ± 0.6 pg (leukocytes), p < 0.001; had greater volumes: 518.3 ± 24.5 fL (HD-CTC) compared to 230.9 ± 78.5 fL (leukocyte), p < 0.001; and possessed a decreased dry mass density with respect to leukocytes: 0.065 ± 0.006 pg/fL (HD-CTC) compared to 0.085 ± 0.004 pg/fL (leukocyte), p < 0.006. Quantification of HD-CTC dry mass content and volume provide key insights into the fluid dynamics of cancer, and may provide the rationale for strategies to isolate, monitor or target CTCs based on their physical properties. The parameters reported here can also be incorporated into blood cell flow models to better understand metastasis.

  12. Evaluation of gross tumor size using CT, 18F-FDG PET, integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT and pathological analysis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Huiming; Liu Yunfang; Hou Ming; Liu Jie; Li Xiaonan; Yu Jinming

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The correlation of gross tumor sizes between combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT images and macroscopic surgical samples has not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we compared CT, 18 F-FDG PET and combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT for the delineation of gross tumor volume (GTV) and validated the results through examination of the macroscopic surgical specimen. Methods: Fifty-two operable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients had integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans preoperatively and pathological examination post-operation. Four separate maximal tumor sizes at X (lateral direction), Y (ventro-dorsal direction) and Z (cranio-caudal direction) axis were measured on 18 F-FDG PET, CT, combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and surgical specimen, respectively. Linear regression was calculated for each of the three imaging measurements versus pathological measurement. Results: No significant differences were observed among the tumor sizes measured by three images and pathological method. Compared with pathological measurement, CT size at X, Y, Z axis was larger, whereas combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT and 18 F-FDG PET size were smaller. Combined 18 F-FDG PET/CT size was more similar to the pathological size than that of 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Results of linear regressions showed that integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT was the most accurate modality in measuring the size of cancer. Conclusions: 18 F-FDG PET/CT correlates more faithfully with pathological findings than 18 F-FDG PET or CT. Integrated 18 F-FDG PET/CT is an effective tool to define the target of GTV in radiotherapy.

  13. Multimodality imaging with CT, MR and FDG-PET for radiotherapy target volume delineation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, David; Scarsbrook, Andrew F.; Sykes, Jonathan; Ramasamy, Satiavani; Subesinghe, Manil; Carey, Brendan; Wilson, Daniel J.; Roberts, Neil; McDermott, Gary; Karakaya, Ebru; Bayman, Evrim; Sen, Mehmet; Speight, Richard; Prestwich, Robin J.D.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the variation in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma gross tumour volume (GTV) delineation between CT, MR and FDG PET-CT imaging. A prospective, single centre, pilot study was undertaken where 11 patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal cancers (2 tonsil, 9 base of tongue primaries) underwent pre-treatment, contrast enhanced, FDG PET-CT and MR imaging, all performed in a radiotherapy treatment mask. CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs were contoured by 5 clinicians (2 radiologists and 3 radiation oncologists). A semi-automated segmentation algorithm was used to contour PET GTVs. Volume and positional analyses were undertaken, accounting for inter-observer variation, using linear mixed effects models and contour comparison metrics respectively. Significant differences in mean GTV volume were found between CT (11.9 cm 3 ) and CT-MR (14.1 cm 3 ), p < 0.006, CT-MR and PET (9.5 cm 3 ), p < 0.0009, and MR (12.7 cm 3 ) and PET, p < 0.016. Substantial differences in GTV position were found between all modalities with the exception of CT-MR and MR GTVs. A mean of 64 %, 74 % and 77 % of the PET GTVs were included within the CT, MR and CT-MR GTVs respectively. A mean of 57 % of the MR GTVs were included within the CT GTV; conversely a mean of 63 % of the CT GTVs were included within the MR GTV. CT inter-observer variability was found to be significantly higher in terms of position and/or volume than both MR and CT-MR (p < 0.05). Significant differences in GTV volume were found between GTV volumes delineated by radiologists (9.7 cm 3 ) and oncologists (14.6 cm 3 ) for all modalities (p = 0.001). The use of different imaging modalities produced significantly different GTVs, with no single imaging technique encompassing all potential GTV regions. The use of MR reduced inter-observer variability. These data suggest delineation based on multimodality imaging has the potential to improve accuracy of GTV definition. ISRCTN Registry: ISRCTN34165059. Registered 2

  14. Outcomes of Modestly Hypofractionated Radiation for Lung Tumors: Pre- and Mid-Treatment Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography Metrics as Prognostic Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeremy P; Chang-Halpenny, Christine N; Maxim, Peter G; Quon, Andrew; Graves, Edward E; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2015-11-01

    Many patients with lung tumors have tumors too large for stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and comorbidities precluding concurrent chemotherapy. We report the outcomes of 29 patients treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) to 60 to 66 Gy in 3-Gy fractions. We also report an exploratory analysis of the prognostic value of the pre- and mid-RT positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Modestly hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT; 60-66 Gy in 3-Gy fractions) allows patients with locally advanced thoracic tumors and poor performance status to complete treatment within a shorter period without concurrent chemotherapy. We evaluated the outcomes and imaging prognostic factors of HypoRT. We retrospectively reviewed the data from all patients with primary and metastatic intrathoracic tumors treated with HypoRT from 2006 to 2012. We analyzed the survival and toxicity outcomes, including overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local recurrence (LR), and distant metastasis. We also evaluated the following tumor metrics in an exploratory analysis: gross tumor volume (GTV), maximum standardized uptake value (SUVMax), and metabolic tumor volume using a threshold of ≥ 50% of the SUVMax (MTV50%) or the maximum gradient of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose uptake (MTVEdge). We assessed the association of these metrics and their changes from before to mid-RT using positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) with OS and PFS. We identified 29 patients, all with pre-RT and 20 with mid-RT PET-CT scans. The median follow-up period was 15 months. The 2-year overall and non-small-cell lung cancer-only rate for OS, PFS, and LR, was 59% and 59%, 52% and 41%, and 27% and 32%, respectively. No grade ≥ 3 toxicities developed. The median decrease in GTV, SUVMax, and MTVEdge was 11%, 24%, and 18%, respectively. Inferior OS was associated with a larger pre-RT MTVEdge (P = .005) and pre-RT MTV50% (P = .007). Inferior PFS was associated with a

  15. Evaluation of Tumor Shape Variability in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Over the Course of Radiation Therapy Using Implanted Gold Markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Kranen, Simon Robert van; Beek, Suzanne van; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Herk, Marcel van; Brekel, Michiel Wilhelmus Maria van den; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Rasch, Coenraad Robert Nico

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies tumor shape variability in head-and-neck cancer patients during radiation therapy using implanted markers. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven patients with oropharyngeal tumors treated with (chemo)radiation were included. Helical gold markers (0.35 × 2 mm, 3-10/patient, average 6) were implanted around the tumor. Markers were identified on planning computed tomography (CT) and daily cone beam CT (CBCT). After bony anatomy registration, the daily vector length on CBCT in reference to the planning CT and daily marker movement perpendicular to the gross tumor volume (GTV) surface at planning CT (d normal ) of each marker were analyzed. Time trends were assessed with linear regression of the normal > markers . In 2 patients, 2 markers were implanted in normal tissue to evaluate migration by measuring intermarker distances. Results: Marker implantation was feasible without complications. Three-dimensional vectors (4827 measurements, mean 0.23 cm, interquartile ratio 0.24 cm) were highest in base of tongue sublocalization (P<.001) and bulky tumors (vectors exceeded 0.5 cm in 5.7% [0-20 mL], 12.0% [21-40 mL], and 21.7% [≥41 mL], respectively [P<.001] of measurements). The measured inward time trend in 11/27 patients correlated with the visual observed marker pattern. In patients with an outward trend (5/27) or no trend (11/27), visual observation showed predominantly an inhomogeneous pattern. Remarkably, in 6 patients, outward marker movement was observed in the posterior pharyngeal wall. The difference in distance between normal tissue markers (1 SD) was 0.05-0.06 cm without time trend, indicating that implanted markers did not migrate. Conclusions: During head-and-neck radiation therapy, normal tissue markers remained stable. Changes in position of tumor markers depended on sublocalization and tumor volume. Large differences in marker patterns between patients as well as within patients were observed. Based on our study, the cranial

  16. Comparison of primary tumour volumes delineated on four-dimensional computed tomography maximum intensity projection and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography computed tomography images of non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Yili; Li, Jianbin; Zhang, Yingjie; Wang, Wei; Fan, Tingyong; Shao, Qian; Xu, Min; Guo, Yanluan; Sun, Xiaorong; Shang, Dongping

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to compare the positional and volumetric differences of tumour volumes based on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) of four-dimensional CT (4DCT) and 18 F-fluorodexyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) positron emission tomography CT (PET/CT) images for the primary tumour of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ten patients with NSCLC underwent 4DCT and 18 F-FDG PET/CT scans of the thorax on the same day. Internal gross target volumes (IGTVs) of the primary tumours were contoured on the MIP images of 4DCT to generate IGTV MIP . Gross target volumes (GTVs) based on PET (GTV PET ) were determined with nine different threshold methods using the auto-contouring function. The differences in the volume, position, matching index (MI) and degree of inclusion (DI) of the GTV PET and IGTV MIP were investigated. In volume terms, GTV PET2.0 and GTV PET20% approximated closely to IGTV MIP with mean volume ratio of 0.93 ± 0.45 and 1.06 ± 0.43, respectively. The best MI was between IGTV MIP and GTV PET20% (0.45 ± 0.23). The best DI of IGTV MIP in GTV PET was IGTV MIP in GTV PET20% (0.61 ± 0.26). In 3D PET images, the GTVPET contoured by standardised uptake value (SUV) 2.0 or 20% of maximal SUV (SUV max ) approximate closely to the IGTV MIP in target size, while the spatial mismatch is apparent between them. Therefore, neither of them could replace IGTV MIP in spatial position and form. The advent of 4D PET/CT may improve the accuracy of contouring the perimeter for moving targets.

  17. Quantification of gross tumour volume changes between simulation and first day radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head / neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishan, Amar U.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Chen, Allen M.; Cui, Jing; Daly, Megan E.; Purdy, James A.

    2014-01-01

    To quantify changes in gross tumour volume (GTV) between simulation and initiation of radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced malignancies of the lung and head/neck. Initial cone beam computed tomography (CT) scans from 12 patients with lung cancer and 12 with head/neck cancer (head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)) treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with image guidance were rigidly registered to the simulation CT scans. The GTV was demarcated on both scans. The relationship between percent GTV change and variables including time interval between simulation and start, tumour (T) stage, and absolute weight change was assessed. For lung cancer patients, the GTV increased a median of 35.06% (range, −16.63% to 229.97%) over a median interval of 13 days (range, 7–43), while for HNSCC patients, the median GTV increase was 16.04% (range, −8.03% to 47.41%) over 13 days (range, 7–40). These observed changes are statistically significant. The magnitude of this change was inversely associated with the size of the tumour on the simulation scan for lung cancer patients (P 0.1). While the observed changes in GTV were moderate from the time of simulation to start of radiotherapy, these findings underscore the importance of image guidance for target localisation and verification, particularly for smaller tumours. Minimising the delay between simulation and treatment initiation may also be beneficial.

  18. Prognostic value of primary gross tumor volume and standardized uptake value of18F-FDG in PET/CT for distant metastasis in locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ya-Nan; Yao, Ji-Jin; Wang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Wang-Jian; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Zhang, Fan; Cheng, Zhi-Bin; Ma, Jun; Mo, Hao-Yuan; Sun, Ying

    2017-07-01

    Distant metastasis has become the predominant model of treatment failures in patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Effort should therefore be made to stratify locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients into different groups based on the risk of metastasis to improve prognosis and tailor individualized treatments. This study aims to assess the value of primary gross tumor volume and the maximum standardized uptake value for predicting distant metastasis-free survival of patients with locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. A total of 294 locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients who were identified from prospectively maintained database and underwent fluor-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging before treatment were included. The maximum standardized uptake value was recorded for the primary tumor (SUVmax-P) and neck lymph nodes (SUVmax-N). Computed tomography-derived primary gross tumor volume was measured using the summation-of-area technique. At 5 years, the distant metastasis-free survival rate was 83.7%. The cut-off of the SUVmax-P, SUVmax-N, and primary gross tumor volume for distant metastasis-free survival was 8.95, 5.75, and 31.3 mL, respectively, by receiver operating characteristic curve. In univariate analysis, only SUVmax-N (hazard ratio: 7.01; 95% confidence interval: 1.70-28.87; p nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Combining SUVmax-N with clinical stage gives a more precise picture in predicting distant metastasis.

  19. Nonlocal Means Denoising of Self-Gated and k-Space Sorted 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Block-Matching and 3-Dimensional Filtering: Implications for Pancreatic Tumor Registration and Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jun; McKenzie, Elizabeth; Fan, Zhaoyang; Tuli, Richard; Deng, Zixin; Pang, Jianing; Fraass, Benedick; Li, Debiao; Sandler, Howard; Yang, Guang; Sheng, Ke; Gou, Shuiping; Yang, Wensha

    2016-07-01

    To denoise self-gated k-space sorted 4-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (SG-KS-4D-MRI) by applying a nonlocal means denoising filter, block-matching and 3-dimensional filtering (BM3D), to test its impact on the accuracy of 4D image deformable registration and automated tumor segmentation for pancreatic cancer patients. Nine patients with pancreatic cancer and abdominal SG-KS-4D-MRI were included in the study. Block-matching and 3D filtering was adapted to search in the axial slices/frames adjacent to the reference image patch in the spatial and temporal domains. The patches with high similarity to the reference patch were used to collectively denoise the 4D-MRI image. The pancreas tumor was manually contoured on the first end-of-exhalation phase for both the raw and the denoised 4D-MRI. B-spline deformable registration was applied to the subsequent phases for contour propagation. The consistency of tumor volume defined by the standard deviation of gross tumor volumes from 10 breathing phases (σ_GTV), tumor motion trajectories in 3 cardinal motion planes, 4D-MRI imaging noise, and image contrast-to-noise ratio were compared between the raw and denoised groups. Block-matching and 3D filtering visually and quantitatively reduced image noise by 52% and improved image contrast-to-noise ratio by 56%, without compromising soft tissue edge definitions. Automatic tumor segmentation is statistically more consistent on the denoised 4D-MRI (σ_GTV = 0.6 cm(3)) than on the raw 4D-MRI (σ_GTV = 0.8 cm(3)). Tumor end-of-exhalation location is also more reproducible on the denoised 4D-MRI than on the raw 4D-MRI in all 3 cardinal motion planes. Block-matching and 3D filtering can significantly reduce random image noise while maintaining structural features in the SG-KS-4D-MRI datasets. In this study of pancreatic tumor segmentation, automatic segmentation of GTV in the registered image sets is shown to be more consistent on the denoised 4D-MRI than on the raw 4D

  20. Tumor shrinkage assessed by volumetric MRI in the long-term follow-up after stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astner, Sabrina T.; Theodorou, Marilena; Dobrei-Ciuchendea, Mihaela; Kopp, Christine; Molls, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Auer, Florian [Dept. of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical Univ. of Munich (Germany); Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Freiburg (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate tumor volume reduction in the follow-up of meningiomas after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) or linac radiosurgery (RS) by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients and Methods: In 59 patients with skull base meningiomas, gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on contrast-en-hanced MRI before and median 50 months (range 11-92 months) after stereotactic radiotherapy. MRI was performed as an axial three-dimensional gradient-echo T1-weighted sequence at 1.6 mm slice thickness without gap (3D-MRI). Results were compared to the reports of diagnostic findings. Results: Mean tumor size of all 59 meningiomas was 13.9 ml (0.8-62.9 ml) before treatment. There was shrinkage of the treated meningiomas in all but one patient. Within a median volumetric follow-up of 50 months (11-95 months), an absolute mean volume reduction of 4 ml (0-18 ml) was seen. The mean relative size reduction compared to the volume before radiotherapy was 27% (0-73%). Shrinkage measured by 3D-MRI was greater at longer time intervals after radiotherapy. The mean size reduction was 17%, 23%, and 30% (at < 24 months, 24-48 months, and 48-72 months). Conclusion: By using 3D-MRI in almost all patients undergoing radiotherapy of a meningioma, tumor shrinkage is detected. The data presented here demonstrate that volumetric assessment from 3D-MRI provides additional information to routinely used radiologic response measurements. After FSRT or RS, a mean size reduction of 25-45% can be expected within 4 years. (orig.)

  1. Impact of intra-arterial administration of boron compounds on dose-volume histograms in boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head-and-neck tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nagata, Kenji; Kinashi, Yuko; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira; Kato, Ituro; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Imahori, Yoshio

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of head-and-neck tumors treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and to determine the advantage of the intra-arterial (IA) route over the intravenous (IV) route as a drug delivery system for BNCT. Methods and Materials: Fifteen BNCTs for 12 patients with recurrent head-and-neck tumors were included in the present study. Eight irradiations were done after IV administration of boronophenylalanine and seven after IA administration. The maximal, mean, and minimal doses given to the gross tumor volume were assessed using a BNCT planning system. Results: The results are reported as median values with the interquartile range. In the IA group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 68.7 Gy-Eq (range, 38.8-79.9), 45.0 Gy-Eq (range, 25.1-51.0), and 13.8 Gy-Eq (range, 4.8-25.3), respectively. In the IV group, the maximal, mean, and minimal dose given to the gross tumor volume was 24.2 Gy-Eq (range, 21.5-29.9), 16.4 Gy-Eq (range, 14.5-20.2), and 7.8 Gy-Eq (range, 6.8-9.5), respectively. Within 1-3 months after BNCT, the responses were assessed. Of the 6 patients in the IV group, 2 had a partial response, 3 no change, and 1 had progressive disease. Of 4 patients in the IA group, 1 achieved a complete response and 3 a partial response. Conclusion: Intra-arterial administration of boronophenylalanine is a promising drug delivery system for head-and-neck BNCT

  2. Temporary organ displacement coupled with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy for paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsoulakis, Evangelia; Thornton, Raymond H; Yamada, Yoshiya; Solomon, Stephen B; Maybody, Majid; Housman, Douglas; Niyazov, Greg; Riaz, Nadeem; Lovelock, Michael; Spratt, Daniel E; Erinjeri, Joseph P

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and dosimetric improvements of a novel technique to temporarily displace critical structures in the pelvis and abdomen from tumor during high-dose radiotherapy. Between 2010 and 2012, 11 patients received high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy with temporary organ displacement (TOD) at our institution. In all cases, imaging revealed tumor abutting critical structures. An all-purpose drainage catheter was introduced between the gross tumor volume (GTV) and critical organs at risk (OAR) and infused with normal saline (NS) containing 5-10% iohexol. Radiation planning was performed with the displaced OARs and positional reproducibility was confirmed with cone-beam CT (CBCT). Patients were treated within 36 hours of catheter placement. Radiation plans were re-optimized using pre-TOD OARs to the same prescription and dosimetrically compared with post-TOD plans. A two-tailed permutation test was performed on each dosimetric measure. The bowel/rectum was displaced in six patients and kidney in four patients. One patient was excluded due to poor visualization of the OAR; thus 10 patients were analyzed. A mean of 229 ml (range, 80–1000) of NS 5-10% iohexol infusion resulted in OAR mean displacement of 17.5 mm (range, 7–32). The median dose prescribed was 2400 cGy in one fraction (range, 2100–3000 in 3 fractions). The mean GTV D min and PTV D min pre- and post-bowel TOD IG-IMRT dosimetry significantly increased from 1473 cGy to 2086 cGy (p=0.015) and 714 cGy to 1214 cGy (p=0.021), respectively. TOD increased mean PTV D95 by 27.14% of prescription (p=0.014) while the PTV D05 decreased by 9.2% (p=0.011). TOD of the bowel resulted in a 39% decrease in mean bowel D max (p=0.008) confirmed by CBCT. TOD of the kidney significantly decreased mean kidney dose and D max by 25% (0.022). TOD was well tolerated, reproducible, and facilitated dose escalation to previously radioresistant tumors abutting critical structures while

  3. Targetting in atelectatic lung by positron emission tomography in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kai; Wang Luhua; Liang Jun; Ou Guangfei; Lu Jima

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the potential benefit of incorporating fluorodeoxyglucose positron e- mission tomography (FDG PET) to delineate tire gross tumor volume(GTV) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) complicated with atelectasis who are to be treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). Methods: Fourteen patients histopathologically proven as having NSCLC with image diagnosed as complicated with various degrees were studied in this study. All patients were scanned with both thoracic CT and thoracic or whole body PET. The GTV was delineated basing on both CT image and PET image (CT-GTV, PET- GTV) and the volume of each GTV(designated CT-GTV and PET-GTV) was compared by 3DCRT plan. Results: Each paired CT-GTV and PET-GTV was different from each other. All patients' GTV was reduced to an average of 27 cm 3 (20.4%) with median CT-PET of 133 cm 3 (90-180 cm 3 ) and median PET-GTV of 106 cm 3 , with a in- crease of 16.9%, 22 cm 3 ). The reduction of PET-GTV was due to PET could so differ cancer-induced atelectasis from gross tumor that it reduced the tarbet volume and spared more surrounding normal tissues. Conclusions: The incorporation of FDG PET data with gross tumor delineation is able to improve the accuracy of 3DCRT for non-small cell lung cancer patients complicated with atelectasis. (authors)

  4. SU-E-T-304: Dosimetric Comparison of Cavernous Sinus Tumors: Heterogeneity Corrected Pencil Beam (PB-Hete) Vs. X-Ray Voxel Monte Carlo (XVMC) Algorithms for Stereotactic Radiotherapy (SRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Sood, S; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Saleh, H; Wang, F [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions calculated using PB-hete vs. XVMC algorithms for SRT treatments of cavernous sinus tumors. Methods: Using PB-hete SRT, five patients with cavernous sinus tumors received the prescription dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions for planning target volume PTV(V100%)=95%. Gross tumor volume (GTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were delineated on T1/T2 MRI-CT-fused images. PTV (range 2.1–84.3cc, mean=21.7cc) was generated using a 5mm uniform-margin around GTV. PB-hete SRT plans included a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/static beams delivered by Novalis-TX consisting of HD-MLCs and a 6MV-SRS(1000 MU/min) beam. Plans were re-optimized using XVMC algorithm with identical beam geometry and MLC positions. Comparison of plan specific PTV(V99%), maximal, mean, isocenter doses, and total monitor units(MUs) were evaluated. Maximal dose to OARs such as brainstem, optic-pathway, spinal cord, and lenses as well as normal tissue volume receiving 12Gy(V12) were compared between two algorithms. All analysis was performed using two-tailed paired t-tests of an upper-bound p-value of <0.05. Results: Using either algorithm, no dosimetrically significant differences in PTV coverage (PTVV99%,maximal, mean, isocenter doses) and total number of MUs were observed (all p-values >0.05, mean ratios within 2%). However, maximal doses to optic-chiasm and nerves were significantly under-predicted using PB-hete (p=0.04). Maximal brainstem, spinal cord, lens dose and V12 were all comparable between two algorithms, with exception of one patient with the largest PTV who exhibited 11% higher V12 with XVMC. Conclusion: Unlike lung tumors, XVMC and PB-hete treatment plans provided similar PTV coverage for cavernous sinus tumors. Majority of OARs doses were comparable between two algorithms, except for small structures such as optic chiasm/nerves which could potentially receive higher doses when using XVMC algorithm. Special attention may need to be paid on a case

  5. Target Definition by C11-Methionine-PET for the Radiotherapy of Brain Metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Masayuki; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Shinoda, Jun; Kako, Nobuo; Nishibori, Hironori; Sakurai, Kouta; Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru; Kanematsu, Masayuki

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) to delineate target volumes for brain metastases and to investigate to what extent tumor growth is presented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MET-PET. Materials and Methods: Three observers undertook target definition in 19 patients with 95 brain metastases by MRI and MET-PET images. MRI gross target volume (GTV) (GTV-MRI) was defined as the contrast-enhanced area on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI. MET-PET GTV (GTV-PET) was defined as the area of an accumulation of MET-PET apparently higher than that of normal tissue on MET-PET images. The size of occupation ratio was determined using the following equation: SOR (%) of MET are within x mm margin outside GTV-MRI = the volume of the GTV-PET within x mm outside the GTV-MRI/the volume of the GTV-PET. Results: For GTV-MRI volumes of ≤0.5 mL, the sensitivity of tumor detection by MET-PET was 43%. For GTV-MRI volume of >0.5 mL, GTV-PET volumes were larger than GTV-MRI volumes and a significant correlation was found between these variables by linear regression. For all tumor sizes and tumor characteristics, a 2-mm margin outside the GTV-MRI significantly improved the coverage of the GTV-PET. Conclusions: Although there were some limitations in our study associated with spatial resolution, blurring effect, and image registrations with PET images, MET-PET was supposed to have a potential as a promising tool for the precise delineation of target volumes in radiotherapy planning for brain metastases.

