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Sample records for tumor invading parenchyma

  1. CT differentiation of renal tumor invading parenchyma and pelvis: renal cell carcinoma vs transitional cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Cho, Seong Beum; Park, Cheol Min; Cha, In Ho; Chung, Kyoo Byung

    1994-01-01

    The differentiation between renal cell carcinoma(RCC) and transitional cell carcinoma(TCC) is important due to the different methods of treatment and prognosis. But occasionally it is difficult to draw a distinction between the two diseases when renal parenchyma and renal collecting systems are invaded simultaneously. We reviewed CT scans of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma and 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma which showed involvement of renal parenchyma and renal sinus fat on CT. Retrospective analysis was performed by 3 abdominal radiologists. Check points were renal contour bulging or reinform shape, location of mass center, intact parenchyma overlying the tumor, cystic change, calcification, LN metastasis, vessel invasion, and perirenal extention. There were renal contour bulging due to the tumor mass in 33 out of 37 cases of renal cell carcinoma, where a and nine of 12 cases of transitional cell carcinoma maintained the reinform appearance. This is significant statiscal difference between the two(P<0.005). Center of all TCCs were located in the renal sinus, and 24 out of 35 cases of RCC were located in the cortex(P<0.005). Thirty-six out of 37 cases of RCC lost the overlying parenchyma, where as 4 out of 9 cases of well enhanced TCC had intact overlying parenchyma(P<0.005) RCC showed uptic change within the tumor mags in 31 cases which was significanity higher than the 4 cases in TCC(P<0.05). CT findings of renal cell carcinoma are contour bulging, peripheral location, obliteration of parenchyma, and cystic change. Findings of transitional cell carcinoma are reinform appearance, central location within the kidney, intact overlying parenchyma, and rare cystic change

  2. Migratory neighbors and distant invaders: tumor-associated niche cells

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    Wels, Jared; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Rafii, Shahin; Lyden, David

    2008-01-01

    The cancer environment is comprised of tumor cells as well as a wide network of stromal and vascular cells participating in the cellular and molecular events necessary for invasion and metastasis. Tumor secretory factors can activate the migration of host cells, both near to and far from the primary tumor site, as well as promote the exodus of cells to distant tissues. Thus, the migration of stromal cells and tumor cells among specialized microenvironments takes place throughout tumor and metastatic progression, providing evidence for the systemic nature of a malignancy. Investigations of the tumor–stromal and stromal–stromal cross-talk involved in cellular migration in cancer may lead to the design of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:18316475

  3. Value of gamma knife radiosurgery for tumors invading cavernous sinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokura, Hidefumi; Yoshimoto, Takashi

    1999-01-01

    The usefulness of radiosurgery for cavernous sinus tumors was evaluated based on our experience and recent published reports from other institutes. Twenty-six meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus were treated by radiosurgery. The length of follow-up average 3 years. Tumors regressed in 40% and remained stable in 56% of cases. A total of 96% of the tumors were controlled with only a few minor complications. We believe surgical resection to reduce the volume of the tumor without causing new neurological deficits, followed by radiosurgery on the tumor located in the cavernous sinus is the best choice in many cases. Twenty-five pituitary adenomas with cavernous sinus invasion were treated by a combination of transsphenoidal removal and radiosurgery. All the tumors are controlled in terms of volume during the follow-up (average of 34 months). There were no new neurological deficits, including visual disturbance. Hormone elevation was able to be corrected at an early stage without pituitary insufficiency more by radiosurgery than by fractionated radiation. However, to obtain good results by radiosurgery, it must be preceded by complete surgical decompression of optic nerves and chiasma from the tumor. (author)

  4. CT perfusion of the liver during selective hepatic arteriography. Pure arterial blood perfusion of liver tumor and parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Kariya, Shuji; Sawada, Satoshi

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify pure arterial blood perfusion of liver tumor and parenchyma by using CT perfusion during selective hepatic arteriography. A total of 44 patients underwent liver CT perfusion study by injection of contrast medium via the hepatic artery. CT-perfusion parameters including arterial blood flow, arterial blood volume, and arterial mean transit time in the liver parenchyma and liver tumor were calculated using the deconvolution method. The CT-perfusion parameters and vascularity of the tumor were compared. A complete analysis could be performed in 36 of the 44 patients. For liver tumor and liver parenchyma, respectively, arterial blood flow was 184.6±132.7 and 41.0±27.0 ml/min/100 g, arterial blood volume was 19.4±14.6 and 4.8±4.2 ml/100 g, and arterial mean transit time was 8.9±4.2 and 10.2±5.3 sec. Arterial blood flow and arterial blood volume correlated significantly with the vascularity of the tumor; however no correlation was detected between arterial mean transit time and the vascularity of the tumor. This technique could be used to quantify pure hepatic arterial blood perfusion. (author)

  5. Comparing renal function preservation after laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for clinical T1a renal tumor: using a 3D parenchyma measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liangsong; Wu, Guangyu; Huang, Jiwei; Wang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Ruiyun; Kong, Wen; Xue, Wei; Huang, Yiran; Chen, Yonghui; Zhang, Jin

    2017-05-01

    To compare the renal function preservation between laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy. Data were analyzed from 246 patients who underwent laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation and laparoscopic partial nephrectomy for solitary cT1a renal cell carcinoma from January 2013 to July 2015. To reduce the intergroup difference, we used a 1:1 propensity matching analysis. The functional renal parenchyma volume preservation were measured preoperative and 12 months after surgery. The total renal function recovery and spilt GFR was compared. Multivariable logistic analysis was used for predictive factors for renal function decline. After 1:1 propensity matching, each group including 100 patients. Patients in the laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation had a smaller decrease in estimate glomerular filtration rate at 1 day (-7.88 vs -20.01%, p renal parenchyma volume preservation (89.19 vs 84.27%, p renal parenchyma volume preservation, warm ischemia time and baseline renal function were the important independent factors in determining long-term functional recovery. The laparoscopic radio frequency ablation assisted tumor enucleation technology has unique advantage and potential in preserving renal parenchyma without ischemia damage compared to conventional laparoscopic partial nephrectomy, and had a better outcome, thus we recommend this technique in selected T1a patients.

  6. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Hongsheng; Choi, Bryan D; Suryadevara, Carter M; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Yang, Shicheng; De Leon, Gabriel; Sayour, Elias J; McLendon, Roger; Herndon, James E; Healy, Patrick; Archer, Gary E; Bigner, Darell D; Johnson, Laura A; Sampson, John H

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

  7. EGFRvIII-specific chimeric antigen receptor T cells migrate to and kill tumor deposits infiltrating the brain parenchyma in an invasive xenograft model of glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Miao

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of "immunologically silent" tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

  8. A rare case of retroperitoneal malignant triton tumor invading renal vein and small intestine

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    Mijović Žaklina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Malignant Triton tumor is a very rare malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. Most of those tumors occur in patients with von Recklinghausen’s disease or as a late complication of irradiation and commonly seen in the head, neck, extremities and trunk. Case report. We reported retroperitoneal malignant Triton tumor in a 57-year-old female patient. Skin lesions were not present, and there was no family history of neurofibromatosis or previous irradiation. The presented case is one of a few recorded in the specialized literature that occurs in the retroperitoneal space in sporadic form. In this case, tumor consisted of a multilobular mass was in close relation with the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava and involved the renal vein with gross invasion of the small intestine. The patient underwent total resection of the tumor and left nefrectomy was performed. The small intestine 10 cm in length was also resected and end-to-end anastomosis was conducted. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged from the hospital ten days after the surgery. Conclusion. Diagnostically, it is crucial to recognize this uncommon histological variant because malignant Triton tumor has a worse prognosis than classic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor does. The use of the immunohistochemistry is essential in making the correct diagnosis. Only appropriate pathological evaluation supported by immunostaining with S-100 protein and desmin confirmed the diagnosis. Aggressive surgical management treatment improves the prognosis of such cases with adjuvant radiotherapy.

  9. The Rare Benign Lesion That Mimics a Malignant Tumor in Breast Parenchyma: Nodular Fasciitis of the Breast

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    Hilal Erinanc

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We herein report the clinical and pathological findings of a rare case of nodular fasciitis in the breast parenchyma of a 48-year-old female. Because of potentially malignant findings on ultrasonography and during clinical examination, the patient underwent an excisional biopsy. Histologically, the lesion was composed of spindle to round shaped cells arranged in short bundles in a storiform pattern. Immunohistochemically, the cells were positive for vimentin and SMA and negative for desmin, S100, and CD34. Based on these morphological and immunohistochemical features, a diagnosis of nodular fasciitis was made. We emphasize that nodular fasciitis of the breast may show clinical features and imaging findings similar to those of breast cancer. The histopathologic diagnosis of nodular fasciitis can also be challenging. The purpose of this case report is to highlight the characteristics and the differential diagnosis of this rare neoplasm.

  10. A review of nasal, paranasal, and skull base tumors invading the orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten; Heegaard, Steffen

    2018-01-01

    of ophthalmological and otorhinolaryngological symptoms, including proptosis, pain, decreased visual acuity, restrictions in motility of the eye, epistaxis, and nasal obstruction. Sarcomas and benign bone and cartilage tumors arise from surrounding structures, whereas carcinomas usually arise from the paranasal...

  11. Benign Tumors of the Pancreas-Radical Surgery Versus Parenchyma-Sparing Local Resection-the Challenge Facing Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Hans G

    2018-03-01

    Pancreaticoduodenectomy and left-sided pancreatectomy are the surgical treatment standards for tumors of the pancreas. Surgeons, who are requested to treat patients with benign tumors, using standard oncological resections, face the challenge of sacrificing pancreatic and extra-pancreatic tissue. Tumor enucleation, pancreatic middle segment resection and local, duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resections are surgical procedures increasingly used as alternative treatment modalities compared to classical pancreatic resections. Use of local resection procedures for cystic neoplasms and neuro-endocrine tumors of the pancreas (panNETs) is associated with an improvement of procedure-related morbidity, when compared to classical Whipple OP (PD) and left-sided pancreatectomy (LP). The procedure-related advantages are a 90-day mortality below 1% and a low level of POPF B+C rates. Most importantly, the long-term benefits of the use of local surgical procedures are the preservation of the endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions. PD performed for benign tumors on preoperative normo-glycemic patients is followed by the postoperative development of new onset of diabetes mellitus (NODM) in 4 to 24% of patients, measured by fasting blood glucose and/or oral/intravenous glucose tolerance test, according to the criteria of the international consensus guidelines. Persistence of new diabetes mellitus during the long-term follow-up after PD for benign tumors is observed in 14.5% of cases and after surgery for malignant tumors in 15.5%. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after PD is found in the long-term follow-up for benign tumors in 25% and for malignant tumors in 49%. Following LP, 14-31% of patients experience postoperatively NODM; many of the patients subsequently change to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The decision-making for cystic neoplasms and panNETs of the pancreas should be guided by the low surgical risk and the preservation of pancreatic metabolic

  12. Bladder cancer: The combination of chemotherapy and irradiation in the treatment of patients with muscle-invading tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    1996-01-01

    In the USA the recommended treatment for patients with muscle-invading transitional cell cancer of the bladder is usually radical cystectomy. Conservative surgery irradiation, and cisplatin-based systemic chemotherapy are, however, each effective for some patients. Although they provide the opportunity for bladder preservation, each modality, when used alone, is inferior to radical cystectomy in terms of local control and, perhaps, survival. Many recent publications have now documented the efficacy of combined modality treatment protocols employing all three of these modalities together. All employ a selective approach in which the patients only receive full-dose radiation if they have had a complete response to induction CMT. Overall survival data for T2-T3a patients are certainly as good as any reported cystectomy series of similarly clinically staged and similar aged patients. Radiation adds very significantly to the transurethral resection and systemic chemotherapy to maintain the bladder free of tumor. Substantially higher rates of pathologic confirmation of complete response are found following transurethral surgery and chemoradiation when compared with transurethral surgery and chemotherapy omitting the radiation. Overall survival is as good as cystectomy based approaches at 48-54% and over 80% of these long-term survivors keep their bladders. Following such therapies, 20-30% will subsequently develop superficial tumors. These patients may still be well treated by standard methods using transurethral resection and intravesical drugs. The concern of urologists that the conserved irradiated bladder functions poorly has also been answered by recent reports using modern radiation techniques. The instance of cystectomy for bladder shrinkage is repeatedly below 2%. Furthermore, sexual function is commonly preserved. The systemic morbidity of the chemotherapy is relatively high, but new approached using anti-emetics and GCSF now allow this to be reduced. In many

  13. Middle-preserving pancreatectomy for advanced transverse colon cancer invading the duodenun and non-functioning endocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail.

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    Noda, Hiroshi; Kato, Takaharu; Kamiyama, Hidenori; Toyama, Nobuyuki; Konishi, Fumio

    2011-02-01

    A 73-year-old female was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of advanced transverse colon cancer with severe anemia and body weight loss. Preoperative evaluations, including colonoscopy, gastroduodenoscopy, and computed tomography, revealed not only a transverse colon cancer massively invading the duodenum, but also a non-functioning endocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail. We performed middle-preserving pancreatectomy (MPP) with right hemicolectomy for these tumors with a curative intent. After the resection, about 6 cm of the body of the pancreas was preserved, and signs of diabetes mellitus have not appeared. The postoperative course was complicated by a grade B pancreatic fistula, but this was successfully treated with conservative management. After a 33-day hospital stay, the patient returned to daily life without signs of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Although the long-term follow-up of the patient is indispensable, in this case, MPP might be able to lead to the curative resection of transverse colon cancer massively invading the duodenum and non-functioning endocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail with preservation of pancreatic function.

  14. Reconstruction of a Marjolin Ulcer Defect of the Scalp Invading Brain and Causing Brain Abscess Formation Using Free Latissimus Dorsi Flap.

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    Tenekeci, Goktekin; Sari, Alper; Hamzaoglu, Vural; Ozalp, Hakan

    2017-07-01

    Marjolin ulcers are known as aggressive malignant tumors that mostly arise over chronic wounds and cutaneous scars. Brain abscess is a serious medical condition that requires surgical drainage along with antibiotic treatment. Here, we report a case with a Marjolin ulcer located over the right parietal bone with intracranial abscess formation along with tumor invasion into brain parenchyma. This patient was a 64-year-old man and had a 4 × 4 cm open wound on his scalp from which a purulent discharge was coming. This wound required surgical excision with security margins, resection of bone, evacuation of the cystic cavity, and excision of the walls of the cystic cavity, which were invaded by the tumor. Duraplasty and reconstruction of the defect with a free lattisimus dorsi flap are performed. To the best of our knowledge, the case reported here is unique because of the formation of brain abscess in the background of a long-lasting Marjolin ulcer invading brain parenchyma. It must be remembered that on the background of cutaneous scars located over the scalp, a Marjolin ulcer may develop, and if left untreated, tumor cells may invade even the brain parenchyma. Long-term asymptomatic brain infections may also accompany the given scenario, and complicate differential diagnosis.

  15. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  16. Bladder cancer: the combination of chemotherapy and irradiation in the treatment of patients with muscle-invading tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    1995-01-01

    In the USA the recommended treatment for patients with muscle-invading transitional cell cancer of the bladder is usually radical cystectomy. Conservative surgery (transurethral resection and partial cystectomy), irradiation, and cis-platinum based systemic chemotherapy are, however, each effective for some patients. Although they provide the opportunity for bladder preservation, each modality, when used alone, is inferior to radical cystectomy in terms of local control and, perhaps, survival. Initial response and local control rates are improved when a multimodality approach is used. Up to 85% of patients selected for bladder sparing therapy on the basis of their initial response to chemo-radiation may keep their bladders. This figure could increase further when other powerful prognostic factors, such as the presence of hydronephrosis or carcinoma in situ, are taken into account in initial patient selection. Deferring the patient from immediate cystectomy does not appear to compromise survival. The most appropriate sequencing of radiation and chemotherapy is yet to be established. Concomitant cis-platinum and irradiation improves local control and bladder preservation when compared with irradiation alone but does not decrease the metastatic rate. It is hoped that the well recognized activity of cis-platinum based combination chemotherapy in advanced disease will translate into effective eradication of micrometastatic disease (known to be present in up to 40% of patients at diagnosis). This has yet to be clearly demonstrated in a randomized trial. The addition of combination chemotherapy to radiation does not increase bladder morbidity but carries a considerable systemic risk. Thus, despite promising phase II studies, until a survival benefit is proven in a randomized trial, neoadjuvant or adjuvant combination chemotherapy in conjunction with irradiation should continue to be regarded as experimental

  17. Changes in the acinar distribution of some enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism in rat liver parenchyma after experimentally induced cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noorden, C. J.; Frederiks, W. M.; Aronson, D. C.; Marx, F.; Bosch, K.; Jonges, G. N.; Vogels, I. M.; James, J.

    1987-01-01

    Extrahepatic cholestasis induced by ligation and transsection of the common bile duct caused a change in the parenchyma/stroma relationship in rat liver. Two weeks after ligation, the periportal zones of the parenchyma were progressively invaded by expanding bile ductules with surrounding connective

  18. CT differentiation of infiltrating renal cell carcinoma and renal urothelial tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyo Kyeong; Goo, Dong Erk; Bang, Sun Woo; Lee, Moon Gyu; Cho, Kyoung Sik; Auh, Yong Ho

    1994-01-01

    It may be difficult to differentiate renal cell carcinoma involving collecting system from renal urothelial tumor invading into renal parenchyma. The purpose of this study was to assess the differences of CT findings between two conditions. CT findings of 5 cases of renal cell carcinoma involving the renal collecting systems and 10 cases of renal urothelial tumors invading the renal parenchyma were compared, and analyzed about the presence or absence of hydronephrosis, normal or abnormal CT nephrogram, renal contour changes due to mass and tentative diagnosis. The diagnoses were confirmed at surgery. Renal cell carcinoma showed hydronephrosis in only 20% and normal CT nephrogram and outward contour bulging in all cases. In contrast, renal urothelial tumor showed hydronephrosis(70%), abnormal CT nephrogram(60%), and preservation of reinform shape(100%). Renal contour changes and CT nephrogram may be useful in distinguishing both disease entities

  19. Early invasion of brain parenchyma by African trypanosomes.

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    Ute Frevert

    Full Text Available Human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is a vector-borne parasitic disease that has a major impact on human health and welfare in sub-Saharan countries. Based mostly on data from animal models, it is currently thought that trypanosome entry into the brain occurs by initial infection of the choroid plexus and the circumventricular organs followed days to weeks later by entry into the brain parenchyma. However, Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream forms rapidly cross human brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro and appear to be able to enter the murine brain without inflicting cerebral injury. Using a murine model and intravital brain imaging, we show that bloodstream forms of T. b. brucei and T. b. rhodesiense enter the brain parenchyma within hours, before a significant level of microvascular inflammation is detectable. Extravascular bloodstream forms were viable as indicated by motility and cell division, and remained detectable for at least 3 days post infection suggesting the potential for parasite survival in the brain parenchyma. Vascular inflammation, as reflected by leukocyte recruitment and emigration from cortical microvessels, became apparent only with increasing parasitemia at later stages of the infection, but was not associated with neurological signs. Extravascular trypanosomes were predominantly associated with postcapillary venules suggesting that early brain infection occurs by parasite passage across the neuroimmunological blood brain barrier. Thus, trypanosomes can invade the murine brain parenchyma during the early stages of the disease before meningoencephalitis is fully established. Whether individual trypanosomes can act alone or require the interaction from a quorum of parasites remains to be shown. The significance of these findings for disease development is now testable.

  20. The unseen invaders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craven, Dylan; Thakur, Madhav P.; Cameron, Erin

    2017-01-01

    earthworms on plant diversity and community composition in North American forests. We conducted a meta-analysis using a total of 645 observations to quantify mean effect sizes of associations between introduced earthworm communities and plant diversity, cover of plant functional groups, and cover of native...... to the abiotic conditions of earthworm-invaded forests. Further, our study provides evidence that introduced earthworms are associated with declines in plant diversity in North American forests. Changing plant functional composition in these forests may have long-lasting effects on ecosystem functioning....

  1. Krukenberg tumor in a young woman: A rare presentation

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    Deepa Hatwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Krukenberg tumors mostly occur after 40 years. Metastatic ovarian tumors in young age are very rare and reported to be 2% of all the cases. Thirty percent of all ovarian neoplasms occurring during childhood and adolescence are malignant. A 25-year-old woman, parity- 2, presented with abdominal distension, pain in abdomen and amenorrhea. On examination, 18 weeks lump was palpable, firm to hard in consistency, non-tender and mobile. On ultrasonography bilateral ovarian tumors were reported, without any peritoneal free fluid. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Microscopic examination revealed signet ring cells with glandular differentiation, diffusely invading the ovarian parenchyma. Tumor cells exhibited strong, diffuse immunopositivity for CEA with focal strong immunopositivity for CK7 and CK20 and immunonegativity for SATB2. Diagnosis of Krukenberg tumor was made. Endoscopic biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma stomach. This case is reported because of its rarity in younger age group.

  2. Dissimilarity Representations in Lung Parenchyma Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge Emil Borch Laurs; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    parenchyma classification. This allows for the classifiers to work on dissimilarities between objects, which might be a more natural way of representing lung parenchyma. In this context, dissimilarity is defined between CT regions of interest (ROI)s. ROIs are represented by their CT attenuation histogram...... and ROI dissimilarity is defined as a histogram dissimilarity measure between the attenuation histograms. In this setting, the full histograms are utilized according to the chosen histogram dissimilarity measure. We apply this idea to classification of different emphysema patterns as well as normal...... are built in this representation. This is also the general trend in lung parenchyma classification in computed tomography (CT) images, where the features often are measures on feature histograms. Instead, we propose to build normal density based classifiers in dissimilarity representations for lung...

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor masquerading as a lung neoplasm. A case presentation and literature review

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    Papagiannopoulos K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Their incidence in the esophagus is 1%–3%. Never has a GIST been documented to directly invade the lung. We report a primary esophageal GIST with direct invasion into the lung parenchyma, presenting predominantly with respiratory symptoms. We include a retrospective literature review. Although the principle 'common things are common' usually guides our everyday clinical practice, this case emphasizes that rare entities can mimic common pathologies and underlines the importance of having a clearly defined differential diagnostic list which should be meticulously scrutinized.

  4. Micromechanical model of lung parenchyma hyperelasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concha, Felipe; Sarabia-Vallejos, Mauricio; Hurtado, Daniel E.

    2018-03-01

    Mechanics plays a key role in respiratory physiology, as lung tissue cyclically deforms to bring air in and out the lung, a life-long process necessary for respiration. The study of regional mechanisms of deformation in lung parenchyma has received great attention to date due to its clinical relevance, as local overstretching and stress concentration in lung tissue is currently associated to pathological conditions such as lung injury during mechanical ventilation therapy. This mechanical approach to lung physiology has motivated the development of constitutive models to better understand the relation between stress and deformation in the lung. While material models proposed to date have been key in the development of whole-lung simulations, either they do not directly relate microstructural properties of alveolar tissue with coarse-scale behavior, or they require a high computational effort when based on real alveolar geometries. Furthermore, most models proposed to date have not been thoroughly validated for anisotropic deformation states, which are commonly found in normal lungs in-vivo. In this work, we develop a novel micromechanical model of lung parenchyma hyperelasticity using the framework of finite-deformation homogenization. To this end, we consider a tetrakaidecahedron unit cell with incompressible Neo-Hookean structural elements that account for the alveolar wall tissue responsible for the elastic response, and derive expressions for its effective coarse-scale behavior that directly depend on the alveolar wall elasticity, reference porosity, and two other geometrical coefficients. To validate the proposed model, we simulate the non-linear elastic response of twelve representative volume elements (RVEs) of lung parenchyma with micrometric dimensions, whose geometry is obtained from micrometric computed-tomography reconstructions of murine lungs. We show that the proposed micromechanical model accurately captures the RVEs response not only for isotropic

  5. Surgical outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma invading hepatocaval confluence.

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    Li, Wei; Wu, Hong; Han, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Combined liver and inferior vena cava (IVC) resection followed by IVC and/or hepatic vein reconstruction (HVR) is a curative operation for selected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) invading the hepatocaval confluence. The present study aimed to elucidate the prognostic factors for patients with HCC invading the hepatocaval confluence. Forty-two consecutive patients underwent hepatectomy, combined with IVC replacement and/or HVR for HCC between January 2009 and December 2014 were included in this study. The cases were divided into three groups based on the surgical approaches of HVR: group 1 (n=13), tumor invaded the hepatocaval confluence but with one or two hepatic veins intact in the residual liver, thus only the replacement of IVC, not HVR; group 2 (n=23), the hepatic vein of the residual liver was also partially invaded, and the hepatic vein defect was repaired with patches locally; group 3 (n=6), three hepatic veins at the hepatocaval confluence were infiltrated, and the hepatic vein remnant was re-implanted onto the side of the tube graft. The patient characteristics, intra- and postoperative results, and long-term overall survival were compared among the three groups. The survival-related factors were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analysis. The group 1 had higher preoperative alpha-fetoprotein level (PHVR (PHVR (group 1). HVR was one of the unfavorable prognostic factors of overall survival.

  6. MRI findings of cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter under various intracranial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshisuke; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Suzuki, Hidenori

    1993-01-01

    We have experienced 4 cases of cerebral parenchymas in which high intensity was sustained by MRI T 2 WI, though a low density disappeared in CT, among the cases in which an expansion of the low density was observed in the cerebral parenchyma along a ventricular catheter by a CT scan after ventricular drainage and a shunt operation designed to combat increased intracranial pressure due to meningitis and a brain tumor. The cases were classified on the basis of morbidity into 1 case of cryptococcus meningitis, 1 case complicated by cerebellar hemorrhage and meningitis, and two cases of acute increased intracranial pressue due to a thalamic tumor and cerebellar astrocytoma. If a ventricular catheter or drainage tube is inserted, cerebral fluid penetrates into the cerebral parenchyma to cause a change in the tissue which can be explained, on the basis of CT findings, as a reversible change. However, this histological change is not always reversible according to our present MRI finding; rather, it becomes strong if the results of an inflammation such as meningitis are added to the cerebral fluid; in such a case, the reversibility is considered to disappear completely. (author)

  7. Diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma invading subarachnoid space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kase S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Satoru Kase1, Kazuhiko Yoshida1, Shigenobu Suzuki2, Koh-ichi Ohshima3, Shigeaki Ohno4, Susumu Ishida11Department of Ophthalmology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo; 2Department of Ophthalmic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo; 3Section of Ophthalmology, Okayama Medical Center, Okayama; 4Department of Ocular Inflammation and Immunology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: We report herein an unusual case of diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma involving the brain, which caused a patient’s death 27 months after enucleation. An eight-year-old boy complained of blurred vision in his right eye (OD in October 2006. Funduscopic examination showed optic disc swelling, dense whitish vitreous opacity, and an orange-colored subretinal elevated lesion adjacent to the optic disc. Fluorescein angiography revealed hyperfluorescence in the peripapillary region at an early-phase OD. Because the size of the subretinal lesion and vitreous opacity gradually increased, he was referred to us. His visual acuity was 20/1000 OD on June 20, 2007. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy showed a dense anterior vitreous opacity. Ophthalmoscopically, the subretinal orange-colored area spread out until reaching the mid peripheral region. A B-mode sonogram and computed tomography showed a thick homogeneous lesion without calcification. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging showed a markedly enhanced appearance of the underlying posterior retina. Enucleation of the right eye was performed nine months after the initial presentation. Histopathology demonstrated retinal detachment and a huge choroidal mass invading the optic nerve head. The tumor was consistent with diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma. The patient died due to brain involvement 27 months after enucleation. Ophthalmologists should be aware that diffuse infiltrating retinoblastoma may show an unfavorable course if its diagnosis is delayed

  8. Mechanisms of Glioma Formation: Iterative Perivascular Glioma Growth and Invasion Leads to Tumor Progression, VEGF-Independent Vascularization, and Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Baker

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As glioma cells infiltrate the brain they become associated with various microanatomic brain structures such as blood vessels, white matter tracts, and brain parenchyma. How these distinct invasion patterns coordinate tumor growth and influence clinical outcomes remain poorly understood. We have investigated how perivascular growth affects glioma growth patterning and response to antiangiogenic therapy within the highly vascularized brain. Orthotopically implanted rodent and human glioma cells are shown to commonly invade and proliferate within brain perivascular space. This form of brain tumor growth and invasion is also shown to characterize de novo generated endogenous mouse brain tumors, biopsies of primary human glioblastoma (GBM, and peripheral cancer metastasis to the human brain. Perivascularly invading brain tumors become vascularized by normal brain microvessels as individual glioma cells use perivascular space as a conduit for tumor invasion. Agent-based computational modeling recapitulated biological perivascular glioma growth without the need for neoangiogenesis. We tested the requirement for neoangiogenesis in perivascular glioma by treating animals with angiogenesis inhibitors bevacizumab and DC101. These inhibitors induced the expected vessel normalization, yet failed to reduce tumor growth or improve survival of mice bearing orthotopic or endogenous gliomas while exacerbating brain tumor invasion. Our results provide compelling experimental evidence in support of the recently described failure of clinically used antiangiogenics to extend the overall survival of human GBM patients.

  9. Primary extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with AL amyloidosis in cerebral parenchyma in an immunocompetent patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Terada, M.D., Ph.D.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein reported is an extremely rare case of primary MALT lymphoma of cerebral parenchyma. A 79-year-old man presented with paresis. Imaging modalities identified a tumor measuring 3 cm in diameter in right cerebral parenchyma. An operation completely resected the tumor. Macroscopically, the tumor was well defined, but showed mild infiltrative features. Histologically, the tumor showed proliferation of small atypical lymphocytes separated by fibrous septae with AL amyloid depositions. No apparent plasma cell differentiation was seen. The tumor cells showed monotonous appearances with hyperchromatic nuclei but without nucleoli and nuclear indentations. Immunoblastic cells were scattered. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for vimentin, CD45, CD20, CD79α, bcl-2, CD3 (focal, CD45RO (focal, CD5 (focal, CD10, CD23, bcl-6, CD138, p53, and Ki-67 (labeling = 27%. The immunoblastic cells were positive for CD30. The lymphoid cells were negative for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-related molecules of EBV latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1 and EBV early RNAs (EBER. They were also negative for cytokeratins AE 1/3 and CAM5.2, cyclin D1, CD34, GFAP, α-smooth muscle actin, and S100 protein. Because of the heterogeneity of tumor cells and positive AL amyloid deposition, the author diagnosed it as primary MALT lymphoma. The patient is now free from tumors. Differential diagnosis was discussed.

  10. Improved pulmonary nodule classification utilizing quantitative lung parenchyma features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilger, Samantha K N; Uthoff, Johanna; Judisch, Alexandra; Hammond, Emily; Mott, Sarah L; Smith, Brian J; Newell, John D; Hoffman, Eric A; Sieren, Jessica C

    2015-10-01

    Current computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) models for determining pulmonary nodule malignancy characterize nodule shape, density, and border in computed tomography (CT) data. Analyzing the lung parenchyma surrounding the nodule has been minimally explored. We hypothesize that improved nodule classification is achievable by including features quantified from the surrounding lung tissue. To explore this hypothesis, we have developed expanded quantitative CT feature extraction techniques, including volumetric Laws texture energy measures for the parenchyma and nodule, border descriptors using ray-casting and rubber-band straightening, histogram features characterizing densities, and global lung measurements. Using stepwise forward selection and leave-one-case-out cross-validation, a neural network was used for classification. When applied to 50 nodules (22 malignant and 28 benign) from high-resolution CT scans, 52 features (8 nodule, 39 parenchymal, and 5 global) were statistically significant. Nodule-only features yielded an area under the ROC curve of 0.918 (including nodule size) and 0.872 (excluding nodule size). Performance was improved through inclusion of parenchymal (0.938) and global features (0.932). These results show a trend toward increased performance when the parenchyma is included, coupled with the large number of significant parenchymal features that support our hypothesis: the pulmonary parenchyma is influenced differentially by malignant versus benign nodules, assisting CAD-based nodule characterizations.

  11. Exotic woody plant invaders of the Transvaal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Henderson

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency and abundance o ;f exotic, woody plant invaders were recorded in 60% of the quarter degree squares in the study area. Sixty-one invaders were encountered o f which the most important and aggressive were Acacia dealbaia, Populus spp.,  Melia azedarach, Opuntia ficus-indica, Salix babylonica and  Acacia mearnsii. Invasion patterns are discussed and an attempt is made to correlate distribution with environmental factors. Attention is drawn to the areas of greatest invasion and the areas that are liable to show the greatest expansion in the future.

  12. Characterization of the Lung Parenchyma Using Ultrasound Multiple Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Kaustav; Blackwell, John; Egan, Thomas; Muller, Marie

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to showcase the application of ultrasound to quantitative characterization of the micro-architecture of the lung parenchyma to predict the extent of pulmonary edema. The lung parenchyma is a highly complex and diffusive medium for which ultrasound techniques have remained qualitative. The approach presented here is based on ultrasound multiple scattering and exploits the complexity of ultrasound propagation in the lung structure. The experimental setup consisted of a linear transducer array with an 8-MHz central frequency placed in contact with the lung surface. The diffusion constant D and transport mean free path L* of the lung parenchyma were estimated by separating the incoherent and coherent intensities in the near field and measuring the growth of the incoherent diffusive halo over time. Significant differences were observed between the L* values obtained in healthy and edematous rat lungs in vivo. In the control rat lung, L* was found to be 332 μm (±48.8 μm), whereas in the edematous lung, it was 1040 μm (±90 μm). The reproducibility of the measurements of L* and D was tested in vivo and in phantoms made of melamine sponge with varying air volume fractions. Two-dimensional finite difference time domain numerical simulations were carried out on rabbit lung histology images with varying degrees of lung collapse. Significant correlations were observed between air volume fraction and L* in simulation (r = -0.9542, p lung in which edema was simulated by adding phosphate-buffered saline revealed a linear relationship between the fluid volume fraction and L*. These results illustrate the potential of methods based on ultrasound multiple scattering for the quantitative characterization of the lung parenchyma. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlation between alveolar ventilation and electrical properties of lung parenchyma

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, J. C., Ehrl, A., Becher, T., Frerichs, I., Schittny, J., Weller, N., Wall W. A.

    2016-01-01

    One key problem in modern medical imaging is linking measured data and actual physiological quantities. In this article we derive such a link between the electrical bioimpedance of lung parenchyma, which can be measured by electrical impedance tomography (EIT), and the magnitude of regional ventilation, a key towards understanding lung mechanics and developing novel protective ventilation strategies. Two rat-derived three-dimensional alveolar microstructures obtained from synchrotron-ba...

  14. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil in brain parenchyma after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiurong; Sun, Guanghua; Zhang, Han; Ting, Shun-Ming; Song, Shen; Gonzales, Nicole; Aronowski, Jaroslaw

    2014-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) infiltration into brain parenchyma after cerebrovascular accidents is viewed as a key component of secondary brain injury. Interestingly, a recent study of ischemic stroke suggests that after ischemic stroke, PMNs do not enter brain parenchyma and as such may cause no harm to the brain. Thus, the present study was designed to determine PMNs' behavior after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Using the autologous blood injection model of ICH in rats and immunohistochemistry for PMNs and vascular components, we evaluated the temporal and spatial PMNs distribution in the ICH-affected brain. We found that, similar to ischemia, there is a robust increase in presence of PMNs in the ICH-injured tissue that lasts for at least 1 to 2 weeks. However, in contrast to what was suggested for ischemia, besides PMNs that stay in association with the vasculature, after ICH, we found abundance of intraparenchymal PMNs (with no obvious association with vessels) in the ICH core and hematoma border, especially between 1 and 7 days after the ictus. Interestingly, the increased presence of intraparenchymal PMNs after ICH coincided with the massive loss of microvascular integrity, suggesting vascular disruption as a potential cause of PMNs presence in the brain parenchyma. Our study indicates that in contrast to ischemic stroke, after ICH, PMNs target not only vascular compartment but also brain parenchyma in the affected brain. As such, it is possible that the pathogenic role and therapeutic implications of targeting PMNs after ICH could be different from these after ischemic stroke. Our work suggests the needs for more studies addressing the role of PMNs in ICH.

  15. A tree-parenchyma coupled model for lung ventilation simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozin, Nicolas; Montesantos, Spyridon; Katz, Ira; Pichelin, Marine; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Grandmont, Céline

    2017-11-01

    In this article, we develop a lung ventilation model. The parenchyma is described as an elastic homogenized media. It is irrigated by a space-filling dyadic resistive pipe network, which represents the tracheobronchial tree. In this model, the tree and the parenchyma are strongly coupled. The tree induces an extra viscous term in the system constitutive relation, which leads, in the finite element framework, to a full matrix. We consider an efficient algorithm that takes advantage of the tree structure to enable a fast matrix-vector product computation. This framework can be used to model both free and mechanically induced respiration, in health and disease. Patient-specific lung geometries acquired from computed tomography scans are considered. Realistic Dirichlet boundary conditions can be deduced from surface registration on computed tomography images. The model is compared to a more classical exit compartment approach. Results illustrate the coupling between the tree and the parenchyma, at global and regional levels, and how conditions for the purely 0D model can be inferred. Different types of boundary conditions are tested, including a nonlinear Robin model of the surrounding lung structures. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Effect of gamma irradiated parenchyma on the growth of irradiated potato tuber buds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gonzalez, J.; Garcia Collantes, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The development of buds greffed on irradiated potato parenchyma was studied. The irradiated parenchyma does not influence the sprouting capacity of buds, but it affects the way they develop. (Author) 9 refs

  17. Can Daphnia lumholtzi invade European lakes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Wittmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi is a subtropical and tropical zooplankter, and an invasive species in North America. Thus far, D. lumholtzi has not been detected in Europe. Here we investigated whether a hypothetical introduction to Europe could result in a successful invasion, either now or in the near future when facilitated by climate change. In laboratory experiments, we tested whether different clones of D. lumholtzi can invade a resident community consisting of native Daphnia from lake Klostersee, Germany, and how invasion success depends on temperature and the presence or absence of planktivorous fish. In some treatments, invasion success was consistently high, and D. lumholtzi reached densities similar to the native competitors by the end of the experiment. The presence of a planktivorous fish reduced the invasion success of D. lumholtzi, and a clone with an inducible defense against fish predation was a more successful invader than a permanently defended clone. Of the three temperatures tested in this study (15, 20, and 24 °C, invasion success was highest at 20 °C. To understand the competitive interaction between native and introduced Daphnia, we fit a Lotka-Volterra-type competition model to the population dynamics. Our experimental and modeling results suggest that D. lumholtzi can invade European lakes and can cause substantial declines in the population size of native Daphnia, with potential consequences for higher trophic levels.

  18. Distinguishing neuroblastoma invading the kidney from nephroblastoma: evaluation in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Zhongwei; Li Guoping; Mamier; Wang Kang'an; Lv Zhibao; Miao Fei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the CT findings in the differential diagnosis between neuroblastoma invading the kidney and nephroblastoma. Methods: CT morphologic details in 13 patients with neuroblastoma invading the kidney confirmed by surgical operation and pathology were studied, and CT findings in 15 patients with nephroblastoma confirmed by surgery and pathology were compared. Results: In 13 cases of neuroblastoma, CT showed irregular mass in 12 cases, tumor with poorly defined margins in 11 cases, tumorous calcifications in 10 cases, invasion of retroperitoneal vessels in 9 cases, and retroperitoneal and retrocrural lymph nodes invasion in 12 cases. In 15 cases of nephroblastoma, round mass was p resented in 12 cases, tumor with poorly defined margins in 2 cases, tumorous calcifications in 2 cases, involvement of retroperitoneal vessels in 2 cases, and invasion of retroperitoneal lymph nodes in 3 cases. None of the nephroblastoma invaded retrocrural lymph nodes. Irregular mass with calcifications, involvement of retroperitoneal vessels, retrocrural and retroperitoneal lymph nodes were more common in cases of neuroblastoma than in nephroblastoma. Moreover, involvement of retrocrural lymph nodes and encasement of retroperitoneal vessels had higher positive prediction value on neuroblastoma. Conclusion: Involvement of retrocrural lymph nodes and encasement of retroperitoneal vessels were the specific CT findings of neuroblastoma and the most valuable evidence in distinguishing neuroblastoma from nephroblastoma. (authors)

  19. Hepatocellular carcinoma directly invading the duodenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Abdelrehman O.; Joshi, Sandhya; Czechowski, Janusz; Branicki, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) invading the duodenum is very rare. We present a case of 50-year-old male who was admitted with a history of recurrent upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) bleeding, weight loss and anemia. The patient was known to have a chronic hepatitis C. Endoscopic examination showed grade-2 non-bleeding esophageal varices, and a large ulcerated duodenal mass partially obstructing the duodenal bulb outlet and causing recurrent UGIT bleeding. Pathological evaluation of the mass revealed HCC. (author)

  20. A comparisonof lymphocytic thyroiditis with papillary thyroid carcinoma showing suspicious ultrasonographic findings in a background of heterogeneous parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Sang Yu; Shin, Jung Hee; Ko, Eun Young; Hahn, Soo Yeon [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medicine Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this study was to compare ultrasonographic features in patients with lymphocytic thyroiditis (LT) and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) having suspicious thyroid nodule(s) in a background of heterogeneous parenchyma and to determine the clinical and radiological predictors of malignancy. We reviewed the cases of 100 patients who underwent ultrasonography between April 2011 and October 2012, and showed suspicious thyroid nodule(s) in a background of heterogeneous parenchyma. Eight patients who did not undergo ultrasonography-guided fineneedle aspiration cytology (FNAC) and 34 cases of follow-up ultrasonography after initial FNAC were excluded. We compared the benign and malignant nodules in terms of their clinical and radiological factors. For the 58 nodules including 31 LTs (53.4%) and 27 PTCs (46.6%), the mean tumor sizes of the two groups were 0.96 cm for LT and 0.97 cm for PTC. A univariate analysis revealed that PTCs were more frequent in patients younger than 45 years and having microcalcifications than was LT. An independent predictor of PTC after adjustment was an age of <45 years. LT mimics malignancy in a background of heterogeneous parenchyma on ultrasonography. A young age of <45 years is the most important predictor of malignancy in this condition.

  1. Imaging manifestations of the cavitation in pulmonary parenchyma of SARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chunwang; Zhao Dawei; Wang Wei; Jia Cuiyu; Bai Chunsheng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging appearances of cavitation in pulmonary parenchyma and the clinical features of the cases of SARS. Methods: Chest imaging films and clinical data of 180 patients with clinically confirmed SARS were analyzed retrospectively. The imaging manifestations of cavitation and the clinical features of the patients were observed and evaluated. Results: Of 180 patients, cavitations were showed in 5 (2.8%), which were all found through X-ray or CT scanning. Most of them were round or irregular, and had thick wall. The 5 patients all had been in hospital and treated with more dosage antibiotics, antivirus medicines and glucocorticoid for long time, the glucocorticoid was used for 25-65 d, and in the first 10-15 days the dosage was 160-240 mg per day. In hospitalization, one of them had been diagnosed diabetes mellitus, four had increased fasting blood sugar, the counts of white blood cells [(14.1-20.4) x 10 9 /L] increased significantly, the percent of neutrophils might increased also. Meanwhile, there was a continue increase of lactate dehydrogenase (228.00-475.00 U/L), glutamic dehydrogenase (10.08-60.00 U/L) and hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (190.00-444.00 U/L) in lab examination. Conclusion: SARS can cause cavitation in pulmonary parenchyma in posterior process of the disease. CT scanning can find the cavitation earlier and accurately, catching the imaging features of them is helpful in differential diagnosis, guiding therapy and estimating prognosis

  2. Computed tomographic and ultrasonographic diagnosis of portal vein tumor thrombus in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, H; Futagawa, S; Hayashi, K; Amagasaki, Y; Ochi, M [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1982-04-01

    Nine cases of hepatocellular carcinoma which have invaded the intra- and extrahepatic portal vein were evaluated by computed tomography (CT) and ultrasonography (US). The outstanding CT and sonographic features of the portal vein tumor thrombus were described. In CT, contrast opacification of normal portal vein and its major tributaries were not observed, and they were replaced by a soft tissue density mass representing the tumor thrombus. The thrombus measured 35 - 45 Hounsfield units (HU) in precontrast scans and 60 - 80 HU in postcontrast scans. The portal vein tumor thrombus showed a branched pattern of low density in porta hepatis and intrahepatic region due to differences in attenuation coefficients of the thrombus and adjacent noncancerous hepatic parenchyma on postcontrast scans. In ultrasound study, tumor thrombus was recognized as an echogenic solid mass in the porta hepatis obliterating the normal portal venous structures, or as an intraluminal solid mass in the dilated portal vein and its branches. Numerous collateral venous channels surrounding the thrombosed portal vein were also demonstrated on both CT and US. Particular emphasis was placed on the clinical implications of these non-invasive detection of the portal vein tumor thrombosis in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Evolution of competitive ability within Lonicera japonica's invaded range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory A. Evans; Francis F. Kilkenny; Laura F. Galloway

    2013-01-01

    Factors influencing invasive taxa may change during the course of an invasion. For example, intraspecific competition is predicted to be more important in areas with older stands of dense monospecific invaders than at the margins of an invaded range. We evaluated evolution in response to predicted changes in competition by comparing the intraspecific competitive...

  4. Isolated Retroperitoneal Hydatid Cyst Invading Splenic Hilum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Ozturk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hydatid disease (HD is an infestation that is caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus. The liver is affected in approximately two-thirds of patients, the lungs in 25%, and other organs in a small proportion. Primary retroperitoneal hydatid cyst is extremely rare. The most common complaint is abdominal pain; however, the clinical features of HD may be generally dependent on the location of the cyst. Case Presentation. A 43-year-old female was admitted with the complaint of abdominal pain. Her physical examination was normal. Computed tomography (CT revealed a 17 × 11 cm cystic lesion, with a thick and smooth wall that is located among the left liver lobe, diaphragm, spleen, tail of the pancreas, and transverse colon and invading the splenic hilum. Total cystectomy and splenectomy were performed. Pathological examination was reported as cyst hydatid. Discussion. Cysts in the peritoneal cavity are mainly the result of the spontaneous or traumatic rupture of concomitant hepatic cysts or surgical inoculation of a hepatic cyst. Serological tests contribute to diagnosis. In symptomatic and large hydatid peritoneal cysts, surgical resection is the only curative treatment. Total cystectomy is the gold standard. Albendazole or praziquantel is indicated for inoperable and disseminated cases. Percutaneous aspiration, injection, and reaspiration (PAIR technique is another nonsurgical option.

  5. Correlation between alveolar ventilation and electrical properties of lung parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Christian J; Ehrl, Andreas; Becher, Tobias; Frerichs, Inéz; Schittny, Johannes C; Weiler, Norbert; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2015-06-01

    One key problem in modern medical imaging is linking measured data and actual physiological quantities. In this article we derive such a link between the electrical bioimpedance of lung parenchyma, which can be measured by electrical impedance tomography (EIT), and the magnitude of regional ventilation, a key to understanding lung mechanics and developing novel protective ventilation strategies. Two rat-derived three-dimensional alveolar microstructures obtained from synchrotron-based x-ray tomography are each exposed to a constant potential difference for different states of ventilation in a finite element simulation. While the alveolar wall volume remains constant during stretch, the enclosed air volume varies, similar to the lung volume during ventilation. The enclosed air, serving as insulator in the alveolar ensemble, determines the resulting current and accordingly local tissue bioimpedance. From this we can derive a relationship between lung tissue bioimpedance and regional alveolar ventilation. The derived relationship shows a linear dependence between air content and tissue impedance and matches clinical data determined from a ventilated patient at the bedside.

  6. Radiologic imaging of the renal parenchyma structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Nicolas; Merville, Pierre; Combe, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Radiologic imaging has the potential to identify several functional and/or structural biomarkers of acute and chronic kidney diseases that are useful diagnostics to guide patient management. A renal ultrasound examination can provide information regarding the gross anatomy and macrostructure of the renal parenchyma, and ultrasound imaging modalities based on Doppler or elastography techniques can provide haemodynamic and structural information, respectively. CT is also able to combine morphological and functional information, but the use of CT is limited due to the required exposure to X-ray irradiation and a risk of contrast-induced nephropathy following intravenous injection of a radio-contrast agent. MRI can be used to identify a wide range of anatomical and physiological parameters at the tissue and even cellular level, such as tissue perfusion, oxygenation, water diffusion, cellular phagocytic activity, tissue stiffness, and level of renal filtration. The ability of MRI to provide valuable information for most of these parameters within a renal context is still in development and requires more clinical experience, harmonization of technical procedures, and an evaluation of reliability and validity on a large scale.

  7. HURTLE CELLS IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ACTIVITIES IN HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS PARENCHYMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagareli, Z; Kvachadze, T; Melikadze, E; Metreveli, L; Nikobadze, E; Gogiashvili, L

    2016-11-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the participation and utility of Hǘrtle cells morphological requirment and transformation under Hashimoto autoimmune thyroiditis versus Riedel´s struma. Several markers have been evaluated to detect induced activities of Hǘrtle cells. Study subject - specimens (tissue fragments) collected from TG surgery (thyroidectomy) for mollecular (receptor) diagnosis of Hǘrtle cells activities using routine histological and immunohistochemical samples. 89 cases were selected in Hashimoto thyroiditis diagnosis with Hǘrtle cells history (adenoma and adenomatous grouth of oncocytes). Markers as: TSH receptors, TTF-1, S-100 protein, also anti-TPO and anti-TG levels in blood plasm were detected. It was shown that solid cell claster-nests like agregation of oncocytes and adenomatous growth foci in parafollicular areas with anti-TPO and anti-TG antibodies levels arising while Riedel´s struma shown only large intra- and extra glandular inflammatory proliferative fibrosing process. Large positive expression of TTF-1 and S-100 protein and the negative reaction of TSH receptor factor suggest that Thyroid parenchyma disorganization and mollecular biological atypia with Hǘrtle cells are proceses due to hypothyreoidismus, as well as neuroectodermal cells prominent activities in 70% of Hashimoto cases.

  8. Wall ingrowth deposition in phloem parenchyma transfer cells in Arabidopsis: Heteroblastic variations and a potential role in pathogen defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Suong T T; McCurdy, David W

    2017-06-03

    Transfer cell (TCs) develop unique wall ingrowth networks which amplify plasma membrane surface area and thus maximize nutrient transporter density at key anatomic sites for nutrient exchange within plants and their external environment. These sites fall into 4 main groups corresponding to 4 categories of trans-membrane flux: absorption/secretion of solutes from or to the external environment, and absorption/secretion of solutes from or to internal, extra-cytoplasmic compartments. Research on TC biology over recent decades has demonstrated correlations between wall ingrowth deposition in TCs and enhanced transport capacity in many major agricultural species such as pea, fava bean, cotton and maize. Consequently, there is general consensus that the existence of wall ingrowth morphology implies an augmentation in membrane transport capacity. However, this may not be entirely applicable for phloem parenchyma (PP) TCs in Arabidopsis. Our recent survey of PP TC abundance and distribution in Arabidopsis veins indicated that PP TC development reflects heteroblastic status. A consequence of this observation is the suggestion that PP TCs, or at least wall ingrowth deposition in these cells, potentially act as a physical barrier to defend access of invading pathogens to sugar-rich sieve elements rather than solely in facilitating the export of photoassimilate from collection phloem in leaves.

  9. Correlation of neurocognitive function and brain parenchyma volumes in children surviving cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddick, Wilburn E.; White, Holly A.; Glass, John O.; Mulhern, Raymond K.

    2002-04-01

    This research builds on our hypothesis that white matter damage and associated neurocognitive symptoms, in children treated for cancer with cranial spinal irradiation, spans a continuum of severity that can be reliably probed using non-invasive MR technology. Quantitative volumetric assessments of MR imaging and psychological assessments were obtained in 40 long-term survivors of malignant brain tumors treated with cranial irradiation. Neurocognitive assessments included a test of intellect (Wechsler Intelligence Test for Children, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale), attention (Conner's Continuous Performance Test), and memory (California Verbal Learning Test). One-sample t-tests were conducted to evaluate test performance of survivors against age-adjusted scores from the test norms; these analyses revealed significant impairments in all apriori selected measures of intelligence, attention, and memory. Partial correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationships between brain tissues volumes (normal appearing white matter (NAWM), gray matter, and CSF) and neurocognitive function. Global intelligence (r = 0.32, p = 0.05) and global attentional (r = 0.49, p attentional deficits, whereas overall parenchyma loss, as reflected by increased CSF and decreased white matter, is associated with memory-related deficits.

  10. Saddam Hussein's Decision to Invade Kuwait - Where Was Plan B

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Culpepper, Frances R

    1997-01-01

    ... in his decision to invade Kuwait in August 1990 Surveying the damage to the Iraqi economy following the Iran-Iraq war, Saddam knew that insufficient resources would force hum to shelve any domestic program...

  11. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  12. Developmental characteristics of parenchyma and fiber cells and their secondary wall deposition in fargesia yunnanensis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.G.; Zhan, H.; Wan, C.B.; Lin, S.Y.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and analyse the morphological characteristics of nuclei and the secondary wall deposition in parenchyma and fiber cells during the whole bamboo growth cycle from shoots to old culms, with a further purpose to assess the developmental differences between fibers and parenchyma cells and analyze the secondary wall deposition mechanism. Initially the fiber wall thickness was less than the parenchyma cell thickness in young shoots, but increased significantly after 1 year. Fibers elongated earlier than both their nuclei and parenchyma cells. Fiber nuclei also elongated and presented the spindle shape in longitudinal section. The formation and elongation of long cells were involved in the fast elongation of internodes. In mature culms, the ways of secondary wall deposition for fibers depended on their diameter and positions. Large diameter fibers usually had more cell wall layers than narrow fibers. (author)

  13. Advances in Brain Tumor Surgery for Glioblastoma in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Lara-Velazquez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary intracranial neoplasia, and is characterized by its extremely poor prognosis. Despite maximum surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, the histological heterogeneity of GBM makes total eradication impossible, due to residual cancer cells invading the parenchyma, which is not otherwise seen in radiographic images. Even with gross total resection, the heterogeneity and the dormant nature of brain tumor initiating cells allow for therapeutic evasion, contributing to its recurrence and malignant progression, and severely impacting survival. Visual delimitation of the tumor’s margins with common surgical techniques is a challenge faced by many surgeons. In an attempt to achieve optimal safe resection, advances in approaches allowing intraoperative analysis of cancer and non-cancer tissue have been developed and applied in humans resulting in improved outcomes. In addition, functional paradigms based on stimulation techniques to map the brain’s electrical activity have optimized glioma resection in eloquent areas such as the Broca’s, Wernike’s and perirolandic areas. In this review, we will elaborate on the current standard therapy for newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma with a focus on surgical approaches. We will describe current technologies used for glioma resection, such as awake craniotomy, fluorescence guided surgery, laser interstitial thermal therapy and intraoperative mass spectrometry. Additionally, we will describe a newly developed tool that has shown promising results in preclinical experiments for brain cancer: optical coherence tomography.

  14. Morphological variation of the kidney secondary to junctional parenchyma on ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Park, Byeong Ho; Nam, Kyeong Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Koo, Bong Sig; Kim, Jou Yeoun; Ahn, Seung Eon; Lee, Yung Il

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalance of morphological variation of the kidney secondary to junctional parenchyma, as well as to analyze the ultrasonographic features of junctional parenchyma. Two hundred and eighty two kidneys of 141 patient without clinical or radiologic evidence of renal disease were prospectively analysed using ultrasound. In all patients, ultrasonograms were obtained in sagittal, coronal and transaxial planes. The kidney was considered to have morphological variation if the ultrasonogram demonstrated junctional parenchymal defect of line ; those showing such variation were classified as one of three types : continuous, discontinuous, or junctional parenchymal line or defect without junctional parenchyma. The prevalance and ultrasonographic features of the kidneys were evaluated. Morphological variation was noted in 71 cases(25%). the continuous type accounted for 54% of these, the discontinuous type for 38%, and junctional parenchymal defect or line without junctional parenchyma for 8%. In all cases, junctional parenchyma was located approximately at the junction of the upper and middle third of the kidney, and had the same echogenecity as the renal cortex. An understanding of the morphological variation of the kidney resulting from junctional renal parenchyma would be helpful in differentiating pseudotumor from true renal neoplasm

  15. Inverted papilloma of lacrimal sac invading into the orbit: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair W Hardy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted papilloma (IP is a sinonasal tumor of benign etiology with local invasion and malignant potential. IP arising in lacrimal sac invading the orbit is extremely rare with only one case reported so far. The presented case appears to be the second such case reported in the literature. A 60-year-old Caucasian male presented with a medial canthal mass and epiphora. Incisional biopsy confirmed a transitional neoplasm. The lesion was completely excised enbloc with clear margins by using a Weber-Ferguson incision; orbital clearance and nasolacrimalfossa clearance was achieved via a medial maxillectomy. Enbloc resection of orbital and nasolacrimal parts of the tumor with clear margins is recommended.