  6. Time course of hypothalamic-pituitary deficiency in adults receiving cranial radiotherapy for primary extrasellar brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madaschi, Sara; Sara, Madaschi; Fiorino, Claudio; Claudio, Fiorino; Losa, Marco; Marco, Losa; Lanzi, Roberto; Roberto, Lanzi; Mazza, Elena; Elena, Mazza; Motta, Micaela; Micaela, Motta; Perna, Lucia; Lucia, Perna; Brioschi, Elena; Elena, Brioschi; Scavini, Marina; Marina, Scavini; Reni, Michele; Michele, Reni

    2011-04-01

    No longitudinal data on hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) function are available in patients who had received cranial radiation therapy (CRT) for primary extrasellar brain tumors (PBT). To investigate the effects of CRT on HP function in adults with PBT. Twenty-six adults irradiated for PBT and six CRT naive controls were studied. CRT was delivered with 6 MV X-ray by a linear accelerator (2 Gy fraction schedule). Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) excluded the HP region that was contoured on the planning CT. Median dose to the HP region was 41.8 Gy (IQR: 30.7-49.8). All controls maintained normal HP function. Hypopituitarism developed in 38% of CRT patients (GH deficiency 29%, ACTH 22%, TSH 14%, gonadotropin 4%, no abnormal prolactin level or diabetes insipidus). All HP failures occurred within 32 months after CRT. Adults undergoing CRT for PBT are at increased risk for HP dysfunction within 3 years from CRT. Endocrine surveillance is recommended also in adults patients exposed to CRT for primary brain tumors distant from HP region. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony

    2016-01-01

    % of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. RESULTS: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V95% was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P......=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). CONCLUSIONS: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy....... Potential risk factors for reduced V95% are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs...

  8. TU-F-CAMPUS-T-05: Dose Escalation to Biological Tumor Volumes of Prostate Cancer Patients Using Gold Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jermoumi, M; Ngwa, W [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States); Sajo, E [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, Medical Physics Program, University of Massachusetts Lowell (United States); Houari, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Insitute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown that radiation boosting could help reduce prostate cancer (PCa) recurrence. Biological tumor volumes (BTV) are a high priority for such radiation boosting. The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of radiation boosting of real patient BTVs using gold nanoparticles (GNP) released from gold-loaded brachytherapy spacers (GBS) during brachytherapy. Methods: The BTVs of 12 patients having prostate adenocarcinoma identified with positron emission tomography (PET) and CT scanner using C-11 labeled tracer [11C]acetate were investigated. The initial GNP concentration and time to achieve a dose enhancement effect (DEF) of 2 was simulated using the freely downloadable software RAID APP. The investigations were carried out for low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy sources (BTS) described in AAPM Task Group report 43: Cs-131, I-125, and Pd-103. In first case, we used 7 mg/g and 18 mg/g of GNP initial concentrations to estimate the time needed for released GNP to achieve a DEF of 2 for the different BTS, and compare with clinically relevant treatment times. In second case, we calculated the initial concentration of GNPs needed to achieve a DEF of 2 during the time the BTS would typically deliver 50%, 70% and 90% of the total dose. Results: For an initial concentration of 18 mg/g, when using Cs-131, and Pd-103, a DEF of 2 could only be achieved for BTV of 3.3 cm3 and 1 cm3 respectively. Meanwhile a DEF of 2 could be achieved for all 12 BTVs when using I-125. To achieve a DEF of 2 for all patients using Cs-131 and Pd-103, much higher initial concentrations would have to be used than have been typically employed in pre-clinical studies. Conclusion: The I-125 is the most viable BTS that can be employed with GBS to guide dose painting treatment planning for localized PCa.

  9. Clinical Value of [{sup 11}C]Methionine PET for Stereotactic Radiation Therapy With Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to Metastatic Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miwa, Kazuhiro, E-mail: doctor.3@jasmine.ocn.ne.jp [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Shinoda, Jun; Aki, Tatsuki; Yonezawa, Shingo [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Ito, Takeshi [Department of Neurosurgery, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Asano, Yoshitaka [Chubu Medical Center for Prolonged Traumatic Brain Dysfunction, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Department of Clinical Brain Sciences, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Yamada, Mikito; Yokoyama, Kazutoshi; Yamada, Jitsuhiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Minokamo, Gifu (Japan); Yano, Hirohito; Iwama, Toru [Department of Neurosurgery, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the clinical impact of {sup 11}C-labeled methionine-positron emission tomography (MET-PET) for stereotactic radiation therapy with intensity modulated radiation therapy (SRT-IMRT) in metastatic brain tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-two metastatic brain tumors were examined. All tumors were treated with SRT-IMRT using a helical tomotherapy system. Gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined and drawn on the stereotactic magnetic resonance (MR) image, taking into account the respective contributions of MR imaging and MET-PET. Planning target volume (PTV) encompassed the GTV-PET plus a 2-mm margin. SRT-IMRT was performed, keeping the dose for PTV at 25-35 Gy in 5 fractions. The ratio of the mean value of MET uptake to the contralateral normal brain (L/N ratio) was plotted for the PTV prior to SRT-IMRT, at 3 months following SRT-IMRT, and at 6 months following SRT-IMRT. Tumor characteristic changes of MET uptake before and after SRT-IMRT were evaluated quantitatively, comparing them with MRI examination. Results: Mean {+-} SD L/N ratios were 1.95 {+-} 0.83, 1.18 {+-} 0.21, and 1.12 {+-} 0.25 in the pre-SRT-IMRT group, in the 3 months post-SRT-IMRT group, and in the 6 months post-SRT-IMRT group, respectively. Differences in the mean L/N ratio between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 3-month post-SRT-IMRT group and between the pre-SRT-IMRT group and the 6 month post-SRT-IMRT group were statistically significant, irrespective of MRI examination. Conclusions: We showed examples of metastatic lesions demonstrating significant decreases in MET uptake following SRT-IMRT. MET-PET seems to have a potential role in providing additional information, although MRI remains the gold standard for diagnosis and follow-up after SRT-IMRT. The present study is a preliminary approach, but to more clearly define the impact of PET-based radiosurgical assessment, further experimental and clinical analyses are required.

  10. The predictive value of mean platelet volume, plateletcrit and red cell distribution width in the differentiation of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without type I gastric carcinoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Ali; Keskin, Onur; Yakut, Mustafa; Kalkan, Cagdas; Soykan, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune gastritis is an autoimmune and inflammatory condition that may predispose to gastric carcinoid tumors or adenocarcinomas. The early diagnosis of these tumors is important in order to decrease morbidity and mortality. Platelet indices such as mean platelet volume and plateletcrit levels increase in inflammatory, infectious and malign conditions. The primary aim of this study was to explore wheter platelet indices and red cell distribution width have any predictive role in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis patients with and without gastric carcinoid tumors. Also secondary aim of this study was to investigate whether any changes exist betwenn autoimmune gastritis and functional dyspepsia patients by means of platelet indices. Plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.20 ± 0.03%, p gastritis patients compared to control group. Receiver operating curve analysis suggested that optimum plateletcrit cut-off point was 0.20% (AUC: 0.646), and 13.95% as the cut off value for red cell distribution width (AUC: 0.860). Although plateletcrit (0.22 ± 0.06 vs. 0.21 ± 0.04%, p = 0.220) and mean platelet volume (8.94 ± 1.44 vs. 8.68 ± 0.89 fl, p = 0.265) were higher in autoimmune gastritis patients without carcinoid tumor compared to patients with carcinoid tumors, these parameters were not statistically significant. Changes in plateletcrit and red cell distribution width values may be used as a marker in the discrimination of autoimmune gastritis and fucntional dyspepsia patients but not useful in patients with gastric carcinoid tumor type I.

  11. A prospective study of cerebral, frontal lobe, and temporal lobe volumes and neuropsychological performance in children with primary brain tumors treated with cranial radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbahiwe, Harold; Rashid, Arif; Horska, Alena; Mahone, E Mark; Lin, Doris; McNutt, Todd; Cohen, Kenneth; Redmond, Kristin; Wharam, Moody; Terezakis, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (RT) is an important component in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors. However, it can result in long-term effects on the developing brain. This prospective study assessed the effects of cranial RT on cerebral, frontal lobe, and temporal lobe volumes and their correlation with higher cognitive functioning. Ten pediatric patients with primary brain tumors treated with cranial RT and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy children serving as controls were evaluated. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological assessments (language, memory, auditory and visual processing, and vocabulary) were performed at the baseline and 6, 15, and 27 months after RT. The effects of age, the time since RT, and the cerebral RT dose on brain volumes and neuropsychological performance were analyzed with linear mixed effects model analyses. Cerebral volume increased significantly with age in both groups (P = .01); this increase in volume was more pronounced in younger children. Vocabulary performance was found to be significantly associated with a greater cerebral volume (P = .05) and a lower RT dose (P = .003). No relation was observed between the RT dose and the cerebral volume. There was no difference in the corresponding neuropsychological tests between the 2 groups. This prospective study found significant relations among the RT dose, cerebral volumes, and rate of vocabulary development among children receiving RT. The results of this study provide further support for clinical trials aimed at reducing cranial RT doses in the pediatric population. Cancer 2017;161-168. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Evaluation of a new software tool for the automatic volume calculation of hepatic tumors. First results; Evaluation eines neuen Softwareassistenten zur automatischen Volumenbestimmung von intrahepatischen Tumoren. Erste Ergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, S.; Mildenberger, P.; Pitton, M.; Thelen, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie, Univ. Mainz (Germany); Schenk, A.; Bourquain, H. [MeVis, Bremen (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Purpose: computed tomography has become the preferred method in detecting liver carcinomas. The introduction of spiral CT added volumetric assessment of intrahepatic tumors, which was unattainable in the clinical routine with incremental CT due to complex planimetric revisions and excessive computing time. In an ongoing clinical study, a new software tool was tested for the automatic detection of tumor volume and the time needed for this procedure. Materials and methods: we analyzed patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). All patients underwent treatment with repeated transcatheter chemoembolization of the hepatic arteria. The volumes of the HCC lesions detected in CT were measured with the new software tool in HepaVison (MeVis, Germany). The results were compared with manual planimetric calculation of the volume performed by three independent radiologists. Results: our first results in 16 patients show a correlation between the automatically and the manually calculated volumes (up to a difference of 2 ml) of 96.8%. While the manual method of analyzing the volume of a lesion requires 2.5 minutes on average, the automatic method merely requires about 30 seconds of user interaction time. Conclusion: These preliminary results show a good correlation between automatic and manual calculations of the tumor volume. The new software tool requires less time for accurate determination of the tumor volume and can be applied in the daily clinical routine. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Die Computertomographie hat sich bei der Verlaufskontrolle von Lebertumoren als wichtiges Verfahren etabliert. Mit dem Verfahren ist auch eine Angabe des Tumorvolumens moeglich, welche bisher jedoch aufgrund der aufwendigen planimetrischen Aufarbeitung nicht praktikabel ist. In einer laufenden klinischen Studie wird ein neuer Softwareassistent auf seine automatische Volumenerfassung von Lebertumoren getestet und die notwendige Zeit fuer diesen Vorgang erfasst. Material und Methoden: Es

  13. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-11-01

    We evaluate the contribution of (18)F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median=5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of (18)F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the (18)F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), and a region growing (GTV(RG)) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p=0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Semi-automated segmentation techniques for (18)F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  14. Effect of tumor dose, volume and overall treatment time on local control after radiochemotherapy including MRI guided brachytherapy of locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Kari; Fokdal, Lars Ulrik; Sturdza, Alina

    2016-01-01

    (CTVHR) (p = 0.022, HR = 0.967 per Gy) was significant for local control, whereas increasing CTVHR volume (p = 0.004, HR = 1.017 per cm3), and longer OTT (p = 0.004, HR = 1.023 per day) were associated with worse local control. Histology (p = 0.084), chemotherapy (p = 0.49) and dose rate (p = 1.00) did...... Hazards model was applied to analyze the effect on local control of dose-volume metrics as well as overall treatment time (OTT), dose rate, chemotherapy, and tumor histology. Results With a median follow up of 46 months, 43 local failures were observed. Dose (D90) to the High Risk Clinical Target Volume...... not have significant impact on local control. Separate analyses according to stage of disease showed that dose to CTVHR, residual gross tumor volume (GTVres), and Intermediate Risk CTV (CTVIR) has significant impact on local control. Conclusion CTVHR dose of ⩾85 Gy (D90) delivered in 7 weeks provides 3...

  15. Risk-stratifying capacity of PET/CT metabolic tumor volume in stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finkle, Joshua H.; Jo, Stephanie Y.; Yuan, Cindy; Pu, Yonglin [University of Chicago, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ferguson, Mark K. [University of Chicago, Department of Surgery, Chicago, IL (United States); Liu, Hai-Yan [First Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Taiyuan, Shanxi (China); Zhang, Chenpeng [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, RenJi Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Xuee [Nanjing Medical University, Department of Radiology, BenQ Medical Center, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2017-08-15

    Stage IIIA non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is heterogeneous in tumor burden, and its treatment is variable. Whole-body metabolic tumor volume (MTV{sub WB}) has been shown to be an independent prognostic index for overall survival (OS). However, the potential of MTV{sub WB} to risk-stratify stage IIIA NSCLC has previously been unknown. If we can identify subgroups within the stage exhibiting significant OS differences using MTV{sub WB}, MTV{sub WB} may lead to adjustments in patients' risk profile evaluations and may, therefore, influence clinical decision making regarding treatment. We estimated the risk-stratifying capacity of MTV{sub WB} in stage IIIA by comparing OS of stratified stage IIIA with stage IIB and IIIB NSCLC. We performed a retrospective review of 330 patients with clinical stage IIB, IIIA, and IIIB NSCLC diagnosed between 2004 and 2014. The patients' clinical TNM stage, initial MTV{sub WB}, and long-term survival data were collected. Patients with TNM stage IIIA disease were stratified by MTV{sub WB}. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cutoff value for stage IIIA patients was calculated using sequential log-rank tests. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses and Kaplan-Meier OS analysis with log-rank tests were performed. The optimal MTV{sub WB} cut-point was 29.2 mL for the risk-stratification of stage IIIA. We identified statistically significant differences in OS between stage IIB and IIIA patients (p < 0.01), between IIIA and IIIB patients (p < 0.01), and between the stage IIIA patients with low MTV{sub WB} (below 29.2 mL) and the stage IIIA patients with high MTV{sub WB} (above 29.2 mL) (p < 0.01). There was no OS difference between the low MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA and the cohort of stage IIB patients (p = 0.485), or between the high MTV{sub WB} stage IIIA patients and the cohort of stage IIIB patients (p = 0.459). Similar risk-stratification capacity of MTV{sub WB} was observed in a large range of cutoff values from 15 to 55 mL in

  16. Assessment of treatment response by total tumor volume and global apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with metastatic bone disease: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blackledge

    Full Text Available We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI using a Markov random field (MRF model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC; and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change = +0.18, range = -0.07 to +0.78 × 10(-3 mm2/s after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change = -0.02, range = -0.10 to +0.05 × 10(-3 mm2/s, p = 0.05, Mann-Whitney test, whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change = +26%, range = +3 to +284% compared to responding patients (median change = -50%, range = -85 to +27%, p = 0.02, Mann-Whitney test. Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment.

  17. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M [University of California, Orange, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments.

  18. SU-C-210-06: Quantitative Evaluation of Dosimetric Effects Resulting From Positional Variations of Pancreatic Tumor Volumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, S; Sehgal, V; Wei, R; Lawrenson, L; Kuo, J; Hanna, N; Ramsinghani, N; Daroui, P; Al-Ghazi, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to quantify dosimetric effects resulting from variation in pancreatic tumor position assessed by bony anatomy and implanted fiducial markers Methods: Twelve pancreatic cancer patients were retrospectively analyzed for this study. All patients received modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment using fiducial-based Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) to the intact pancreas. Using daily orthogonal kV and/or Cone beam CT images, the shift needed to co-register the daily pre-treatment images to reference CT from fiducial to bone (Fid-Bone) were recorded as Left-Right (LR), Anterior-Posterior (AP) and Superior-Inferior (SI). The original VMAT plan iso-center was shifted based on KV bone matching positions at 5 evenly spaced fractions. Dose coverage of the planning target volumes (PTVs) (V100%), mean dose to liver, kidney and stomach/duodenum were assessed in the modified plans. Results: A total of 306 fractions were analyzed. The absolute fiducial-bone positional shifts were greatest in the SI direction, (AP = 2.7 ± 3.0, LR = 2.8 ± 2.8, and SI 6.3 ± 7.9 mm, mean ± SD). The V100% was significantly reduced by 13.5%, (Fid-Bone = 95.3 ± 2.0 vs. 82.3 ± 11.8%, p=0.02). This varied widely among patients (Fid-Bone V100% Range = 2–60%), where 33% of patients had a reduction in V100% of more than 10%. The impact on OARs was greatest to the liver (Fid-Bone= 14.6 vs. 16.1 Gy, 10%), and stomach, (Fid-Bone = 23.9 vx. 25.5 Gy, 7%), however was not statistically significant (p=0.10 both). Conclusion: Compared to matching by fiducial markers, matching by bony anatomy would have substantially reduced the PTV coverage by 13.5%. This reinforces the importance of online position verification based on fiducial markers. Hence, implantation of fiducial markers is strongly recommended for pancreatic cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy treatments

  19. Tumor volume determines the feasibility of cell-free DNA sequencing for mutation detection in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Tatsuo; Sakai, Kazuko; Matsubayashi, Jun; Kajiwara, Naohiro; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Hagiwara, Masaru; Hibi, Masaaki; Yoshida, Koichi; Maeda, Junichi; Ohtani, Keishi; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2016-11-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and digital PCR technologies allow analysis of the mutational profile of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in individuals with advanced lung cancer. We have now evaluated the feasibility of cfDNA sequencing for mutation detection in patients with non-small cell lung cancer at earlier stages. A total of 150 matched tumor and serum samples were collected from non-small cell lung cancer patients at stages IA-IIIA. Amplicon sequencing with DNA extracted from tumor tissue detected frequent mutations in EGFR (37% of patients), TP53 (39%), and KRAS (10%), consistent with previous findings. In contrast, NGS of cfDNA identified only EGFR, TP53, and PIK3CA mutations in three, five, and one patient, respectively, even though adequate amounts of cfDNA were extracted (median of 4936 copies/mL serum). Next-generation sequencing showed a high accuracy (98.8%) compared with droplet digital PCR for cfDNA mutation detection, suggesting that the low frequency of mutations in cfDNA was not due to a low assay sensitivity. Whereas the yield of cfDNA did not differ among tumor stages, the cfDNA mutations were detected in seven patients at stages IIA-IIIA and at T2b or T3. Tumor volume was significantly higher in the cfDNA mutation-positive patients than in the negative patients at stages T2b-T4 (159.1 ± 58.0 vs. 52.5 ± 9.9 cm 3 , P = 0.014). Our results thus suggest that tumor volume is a determinant of the feasibility of mutation detection with cfDNA as the analyte. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Practical integration of [18F]-FDG-PET and PET-CT in the planning of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): the technical basis, ICRU-target volumes, problems, perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestle, Ursula; Kremp, Stephanie; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2006-11-01

    The value of positron emission tomography using [18F]-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG-PET) for pretherapeutic evaluation of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is beyond doubt. Due to the increasing availability of PET and PET-CT scanners the method is now widely available, and its technical integration has become possible for radiotherapy planning systems. Due to the depiction of malignant tissue with high diagnostic accuracy, the use of FDG-PET in radiotherapy planning of NSCLC is very promising. However, by uncritical application, PET could impair rather than improve the prognosis of patients. Therefore, in the present paper we give an overview of technical factors influencing PET and PET-CT data, and their consequences for radiotherapy planning. We further review the relevant literature concerning the diagnostic value of FDG-PET and on the integration of FDG-PET data in RT planning for NSCLC. We point out the possible impact in gross tumor volume (GTV) definition and describe methods of target volume contouring of the primary tumor, as well as concepts for the integration of diagnostic information on lymph node involvement into the clinical target volume (CTV), and the possible implications of PET data on the definition of the planning target volume (PTV). Finally, we give an idea of the possible future use of tracers other than [18F]-FDG in lung cancer.

  1. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueck, Jenny; Knopf, Antje-Christin; Lomax, Antony; Albertini, Francesca; Persson, Gitte F.; Josipovic, Mirjana; Aznar, Marianne; Weber, Damien C.; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V 95% (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V 95% was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V 95% (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V 95% are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  2. Prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume as measured by fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Young-Ho; Lee, Seok-Hwan; Hong, Sung-Lyong; Kim, Seong-Jang; Roh, Hwan-Jung; Cho, Kyu-Sup

    2014-10-01

    The prognostic value of the tumor burden characterized by the metabolic tumor volume (MTV) remains under investigation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax ) and MTV according to metabolic volume threshold as measured by positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), and other clinical factors, in patients with NPC. This study was a retrospective chart review. We evaluated the association of SUVmax , MTV2.5 , MTV3.0 , and other clinical factors with overall survival (OS) using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models. (MTV2.5 and MTV3.0 are the volume of hypermetabolic tissue within the regions of gross tumor volumes with a SUV value greater than the threshold values of 2.5 and 3.0, respectively.) Higher MTV2.5 of 31.45 cm(3) and MTV3.0 of 23.01 cm(3) were associated with an increased risk of death (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.028; p = 0.029), although no significant relationship was found between SUVmax and OS. Interestingly, MTV3.0 was associated with OS in both the differentiated and undifferentiated groups, although MTV2.5 was only associated with OS in the undifferentiated group. Among the clinical parameters, only radiotherapy was associated with longer OS (HR = 12.124; p < 0.001). The MTV and radiotherapy could be prognostic values associated with OS. Particularly, MTV2.5 and MTV3.0 might be valuable metabolic parameters for predicting long-term survival in patients with NPC. Furthermore, MTV3.0 may be more useful because it can be applied irrespective of pathologic subtype. © 2014 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  3. Risk Factors for Neovascular Glaucoma After Proton Beam Therapy of Uveal Melanoma: A Detailed Analysis of Tumor and Dose–Volume Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: kmishra@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Cole, Tia [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Castro, Joseph R.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine neovascular glaucoma (NVG) incidence and identify contributing tumor and dosing factors in uveal melanoma patients treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 704 PBRT patients treated by a single surgeon (DHC) for uveal melanoma (1996-2010) were reviewed for NVG in our prospectively maintained database. All patients received 56 GyE in 4 fractions. Median follow-up was 58.3 months. Analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate NVG distributions, univariate log–rank tests, and Cox's proportional hazards multivariate analysis using likelihood ratio tests to identify independent risk factors of NVG among patient, tumor, and dose–volume histogram parameters. Results: The 5-year PBRT NVG rate was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.2%-15.9%). The 5-year rate of enucleation due to NVG was 4.9% (95% CI 3.4%-7.2%). Univariately, the NVG rate increased significantly with larger tumor diameter (P<.0001), greater height (P<.0001), higher T stage (P<.0001), and closer proximity to the disc (P=.002). Dose–volume histogram analysis revealed that if >30% of the lens or ciliary body received ≥50% dose (≥28 GyE), there was a higher probability of NVG (P<.0001 for both). Furthermore, if 100% of the disc or macula received ≥28 GyE, the NVG rate was higher (P<.0001 and P=.03, respectively). If both anterior and posterior doses were above specified cut points, NVG risk was highest (P<.0001). Multivariate analysis confirmed significant independent risk factors to include tumor height (P<.0001), age (P<.0001), %disc treated to ≥50% Dose (<100% vs 100%) (P=.0007), larger tumor diameter (P=.01), %lens treated to ≥90% Dose (0 vs >0%-30% vs >30%) (P=.01), and optic nerve length treated to ≥90% Dose (≤1 mm vs >1 mm) (P=.02). Conclusions: Our current PBRT patients experience a low rate of NVG and resultant enucleation compared with historical data. The present analysis shows that tumor height

  4. Radical cyberknife radiosurgery with tumor tracking: an effective treatment for inoperable small peripheral stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Curative surgery is not an option for many patients with clinical stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, but radical radiosurgery may be effective. Methods Inoperable patients with small peripheral clinical stage I NSCLC were enrolled in this study. Three-to-five fiducial markers were implanted in or near tumors under CT guidance. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs were contoured using lung windows. The GTV margin was expanded by 5 mm to establish the planning treatment volume (PTV. A dose of 42–60 Gy was delivered to the PTV in 3 equal fractions in less than 2 weeks using the CyberKnife radiosurgery system. The 30-Gy isodose contour extended at least 1 cm from the GTV. Physical examination, CT imaging and pulmonary function testing were completed at 6 months intervals for three years following treatment. Results Twenty patients with an average maximum tumor diameter of 2.2 cm (range, 1.1 – 3.5 cm and a mean FEV1 of 1.08 liters (range, 0.53 – 1.71 L were treated. Pneumothorax requiring tube thoracostomy occurred following CT-guided fiducial placement in 25% of the patients. All patients completed treatment with few acute side effects and no procedure-related mortality. Transient chest wall discomfort developed in 8 of the 12 patients with lesions within 5 mm of the pleura. The mean percentage of the total lung volume receiving a minimum of 15 Gy was 7.3% (range, 2.4% to 11.3%. One patient who received concurrent gefitinib developed short-lived, grade III radiation pneumonitis. The mean percent predicted DLCO decreased by 9% and 11% at 6 and 12 months, respectively. There were no local failures, regional lymph node recurrences or distant metastases. With a median follow-up of 25 months for the surviving patients, Kaplan-Meier overall survival estimate at 2 years was 87%, with deaths due to COPD progression. Conclusion Radical CyberKnife radiosurgery is a well-tolerated treatment option for inoperable patients with small

  5. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; Schelfhout, J.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  6. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  7. SU-E-J-123: Assessing Segmentation Accuracy of Internal Volumes and Sub-Volumes in 4D PET/CT of Lung Tumors Using a Novel 3D Printed Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soultan, D; Murphy, J; James, C; Hoh, C; Moiseenko, V; Cervino, L; Gill, B

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the accuracy of internal target volume (ITV) segmentation of lung tumors for treatment planning of simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) radiotherapy as seen in 4D PET/CT images, using a novel 3D-printed phantom. Methods: The insert mimics high PET tracer uptake in the core and 50% uptake in the periphery, by using a porous design at the periphery. A lung phantom with the insert was placed on a programmable moving platform. Seven breathing waveforms of ideal and patient-specific respiratory motion patterns were fed to the platform, and 4D PET/CT scans were acquired of each of them. CT images were binned into 10 phases, and PET images were binned into 5 phases following the clinical protocol. Two scenarios were investigated for segmentation: a gate 30–70 window, and no gating. The radiation oncologist contoured the outer ITV of the porous insert with on CT images, while the internal void volume with 100% uptake was contoured on PET images for being indistinguishable from the outer volume in CT images. Segmented ITVs were compared to the expected volumes based on known target size and motion. Results: 3 ideal breathing patterns, 2 regular-breathing patient waveforms, and 2 irregular-breathing patient waveforms were used for this study. 18F-FDG was used as the PET tracer. The segmented ITVs from CT closely matched the expected motion for both no gating and gate 30–70 window, with disagreement of contoured ITV with respect to the expected volume not exceeding 13%. PET contours were seen to overestimate volumes in all the cases, up to more than 40%. Conclusion: 4DPET images of a novel 3D printed phantom designed to mimic different uptake values were obtained. 4DPET contours overestimated ITV volumes in all cases, while 4DCT contours matched expected ITV volume values. Investigation of the cause and effects of the discrepancies is undergoing

  8. [Irradiation of hepatocellular carcinoma: impact of breathing on motions and variations of volume of the tumor, liver and upper abdominal organs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubas, A; Mornex, F; Merle, P; d'Hombres, A; Lorchel, F; Chapet, O

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the amplitude of motion and the variations of volume of the tumor, the liver and upper abdominal organs induced by breathing during the irradiation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Two scanners were performed in inhale and in exhale not forced in 20 patients with a HCC. The liver (left/right lobes), the tumor, the duodenum, the two kidneys and the pancreas were delineated on each acquisition. The superposition of the two spirals made it possible to measure the displacements and variations of volume of these structures in the craniocaudal (CC), lateral (Lat), and anteroposterior (AP) directions. The mean displacement of the tumour in CC, Lat and AP was of 19.7+/-8.3 mm, 4.5+/-2.3 mm, and 8.9+/-6.5 mm. The greatest amplitude of movement was obtained in CC for the right and left hepatic lobes (19+/-6.5 mm, 10+/-5.6 mm), the duodenum(12.6+/-6.4 mm), the kidneys right and left (15.5+/-6.1 mm, 16.2+/-10 mm) and the pancreas (13.2+/-6 mm). No significant variation of volume was observed for these organs. The movements of the tumour, the liver and the abdominal organs, induced by breathing are significant. The respiratory gating appears essential in particular with the development of new techniques of irradiation such as the intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT).

  9. Optimal Timing of Surgery for Intramedullary Cavernous Hemangioma of the Spinal Cord in Relation to Preoperative Motor Paresis, Disease Duration, and Tumor Volume and Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Matsumoto, Akiyuki; Morozumi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Satoshi; Machino, Masaaki; Ota, Kyotaro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Wakao, Norimitsu; Sakai, Yoshihito; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Prospective study. Investigate factors associated with preoperative motor paresis, recovery, ambulatory status, and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) among patients with no preoperative paresis (N group), complete preoperative motor recovery (CR group), and no complete recovery (NCR group) in patients with intramedullary spinal cavernous hemangioma to determine the optimal timing of surgery. The study evaluated 41 surgical cases in our institute. Disease duration, tumor lesion, manual muscle testing (MMT), and gait at onset, just before surgery, and final follow-up (FU), tumor and lesion volume, IONM, extent of tumor resection, and tumor recurrence were evaluated among N, CR, and NCR groups. Motor paresis at onset was found in 26 patients (63%), with 42% of those in CR group. Disease duration from onset negatively affected stable gait just before surgery and FU as well as lower preoperative MMT ( P preoperative motor paresis to allow optimal surgical outcome. IONM should be carefully monitored in patients with a history of preoperative paresis even with preoperative complete motor recovery.

  10. The accuracy of target delineation in laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas-Magalhaes, Joana; Kooij, Nina; Ligtenberg, Hans; Jager, Elise A; Schakel, Tim; Kasperts, Nicolien; Pameijer, Frank A; Terhaard, Chris H J; Janssen, Luuk M; van Diest, Paul J; Philippens, Marielle E P; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the spatial correspondence between the gross tumor volume (GTV) delineated on computer tomography (CT) and the actual tumor on histopathology. Sixteen patients with T3 or T4 laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer underwent a CT scan before total laryngectomy. The GTV was delineated on CT by three independent observers and by consensus between the three observers. After surgery, whole-mount hematoxylin-eosin stained (H&E) sections were obtained. One pathologist delineated the tumor in the H&E sections (tumorH&E). The reconstructed specimen was registered to the CT scan in order to compare the GTV to the tumorH&E in three dimensions. The overlap between the GTV and the tumorH&E was calculated and the distance between the volumes was determined. Tumor tissue was delineated in 203 of 516 H&E sections. For 14 patients a detailed analysis could be performed. The GTV volume was on average 1.7 times larger than the volume of the tumorH&E. The mean coverage of the tumorH&E by the consensus GTV was 88%. tumorH&E tissue was found at 1.6 mm to 12.9 mm distance outside the GTV depending on observer and patient. GTVs delineated on CT for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer were 1.7 times larger than the tumor. Complete coverage of the tumor by the GTV was, however, not obtained.

  11. Risk Factors for Neovascular Glaucoma After Proton Beam Therapy of Uveal Melanoma: A Detailed Analysis of Tumor and Dose–Volume Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, Kavita K.; Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian; Cole, Tia; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Castro, Joseph R.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Char, Devron H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine neovascular glaucoma (NVG) incidence and identify contributing tumor and dosing factors in uveal melanoma patients treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 704 PBRT patients treated by a single surgeon (DHC) for uveal melanoma (1996-2010) were reviewed for NVG in our prospectively maintained database. All patients received 56 GyE in 4 fractions. Median follow-up was 58.3 months. Analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate NVG distributions, univariate log–rank tests, and Cox's proportional hazards multivariate analysis using likelihood ratio tests to identify independent risk factors of NVG among patient, tumor, and dose–volume histogram parameters. Results: The 5-year PBRT NVG rate was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.2%-15.9%). The 5-year rate of enucleation due to NVG was 4.9% (95% CI 3.4%-7.2%). Univariately, the NVG rate increased significantly with larger tumor diameter (P 30% of the lens or ciliary body received ≥50% dose (≥28 GyE), there was a higher probability of NVG (P 0%-30% vs >30%) (P=.01), and optic nerve length treated to ≥90% Dose (≤1 mm vs >1 mm) (P=.02). Conclusions: Our current PBRT patients experience a low rate of NVG and resultant enucleation compared with historical data. The present analysis shows that tumor height, diameter, and anterior as well as posterior critical structure dose–volume parameters may be used to predict NVG risk

  12. Prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume on {sup 11}C-methionine PET in predicting progression-free survival in high-grade glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Min Young; Paeng, Jin Chul; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Kang, Keon Wook [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, E. Edmund [Dept. of Molecular Medicine and Biopharmaceutical Sciences, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    C-11 methionine (MET) PET is commonly used for diagnosing high-grade glioma (HGG). Recently, volumetric analysis has been widely applied to oncologic PET imaging. In this study, we investigated the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on MET PET in HGG. A total of 30 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 12) and glioblastoma multiforme (n = 18) who underwent MET PET before treatment (surgery followed by chemo-radiotherapy) were retrospectively enrolled. Maximal tumor-to-normal brain ratio (TNR{sub max}, maximum tumor activity divided by mean of normal tissue) and MTV (volume of tumor tissue that shows uptake >1.3-fold of mean uptake in normal tissue) were measured on MET PET. Adult patients were classified into two subgroups according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis (RTOG RPA) classification. Prognostic values of TNR{sub max}, MTV and clinicopathologic factors were evaluated with regard to progression-free survival (PFS). Median PFS of all patients was 7.9 months (range 1.0–53.8 months). In univariate analysis, MTV (cutoff 35 cm{sup 3}) was a significant prognostic factor for PFS (P = 0.01), whereas TNR{sub max} (cutoff 3.3) and RTOG RPA class were not (P = 0.80 and 0.61, respectively). Treatment of surgical resection exhibited a borderline significance (P = 0.06). In multivariate analysis, MTV was the only independent prognostic factor for PFS (P = 0.03). MTV on MET PET is a significant and independent prognostic factor for PFS in HGG patients, whereas TNR{sub max} is not. Thus, performing volumetric analysis of MET PET is recommended in HGG for better prognostication.

  13. A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jani, Shyam S., E-mail: sjani@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); Robinson, Clifford G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Dahlbom, Magnus [Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States); White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ≥2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated

  14. A Comparison of Amplitude-Based and Phase-Based Positron Emission Tomography Gating Algorithms for Segmentation of Internal Target Volumes of Tumors Subject to Respiratory Motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, Shyam S.; Robinson, Clifford G.; Dahlbom, Magnus; White, Benjamin M.; Thomas, David H.; Gaudio, Sergio; Low, Daniel A.; Lamb, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively compare the accuracy of tumor volume segmentation in amplitude-based and phase-based respiratory gating algorithms in respiratory-correlated positron emission tomography (PET). Methods and Materials: List-mode fluorodeoxyglucose-PET data was acquired for 10 patients with a total of 12 fluorodeoxyglucose-avid tumors and 9 lymph nodes. Additionally, a phantom experiment was performed in which 4 plastic butyrate spheres with inner diameters ranging from 1 to 4 cm were imaged as they underwent 1-dimensional motion based on 2 measured patient breathing trajectories. PET list-mode data were gated into 8 bins using 2 amplitude-based (equal amplitude bins [A1] and equal counts per bin [A2]) and 2 temporal phase-based gating algorithms. Gated images were segmented using a commercially available gradient-based technique and a fixed 40% threshold of maximum uptake. Internal target volumes (ITVs) were generated by taking the union of all 8 contours per gated image. Segmented phantom ITVs were compared with their respective ground-truth ITVs, defined as the volume subtended by the tumor model positions covering 99% of breathing amplitude. Superior-inferior distances between sphere centroids in the end-inhale and end-exhale phases were also calculated. Results: Tumor ITVs from amplitude-based methods were significantly larger than those from temporal-based techniques (P=.002). For lymph nodes, A2 resulted in ITVs that were significantly larger than either of the temporal-based techniques (P<.0323). A1 produced the largest and most accurate ITVs for spheres with diameters of ≥2 cm (P=.002). No significant difference was shown between algorithms in the 1-cm sphere data set. For phantom spheres, amplitude-based methods recovered an average of 9.5% more motion displacement than temporal-based methods under regular breathing conditions and an average of 45.7% more in the presence of baseline drift (P<.001). Conclusions: Target volumes in images generated

  15. Dose reduction to normal tissues as compared to the gross tumor by using intensity modulated radiotherapy in thoracic malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla NK

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT is a powerful tool, which might go a long way in reducing radiation doses to critical structures and thereby reduce long term morbidities. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the impact of IMRT in reducing the dose to the critical normal tissues while maintaining the desired dose to the volume of interest for thoracic malignancies. Materials and methods During the period January 2002 to March 2004, 12 patients of various sites of malignancies in the thoracic region were treated using physical intensity modulator based IMRT. Plans of these patients treated with IMRT were analyzed using dose volume histograms. Results An average dose reduction of the mean values by 73% to the heart, 69% to the right lung and 74% to the left lung, with respect to the GTV could be achieved with IMRT. The 2 year disease free survival was 59% and 2 year overall survival was 59%. The average number of IMRT fields used was 6. Conclusion IMRT with inverse planning enabled us to achieve desired dose distribution, due to its ability to provide sharp dose gradients at the junction of tumor and the adjacent critical organs.