  16. Relationship between renal cortex and parenchyma thickness and renal function: study with CT measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yufeng; Tang Guangjian; Jiang Xuexiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between renal morphology and renal function, and to assess the value of CT as a criterion to grade renal function. Methods: Enhancement CT were performed in 89 patients with no local renal disease whose split renal glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were measured by renal dynamic imaging with 99 Tc m -DTPA. The 178 kidneys were divided into normal renal function, mild and severe renal impairment groups according to renal function. Differences between three groups respect to the mean thickness of renal cortex and parenchyma were assessed by ANOVA. Using Pearson's correlation test, the correlation between the renal cortex, parenchyma thicknesses and renal GFR were examined. The value of CT in predicting renal function was assessed by using ROC analysis. Results: The renal cortex thicknesses of normal renal function, mild and severe renal impairment groups were (5.9±1.1), (4.6± 1.1), and (3.3±1.0) mm respectively, and the renal parenchyma thicknesses were (26.3±4.2), (21.3±4.6), (16.2±4.6) mm. There were significant differences of renal cortex, parenchyma thicknesses between 3 groups (cortex F=54.78, P<0.01; parenehyma F=43.90, P<0.01). The thicknesses of renal cortex (r=0.752, P<0.01), parenchyma (r=0.738, P<0.01) had positive linear correlation with renal function. ROC analysis of the renal cortex thicknesses measured by CT in predicting mild and severe renal impairment showed that the Az was 0.860 and 0.905 respectively, whereas that of parenchyma was 0.868 and 0.884. Conclusion: The thicknesses of renal cortex, parenchyma measured by CT can reflect renal function. CT was a supplementary method to assess renal function. (authors)

  17. [A case of recurrent transverse colon cancer invading the pancreas and duodenum successfully treated with biliary and duodenal stenting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonooka, Toru; Yoshioka, Shigeru; Shiobara, Masayuki; Wakatsuki, Kazuo; Kataoka, Masaaki; Arai, Shuka; Miyazawa, Kotaro; Nakada, Shinichiro; Kita, Kazuhiko; Saito, Hirofumi; Nomoto, Hiromasa; Usui, Masatoshi; Yabiki, Masashi; Ota, Yuki; Oeda, Yoshio

    2013-11-01

    We report a case of recurrent transverse colon cancer invading the pancreas and duodenum that was successfully treated with biliary and duodenal stenting. A 46-year-old man underwent ascending colostomy for the treatment of obstructive transverse colon cancer with hepatic metastasis. Chemotherapy achieved a partial response, but the levels of tumor markers later began to rise again. He then underwent right hemicolectomy and partial hepatectomy. Post-operative chemotherapy was administered, but the recurrent tumor caused obstructive jaundice and duodenal obstruction. These were successfully treated with biliary and duodenal stenting, and the patient was able to remain at home and maintain his quality of life.

  18. Invaders interfere with native parasite-host interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thieltges, David W.; Reise, Karsten; Prinz, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of species is of increasing concern as invaders often reduce the abundance of native species due to a variety of interactions like habitat engineering, predation and competition. A more subtle and not recognized effect of invaders on their recipient biota is their potential...... interference with native parasite-host interactions. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that two invasive molluscan filter-feeders of European coastal waters interfere with the transmission of free-living infective trematode larval stages and hereby mitigate the parasite burden of native mussels (Mytilus...

  19. Comparison of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in Rocky Mountain savannas invaded and un-invaded by an exotic forb, spotted knapweed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison K. Hansen; Yvette K. Ortega; Diana L. Six

    2009-01-01

    We compared ground beetle (Carabidae) assemblages between spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa Lam.) -invaded (invaded) and un-invaded (native) habitats in Rocky Mountain savannas. Carabids play important roles in biotic communities and are known as a good indictor group of environmental change. Carabid species activity-abundance and diversity were estimated, and...

  20. Standardisation of liver MDCT by tracking liver parenchyma enhancement to trigger imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodoefel, H.; Tognolini, A.; Zamboni, G.A.; Gourtsoyianni, S.; Raptopoulos, V.; Claussen, C.D.

    2012-01-01

    To assess parenchymal bolus-triggering in terms of liver enhancement, lesion-to-liver conspicuity and inter-image variability across serial follow-up MDCTs. We reviewed MDCTs of 50 patients with hepatic metastases who had a baseline CT and two follow-up examinations. In 25 consecutive patients CT data acquisition was initiated by liver parenchyma triggering at a 50-HU enhancement threshold. In a matched control group, imaging was performed with an empirical delay of 65 s. CT attenuation values were assessed in vessels, liver parenchyma and metastasis. Target lesions were classified according to five enhancement patterns. Compared with the control group, liver enhancement was significantly higher with parenchyma triggering (59.8 ± 7.6 HU vs. 48.8 ± 11.2 HU, P = 0.0002). The same was true for conspicuity (liver parenchyma - lesion attenuation) of hypo-enhancing lesions (72.2 ± 15.9 HU vs. 52.7 ± 19.4 HU, P = 0.0006). Liver triggering was associated with reduced variability for liver enhancement among different patients (P = 0.035) and across serial follow-up examinations in individual patients (P < 0.0001). The number of patients presenting with uniform lesion enhancement pattern across serial examinations was significantly higher in the triggered group (20 vs. 11; P = 0.018). Liver parenchyma triggering provides superior lesion conspicuity and improves standardisation of image quality across follow-up examinations with greater uniformity of enhancement patterns. (orig.)

  1. Tumorous interstitial lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Meyer, E.; Mundinger, A.; Helwig, A.; Blum, U.; Wuertemberger, G.

    1990-01-01

    The radiological findings in pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis and in leukemic pulmonary infiltrates mirror the tumor-dependent monomorphic interstitial pathology of lung parenchyma. It is a proven fact that pulmonary lymphangitic carcinomatosis is caused by hematogenous tumor embolization to the lungs; pathogenesis by contiguous lymphangitic spread is the exception. High-resolution CT performed as a supplement to the radiological work-up improves the sensitivity for pulmonary infiltrates in general and thus makes the differential diagnosis decided easier. Radiological criteria cannot discriminate the different forms of leukemia. Plain chest X-ray allows the diagnosis of pulmonary involvement in leukemia due to tumorous infiltrates and of tumor- or therapy-induced complications. It is essential that the radiological findings be interpreted with reference to the stage of tumor disease and the clinical parameters to make the radiological differential diagnosis of opportunistic infections more reliable. (orig.) [de

  2. Deja vu? A second mytilid mussel, Semimytilus algosus , invades ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A second marine mussel is shown to have invaded South Africa's west coast. Molecular techniques, based on intraspecific gene sequence divergences, prove its identity as Semimytilus algosus, a member of the family Mytilidae, native to Chile. The identity of an older introduced population found in Namibia is also ...

  3. Assessment of insect invaders of decaying banana and plantain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insect invaders of decaying banana and plantain pseudo stems in Umuagwo, Ohaji-Egbema, Imo State were investigated in randomly selected crop plots near living homes (<500 m) and far from living homes (.500m). Investigation was done by the use of trapping systems, dissections of cut decaying pseudo stems and ...

  4. Total or partial vertebrectomy for lung cancer invading the spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Oka

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: In our experience, Lung cancer surgery combined with vertebrectomy is highly aggressive surgery associated with high morbidity. But, this procedure is a promising treatment option for selected patients, for example N0M0 disease with lung cancer invading the spine.

  5. Prospects for extirpating small populations of the wetland invader ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The broad-leaved paper bark tree Melaleuca quinquenervia is a major invader in the wetlands of the Florida Everglades, USA. In South Africa, this introduced species is known from eight locality records and is naturalising at two of these sites. The potential for its spread to other wetlands and estuaries is of concern.

  6. Patterns of seed dispersal and establishment of the invader ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Invasive species in Africa have important impacts on food security and biodiversity conservation. African floodplains in arid areas are critical wildlife habitats in addition to crop production and dry season livestock grazing. The study aimed to understand the patterns of spread of the invader Prosopis juliflora in a typical ...

  7. Development of fibre and parenchyma cells in the bamboo Phyllostachys viridi-glaucescens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crow, E.

    2000-02-01

    The development of the shoot apex and the ontogeny of fibre and parenchyma cells in elongating shoots of the bamboo Phyllostachys viridi-glaucescens (Carr.) Riv. and Riv., seen under the light microscope is described. Fibre cells differentiated from cells of the procambium, whilst the parenchyma cells differentiated from cells of the primary thickening meristem which surround the procambium strands. Three stages of early fibre and parenchyma cell development were identified and these are referred to in subsequent studies of cell wall development. The cytology of developing internodal fibre and parenchyma cells seen under the transmission electron microscope (TEM) is described. There were few ultrastructural features to distinguish the two cell types. Thiery's PATAg test was performed to identify organelles which may be associated with the synthesis of polysaccharides destined for the cell wall. The ultrastructural results are discussed in terms of the process of cell wall deposition. Observations were made of cytoskeletal elements using indirect immunofluorescence techniques. Orientations of cortical microtubules differed from those of the microfilaments throughout early development. Filaments on the inner walls of cells seen under the conventional scanning electron microscope (SEM) were cytoskeletal-like in their orientation and form. Immunogold labelling techniques were performed in an attempt to confirm their identity. Staining with safranin and alcian blue allowed an anatomical description of wall development in fibre and parenchyma cells. These studies were coupled with observations using polarizing optics where cellulose microfibril orientations of the primary and secondary wall layers were established. The field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) was used to describe microfibril orientations seen on the inner wall of developing and maturing fibre and parenchyma cells. Chemical extraction of wall matrix materials was necessary for maturing tissue

  8. Liver stem/progenitor cells in the canals of Hering: cellular origin of hepatocellular carcinoma with bile duct tumor thrombi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ningfu; Li, Lequn; Cai, Xiang; Tan, Shaozao; Wu, Ting

    2010-12-01

    It is generally believed that the invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) into the biliary tree ultimately leads to the formation of bile duct tumor thrombi (BDTT). However, recent studies revealed that primary tumor might be small, even undetectable, and there was no histopathologic evidence of direct tumor invasion into bile duct wall in some patients. During the last decade, efforts on stem cell biology may shed light on the pathogenesis of BDTT. Presently, accumulating evidence supports the following notions: (1) the canals of Hering (CoH) are the most likely origin of liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs) in adult livers; (2) similar signalling pathways may regulate self-renewal in LSPCs and liver cancer cells, and a substantial proportion of liver tumors may often originate from the transformation of LSPCs; and (3) liver cancer contains rare cells with stem cell-like properties, which could derive from malignant transformation of LSPCs. Herein, we propose that HCC with BDTT, especially with small or undetectable primary lesion and/or no histopathologic evidence for bile duct invasion, might arise from LSPCs residing in the CoH and, possibly, some primary lesions are formed firstly within the intrahepatic biliary tree. When "tumor thrombi" extends mainly along bile duct, there might be "BDTT" alone; when it invades into surrounding parenchyma, there might often be small "primary tumor" with "BDTT". If this holds true, the putative type may be a particular subset of HCC, and most importantly it would facilitate our understanding of stem-cell origin of HCC.

  9. Tissue distribution and deposition pattern of a cellulosic parenchyma-specific protein from cassava roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrônio A.S. Souza

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available A protein with a molecular mass of 22kDa was purified from the cellulosic parenchyma of cassava roots. The amino acid composition of the protein was determined and antibodies generated against the purified protein were used to show that the concentration of the protein remains unchanged during root "tuber" formation. By using a tissue printing technique, as well as western blot, it was shown that the cellulosic parenchyma was the only root tissue in which the protein was deposited.

  10. Computer analysis of the amount functioning renal parenchyma according scintigraphy with 99mTc - DMSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyikolov, M.O.; Suprunyuk, D.O.; Chizhevs'kij, V.B.; Kamyins'ka, A.L.; Makarenko, A.V.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the definition of information values of focal changes in the renal parenchyma as a fuzzy set according kidney scan with 99m Tc-DMSA. The results of kidney scan of 99m Tc-DMSA 15 patients. It is shown that it is advisable to determine the degree of damage to the renal parenchyma as a fuzzy set, it count lower, upper limits of defeat and 'average' rating. Segmentation algorithms developed scintigraphic imaging of the kidneys are informative, independent and requires their simultaneous use

  11. Renal parenchyma thickness: a rapid estimation of renal function on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplon, Daniel M.; Lasser, Michael S.; Sigman, Mark; Haleblian, George E.; Pareek, Gyan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To define the relationship between renal parenchyma thickness (RPT) on computed tomography and renal function on nuclear renography in chronically obstructed renal units (ORUs) and to define a minimal thickness ratio associated with adequate function. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight consecutive patients undergoing both nuclear renography and CT during a six-month period between 2004 and 2006 were included. All patients that had a diagnosis of unilateral obstruction were included for analysis. RPT was measured in the following manner: The parenchyma thickness at three discrete levels of each kidney was measured using calipers on a CT workstation. The mean of these three measurements was defined as RPT. The renal parenchyma thickness ratio of the ORUs and non-obstructed renal unit (NORUs) was calculated and this was compared to the observed function on Mag-3 lasix Renogram. Results: A total of 28 patients were evaluated. Mean parenchyma thickness was 1.82 cm and 2.25 cm in the ORUs and NORUs, respectively. The mean relative renal function of ORUs was 39%. Linear regression analysis comparing renogram function to RPT ratio revealed a correlation coefficient of 0.48 (p * RPT ratio. A thickness ratio of 0.68 correlated with 20% renal function. Conclusion: RPT on computed tomography appears to be a powerful predictor of relative renal function in ORUs. Assessment of RPT is a useful and readily available clinical tool for surgical decision making (renal salvage therapy versus nephrectomy) in patients with ORUs. (author)

  12. Plant foods in the Upper Palaeolithic at Dolní Věstonice? Parenchyma redux

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pryor, A.; Steele, M.; Jones, M. K.; Svoboda, Jiří; Beresford-Jones, D. G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 338 (2013), s. 971-984 ISSN 0003-598X Institutional support: RVO:68081758 Keywords : Czech Republic * Dolní Věstonice * upper palaeolithic * gravettian * archaeobotany * plant foods * parenchyma Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology OBOR OECD: Archaeology Impact factor: 1.594, year: 2013

  13. Changes in energy metabolism of the juvenile Fasciola hepatica during its development in the liver parenchyma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, A.G.M.; Heuvel, J.M. van den; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1982-01-01

    Juvenile Fasciola hepatica at different stages of development were isolated from the liver parenchyma of experimentally infected rats. Their energy metabolism was studied by incubation with D-[16-14C]glucose and compared with that of juveniles isolated immediately after in vitro emergence from the

  14. [ULTRASTRUCTURE OF PARENCHYMA IN THE SYNCYTIAL DIGESTIVE SYSTEM IN TURBELLARIA Convoluta convoluta (Acoela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazizova, G R; Zabotin, Ya I; Golubev, A I

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents data on the ultrastructure of parenchyma that is involved in the digestion in turbellaria Convoluta convoluta (n = 15). Unusual connections between the nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane of parenchymal cells were found for the first time, which may indicate the origin of these cell structures. The double trophic role of zooxanthellae in the organism of Convoluta is described.

  15. Influence of gamma radiation on the growth and metabolism ''in vitro'' culture of potato parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gonzalez, J.; Mazon Matanzo, M.P.

    1977-01-01

    The growth ''in vitro'' of the parenchyma tissues coming from control and irradiated potato tubers with doses of 3, 6, 9 and 12 Krad. is studied. At the end of a four months' cultivation period the cellular proliferation, respiratory activity, content in ascorbic acid, conductivity, and pH was studied. Some differences between control and irradiated tissues were observed. (author) [es

  16. Influence of gamma radiation on the growth and metabolism in vitro culture of potato parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Gonzalez, J.; Mazon Matanzo, M. P.

    1977-01-01

    The present work studies the growth in vitro of the parenchyma tissues coming from control and irradiated potato tubers with doses of 3, 6, 9 and 12 Krad. At the end of a four months cultivation period the cellular proliferation, respiratory activity, content in ascorbic acid, conductivity and ph was studied. Some differences between control and irradiated tissues were observed. (Author) 22 refs

  17. Parasites of the raccoon dog – an invading species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman; Hammer, A. S.; Chriél, Mariann

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species have a marked negative influence on the biodiversity of ecosystems and may contribute to the transmission of diseases. During the 1920s until 1950s, thousands of Raccoon dogs were deliberately introduces to the eastern European countries from the Far East, in order to enrich...... the wild with this new valuable fur animal. The Raccoon dog is considered the most successful invading mammal in Europe, and in the last 20 years, it has invaded the western part of Denmark, namely Jutland. The Danish ministry of Environment reacted to the new threat by deciding to eradicate this species...... species were isolated from both hosts; however, foxes harboured more helminth species per infected animal (average 3,1 helminth species/fox) than raccoon dogs (average 1,7 helminth species/raccoon dog). Prevalences of nematodes (Uncinaria stenocephala, Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonine) and cestodes...

  18. Metabolic characterization of invaded cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC?1

    OpenAIRE

    Fujita, Mayumi; Imadome, Kaori; Imai, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    We previously reported that about 0.4% of cells in the cultured human pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC?1, can invade matrigel during the transwell invasion assay, suggesting that these invaded PANC?1 cells may have specific characteristics to keep their invasive potential. To identify the metabolic characterization specific in the invaded PANC?1 cells, metabolome analysis of the invaded PANC?1 compared with the whole cultured PANC?1 was performed using CE?TOFMS, and concentrations of 110 met...

  19. Apparent diffusion coefficient of renal parenchyma and color Doppler ultrasound of intrarenal arteries in patients with cirrhosis related renal dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M Hefeda

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Liver cirrhosis, even in the presence of refractory ascites, did not affect the ADC value of renal parenchyma, however ADC value is affected in renal parenchyma of patients with hepato-renal syndrome. Duplex-Doppler ultrasound of intrarenal arteries enables the early detection of renal hemodynamic disturbances in patients with liver cirrhosis.

  20. Contribution of computed tomography (CT) in affections of the lung parenchyma in HIV positive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuwirth, J.; Stankova, M.; Spala, J.; Strof, J.

    1996-01-01

    CT findings in HIV positive patients with respiratory complaints were analyzed. The predominant morphological type of changes is a 'ground glass' increased density. Minimal changes of the lung parenchyma were recorded on high resolution computed tomography (HRCT) even in patients with a negative or doubtful finding on plain chest radiographs. Also the range of affections on HRCT scans was wider than on simple scans. The morphological changes on HRCT scans alone, however, are not an adequate basis for differentiation of various infectious agents in inflammatory changes of the lung parenchyma, and frequently mixed infections are involved. When at the same time clinical symptoms are considered, it frequently is possible to considerably reduce the number of possible pathogenic organisms and to start treatment. (author) 4 figs., 11 refs

  1. Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder Arising from Renal Allograft Parenchyma: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byung Kwan; Kim, Chan Kyo; Kwon, Ghee Young [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is a rare but serious complication that occurs in patients undergoing kidney transplantation. PTLD usually manifests as a renal hilar mass comprised of histologically B-lymphocytes. We report our experience of managing a patient with PTLD arising from renal parenchyma. Ultrasonographic and MR imaging features of this unusual PTLD suggested differentiated renal cell carcinoma arising from the renal allograft

  2. Infarction and Laceration of Liver Parenchyma Caused by Wedged CO2 Venography Before TIPS Insertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theuerkauf, Ingo; Strunk, Holger; Brensing, Karl August; Schild, Hans Heinz; Pfeifer, Ulrich

    2001-01-01

    We describe the fatal outcome of an elective TIPS procedure performed in a 43-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis. Wedged hepatic venography with CO 2 was the reason for infarction and laceration of liver parenchyma resulting in a subcapsular hematoma and subsequent intra-abdominal bleeding. This is the first report of this complication after the use of CO 2 in a cirrhotic patient

  3. Traits of Heracleum sosnowskyi Plants in Monostand on Invaded Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V Dalke

    Full Text Available The ability of giant hogweeds to form monodominant communities and even pure monostands in invaded areas has been well documented. Understanding of the mechanisms leading to monostand formation can aid in determining the limitations of existing community ecology models and establishing an effective management plan for invasive species elimination. The aim of this observational study was to investigate traits of Heracleum sosnowskyi plants (demography, canopy structure, morphology and physiology of the plants in a pure stand in an invaded area useful for understanding potential monostand formation mechanisms. All measurements were performed in one typical Heracleum sosnowskyi monostand located in an abandoned agriculture field located in Syktyvkar city suburb (North-east Russia. This monostand consisted of five main plant growth stages: seed, seedling, juvenile, vegetative adult, and generative adult. Plants of all stages began to grow simultaneously shortly after the snowmelt, at the same time as spring ephemeral plant species grew. The density of generative plants did not change during the vegetation period, but the density of the other plant stages rapidly decreased after the formation of a tall (up to 2-2.5 m and dense (Leaf area index up to 6.5 canopy. The canopy captured approximately 97% of the light. H. sosnowskyi showed high (several orders of magnitude higher than average taiga zone grasses photosynthetic water use efficiency (6-7 μM CO2/μM H2O. Formation of H. sosnowskyi monostands occurs primarily in disturbed areas with relatively rich and well-moistened soils. Early commencement of growth, rapid formation of a dense canopy, high efficiency of light and water use during photosynthesis, ability of young plants to survive in low light conditions, rapid recovery of above-ground plant parts after damage, and the high density of the soil seed bank are the most important traits of H. sosnowskyi plants for monostand formation in invaded

  4. Radioindication of hemodynamics and functional state of parenchyma of the kidneys in stenosis of renal arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, O.N.; Gabuniya, R.I.; Kamynin, Yu.F.; Matveenko, E.G.; Buyuklyan, A.N.; Skoropad, L.S.; Syzgantseva, L.M.

    1978-01-01

    Hemodynamics and functional state of parenchyma of the kidney were studied in 39 patients with stenosis of the renal arteries by means of pertechnetate 99 Tc, hippuran 131 I and chlormerodrine 197 Hg. In patients with vasorenal hypertension the following changes in the stenosed kidney were revealed: a significant decrease in the renal blood flow, renal fraction, volume of maximal saturation, specific blood flow, systolic renal index; elevation of the intrarenal vascular resistance; and impairment of the functional state of the renal parenchyma. It was established that there was a direct dependence between the renal blood flow and the volume of maximal saturation and a reverse dependence between the renal blood flow and intrarenal vascular resistance. Hemodynamic changes in the stenosed kidney played an important role and led at first to a bias in renographic indices and then - to a decrease in accumulation of chlormerodrine 197 Hg in the kidneys. It was noted that changes in the functional state of the renal parenchyma tended to be dependent upon the level of the renal blood flow, and indices of the renal blood flow - upon the values of arterial pressure. From diagnostic point of view, methods of radioiangiography, as compared with renography and scintigraphy, were found to be the most informative

  5. Area 51: How do Acanthamoeba invade the central nervous system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Emes, Richard; Elsheikha, Hany; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2011-05-01

    Acanthamoeba granulomatous encephalitis generally develops as a result of haematogenous spread, but it is unclear how circulating amoebae enter the central nervous system (CNS) and cause inflammation. At present, the mechanisms which Acanthamoeba use to invade this incredibly well-protected area of the CNS and produce infection are not well understood. In this paper, we propose two key virulence factors: mannose-binding protein and extracellular serine proteases as key players in Acanthamoeba traversal of the blood-brain barrier leading to neuronal injury. Both molecules should provide excellent opportunities as potential targets in the rational development of therapeutic interventions against Acanthamoeba encephalitis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Interleukin-6 induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype in human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma cells and promotes tumor cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Chao; Pan, Jun; Chen, Ligang; Qi, Song-Tao

    2017-01-01

    Total resection of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) is complex and often leads to postoperative recurrence. This is due to the tendency of the tumor to invade the surrounding brain tissue and the generation of a local inflammatory state between the tumor cells and parenchyma. While there is evidence to suggest that interleukin-6 (IL-6) induces craniopharyngioma (CP)-associated inflammation, particularly in ACP, the role of IL-6 in the progression of ACP remains unclear. The results of the present study demonstrated that CP inflammation was associated with pathological classification, extent of surgery, degree of calcification and postoperative hypothalamic status scale. Cytokine antibody arrays were conducted to measure the expression of IL-6 and other inflammatory factors in tumor tissues in response to various levels of inflammatory exposure. IL-6, IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) and glycoprotein 130 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. In addition, an ELISA was performed to quantify the levels of soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) in the cystic fluid and supernatants of ACP cells and tumor-associated fibroblasts. These measurements demonstrated that ACP cells produce IL-6 and its associated proteins. In addition, the results revealed that while the viability of ACP cells was not affected, the migration of ACP cells was promoted by IL-6 treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. Conversely, treatment with an IL-6-blocking monoclonal antibody significantly decreased the migration of ACP cells. In addition, IL-6 treatment increased the expression of vimentin and decreased the expression of E-cadherin in a dose-dependent manner. The findings of the present study demonstrate that IL-6 may promote migration in vitro via the classic- and trans-signaling pathways by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in ACP cell cultures. PMID:28487953

  7. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  8. Effects of a Major Tree Invader on Urban Woodland Arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity; however, the degree of impact can vary depending on the ecosystem and taxa. Here, we test whether a top invader at a global scale, the tree Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust or false acacia), which is known to profoundly change site conditions, significantly affects urban animal diversity. As a first multi-taxon study of this kind, we analyzed the effects of Robinia dominance on 18 arthropod taxa by pairwise comparisons of woodlands in Berlin, Germany, that were dominated by R. pseudoacacia or the native pioneer tree Betula pendula. As a negative effect, abundances of five arthropod taxa decreased (Chilopoda, Formicidae, Diptera, Heteroptera, Hymenoptera); 13 others were not affected. Woodland type affected species composition of carabids and functional groups in spiders, but surprisingly did not decrease alpha and beta diversity of carabid and spider assemblages or the number of endangered species. Tree invasion thus did not induce biotic homogenization at the habitat scale. We detected no positive effects of alien dominance. Our results illustrate that invasions by a major tree invader can induce species turnover in ground-dwelling arthropods, but do not necessarily reduce arthropod species abundances or diversity and might thus contribute to the conservation of epigeal invertebrates in urban settings. Considering the context of invasion impacts thus helps to set priorities in managing biological invasions and can illustrate the potential of novel ecosystems to maintain urban biodiversity. PMID:26359665

  9. Effects of a Major Tree Invader on Urban Woodland Arthropods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Buchholz

    Full Text Available Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity; however, the degree of impact can vary depending on the ecosystem and taxa. Here, we test whether a top invader at a global scale, the tree Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust or false acacia, which is known to profoundly change site conditions, significantly affects urban animal diversity. As a first multi-taxon study of this kind, we analyzed the effects of Robinia dominance on 18 arthropod taxa by pairwise comparisons of woodlands in Berlin, Germany, that were dominated by R. pseudoacacia or the native pioneer tree Betula pendula. As a negative effect, abundances of five arthropod taxa decreased (Chilopoda, Formicidae, Diptera, Heteroptera, Hymenoptera; 13 others were not affected. Woodland type affected species composition of carabids and functional groups in spiders, but surprisingly did not decrease alpha and beta diversity of carabid and spider assemblages or the number of endangered species. Tree invasion thus did not induce biotic homogenization at the habitat scale. We detected no positive effects of alien dominance. Our results illustrate that invasions by a major tree invader can induce species turnover in ground-dwelling arthropods, but do not necessarily reduce arthropod species abundances or diversity and might thus contribute to the conservation of epigeal invertebrates in urban settings. Considering the context of invasion impacts thus helps to set priorities in managing biological invasions and can illustrate the potential of novel ecosystems to maintain urban biodiversity.