  16. Comparison between 2-(18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography for measuring gross tumor volume in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Randall, Elissa K; Kraft, Susan L; Larue, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma is one of the most refractory feline malignancies. Most patients succumb due to failure in local tumor control. 2-(18) F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography ((18) F-FDG PET) is increasingly being used for veterinary oncology staging as it highlights areas with higher glucose metabolism. The goal of the current prospective study was to compare gross tumor volume measurements using (18) F-FDG PET vs. those using computed tomography (CT) for stereotactic radiation therapy planning in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Twelve cats with confirmed oral squamous cell carcinoma underwent pretreatment (18) F-FDG PET/CT. Gross tumor volumes based on contrast-enhanced CT and (18) F-FDG PET were measured and compared among cats. Mean PET gross tumor volume was significantly smaller than mean CT gross tumor volume in the mandibular/maxillary squamous cell carcinoma group (n = 8, P = 0.002) and for the total number of patients (n = 12, P = 0.006), but not in the lingual/laryngeal group (n = 4, P = 0.57). Mismatch fraction analysis revealed that most of the lingual/laryngeal patients had a large region of high-(18) F-FDG activity outside of the CT gross tumor volume. This mismatch fraction was significantly greater in the lingual/laryngeal group than the mandibular/maxillary group (P = 0.028). The effect of poor spatial resolution of PET imaging was greater when the absolute tumor volume was small. Findings from this study indicated that (18) F-FDG PET warrants further investigation as a supplemental imaging modality in cats with oral squamous cell carcinoma because it detected regions of possible primary tumor that were not detected on CT images. © 2013 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  17. Response assessment in pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma: can response evaluation criteria in solid tumors replace three-dimensional volume assessments?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoot, Reineke A.; McHugh, Kieran; van Rijn, Rick R.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Chisholm, Julia C.; Caron, Huib N.; Merks, Johannes H. M.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate (a) interobserver variability for three-dimensional (3D) (based on European Pediatric Soft-Tissue Sarcoma Study Group [EpSSG] guidelines) and one-dimensional (1D) (based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [RECIST]) response assessments, (b) intermethod variability between

  18. Paternal B Vitamin Intake Is a Determinant of Growth, Hepatic Lipid Metabolism and Intestinal Tumor Volume in Female Apc1638N Mouse Offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sabet

    Full Text Available The importance of maternal nutrition to offspring health and risk of disease is well established. Emerging evidence suggests paternal diet may affect offspring health as well.In the current study we sought to determine whether modulating pre-conception paternal B vitamin intake alters intestinal tumor formation in offspring. Additionally, we sought to identify potential mechanisms for the observed weight differential among offspring by profiling hepatic gene expression and lipid content.Male Apc1638N mice (prone to intestinal tumor formation were fed diets containing replete (control, CTRL, mildly deficient (DEF, or supplemental (SUPP quantities of vitamins B2, B6, B12, and folate for 8 weeks before mating with control-fed wild type females. Wild type offspring were euthanized at weaning and hepatic gene expression profiled. Apc1638N offspring were fed a replete diet and euthanized at 28 weeks of age to assess tumor burden.No differences in intestinal tumor incidence or burden were found between male Apc1638N offspring of different paternal diet groups. Although in female Apc1638N offspring there were no differences in tumor incidence or multiplicity, a stepwise increase in tumor volume with increasing paternal B vitamin intake was observed. Interestingly, female offspring of SUPP and DEF fathers had a significantly lower body weight than those of CTRL fed fathers. Moreover, hepatic trigylcerides and cholesterol were elevated 3-fold in adult female offspring of SUPP fathers. Weanling offspring of the same fathers displayed altered expression of several key lipid-metabolism genes. Hundreds of differentially methylated regions were identified in the paternal sperm in response to DEF and SUPP diets. Aside from a few genes including Igf2, there was a striking lack of overlap between these genes differentially methylated in sperm and differentially expressed in offspring.In this animal model, modulation of paternal B vitamin intake prior to mating

  19. Sarcopenia Impairs Prognosis of Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma: The Role of Liver Functional Reserve and Tumor-Related Factors in Loss of Skeletal Muscle Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Imai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia impairs survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. This study aimed to clarify the factors that contribute to decreased skeletal muscle volume in patients with HCC. The third lumbar vertebra skeletal muscle index (L3 SMI in 351 consecutive patients with HCC was calculated to identify sarcopenia. Sarcopenia was defined as an L3 SMI value ≤ 29.0 cm2/m2 for women and ≤ 36.0 cm2/m2 for men. The factors affecting L3 SMI were analyzed by multiple linear regression analysis and tree-based models. Of the 351 HCC patients, 33 were diagnosed as having sarcopenia and showed poor prognosis compared with non-sarcopenia patients (p = 0.007. However, this significant difference disappeared after the adjustments for age, sex, Child–Pugh score, maximum tumor size, tumor number, and the degree of portal vein invasion by propensity score matching analysis. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that age (p = 0.015 and sex (p < 0.0001 were significantly correlated with a decrease in L3 SMI. Tree-based models revealed that sex (female is the most significant factor that affects L3 SMI. In male patients, L3 SMI was decreased by aging, increased Child–Pugh score (≥56 years, and enlarged tumor size (<56 years. Maintaining liver functional reserve and early diagnosis and therapy for HCC are vital to prevent skeletal muscle depletion and improve the prognosis of patients with HCC.

  20. Obtention of tumor volumes in PET images stacks using techniques of colored image segmentation; Obtencao de volumes tumorais em pilhas de imagens PET usando tecnicas de segmentacao de imagens coloridas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, Jose W.; Lopes Filho, Ferdinand J., E-mail: jose.wilson@recife.ifpe.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE) Recife, PE (Brazil); Vieira, Igor F., E-mail: igoradiologia@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Lima, Fernando R.A.; Cordeiro, Landerson P., E-mail: leoxofisico@gmail.com, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work demonstrated step by step how to segment color images of the chest of an adult in order to separate the tumor volume without significantly changing the values of the components R (Red), G (Green) and B (blue) of the colors of the pixels. For having information which allow to build color map you need to segment and classify the colors present at appropriate intervals in images. The used segmentation technique is to select a small rectangle with color samples in a given region and then erase with a specific color called 'rubber' the other regions of image. The tumor region was segmented into one of the images available and the procedure is displayed in tutorial format. All necessary computational tools have been implemented in DIP (Digital Image Processing), software developed by the authors. The results obtained, in addition to permitting the construction the colorful map of the distribution of the concentration of activity in PET images will also be useful in future work to enter tumors in voxel phantoms in order to perform dosimetric assessments.

  1. Vestibular schwannomas: Accuracy of tumor volume estimated by ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsing-Hao; Li, Ya-Hui; Lee, Jih-Chin; Wang, Chih-Wei; Yu, Yi-Lin; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Ma, Hsin-I; Hsu, Hsian-He; Juan, Chun-Jung

    2018-01-01

    We estimated the volume of vestibular schwannomas by an ice cream cone formula using thin-sliced magnetic resonance images (MRI) and compared the estimation accuracy among different estimating formulas and between different models. The study was approved by a local institutional review board. A total of 100 patients with vestibular schwannomas examined by MRI between January 2011 and November 2015 were enrolled retrospectively. Informed consent was waived. Volumes of vestibular schwannomas were estimated by cuboidal, ellipsoidal, and spherical formulas based on a one-component model, and cuboidal, ellipsoidal, Linskey's, and ice cream cone formulas based on a two-component model. The estimated volumes were compared to the volumes measured by planimetry. Intraobserver reproducibility and interobserver agreement was tested. Estimation error, including absolute percentage error (APE) and percentage error (PE), was calculated. Statistical analysis included intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), linear regression analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and paired t-tests with P ice cream cone method, and ellipsoidal and Linskey's formulas significantly reduced the APE to 11.0%, 10.1%, and 12.5%, respectively (all P ice cream cone method and other two-component formulas including the ellipsoidal and Linskey's formulas allow for estimation of vestibular schwannoma volume more accurately than all one-component formulas.

  2. Influence of Software Tool and Methodological Aspects of Total Metabolic Tumor Volume Calculation on Baseline [18F]FDG PET to Predict Survival in Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoun, Salim; Tal, Ilan; Berriolo-Riedinger, Alina; Rossi, Cédric; Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Vrigneaud, Jean-Marc; Legrand, Louis; Humbert, Olivier; Casasnovas, Olivier; Brunotte, François; Cochet, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the respective influence of software tool and total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV0) calculation method on prognostic stratification of baseline 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET) in newly diagnosed Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). 59 patients with newly diagnosed HL were retrospectively included. [18F]FDG-PET was performed before any treatment. Four sets of TMTV0 were calculated with Beth Israel (BI) software: based on an absolute threshold selecting voxel with standardized uptake value (SUV) >2.5 (TMTV02.5), applying a per-lesion threshold of 41% of the SUV max (TMTV041) and using a per-patient adapted threshold based on SUV max of the liver (>125% and >140% of SUV max of the liver background; TMTV0125 and TMTV0140). TMTV041 was also determined with commercial software for comparison of software tools. ROC curves were used to determine the optimal threshold for each TMTV0 to predict treatment failure. Median follow-up was 39 months. There was an excellent correlation between TMTV041 determined with BI and with the commercial software (r = 0.96, pfree survival (PFS) were respectively: 313 ml and 0.70, 432 ml and 0.68, 450 ml and 0.68, 330 ml and 0.68. There was no significant difference between ROC curves. High TMTV0 value was predictive of poor PFS in all methodologies: 4-years PFS was 83% vs 42% (p = 0.006) for TMTV02.5, 83% vs 41% (p = 0.003) for TMTV041, 85% vs 40% (p<0.001) for TMTV0125 and 83% vs 42% (p = 0.004) for TMTV0140. In newly diagnosed HL, baseline metabolic tumor volume values were significantly influenced by the choice of the method used for determination of volume. However, no significant differences were found in term of prognosis.

  3. Optimal technique of linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for tumors adjacent to brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chiou-Shiung; Hwang, Jing-Min; Tai, Po-An; Chang, You-Kang; Wang, Yu-Nong; Shih, Rompin; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a well-established technique that is replacing whole-brain irradiation in the treatment of intracranial lesions, which leads to better preservation of brain functions, and therefore a better quality of life for the patient. There are several available forms of linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS, and the goal of the present study is to identify which of these techniques is best (as evaluated by dosimetric outcomes statistically) when the target is located adjacent to brainstem. We collected the records of 17 patients with lesions close to the brainstem who had previously been treated with single-fraction radiosurgery. In all, 5 different lesion catalogs were collected, and the patients were divided into 2 distance groups-1 consisting of 7 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of less than 0.5cm, and the other of 10 patients with a target-to-brainstem distance of ≥ 0.5 and techniques included multiple noncoplanar beams or arcs with or without intensity-modulated delivery. The volume of gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 0.2cm(3) to 21.9cm(3). Regarding the dose homogeneity index (HIICRU) and conformity index (CIICRU) were without significant difference between techniques statistically. However, the average CIICRU = 1.09 ± 0.56 achieved by VMAT was the best of the 3 techniques. Moreover, notable improvement in gradient index (GI) was observed when VMAT was used (0.74 ± 0.13), and this result was significantly better than those achieved by the 2 other techniques (p techniques required higher MU delivery than DCA, with the averages being twice as high (p technique for delivering treatment to tumors adjacent to brainstem. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterisation of radiotherapy planning volumes using textural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nailon, William H; Redpath, Anthony T; McLaren, Duncan B

    2008-01-01

    Computer-based artificial intelligence methods for classification and delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) on computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images do not, at present, provide the accuracy required for radiotherapy applications. This paper describes an image analysis method for classification of distinct regions within the GTV, and other clinically relevant regions, on CT images acquired on eight bladder cancer patients at the radiotherapy planning stage and thereafter at regular intervals during treatment. Statistical and fractal textural features (N=27) were calculated on the bladder, rectum and a control region identified on axial, coronal and sagittal CT images. Unsupervised classification results demonstrate that with a reduced feature set (N=3) the approach offers significant classification accuracy on axial, coronal and sagittal CT image planes and has the potential to be developed further for radiotherapy applications, particularly towards an automatic outlining approach.

  5. Characterisation of radiotherapy planning volumes using textural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nailon, William H.; Redpath, Anthony T.; McLaren, Duncan B. (Dept. of Oncology Physics, Edinburgh Cancer Centre, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom))

    2008-08-15

    Computer-based artificial intelligence methods for classification and delineation of the gross tumour volume (GTV) on computerised tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images do not, at present, provide the accuracy required for radiotherapy applications. This paper describes an image analysis method for classification of distinct regions within the GTV, and other clinically relevant regions, on CT images acquired on eight bladder cancer patients at the radiotherapy planning stage and thereafter at regular intervals during treatment. Statistical and fractal textural features (N=27) were calculated on the bladder, rectum and a control region identified on axial, coronal and sagittal CT images. Unsupervised classification results demonstrate that with a reduced feature set (N=3) the approach offers significant classification accuracy on axial, coronal and sagittal CT image planes and has the potential to be developed further for radiotherapy applications, particularly towards an automatic outlining approach

  6. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  7. Prognostic value of baseline metabolic tumor volume in early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma in the standard arm of H10 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cottereau, Anne Ségolène; Versari, Annibale; Loft, Annika

    2018-01-01

    We tested baseline PET/CT as a measure of total tumor burden in order to better identify high risk patients in early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Stage I-II HL patients enrolled in the standard arm (combined modality treatment) of the H10 trial (NCT00433433) with available baseline PET and inte......We tested baseline PET/CT as a measure of total tumor burden in order to better identify high risk patients in early-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Stage I-II HL patients enrolled in the standard arm (combined modality treatment) of the H10 trial (NCT00433433) with available baseline PET...... and compared to baseline characteristics, staging classifications and iPET2. A total of 258 patients were eligible, 101 favorable and 157 unfavorable. The median follow-up was 55 months, with 27 PFS and 12 OS events. TMTV was prognosticator of PFS (p... respectively. The 5y-PFS and OS were 71% and 83% in the high TMTV (>147cm3) group (n=46) vs. 92% and 98% in the low TMTV group (≤147cm3). In multivariable analysis including iPET2, TMTV was the only baseline prognosticator compared to the current staging systems proposed by EORTC/GELA, GHSG, or NCCN groups...

  8. A prospective study of corpus callosum regional volumes and neurocognitive outcomes following cranial radiation for pediatric brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Arif; Ram, Ashwin N; Kates, Wendy R; Redmond, Kristin J; Wharam, Moody; Mark Mahone, E; Horska, Alena; Terezakis, Stephanie

    2017-06-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (CRT) may disrupt the corpus callosum (CC), which plays an important role in basic motor and cognitive functions. The aim of this prospective longitudinal study was to assess changes in CC mid-sagittal areas, CC volumes, and performance on neuropsychological (NP) tests related to the CC in children following CRT. Twelve pediatric patients were treated with CRT for primary brain malignancies. Thirteen age-matched healthy volunteers served as controls. Brain MRIs and NP assessment emphasizing motor dexterity, processing speed, visuomotor integration, and working memory (visual and verbal) were performed at baseline and at 6, 15, and 27 months following completion of CRT. Linear mixed effects (LME) analyses were used to evaluate patient NP performance and changes in regional CC volumes (genu, anterior body, mid-body, posterior body, and splenium) and mid-sagittal areas over time and with radiation doses, correcting for age at CRT start. The mean age at CRT was 9.41 (range 1.2-15.7) years. The median prescription dose was 54 (range 18-59.4) Gy. LME analysis revealed a significant decrease in overall CC volumes over time (p memory (both p memory. Further prospective study of larger cohorts of patients is needed to establish the relationship between CRT dose, neuroanatomical, and functional changes in the CC.

  9. Internal target volume for post-hysterectomy vaginal recurrences of cervical cancers during image-guided radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upasani, Maheshkumar N; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Medhi, Seema; Mehta, Zubin; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of post-surgical recurrences of cervical cancer may be improved through radiation dose escalation, which hinges on accurate identification and treatment of the target. The present study quantifies target motion during course of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for vault cancers. All patients underwent planning CT simulation after bladder-filling protocol. A daily pre-treatment megavoltage CT was performed. All translations and rotations were recorded. Post-registration displacement of gross tumour volume (GTV) and centre of mass (COM) of GTV was independently recorded by two observers for fractions one to seven. Day 1 image sets served as reference images against which the displacements of COM were measured. We calculated the displacements of common volume (CV) and encompassing volume (EV) of GTV for both the observers. A total of 90 image data sets of 15 patients were available for evaluation. Individual patient GTV and average GTV by both the observers were comparable. The average shifts for EV were 2.4 mm [standard deviation (SD) ±1.2] in the mediolateral, 4.2 mm (SD ±2.8) in the anteroposterior and 4.0 mm (SD ±2.1) in superoinferior directions. Similarly, the average shifts for CV were 1.9 mm (SD ±0.6) in the mediolateral, 3.7 mm (SD ±2.7) in the anteroposterior and 4.4 mm (SD ±2.7) in superoinferior directions. Using Stroom's/van Herk's formula, the minimum recommended margins would be 4.5/5.2, 8.2/9.4 and 7.3/8.3 mm, respectively, for lateral, anteroposterior and superoinferior directions. Differential directional internal margin is recommended in patients undergoing IGRT for post-surgical recurrence of cervical cancers. Internal organ motion of vault cancers can be accounted for by a directional margin to the gross tumour.

  10. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-04-01

    In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs.

  11. Single minimum incision endoscopic radical nephrectomy for renal tumors with preoperative virtual navigation using 3D-CT volume-rendering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shioyama Yasukazu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single minimum incision endoscopic surgery (MIES involves the use of a flexible high-definition laparoscope to facilitate open surgery. We reviewed our method of radical nephrectomy for renal tumors, which is single MIES combined with preoperative virtual surgery employing three-dimensional CT images reconstructed by the volume rendering method (3D-CT images in order to safely and appropriately approach the renal hilar vessels. We also assessed the usefulness of 3D-CT images. Methods Radical nephrectomy was done by single MIES via the translumbar approach in 80 consecutive patients. We performed the initial 20 MIES nephrectomies without preoperative 3D-CT images and the subsequent 60 MIES nephrectomies with preoperative 3D-CT images for evaluation of the renal hilar vessels and the relation of each tumor to the surrounding structures. On the basis of the 3D information, preoperative virtual surgery was performed with a computer. Results Single MIES nephrectomy was successful in all patients. In the 60 patients who underwent 3D-CT, the number of renal arteries and veins corresponded exactly with the preoperative 3D-CT data (100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These 60 nephrectomies were completed with a shorter operating time and smaller blood loss than the initial 20 nephrectomies. Conclusions Single MIES radical nephrectomy combined with 3D-CT and virtual surgery achieved a shorter operating time and less blood loss, possibly due to safer and easier handling of the renal hilar vessels.

  12. A project proposal for the implementation of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) for treatment of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alert Silva, Jose; Chon Rivas, Ivon; Ascension Ibarra, Yudy; Yanez Lopez, Yaima; Rodriguez Zayas, Michel; Diaz Moreno, Rogelio

    2009-01-01

    Radiotherapy, together with the surgery, one of the essential therapeutic tools in the treatment of CNS tumors. The use of radiation, can be severe sequelae affecting quality of life of the patient, organs at risk receiving high dose and advanced technique of IMRT treatment planning and allows treatments shaped fields, especially when the target of radiation is irregular, with fewer side effects by limiting the dose in the tumor tissues and organs at risk and to allow us to increase the doses in the tumor .. So we decided to develop a protocol for the implementation of IMRT, taking into account that we have the appropriate equipment, trained staff to develop this technique. The main objective of this proposal is to allow us to establish the parameters necessary to perform IMRT, and then escalate the dose of radiation to the tumor, with reduced toxicity to healthy tissues. Inclusion criteria. It included 6 patients with histological diagnosis of CNS tumors, specifically astrocytomas grade II, III and IV, glioblastoma multiforme, where radiation is the main treatment, or associated with surgery. It excludes patients who have previously received radiation therapy or are unable to receive treatment without having movements that do not suffer another debilitating disease and to sign informed consent. Be held position and will be used as masks thermo deformed stun, then planning CT performed in all cases. Be designed later volumes (GTV, CTV and PTV, and OR, as established by the ICRU reports 52 and 60, the IAEA), will define the dose, and restrictions on healthy tissue technique is defined treatment according proposed objectives in the planning system. Once approved, is made conventional simulation, verification of the treatment plan on your computer with web plates and implementation of treatment in 1220 of INOR LINAC. Be made patient-specific quality controls and verification of DRR plan once a week for each patient treated. Monitoring will be conducted weekly during

  13. SU-E-J-249: Characterization of Gynecological Tumor Heterogeneity Using Texture Analysis in the Context of An 18F-FDG PET Adaptive Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nawrocki, J [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Chino, J; Craciunescu, O [Duke University Medical Center Department of Radiation Oncology, Durham, NC (United States); Das, S [University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We propose a method to examine gynecological tumor heterogeneity using texture analysis in the context of an adaptive PET protocol in order to establish if texture metrics from baseline PET-CT predict tumor response better than SUV metrics alone as well as determine texture features correlating with tumor response during radiation therapy. Methods: This IRB approved protocol included 29 women with node positive gynecological cancers visible on FDG-PET treated with EBRT to the PET positive nodes. A baseline and intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained. Tumor outcome was determined based on RECIST on posttreatment PET-CT. Primary GTVs were segmented using 40% threshold and a semi-automatic gradient-based contouring tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH). SUV histogram features, Metabolic Volume (MV), and Total Lesion Glycolysis (TLG) were calculated. Four 3D texture matrices describing local and regional relationships between voxel intensities in the GTV were generated: co-occurrence, run length, size zone, and neighborhood difference. From these, 39 texture features were calculated. Prognostic power of baseline features derived from gradientbased and threshold GTVs were determined using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Receiver Operating Characteristics and logistic regression was performed using JMP (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) to find probabilities of predicting response. Changes in features during treatment were determined using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Of the 29 patients, there were 16 complete responders, 7 partial responders, and 6 non-responders. Comparing CR/PR vs. NR for gradient-based GTVs, 7 texture values, TLG, and SUV kurtosis had a p < 0.05. Threshold GTVs yielded 4 texture features and TLG with p < 0.05. From baseline to intra-treatment, 14 texture features, SUVmean, SUVmax, MV, and TLG changed with p < 0.05. Conclusion: Texture analysis of PET imaged gynecological tumors is an effective method for early prognosis and should

  14. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume

  15. More accurate definition of clinical target volume based on the measurement of microscopic extensions of the primary tumor toward the uterus body in international federation of gynecology and obstetrics Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen-Jia; Wu, Xiao; Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying; Kidd, Elizabeth A; Yan, Shu-Mei; Zhang, Yao-Hong; Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Hai-Hua; Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui; Xie, Liang-Xi

    2015-01-01

    To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. More Accurate Definition of Clinical Target Volume Based on the Measurement of Microscopic Extensions of the Primary Tumor Toward the Uterus Body in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Ib-IIa Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Wen-Jia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Wu, Xiao [Department of Pathology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Xue, Ren-Liang; Lin, Xiang-Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Kidd, Elizabeth A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Yan, Shu-Mei [Department of Pathology, Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province (China); Zhang, Yao-Hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chaozhou Hospital of Chaozhou City, Guangdong Province (China); Zhai, Tian-Tian; Lu, Jia-Yang; Wu, Li-Li; Zhang, Hao [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Huang, Hai-Hua [Department of Pathology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Chen, Zhi-Jian; Li, De-Rui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China); Xie, Liang-Xi, E-mail: xieliangxi1@qq.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong Province (China)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To more accurately define clinical target volume for cervical cancer radiation treatment planning by evaluating tumor microscopic extension toward the uterus body (METU) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (SCCC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter study, surgical resection specimens from 318 cases of stage Ib-IIa SCCC that underwent radical hysterectomy were included. Patients who had undergone preoperative chemotherapy, radiation, or both were excluded from this study. Microscopic extension of primary tumor toward the uterus body was measured. The association between other pathologic factors and METU was analyzed. Results: Microscopic extension toward the uterus body was not common, with only 12.3% of patients (39 of 318) demonstrating METU. The mean (±SD) distance of METU was 0.32 ± 1.079 mm (range, 0-10 mm). Lymphovascular space invasion was associated with METU distance and occurrence rate. A margin of 5 mm added to gross tumor would adequately cover 99.4% and 99% of the METU in the whole group and in patients with lymphovascular space invasion, respectively. Conclusion: According to our analysis of 318 SCCC specimens for METU, using a 5-mm gross tumor volume to clinical target volume margin in the direction of the uterus should be adequate for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage Ib-IIa SCCC. Considering the discrepancy between imaging and pathologic methods in determining gross tumor volume extent, we recommend a safer 10-mm margin in the uterine direction as the standard for clinical practice when using MRI for contouring tumor volume.

  17. SU-F-T-206: Proton Treatment Techniques for Posterior Fossa Tumors: Consequences for LET and Dose/Volume Parameters for the Brainstem and Organs at Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giantsoudi, D; Adams, J; MacDonald, S; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In proton radiation therapy of posterior fossa tumors, to spare other sensitive structures, the preferred beam geometry results in placing the treatment field distal edge within or just beyond the brainstem, including in at least partially in the treatment volume. Concerns for brainstem toxicity are increased and a controversy exists as to weather the beam’s distal edge should be placed within the brainstem or beyond it, to avoid elevated linear energy transfer (LET) and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) within the brainstem. The dosimetric efficacy of these techniques was examined, accounting for LET- and dose-dependent variable RBE distributions. Methods: Three treatment planning techniques were applied in six ependymoma cases: (a) three-field dose-sparing, with beams’ distal edge within the brainstem; (b) three-field LET-sparing, using same beam directions as (a) but extended field ranges beyond the brainstem; (c) two-posterior-oblique LET-sparing, with extended ranges as (b). Monte Carlo calculated dose, LET and RBE-weighted dose distributions were compared. Results: Lower LET values in the brainstem were accompanied by higher median dose: 53.7 Gy[RBE] and 54.3 Gy[RBE] for techniques (b) and (c) versus 52.1 Gy[RBE] for (a). Accounting for variable RBE, a 15% increase of the brainstem volume receiving at least 60 Gy[RBE] was observed for technique (c) versus (a). Maximum variable-RBE-weighted brainstem dose was comparable for all techniques. Conclusion: Extending the treatment beam range beyond the brainstem, significantly increased its volume receiving high dose radiation, even when accounting for the decreased LET values. The dosimetric benefits of techniques limiting the brainstem dose may outweigh the impact of LET reduction achieved through this technique, especially since clinical consequences of increased LET at the end of range have not been proven yet.

  18. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord: incidence and dose-volume relationship of symptomatic and asymptomatic late effects following high dose irradiation of paraspinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mitchell C.C.; Munzenrider, John E.; Finkelstein, Dianne; Liebsch, Norbert; Adams, Judy; Hug, Eugen B.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Low grade chordomas and chondrosarcomas require high radiation doses for effective, lasting tumor control. Fractionated, 3-D planned, conformal proton radiation therapy has been used for lesions along the base of skull and spine to deliver high target doses, while respecting constraints of critical, normal tissues. In this study, we sought to determine the incidence of myelopathy after high dose radiotherapy to the cervical spine and investigated the influence of various treatment parameters, including dose-volume relationship. Methods and Materials: Between December 1980 and March 1996, 78 patients were treated at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory for primary or recurrent chordomas and chondrosarcomas of the cervical spine using combined proton and photon radiation therapy. In general, the tumor dose given was between 64.5 to 79.2 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent). The guidelines for maximum permissible doses to spinal cord were: ≤ 64 CGE to the spinal cord surface and ≤ 53 CGE to the spinal cord center. Dose volume histograms of the spinal cord were analyzed to investigate a possible dose and volume relationship. Results: With a mean follow-up period of 46.6 months (range: 3 - 157 months), 4 of 78 patients (5.1%) developed high-grade (RTOG Grade 3 and 4) late toxicity: 3 patients (3.8%) experienced sensory deficits without motor deficits, none had any limitations of daily activities. One patient (1.2%) developed motor deficit with loss of motor function of one upper extremity. The only patient, who developed permanent motor damage had received additional prior radiation treatment and therefore received a cumulative spinal cord dose higher than the treatment guidelines. No patient treated within the guidelines experienced any motor impairment. Six patients (7.7%) experienced transient Lhermitt's syndrome and 1 patient (1.2%) developed asymptomatic radiographic MR findings only. Time to onset of symptoms of radiographic

  19. SU-E-T-525: Dose Volume Histograms (DVH) Analysis and Comparison with ICRU Point Doses in MRI Guided HDR Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badkul, R; McClinton, C; Kumar, P; Mitchell, M [University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy plays a crucial role in management of cervix cancer. MRI compatible applicators have made it possible to accurately delineate gross-target-volume(GTV) and organs-at-risk(OAR) volumes, as well as directly plan, optimize and adapt dose-distribution for each insertion. We sought to compare DVH of tumor-coverage and OARs to traditional Point-A, ICRU-38 bladder and rectum point-doses for four different planning-techniques. Methods: MRI based 3D-planning was performed on Nucletron-Oncentra-TPS for 3 selected patients with varying tumor-sizes and anatomy. GTV,high-risk-clinical-target-volume(HR-CTV), intermediate-risk-clinical-target-volume(IR-CTV) and OARs: rectum, bladder, sigmoid-colon, vaginal-mucosa were delineated. Three conventionally used techniques: mg-Radium-equivalent(RaEq),equal-dwell-weights(EDW), Medical-College-of-Wisconsin proposed points-optimization (MCWO) and a manual-graphical-optimization(MGO) volume-coverage based technique were applied for each patient. Prescription was 6Gy delivered to point-A in Conventional techniques (RaEq, EDW, MCWO). For MGO, goal was to achieve 90%-coverage (D90) to HR-CTV with prescription-dose. ICRU point doses for rectum and bladder, point-A doses, DVH-doses for HR-CTV-D90,0.1cc-volume(D0.1),1ccvolume( D1),2cc-volume(D2) were collected for all plans and analyzed . Results: Mean D90 for HR-CTV normalized to MGO were 0.89,0.84,0.9,1.0 for EDW, RaEq, MCWO, MGO respectively. Mean point-A doses were 21.7% higher for MGO. Conventional techniques with Point-A prescriptions under covered HR-CTV-D90 by average of 12% as compared to MGO. Rectum, bladder and sigmoid doses were highest in MGO-plans for ICRU points as well as D0.1,D1 and D2 doses. Among conventional-techniques, rectum and bladder ICRU and DVH doses(0.1,1,2cc) were not significantly different (within 7%).Rectum D0.1 provided good estimation of ICRU-rectum-point doses (within 3.9%),rectum D0.1 were higher from 0.8 to 3.9% while bladder D0

  20. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Karen; Small, William; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  1. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslian, Hossein; Sadeghi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Seied Rabie; Babapour Mofrad, Farshid; Astarakee, Mahdi; Khaledi, Navid; Fadavi, Pedram

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer

  2. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  3. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  4. Serial megavoltage CT imaging during external beam radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: Observations on tumor regression during treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupelian, Patrick A.; Ramsey, Chester; Meeks, Sanford L.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Forbes, Alan; Wagner, Thomas H.; Langen, Katja M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to obtain soft-tissue imaging in the treatment room, such as with megavoltage CT imaging, enables the observation of tumor regression during a course of external beam radiation therapy. In this current study, we report on the most extensive study looking at the rate of regression of non-small-cell lung cancers during a course of external beam radiotherapy by analyzing serial megavoltage CT images obtained on 10 patients. Methods and Materials: The analysis is performed on 10 patients treated with the Helical Tomotherapy Hi*Art device. All 10 patients had non-small-cell lung cancer. A total of 274 megavoltage CT sets were obtained on the 10 patients (average, 27 scans per patient; range, 9-35). All patients had at least a scan at beginning and at the end of treatment. The frequency of scanning was determined by the treating physician. The treatment was subsequently delivered with the Tomotherapy Hi*Art system. The gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were later contoured on each megavoltage CT scan, and tumor volumes were calculated. Although some patients were treated to draining nodal areas in addition to the primary tumor, only the primary GTVs were tracked. Response to treatment was quantified by the relative decrease in tumor volume over time, i.e., elapsed days from the first day of therapy. The individual GTVs ranged from 5.9 to 737.2 cc in volume at the start of treatment. In 6 of the 10 patients, dose recalculations were also performed to document potential variations in delivered doses within the tumors. The megavoltage CT scans were used, and the planned treatment was recalculated on the daily images. The hypothesis was that dose deposited in the target would increase throughout the course of radiotherapy because of tumor shrinkage and subsequent decreasing attenuation. Specifically, the dose received by 95% of the GTV (D 95 ) was monitored over time for each of the 6 patients treated at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Orlando. Results: Regression

  5. Interobserver variability in target volume delineation of hepatocellular carcinoma. An analysis of the working group ''Stereotactic Radiotherapy'' of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gkika, E.; Kirste, S. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Tanadini-Lang, S.; Andratschke, N.; Guckenberger, M. [University Hospital Zuerich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Zurich (Switzerland); Holzner, P.A.; Neeff, H.P. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Visceral Surgery, Freiburg (Germany); Rischke, H.C. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Reese, T. [University Hospital Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Lohaus, F. [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Department of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany); National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Dresden (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Dresden (Germany); Duma, M.N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Munich, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy, Department of Radiation Sciences, Munich (Germany); TU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Dieckmann, K. [Medical University Vienna, Department of Radiation Oncology, General Hospital Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Semrau, R. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Cologne (Germany); Stockinger, M. [University Hospital Mainz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Mainz (Germany); Imhoff, D. [University Hospital Frankfurt, Department of Radiation Oncology, Frankfurt (Germany); Saphir Radiosurgery Center, Frankfurt (Germany); Kremers, N. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiology, Freiburg (Germany); Haefner, M.F. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nestle, U.; Grosu, A.L.; Brunner, T.B. [Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Freiburg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Definition of gross tumor volume (GTV) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) requires dedicated imaging in multiple contrast medium phases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interobserver agreement (IOA) in gross tumor delineation of HCC in a multicenter panel. The analysis was performed within the ''Stereotactic Radiotherapy'' working group of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). The GTVs of three anonymized HCC cases were delineated by 16 physicians from nine centers using multiphasic CT scans. In the first case the tumor was well defined. The second patient had multifocal HCC (one conglomerate and one peripheral tumor) and was previously treated with transarterial chemoembolization (TACE). The peripheral lesion was adjacent to the previous TACE site. The last patient had an extensive HCC with a portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and an inhomogeneous liver parenchyma due to cirrhosis. The IOA was evaluated according to Landis and Koch. The IOA for the first case was excellent (kappa: 0.85); for the second case moderate (kappa: 0.48) for the peripheral tumor and substantial (kappa: 0.73) for the conglomerate. In the case of the peripheral tumor the inconsistency is most likely explained by the necrotic tumor cavity after TACE caudal to the viable tumor. In the last case the IOA was fair, with a kappa of 0.34, with significant heterogeneity concerning the borders of the tumor and the PVT. The IOA was very good among the cases were the tumor was well defined. In complex cases, where the tumor did not show the typical characteristics, or in cases with Lipiodol (Guerbet, Paris, France) deposits, IOA agreement was compromised. (orig.) [German] Die Definition des makroskopischen Tumorvolumens (GTV) bei hepatozellulaeren Karzinomen (HCC) erfordert eine dezidierte Bildgebung in mehreren Kontrastmittelphasen. Ziel dieser Studie war es, die Interobservervariabilitaet (IOA) bei der Konturierung von HCC-Laesionen durch ein multizentrisches

  6. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabbour, Salma K.; Kim, Sinae; Haider, Syed A.; Xu, Xiaoting; Wu, Alson; Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph; Langenfeld, John; Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes

  7. Contouring and dose calculation in head and neck cancer radiotherapy after reduction of metal artifacts in CT images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rønn; Lübeck Christiansen, Rasmus; Lorenzen, Ebbe Laugaard

    2017-01-01

    Background: Delineation accuracy of the gross tumor volume (GTV) in radiotherapy planning for head and neck (H&N) cancer is affected by computed tomography (CT) artifacts from metal implants which obscure identification of tumor as well as organs at risk (OAR). This study investigates the impact...... region preceding curative radiotherapy (RT). The GTV-tumor (GTV-T), GTV-node and parotid glands were contoured by four independent observers on standard CT images and MAR images. Dose calculation was evaluated on thirty H&N patients with dental implants near the treated volume. For each patient, the dose...... derived from the clinical treatment plan using the standard image set was compared with the recalculated dose on the MAR image dataset. Results: Reduction of metal artifacts resulted in larger volumes of all delineated structures compared to standard reconstruction. The GTV-T and the parotids were...

  8. Dose painting based on tumor uptake of Cu-ATSM and FDG: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Malene Martini; Hansen, Anders Elias; Lundemann, Michael; Hollensen, Christian; Pommer, Tobias; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Kjær, Andreas; McEvoy, Fintan J; Engelholm, Svend Aage

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia and increased glycolytic activity of tumors are associated with poor prognosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in radiotherapy (RT) dose painting based on the uptake of 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and the proposed hypoxia tracer, copper(II)diacetyl-bis(N 4 )-methylsemithiocarbazone (Cu-ATSM) using spontaneous clinical canine tumor models. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans of five spontaneous canine sarcomas and carcinomas were obtained; FDG on day 1 and 64 Cu-ATSM on day 2 and 3 (approx. 3 and 24 hours pi.). Sub-volumes for dose escalation were defined by a threshold-based method for both tracers and five dose escalation levels were formed in each sub-volume. Volumetric modulated arc therapy plans were optimized based on the dose escalation regions for each scan for a total of three dose plans for each dog. The prescription dose for the GTV was 45 Gy (100%) and it was linearly escalated to a maximum of 150%. The correlations between dose painting plans were analyzed with construction of dose distribution density maps and quality volume histograms (QVH). Correlation between high-dose regions was investigated with Dice correlation coefficients. Comparison of dose plans revealed varying degree of correlation between cases. Some cases displayed a separation of high-dose regions in the comparison of FDG vs. 64 Cu-ATSM dose plans at both time points. Among the Dice correlation coefficients, the high dose regions showed the lowest degree of agreement, indicating potential benefit of using multiple tracers for dose painting. QVH analysis revealed that FDG-based dose painting plans adequately covered approximately 50% of the hypoxic regions. Radiotherapy plans optimized with the current approach for cut-off values and dose region definitions based on FDG, 64 Cu-ATSM 3 h and 24 h uptake in canine tumors had different localization of the regional dose escalation levels. This indicates that 64 Cu-ATSM at two

  9. Comparison of stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neurinomas according to 3-D tumor volume shrinkage and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henzel, Martin; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Hamm, Klaus; Surber, Gunnar; Kleinert, Gabriele; Sitter, Helmut; Gross, Markus W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and also fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offer high local control (LC) rates (> 90%). This study aimed to evaluate three-dimensional (3-D) tumor volume (TV) shrinkage and to assess quality of life (QoL) after SRS/SRT. Patients and methods: from 1999 to 2005, 35/74 patients were treated with SRS, and 39/74 with SRT. Median age was 60 years. Treatment was delivered by a linear accelerator. Median single dose was 13 Gy (SRS) or 54 Gy (SRT). Patients were followed up ≥ 12 months after SRS/SRT. LC and toxicity were evaluated by clinical examinations and magnetic resonance imaging. 3-D TV shrinkage was evaluated with the planning system. QoL was assessed using the questionnaire Short Form-36. Results: Median follow-up was 50/36 months (SRS/SRT). Actuarial 5-year freedom from progression/overall survival was 88.1%/100% (SRS), and 87.5%/87.2% (SRT). TV shrinkage was 15.1%/40.7% (SRS/SRT; p = 0.01). Single dose ( 0.05). Compared with the German normal population, patients had worse values for all domains except for mental health. Conclusion: TV shrinkage was significantly higher after SRT than after SRS. Main symptoms were not affected by SRS/SRT. Retrospectively, QoL was neither affected by SRS nor by SRT. (orig.)

  10. SU-C-BRE-02: BED Vs. Local Control: Radiobiological Effect of Tumor Volume in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Park, J; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT with hypofractionated dose schemata has emerged a compelling treatment modality for medically inoperable early stage lung cancer patients. It requires more accurate dose calculation and treatment delivery technique. This report presents the relationship between tumor control probability(TCP) and size-adjusted biological effective dose(sBED) of tumor volume for MC lung SBRT patients. Methods: Fifteen patients who were treated with MC-based lung SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions to PTVV100%=95% were studied. ITVs were delineated on MIP images of 4DCT-scans. PTVs diameter(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 2.7–4.9cm (mean 3.7cm). Plans were generated using non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVMC algorithm (BrainLABiPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX with HD-MLCs and 6MVSRS(1000MU/min) mode, following RTOG-0813 dosimetric guidelines. To understand the known uncertainties of conventional heterogeneities-corrected/uncorrected pencil beam (PBhete/ PB-homo) algorithms, dose distributions were re-calculated with PBhete/ PB-homo using same beam configurations, MLCs and monitor units. Biologically effective dose(BED10) was computed using LQ-model with α/β=10Gy for meanPTV and meanITV. BED10-c*L, gave size-adjusted BED(sBED), where c=10Gy/cm and L=PTV diameter in centimeter. The TCP model was adopted from Ohri et al.(IJROBP, 2012): TCP = exp[sBEDTCD50]/ k /(1.0 + exp[sBED-TCD50]/k), where k=31Gy corresponding to TCD50=0Gy; and more realistic MC-based TCP was computed for PTV(V99%). Results: Mean PTV PB-hete TCP value was 6% higher, but, mean PTV PB-homo TCP value was 4% lower compared to mean PTV MC TCP. Mean ITV PB-hete/PB-homo TCP values were comparable (within ±3.0%) to mean ITV MC TCP. The mean PTV(V99%)had BED10=90.9±3.7%(median=92.2%),sBED=54.1±8.2%(median=53.5%) corresponding to mean MC TCP value of 84.8±3.3%(median=84.9%) at 2- year local control. Conclusion: The TCP model which incorporates BED10 and tumor diameter indicates that radiobiological

  11. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dholakia, Avani S.; Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P.; Chang, Daniel T.; Raman, Siva P.; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan; Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E.; Wahl, Richard L.; Tryggestad, Erik; Pawlik, Timothy; Laheru, Daniel A.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Koong, Albert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV max and SUV peak ) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver mean + [2 × Liver sd ]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm 3 or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in tailoring therapy

  12. SU-F-J-89: Assessment of Delivered Dose in Understanding HCC Tumor Progression Following SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, M; Cazoulat, G; Polan, D; Schipper, M; Lawrence, T; Feng, M; Brock, K [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: It is well documented that the delivered dose to patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT) is often different from the planned dose due to geometric variability and uncertainties in patient positioning. Recent work suggests that accumulated dose to the GTV is a better predictor of progression compared to the minimum planned dose to the PTV. The purpose of this study is to evaluate if deviations from the planned dose can contributed to tumor progression. Methods: From 2010 to 2014 an in-house Phase II clinical trial of adaptive stereotactic body RT was completed. Of the 90 patients enrolled, 7 patients had a local recurrence defined on contrast enhanced CT or MR imaging 3–21 months after completion of RT. Retrospective dose accumulation was performed using a biomechanical model-based deformable image registration algorithm (DIR) to accumulate the dose based on the kV CBCT acquired prior to each fraction for soft tissue alignment of the patient. The DIR algorithm was previously validated for geometric accuracy in the liver (target registration error = 2.0 mm) and dose accumulation in a homogeneous image, similar to a liver CBCT (gamma index = 91%). Following dose accumulation, the minimum dose to 0.5 cc of the GTV was compared between the planned and accumulated dose. Work is ongoing to evaluate the tumor control probability based on the planned and accumulated dose. Results: DIR and dose accumulation was performed on all fractions for 6 patients with local recurrence. The difference in minimum dose to 0.5 cc of the GTV ranged from −0.3–2.3 Gy over 3–5 fractions. One patient had a potentially significant difference in minimum dose of 2.3 Gy. Conclusion: Dose accumulation can reveal tumor underdosage, improving our ability to understand recurrence and tumor progression patterns, and could aid in adaptive re-planning during therapy to correct for this. This work was supported in part by NIH P01CA059827.