  10. Effects of a Major Tree Invader on Urban Woodland Arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Sascha; Tietze, Hedwig; Kowarik, Ingo; Schirmel, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Biological invasions are a major threat to biodiversity; however, the degree of impact can vary depending on the ecosystem and taxa. Here, we test whether a top invader at a global scale, the tree Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust or false acacia), which is known to profoundly change site conditions, significantly affects urban animal diversity. As a first multi-taxon study of this kind, we analyzed the effects of Robinia dominance on 18 arthropod taxa by pairwise comparisons of woodlands in Berlin, Germany, that were dominated by R. pseudoacacia or the native pioneer tree Betula pendula. As a negative effect, abundances of five arthropod taxa decreased (Chilopoda, Formicidae, Diptera, Heteroptera, Hymenoptera); 13 others were not affected. Woodland type affected species composition of carabids and functional groups in spiders, but surprisingly did not decrease alpha and beta diversity of carabid and spider assemblages or the number of endangered species. Tree invasion thus did not induce biotic homogenization at the habitat scale. We detected no positive effects of alien dominance. Our results illustrate that invasions by a major tree invader can induce species turnover in ground-dwelling arthropods, but do not necessarily reduce arthropod species abundances or diversity and might thus contribute to the conservation of epigeal invertebrates in urban settings. Considering the context of invasion impacts thus helps to set priorities in managing biological invasions and can illustrate the potential of novel ecosystems to maintain urban biodiversity.

  11. A clinicopathological analysis of papillary endolymphatic sac tumor in inner ear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIN Yu-jing

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Endolymphatic sac tumor (ELST is a rare tumor originating fromendolymphatic epithelium of inner ear. This tumor exhibits low-grade malignancy with benign histopathological appearance and clinically destructive behavior which occurs in the skull base and frequently invades the posterior petrous bone, the mastoid, semicircular canal, cerebellopontine angle structures and cranial nerve. The presence of intracranial ELST always makes the diagnosis challenge for clinicians and pathologists. Herein we describe a case of ELST in skull base. The clinicopathology of this tumor and its differential diagnosis are discussed. Methods The clinical manifestation of a patient with primary ELST occurring in right cerebellopontine angle was presented retrospectively. Resected mass was routinely paraffin-embedded and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Dako EnVision immunohistochemical staining system was used to detect the tumor antigen expressions, including cytokeratin (CK, vimentin (Vim, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, synaptophysin (Syn, chromogranin A (CgA, S-100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, thyroglobulin (TG, thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 and Ki-67. Results A 32-year-old male patient presented with 20-year history of progressive hearing loss. MRI scan revealed an expansile lytic lesion of the mastoid process of the right petrous bone, measuring 4.20 cm × 3.30 cm × 2.00 cm, occupied the right cerebellopontine angle with infiltration of surrounding dura mater. But the lesion did not break the dura mater and invade the brain parenchyma. Craniotomy was performed and the tumor was removed totally. Histological examination revealed a papillary, cystic or glandular architecture in mass. The papillary and glandular structures were lined by a single layer of flattened cuboidal-to-columnar cells. The stroma of the papillary fronds was richly vascularized and chronically inflamed. There

  12. Metabolic characterization of invaded cells of the pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mayumi; Imadome, Kaori; Imai, Takashi

    2017-05-01

    We previously reported that about 0.4% of cells in the cultured human pancreatic cancer cell line, PANC-1, can invade matrigel during the transwell invasion assay, suggesting that these invaded PANC-1 cells may have specific characteristics to keep their invasive potential. To identify the metabolic characterization specific in the invaded PANC-1 cells, metabolome analysis of the invaded PANC-1 compared with the whole cultured PANC-1 was performed using CE-TOFMS, and concentrations of 110 metabolites were measured. In contrast to the whole cultured cells, the invaded PANC-1 was characterized as a population with reduced levels of amino acids and TCA cycle intermediates, and decreased and increased intermediates in glycolysis and nucleic acid metabolism. In particular, the ratio of both adenosine and guanosine energy charge was reduced in the invaded cells, revealing that the consumption of ATP and GTP was high in the invaded cells, and thus suggesting that ATP- or GTP-generating pathways are stimulated. In addition, the GSH/GSSG ratio was low in the invaded cells, but these cells had a higher surviving fraction after exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Thus, the invaded cells were the population resistant to oxidative stress. Furthermore, reduction in intracellular GSH content inhibited PANC-1 invasiveness, indicated that GSH has an important role in PANC-1 invasiveness. Overall, we propose the invaded cells have several unique metabolic profiles. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  13. Powerful qPCR assays for the early detection of latent invaders: interdisciplinary approaches in clinical cancer research and plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchi, Nicola; Capretti, Paolo; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-06-01

    Latent invaders represent the first step of disease before symptoms occur in the host. Based on recent findings, tumors are considered to be ecosystems in which cancer cells act as invasive species that interact with the native host cell species. Analogously, in plants latent fungal pathogens coevolve within symptomless host tissues. For these reasons, similar detection approaches can be used for an early diagnosis of the invasion process in both plants and humans to prevent or reduce the spread of the disease. Molecular tools based on the evaluation of nucleic acids have been developed for the specific, rapid, and early detection of human diseases. During the last decades, these techniques to assess and quantify the proliferation of latent invaders in host cells have been transferred from the medical field to different areas of scientific research, such as plant pathology. An improvement in molecular biology protocols (especially referring to qPCR assays) specifically designed and optimized for detection in host plants is therefore advisable. This work is a cross-disciplinary review discussing the use of a methodological approach that is employed within both medical and plant sciences. It provides an overview of the principal qPCR tools for the detection of latent invaders, focusing on comparisons between clinical cancer research and plant pathology, and recent advances in the early detection of latent invaders to improve prevention and control strategies.

  14. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI-Initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan Li [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: fanli0930@163.com; Liu Shiyuan [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China); Sun Fei [GE Healthcare China (China)], E-mail: Fei.sun@med.ge.com; Xiao Xiangsheng [Department of Radiology, ChangZheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, No. 415 Fengyang Road, Shanghai 200003 (China)], E-mail: lizhaobin79@163.com

    2009-04-15

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. Results: One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P > 0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Conclusion: Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  15. Assessment of pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with FAIR in comparison with DCE-MRI-Initial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Li; Liu Shiyuan; Sun Fei; Xiao Xiangsheng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess pulmonary parenchyma perfusion with flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery (FAIR) in comparison with 3D dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) imaging in healthy volunteers and in patients with pulmonary embolism or lung cancer. Materials and methods: Sixteen healthy volunteers and 16 patients with pulmonary embolism (5 cases) or lung cancer (11 cases) were included in this study. Firstly, the optimized inversion time of FAIR (TI) was determined in 12 healthy volunteers. Then, FAIR imaging with the optimized TI was performed followed by DCE-MRI on the other 4 healthy volunteers and 16 patients. Tagging efficiency of lung and SNR of perfusion images were calculated with different TI values. In the comparison of FAIR with DCE-MRI, the homogeneity of FAIR and DCE-MRI perfusion was assessed. In the cases of perfusion abnormality, the contrast between normal lung and perfusion defects was quantified by calculating a normalized signal intensity ratio. Results: One thousand milliseconds was the optimal TI, which generated the highest lung tagging efficiency and second highest PBF SNR. In the volunteers, the signal intensity of perfusion images acquired with both FAIR and DCE-MRI was homogeneous. Wedged-shaped or triangle perfusion defects were visualized in five pulmonary embolisms and three lung cancer cases. There was no significant statistical difference in signal intensity ratio between FAIR and DCE-MRI (P > 0.05). In the rest of eight lung cancers, all the lesions showed low perfusion against the higher perfused pulmonary parenchyma in both FAIR and DCE-MRI. Conclusion: Pulmonary parenchyma perfusion imaging with FAIR was feasible, consistent and could obtain similar functional information to that from DCE-MRI.

  16. Possibilities of 99mTc-MIBI for imaging of the thyroid parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mluchkov, N.; Mluchkov, Kh.

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid parenchyma imaging is very important as an evidence of residual part of the gland in case of thyroidectomy. The determination of the mass of this part and its function is crucial at the substituting hormonal therapy. Also at cases of thyroid carcinomas the differential diagnosis of recurrences of radiation and/or postoperative fibrosis is difficult. The thyroid imaging by 131 I and by 99m Tc-pertechnetates is not always possible because of gland blockage from medicines, thyroid hormones and foods with high iodine content. The aim of this study was to establish if 99m Tc-MIBI could depict the thyroid parenchyma without being influenced by gland blockage giving a real image of it. A comparative scintigraphic study has been carried out at 58 patients with different thyroid diseases using 99m Tc-pertechnetate, 131 I and 99m Tc-MIBI. There were 17 patients with diffuse goiter, 27 with nodules (23 of normal activity and 4 with cold nodules), 3 patients with retrosternal goiter and 11 with thyroid carcinoma after surgery intervention. The visualization of the thyroid parenchyma with 99m Tc-MIBI was better than that with 99 0 m Tc-pertechnetate and no dependent on suppression of the gland. All nodules showed 99m Tc-MIBI uptake with the same intensity as the surrounding normal gland tissue. The scintigraphy with 99m Tc-MIBI was of no value for differential diagnosis of nodules. 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy could be successfully applied at patients with retrosternal thyroid goiter and for detecting a thyroid rest at patients with thyroid cancer after surgery intervention. (author)

  17. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Analysis of disease manifestation by region-based quantification of lung parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilig, D., E-mail: dorothea.theilig@charite.de [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Doellinger, F. [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Kuhnigk, J.M. [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Universitaetsallee 29, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Temmesfeld-Wollbrueck, B.; Huebner, R.H. [Charité, Department of Pneumology, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Schreiter, N.; Poellinger, A. [Charité, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The distribution of cystic lesions in LAM was evaluated with quantitative CT. •There were more cystic lesions in the central lung compared to peripheral areas. •Cystic changes were more frequent in apical two thirds compared to lower third. •Results might help to obviate the need for biopsy in more cases. -- Abstract: Purpose: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterized by proliferation of smooth muscle tissue that causes bronchial obstruction and secondary cystic destruction of lung parenchyma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the typical distribution of cystic defects in LAM with quantitative volumetric chest computed tomography (CT). Materials and methods: CT examinations of 20 patients with confirmed LAM were evaluated with region-based quantification of lung parenchyma. Additionally, 10 consecutive patients were identified who had recently undergone CT imaging of the lung at our institution, in which no pathologies of the lung were found, to serve as a control group. Each lung was divided into three regions (upper, middle and lower thirds) with identical number of slices. In addition, we defined a “peel” and “core” of the lung comprising the 2 cm subpleural space and the remaining inner lung area. Computerized detection of lung volume and relative emphysema was performed with the PULMO 3D software (v3.42, Fraunhofer MEVIS, Bremen, Germany). This software package enables the quantification of emphysematous lung parenchyma by calculating the pixel index, which is defined as the ratio of lung voxels with a density <−950 HU to the total number of voxels in the lung. Results: Cystic changes accounted for 0.1–39.1% of the total lung volume in patients with LAM. Disease manifestation in the central lung was significantly higher than in peripheral areas (peel median: 15.1%, core median: 20.5%; p = 0.001). Lower thirds of lung parenchyma showed significantly less cystic changes than upper and middle lung areas combined (lower

  18. Chronic diseases of lung parenchyma in children: the role of imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haran Jogeesvaran, K.; Owens, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic diseases of the lung parenchyma (CDoLP) in children encompass a vast number of distinct clinico-pathological conditions. The prevalence of CDoLP has continued to increase in the last 10-15 years and the paediatric radiologist will therefore have to become more familiar with the imaging appearances of CDoLP. This review highlights some of the key imaging appearances of CDoLP, focussing mainly on airways disease. We also explore issues around technique optimisation and dose minimisation that remain of paramount importance in children. (orig.)

  19. Selective localization of IgG from cerebrospinal fluid to brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Marlene Thorsen; Forsberg Sørensen, Sofie; Khorooshi, Reza M. H.

    2018-01-01

    the cerebrospinal fluid and induce subpial and periventricular NMO-like lesions and blood-brain barrier breakdown, in a complement-dependent manner. To investigate how IgG trafficking from cerebrospinal fluid to brain parenchyma can be influenced by injury. IgG from healthy donors was intrathecally injected...... into the cerebrospinal fluid via cisterna magna at 1, 2, 4, or 7 days after a distal stereotactic sterile needle insertion to the striatum. Antibody deposition, detected by staining for human IgG, peaked 1 day after the intrathecal injection and was selectively seen close to the needle insertion. When NMO...

  20. Interleukin‑6 induces an epithelial‑mesenchymal transition phenotype in human adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma cells and promotes tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Chao; Pan, Jun; Chen, Ligang; Qi, Song-Tao

    2017-06-01

    Total resection of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma (ACP) is complex and often leads to postoperative recurrence. This is due to the tendency of the tumor to invade the surrounding brain tissue and the generation of a local inflammatory state between the tumor cells and parenchyma. While there is evidence to suggest that interleukin‑6 (IL‑6) induces craniopharyngioma (CP)‑associated inflammation, particularly in ACP, the role of IL‑6 in the progression of ACP remains unclear. The results of the present study demonstrated that CP inflammation was associated with pathological classification, extent of surgery, degree of calcification and postoperative hypothalamic status scale. Cytokine antibody arrays were conducted to measure the expression of IL‑6 and other inflammatory factors in tumor tissues in response to various levels of inflammatory exposure. IL‑6, IL‑6 receptor (IL‑6R) and glycoprotein 130 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry. In addition, an ELISA was performed to quantify the levels of soluble IL‑6R (sIL‑6R) in the cystic fluid and supernatants of ACP cells and tumor‑associated fibroblasts. These measurements demonstrated that ACP cells produce IL‑6 and its associated proteins. In addition, the results revealed that while the viability of ACP cells was not affected, the migration of ACP cells was promoted by IL‑6 treatment in a concentration‑dependent manner. Conversely, treatment with an IL‑6‑blocking monoclonal antibody significantly decreased the migration of ACP cells. In addition, IL‑6 treatment increased the expression of vimentin and decreased the expression of E‑cadherin in a dose‑dependent manner. The findings of the present study demonstrate that IL‑6 may promote migration in vitro via the classic‑ and trans‑signaling pathways by inducing epithelial‑mesenchymal transition in ACP cell cultures.

  1. An automatic extraction algorithm of three dimensional shape of brain parenchyma from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matozaki, Takeshi

    2000-01-01

    For the simulation of surgical operations, the extraction of the selected region using MR images is useful. However, this segmentation requires a high level of skill and experience from the technicians. We have developed an unique automatic extraction algorithm for extracting three dimensional brain parenchyma using MR head images. It is named the ''three dimensional gray scale clumsy painter method''. In this method, a template having the shape of a pseudo-circle, a so called clumsy painter (CP), moves along the contour of the selected region and extracts the region surrounded by the contour. This method has advantages compared with the morphological filtering and the region growing method. Previously, this method was applied to binary images, but there were some problems in that the results of the extractions were varied by the value of the threshold level. We introduced gray level information of images to decide the threshold, and depend upon the change of image density between the brain parenchyma and CSF. We decided the threshold level by the vector of a map of templates, and changed the map according to the change of image density. As a result, the over extracted ratio was improved by 36%, and the under extracted ratio was improved by 20%. (author)

  2. Gastrointestinal parasite control during prepuberty improves mammary parenchyma development in Holstein heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Adrián F; Mejía, Miguel E; Licoff, Nicolás; Diab, Santiago S; Formía, Néstor; Ornstein, Ana; Becú-Villalobos, Damasia; Lacau-Mengido, Isabel M

    2013-12-06

    Parasitism during development impairs normal growth and delays the onset of puberty through altered hormone profiles, including insulin-like growth factor one (IGF-1). As mammary gland development during prepuberty is strongly dependent on IGF-1, we determined if antiparasitic treatment during this stage of growth improved mammary gland development. One group of Holstein heifers was treated monthly, rotationally with antiparasitic drugs from birth to 70 weeks of age, a second group was untreated. Treated heifer calves had between 56% and 65% less EPG counts than untreated ones. Presence of Ostertagia, Cooperia, Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus was demonstrated. Treatment effectively advanced the onset of puberty and increased IGF-1 levels. At 20, 30, 40 and 70 weeks of age biopsies from the mammary gland were taken and histological sections were prepared and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Pictures were analyzed to compare parenchyma area in relation to total mammary tissue between groups. Mammary samples from treated heifers had higher ratios of parenchyma/total area than untreated ones. As mammary development during prepuberty is crucial for mammary performance during lactation, these results add new evidence to the importance of gastrointestinal parasite control in heifers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of selective bile duct ligation on liver parenchyma in young animals: histologic and molecular evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannuri, Ana Cristina A; Coelho, Maria Cecília M; de Oliveira Gonçalves, Josiane; Santos, Maria Mercês; Ferraz da Silva, Luiz Fernando; Bendit, Israel; Tannuri, Uenis

    2012-03-01

    The mechanisms of increased collagen production and liver parenchyma fibrosis are poorly understood. These phenomena are observed mainly in children with biliary obstruction (BO), and in a great number of patients, the evolution to biliary cirrhosis and hepatic failure leads to the need for liver transplantation before adolescence. However, pediatric liver transplantation presents with biliary complications in 20% to 30% of cases in the postoperative period. Intra- or extrahepatic stenosis of bile ducts is frequent and may lead to secondary biliary cirrhosis and the need for retransplantation. It is unknown whether biliary stenosis involving isolated segments or lobes may affect the adjacent nonobstructed lobes by paracrine or endocrine means, leading to fibrosis in this parenchyma. Therefore, the present study aimed to create an experimental model of selective biliary duct ligation in young animals with a subsequent evaluation of the histologic and molecular alterations in liver parenchyma of the obstructed and nonobstructed lobes. After a pilot study to standardize the surgical procedures, weaning rats underwent ligation of the bile ducts of the median, left lateral, and caudate liver lobes. The bile duct of the right lateral lobe was kept intact. To avoid intrahepatic biliary duct collaterals neoformation, the parenchymal connection between the right lateral and median lobes was clamped. The animals were divided into groups according to the time of death: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 weeks after surgical procedure. After death, the median and left lateral lobes (with BO) and the right lateral lobe (without BO [NBO]) were harvested separately. A group of 8 healthy nonoperated on animals served as controls. Liver tissues were subjected to histologic evaluation and quantification of the ductular proliferation and of the portal fibrosis. The expressions of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA), desmin, and transforming growth factor β1 genes were studied by molecular analyses

  4. Compositional analysis of Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis) cell-wall material from parenchyma, epidermis, and subepidermal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassby, Terri; Jay, Andrew J; Merali, Zara; Parker, Mary L; Parr, Adrian J; Faulds, Craig B; Waldron, Keith W

    2013-10-09

    Chinese water chestnut (Eleocharis dulcis (Burman f.) Trin ex Henschel) is a corm consumed globally in Oriental-style cuisine. The corm consists of three main tissues, the epidermis, subepidermis, and parenchyma; the cell walls of which were analyzed for sugar, phenolic, and lignin content. Sugar content, measured by gas chromatography, was higher in the parenchyma cell walls (931 μg/mg) than in the subepidermis (775 μg/mg) or epidermis (685 μg/mg). The alkali-extractable phenolic content, measured by high-performance liquid chromatography, was greater in the epidermal (32.4 μg/mg) and subepidermal cell walls (21.7 μg/mg) than in the cell walls of the parenchyma (12.3 μg/mg). The proportion of diferulic acids was higher in the parenchyma. The Klason lignin content of epidermal and subepidermal cell walls was ~15%. Methylation analysis of Chinese water chestnut cell-wall polysaccharides identified xyloglucan as the predominant hemicellulose in the parenchyma for the first time, and also a significant pectin component, similar to other nongraminaceous monocots.

  5. Sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT: dynamic enhancement patterns and timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Liang; Xue, Hua-dan; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xuan; Sun, Hao; Li, Ping; Jin, Zheng-yu [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Wu, Wen-ming; Zhao, Yu-pei [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of General Surgery, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    To assess enhancement patterns of sporadic insulinomas on volume perfusion CT (VPCT), and to identify timing of optimal tumour-parenchyma contrast. Consecutive patients who underwent VPCT for clinically suspected insulinomas were retrospectively identified. Patients with insulinomas confirmed by surgery were included, and patients with familial syndromes were excluded. Two radiologists evaluated VPCT images in consensus. Tumour-parenchyma contrast at each time point was measured, and timing of optimal contrast was determined. Time duration of hyperenhancement (tumour-parenchyma contrast >20 Hounsfield units, HU) was recorded. Perfusion parameters were evaluated. Three dynamic enhancement patterns were observed in 63 tumours: persistent hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement time window ≥10 s) in 39 (61.9%), transient hyperenhancement (hyperenhancement <10 s) in 19 (30.2%) and non-hyperenhancement in 5 (7.9%). Timing of optimal contrast was 9 s after abdominal aorta threshold (AAT) of 200 HU, with tumour-parenchyma contrast of 77.6 ± 57.2 HU. At 9 s after AAT, 14 (22.2%) tumours were non-hyperenhancing, nine of which had missed transient hyperenhancement. Insulinomas with transient and persistent hyperenhancement patterns had significantly increased perfusion. Insulinomas have variable enhancement patterns. Tumour-parenchyma contrast is time-dependent. Optimal timing of enhancement is 9 s after AAT. VPCT enables tumour detection even if the hyperenhancement is transient. (orig.)

  6. Preoperative radiation therapy for muscle-invading bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, J.A.; Greven, K.M.; Anscher, M.S.; Morgan, T.M.; Scott, J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on low-dose and high-dose radiation therapy (RT) followed by cystectomy for bladder carcinoma that was evaluated for survival, failure patterns, and complications as these outcomes have been incompletely documented in the past. One hundred five patients with clinical stages T2-T4 (muscle-invading) transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder who completed preoperative RT followed by total cystectomy were evaluated. Eighty-five patients received 20-27 Gy in 4-7 fractions (group A). Twenty patients received 40-50 Gy in 20-28 fractions (group B). Actuarial 5-year survival was 45% and 29% (P = .06) for groups A and B, respectively; 6% of group A was stage T4 compared with 30% of group B. Five-year actuarial survival for patients with stages T2-T3 in groups A and B was 46% and 42%, respectively, while that for T4 was 33% and 0% in groups A and B, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that stage, grade, and presence of hydronephrosis independently affected survival. Five-year actuarial local control rates for T2, T3, and T4 were 93%, 93%, and 22%, respectively, with no significant difference between RT groups. Rates of distant metastasis and complications versus preoperative regime and stage were similar

  7. Vegetative Regeneration Capacities of Five Ornamental Plant Invaders After Shredding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monty, Arnaud; Eugène, Marie; Mahy, Grégory

    2015-02-01

    Vegetation management often involves shredding to dispose of cut plant material or to destroy the vegetation itself. In the case of invasive plants, this can represent an environmental risk if the shredded material exhibits vegetative regeneration capacities. We tested the effect of shredding on aboveground and below-ground vegetative material of five ornamental widespread invaders in Western Europe that are likely to be managed by cutting and shredding techniques: Buddleja davidii (butterfly bush, Scrophulariaceae), Fallopia japonica (Japanese knotweed, Polygonaceae), Spiraea × billardii Hérincq (Billard's bridewort, Rosaceae), Solidago gigantea (giant goldenrod, Asteraceae), and Rhus typhina L. (staghorn sumac, Anacardiaceae). We looked at signs of vegetative regeneration and biomass production, and analyzed the data with respect to the season of plant cutting (spring vs summer), the type of plant material (aboveground vs below-ground), and the shredding treatment (shredded vs control). All species were capable of vegetative regeneration, especially the below-ground material. We found differences among species, but the regeneration potential was generally still present after shredding despite a reduction of growth rates. Although it should not be excluded in all cases (e.g., destruction of giant goldenrod and staghorn sumac aboveground material), the use of a shredder to destroy woody alien plant material cannot be considered as a general management option without significant environmental risk.

  8. CT findings of parotid gland tumors: benign versus malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Moon Ok; Han, Chun Hwan; Kim, Mie Young; Yi, Jeong Geun; Park, Kyung Joo; Lee, Joo Hyuk; Bae, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jeung Sook

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the characteristics of parotid gland tumors to help in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions. The CT findings of 22 patients with surgically proven parotid gland tumors were reviewed. Analysis was focused on the density and margin characteristics of the tumors, and the relationship between the tumor and surrounding structures. Those tumors were pleomorphic adenoma (n = 8), Warthin's tumor (n = 5), basal cell adenoma (n = 1), lipoma (n = 1), dermoid cyst (n = 1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (n = 2), mucoepidermoid carcinoma (n 1), epidermoid carcinoma (n = 1), and carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma (n 1). Most of benign and malignant tumors were heterogeneous in density on contrast enhanced CT scans. In 5 of 6 malignant cases, the tumors had irregular or ill-defined margin and a tendancy to involve or cross the superficial layer of deep cervical fascia with obliteration of subcutaneous fat. Two malignant tumors invaded surrounding structures. Although the heterogeneous density of tumor is not a specific finding for malignancy at CT, following findings, such as, irregular or blurred margin of the lesion, the involvement of fascial plane, and the infiltration of surrounding structures may suggest the possibility of malignant parotid tumor

  9. Physiological and biochemical aspects of the effect of ionizing radiations on the lung parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasquier, Christian.

    1975-03-01

    Concerning the biochemical reactions of the lung parenchyma to irradiation the following points have been developed. Role of biochemically active substances (histamine, serotonin, kinins, catecholamines, prostaglandins) in the early reaction of the lung to irradiation, their common feature being their vascular impact point. Lung irradiation and lipids (fatty acids and lipid metabolism in general); irradiation, by raising the proportion of unsaturated at the expense of saturated fatty acids, may give rise to serious physiological respiratory disorders. Lung irradiation and blood fluidity (fibrinolytic activity, heparin, platelet factors). Pulmonary interstitium and irradiation (of the three interstitium components collagen plays a preferential part). Irradiation and immunological lung reaction (reasons behind the immunological theory, immunological assistance, immunological mechanism of pulmonary reactions towards pollutants). Enzymatic lung radiolesion indicators. Three kinds of physiological changes have been considered. Vascular physiology disturbances caused by the initial biochemical reactions; anomalies of physiological or functional trials, images of the lesion formed; disorders of the cell physiology of carcinogenesis [fr

  10. The structural and functional state of hemomicrocirculatory bed and parenchyma of the testis in varicocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. E. Khallo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Varicose veins of the spermatic cord and testis membranes play a key role in the development of male infertility. Aim. To study the structural features of the bloodstream and testicular parenchyma in terms of varicose veins of the spermatic cord and testis membranes. Meyhods and results. In 23 testicular preparations taken from men of mature age convoluted seminiferous tubules diameter, number of cells of spermatogenic epithelium and interstitial endocrinocytes nuclei volume were studied using macro- and microscopic morphometric methods. It was established that in varicocele testis volume, diameter of convoluted seminiferous tubules and interstitial endocrinocytes nuclei volume significantly reduced. Conclusion. This indicates the presence of circulatory hypoxia of testicles, which leads to a decrease in the volume of interstitial endocrinocytes nuclei by 31%, thereby reducing their functional properties.

  11. Organization of the cytoplasmic reticulum in the central vacuole of parenchyma cells in Allium cepa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz J. Wodzicki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An elaborate and complex cytoplasmic reticulum composed of fine filaments and lamellae ranging from 0.1 to 4 microns in size is revealed by viewing the central vacuole of onion bulb parenchyma cells with the scanning election microscope. The larger cytoplasmic strands, visible with the light microscope, are composed of numerous smaller filaments (some tubular which might explain the observed bidirectional movement of particles in these larger strands. The finely divided cytoplasmic network of filaments is continuous with the parietal cytoplasm inclosing the vacuolar sap. In these highly vacuolated cells the mass of the protoplast is in the form of an intravacuolar reticulum immersed in the cell sap. The probable significance of the vacuolar sap in relation to physiological processes of the cell is discussed.