  13. Comparison of investigator-delineated gross tumour volumes and quality assurance in pancreatic cancer: Analysis of the on-trial cases for the SCALOP trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Spezi, Emiliano; Patel, Neel; Hurt, Chris; Nixon, Lisette; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Staffurth, John; Abrams, Ross; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2016-08-01

    We performed a retrospective central review of tumour outlines in patients undergoing radiotherapy in the SCALOP trial. The planning CT scans were reviewed retrospectively by a central review team, and the accuracy of investigators' GTV (iGTV) and PTV (iPTV) was compared to the trials team-defined gold standard (gsGTV and gsPTV) using the Jaccard Conformity Index (JCI) and Geographical Miss Index (GMI). The prognostic value of JCI and GMI was also assessed. The RT plans were also reviewed against protocol-defined constraints. 60 patients with diagnostic-quality planning scans were included. The median whole volume JCI for GTV was 0.64 (IQR: 0.43-0.82), and the median GMI was 0.11 (IQR: 0.05-0.22). For PTVs, the median JCI and GMI were 0.80 (IQR: 0.71-0.88) and 0.04 (IQR: 0.02-0.12) respectively. Tumour was completely missed in 1 patient, and⩾50% of the tumour was missed in 3. Patients with JCI for GTV⩾0.7 had 7.12 (95% CIs: 1.83-27.67, p=0.005) higher odds of progressing by 9months in multivariate analysis. Major deviations in RT planning were noted in 4.5% of cases. Radiotherapy workshops and real-time central review of contours are required in RT trials of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential role of proton therapy in the treatment of pediatric medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors: reduction of the supratentorial target volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miralbell, Raymond; Lomax, Anthony; Bortfeld, Thomas; Rouzaud, Michel; Carrie, Christian

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: One of the components of radiotherapy (RT) in medulloblastoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumors is the prophylactic irradiation of the whole brain (WBI). With the aim of reducing late neuropsychologic morbidity a CT-scan-based dosimetric study was undertaken in which treatment was confined mainly or exclusively to supratentorial sites considered at high risk for disease recurrence. Methods and Materials: A comparative dosimetric study is presented in which a three field (two laterals and one posterior) proton plan (spot scanning method) is compared with a two-field conventional WBI 6 MV x-ray plan, to a 6-field 'hand-made' 6 MV x-ray plan, and to a computer-optimized 9-field 'inverse' 15 MV x-ray plan. For favorable patients, 30 Gy were delivered to the ventricles and main cisterns, the subfrontal and subtemporal regions, and the posterior fossa. For the unfavorable patients, 10 Gy WBI preceded a boost to 30 Gy to the same treatment volume chosen for favorable patients. The dose distribution was evaluated with dose-volume histograms to examine the coverage of the targets as well as the dose to the nontarget brain and optical structures. In addition, the risks of radiation-related late neuropsychologic effects after WBI were collected from the literature and used to predict normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) for an intelligence quotient deficit after treatment with photon or proton beams. Results: Proton beams succeeded better in reducing the dose to the brain hemispheres and eye than any of the photon plans. A 25.1% risk of an IQ score <90 was predicted after 30 Gy WBI. Almost a 10% drop in the predicted risk was observed when using proton beams in both favorable and unfavorable patients. However, predicted NTCPs for both optimized photon plans ('hand made' and 'inverse') were only slightly higher (0.3-2.5%) than those of proton beams. An age-modifying factor was introduced in the predictive NTCP model to assess for IQ differences in relation

  15. Parotid gland tumors: a comparison of postoperative radiotherapy techniques using three dimensional (3-D) dose distributions and dose-volume histograms (DVH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaparpalvi, R.; Tyerech, S.K.; Boselli, L.R.; Fontenla, D.P.; Beitler, J.J.; Vikram, B.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To compare different treatment techniques for unilateral treatment of parotid gland tumors. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients previously treated postoperatively for parotid gland tumors were retrospectively reviewed. Average field size was 9 x 11 cm, average separation was 15.5 cm, and the average prescription depth was 4.5 cm. Using 3-D dose distributions, tissue inhomogeneity corrections, scatter integration (for photons) and pencil beam (for electrons) algorithms and DVH, nine treatment techniques were compared using a representative patient. The treatment techniques investigated were: [1] unilateral 6 MV photons. [2] unilateral 12 MeV electrons. [3] unilateral 16 MeV electrons. [4] a ipsilateral wedge pair technique using 6 MV photons and a 45-degree wedge. [5] a 3-field AP (wedged), PA (wedged) and lateral portal technique using 6 MV photons. [6] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 12 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [7] a mixed beam technique using 6 MV photons and 16 MeV electrons (1:4 weighting). [8] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (2:3 weighting). [9] a mixed beam technique using 18 MV photons and 20 MeV electrons (1:1 weighting). Results: Using dose-volume histograms to evaluate the dose to the contralateral parotid gland, the percentage of contralateral parotid volume receiving ≥30% of the prescribed dose was 100% for techniques [1], [8] and [9], and <5% for techniques [2] through [7]. Evaluating the 'hottest' 5 cc of the ipsilateral mandible and temporal lobes, the hot spots were: 152% and 150% for technique [2], 132% and 130% for technique [6]. Comparing the exit doses, techniques [1] and [8] contributed to ≥50% of the prescribed dose to the contralateral mandible and the temporal lobes. Only techniques [2] and [6] kept the highest point doses to both the brain stem and the spinal cord below 50% of the prescribed dose. Conclusion: The single photon lateral field [1] and the mixed

  16. TU-AB-202-07: A Novel Method for Registration of Mid-Treatment PET/CT Images Under Conditions of Tumor Regression for Patients with Locally Advanced Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharifi, Hoda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, MI (United States); Zhang, Hong; Jin, Jian-Yyue; Kong, Feng-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, GRU Cancer Center, Augusta GA (United States); Chetty, Indrin J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Zhong, Hualiang

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In PET-guided adaptive radiotherapy (RT), changes in the metabolic activity at individual voxels cannot be derived until the duringtreatment CT images are appropriately registered to pre-treatment CT images. However, deformable image registration (DIR) usually does not preserve tumor volume. This may induce errors when comparing to the target. The aim of this study was to develop a DIR-integrated mechanical modeling technique to track radiation-induced metabolic changes on PET images. Methods: Three patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were treated with adaptive radiotherapy under RTOG 1106. Two PET/CT image sets were acquired 2 weeks before RT and 18 fractions after the start of treatment. DIR was performed to register the during-RT CT to the pre-RT CT using a B-spline algorithm and the resultant displacements in the region of tumor were remodeled using a hybrid finite element method (FEM). Gross tumor volume (GTV) was delineated on the during-RT PET/CT image sets and deformed using the 3D deformation vector fields generated by the CT-based registrations. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) was calculated using the pre- and during–RT image set. The quality of the PET mapping was evaluated based on the constancy of the mapped MTV and landmark comparison. Results: The B-spline-based registrations changed MTVs by 7.3%, 4.6% and −5.9% for the 3 patients and the correspondent changes for the hybrid FEM method −2.9%, 1% and 6.3%, respectively. Landmark comparisons were used to evaluate the Rigid, B-Spline, and hybrid FEM registrations with the mean errors of 10.1 ± 1.6 mm, 4.4 ± 0.4 mm, and 3.6 ± 0.4 mm for three patients. The hybrid FEM method outperforms the B-Spline-only registration for patients with tumor regression Conclusion: The hybrid FEM modeling technique improves the B-Spline registrations in tumor regions. This technique may help compare metabolic activities between two PET/CT images with regressing tumors. The author gratefully

  17. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussien, Amr Elsayed M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine (KME), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Jülich, 52426 (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany); Furth, Christian [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, 39120 (Germany); Schönberger, Stefan [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology and Clinical Immunology, University Children’s Hospital, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany); Hundsdoerfer, Patrick [Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Charité Campus Virchow, Humboldt-University Berlin, Berlin, 13353 (Germany); Steffen, Ingo G.; Amthauer, Holger [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Medical School, Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, 39120 (Germany); Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Hautzel, Hubertus, E-mail: h.hautzel@fz-juelich.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine (KME), Forschungszentrum Jülich, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Jülich, 52426 (Germany); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, 40225 (Germany)

    2015-01-28

    Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL) early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18)F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV) but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV). Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV), PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG); Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54) of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in %) were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC)-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0%) but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV.

  18. Design of planning target volume margin using an active breathing control and Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system in unresectable liver tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Jinbo; Yu Jinming; Liu Jing; Liu Tonghai; Yin Yong; Shi Xuetao; Song Jinlong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To define the planning target volume(PTV) margin with an active breathing control (ABC) and the Varian image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) system. Methods: Thirteen patients with liver cancer were treated with radiotherapy from May 2006 to September 2006. Prior to radiotherapy, all patients had undergone transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) by infusing a mixture of iodized oil contrast medium and chemotherapeutic agents, kV fluoroscopy was used to measure the potential motion of lipiodol spot positions during ABC breath-holds. ABC was used for planning CT scan and radiation delivery, with the breath held at the same phase of the respiratory cycle (near end-exhalation). Cone beam CT (CBCT) was taken using Varian IGRT system, which was then compared online with planning CT using a 3 D-3 D matching tool. Analysis relied on lipiodol spots on planning CT and CBCT manually. The treatment table was moved to produce acceptable setup before treatment delivery. Repeated CBCT image and another analysis were obtained after irradiation. Results: No motion of the intrahepatic tumor was observed on fluoroscopy during ABC breath-holds. The estimated required PTV margins, calculated according to the Stroom formula, were 4.4 mm, 5.3 mm and 7.8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions before radiotherapy. The corresponding parameters were 2.5m, 2.6 mm and 3.9 mm after radiotherapy. Conclusions: We have adopted a PTV margin of 5 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm in the x, y and z axis directions with ABC, and 3,3 and 4 mm with ABC and on-line kilovoltage CBCT. (authors)

  19. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by 18F FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0±8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV peak) and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV peak, MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV peakw as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm 3( range, 0.1-131.0cm 3) . The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV peak6 .2 and MTV 20.7cm 3w ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy

  20. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume Measured by {sup 18F} FDG PET/CT in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated by Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Kyu Ho; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Han, Eun Ji; Kim, Yeon Sil; Kim, Gi Wom; Na, Sea Jung; Sun, Dong Il; Jung, So Lyung; Jung, Chan Kwon; Kim, Min Sik; Lee, So Yeon; Kim, Sung Hoon [The Cathholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    We assessed the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume (MTV) measured using {sup 18F} fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) inpatients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). We retrospectively reviewed 56 patients (51 men, five women; mean age 56.0{+-}8.8 years) who had locally advanced HNSCC and underwent FDG PET/CT for initial evaluation. All patients had surgical resection and radiotherapy with or without concurrent chemotherapy. The peak standardized uptake (SUV{sup peak)} and MTV of the target lesion, including primary HNSCC and metastatic cervical lymph nodes, were measured SUV{sup peak,} MTV, and clinico pathologic variables such as age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status, pN stage, pT stage, TNM stage, histologic grade and treatment modality to disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). On the initial FDG PET/CT scans, the median SUV{sup peakw}as 7.8 (range, 1.8-19.0) and MTV was 17.0cm{sup 3(}range, 0.1-131.0cm{sup 3)}. The estimated 2 year DFS and OS rates were 67.2% and 81.8%. The cutoff points of SUV{sup peak6}.2 and MTV 20.7cm{sup 3w}ere the best discriminative values for predicting clinical outcome. MTV and ECOG performance status were significantly related to DFS and OS on univariate and multivariate analyses (P=0.05). The MTV obtained from initial FDG PET/CT scan is a significant prognostic factor for disease recurrence and mortality in locally advanced HNSCC treated with surgery and radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy.

  1. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Elsayed M. Hussien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV. Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV, PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG; Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54 of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in % were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0% but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV.

  2. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Castiglioni, I.; Canervari, C.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in

  3. FDG-PET Response Prediction in Pediatric Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: Impact of Metabolically Defined Tumor Volumes and Individualized SUV Measurements on the Positive Predictive Value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussien, Amr Elsayed M.; Furth, Christian; Schönberger, Stefan; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Steffen, Ingo G.; Amthauer, Holger; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm; Hautzel, Hubertus

    2015-01-01

    Background: In pediatric Hodgkin’s lymphoma (pHL) early response-to-therapy prediction is metabolically assessed by (18)F-FDG PET carrying an excellent negative predictive value (NPV) but an impaired positive predictive value (PPV). Aim of this study was to improve the PPV while keeping the optimal NPV. A comparison of different PET data analyses was performed applying individualized standardized uptake values (SUV), PET-derived metabolic tumor volume (MTV) and the product of both parameters, termed total lesion glycolysis (TLG); Methods: One-hundred-eight PET datasets (PET1, n = 54; PET2, n = 54) of 54 children were analysed by visual and semi-quantitative means. SUVmax, SUVmean, MTV and TLG were obtained the results of both PETs and the relative change from PET1 to PET2 (Δ in %) were compared for their capability of identifying responders and non-responders using receiver operating characteristics (ROC)-curves. In consideration of individual variations in noise and contrasts levels all parameters were additionally obtained after threshold correction to lean body mass and background; Results: All semi-quantitative SUV estimates obtained at PET2 were significantly superior to the visual PET2 analysis. However, ΔSUVmax revealed the best results (area under the curve, 0.92; p < 0.001; sensitivity 100%; specificity 85.4%; PPV 46.2%; NPV 100%; accuracy, 87.0%) but was not significantly superior to SUVmax-estimation at PET2 and ΔTLGmax. Likewise, the lean body mass and background individualization of the datasets did not impove the results of the ROC analyses; Conclusions: Sophisticated semi-quantitative PET measures in early response assessment of pHL patients do not perform significantly better than the previously proposed ΔSUVmax. All analytical strategies failed to improve the impaired PPV to a clinically acceptable level while preserving the excellent NPV

  4. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  5. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert - ask your colleague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, C.; Grosu, A.L.; Nestle, U.; Duncker-Rohr, V.; Ruecker, G.; Mix, M.; MacManus, M.; Ruysscher, D. de; Vogel, W.; Eriksen, J.G.; Oyen, W.; Weber, W.

    2014-01-01

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates the dependency of manual delineation on experience and qualification. A total of 44 international interdisciplinary observers each defined a [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET based gross tumor volume (GTV) using the same PET/CT scan from a patient with lung cancer. The observers were ''experts'' (E; n = 3), ''experienced interdisciplinary pairs'' (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), ''single field specialists'' (SFS; n = 13), and ''students'' (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices within the groups (pCI) and relative to the experts (eCI) were calculated. E (pCI = 0.67) and EP (pCI = 0.53) showed a significantly higher agreement within the groups as compared to SFS (pCI = 0.43, p = 0.03, and p = 0.006). In relation to the experts, EP (eCI = 0.55) showed better concordance compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring. Joint delineation by a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician showed remarkable agreement and better concordance with the experts compared to other specialists. The relevant intermethod variability of the automatic algorithms underlines the need for further standardization and optimization in this field. (orig.) [de

  6. Technical Note: A deep learning based auto segmentation of rectal tumors in MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Lu, Jiayu; Qin, Gan; Shen, Lijun; Sun, Yiqun; Ying, Hongmei; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Weigang

    2018-04-16

    Manual contouring of gross tumor volumes (GTV) is a crucial and time-consuming process in rectum cancer radiotherapy. This study aims to develop a simple deep learning based auto segmentation algorithm to segment rectal tumors on T2 weighted MR images. MRI scans (3T, T2-weighted) of 93 patients with locally advanced (cT3-4 and/or cN1-2) rectal cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery were enrolled in this study. A 2D U-net similar network was established as a training model. The model was trained in two phases to increase efficiency. These phases were tumor recognition and tumor segmentation. An opening (erosion and dilation) process was implemented to smooth contours after segmentation. Data were randomly separated into training (90%) and validation (10%) datasets for a 10-folder cross-validation. Additionally, 20 patients were double contoured for performance evaluation. Four indices were calculated to evaluate the similarity of automated and manual segmentation, including Hausdorff distance (HD), average surface distance (ASD), Dice index (DSC), and Jaccard index (JSC). The DSC, JSC, HD, ASD (mean±SD) were 0.74±0.14, 0.60±0.16, 20.44±13.35 and 3.25±1.69mm for validation dataset; and these indices were 0.71±0.13, 0.57±0.15, 14.91±7.62 and 2.67±1.46mm between two human radiation oncologists, respectively. No significant difference has been observed between automated segmentation and manual segmentation considering DSC (p=0.42), JSC (p=0.35), HD (p=0.079) and ASD (p=0.16). However, significant difference was found for HD (p=0.0027) without opening process. This study showed that a simple deep learning neural network can perform segmentation for rectum cancer based on MRI T2 images with results comparable to a human. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. SU-E-J-107: The Impact of the Tumor Location to Deformable Image Registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Y; Tachibana, H; Kadoya, N; Jingu, K; Kitamura, N

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: For four-dimensional planning and adaptive radiotherapy, the accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) is essential. We evaluated the accuracy of an in-house program with the free-downloadable DIR software library package (NiftyReg) and two commercially available DIR software programs (MIM Maestro and Velocity AI) in lung SBRT cancer patients. In addition to it, the relationship between the tumor location and the accuracy of the DIRs was investigated. Methods: The free-form deformation was implemented in the in-house program and the MIM. The Velocity was based on the B-spline algorithm. The accuracy of the three programs was evaluated in comparison for the structures on 4DCT image datasets between at the peak-inhale and at the peak-exhale. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and normalized DSC (NDSC) were measured for the gross tumor volumes from 19 lung SBRT patients. Results: The DSC measurement showed the median values of the DSC were 0.885, 0.872 and 0.798 for the In-house program, the MIM and the Velocity, respectively. The Velocity showed significant difference compared to the others. The median NDSC values were 1.027, 1.005 and 0.946 for the In-house, the MIM and the Velocity, respectively. This indicated that the spatial overlap agreement between the reference and the deformed structure for the in-house and MIM was comparable with the accuracy within 1mm uncertainty. There was larger discrepancy within 1–2mm uncertainty for the Velocity. The In-house and the MIM showed the higher NDSC values than the median values when the GTV was not attached to the chest wall and diaphragm(p < 0.05). However, there is no relationship between the accuracy and the tumor location in the Velocity. Conclusion: The difference of the DIR program would affect different accuracy and the accuracy may be reduced when the tumor is located or attached to chest wall or diaphragm

  8. Histogram analysis reveals a better delineation of tumor volume from background in 18F-FET PET compared to CBV maps in a hybrid PET–MR studie in gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filss, Christian P.; Stoffels, Gabriele; Galldiks, Norbert; Sabel, Michael; Wittsack, Hans J.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Shah, Nadim J.; Herzog, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is currently the method of first choice for diagnostic investigation of glial tumors. However, different MR sequences may over- or underestimate tumor size and thus it may not be possible to delineate tumor from adjacent brain. In order to compensate this confinement additonal MR sequences like perfusion weighted MRI (PWI) with regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) or positron emission tomography (PET) with aminoacids are used to gain further information. Recent studies suggest that both of theses image modalities provide similar diagnostic information. For comparison tumor to brain ratios (TBR) with mean and maximum values are frequently used but results from different studies can often not be checked against each other. Furthermore, especially the maximum TBR in rCBV is at risk to be falsified by artifacts (e.g. blood vessels). These confinements are reduced by the use of histograms since all information of the VOIs are equally displayed. In this study we measured and compared the intersection of tumor and reference tissue histograms in 18 F-FET PET and rCBV maps in glioma patients. Methods: Twenty-seven glioma patients with contrast enhancing lesion on T1-weighted MR images were investigated using static 18 F-FET PET and rCBV in MRI using a PET–MR hybrid scanner. In all patients diagnosis was confirmed histologically (7 grade II gliomas, 6 grade III gliomas and 14 grade IV gliomas). We generated a set of tumor and reference tissue Volumes-of-Interest (VOIs) based on T1 weighted images in MRI with the tumor VOI defined by contrast enhancement and transferred these VOIs to the corresponding 18 F-FET PET scans and rCBV maps. From these VOIs we generated tumor and reference tissue histograms with a unity of one for each curve integral and measured the proportion of the area under the tumor curve that falls into the reference curve for 18 F-FET PET and rCBV maps for each patient. Results: The mean proportion

  9. Re-irradiation after gross total resection of recurrent glioblastoma. Spatial pattern of recurrence and a review of the literature as a basis for target volume definition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straube, Christoph; Elpula, Greeshma [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Gerhardt, Julia; Meyer, Bernhard [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Bette, Stefanie; Zimmer, Claus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Schmidt-Graf, Friederike [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute for Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Department of Radiation Sciences (DRS), Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Currently, patients with gross total resection (GTR) of recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) undergo adjuvant chemotherapy or are followed up until progression. Re-irradiation, as one of the most effective treatments in macroscopic rGBM, is withheld in this situation, as uncertainties about the pattern of re-recurrence, the target volume, and also the efficacy of early re-irradiation after GTR exist. Imaging and clinical data from 26 consecutive patients with GTR of rGBM were analyzed. The spatial pattern of recurrences was analyzed according to the RANO-HGG criteria (''response assessment in neuro-oncology criteria for high-grade gliomas''). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Furthermore, a systematic review was performed in PubMed. All but 4 patients underwent adjuvant chemotherapy after GTR. Progression was diagnosed in 20 of 26 patients and 70% of recurrent tumors occurred adjacent to the resection cavity. The median extension beyond the edge of the resection cavity was 20 mm. Median PFS was 6 months; OS was 12.8 months. We propose a target volume containing the resection cavity and every contrast enhancing lesion as the gross tumor volume (GTV), a spherical margin of 5-10 mm to generate the clinical target volume (CTV), and a margin of 1-3 mm to generate the planning target volume (PTV). Re-irradiation of this volume is deemed to be safe and likely to prolong PFS. Re-irradiation is worth considering also after GTR, as the volumes that need to be treated are limited and re-irradiation has already proven to be a safe treatment option in general. The strategy of early re-irradiation is currently being tested within the GlioCave/NOA 17/Aro 2016/03 trial. (orig.) [German] Patienten mit einem rezidivierten Glioblastom (rGBM) werden, wenn eine komplette Resektion (GTR) des makroskopischen Rezidivs durchgefuehrt wurde, aktuell meist systemisch adjuvant behandelt oder einer engmaschigen Nachsorge

  10. Mediastinal tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thymoma - mediastinal; Lymphoma - mediastinal ... mediastinal tumors in adults occur in the anterior mediastinum. They are usually cancerous (malignant) lymphomas, germ cell tumors, or thymomas. These tumors are ...