  12. Giant solitary fibrous tumor of the lung: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Ping; Sun, Linlin; Zhong, Diansheng; Lian, Linjuan; Xu, Dongbo

    2014-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumor arising from the lung parenchyma is rarely described. Here, we present the clinical, imaging, and histological features of a case of a 54-year-old woman with an incidental lung mass of the right lower lobe on a chest radiograph.

  13. Test of the 'glymphatic' hypothesis demonstrates diffusive and aquaporin-4-independent solute transport in rodent brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alex J; Yao, Xiaoming; Dix, James A; Jin, Byung-Ju; Verkman, Alan S

    2017-08-21

    Transport of solutes through brain involves diffusion and convection. The importance of convective flow in the subarachnoid and paravascular spaces has long been recognized; a recently proposed 'glymphatic' clearance mechanism additionally suggests that aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channels facilitate convective transport through brain parenchyma. Here, the major experimental underpinnings of the glymphatic mechanism were re-examined by measurements of solute movement in mouse brain following intracisternal or intraparenchymal solute injection. We found that: (i) transport of fluorescent dextrans in brain parenchyma depended on dextran size in a manner consistent with diffusive rather than convective transport; (ii) transport of dextrans in the parenchymal extracellular space, measured by 2-photon fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, was not affected just after cardiorespiratory arrest; and (iii) Aqp4 gene deletion did not impair transport of fluorescent solutes from sub-arachnoid space to brain in mice or rats. Our results do not support the proposed glymphatic mechanism of convective solute transport in brain parenchyma.

  14. T2 relaxation time in MR imaging of normal and abnormal lung parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayo, J.R.; McKay, A.; Mueller, N.L.

    1990-01-01

    To measure the T2 relaxation times of normal and abnormal lung parenchyma and to evaluate the influence of field strength and lung inflation on T2. Five healthy volunteers and five patients with diffuse lung disease were imaged at 0.15 and 1.5 T. Excised normal pig lung was imaged at 0.15 and 1.5 T and analyzed in a spectrometer at 2.0 T. Single-echo (Hahn) pulse sequences (TR, 2,000 msec; TE, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 msec) were compared with multiecho trains (Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill [CPMG] at 0.15 T (TR, 2,000 msec; TE, 20-40-60... 240 msec) and 2.0 T (TR, 2,000 msec; TE, 1, 2, 3,..., 10msec). T2 relaxation times calculated from single-echo sequences showed considerable variation between 0.15 and 2.0 T. T2 also changed with lung inflation. However, the T2 measurements on CPMG sequences did not change significantly (P > .05) with field strength and were only minimally affected by lung inflation. The mean ± SD T2 values for normal lung were 99 ± 8 and for abnormal lung were 84 ± 17. Lung parenchyma T2 measurements obtained with the use of conventional single-echo pulse sequences are variable and inaccurate because of inflation and field strength dependent magnetic susceptibility effects that lead to rapid nonrecoverable dephasing. The results indicate that multiecho sequences with appropriately short echo spacings yield more reproducible determinations of T2, which are independent of field strength and less dependent on lung inflation

  15. Diffusion tensor imaging of spinal cord parenchyma lesion in rat with chronic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng; Pei, Xiao-Jiao; Lei, Jian-Feng; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhao, Wen; Wei, Rui-Han; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2018-04-01

    Adequate evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma and accurate identification of injury range are considered two premises for the research and treatment of chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides information about water diffusion in spinal cord, and thus makes it possible to realize these premises. In this study, we conducted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for Wistar rats 84days after spinal cord contusion. DTI metrics including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) from different positions of the injured cord were collected, analyzed, and compared with the histological results and locomotor outcomes. Moreover, we performed fiber tractography, and examined the difference in cavity percentage obtained respectively via conventional MRI, DTI and histology. Results showed that the chronic SCI rats had the largest changes of all DTI metrics at the epicenter; the farther away from the epicenter, the smaller the variation. FA, AD and RD were all influenced by SCI in a greater space range than MD. The good consistency of FA values and histological results in specific regions evidenced FA's capability of reflecting Wallerian degeneration after SCI. DTI metrics at the epicenter in ventral funiculus also showed a close correlation with the BBB scores. Additionally, supported by the histological results, DTI enables a more accurate measurement of cavity percentage compared to the conventional MRI. DTI parameters might comprehensively reflect the post-SCI pathological status of spinal cord parenchyma at the epicenter and distal parts during the chronic stage, while showing good consistency with locomotor performance. DTI combined with tractography could intuitively display the distribution of spared fibers after SCI and accurately provide information such as cavity area. This may shed light on the research and treatment of chronic SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Experimental control of Spanish broom (Spartium junceum invading natural grasslands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Sanhueza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of legumes generically known as brooms are among the most successful shrubs invading grasslands in South America and otherregions. These species share a set of biological features that enhance their invasiveness, such as abundant and long-lasting seed banks,aggressive root systems and rapid growth, combined with their ability for re-sprouting after cutting or burning and for avoiding herbivores.They grow in dense stands that exclude native vegetation and are able to change ecological processes, increasing fire frequency and intensity,and fixing atmospheric nitrogen. The Spanish broom (Spartium junceum is a shrub native form the Mediterranean that was introduced intothe Argentine Pampas grasslands where it spreads over remnants of pristine ecosystems, threatening their biodiversity. This paper reports theresults obtained after an adaptive management strategy aimed at controlling this species in a nature reserve, and compares the efficiency ofdifferent mechanical and chemical control techniques in terms of the number of plants killed and the effects on surrounding vegetation andon the recruitment of broom seedlings. Control was implemented in two phases, the first included three treatments: i cut at the base of theplant, ii cut followed by the immediate application of Togar (Picloram 3% + Triclopyr 6%, at a 5% dilution in diesel oil on top of the cut stump, and iii foliar spraying with Togar. The follow-up treatments, implemented one year later, consisted of spraying the re-sprouts with Togar (5% in diesel oil or Glyphosate 36% (2% in water. The best option in terms of controlling Spanish broom was spraying the resprouts with Togar which gave 100% mortality of the treated plants, compared with values of 40% - 100% re-sprouting for the other optionstested. None of the methods was associated with an increase in seedling recruitment, nor with significant changes in the vegetation in the immediate vicinity of the controlled brooms.

  17. Ecosystem impacts of exotic annual invaders in the Genus Bromus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germino, Matthew J.; Belnap, Jayne; Stark, John M.; Allen, Edith B.; Rau, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystems is necessary to justify and guide efforts to limit their spread, restore natives, and plan for conservation. Invasive annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum, B. rubens, B. hordeaceus, and B. diandrus (hereafter collectively referred to as Bromus) transform the structure and function of ecosystems they dominate. Experiments that prove cause-and-effect impacts of Bromus are rare, yet inferences can be gleaned from the combination of Bromus-ecosystem associations, ecosystem condition before/after invasion, and an understanding of underlying mechanisms. Bromus typically establishes in bare soil patches and can eventually replace perennials such as woody species or bunchgrasses, creating a homogeneous annual cover. Plant productivity and cover are less stable across seasons and years when Bromus dominates, due to a greater response to annual climate variability. Bromus’ “flash” of growth followed by senescence early in the growing season, combined with shallow rooting and annual habit, may lead to incomplete use of deep soil water, reduced C sequestration, and accelerated nutrient cycling. Litter produced by Bromus alters nearly all aspects of ecosystems and notably increases wildfire occurrence. Where Bromus has become dominant, it can decrease soil stability by rendering soils bare for months following fire or episodic, pathogen-induced stand failure. Bromus-invaded communities have lower species diversity, and associated species tend to be generalists adapted to unstable and variable habitats. Changes in litter, fire, and soil properties appear to feedback to reinforce Bromus’ dominance in a pattern that portends desertification.

  18. Grassland invader responses to realistic changes in native species richness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinella, Matthew J; Pokorny, Monica L; Rekaya, Romdhane

    2007-09-01

    The importance of species richness for repelling exotic plant invasions varies from ecosystem to ecosystem. Thus, in order to prioritize conservation objectives, it is critical to identify those ecosystems where decreasing richness will most greatly magnify invasion risks. Our goal was to determine if invasion risks greatly increase in response to common reductions in grassland species richness. We imposed treatments that mimic management-induced reductions in grassland species richness (i.e., removal of shallow- and/or deep-rooted forbs and/or grasses and/or cryptogam layers). Then we introduced and monitored the performance of a notorious invasive species (i.e., Centaurea maculosa). We found that, on a per-gram-of-biomass basis, each resident plant group similarly suppressed invader growth. Hence, with respect to preventing C. maculosa invasions, maintaining overall productivity is probably more important than maintaining the productivity of particular plant groups or species. But at the sites we studied, all plant groups may be needed to maintain overall productivity because removing forbs decreased overall productivity in two of three years. Alternatively, removing forbs increased productivity in another year, and this led us to posit that removing forbs may inflate the temporal productivity variance as opposed to greatly affecting time-averaged productivity. In either case, overall productivity responses to single plant group removals were inconsistent and fairly modest, and only when all plant groups were removed did C. maculosa growth increase substantially over a no-removal treatment. As such, it seems that intense disturbances (e.g., prolonged drought, overgrazing) that deplete multiple plant groups may often be a prerequisite for C. maculosa invasion.

  19. Quantitative computed tomography of lung parenchyma in patients with emphysema: analysis of higher-density lung regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Dror; Leader, Joseph K.; Zheng, Bin; Sciurba, Frank C.; Tan, Jun; Gur, David

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (CT) has been widely used to detect and evaluate the presence (or absence) of emphysema applying the density masks at specific thresholds, e.g., -910 or -950 Hounsfield Unit (HU). However, it has also been observed that subjects with similar density-mask based emphysema scores could have varying lung function, possibly indicating differences of disease severity. To assess this possible discrepancy, we investigated whether density distribution of "viable" lung parenchyma regions with pixel values > -910 HU correlates with lung function. A dataset of 38 subjects, who underwent both pulmonary function testing and CT examinations in a COPD SCCOR study, was assembled. After the lung regions depicted on CT images were automatically segmented by a computerized scheme, we systematically divided the lung parenchyma into different density groups (bins) and computed a number of statistical features (i.e., mean, standard deviation (STD), skewness of the pixel value distributions) in these density bins. We then analyzed the correlations between each feature and lung function. The correlation between diffusion lung capacity (DLCO) and STD of pixel values in the bin of -910HU lung parenchyma and lung function, which indicates that similar to the conventional density mask method, the pixel value distribution features in "viable" lung parenchyma areas may also provide clinically useful information to improve assessments of lung disease severity as measured by lung functional tests.

  20. In vivo proton MR spectroscopy of normal liver parenchyma: technique and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.; Huebner, F.; Bisdas, S.; Herzog, C.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Vogl, T.J.; Ackermann, H.; Vorbuchner, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic data ( 1 H MRS) of normal liver parenchyma with regard to age, sex, body mass index and location in the liver. Materials and Methods: 45 healthy volunteers age 24 to 65 years were examined with an optimized single-voxel 1 H MRS using a 1.5-T scanner. A spin echo sequence with a TR of 1500 ms and a TE of 135 ms was used, allowing in-phase detection of the choline signal. Weak water suppression was achieved using a chemical shift selective suppression (CHESS) technique. Each examination included the measurement of three voxels with a voxel size of 18 x 18 x 18 mm 3 in different areas of the liver. The volunteers were divided into different age-based groups (young: ≤44 years; older: ≥44 years), BMI (normal weighted: 2 ; obese: >25 kg/m 2 ) and sex. Results: In the acquired spectra different lipid (e.g. [CH 2 ] n ), choline, glutamine, glutamate and glycogenglucose-complex reasonances were detected. The analysis of the spectra, however, only focused on the concentrations of choline and (CH 2 ) n and the relative concentrations of the choline-to-(CH 2 ) n -ratios. In the older volunteers the relative concentration of the choline-to-(CH 2 ) n -ratio was significantly decreased by 0.213±0.193 in comparison to the younger subjects (p=0,031). Further statistical analysis confirmed a significant decrease of the choline-to-(CH 2 ) n -ratio by 0.223±0.180 in obese volunteers compared to volunteers of a standard weight (p=0,016). The significant difference between the choline-to-(CH 2 ) n -ratio female versus male volunteers was calculated with an increase of 0.483±0.172 (p=0,000). The location of the voxel in the liver parenchyma did not yield a signficant difference in the choline-to-(CH 2 ) n -ratio. (orig.)

  1. Brain parenchyma PO2, PCO2, and pH during and after hypoxic, ischemic brain insult in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinley, B A; Morris, W P; Parmley, C L; Butler, B D

    1996-11-01

    1) The investigation of fiberoptic PO2, PCO2, and pH sensor technology as a monitor of brain parenchyma during and after brain injury, and 2) the comparison of brain parenchyma PO2, PCO2, and pH with intracranial pressure during and after hypoxic, ischemic brain insult. Prospective, controlled, animal study in an acute experimental preparation. Physiology laboratory in a university medical school. Fourteen mongrel dogs (20 to 35 kg), anesthetized, room-air ventilated. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental and maintained after intubation using 1% to 1.5% halothane in room air (FiO2 0.21). Mechanical ventilation was established to maintain end-tidal PCO2 approximately 35 torr (-4.7 kPa). Intravenous, femoral artery, and pulmonary artery catheters were placed. The common carotid arteries were surgically exposed, and ultrasonic blood flow probes were applied. A calibrated intracranial pressure probe was placed through a right-side transcranial bolt, and a calibrated intracranial chemistry probe with optical sensors for PO2, PCO2, and pH was placed through a left-side bolt into brain parenchyma. Brain insult was induced in the experimental group (n = 6) by hypoxia (FiO2 0.1), ischemia (bilateral carotid artery occlusion), and hypotension (mean arterial pressure [MAP] approximately 40 mm Hg produced with isoflurane approximately 4%). After 45 mins, carotid artery occlusion was released, FiO2 was reset to 0.21, and anesthetic was returned to halothane (approximately 1.25%). The control group (n = 5) had the same surgical preparation and sequence of anesthetic agent exposure but no brain insult. Monitored variables included brain parenchyma PO2, PCO2, and pH, which were monitored at 1-min intervals, and intracranial pressure, MAP, arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation (by pulse oximetry), end-tidal PCO2, and carotid artery blood flow rate, for which data were collected at 15-min intervals for 7 hrs. Arterial and mixed venous blood gas analyses were done at approximately 1

  2. Competitive interactions between co-occurring invaders: identifying asymmetries between two invasive crayfish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudina, S.; Galic, N.G.; Roessink, I.; Hock, K.

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystems today increasingly suffer invasions by multiple invasive species. Complex interactions between invasive species can have different fitness implications for each invader, which can in turn determine the future progression of their invasions and result in differential impacts on native

  3. Investigation of Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis in invaded macrophyte communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although native macrophytes are beneficial in aquatic ecosystems, invasive macrophytes can cause significant ecological and economic harm. Numerous studies have attributed invasiveness to species’ characteristics, whereas others attribute invasion to biotic and abiotic characteristics of the invaded...

  4. Success of seeding native compared with introduced perennial vegetation for revegetating medusahead-invaded sagebrush rangeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millions of hectares of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle &Young) rangeland have been invaded by medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae [L.] Nevski), an exotic annual grass that degrades wildlife habitat, reduces forage production, and decreases biodiversity....

  5. Chemoradiotherapy for muscle invading bladder carcinoma. final report of a single institutional organ-sparing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, Fernando; Dominguez, Miguel A.; Martinez, Enrique; Illarramendi, Jose J.; Miquelez, Santiago; Pascual, Ignacio; Marcos, Marta

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Chemoradiotherapy is becoming an alternative to radical cystectomy among patients with muscle invading bladder cancer. We began a prospective study in 1988 to determine the possibilities of conservative treatment and aiming to improve the results obtained by cystectomy alone in invasive bladder cancer. A combination of methotrexate, vinblastine, adriamycin, and cisplatin (M-VAC), followed by radiotherapy and concomitant cisplatin was used. Methods: Fifty patients with good performance status and with stages T2 to T4 operable untreated invasive bladder cancer were entered in the study. Treatment protocol was as follows: (i) cytoreductive transurethral resection; (ii) two cycles of M-VAC chemotherapy; (iii) radiotherapy, 45 Gy on pelvic volume and, at the same time, 20 mg/m 2 cisplatin on days 1 to 5. Cystoscopic evaluation: if there was a complete response, radiotherapy was completed up to 65 Gy; if there was not a complete response, a cystectomy was performed. Median follow-up of the series was 73 months (18-180 m). Results: Tumor response was as follows: 34 complete responses (68%), 9 partial responses (18%), and 7 nonresponses (14%) were observed. The 5-year overall survival and local control were 48% and 47%, respectively. For the complete responder patient, 5-year survival and local control were 65% and 70%, respectively. Severe toxicity was uncommon. The most frequent were leucopenia and cystitis. No treatment-related deaths occurred with either treatment protocol. Conclusions: Conservative combination treatment may be an acceptable alternative to immediate cystectomy in selected patients with bladder cancer, although a randomized clinical trial would be required to produce definitive results

  6. Comparative analysis of contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocity of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Eun Joo; Choi, Byung Jin; Han, Joon Koo; Cha, Joo Hee; Kim, Seung Hyup; Lee, Dong Hyuk

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma with controlled velocities of ultrasound in normal and fatty liver. 31 patient with normal liver and 39 patients with moderate degree of fatty liver were studies with sonography with controlled velocities of ultrasound (1,580 m/sec, 1,540 m/sec, 1,500 m/sec, 1,460 m/sec). Sonographic images were captured with picture grabbing (Sono-PACS) and were recalled with visual C++(Microsoft Redmond. WA, USA). The contrast between hepatic vein and parenchyma was measured and analyzed on each sonographic image. The number of patients with the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 31 patients with normal liver were 5 (16.1%) with 1,580 m/sec, 12 (38.8%) with 1,540 m/sec, 9 (29.0%) with 1,500 m/sec, and 5 (16.1%) with 1,460 m/sec. The number of patients with highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma among the 39 patients with fatty liver were 3 (7.7%) with 1,580 m/sec, 7 (17.9%) with 1,540 m/sec, 12 (30.8%) with 1,500 m/sec and 17 (43.6%) with 1,460 m/sec. The velocity of ultrasound for the highest contrast between hepatic vein and hepatic parenchyma in normal liver was 1,540 m/sec, and 1,460 m/sec in fatty liver.

  7. Predicting the spread of aquatic invaders: insight from 200 years of invasion by zebra mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatayev, Alexander Y; Burlakova, Lyubov E; Mastitsky, Sergey E; Padilla, Dianna K

    2015-03-01

    Understanding factors controlling the introduction and spread of species is crucial to improving the management of both natural populations and introduced species. The zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, is considered the most aggressive freshwater invader in the Northern Hemisphere, and is a convenient model system for invasion biology, offering one of the best aquatic examples for examining the invasion process. We used data on 553 of the 1040 glacial lakes in the Republic of Belarus that were examined for the presence of zebra mussels. We used these data to build, test, and construct modified models to predict the spread of this invader, including selection of important parameters that could limit the spread of this invader. In spite of 200 years of continuous invasion, by 1996, zebra mussels were found in only 16.8% of all lakes studied. Of those lakes without zebra mussels in 1996, 66% were predicted to be susceptible to invasion by zebra mussels in the future, and 33% were predicted to be immune to successful invasion due to their water chemistry. Eighty lakes free of zebra mussels in 1996 were reexamined from 1997 to 2008. Of these, zebra mussels successfully invaded an additional 31 lakes, all of which were classified initially as suitable for zebra mussels; none of the lakes previously classified as unsuitable were invaded. We used the Random Forests classification algorithm with 16 environmental variables to determine the most important factors that differed between invaded lakes and those lakes suitable for invasion that have not yet been invaded. Distance to the nearest infested lakes was found to be the most important variable, followed by the lake area, color, average depth, and concentration of chloride, magnesium, and bicarbonate. This study provides a useful approach for predicting the spread of an invader across a landscape with variable habitat suitability that can be applied to a variety of species and systems.

  8. Alien plant invasions--incorporating emerging invaders in regional prioritization: a pragmatic approach for Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgidi, Theresa N; Le Maitre, David C; Schonegevel, Lucille; Nel, Jeanne L; Rouget, Mathieu; Richardson, David M

    2007-07-01

    Plant invasions are a serious threat to natural and semi-natural ecosystems worldwide. Most management-orientated research on invasions focuses on invaders that are already widespread and often have major impacts. This paper deals with "emerging" invaders-those alien species with the potential to become important problems without timely intervention. A climate matching procedure was developed to define areas of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland that could be invaded by 28 plant species that had previously been classified as emerging invaders. Information on the location of populations of these species in the study area was combined with information on their distributions (as native or alien) in parts of Australia and the United States of America. These two countries had the best available distribution data for this study. They also share many invasive alien plant species with South Africa. Climatic data obtained for weather stations near points of known occurrence in these countries were used to define the climatically suitable areas for each species in the study area. Almost 80% of the remaining natural environment in southern Africa was found to be vulnerable to invasion by at least one of these species, 50% by six or more and 24% by 16 or more species. The most vulnerable areas are the highveld grasslands and the eastern escarpment. The emerging invaders with the greatest potential range included Acacia podalyriifolia and Cortaderia selloana. The globally important invaders Ulex europaeus and Lythrum salicaria had a more limited invasion potential but could still become major invaders. There was no relationship between the extent of the climatically suitable areas for the different species and an expert ranking of their invasion potential, emphasising the uncertainties inherent in making expert assessments based on very little information. The methods used in this analysis establish a protocol for future modelling exercises to assess the invasion potential of

  9. Morphological peculiarity of the renal parenchyma on S10 thin plastinated pig kidneys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pendovski Lazo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the morphological structures on the renal parenchyma on the pig kidneys, prepared in thin slices by S10 sheet plastination method. A total number of 60 kidneys taken form two adult breeds are plastinated in 2mm sagital thin sections. The morphological structure on thin kidney slices is analyzed and their anatomic-topographical relationship is investigated. The prepared thin kidney slices are permanent, flexible, dry, and odorless with smooth surfaces anatomical models with clear distinction between renal medulla and renal cortex. In cross-bread landras/yorkshire, the number of renal pyramids is ranged between 8-14 (average 10.63 while in breed dalland the number is ranged between 8- 13(average 9.94(p>0.05. Three morphological forms are found in pig kidneys based of the variation of adhesion of renal pyramids and derange of their renal papilla into renal pelvis. According the results can be concluded that the S10 sheet plastination method could be used for preparing of thin anatomical models that are suitable for education and research purposes enabling three-dimensional plan view of anatomical structures inside of kidneys.

  10. Areas of normal pulmonary parenchyma on HRCT exhibit increased FDG PET signal in IPF patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Win, Thida; Thomas, Benjamin A.; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hutton, Brian F.; Endozo, Raymondo; Shortman, Robert I.; Afaq, Asim; Ell, Peter J.; Groves, Ashley M.; Screaton, Nicholas J.; Porter, Joanna C.; Maher, Toby M.; Lukey, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) show increased PET signal at sites of morphological abnormality on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the PET signal at sites of normal-appearing lung on HRCT in IPF. Consecutive IPF patients (22 men, 3 women) were prospectively recruited. The patients underwent 18 F-FDG PET/HRCT. The pulmonary imaging findings in the IPF patients were compared to the findings in a control population. Pulmonary uptake of 18 F-FDG (mean SUV) was quantified at sites of morphologically normal parenchyma on HRCT. SUVs were also corrected for tissue fraction (TF). The mean SUV in IPF patients was compared with that in 25 controls (patients with lymphoma in remission or suspected paraneoplastic syndrome with normal PET/CT appearances). The pulmonary SUV (mean ± SD) uncorrected for TF in the controls was 0.48 ± 0.14 and 0.78 ± 0.24 taken from normal lung regions in IPF patients (p 18 F-FDG on PET in areas of lung with a normal morphological appearance on HRCT. This may have implications for determining disease mechanisms and treatment monitoring. (orig.)

  11. Ultrastructure and autoradiography of dormant and activated parenchyma of Helianthus tuberosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favali, M.A.; Sartorato, P.; Serafini-Fracassini, D.

    1984-01-01

    Parenchyma cells of dormant tubers of Helianthus tuberosus L. cv. OB 1 (Jerusalem artichoke) contain a very low amount of hormones, therefore they respond to 2.4-D or IAA treatment by dividing and synthesizing RNA, DNA, and polyamines. In particular the activation of the dormant tissues induces an early synthesis of DNA, which reaches the maximum at 3 hours, much before the beginning of the S phase (12 hours). By supplying [6- 3 H] thymidine and carrying out electron microscopic autoradiography, we were able to determine that plastids and mitochondria were the organelles responsible for this early synthesis while the DNA in the nucleus first appeared labeled at 15 hours. In addition, ultrastructural observations carried out to compare the dormant cells with activated ones, showed an increase in the nucleolar volume, a different organization of the tubular complex of the plastids and several other ultrastructural changes which indicate that at 3 hours some fundamental metabolic processes are already active; they become even more evident later on. The implication of these results in the physiology of the tuber cells during activation are discussed. (Author)

  12. Ultrastructure and autoradiography of dormant and activated parenchyma of Helianthus tuberosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favali, M.A.; Sartorato, P. (Padua Univ. (Italy)); Serafini-Fracassini, D. (Bologna Univ. (Italy))

    1984-01-01

    Parenchyma cells of dormant tubers of Helianthus tuberosus L. cv. OB/sup 1/ (Jerusalem artichoke) contain a very low amount of hormones, therefore they respond to 2.4-D or IAA treatment by dividing and synthesizing RNA, DNA, and polyamines. In particular the activation of the dormant tissues induces an early synthesis of DNA, which reaches the maximum at 3 hours, much before the beginning of the S phase (12 hours). By supplying (6-/sup 3/H) thymidine and carrying out electron microscopic autoradiography, we were able to determine that plastids and mitochondria were the organelles responsible for this early synthesis while the DNA in the nucleus first appeared labeled at 15 hours. In addition, ultrastructural observations carried out to compare the dormant cells with activated ones, showed an increase in the nucleolar volume, a different organization of the tubular complex of the plastids and several other ultrastructural changes which indicate that at 3 hours some fundamental metabolic processes are already active; they become even more evident later on. The implication of these results in the physiology of the tuber cells during activation are discussed.

  13. Neutrophils Infiltrate the Spinal Cord Parenchyma of Rats with Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Newton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal glial cell activation and cytokine secretion have been implicated in the etiology of neuropathic pain in a number of experimental models, including diabetic neuropathy. In this study, streptozotocin- (STZ- induced diabetic rats were either untreated or treated with gabapentin (50 mg/kg/day by gavage for 2 weeks, from 6 weeks after STZ. At 8 weeks after STZ, hypersensitivity was confirmed in the untreated diabetic rats as a reduced response threshold to touch, whilst mechanical thresholds in gabapentin-treated diabetic rats were no different from controls. Diabetes-associated thermal hypersensitivity was also ameliorated by gabapentin. We performed a cytokine profiling array in lumbar spinal cord samples from control and diabetic rats. This revealed an increase in L-selectin, an adhesion molecule important for neutrophil transmigration, in the spinal cord of diabetic rats but not diabetic rats treated with gabapentin. Furthermore, we found an increase in the number of neutrophils present in the parenchyma of the spinal cord, which was again ameliorated in gabapentin-treated diabetic rats. Therefore, we suggest that dysregulated spinal L-selectin and neutrophil infiltration into the spinal cord could contribute to the pathogenesis of painful diabetic neuropathy.

  14. Effects of BST and high energy diet on gene expression in mammary parenchyma of dairy heifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Joyce Lew

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of dietary energy and recombinant bovine somatotropin (bST injection to identify genes that might control mammogenesis. Total RNA was extracted from the parenchymal tissue of 32 heifers randomly assigned to one of four treatments: two diets (a standard diet and a high energy, high protein diet, each with or without bST. To perform microarray experiments, RNA samples were pooled (2 animals/pool before reverse transcription and labeling with Cy3 or Cy5. A 4-node loop design was used to examine the differential gene expression among treatments using a bovine-specific cDNA microarray (National Bovine Functional Genomics Consortium Library, NBFGC containing 18,263 unique expressed sequence tags (EST. Significance levels of differential gene expression among treatments were assessed using a mixed model approach. Injection of bST altered the expression of 12 % of the genes on NBFGC slide related to tissue development, whereas 6% were altered by diet. Administration of bST increases the expression of genes positively related to cell proliferation and mammary parenchyma to a greater extent than a high energy diet.

  15. Areas of normal pulmonary parenchyma on HRCT exhibit increased FDG PET signal in IPF patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Win, Thida [Lister Hospital, Respiratory Medicine, Stevenage (United Kingdom); Thomas, Benjamin A.; Lambrou, Tryphon; Hutton, Brian F.; Endozo, Raymondo; Shortman, Robert I.; Afaq, Asim; Ell, Peter J.; Groves, Ashley M. [University College London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Screaton, Nicholas J. [Papworth Hospital, Radiology Department, Papworth Everard (United Kingdom); Porter, Joanna C. [University College London, Centre for Respiratory Diseases, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Maher, Toby M. [Royal Brompton Hospital, Interstitial Lung Disease Unit, London (United Kingdom); Lukey, Pauline [GSK, Fibrosis DPU, Research and Development, Stevenage (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) show increased PET signal at sites of morphological abnormality on high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). The purpose of this investigation was to investigate the PET signal at sites of normal-appearing lung on HRCT in IPF. Consecutive IPF patients (22 men, 3 women) were prospectively recruited. The patients underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/HRCT. The pulmonary imaging findings in the IPF patients were compared to the findings in a control population. Pulmonary uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG (mean SUV) was quantified at sites of morphologically normal parenchyma on HRCT. SUVs were also corrected for tissue fraction (TF). The mean SUV in IPF patients was compared with that in 25 controls (patients with lymphoma in remission or suspected paraneoplastic syndrome with normal PET/CT appearances). The pulmonary SUV (mean ± SD) uncorrected for TF in the controls was 0.48 ± 0.14 and 0.78 ± 0.24 taken from normal lung regions in IPF patients (p < 0.001). The TF-corrected mean SUV in the controls was 2.24 ± 0.29 and 3.24 ± 0.84 in IPF patients (p < 0.001). IPF patients have increased pulmonary uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG on PET in areas of lung with a normal morphological appearance on HRCT. This may have implications for determining disease mechanisms and treatment monitoring. (orig.)

  16. Resistance to alveolar shape change limits range of force propagation in lung parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Smith, Bradford J; Bates, Jason H T

    2015-06-01

    We have recently shown that if the lung parenchyma is modeled in 2 dimensions as a network of springs arranged in a pattern of repeating hexagonal cells, the distortional forces around a contracting airway propagate much further from the airway wall than classic continuum theory predicts. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that this occurs because of the negligible shear modulus of a hexagonal spring network. We simulated the narrowing of an airway embedded in a hexagonal network of elastic alveolar walls when the hexagonal cells of the network offered some resistance to a change in shape. We found that as the forces resisting shape change approach about 10% of the forces resisting length change of an individual spring the range of distortional force propagation in the spring network fell of rapidly as in an elastic continuum. We repeated these investigations in a 3-dimensional spring network composed of space-filling polyhedral cells and found similar results. This suggests that force propagation away from a point of local parenchymal distortion also falls off rapidly in real lung tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Agrin in Alzheimer's Disease: Altered Solubility and Abnormal Distribution within Microvasculature and Brain Parenchyma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, John E.; Berzin, Tyler M.; Rafii, Michael S.; Glass, David J.; Yancopoulos, George D.; Fallon, Justin R.; Stopa, Edward G.

    1999-05-01

    Agrin is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan that is widely expressed in neurons and microvascular basal lamina in the rodent and avian central nervous system. Agrin induces the differentiation of nerve-muscle synapses, but its function in either normal or diseased brains is not known. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by loss of synapses, changes in microvascular architecture, and formation of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques. Here we have asked whether AD causes changes in the distribution and biochemical properties of agrin. Immunostaining of normal, aged human central nervous system revealed that agrin is expressed in neurons in multiple brain areas. Robust agrin immunoreactivity was observed uniformly in the microvascular basal lamina. In AD brains, agrin is highly concentrated in both diffuse and neuritic plaques as well as neurofibrillary tangles; neuronal expression of agrin also was observed. Furthermore, patients with AD had microvascular alterations characterized by thinning and fragmentation of the basal lamina. Detergent extraction and Western blotting showed that virtually all the agrin in normal brain is soluble in 1% SDS. In contrast, a large fraction of the agrin in AD brains is insoluble under these conditions, suggesting that it is tightly associated with β -amyloid. Together, these data indicate that the agrin abnormalities observed in AD are closely linked to β -amyloid deposition. These observations suggest that altered agrin expression in the microvasculature and the brain parenchyma contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

  18. Related B cell clones populate the meninges and parenchyma of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Laura; Willis, Simon N; Rodig, Scott J; Caron, Tyler; Almendinger, Stefany E; Howell, Owain W; Reynolds, Richard; O'Connor, Kevin C; Hafler, David A

    2011-02-01

    In the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis, B cell aggregates populate the meninges, raising the central question as to whether these structures relate to the B cell infiltrates found in parenchymal lesions or instead, represent a separate central nervous system immune compartment. We characterized the repertoires derived from meningeal B cell aggregates and the corresponding parenchymal infiltrates from brain tissue derived primarily from patients with progressive multiple sclerosis. The majority of expanded antigen-experienced B cell clones derived from meningeal aggregates were also present in the parenchyma. We extended this investigation to include 20 grey matter specimens containing meninges, 26 inflammatory plaques, 19 areas of normal appearing white matter and cerebral spinal fluid. Analysis of 1833 B cell receptor heavy chain variable region sequences demonstrated that antigen-experienced clones were consistently shared among these distinct compartments. This study establishes a relationship between extraparenchymal lymphoid tissue and parenchymal infiltrates and defines the arrangement of B cell clones that populate the central nervous system of patients with multiple sclerosis.

  19. Contrast between hypervascularized liver lesions and hepatic parenchyma. Early dynamic PET versus contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freesmeyer, M.; Winkens, T.; Schierz, J.-H.

    2014-01-01

    To detect hypervascularized liver lesions, early dynamic (ED) 18 F-FDG PET may be an alternative when contrast-enhanced (CE) imaging is infeasible. This retrospective pilot analysis compared contrast between such lesions and liver parenchyma, an important objective image quality variable, in ED PET versus CE CT. Twenty-eight hypervascularized liver lesions detected by CE CT [21 (75%) hepatocellular carcinomas; mean (range) diameter 4.9 ± 3.5 (1-14) cm] in 20 patients were scanned with ED PET. Using regions of interest, maximum and mean lesional and parenchymal signals at baseline, arterial and venous phases were calculated for ED PET and CE CT. Lesional/parenchymal signal ratio was significantly higher (P < 0.005) with ED PET versus CE CT at the arterial phase and similar between the methods at the venous phase. In liver imaging, ED PET generates greater lesional-parenchymal contrast during the arterial phase than does CE CT; these observations should be formally, prospectively evaluated. (author)

  20. Bone tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumor - bone; Bone cancer; Primary bone tumor; Secondary bone tumor; Bone tumor - benign ... The cause of bone tumors is unknown. They often occur in areas of the bone that grow rapidly. Possible causes include: Genetic defects ...

  1. Pediatric brain tumors; Kindliche Hirntumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reith, W.; Bodea, S. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Muehl-Benninghaus, R.

    2017-09-15

    Brain tumors differ between children and adults both in histology and localization. Malignant gliomas and meningiomas predominate in adults while medulloblastomas and low-grade astrocytomas are the most frequent brain tumors in children. More than one half (50-70%) of pediatric brain tumors have an infratentorial location but only approximately 30% in adults. Brain tumors can be recognized in sonography, cranial computed tomography (CCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) by their space-consuming character and by their divergent density and intensity in comparison to normal brain parenchyma. They can grow extrusively, even infiltrate the parenchyma or originate from it. Besides clinical symptoms and diagnostics this article describes the most common pediatric brain tumors, i.e. astrocytoma, medulloblastoma, brainstem glioma, craniopharyngioma, neurofibromatosis and ganglioglioma. The most important imaging criteria are outlined. (orig.) [German] Sowohl Histologie als auch Lokalisation von Hirntumoren unterscheiden sich bei Kindern und Erwachsenen. Waehrend maligne Gliome und Meningeome bei Erwachsenen vorherrschen, kommen bei Kindern ueberwiegend Medulloblastome und niedriggradige Astrozytome vor. Mehr als die Haelfte (50-70 %) aller kindlichen Hirntumoren sind infratentoriell lokalisiert, dagegen sind es bei Erwachsenen nur etwa 30 %. Im Ultraschall, in der kranialen CT (CCT) oder MRT koennen Hirntumoren durch ihren raumfordernden Charakter und ihrer zum normalen Parenchym abweichenden Dichte oder Signalintensitaet erkannt werden. Sie koennen verdraengend wachsen, z. T. auch das Parenchym infiltrieren oder von diesem ausgehen. Neben der klinischen Symptomatik und Diagnostik werden im vorliegenden Artikel die haeufigsten kindlichen Hirntumoren, das Astrozytom, Medulloblastom, Hirnstammgliom, Kraniopharyngeom, die Neurofibromatose und das Gangliogliom beschrieben. Die wichtigsten bildgebende Kriterien werden dargestellt. (orig.)

  2. Extended resections of non-small cell lung cancers invading the aorta, pulmonary artery, left atrium, or esophagus: can they be justified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Emily S; Schrump, David S

    2014-11-01

    T4 tumors that invade the heart, great vessels, or esophagus comprise a heterogenous group of locally invasive lung cancers. Prognosis depends on nodal status; this relationship has been consistently demonstrated in many of the small series of extended resection. Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines do not recommend surgery for T4 extension with N2-3 disease (stage IIIB). However, biopsy-proven T4 N0-1 (stage IIIA) may be operable. Localized tumors with invasion of the aorta, pulmonary artery, left atrium, or esophagus represent a small subset of T4 disease. Acquiring sufficient randomized data to provide statistical proof of a survival advantage for patients undergoing extended resections for these neoplasms will likely never be possible.Therefore, we are left to critically analyze current documented experience to make clinical decisions on a case-by-case basis.It is clear that the operative morbidity and mortality of extended resections for locally advanced T4 tumors have significantly improved over time,yet the risks are still high. The indications for such procedures and the anticipated outcomes should be clearly weighed in terms of potential perioperative complications and expertise of the surgical team. Patients with T4 N0-1 have the best prognosis and with complete resection may have the potential for cure. The use of induction therapy and surgery for advanced T4 tumors may improve survival. Current data suggest that for tumors that invade the aorta, pulmonary artery,left atrium, or esophagus, resection should be considered in relation to multidisciplinary care.For properly selected patients receiving treatment at high volume, experienced centers, extended resections may be warranted. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Single source dual energy CT: What is the optimal monochromatic energy level for the analysis of the lung parenchyma?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, M., E-mail: mickael.ohana@gmail.com [iCube Laboratory, Université de Strasbourg/CNRS, UMR 7357, 67400 Illkirch (France); Service de Radiologie B, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Labani, A., E-mail: aissam.labani@chru-strasbourg.fr [Service de Radiologie B, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Severac, F., E-mail: francois.severac@chru-strasbourg.fr [Département de Biostatistiques et d’Informatique Médicale, Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg,1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Jeung, M.Y., E-mail: Mi-Young.Jeung@chru-strasbourg.fr [Service de Radiologie B, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, 1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Gaertner, S., E-mail: Sebastien.Gaertner@chru-strasbourg.fr [Service de Médecine Vasculaire, Nouvel Hôpital Civil – Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg,1 place de l’hôpital, 67000 Strasbourg (France); and others

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Lung parenchyma aspect varies with the monochromatic energy level in spectral CT. • Optimal diagnostic and image quality is obtained at 50–55 keV. • Mediastinum and parenchyma could be read on the same monochromatic energy level. - Abstract: Objective: To determine the optimal monochromatic energy level for lung parenchyma analysis in spectral CT. Methods: All 50 examinations (58% men, 64.8 ± 16yo) from an IRB-approved prospective study on single-source dual energy chest CT were retrospectively included and analyzed. Monochromatic images in lung window reconstructed every 5 keV from 40 to 140 keV were independently assessed by two chest radiologists. Based on the overall image quality and the depiction/conspicuity of parenchymal lesions, each reader had to designate for every patient the keV level providing the best diagnostic and image quality. Results: 72% of the examinations exhibited parenchymal lesions. Reader 1 picked the 55 keV monochromatic reconstruction in 52% of cases, 50 in 30% and 60 in 18%. Reader 2 chose 50 keV in 52% cases, 55 in 40%, 60 in 6% and 40 in 2%. The 50 and 55 keV levels were chosen by at least one reader in 64% and 76% of all patients, respectively. Merging 50 and 55 keV into one category results in an optimal setting selected by reader 1 in 82% of patients and by reader 2 in 92%, with a 74% concomitant agreement. Conclusion: The best image quality for lung parenchyma in spectral CT is obtained with the 50–55 keV monochromatic reconstructions.

  4. Infarction and Laceration of Liver Parenchyma Caused by Wedged CO{sub 2} Venography Before TIPS Insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theuerkauf, Ingo [Department of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Strunk, Holger [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Brensing, Karl August [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Schild, Hans Heinz [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany); Pfeifer, Ulrich [Department of Pathology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, D-53127 Bonn (Germany)

    2001-01-15

    We describe the fatal outcome of an elective TIPS procedure performed in a 43-year-old man with alcoholic cirrhosis. Wedged hepatic venography with CO{sub 2} was the reason for infarction and laceration of liver parenchyma resulting in a subcapsular hematoma and subsequent intra-abdominal bleeding. This is the first report of this complication after the use of CO{sub 2} in a cirrhotic patient.

  5. Pulmonary parenchyma segmentation in thin CT image sequences with spectral clustering and geodesic active contour model based on similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Nana; Zhang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Juanjuan; Zhao, Huilan; Qiang, Yan

    2017-07-01

    While the popular thin layer scanning technology of spiral CT has helped to improve diagnoses of lung diseases, the large volumes of scanning images produced by the technology also dramatically increase the load of physicians in lesion detection. Computer-aided diagnosis techniques like lesions segmentation in thin CT sequences have been developed to address this issue, but it remains a challenge to achieve high segmentation efficiency and accuracy without much involvement of human manual intervention. In this paper, we present our research on automated segmentation of lung parenchyma with an improved geodesic active contour model that is geodesic active contour model based on similarity (GACBS). Combining spectral clustering algorithm based on Nystrom (SCN) with GACBS, this algorithm first extracts key image slices, then uses these slices to generate an initial contour of pulmonary parenchyma of un-segmented slices with an interpolation algorithm, and finally segments lung parenchyma of un-segmented slices. Experimental results show that the segmentation results generated by our method are close to what manual segmentation can produce, with an average volume overlap ratio of 91.48%.

  6. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Baghirov

    Full Text Available The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma.

  7. Transtemporal Investigation of Brain Parenchyma Elasticity Using 2-D Shear Wave Elastography: Definition of Age-Matched Normal Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Michael; Raasch, Nele; Hammel, Gertrud; Harter, Katharina; Lang, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    The goal of our research was to assess the possibility of reliable investigation of brain tissue stiffness using ultrasonographic brain parenchyma elastography with an intact temporal bone. We enrolled 108 patients after exclusion of intracranial pathology or healthy volunteers. All patients were subdivided by age into groups: 20-40, 40-60 and >60 y. For statistical analysis, the χ 2 test and t-test were used. The mean values, regardless of age and other parameters, were 3.34 kPa (SD = 0.59) on the left side and 3.33 kPa (SD = 0.58) on the right side. We found no correlation between the values, body mass index (r = 0.07, p = 0.48) and sex (t = -0.11, p = 0.91), but we observed a highly significant correlation between the values and age (r = 0.43, p <0.0001). We found ultrasonographic brain parenchyma elastography to be a valid, reproducible and investigator-independent method that reliably determines brain parenchyma stiffness. Normal values should serve as a reference for studies on various intracranial lesions. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ultrasound-mediated delivery and distribution of polymeric nanoparticles in the normal brain parenchyma of a metastatic brain tumour model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghirov, Habib; Snipstad, Sofie; Sulheim, Einar; Berg, Sigrid; Hansen, Rune; Thorsen, Frits; Mørch, Yrr; Åslund, Andreas K. O.

    2018-01-01

    The treatment of brain diseases is hindered by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) preventing most drugs from entering the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can open the BBB safely and reversibly. Systemic drug injection might induce toxicity, but encapsulation into nanoparticles reduces accumulation in normal tissue. Here we used a novel platform based on poly(2-ethyl-butyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles to permeabilize the BBB in a melanoma brain metastasis model. With a dual-frequency ultrasound transducer generating FUS at 1.1 MHz and 7.8 MHz, we opened the BBB using nanoparticle-microbubbles and low-frequency FUS, and applied high-frequency FUS to generate acoustic radiation force and push nanoparticles through the extracellular matrix. Using confocal microscopy and image analysis, we quantified nanoparticle extravasation and distribution in the brain parenchyma. We also evaluated haemorrhage, as well as the expression of P-glycoprotein, a key BBB component. FUS and microbubbles distributed nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma, and the distribution depended on the extent of BBB opening. The results from acoustic radiation force were not conclusive, but in a few animals some effect could be detected. P-glycoprotein was not significantly altered immediately after sonication. In summary, FUS with our nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles can achieve accumulation and displacement of nanoparticles in the brain parenchyma. PMID:29338016

  9. Ultrastructural changes in aster yellows phytoplasma affected Limonium sinuatum Mill. plants II. Pathology of cortex parenchyma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Limonium sinuatum Mill, plants with severe symptoms of aster yellows infection phytoplasmas were present not only in the phloem but also in some cortex parenchymas cells. These parenchyma cells were situated at some distance from the conducting bundles. The phytoplasmas were observed directly in parenchyma cells cytoplasm. The number of phytoplasmas present in each selected cell varies. The cells with a small number of phytoplasmas show little pathological changes compared with the unaffected cells of the same zone of the stem as well with the cells of healthy plants. The cells filled with a number of phytoplasmas had their protoplast very much changed. The vacuole was reduced and in the cytoplasm a reduction of the number of ribosomes was noted and regions of homogenous structure appeared. Mitochondria were moved in the direction of the tonoplast and plasma membrane. Compared to the cells unaffected by phytoplasma, the mitochondria were smaller and had an enlarged cristae internal space. The chloroplasts from affected cells had a very significant reduction in size and the tylacoids system had disappeared. The role of these changes for creating phytoplasma friendly enviroment is discused.

  10. Native birds and alien insects: spatial density dependence in songbird predation of invading oak gallwasps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Schönrogge

    Full Text Available Revealing the interactions between alien species and native communities is central to understanding the ecological consequences of range expansion. Much has been learned through study of the communities developing around invading herbivorous insects. Much less, however, is known about the significance of such aliens for native vertebrate predators for which invaders may represent a novel food source. We quantified spatial patterns in native bird predation of invading gall-inducing Andricus wasps associated with introduced Turkey oak (Quercus cerris at eight sites across the UK. These gallwasps are available at high density before the emergence of caterpillars that are the principle spring food of native insectivorous birds. Native birds showed positive spatial density dependence in gall attack rates at two sites in southern England, foraging most extensively on trees with highest gall densities. In a subsequent study at one of these sites, positive spatial density dependence persisted through four of five sequential week-long periods of data collection. Both patterns imply that invading galls are a significant resource for at least some native bird populations. Density dependence was strongest in southern UK bird populations that have had longest exposure to the invading gallwasps. We hypothesise that this pattern results from the time taken for native bird populations to learn how to exploit this novel resource.

  11. Knock down of HIF-1α in glioma cells reduces migration in vitro and invasion in vivo and impairs their ability to form tumor spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esencay Mine

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and malignant primary intracranial human neoplasm. GBMs are characterized by the presence of extensive areas of necrosis and hypoxia. Hypoxia and its master regulator, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 play a key role in glioma invasion. Results To further elucidate the functional role of HIF-1α in glioma cell migration in vitro and in invasion in vivo, we used a shRNA approach to knock down HIF-1α expression complemented with genome-wide expression profiling, performed in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Our data show that knock down of HIF-1α in glioma cells significantly impairs their migration in vitro as well as their ability to invade into the brain parenchyma in vivo. Next, we assessed the role that HIF-1α plays in maintaining the characteristics of cancer stem cells (CSCs. By using the tumor sphere forming assay, we demonstrate that HIF-1α plays a role in the survival and self-renewal potential of CSCs. Finally, expression profiling experiments in glioma cells provided detailed insight into a broad range of specific biological pathways and processes downstream of HIF-1α. We discuss the role of these processes in the migratory and invasive properties, as well as the stem cell biology of glioblastomas Conclusions Our data show that knock down of HIF-1α in human and murine glioma cells impairs their migration in vitro and their invasion in vivo. In addition, our data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in the survival and self-renewal potential of CSCs and identify genes that might further elucidate the role of HIF-1α in tumor migration, invasion and stem cell biology.

  12. [A case of sigmoid colon cancer invading urinary bladder treated with preoperative mFOLFOX6 and urinary bladder conserving surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Takeshi; Katayama, Kazuhisa; Takahashi, Yuji; Tanaka, Takashi

    2012-02-01

    A 69-year-old man visited our hospital because of melena and anemia. Colonoscopy revealed a type 3 tumor at sigmoid colon, and by abdominal CT, we detected a sigmoid colon cancer invading the urinary bladder with a single liver metastasis. The patient required sigmoidectomy with partial hepatectomy and total urinary bladder resection. Preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was initiated as a part of multidisciplinary therapy. After the 6th course was completed, CT revealed a reduction in the primary tumor's size and the disappearance of liver metastasis. After the 8th course was completed, we performed urinary bladder conserving sigmoidectomy. The pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was tub1, pSS, ly0, v0, pN0, and pStage II. Down-sizing chemotherapy might improve the quality of life(QOL)of colon cancer patients with extensive invasion of the urinary bladder.

  13. Effect of gamma irradiated parenchyma on the growth of irradiated potato tuber buds; Efecto del parenquina irradiado sobre el desarrollo de las yemas de tuberculos de patata tratados por radiacion GAMMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Gonzalez, J; Garcia Collantes, M A

    1976-07-01

    The development of buds greffed on irradiated potato parenchyma was studied. The irradiated parenchyma does not influence the sprouting capacity of buds, but it affects the way they develop. (Author) 9 refs.

  14. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unni, K.K.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on bone tumors. Topics covered include: Bone tumor imaging: Contribution of CT and MRI, staging of bone tumors, perind cell tumors of bone, and metastatic bone disease

  15. MRI diagnosis of tongue tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minowa, Kazuyuki; Abe, Satoru; Ohmori, Keiichi; Hosokawa, Yoichirou; Yamasaki, Michio; Hirano, Masayasu.

    1992-01-01

    MRI studies were performed on 29 patients with tongue tumors. Twenty-six cases were fresh, others were recurrent. Signal intensity of tongue tumor was not characteristic and specific, and it was a low∼iso signal on T1 weighted image (WI), heterogeneously iso∼high signal intensity on T2 WI, heterogeneous enhancement on gadolinium-DTPA enhanced image compared to muscle signal intensity. In 3 of 29 patients, the tongue tumor invaded to the mandible. With regard to the grasping tumor invasion to the mandible, the STIR method was superior to T1, T2 WI of the spin echo method. Dynamic enhanced MR images were performed in 6 of 29 patients. Dynamic change of signal intensity after gadolinium-DTPA administration were assessed with fast low angle shot imaging. On dynamic study at about 20 seconds after gadolinium-DTPA injection, the first signal intensity in the periphery of the tumor gradually began to increase. Maximum signal intensity of the tumor showed at about 70 seconds after gadolinium-DTPA injection. In search from 0 to 5 minutes, after the tongue tumor showed maximum signal intensity, its signal maintain the maximum. Necrotic and peritumorous edema showed a significantly lower and more gradual increase in signal intensity than adjacent neoplastic tissue on dynamic enhanced MRI. (author)

  16. Cancer intravasation-on-a-chip : a LEGO house for tumors!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eslami Amirabadi, H.; Sahebali, Sh.; Miggiels, A.L.W.; Frimat, J.Ph.; Luttge, R.; den Toonder, J.

    2015-01-01

    The process where cancer cells leave the primary tumor and invade to the blood vessel. As shown in figure 1, intravasation is highly regulated by the micro-environment of the tumor. An important component of the micro-environment is the extracellular matrix (ECM) which can be seen as the building

  17. Skull base tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikinis, R.; Matsumae, M.; Jolesz, F.A.; Black, P.M.; Cline, H.E.; Lorenson, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an image processing procedure for the planning of surgery of skull base tumors that can extract bone, vessels, tumor, and brain parenchyma and that permits resolution of cranial nerves. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions were generated from double-echo long TR interleaved conventional spin-echo and fast-spin-echo MR imaging data. Sixteen cases have been analyzed preoperatively. Image processing consisted of a multistep procedure combining a supervised multivariate analysis with neighborhood operations such as connectivity and erosion/dilation. 3D renderings of anatomic structures of interest were then generated. Cases were evaluated preoperatively and manipulated interactively with the computer-generated images by a team consisting of neuroradiologists, neurosurgeons, and craniofacial surgeons. The preparation of 3D reconstructions required only a few hours and was performed mostly by a research assistant. The preoperative analysis of the 3D reconstructions was found to be a valuable tool, providing information complementing the surgeon's understanding of a case as derived from conventional imaging. The interactive manipulation of data proved to be a powerful way to evaluate alternative surgical approaches

  18. Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor of the brain without tumor-induced osteomalacia in an 8-year-old girl: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Mark B; Gridley, Daniel; Lal, Suresh; Nair, Geetha R; Feiz-Erfan, Iman

    2016-05-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor (mixed connective tissue variant) (PMT-MCT) are tumors that may cause tumor-induced osteomalacia and rarely appear intracranially. The authors describe the case of an 8-year-old girl who was found to have PMT-MCT with involvement of the cerebellar hemisphere and a small tumor pedicle breaching the dura mater and involving the skull. This was removed surgically in gross-total fashion without further complication. Histologically the tumor was confirmed to be a PMT-MCT. There was no evidence of tumor-induced osteomalacia. At the 42-month follow-up, the patient is doing well, has no abnormalities, and is free of recurrence. PMT-MCTs are rare tumors that may involve the brain parenchyma. A gross-total resection may be effective to cure these lesions.

  19. Plasma Cell Type of Castleman's Disease Involving Renal Parenchyma and Sinus with Cardiac Tamponade: Case Report and Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Un; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Jeon, Ung Bae; Ha, Hong Gu; Shin, Dong Hoon [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Castleman's disease is an uncommon disorder characterized by benign proliferation of the lymphoid tissue that occurs most commonly in the mediastinum. Although unusual locations and manifestations have been reported, involvement of the renal parenchyma and sinus, and moreover, manifestations as cardiac tamponade are extremely rare. Here, we present a rare case of Castleman's disease in the renal parenchyma and sinus that also accompanied cardiac tamponade.

  20. Dynamic-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cirrhotic liver parenchyma: A comparison between gadolinium–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and gadolinium–ethoxybenzyl–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yi Lin

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: The enhancement effect of the liver parenchyma using both MRI contrast agents was not affected by the degree of liver cirrhosis or abnormal liver function. However, it was affected by the serum-bilirubin levels in the Gd–EOB–DTPA-enhanced MRIs. Furthermore, enhancement of the liver was higher when using Gd–EOB–DTPA in the VP, DP, and HP. This knowledge is helpful when performing dynamic MRIs to diagnose focal hepatic lesions in the heterogeneous liver parenchyma.

  1. Impact of invading alien plants on surface water resources in South Africa: a preliminary assessment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Maitre, David C

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available areas (the equivalent area with a canopy cover of 100%). Each of the invading species was classified as a tall shrub, medium tree or tall tree - based on growth form and likely water use - and its biomass was estimated from a function based on vegetation...