  11. SU-E-T-762: Toward Volume-Based Independent Dose Verification as Secondary Check

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, H; Tachibana, R

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Lung SBRT plan has been shifted to volume prescription technique. However, point dose agreement is still verified using independent dose verification at the secondary check. The volume dose verification is more affected by inhomogeneous correction rather than point dose verification currently used as the check. A feasibility study for volume dose verification was conducted in lung SBRT plan. Methods: Six SBRT plans were collected in our institute. Two dose distributions with / without inhomogeneous correction were generated using Adaptive Convolve (AC) in Pinnacle3. Simple MU Analysis (SMU, Triangle Product, Ishikawa, JP) was used as the independent dose verification software program, in which a modified Clarkson-based algorithm was implemented and radiological path length was computed using CT images independently to the treatment planning system. The agreement in point dose and mean dose between the AC with / without the correction and the SMU were assessed. Results: In the point dose evaluation for the center of the GTV, the difference shows the systematic shift (4.5% ± 1.9 %) in comparison of the AC with the inhomogeneous correction, on the other hands, there was good agreement of 0.2 ± 0.9% between the SMU and the AC without the correction. In the volume evaluation, there were significant differences in mean dose for not only PTV (14.2 ± 5.1 %) but also GTV (8.0 ± 5.1 %) compared to the AC with the correction. Without the correction, the SMU showed good agreement for GTV (1.5 ± 0.9%) as well as PTV (0.9% ± 1.0%). Conclusion: The volume evaluation for secondary check may be possible in homogenous region. However, the volume including the inhomogeneous media would make larger discrepancy. Dose calculation algorithm for independent verification needs to be modified to take into account the inhomogeneous correction

  12. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert - ask your colleague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doll, C.; Grosu, A.L.; Nestle, U. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Duncker-Rohr, V. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Freiburg/Breisgau (Germany); Ortenau Clinical Center Offenburg, Radiation Oncology Department, Offenburg (Germany); Ruecker, G. [University of Freiburg, Institute of Medical Biometry und Medical Informatics, Freiburg (Germany); Mix, M. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); MacManus, M. [University of Melbourne, The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Melbourne (Australia); Ruysscher, D. de [University Hospital Leuven/KU Leuven, Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven (Belgium); Vogel, W. [Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Eriksen, J.G. [Odense University Hospital, Department of Oncology, Odense (Denmark); Oyen, W. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Weber, W. [University Medical Center Freiburg, Nuclear Medicine Department, Freiburg (Germany); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology/Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York (United States)

    2014-06-15

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates the dependency of manual delineation on experience and qualification. A total of 44 international interdisciplinary observers each defined a [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET based gross tumor volume (GTV) using the same PET/CT scan from a patient with lung cancer. The observers were ''experts'' (E; n = 3), ''experienced interdisciplinary pairs'' (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), ''single field specialists'' (SFS; n = 13), and ''students'' (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices within the groups (pCI) and relative to the experts (eCI) were calculated. E (pCI = 0.67) and EP (pCI = 0.53) showed a significantly higher agreement within the groups as compared to SFS (pCI = 0.43, p = 0.03, and p = 0.006). In relation to the experts, EP (eCI = 0.55) showed better concordance compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring. Joint delineation by a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician showed remarkable agreement and better concordance with the experts compared to other specialists. The relevant intermethod variability of the automatic algorithms underlines the need for further standardization and optimization in this field. (orig.) [German] Die Daten aus der Positronenemissionstomographie (PET) werden in vielen Kliniken routinemaessig zur

  13. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I; Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (42–86) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.4–70 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (26–86%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted

  14. Distribution of Functional Liver Volume in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus in the 1st Branch and Main Trunk Using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography—Application to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ikoma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the distribution of functional liver volume (FLV in the margin volume (MV surrounding hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT before radiation therapy (RT and to verify the safety of single photon emission computed tomography-based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (SPECT-B3DCRT by exploring the relation of FLV in MV to radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Methods and Materials: Clinical target volume (CTV included main tumor and PVTT, and planning target volume (PTV included CTV with a 10 mm margin. MV was defined as PTV–CTV. FLV ratio in MV was calculated as FLV in MV/MV × 100 (%. The two high-dose beams were planned to irradiate FLV as little as possible. Fifty-seven cases of HCC (26/57, 46%; Child–Pugh grade B with PVTT underwent SPECT-B3DCRT which targeted the CTV to a total dose of 45 Gy/18 fractions. The destructive ratio was defined as radiation induced dysfunctional volume/FLV × 100 (%. Results: We observed a significant negative correlation between FLV ratio in MV and CTV (p < 0.001. Three cases with CTVs of 287, 587 and 1184 cm3 experienced transient RILD. The FLV ratio in MV was highest in patients with RILD: nine patients with CTV of 200–300 cm3, three with CTV of 500–600 cm3, and two with CTV of 1100–1200 cm3. The destructive ratio yielded a mean value of 24.2 ± 1.5%. Conclusions: Radiation planning that takes into account the distribution of FLV appears to result in the least possible RILD.

  15. Influence of experience and qualification on PET-based target volume delineation. When there is no expert--ask your colleague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, C; Duncker-Rohr, V; Rücker, G; Mix, M; MacManus, M; De Ruysscher, D; Vogel, W; Eriksen, J G; Oyen, W; Grosu, A-L; Weber, W; Nestle, U

    2014-06-01

    The integration of positron emission tomography (PET) information for target volume delineation in radiation treatment planning is routine in many centers. In contrast to automatic contouring, research on visual-manual delineation is scarce. The present study investigates the dependency of manual delineation on experience and qualification. A total of 44 international interdisciplinary observers each defined a [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET based gross tumor volume (GTV) using the same PET/CT scan from a patient with lung cancer. The observers were "experts" (E; n = 3), "experienced interdisciplinary pairs" (EP; 9 teams of radiation oncologist (RO) + nuclear medicine physician (NP)), "single field specialists" (SFS; n = 13), and "students" (S; n = 10). Five automatic delineation methods (AM) were also included. Volume sizes and concordance indices within the groups (pCI) and relative to the experts (eCI) were calculated. E (pCI = 0.67) and EP (pCI = 0.53) showed a significantly higher agreement within the groups as compared to SFS (pCI = 0.43, p = 0.03, and p = 0.006). In relation to the experts, EP (eCI = 0.55) showed better concordance compared to SFS (eCI = 0.49) or S (eCI = 0.47). The intermethod variability of the AM (pCI = 0.44) was similar to that of SFS and S, showing poorer agreement with the experts (eCI = 0.35). The results suggest that interdisciplinary cooperation could be beneficial for consistent contouring. Joint delineation by a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician showed remarkable agreement and better concordance with the experts compared to other specialists. The relevant intermethod variability of the automatic algorithms underlines the need for further standardization and optimization in this field.

  16. Volumetric Analysis Using Low-Field Intraoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging for 168 Newly Diagnosed Supratentorial Glioblastomas: Effects of Extent of Resection and Residual Tumor Volume on Survival and Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Atsushi; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Saito, Taiichi; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Ikuta, Soko; Kawamata, Takakazu

    2017-02-01

    Extent of resection (EOR) remains controversial in therapy for glioblastoma (GBM). However, an increasing number of studies favor maximum EOR as being associated with longer patient survival. Residual tumor volume (RTV) has also recently emerged as a prognostic factor. Low-field intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has contributed to improve the EOR of GBM. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationships between EOR/RTV and overall survival (OS)/progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with newly diagnosed GBM using low-field iMRI. Adult patients who underwent surgery for newly diagnosed supratentorial GBM between 2000 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Three-dimensional volumetric tumor measurements were made. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between EOR/RTV and OS/PFS. Of 168 patients, 126 (75%) died and 154 (91%) showed tumor recurrence. Median OS and PFS for patients with iMRI were 19.3 months (95% confidence interval, 15.4-23.7 months) and 9.5 months (95% confidence interval, 7.8-10.8 months). Median preoperative tumor volume was 37.0 cm 3 (interquartile range [IQR], 19.9-59.8 cm 3 ). Median RTV was 0 cm 3 (IQR, 0-1.6 cm 3 ). Median EOR was 100% (IQR, 96.2%-100%). In multivariate analysis, after controlling for age and Karnofsky Performance Status, EOR and RTV remained significantly associated with survival (hazard ratio, 1.56; P = 0.018) and recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.53; P = 0.013). Maximum RTV for survival was 3 cm 3 . This volumetric analysis for low-field iMRI showed that both EOR and RTV were significantly associated with survival and recurrence. We determined a threshold RTV of 3 cm 3 as the maximum RTV associated with survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. DART-bid (Dose-differentiated accelerated radiation therapy, 1.8 Gy twice daily)–a novel approach for non-resected NSCLC: final results of a prospective study, correlating radiation dose to tumor volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurstbauer, Karl; Sedlmayer, Felix; Deutschmann, Heinz; Dagn, Karin; Kopp, Peter; Zehentmayr, Franz; Lamprecht, Bernd; Porsch, Peter; Wegleitner, Birgit; Studnicka, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Sequential chemo-radiotherapies with intensive radiation components deliver promising results in non-resected non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In general, radiation doses are determined by dose constraints for normal tissues, not by features relevant for tumor control. DART-bid targets directly the doses required for tumor control, correlating doses to tumor volume in a differentiated mode. Radiation doses to primary tumors were aligned along increasing tumor size within 4 groups (<2.5 cm/2.5–4.5 cm/4.5–6.0 cm/>6.0 cm; mean number of three perpendicular diameters). ICRU-doses of 73.8 Gy/79.2 Gy/84.6 Gy/90.0 Gy, respectively, were applied. Macroscopically involved nodes were treated with a median dose of 59.4 Gy, nodal sites about 6 cm cranial to involved nodes electively with 45 Gy. Fractional doses were 1.8 Gy twice daily (bid). 2 cycles chemotherapy were given before radiotherapy. Between 2004 and 2009, 160 not selected patients with 164 histologically/cytologically proven NSCLC were enrolled; Stage I: 38 patients; II: 6 pts.; IIIA: 69 pts.; IIIB: 47 pts. Weight loss >5%/3 months: 38 patients (24%). Primary endpoints are local and regional tumor control rates at 2 years (as >90% of locoregional failures occur within 2 years). Secondary endpoints are survival and toxicity. With a minimum follow-up time of 2 years for patients alive, the final results are presented. 32 local and 10 regional recurrences occurred. The local and regional tumor control rates at 2 years are 77% and 93%, respectively. The median overall survival (OS) time is 28.0 months, the 2- and 5-year OS rates are 57% and 19%, respectively. For stage III patients, median OS amounts to 24.3 months, 2- /5-year OS rates to 51% and 18%, respectively. 2 treatment-related deaths (progressive pulmonary fibrosis) occurred in patients with pre-existing pulmonary fibrosis. Further acute and late toxicity was mild. This novel approach yields a high level of locoregional tumor control and survival times

  18. SU-C-17A-05: Quantification of Intra-Fraction Motion of Breast Tumors Using Cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heijst, T van; Philippens, M; Bongard, D van den; Asselen, B van; Lagendijk, J; Kleijnen, J; Hartogh, M den [University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enables direct characterization of intra-fraction motion ofbreast tumors, due to high softtissue contrast and geometric accuracy. The purpose is to analyzethis motion in early-stage breast-cancer patients using pre-operative supine cine-MRI. Methods: MRI was performed in 12 female early-stage breast-cancer patients on a 1.5-T Ingenia (Philips)wide-bore scanner in supine radiotherapy (RT) position, prior to breast-conserving surgery. Twotwodimensional (2D) T2-weighted balanced fast-field echo (cine-MRI) sequences were added tothe RT protocol, oriented through the tumor. They were alternately acquired in the transverse andsagittal planes, every 0.3 s during 1 min. A radiation oncologist delineated gross target volumes(GTVs) on 3D contrast-enhanced MRI. Clinical target volumes (CTV = GTV + 15 mm isotropic)were generated and transferred onto the fifth time-slice of the time-series, to which subsequents lices were registered using a non-rigid Bspline algorithm; delineations were transformed accordingly. To evaluate intra-fraction CTV motion, deformation fields between the transformed delineations were derived to acquire the distance ensuring 95% surface coverage during scanning(P95%), for all in-plane directions: anteriorposterior (AP), left-right (LR), and caudal-cranial(CC). Information on LR was derived from transverse scans, CC from sagittal scans, AP fromboth sets. Results: Time-series with registration errors - induced by motion artifacts - were excluded by visual inspection. For our analysis, 11 transverse, and 8 sagittal time-series were taken into account. Themedian P95% calculated in AP (19 series), CC (8), and LR (11) was 1.8 mm (range: 0.9–4.8), 1.7mm (0.8–3.6), and 1.0 mm (0.6–3.5), respectively. Conclusion: Intra-fraction motion analysis of breast tumors was achieved using cine-MRI. These first results show that in supine RT position, motion amplitudes are limited. This information can be used for adaptive RT

  19. MLC tracking for lung SABR reduces planning target volumes and dose to organs at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillet, Vincent; Keall, Paul J; Colvill, Emma; Hardcastle, Nicholas; O'Brien, Ricky; Szymura, Kathryn; Booth, Jeremy T

    2017-07-01

    Assess the dosimetric impact of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) tracking and mid-ventilation (midV) planning compared with the internal target volume (ITV)-based planning approach for lung Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiotherapy (SABR). Ten lung SABR patients originally treated with an ITV-based plan were re-planned according to MLC tracking and midV planning schemes. All plans were delivered on a linac to a motion phantom in a simulated treatment with real lung motions. Delivered dose was reconstructed in patient planning scans. ITV-based, tracking and midV regimes were compared at the planning and delivered stages based on PTV volume and dose metrics for the GTV and OAR. MLC tracking and midV schemes yielded favourable outcomes compared with ITV-based plans. Average reduction in PTV volume was (MLC tracking/MidV) 33.9%/22%. GTV dose coverage performed better with MLC tracking than the other regimes. Reduction in dose to OAR were for the lung (mean lung dose, 0.8Gy/0.2Gy), oesophagus (D3cc, 1.9Gy/1.4Gy), great vessels (D10cc, 3.2Gy/1.3Gy), trachea (D4cc, 1.1Gy/0.9Gy), heart (D1cc, 2.0Gy/0.5Gy) and spinal cord (D0.03cc, 0.5Gy/-0.1Gy). MLC tracking showed reduction in PTV volume, superior GTV dose coverage and organ dose sparing than MidV and ITV-based strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiotherapy of Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Nonrigid Image-Based Registration Method for Automatic Localization of Prechemotherapy Gross Tumor Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffino, P; Ciardo, D; Piperno, G; Travaini, L L; Comi, S; Ferrari, A; Alterio, D; Jereczek-Fossa, B A; Orecchia, R; Baroni, G; Spadea, M F

    2016-04-01

    To improve the contouring of clinical target volume for the radiotherapy of neck Hodgkin/non-Hodgkin lymphoma by localizing the prechemotherapy gross target volume onto the simulation computed tomography using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography. The gross target volume delineated on prechemotherapy [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography images was warped onto simulation computed tomography using deformable image registration. Fifteen patients with neck Hodgkin/non-Hodgkin lymphoma were analyzed. Quality of image registration was measured by computing the Dice similarity coefficient on warped organs at risk. Five radiation oncologists visually scored the localization of automatic gross target volume, ranking it from 1 (wrong) to 5 (excellent). Deformable registration was compared to rigid registration by computing the overlap index between the automatic gross target volume and the planned clinical target volume and quantifying the V95 coverage. The Dice similarity coefficient was 0.80 ± 0.07 (median ± quartiles). The physicians' survey had a median score equal to 4 (good). By comparing the rigid versus deformable registration, the overlap index increased from a factor of about 4 and the V95 (percentage of volume receiving the 95% of the prescribed dose) went from 0.84 ± 0.38 to 0.99 ± 0.10 (median ± quartiles). This study demonstrates the impact of using deformable registration between prechemotherapy [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and simulation computed tomography, in order to automatically localize the gross target volume for radiotherapy treatment of patients with Hodgkin/non-Hodgkin lymphoma. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. DNA level, tumor thickness, and stereological estimates of nuclear volume in stage I cutaneous malignant melanomas. A comparative study with analysis of prognostic impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Kristensen, I B; Grymer, F

    1991-01-01

    The mutual relation and prognostic value of three quantitative variables were investigated in a retrospective series of 56 stage I cutaneous malignant melanomas. Unbiased stereological estimates of nuclear volume, nuclear nu v were obtained along with measurements of melanoma thickness. The DNA......, nuclear nu v was the only independent, prognostically significant variable. Physical, three-dimensional nuclear volume is not solely a reflection of nuclear DNA content, and may represent a valuable, quantitative prognostic indicator in cutaneous malignant melanomas....

  2. Radiotherapy of pineal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danoff, B.; Sheline, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    Radiotherapy has universally been used in the treatment of pineal tumors and suprasellar germinomas. Recently however, major technical advances related to the use of the operating microscope and development of microsurgical techniques have prompted a renewed interest in the direct surgical approach for biopsy and/or excision. This interest has resulted in a controversy regarding the role of surgery prior to radiotherapy. Because of the heterogeneity of tumors occurring in the pineal region (i.e., germ cell tumors, pineal parenchymal tumors, glial tumors, and cysts) and their differing biological behavior, controversy also surrounds aspects of radiotherapy such as: the optimal radiation dose, the volume to be irradiated, and indications for prophylactic spinal irradiation. A review of the available data is presented in an attempt to answer these questions

  3. Successful Large-volume Leukapheresis for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Collection in a Very-low-weight Brain Tumor Infant with Coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei Liao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral apheresis has become a safe procedure to collect hematopoietic stem cells, even in pediatric patients and donors. However, the apheresis procedure for small and sick children is more complicated due to difficult venous access, relatively large extracorporeal volume, toxicity of citrate, and unstable hemostasis. We report a small and sick child with refractory medulloblastoma, impaired liver function, and coagulopathy after several major cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. She successfully received large-volume leukapheresis for hematopoietic stem cell collection, although the patient experienced severe coagulopathy during the procedures. Health care providers should be alert to this potential risk.

  4. Quantification of delineation errors of the gross tumor volume on magnetic resonance imaging in uterine cervical cancer using pathology data and deformation correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Schoot, Agustinus J. A. J.; de Boer, Peter; Buist, Marrije R.; Stoker, Jaap; Bleeker, Maaike C. G.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Bel, Arjan

    2015-01-01

    To safely optimize target volumes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for uterine cervical cancer radiation therapy, MRI findings need to be validated. The aim of this study was to correlate pre-operatively acquired MRI and surgical specimen imaging for uterine cervical cancer patients using

  5. Investigation of pancreas tumour movements and of their potential markers by four-dimensional scanography: implication for image-guided radiotherapy; etude des mouvements des tumeurs du pancreas et de leurs marqueurs potentiels par scanographie quadridimensionnelle: implication pour la radiotherapie guidee par l'image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, F. [Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Yorke, E.; Davidson, M.; Zhang, Z.; Jackson, A.; Mageras, G.; Wu, A.; Goodman, K. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the study which aimed at quantifying pancreas tumour movements induced by breathing by using four-dimensional scanography, and at assessing the reliability of biliary prosthesis, of intra-tumor fiducials, and of an external maker as position markers of the gross tumour volume (GTV). The authors analyzed scanography images acquired during the simulation of 22 patients treated for locally advanced pancreas cancer by intensity-modulated conformational irradiation with respiratory gating. Average movements in different directions have measured. Respiratory gating limits the GTV movement amplitude by 40 to 60 per cent. GTV movements are in good correlation with that of biliary prostheses and intra-tumor fiducials. Short communication

  6. Disseminação linfática em neoplasias: determinação do volume nuclear e quantificação do DNA de células do tumor de Ehrlich do coxim plantar e do linfonodo regional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúca Zaidan Dagli

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available When inoculated into the footpad of mice, Ehrlich tumor grows in a solid form and disseminates to popliteal lymph nodes. This study was performed in order to characterize the tumor cells that migrated from footpad to popliteal lymph nodes. The nuclear volume of primitive and lymph node tumor cells was measured with a caryometric ocular. DNA quantitation was performed in Feulgen stained slides by scanning cytophotometry. Tumor cells harvested from popliteal lymph nodes one hour after inoculation into the footpad showed no statistical differences in DNA quantitation from original ascitic and footpad tumor cells. Tumor cells in popliteal lymph nodes 30 days after inoculation showed a smaller nuclear volume, but presented the same DNA content as the cells that grew in the footpad. Tumor cells in the footpad 30 days after inoculation showed a greater DNA content than those in the footpad one hour after inoculation.These results suggest a possible selective effect for Ehriich tumor cells when they grow in the footpad, but not when they metastasize to regional lymph node.

  7. Complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor volume is associated with improved survival in recurrent glioblastoma—results from the DIRECTOR trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Weller, Michael; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Senft, Christian; Hau, Peter; Sabel, Michael C.; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Ketter, Ralf; Schlegel, Uwe; Marosi, Christine; Reifenberger, Guido; Wick, Wolfgang; Tonn, Jörg C.; Wirsching, Hans-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of reoperation for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) remains unclear. Prospective studies are lacking. Here, we studied the association of clinical outcome with extent of resection upon surgery for recurrent GBM in the patient cohort of DIRECTOR, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing 2 dose-intensified temozolomide regimens at recurrence of GBM. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected clinical and imaging data from the DIRECTOR cohort (N = 105). Volumetric analysis was performed on gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI as well as fluid attenuated inversion recovery/T2 MRI and correlated with PFS after initial progression (PFS2) and post-recurrence survival (PRS). Quality of life was monitored by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BN20 questionnaires at 8-week intervals. Results Seventy-one patients received surgery at first recurrence. Prognostic factors, including age, MGMT promoter methylation, and Karnofsky performance score, were balanced between patients with and without reoperation. Outcome in patients with versus without surgery at recurrence was similar for PFS2 (2.0 mo vs 1.9 mo, P = .360) and PRS (11.4 mo vs 9.8 mo, P = .633). Among reoperated patients, post-surgery imaging was available in 59 cases. In these patients, complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor (N = 40) versus residual detection of contrast enhancement (N = 19) was associated with improved PRS (12.9 mo [95% CI: 11.5–18.2] vs 6.5 mo [95% CI: 3.6–9.9], P < .001) and better quality of life. Incomplete tumor resection was associated with inferior PRS compared with patients who did not undergo surgery (6.5 vs 9.8 mo, P = .052). Quality of life was similar in these 2 groups. Conclusion Surgery at first recurrence of GBM improves outcome if complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor is achieved. PMID:26823503

  8. SU-G-JeP3-09: Tumor Location Prediction Using Natural Respiratory Volume for Respiratory Gated Radiation Therapy (RGRT): System Verification Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M; Jung, J; Yoon, D; Shin, H; Kim, S; Suh, T [The catholic university of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Respiratory gated radiation therapy (RGRT) gives accurate results when a patient’s breathing is stable and regular. Thus, the patient should be fully aware during respiratory pattern training before undergoing the RGRT treatment. In order to bypass the process of respiratory pattern training, we propose a target location prediction system for RGRT that uses only natural respiratory volume, and confirm its application. Methods: In order to verify the proposed target location prediction system, an in-house phantom set was used. This set involves a chest phantom including target, external markers, and motion generator. Natural respiratory volume signals were generated using the random function in MATLAB code. In the chest phantom, the target takes a linear motion based on the respiratory signal. After a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan of the in-house phantom, the motion trajectory was derived as a linear equation. The accuracy of the linear equation was compared with that of the motion algorithm used by the operating motion generator. In addition, we attempted target location prediction using random respiratory volume values. Results: The correspondence rate of the linear equation derived from the 4DCT images with the motion algorithm of the motion generator was 99.41%. In addition, the average error rate of target location prediction was 1.23% for 26 cases. Conclusion: We confirmed the applicability of our proposed target location prediction system for RGRT using natural respiratory volume. If additional clinical studies can be conducted, a more accurate prediction system can be realized without requiring respiratory pattern training.