  2. Prescribed fire opportunities in grasslands invaded by Douglas-fir: state-of-the-art guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    George E. Gruell; James K. Brown; Charles L. Bushey

    1986-01-01

    Provides information on use of prescribed fire to enhance productivity of bunchgrass ranges that have been invaded by Douglas-fir. Six vegetative "situations" representative of treatment opportunities most commonly encountered in Montana are discussed. Included are fire prescription considerations and identification of the resource objective, fire objective,...

  3. Comparing methods for measuring the rate of spread of invading populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marius Gilbert; Andrew. Liebhold

    2010-01-01

    Measuring rates of spread during biological invasions is important for predicting where and when invading organisms will spread in the future as well as for quantifying the influence of environmental conditions on invasion speed. While several methods have been proposed in the literature to measure spread rates, a comprehensive comparison of their accuracy when applied...

  4. Strategic management of five deciduous forest invaders using Microstegium vimineum as a model species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cynthia D. Huebner

    2007-01-01

    This paper links key plant invasive traits with key landscape traits to define strategic management for five common forest invaders, using empirical data of Microstegium vimineum dispersal into forests as a preliminary model. Microstegium vimineum exhibits an Allee effect that may allow management to focus on treating its source...

  5. Habitat shift in invading species: Zebra and quagga mussel population characteristics on shallow soft substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, P.A.; Garton, D.W.; Haltuch, M.A.; Kennedy, G.W.; Febo, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    Unexpected habitat innovations among invading species are illustrated by the expansion of dreissenid mussels across sedimentary environments in shallow water unlike the hard substrates where they are conventionally known. In this note, records of population characteristics of invading zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (Dreissena bugensis) mussels from 1994 through 1998 are reported from shallow (less than 20 m) sedimentary habitats in western Lake Erie. Haphazard SCUBA collections of these invading species indicated that combined densities of zebra and quagga mussels ranged from 0 to 32,500 individuals per square meter between 1994 and 1998, with D. polymorpha comprising 75-100% of the assemblages. These mixed mussel populations, which were attached by byssal threads to each other and underlying sand-grain sediments, had size-frequency distributions that were typical of colonizing populations on hard substrates. Moreover, the presence of two mussel cohorts within the 1994 samples indicated that these species began expanding onto soft substrates not later than 1992, within 4 years of their initial invasion in western Lake Erie. Such historical data provide baselines for interpreting adaptive innovations, ecological interactions and habitat shifts among the two invading dreissenid mussel species in North America.

  6. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  7. Plant invasions in the Czech Republic: current state, introduction dynamics, invasive species and invaded habitats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pyšek, Petr; Chytrý, M.; Pergl, Jan; Sádlo, Jiří; Wild, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 3 (2012), s. 575-629 ISSN 0032-7786 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/1028 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : invasive species * invaded habitats * Czech Republic Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.833, year: 2012

  8. The pathway of subarachnoid CSF moving into the spinal parenchyma and the role of astrocytic aquaporin-4 in this process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fang; Zhang, Cui; Xue, Rong; Shan, Lidong; Gong, Shan; Wang, Guoqing; Tao, Jin; Xu, Guangyin; Zhang, Guoxing; Wang, Linhui

    2017-08-01

    It has been proved that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the subarachnoid space could reenter the brain parenchyma via the perivascular space. The present study was designed to explore the pathway of subarachnoid CSF flux into the spinal cord and the potential role of aquaporin-4 (AQP4) in this process. Fluorescently tagged cadaverine, for the first time, was used to study CSF movement in mice. Following intracisternal infusion of CSF tracers, the cervical spinal cord was sliced and prepared for fluorescence imaging. Some sections were subject with immunostaining in order to observe tracer distribution and AQP4 expression. Fluorescently tagged cadaverine rapidly entered the spinal cord. Tracer influx into the spinal parenchyma was time dependent. At 10min post-infusion, cadaverine was largely distributed in the superficial tissue adjacent to the pial surface. At 70min post-infusion, cadaverine was distributed in the whole cord and especially concentrated in the gray matter. Furthermore, fluorescent tracer could enter the spinal parenchyma either along the perivascular space or across the pial surface. AQP4 was observed highly expressed in the astrocytic endfeet surrounding blood vessels and the pial surface. Blocking AQP4 by its specific inhibitor TGN-020 strikingly reduced the inflow of CSF tracers into the spinal cord. Subarachnoid CSF could flow into the spinal cord along the perivascular space or across the pial surface, in which AQP4 is involved. Our observation provides a basis for the study on CSF movement in the spinal cord when some neurological diseases occur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global Invader Impact Network (GIIN): toward standardized evaluation of the ecological impacts of invasive plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Jacob N; Tekiela, Daniel R; Barrios-Garcia, Maria Noelia; Dimarco, Romina D; Hufbauer, Ruth A; Leipzig-Scott, Peter; Nuñez, Martin A; Pauchard, Aníbal; Pyšek, Petr; Vítková, Michaela; Maxwell, Bruce D

    2015-07-01

    Terrestrial invasive plants are a global problem and are becoming ubiquitous components of most ecosystems. They are implicated in altering disturbance regimes, reducing biodiversity, and changing ecosystem function, sometimes in profound and irreversible ways. However, the ecological impacts of most invasive plants have not been studied experimentally, and most research to date focuses on few types of impacts, which can vary greatly among studies. Thus, our knowledge of existing ecological impacts ascribed to invasive plants is surprisingly limited in both breadth and depth. Our aim was to propose a standard methodology for quantifying baseline ecological impact that, in theory, is scalable to any terrestrial plant invader (e.g., annual grasses to trees) and any invaded system (e.g., grassland to forest). The Global Invader Impact Network (GIIN) is a coordinated distributed experiment composed of an observational and manipulative methodology. The protocol consists of a series of plots located in (1) an invaded area; (2) an adjacent removal treatment within the invaded area; and (3) a spatially separate uninvaded area thought to be similar to pre-invasion conditions of the invaded area. A standardized and inexpensive suite of community, soil, and ecosystem metrics are collected allowing broad comparisons among measurements, populations, and species. The method allows for one-time comparisons and for long-term monitoring enabling one to derive information about change due to invasion over time. Invader removal plots will also allow for quantification of legacy effects and their return rates, which will be monitored for several years. GIIN uses a nested hierarchical scale approach encompassing multiple sites, regions, and continents. Currently, GIIN has network members in six countries, with new members encouraged. To date, study species include representatives of annual and perennial grasses; annual and perennial forbs; shrubs; and trees. The goal of the GIIN

  10. Contrast amplification of the liver parenchyma in the computer tomogram by using intravenous and peroral biliary contrast media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justich, E.; Sager, W.D.; Dietrich, G.; Fotter, R.; Nedden, D. zur; Innsbruck Univ.

    1980-01-01

    If intravenous, biliary contrast media are used, a slight albeit specific enhancement of contrast of the liver parenchyma occurs with the applied dosage, which can be utilised in individual cases, for example for identifying isodense lesions. Contrast amplification by the peroral cholegraphic agent under examination, is insufficient for use in computer tomography of the liver. The use of biliary contrast media usually enables very good visualisation of the extrahepatic bile ducts. Attention is drawn to the possibility of pharmakokinetic studies by means of computer tomography. (orig.) [de

  11. The compartments of the parenchyma of the lymph nodes in newborn bull calves of domestic cattle (Bos taurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Gavrilin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the features of the structure of the lymphoid lobules of the parenchyma of the superficial somatic (Limphonodi subiliaci, L. cervicales superficiales, profund somatic (L. axillares proprii L. poplitei, somatovisceral (L. iliaci mediales, L. retropharyngei mediales and visceral (L. mediastinales caudales, L. ileocolici lymph nodes of newborn bull calves of domestic cattle. To visualize clearly the boundaries of the structural components of lymphoid lobules we used the author’s modification of the impregnation of total median frozen histological sections with silver nitrate. We have established a high level of tissue differentiation of the lymph nodes, a significant development of the lymphoid parenchyma, the division of the parenchyma into lymphoid lobules, the presence in the lobules of all the main structural components that are represented by two morphotypes. The first morphotype is ribbon-like perisinusoidal cords (interfollicular zone, paracortical and medullary cords. The second morphotype is rounded lymphoid formations (central zones of deep cortex units, lymphatic nodules. Lymphoid lobules are located along the marginal sinus in one row, they are better developed and differentiated in the visceral lymph nodes. In all the lymph nodes, the lymphoid lobules have a similar histoarchitectonic, and each structural component of the lymphoid lobules has a specific architectonic of the reticular meshwork and the density of the location of the fibroblastic reticulocytes. We determined that the structures of the first morphotype which provide the migration of lymphocytes, the detection of antigens and the accumulation of plasmocytes are more developed. We have established that the relative volume of structures of the first morphotype is 4.5–8.0 times larger than the volume of the structures of the second morphotype, which provide clonal proliferation of T and B lymphocytes, especially in deep somatic lymph nodes. Among the

  12. Cirugías Conservadoras del Parénquima Pancreático / Converving Parenchyma Pancreatic Surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giunippero Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available After a classical pancreatic resection the risk of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency is in the order of : 8-20 % and 20-50 % respectively 1. Conservative surgery of pancreatic parenchyma decrease the risk of insufficiency and represents the clearest benefits of this type of surgery. They are optional techniques that help the surgeon to evaluate the decision which is best for each patient and each type of lesion. Among them we will approach three of them: uncinate process resection, enucleation, median pancreatectomy.

  13. Impacts of invading alien plant species on water flows at stand and catchment scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maitre, D. C.; Gush, M. B.; Dzikiti, S.

    2015-01-01

    There have been many studies of the diverse impacts of invasions by alien plants but few have assessed impacts on water resources. We reviewed the information on the impacts of invasions on surface runoff and groundwater resources at stand to catchment scales and covering a full annual cycle. Most of the research is South African so the emphasis is on South Africa's major invaders with data from commercial forest plantations where relevant. Catchment studies worldwide have shown that changes in vegetation structure and the physiology of the dominant plant species result in changes in surface runoff and groundwater discharge, whether they involve native or alien plant species. Where there is little change in vegetation structure [e.g. leaf area (index), height, rooting depth and seasonality] the effects of invasions generally are small or undetectable. In South Africa, the most important woody invaders typically are taller and deeper rooted than the native species. The impacts of changes in evaporation (and thus runoff) in dryland settings are constrained by water availability to the plants and, thus, by rainfall. Where the dryland invaders are evergreen and the native vegetation (grass) is seasonal, the increases can reach 300–400 mm/year. Where the native vegetation is evergreen (shrublands) the increases are ∼200–300 mm/year. Where water availability is greater (riparian settings or shallow water tables), invading tree water-use can reach 1.5–2.0 times that of the same species in a dryland setting. So, riparian invasions have a much greater impact per unit area invaded than dryland invasions. The available data are scattered and incomplete, and there are many gaps and issues that must be addressed before a thorough understanding of the impacts at the site scale can be gained and used in extrapolating to watershed scales, and in converting changes in flows to water supply system yields. PMID:25935861

  14. Scaling the consequences of interactions between invaders from the individual to the population level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffen, Blaine D

    2016-03-01

    The impact of human-induced stressors, such as invasive species, is often measured at the organismal level, but is much less commonly scaled up to the population level. Interactions with invasive species represent an increasingly common source of stressor in many habitats. However, due to the increasing abundance of invasive species around the globe, invasive species now commonly cause stresses not only for native species in invaded areas, but also for other invasive species. I examine the European green crab Carcinus maenas, an invasive species along the northeast coast of North America, which is known to be negatively impacted in this invaded region by interactions with the invasive Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus. Asian shore crabs are known to negatively impact green crabs via two mechanisms: by directly preying on green crab juveniles and by indirectly reducing green crab fecundity via interference (and potentially exploitative) competition that alters green crab diets. I used life-table analyses to scale these two mechanistic stressors up to the population level in order to examine their relative impacts on green crab populations. I demonstrate that lost fecundity has larger impacts on per capita population growth rates, but that both predation and lost fecundity are capable of reducing population growth sufficiently to produce the declines in green crab populations that have been observed in areas where these two species overlap. By scaling up the impacts of one invader on a second invader, I have demonstrated that multiple documented interactions between these species are capable of having population-level impacts and that both may be contributing to the decline of European green crabs in their invaded range on the east coast of North America.

  15. Impacts of invading alien plant species on water flows at stand and catchment scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maitre, D C; Gush, M B; Dzikiti, S

    2015-05-01

    There have been many studies of the diverse impacts of invasions by alien plants but few have assessed impacts on water resources. We reviewed the information on the impacts of invasions on surface runoff and groundwater resources at stand to catchment scales and covering a full annual cycle. Most of the research is South African so the emphasis is on South Africa's major invaders with data from commercial forest plantations where relevant. Catchment studies worldwide have shown that changes in vegetation structure and the physiology of the dominant plant species result in changes in surface runoff and groundwater discharge, whether they involve native or alien plant species. Where there is little change in vegetation structure [e.g. leaf area (index), height, rooting depth and seasonality] the effects of invasions generally are small or undetectable. In South Africa, the most important woody invaders typically are taller and deeper rooted than the native species. The impacts of changes in evaporation (and thus runoff) in dryland settings are constrained by water availability to the plants and, thus, by rainfall. Where the dryland invaders are evergreen and the native vegetation (grass) is seasonal, the increases can reach 300-400 mm/year. Where the native vegetation is evergreen (shrublands) the increases are ∼200-300 mm/year. Where water availability is greater (riparian settings or shallow water tables), invading tree water-use can reach 1.5-2.0 times that of the same species in a dryland setting. So, riparian invasions have a much greater impact per unit area invaded than dryland invasions. The available data are scattered and incomplete, and there are many gaps and issues that must be addressed before a thorough understanding of the impacts at the site scale can be gained and used in extrapolating to watershed scales, and in converting changes in flows to water supply system yields. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany

  16. Evaluating the effect of a wavelet enhancement method in characterization of simulated lesions embedded in dense breast parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costaridou, L.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Sakellaropoulos, P.; Panayiotakis, G.; Likaki, E.; Kalogeropoulou, C.P.

    2005-01-01

    Presence of dense parenchyma in mammographic images masks lesions resulting in either missed detections or mischaracterizations, thus decreasing mammographic sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study is evaluating the effect of a wavelet enhancement method on dense parenchyma for a lesion contour characterization task, using simulated lesions. The method is recently introduced, based on a two-stage process, locally adaptive denoising by soft-thresholding and enhancement by linear stretching. Sixty simulated low-contrast lesions of known image characteristics were generated and embedded in dense breast areas of normal mammographic images selected from the DDSM database. Evaluation was carried out by an observer performance comparative study between the processed and initial images. The task for four radiologists was to classify each simulated lesion with respect to contour sharpness/unsharpness. ROC analysis was performed. Combining radiologists' responses, values of the area under ROC curve (A z ) were 0.93 (95% CI 0.89, 0.96) and 0.81 (CI 0.75, 0.86) for processed and initial images, respectively. This difference in A z values was statistically significant (Student's t-test, P<0.05), indicating the effectiveness of the enhancement method. The specific wavelet enhancement method should be tested for lesion contour characterization tasks in softcopy-based mammographic display environment using naturally occurring pathological lesions and normal cases. (orig.)

  17. Evaluating the effect of a wavelet enhancement method in characterization of simulated lesions embedded in dense breast parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costaridou, L.; Skiadopoulos, S.; Sakellaropoulos, P.; Panayiotakis, G. [University of Patras, Department of Medical Physics, Patras (Greece); Likaki, E.; Kalogeropoulou, C.P. [University of Patras, Department of Radiology, Patras (Greece)

    2005-08-01

    Presence of dense parenchyma in mammographic images masks lesions resulting in either missed detections or mischaracterizations, thus decreasing mammographic sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study is evaluating the effect of a wavelet enhancement method on dense parenchyma for a lesion contour characterization task, using simulated lesions. The method is recently introduced, based on a two-stage process, locally adaptive denoising by soft-thresholding and enhancement by linear stretching. Sixty simulated low-contrast lesions of known image characteristics were generated and embedded in dense breast areas of normal mammographic images selected from the DDSM database. Evaluation was carried out by an observer performance comparative study between the processed and initial images. The task for four radiologists was to classify each simulated lesion with respect to contour sharpness/unsharpness. ROC analysis was performed. Combining radiologists' responses, values of the area under ROC curve (A{sub z}) were 0.93 (95% CI 0.89, 0.96) and 0.81 (CI 0.75, 0.86) for processed and initial images, respectively. This difference in A{sub z} values was statistically significant (Student's t-test, P<0.05), indicating the effectiveness of the enhancement method. The specific wavelet enhancement method should be tested for lesion contour characterization tasks in softcopy-based mammographic display environment using naturally occurring pathological lesions and normal cases. (orig.)

  18. Histopathological studies on the irradiated brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Tadao

    1980-01-01

    Of 43 cases of irradiated brain tumor, histological findings showed extensive necrosis or disappearance of the neoplasm, considered to be attributable to radiation treatment, in 30 (70%). Extensive necrosis of the tumor in areas exposed to radiation was found in 16 treated cases (37.2%). The histopathology of massive necrosis was that of simple coagulative necrosis, sometimes with marked vascular alterations and extravasation of fibrinoid material into the necrotic tissue. Necrosis was almost always incomplete, and foci of residual tumors were found at the periphery of the tumors. The terminal picture in cases of massive necrosis was often that of widespread intra- and extracranial metastasis. Almost complete disappearance of the tumor was observed in some cases with subsequent diffuse degenerative changes in the brain parenchyma exposed to radiation. In 5 cases of irradiated tumors, autopsy findings suggested that the growth of the primary tumor might have been restricted. And in 5 cases tumor cytology revealed the marked presence of a large number of multinucleated, bizarre giant cells with evidence of degeneration in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Multifocal necrosis of the brain, with axonal swelling and sponginess of the tissue, was observed in two patients following combined radiation and antineoplastic chemotherapy. Diffuse loss and degeneration of nerve cells of the cerebral cortex in pseudo-laminar fashion was observed in 7 patients with or without bilateral necrosis of the globus pallidus. Histological findings revealed typical anoxic encephalopathy. (J.P.N.)

  19. Histopathological studies on the irradiated brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, T [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan).School of Medicine

    1980-01-01

    Of 43 cases of irradiated brain tumor, histological findings showed extensive necrosis or disappearance of the neoplasm, considered to be attributable to radiation treatment, in 30 (70%). Extensive necrosis of the tumor in areas exposed to radiation was found in 16 treated cases (37.2%). The histopathology of massive necrosis was that of simple coagulative necrosis, sometimes with marked vascular alterations and extravasation of fibrinoid material into the necrotic tissue. Necrosis was almost always incomplete, and foci of residual tumors were found at the periphery of the tumors. The terminal picture in cases of massive necrosis was often that of widespread intra- and extracranial metastasis. Almost complete disappearance of the tumor was observed in some cases with subsequent diffuse degenerative changes in the brain parenchyma exposed to radiation. In 5 cases of irradiated tumors, autopsy findings suggested that the growth of the primary tumor might have been restricted. And in 5 cases tumor cytology revealed the marked presence of a large number of multinucleated, bizarre giant cells with evidence of degeneration in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Multifocal necrosis of the brain, with axonal swelling and sponginess of the tissue, was observed in two patients following combined radiation and antineoplastic chemotherapy. Diffuse loss and degeneration of nerve cells of the cerebral cortex in pseudo-laminar fashion was observed in 7 patients with or without bilateral necrosis of the globus pallidus. Histological findings revealed typical anoxic encephalopathy.

  20. Invading Bologna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John; Breitenbauch, Henrik Ø.; Pradhan-Blach, Flemming

    European NATO nations need better staff officers. Operation Unified Protector exposed a widespread deficiency in the professional knowledge of field-grade European officers. Professional military education (PME) is where corrective Alliance action must focus. The Nordic countries—Norway, Denmark...

  1. CD8+ Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Are Trapped in the Tumor-Dendritic Cell Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Boissonnas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy enhances the antitumor adaptive immune T cell response, but the immunosuppressive tumor environment often dominates, resulting in cancer relapse. Antigen-presenting cells such as tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs and tumor dendritic cells (TuDCs are the main protagonists of tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL immuno-suppression. TAMs have been widely investigated and are associated with poor prognosis, but the immuno-suppressive activity of TuDCs is less well understood. We performed two-photon imaging of the tumor tissue to examine the spatiotemporal interactions between TILs and TuDCs after chemotherapy. In a strongly immuno-suppressive murine tumor model, cyclophosphamide-mediated chemotherapy transiently enhanced the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T cell receptor transgenic T cells (OTI but barely affected TuDC compartment within the tumor. Time lapse imaging of living tumor tissue showed that TuDCs are organized as a mesh with dynamic interconnections. Once infiltrated into the tumor parenchyma, OTI T cells make antigen-specific and long-lasting contacts with TuDCs. Extensive analysis of TIL infiltration on histologic section revealed that after chemotherapy the majority of OTI T cells interact with TuDCs and that infiltration is restricted to TuDC-rich areas. We propose that the TuDC network exerts antigen-dependent unproductive retention that trap T cells and limit their antitumor effectiveness.

  2. Contribution to the alien flora of Montenegro and Supplementum to the Preliminary list of plant invaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stešević, D.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is based on the field observations from 2011 to 2013. Besides new data about distribution of some known plant invaders, one new alien species for the flora of Montenegro is reported- Solidago gigantea. This plant was recorded in 2011, on two distinct localities near the road side in peri-urban area of Nikšić and Mojkovac, in the vicinity of gardens, were it has been grown as ornamental. In 2012 survey, species was again reported for Mojkovac, but it disappeared from Nikšić, due to environmental changes caused by road construction. Remaining locality is placed near the Tara river bank, so considering ecological preferences (roadsides, disturbed river banks and moist soils, this species might become more frequent in the area. It is included into the EPPO list of invasive alien plants. In addition, alien plant Tagetes minuta is added to the preliminary list of plant invaders in Montenegro.

  3. Fully automatized renal parenchyma volumetry using a support vector machine based recognition system for subject-specific probability map generation in native MR volume data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloger, Oliver; Tönnies, Klaus; Mensel, Birger; Völzke, Henry

    2015-11-01

    In epidemiological studies as well as in clinical practice the amount of produced medical image data strongly increased in the last decade. In this context organ segmentation in MR volume data gained increasing attention for medical applications. Especially in large-scale population-based studies organ volumetry is highly relevant requiring exact organ segmentation. Since manual segmentation is time-consuming and prone to reader variability, large-scale studies need automatized methods to perform organ segmentation. Fully automatic organ segmentation in native MR image data has proven to be a very challenging task. Imaging artifacts as well as inter- and intrasubject MR-intensity differences complicate the application of supervised learning strategies. Thus, we propose a modularized framework of a two-stepped probabilistic approach that generates subject-specific probability maps for renal parenchyma tissue, which are refined subsequently by using several, extended segmentation strategies. We present a three class-based support vector machine recognition system that incorporates Fourier descriptors as shape features to recognize and segment characteristic parenchyma parts. Probabilistic methods use the segmented characteristic parenchyma parts to generate high quality subject-specific parenchyma probability maps. Several refinement strategies including a final shape-based 3D level set segmentation technique are used in subsequent processing modules to segment renal parenchyma. Furthermore, our framework recognizes and excludes renal cysts from parenchymal volume, which is important to analyze renal functions. Volume errors and Dice coefficients show that our presented framework outperforms existing approaches.

  4. Fully automatized renal parenchyma volumetry using a support vector machine based recognition system for subject-specific probability map generation in native MR volume data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloger, Oliver; Völzke, Henry; Tönnies, Klaus; Mensel, Birger

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiological studies as well as in clinical practice the amount of produced medical image data strongly increased in the last decade. In this context organ segmentation in MR volume data gained increasing attention for medical applications. Especially in large-scale population-based studies organ volumetry is highly relevant requiring exact organ segmentation. Since manual segmentation is time-consuming and prone to reader variability, large-scale studies need automatized methods to perform organ segmentation. Fully automatic organ segmentation in native MR image data has proven to be a very challenging task. Imaging artifacts as well as inter- and intrasubject MR-intensity differences complicate the application of supervised learning strategies. Thus, we propose a modularized framework of a two-stepped probabilistic approach that generates subject-specific probability maps for renal parenchyma tissue, which are refined subsequently by using several, extended segmentation strategies. We present a three class-based support vector machine recognition system that incorporates Fourier descriptors as shape features to recognize and segment characteristic parenchyma parts. Probabilistic methods use the segmented characteristic parenchyma parts to generate high quality subject-specific parenchyma probability maps. Several refinement strategies including a final shape-based 3D level set segmentation technique are used in subsequent processing modules to segment renal parenchyma. Furthermore, our framework recognizes and excludes renal cysts from parenchymal volume, which is important to analyze renal functions. Volume errors and Dice coefficients show that our presented framework outperforms existing approaches. (paper)

  5. Wood anatomical correlates with theoretical conductivity and wood density across China: evolutionary evidence of the functional differentiation of axial and radial parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jingming; Martínez-Cabrera, Hugo I

    2013-09-01

    In recent years considerable effort has focused on linking wood anatomy and key ecological traits. Studies analysing large databases have described how these ecological traits vary as a function of wood anatomical traits related to conduction and support, but have not considered how these functions interact with cells involved in storage of water and carbohydrates (i.e. parenchyma cells). We analyzed, in a phylogenetic context, the functional relationship between cell types performing each of the three xylem functions (conduction, support and storage) and wood density and theoretical conductivity using a sample of approx. 800 tree species from China. Axial parenchyma and rays had distinct evolutionary correlation patterns. An evolutionary link was found between high conduction capacity and larger amounts of axial parenchyma that is probably related to water storage capacity and embolism repair, while larger amounts of ray tissue have evolved with increased mechanical support and reduced hydraulic capacity. In a phylogenetic principal component analysis this association of axial parenchyma with increased conduction capacity and rays with wood density represented orthogonal axes of variation. In multivariate space, however, the proportion of rays might be positively associated with conductance and negatively with wood density, indicating flexibility in these axes in species with wide rays. The findings suggest that parenchyma types may differ in function. The functional axes represented by different cell types were conserved across lineages, suggesting a significant role in the ecological strategies of the angiosperms.

  6. Assessment of tumor vascularization with functional computed tomography perfusion imaging in patients with cirrhotic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin-Ping; Zhao, De-Li; Jiang, Hui-Jie; Huang, Ya-Hua; Li, Da-Qing; Wan, Yong; Liu, Xin-Ding; Wang, Jin-E

    2011-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumor in China, and early diagnosis is critical for patient outcome. In patients with HCC, it is mostly based on liver cirrhosis, developing from benign regenerative nodules and dysplastic nodules to HCC lesions, and a better understanding of its vascular supply and the hemodynamic changes may lead to early tumor detection. Angiogenesis is essential for the growth of primary and metastatic tumors due to changes in vascular perfusion, blood volume and permeability. These hemodynamic and physiological properties can be measured serially using functional computed tomography perfusion (CTP) imaging and can be used to assess the growth of HCC. This study aimed to clarify the physiological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis in cirrhotic liver disease by this fast imaging method. CTP was performed in 30 volunteers without liver disease (control subjects) and 49 patients with liver disease (experimental subjects: 27 with HCC and 22 with cirrhosis). All subjects were also evaluated by physical examination, laboratory screening and Doppler ultrasonography of the liver. The diagnosis of HCC was made according to the EASL criteria. All patients underwent contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, pre- and post-contrast triple-phase CT and CTP study. A mathematical deconvolution model was applied to provide hepatic blood flow (HBF), hepatic blood volume (HBV), mean transit time (MTT), permeability of capillary vessel surface (PS), hepatic arterial index (HAI), hepatic arterial perfusion (HAP) and hepatic portal perfusion (HPP) data. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine differences in perfusion parameters between the background cirrhotic liver parenchyma and HCC and between the cirrhotic liver parenchyma with HCC and that without HCC. In normal liver, the HAP/HVP ratio was about 1/4. HCC had significantly higher HAP and HAI and lower HPP than background liver parenchyma adjacent to the HCC. The value of HBF at the tumor

  7. A taste for novelty in invading house sparrows, Passer domesticus

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn B. Martin; Lisa Fitzgerald

    2005-01-01

    One of the central questions in invasion biology involves why some introductions succeed and others fail. Although several correlates of invasion success have been identified, patterns alone cannot identify the mechanisms underlying the invasion process. Here, we test the hypothesis that one predictor of invasion success, behavioral flexibility, is different between invading and established populations of the same species of bird. We predicted that neophobia (fear of novelty), a surrogate of ...