  9. Simultaneous assessment of cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid IVIM and DK MR imaging: initial experience with brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wen-Chau [National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Oncology, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electronics and Bioinformatics, Taipei (China); National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Yang, Shun-Chung; Chen, Ya-Fang; My, Pei-Chi [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei (China); Tseng, Han-Min [National Taiwan University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Taipei (China)

    2017-01-15

    To investigate the feasibility of simultaneously assessing cerebral blood volume and diffusion heterogeneity using hybrid diffusion-kurtosis (DK) and intravoxel-incoherent-motion (IVIM) MR imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers and 30 patients with histologically proven brain tumours (25 WHO grade II-IV gliomas and five metastases) were recruited. On a 3-T system, diffusion-weighted imaging was performed with six b-values ranging from 0 to 1,700 s/mm{sup 2}. Nonlinear least-squares fitting was employed to extract diffusion coefficient (D), diffusion kurtosis coefficient (K, a measure of the degree of non-Gaussian and heterogeneous diffusion) and intravascular volume fraction (f, a measure proportional to cerebral blood volume). Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance and receiver operating characteristic analysis were performed to assess the ability of D/K/f in differentiating contrast-enhanced tumour from peritumoral oedema and normal-appearing white matter. Based on our imaging setting (baseline signal-to-noise ratio = 32-128), coefficient of variation was 14-20 % for K, ∝6 % for D and 26-44 % for f. The indexes were able to differentiate contrast-enhanced tumour (Wilks' λ = 0.026, p < 10{sup -3}), and performance was greatest with K, followed by f and D. Hybrid DK IVIM imaging is capable of simultaneously measuring cerebral perfusion and diffusion indexes that together may improve brain tumour diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor volume is associated with improved survival in recurrent glioblastoma-results from the DIRECTOR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Weller, Michael; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Senft, Christian; Hau, Peter; Sabel, Michael C; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Ketter, Ralf; Schlegel, Uwe; Marosi, Christine; Reifenberger, Guido; Wick, Wolfgang; Tonn, Jörg C; Wirsching, Hans-Georg

    2016-04-01

    The role of reoperation for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) remains unclear. Prospective studies are lacking. Here, we studied the association of clinical outcome with extent of resection upon surgery for recurrent GBM in the patient cohort of DIRECTOR, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing 2 dose-intensified temozolomide regimens at recurrence of GBM. We analyzed prospectively collected clinical and imaging data from the DIRECTOR cohort (N = 105). Volumetric analysis was performed on gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI as well as fluid attenuated inversion recovery/T2 MRI and correlated with PFS after initial progression (PFS2) and post-recurrence survival (PRS). Quality of life was monitored by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BN20 questionnaires at 8-week intervals. Seventy-one patients received surgery at first recurrence. Prognostic factors, including age, MGMT promoter methylation, and Karnofsky performance score, were balanced between patients with and without reoperation. Outcome in patients with versus without surgery at recurrence was similar for PFS2 (2.0 mo vs 1.9 mo, P = .360) and PRS (11.4 mo vs 9.8 mo, P = .633). Among reoperated patients, post-surgery imaging was available in 59 cases. In these patients, complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor (N = 40) versus residual detection of contrast enhancement (N = 19) was associated with improved PRS (12.9 mo [95% CI: 11.5-18.2] vs 6.5 mo [95% CI: 3.6-9.9], P < .001) and better quality of life. Incomplete tumor resection was associated with inferior PRS compared with patients who did not undergo surgery (6.5 vs 9.8 mo, P = .052). Quality of life was similar in these 2 groups. Surgery at first recurrence of GBM improves outcome if complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor is achieved. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Tumor vaccines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, M.; Ihan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have several potential advantages over standard anticancer regiments. They represent highly specific anticancer therapy. Inducing tumor-specific memory T-lymphocytes, they have potential for long-lived antitumor effects. However, clinical trials, in which cancer patients were vaccinated with tumor vaccines, have been so far mainly disappointing. There are many reasons for the inefficiency of tumor vaccines. Most cancer antigens are normal self-molecules to which immune tolerance exists. That is why the population of tumor-specific lymphocytes is represented by a small number of low-affinity T-lymphocytes that induce weak antitumor immune response. Simultaneously, tumors evolve many mechanisms to actively evade immune system, what makes them poorly immunogenic or even tolerogenic. Novel immunotherapeutic strategies are directed toward breaking immune tolerance to tumor antigens, enhancing immunogenicity of tumor vaccines and overcoming mechanisms of tumor escape. There are several approaches, unfortunately, all of them still far away from an ideal tumor vaccine that would reject a tumor. Difficulties in the activation of antitumor immune response by tumor vaccines have led to the development of alternative immunotherapeutic strategies that directly focus on effector mechanisms of immune system (adoptive tumor- specific T-lymphocyte transfer and tumor specific monoclonal antibodies). (author)

  12. Evaluation of an infrared camera and X-ray system using implanted fiducials in patients with lung tumors for gated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willoughby, Twyla R.; Forbes, Alan R.; Buchholz, Daniel; Langen, Katja M.; Wagner, Thomas H.; Zeidan, Omar A.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the initial clinical use of a commercially available system to deliver gated treatment using implanted fiducials, in-room kV X-rays, and an infrared camera tracking system. Methods and Materials: ExacTrac Adaptive Gating from BrainLab is a localization system using infrared cameras and X-rays. Gating signals are the patient's breathing pattern obtained from infrared reflectors on the patient. kV X-rays of an implanted fiducial are synchronized to the breathing pattern. After localization and shift of the patient to isocenter, the breathing pattern is used to gate Radiation. Feasibility tests included localization accuracy, radiation output constancy, and dose distributions with gating. Clinical experience is reported on treatment of patients with small lung lesions. Results: Localization accuracy of a moving target with gating was 1.7 mm. Dose constancy measurements showed insignificant change in output with gating. Improvements of dose distributions on moving targets improved with gating. Eleven patients with lung lesions were implanted with 20 mm x 0.7 mm gold coil (Visicoil). The implanted fiducial was used to localize and treat the patients with gating. Treatment planning and repeat computed tomographic scans showed that the change in center of gross target volume (GTV) to implanted marker averaged 2.47 mm due in part to asymmetric tumor shrinkage. Conclusion: ExacTrac Adaptive Gating has been used to treat lung lesions. Initial system evaluation verified its accuracy and usability. Implanted fiducials are visible in X-rays and did not migrate

  13. 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography-Based Assessment of Local Failure Patterns in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sura, Sonal; Greco, Carlo; Gelblum, Daphna; Yorke, Ellen D.; Jackson, Andrew; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the pattern of local failure using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) scans after radiotherapy (RT) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with definitive RT whose gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were defined with the aid of pre-RT PET data. Method and Materials: The data from 26 patients treated with involved-field RT who had local failure and a post-RT PET scan were analyzed. The patterns of failure were visually scored and defined as follows: (1) within the GTV/planning target volume (PTV); (2) within the GTV, PTV, and outward; (3) within the PTV and outward; and (4) outside the PTV. Local failure was also evaluated as originating from nodal areas vs. the primary tumor. Results: We analyzed 34 lesions. All 26 patients had recurrence originating from their primary tumor. Of the 34 lesions, 8 (24%) were in nodal areas, 5 of which (63%) were marginal or geographic misses compared with only 1 (4%) of the 26 primary recurrences (p = 0.001). Of the eight primary tumors that had received a dose of <60 Gy, six (75%) had failure within the GTV and two (25%) at the GTV margin. At doses of ≥60 Gy, 6 (33%) of 18 had failure within the GTV and 11 (61%) at the GTV margin, and 1 (6%) was a marginal miss (p < 0.05). Conclusion: At lower doses, the pattern of recurrences was mostly within the GTV, suggesting that the dose might have been a factor for tumor control. At greater doses, the treatment failures were mostly at the margin of the GTV. This suggests that visual incorporation of PET data for GTV delineation might be inadequate, and more sophisticated approaches of PET registration should be evaluated

  14. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenberg, Mara W.; Kato, Catherine M.; Carson, Kelly M.P.; Matsunaga, Nathan M.; Arao, Robert F.; Doss, Emily J.; McCracken, Charles L.; Meng, Lu Z.; Chen, Yiyi; Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin; Tanyi, James A.

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R 50 (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D 2 cm (D max at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D max and D 5 /D 50 were computed. Chest wall (CW) D max and absolute V 30 /V 20 /V 10 /V 5 Gy were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V 10 /V 5 Gy , as well as contralateral CW D max and V 10 /V 5 Gy (all p max and D 5 /D 50 for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p 50 significantly improved with IMRT-s/VMAT-c (p 2 cm significantly improved with VMAT-c (p < 0.001). Plan delivery efficiency improved with sectored technique (p < 0.001); mean monitor unit (MU)/cGy of PD decreased from 5.8 ± 1.9 vs 5.3 ± 1.7 (IMRT) and 2.7 ± 0.4 vs 2.4 ± 0.3 (VMAT). The sectored configuration achieves unambiguous dosimetric advantages over circumferential arrangement in terms

  15. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  16. Mammary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1988-10-01

    Mammary neoplasia is one of the more common malignancies affecting domestic species. Despite their importance, they are often over- diagnosed, undertreated and subject to several misconceptions propagated by veterinarians and pet owners alike. Mammary neoplasia is the most frequent tumor type encountered in the female accounting for almost half of all malignancies reported. The canine has the highest incidence of mammary tumors of all domestic species. In the dog, about 65 percent of mammary tumors are benign mixed tumors, and 25 percent are carcinomas. The rest are adenomas, myoepitheliomas, and malignant mixed tumors. The age distribution of mammary tumors closely follows the age distribution of most tumors in the dog. Mammary tumors are rare in dogs 2 years old, but incidence begins to increase sharply at approximately 6 years of age. Median age at diagnosis is about 10 years. No breed predilection has been consistently reported

  17. Radiation tolerance of the spinal cord previously-damaged by tumor operation: long term neurological improvement and time-dose-volume relationships after irradiation of intraspinal gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopelson, G.

    1982-01-01

    Of 26 patients with intramedullary spinal cord gliomas (9 astrocytomas, 5 glioblastomas, 12 ependymomas) seen at the Massachusetts General Hospital from 1962-1980, 24 were irradiated (21 initially and 3 after post-surgical recurrence). Those 19 patients who survived at least 1 year after completion of irradiation were evaluated for post-irradiation neurological changes.No patient developed radiation myelopathy. Return to a permanently and completely normal neurological status occured for 33/51 (65%) of pre-irradiation neurological deficits. The major cause of post-irradiation neurological deterioration was tumor recurrence. Although 18/19 patients had their thoracic or lumbar spinal cords irradiated, each with field sizes greater than 10 cm, spinal cord doses approaching, equalling, or occasionally exceeding various definitions of spinal cord tolerance were tolerated well without evidence of radiation myelopathy. Spinal cords of patients with intramedullary gliomas, often with major neurological deficits prior to irradiation, may be treated safely to doses approaching or equalling spinal cord tolerance levels. These doses are expected to locally control most ependymomas and astrocytomas without an increased radiation myelopathy. Caution should be observed if doses higher than this are contemplated in an attempt to cure glioblastoma, because the 5% tolerance level of the damaged spinal remains to be defined

  18. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  19. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  20. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  1. [Dosimetry verification of radioactive seed implantation with 3D printing template and CT guidance for paravertebral/retroperitoneal malignant tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Z; Jiang, Y L; Guo, F X; Peng, R; Sun, H T; Fan, J H; Wang, J J

    2017-04-04

    Objective: To compare the dose distributions of postoperative plans with preoperative plans for seeds implantations of paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors assisted by 3D printing guide template and CT guidance, explore the effects of the technology for seeds implantations in dosimetry level and provide data support for the optimization and standardization in seeds implantation. Methods: Between December 2015 and July 2016, a total of 10 patients with paravertebral/retroperitoneal tumors (12 lesions) received 3D printing template assist radioactive seeds implantations in department of radiation oncology of Peking University Third Hospital, and included in the study. The diseases included cervical cancer, kidney cancer, abdominal stromal tumor, leiomyosarcoma of kidney, esophageal cancer and carcinoma of ureter. The prescribed doses was 110-150 Gy. All patients received preoperative planning design, individual template design and production, and the dose distribution of postoperative plan was compared with preoperative plan. Dose parameters including D(90), MPD, V(100), V(150,)conformal index(CI), EI of target volume and D(2cc) of organs at risk (spinal cord, aorta, kidney). Statistical software was SPSS 19.0 and statistical method was non-parameters Wilcoxon symbols test. Results: A total of 10 3D printing templates were designed and produced which were including 12 treatment areas.The mean D(90) of postoperative target area (GTV) was 131.1 (97.8-167.4 Gy) Gy. The actual seeds number of post operation increased by 3 to 12 in 5 cases (42.0%). The needle was well distributed. For postoperative plans, the mean D(90,)MPD, V(100,)V(150) was 131.1 Gy, 69.3 Gy, 90.2% and 65.2%, respectively, and which was 140.2 Gy, 65.6 Gy, 91.7% and 26.8%, respectively, in preoperative plans. This meant that the actual dose of target volume was slightly lower than preplanned dose, and the high dose area of target volume was larger than preplanned range, but there was no statistical

  2. Circumferential or sectored beam arrangements for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of primary lung tumors: Effect on target and normal-structure dose-volume metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Mara W. [Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Physics, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States); Kato, Catherine M. [Macalester College, St. Paul, MN (United States); Carson, Kelly M.P. [The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Matsunaga, Nathan M. [Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Arao, Robert F. [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Doss, Emily J. [Department of Internal Medicine, Providence St. Vincent Medical Center, Portland, OR (United States); McCracken, Charles L. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Meng, Lu Z. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Chen, Yiyi [Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Laub, Wolfram U.; Fuss, Martin [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Tanyi, James A., E-mail: tanyij@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To compare 2 beam arrangements, sectored (beam entry over ipsilateral hemithorax) vs circumferential (beam entry over both ipsilateral and contralateral lungs), for static-gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery techniques with respect to target and organs-at-risk (OAR) dose-volume metrics, as well as treatment delivery efficiency. Data from 60 consecutive patients treated using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for primary non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) formed the basis of this study. Four treatment plans were generated per data set: IMRT/VMAT plans using sectored (-s) and circumferential (-c) configurations. The prescribed dose (PD) was 60 Gy in 5 fractions to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) (maximum PTV dose ∼ 150% PD) for a 6-MV photon beam. Plan conformality, R{sub 50} (ratio of volume circumscribed by the 50% isodose line and the PTV), and D{sub 2} {sub cm} (D{sub max} at a distance ≥2 cm beyond the PTV) were evaluated. For lungs, mean doses (mean lung dose [MLD]) and percent V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} Gy were assessed. Spinal cord and esophagus D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} were computed. Chest wall (CW) D{sub max} and absolute V{sub 30}/V{sub 20}/V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} were reported. Sectored SBRT planning resulted in significant decrease in contralateral MLD and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy}, as well as contralateral CW D{sub max} and V{sub 10}/V{sub 5} {sub Gy} (all p < 0.001). Nominal reductions of D{sub max} and D{sub 5}/D{sub 50} for the spinal cord with sectored planning did not reach statistical significance for static-gantry IMRT, although VMAT metrics did show a statistically significant decrease (all p < 0.001). The respective measures for esophageal doses were significantly lower with sectored planning (p < 0.001). Despite comparable dose conformality, irrespective of planning configuration, R{sub 50} significantly improved with IMRT

  3. [Low dose volume histogram analysis of the lungs in prediction of acute radiation pneumonitis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Wen-bin; Zhu, Shu-chai; Gao, Hong-mei; Li, You-mei; Liu, Zhi-kun; Li, Juan; Su, Jing-wei; Wan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the predictive value of low dose volume of the lung on acute radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with esophageal cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) only, and to analyze the relation of comprehensive parameters of the dose-volume V5, V20 and mean lung dose (MLD) with acute RP. Two hundred and twenty-two patients with esophageal cancer treated by 3D-CRT have been followed up. The V5-V30 and MLD were calculated from the dose-volume histogram system. The clinical factors and treatment parameters were collected and analyzed. The acute RP was evaluated according to the RTOG toxicity criteria. The acute RP of grade 1, 2, 3 and 4 were observed in 68 (30.6%), 40 (18.0%), 8 (3.6%) and 1 (0.5%) cases, respectively. The univariate analysis of measurement data:The primary tumor length, radiation fields, MLD and lung V5-V30 had a significant relationship with the acute RP. The magnitude of the number of radiation fields, the volume of GTV, MLD and Lung V5-V30 had a significant difference in whether the ≥ grade 1 and ≥ grade 2 acute RP developed or not. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that MLD, Lung V5, V20 and V25 were independent risk factors of ≥ grade 1 acute RP, and the radiation fields, MLD and Lung V5 were independent risk factors of ≥ grade 2 acute RP. The ≥ grade 1 and ≥ grade 2 acute RP were significantly decreased when MLD less than 14 Gy, V5 and V20 were less than 60% and 28%,respectively. When the V20 ≤ 28%, the acute RP was significantly decreased in V5 ≤ 60% group. When the MLD was ≤ 14 Gy, the ≥ 1 grade acute RP was significantly decreased in the V5 ≤ 60% group. When the MLD was >14 Gy, the ≥ grade 2 acute RP was significantly decreased in the V5 ≤ 60% group. The low dose volume of the lung is effective in predicting radiation pneumonitis in patients with esophageal cancer treated with 3D-CRT only. The comprehensive parameters combined with V5, V20 and MLD may increase the

  4. Flat-Panel Detector—Based Volume Computed Tomography: A Novel 3D Imaging Technique to Monitor Osteolytic Bone Lesions in a Mouse Tumor Metastasis Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannine Missbach-Guentner

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal metastasis is an important cause of mortality in patients with breast cancer. Hence, animal models, in combination with various imaging techniques, are in high demand for preclinical assessment of novel therapies. We evaluated the applicability of flat-panel volume computed tomography (fpVCT to noninvasive detection of osteolytic bone metastases that develop in severe immunodeficient mice after intracardial injection of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. A single fpVCT scan at 200-wm isotropic resolution was employed to detect osteolysis within the entire skeleton. Osteolytic lesions identified by fpVCT correlated with Faxitron X-ray analysis and were subsequently confirmed by histopathological examination. Isotropic three-dimensional image data sets obtained by fpVCT were the basis for the precise visualization of the extent of the lesion within the cortical bone and for the measurement of bone loss. Furthermore, fpVCT imaging allows continuous monitoring of growth kinetics for each metastatic site and visualization of lesions in more complex regions of the skeleton, such as the skull. Our findings suggest that fpVCT is a powerful tool that can be used to monitor the occurrence and progression of osteolytic lesions in vivo and can be further developed to monitor responses to antimetastatic therapies over the course of the disease.

  5. SU-F-R-47: Quantitative Shape Relationship Analysis of PTV Modification for Critical Anatomy Sparing and Its Impact On Pathologic Response for Neoadjuvant Stereotactic Radiotherapy for Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Z; Rosati, L; Chen, L; Robertson, S; Moore, J; Peng, L; Mian, O; Narang, A; Hacker-Prietz, A; Herman, J; McNutt, T

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) may be used to increase surgery candidacy in borderline resectable (BRPC) and locally advanced (LAPC) pancreatic cancer. However, the planning target volume (PTV) may need to be limited to avoid toxicity when the gross tumor volume (GTV) is anatomically involved with surrounding critical structures. Our study aims to characterize the coverage of GTV and investigate the association between modified PTV and pathologic (pCR) or near pathologic (npCR) complete response rates determined from the surgical specimen. Methods: Patients treated with neoadjuvant pancreas SBRT followed by surgery from 2010–2015 were selected from Oncospace. Overlap volume histogram (OVH) analysis was performed to determine the extent of compromise of the PTV from both the GTV and a standard target (GTV+3mm). Subsequently, normalized overlap volume (%) was calculated for: (1) GTV-PTV, and (2) GTV+3mm expansion-PTV. A logistic regression model was used to identify the association between the overlap ratios and ≥ npCR(pCR/npCR) stratified by active breathing control (ABC) versus free-breathing status. Results: Eighty-one (BRPC: n=42, LAPC: n=39) patients were available for analysis. Nearly 40% (31/81) had ≥npCR and 75% (61/81) were able to complete ABC. Mean coverage of the GTV-PTV was 92.6% (range, 59.9%–100%, SD = 8.68) and coverage of the GTV+3mm expansion-PTV was 85. 2% (range, 59.9% −100.0%, SD= 8.67). Among the patients with ABC, every 10% increase in GTV coverage doubled the odds to have ≥npCR (OR = 1.82, p=0.06). Coverage of GTV+3mm expan