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of a Liver Hydatid Cyst Invading the Portal Vein and Causing Portal Cavernomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herek, Duygu; Sungurtekin, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic hydatid cysts rarely invade portal veins causing portal cavernomatosis as a secondary complication. We report the case of a patient with direct invasion of the right portal vein by hydatid cysts causing portal cavernomatosis diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The presented case highlights the useful application of MRI with T2-weighted images and gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images in the diagnosis of hepatic hydatid lesions presenting with a rare complication of portal cavernomatosis.

  9. Stoichiometric Constraints Do Not Limit Successful Invaders: Zebra Mussels in Swedish Lakes

    OpenAIRE

    Naddafi, Rahmat; Ekl?v, Peter; Pettersson, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Background Elemental imbalances of carbon (C): nitrogen (N): phosphorus (P) ratios in food resources can constrain the growth of grazers owning to tight coupling between growth rate, RNA allocation and biomass P content in animals. Testing for stoichiometric constraints among invasive species is a novel challenge in invasion ecology to unravel how a successful invader tackles ecological barriers in novel ecosystems. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the C?P and N?P ratios and the con...

  10. Mapping cryptic invaders and invisability of tropical forest ecosystems: Chromolaena odorata in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Joshi, C.

    2006-01-01

    For centuries, people continuously increased the rate of biological invasions and there is no sign of slowing down. From the depth of the Ocean to the crest of Himalayas, they are occupying pristine and semi-natural ecosystems at an alarming rate, threatening human, animal, plant as well as ecosystem health. Efforts to avoid or eradicate them are not achievable except for very few cases. Currently, therefore, their management aims at controlling invaders and mitigating their impact rather tha...

  11. Creation of a Tumor-Mimic Model Using a Muscle Paste for Radiofrequency Ablation of the Lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, T.; Kaminou, T.; Sugiura, K.; Hashimoto, M.; Ohuchi, Y.; Adachi, A.; Fujioka, S.; Ito, H.; Nakamura, K.; Ogawa, T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an easily created tumor-mimic model and evaluate its efficacy for radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the lung. The bilateral lungs of eight living adult swine were used. A tumor-mimic model was made by percutaneous injection of 1.0 ml muscle paste through the bone biopsy needle into the lung. An RFA probe was then inserted into the tumor mimics immediately after tumor creation. Ablation time, tissue impedance, and temperature were recorded. The tumor mimics and their coagulated regions were evaluated microscopically and macroscopically. The muscle paste was easily injected into the lung parenchyma through the bone biopsy needle and well visualized under fluoroscopy. In 10 of 12 sites the tumor mimics were oval shaped, localized, and homogeneous on gross specimens. Ten tumor mimics were successfully ablated, and four locations were ablated in the normal lung parenchyma as controls. In the tumor and normal lung parenchyma, ablation times were 8.9 ± 3.5 and 4.4 ± 1.6 min, respectively; tissue impedances at the start of ablation were 100.6 ± 16.6 and 145.8 ± 26.8 Ω, respectively; and temperatures at the end of ablation were 66.0 ± 7.9 and 57.5 ± 7.6 o C, respectively. The mean size of tumor mimics was 13.9 x 8.2 mm, and their coagulated area was 18.8 x 13.1 mm. In the lung parenchyma, the coagulated area was 15.3 x 12.0 mm. In conclusion, our tumor-mimic model using muscle paste can be easily and safely created and can be ablated using the ablation algorithm in the clinical setting.

  12. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of pancreatic islet cell tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, Baris; Salmaslioglu, Artur; Poyanli, Arzu; Rozanes, Izzet; Acunas, Bulent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study is to demonstrate the feasibility of body diffusion weighted (DW) MR imaging in the evaluation of pancreatic islet cell tumors (ICTs) and to define apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values for these tumors. Materials and methods: 12 normal volunteers and 12 patients with histopathologically proven pancreatic ICT by surgery were included in the study. DW MR images were obtained by a body-phased array coil using a multisection single-shot echo planar sequence on the axial plane without breath holding. In addition, the routine abdominal imaging protocol for pancreas was applied in the patient group. We measured the ADC value within the normal pancreas in control group, pancreatic ICT, and surrounding pancreas parenchyma. Mann-Whitney U-test has been used to compare ADC values between tumoral tissues and normal pancreatic tissues of the volunteers. Wilcoxon Signed Ranks Test was preferred to compare ADC values between tumoral tissues and surrounding pancreatic parenchyma of the patients. Results: In 11 patients out of 12, conventional MR sequences were able to demonstrate ICTs successfully. In 1 patient an indistinct suspicious lesion was noted at the pancreatic tail. DW sequence was able to demonstrate the lesions in all of the 12 patients. On the DW images, all ICTs demonstrated high signal intensity relative to the surrounding pancreatic parenchyma. The mean and standard deviations of the ADC values (x10 -3 mm 2 /s) were as follows: ICT (n = 12), 1.51 ± 0.35 (0.91-2.11), surrounding parenchyma (n = 11) 0.76 ± 0.15 (0.51-1.01) and normal pancreas in normal volunteers (n = 12), 0.80 ± 0.06 (0.72-0.90). ADC values of the ICT were significantly higher compared with those of surrounding parenchyma (p < 0.01) and normal pancreas (p < 0.001). Conclusion: DW MR imaging does not appear to provide significant contribution to routine MR imaging protocol in the evaluation of pancreatic islet cell tumors. But it can be added to MR imaging

  13. Morphologic classification of ductal breast tumors on ultrasound : differential diagnosis of benign and malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Mi Sook; Chung, Soo Young; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Park, Hai Jung; Lee, Myoung Hwan; Yoon, In Sook; Koh, Mi Gyoung

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the morphologic differential diagnosis of benign and malignant ductal breast tumors, as seen on US US findings in 29 pathologically proven cases of ductal breast tumor were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were female and their mean age was 42 years. Nineteen tumors were benign and ten were malignant, and all ductal or cystic lesions showed solid masses. According to the location of the mural nodule, we classified the sonographic appearance of these tumors into three types:intraductal, intracystic and amorphic. The intraductal type was divided into three subtypes:incompletely obstructive, completely obstructive and multiple mural nodules. For the intracystic type, too, three subtypes were designated:the intracystic mural nodule (mural cyst), intracystic mural nodule with the duct (mural cyst+duct) and intracystic multiple mural nodules. The amorphic type is defined as an atypical ductal tumor with the mural nodule extending into adjacent parenchyma. The margin of the duct or cyst was smooth in 68.4% of benign, and irregular in 90% of malignant ductal tumors. Internal echogeneity of the duct or cyst usually showed homogeneity in both benign and malignant tumors. 73.7% of tumors connecting the duct were benign and 50% were malignant. In benign tumors, 52.6% of mural nodule had an irregular margin, while in malignant tumors, the corresponding proportion was 100%;both types usually showed heterogeneous hypoechogeneity. Among benign tumors, the most common morphologic type was the intraductal incompletely obstructive subtype (36.8%);among those that were malignant, the amorphic type was most common, accounting for 40% of tumors. No amorphic type was benign and no incompletely obstructive subtype was malignant. When ductal breast tumors are morphologically classified on the basis of sonographic findings, the intraductal incompletely obstructive subtype suggests benignancy, and the amorphic type, malignancy. The morphologic classification of ductal

  14. Obstacles to Brain Tumor Therapy: Key ABC Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juwina Wijaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The delivery of cancer chemotherapy to treat brain tumors remains a challenge, in part, because of the inherent biological barrier, the blood–brain barrier. While its presence and role as a protector of the normal brain parenchyma has been acknowledged for decades, it is only recently that the important transporter components, expressed in the tightly knit capillary endothelial cells, have been deciphered. These transporters are ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters and, so far, the major clinically important ones that functionally contribute to the blood–brain barrier are ABCG2 and ABCB1. A further limitation to cancer therapy of brain tumors or brain metastases is the blood–tumor barrier, where tumors erect a barrier of transporters that further impede drug entry. The expression and regulation of these two transporters at these barriers, as well as tumor derived alteration in expression and/or mutation, are likely obstacles to effective therapy.

  15. MR imaging assessment of direct hepatic invasion by adjacent tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeser, P.M.; Karstaedt, N.; Wolfman, N.T.; Bechtold, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    The proper staging of right renal and adrenal tumors requires accurate prediction of hepatic invasion. The authors retrospectively reviewed MR studies of 35 patients with right renal or adrenal masses to assess the utility of MR imaging in predicting direct hepatic invasion. Twenty-three patients were selected for study on the basis of absence of the fat plane between tumor and liver. Hepatic signal and tumor-liver interface characteristics were used to predict invasion. In 14 patients with renal tumors, absence of abnormal signal from hepatic parenchyma correlated well with absence of invasion, but the presence of abnormal hepatic signal did not necessarily indicate hepatic invasion. Inversion-recovery pulse sequences optimally demonstrated abnormal hepatic signal as well as the tumor-liver interface. The authors are currently reviewing the studies in the nine patients with adrenal masses

  16. An unusual and spectacular case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the spinal cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Damien; Menei, Philippe; Fournier, Henri-Dominique

    2011-11-01

    The authors describe the first case of spindle cell lipoma of the posterior neck invading the upper cervical spinal canal and the posterior cranial fossa. Spindle cell lipoma is an extremely rare variant of benign lipoma. It usually occurs as a solitary subcutaneous well-circumscribed lesion in the posterior neck or shoulders of adult men. Local aggressiveness is unusual. This 61-year-old man presented with an increased left cerebellar syndrome and headaches. He also had a posterior neck tumefaction, which had been known about for a long time. Computed tomography and MR imaging studies revealed a voluminous mass extending to the upper cervical canal and posterior cranial fossa and eroding the neighboring bones. The lesion was well delimited, and contrast enhancement was intense and heterogeneous. The tumor, which had initially developed under the muscles of the posterior neck, was totally resected. Histological assessment revealed numerous fat cells with spindle cells secreting collagen. The large size of the tumor and the submuscular location, bone erosion, and compression of the CNS were unusual in this rare subtype of benign adipose tumor. Its presentation could simulate a sarcoma.

  17. Effect of remote ischemic postconditioning in inflammatory changes of the lung parenchyma of rats submitted to ischemia and reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Cantero Dorsa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:To assess the effects of postconditioning remote in ischemia-reperfusion injury in rat lungs.Methods:Wistar rats (n=24 divided into 3 groups: GA (I/R n=8, GB (R-Po n=8, CG (control n=8, underwent ischemia for 30 minutes artery occlusion abdominal aorta, followed by reperfusion for 60 minutes. Resected lungs and performed histological analysis and classification of morphological findings in accordance with the degree of tissue injury. Statistical analysis of the mean rating of the degree of tissue injury.Results:GA (3.6, GB (1.3 and CG (1.0. (GA GB X P<0.05.Conclusion:The remote postconditioning was able to minimize the inflammatory lesion of the lung parenchyma of rats undergoing ischemia and reperfusion process.

  18. A Randomised Clinical Trial to Compare Coaxial and Noncoaxial Techniques in Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy of Renal Parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei Jandaghi, Ali; Lebady, Mohammadkazem; Zamani, Athar-Alsadat; Heidarzadeh, Abtin; Monfared, Ali; Pourghorban, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo compare the coaxial and noncoaxial techniques of renal parenchymal core needle biopsy.Materials and MethodsThis is an institutional review board-approved randomised controlled trial comparing 83 patients (male, n = 49) who underwent renal parenchymal core biopsy with coaxial method and 83 patients (male, n = 40) with noncoaxial method. The rate of complications, the number of glomerular profiles, and the procedural time were evaluated in a comparison of the two methods. Correlation between the presence of renal parenchymal disease and the rate of complication was also evaluated.ResultsThe procedural time was significantly shorter in the coaxial technique (coaxial group, 5 ± 1 min; noncoaxial group, 14 ± 2 min; p < 0.001). The rates of complications for the coaxial method was significantly lower than the noncoaxial method (coaxial group, 10.8 %; noncoaxial group, 24.1 %; p = 0.025). There was no significant correlation between gender and the rate of complication. The number of glomerular profiles was significantly higher in patents who underwent renal biopsy with the coaxial method (coaxial group, 18.2 ± 9.1; noncoaxial group, 8.6 ± 5.5; p < 0.001). In the whole study population, the rate of complications was significantly higher in patients with a pathologic renal parenchyma compared to those with a normal parenchyma (19/71 vs. 10/95; p = 0.006).ConclusionsRenal parenchymal biopsy using a coaxial needle is a faster and safer method with a lower rate of complications.

  19. A Randomised Clinical Trial to Compare Coaxial and Noncoaxial Techniques in Percutaneous Core Needle Biopsy of Renal Parenchyma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babaei Jandaghi, Ali [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Poursina Hospital (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lebady, Mohammadkazem; Zamani, Athar-Alsadat [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Urology Research Center, Razi Hospital (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Heidarzadeh, Abtin [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Community Medicine (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Monfared, Ali [Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Urology Research Center, Razi Hospital (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourghorban, Ramin, E-mail: ramin-p2005@yahoo.com [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeTo compare the coaxial and noncoaxial techniques of renal parenchymal core needle biopsy.Materials and MethodsThis is an institutional review board-approved randomised controlled trial comparing 83 patients (male, n = 49) who underwent renal parenchymal core biopsy with coaxial method and 83 patients (male, n = 40) with noncoaxial method. The rate of complications, the number of glomerular profiles, and the procedural time were evaluated in a comparison of the two methods. Correlation between the presence of renal parenchymal disease and the rate of complication was also evaluated.ResultsThe procedural time was significantly shorter in the coaxial technique (coaxial group, 5 ± 1 min; noncoaxial group, 14 ± 2 min; p < 0.001). The rates of complications for the coaxial method was significantly lower than the noncoaxial method (coaxial group, 10.8 %; noncoaxial group, 24.1 %; p = 0.025). There was no significant correlation between gender and the rate of complication. The number of glomerular profiles was significantly higher in patents who underwent renal biopsy with the coaxial method (coaxial group, 18.2 ± 9.1; noncoaxial group, 8.6 ± 5.5; p < 0.001). In the whole study population, the rate of complications was significantly higher in patients with a pathologic renal parenchyma compared to those with a normal parenchyma (19/71 vs. 10/95; p = 0.006).ConclusionsRenal parenchymal biopsy using a coaxial needle is a faster and safer method with a lower rate of complications.

  20. Clinical implications of a rare renal entity: Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor (PHAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalici Gesolfo, Cristina; Serretta, Vincenzo; Di Maida, Fabrizio; Giannone, Giulio; Barresi, Elisabetta; Franco, Vito; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2017-02-01

    Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor (PHAT) is a rare benign lesion characterized by slow growth, infiltrative behavior and high rate of local recurrences. Only one case has been described in retroperitoneum, at renal hilum, but not involving pelvis or parenchyma. Here we present the first case of PHAT arising in the renal parenchyma. A nodular lesion in right kidney lower pole was diagnosed to a 61 year old woman. The patient underwent right nephrectomy. Microscopically, the lesion showed solid and pseudo-cystic components with hemorrhagic areas characterized by aggregates of ectatic blood vessels. Pleomorphic cells were characterized by large eosinophilic cytoplasm with irregular and hyperchromatic nuclei. Immunohistochemistry was performed and the lesion was classified as a Pleomorphic Hyalinizing Angiectatic Tumor (PHAT). Due to the clinical behavior of this tumor, in spite of its benign nature, review of the surgical margins and close follow up after partial nephrectomy are mandatory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. A model of hydraulic interactions in liver parenchyma as forces behind the intrahepatic bile flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, S; Kurbel, B; Dmitrovic, B; Wagner, J

    2001-05-01

    livers without arterial blood flow, although some slow changes in the portal flows can be expected, acinar volume changes should be reduced. In acute liver injury, enlarged hepatocytes would diminish sinusoidal diameter and increase acinar resistance. In liver tumors, areas of neovascularization with reduced resistance would divert the arterial flow from the normal tissue, while in the compressed perifocal areas, increased vascular resistance should diminish mainly the portal flow. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  2. Hot-clot artifacts in the lung parenchyma on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography/CT due to faulty injection techniques: Two case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, Elif; Yildirim, Nilufer; Keskin, Mutlay; Kandemir, Zuhai; Turkolmez, Seyda [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Ataturk Training and Research Hospital, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2014-08-15

    F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT is an important whole-body imaging tool in the oncology and widely utilized to stage and restage various malignancies. The findings of significant focal accumulation of FDG in the lung parenchyma in the absence of corresponding CT abnormalities are related to the lung microembolism and known as hot-clot artifacts. Herein we present two cases with focal FDG uptake in the lung parenchyma with no structural lesions on the CT scan and discuss the possible mechanisms.

  3. Hot-clot artifacts in the lung parenchyma on F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose position emission tomography/CT due to faulty injection techniques: Two case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdemir, Elif; Yildirim, Nilufer; Keskin, Mutlay; Kandemir, Zuhai; Turkolmez, Seyda

    2014-01-01

    F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/CT is an important whole-body imaging tool in the oncology and widely utilized to stage and restage various malignancies. The findings of significant focal accumulation of FDG in the lung parenchyma in the absence of corresponding CT abnormalities are related to the lung microembolism and known as hot-clot artifacts. Herein we present two cases with focal FDG uptake in the lung parenchyma with no structural lesions on the CT scan and discuss the possible mechanisms.

  4. Diagnosis of pancreatic tumors by spiral angio CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kohi; Nakao, Norio; Takayasu, Yukio; Okawa, Tomohisa

    1995-01-01

    Spiral angio were performed with injection of 30 ml of contrast material at a rate of 1 ml/sec with a scan delay of 6 sec through catheter into the celiac artery while the blood flow of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was occluded by the inflated balloon catheter. Spiral CT scans were obtained using Somatom Plus (Siemens). Parameter for spiral CT were 24-sec acquisition time, 5 mm collimation, 5 mm/sec table incrementation. Reconstructions were performed every 5 mm. Pancreatic cancers were characteristically depicted with spiral angio CT as hypodensity relative to normal enhanced pancreatic parenchyma. On dynamic angio CT studies performed in pancreatic cancers, the area of cancer and normal parenchyma had maximum level of enhancement at 10-15 sec after injection of contrast material via catheter into the celiac, and there was no difference in enhancement between tumor and normal parenchyma. On the other hand, the lesions of cancer were revealed as hypodensity with spiral angio CT. In case of chronic pancreatitis, the enhancement of the entire pancreas obtained with spiral angio CT was homogeneous. Insulinoma in the tail of pancreas was detected by spiral angio CT but was not detected by both selective angiography and conventional CT. Three-dimensional (3-D) rendering spiral angio CT data shows the extent of vascular involvement by pancreatic cancer and provides useful information for surgical planning. Spiral angio CT is the most useful procedure for diagnosis of pancreatic tumor. (author)

  5. Spatial pattern and scale influence invader demographic response to simulated precipitation change in an annual grassland community

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is important to predict which invasive species will benefit from future changes in climate, and thereby identify those invaders that need particular attention and prioritization of management efforts. Because establishment, persistence, and spread determine invasion success, this prediction requ...

  6. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Hepatic Arteriography in Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Performance Depicting Tumors and Tumor Feeders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Joon [National Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Jin Wook, E-mail: chungjw@snu.ac.kr; Yin, Yong Hu; Kim, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Young Il; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to analyze retrospectively the performance of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) hepatic arteriography in depicting tumors and their feeders and to investigate the related determining factors in chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).MethodsEighty-six patients with 142 tumors satisfying the imaging diagnosis criteria of HCC were included in this study. The performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography for chemoembolization per tumor and per patient was evaluated using maximum intensity projection images alone (MIP analysis) or MIP combined with multiplanar reformation images (MIP + MPR analysis) regarding the following three aspects: tumor depiction, confidence of tumor feeder detection, and trackability of tumor feeders. Tumor size, tumor enhancement, tumor location, number of feeders, diaphragmatic motion, portal vein enhancement, and hepatic artery to parenchyma enhancement ratio were regarded as potential determining factors.ResultsTumors were depicted in 125 (88.0 %) and 142 tumors (100 %) on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis, respectively. Imaging performances on MIP and MIP + MPR analysis were good enough to perform subsegmental chemoembolization without additional angiographic investigation in 88 (62.0 %) and 128 tumors (90.1 %) on per-tumor basis and in 43 (50 %) and 73 (84.9 %) on per-patient basis, respectively. Significant determining factors for performance in MIP + MPR analysis on per tumor basis were tumor size (p = 0.030), tumor enhancement (0.005), tumor location (p = 0.001), and diaphragmatic motion (p < 0.001).ConclusionsCBCT hepatic arteriography provided sufficient information for subsegmental chemoembolization by depicting tumors and their feeders in the vast majority of patients. Combined analysis of MIP and MPR images was essential to enhance the performance of CBCT hepatic arteriography.

  7. Pancreatoblastoma, a Rare Childhood Tumor: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman ARGON

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatoblastoma, rarely encountered in the literature, is a malignant exocrine tumor seen in the pancreas. A 5-year-old boy suffering from abdominal pain was sent to our institute for further examination and treatment. Clinical examination was normal but for a palpable abdominal tumor mass. Abdominal Doppler ultrasonography showed a mass with well-defined margins within the body of the pancreas. Laboratory tests, including lactic dehydrogenase, alpha-fetoprotein and cancer antigen 125 were abnormal. The tumor invading the splenic vein and transverse colon was removed totally. We observed a hypercellular tumor in histopathological examination. The tumor had epithelial acinar cells and squamoid morules (corpuscles separated by stromal bands. Adjuvant chemotherapy was used after surgery. However, the patient died 14 months later. All data about pancreatoblastoma have to be collected in order to choose the treatment to elucidate the molecular pathogenesis of the tumor, to diagnose it early and to develop target-specific treatments.

  8. Sinus Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... RESOURCES Medical Societies Patient Education About this Website Font Size + - Home > CONDITIONS > Sinus Tumors Adult Sinusitis Pediatric ... and they vary greatly in location, size and type. Care for these tumors is individualized to each ...

  9. Tumors markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi-Mizumoto, N.H.

    1989-01-01

    In order to study blood and cell components alterations (named tumor markers) that may indicate the presence of a tumor, several methods are presented. Aspects as diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic value and clinical evaluation are discussed. (M.A.C.)

  10. Wilms tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... suggested. Alternative Names Nephroblastoma; Kidney tumor - Wilms Images Kidney anatomy Wilms tumor References Babaian KN, Delacroix SE, Wood CG, Jonasch E. Kidney cancer. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, ...

  11. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  12. Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    A brain tumor is a growth of abnormal cells in the tissues of the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, ... cancer cells that grow quickly. Some are primary brain tumors, which start in the brain. Others are ...

  13. Urogenital tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    An overview is provided for veterinary care of urogenital tumors in companion animals, especially the dog. Neoplasms discussed include tumors of the kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis, ovary, vagina, vulva and the canine transmissible venereal tumor. Topics addressed include description, diagnosis and treatment.

  14. Intranasal tumors in dogs: diagnosis and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theisen, S.K.; Lewis, D.D.; Hosgood, G.

    1996-01-01

    Intranasal tumors are rare in dogs and occur mostly in middle-aged and old dogs. The malignant behavior of these tumors is reflected more by their tendency to invade local tissue than by a tendency to produce distant metastasis. Distant metastasis may, however, become more important as success in treatment of the initial lesion improves. The history and clinical signs (sneezing, nasal discharge, and facial deformity) of intranasal tumor in dogs often reflect intranasal disease but are usually nonspecific. Diagnostics should include at least the minimum data base, high-detail radiographs of the nasal cavity obtained while the dog is anesthetized, and biopsy of nasal cavity tissue. Radiotherapy with or without aggressive cytoreduction is the only treatment that significantly extends survival of these dogs. Ortho-voltage, megavoltage, or brachytherapy (implantation of (192)lridium) has been used

  15. Contribution to the alien flora of Montenegro and Supplementum to the Preliminary list of plant invaders

    OpenAIRE

    Stešević, D.; Caković, D.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution is based on the field observations from 2011 to 2013. Besides new data about distribution of some known plant invaders, one new alien species for the flora of Montenegro is reported- Solidago gigantea. This plant was recorded in 2011, on two distinct localities near the road side in peri-urban area of Nikšić and Mojkovac, in the vicinity of gardens, were it has been grown as ornamental. In 2012 survey, species was again reported for Mojkovac, but it disappeared f...

  16. Recurrent malignant pilomatrixoma invading the cranial cavity: improved local control with adjuvant radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aherne, N. J.; Fitzpatrick, D. A.; Armstrong, J. G.; Gibbons, D.; Collins, C. D.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We report the case of a 41-year-old mentally retarded male with recurrent pilomatrix carcinoma of the occipital region which invaded the occipital bone, left cerebellum and left temporal lobe. At his initial presentation the patient had a craniotomy and subtotal excision of the lesion with positive margins. He received no adjuvant therapy. After an early intracranial recurrence he had subtotal debulking and was referred for external beam radiotherapy. At 27 months follow-up after adjuvant external beam radiotherapy the intracranial component has not progressed and the patient remains clinically well

  17. Brain parenchyma involvement as isolated central nervous system relapse of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma: An International Primary CNS Lymphoma Collaborative Group report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Doolittle (Nancy); L.E. Abrey (Lauren); T.N. Shenkier (Tamara); T. Siegal (Tali); J.E.C. Bromberg (Jacolien); E.A. Neuwelt (Edward); C. Soussain (Carole); K. Jahnke (Kristoph); P. Johnston (Patrick); G. Illerhaus (Gerald); D. Schiff (David); T.T. Batchelor (Tracy); S. Montoto (Silvia); D.F. Kraemer (Dale); E. Zucca (Emanuele)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIsolated central nervous system (CNS) relapse involving the brain parenchyma is a rare complication of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We retrospectively analyzed patient characteristics, management, and outcomes of this complication. After complete response to initial non-Hodgkin

  18. Two cases of false aneurysm rupture induced by nonvascular tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiromasa; Komiya, Tatsuhiko; Tamura, Nobushige; Sakaguchi, Genichi; Kobayashi, Taira; Furukawa, Tomokuni; Matsushita, Akihito; Sunagawa, Gengo; Murashita, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    We presented here 2 cases of rare nonvascular tumor involving the aorta. A 69-year-old woman. She presented leg edema and dyspnea on admission. Computed tomography revealed abdominal aortic aneurysm perforating left common iliac vein. Abdominal aortic aneurysm replacement and fistula closure were done on an emergency basis. Immunohistologic examination revealed that malignant mesothelioma invaded the aortic wall. A 47-year-old woman presented with dyspnea. Enhanced computed tomography revealed rupture of the descending aortic aneurysm (saccular type). Aortic replacement was done on an emergency basis. One year after the operation, computed tomography revealed a giant mass (160 x 70 mm) surrounding the descending thoracic aorta. On biopsy, malignant schwannoma was found to invade the descending aorta. Sometimes nonvascular tumors form aneurysms. So we should be careful in diagnosis before operation. (author)

  19. Experimental COPD induced by solid combustible burn smoke in rats: a study of the emphysematous changes of the pulmonary parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murărescu, Elena Doina; Eloae-Zugun, Fl; Mihailovici, Maria Sultana

    2008-01-01

    According to the GOLD 2006 definition, COPD is a preventable and treatable pathological situation characterized by the partially reversible airflow limitation determined by a variable proportion mixture of small airways disease (obliterative bronchiolitis) and parenchyma destruction (emphysema). A major impediment in the study of the COPD is represented by the fact the fundamental morphological changes that determine the major pulmonary dysfunction take place in the small, peripheral, airways, at the bronchiolo-alveolar attachments. That is why the experimental model of COPD developed progressively to the transgenic mouse. There are many experimental studies on the animal models that have obtained emphysema rapidly through intratraheal instillation of elastasis or bronchitis/bronchiolitis through intratraheal instillation of particles. It is accepted that the unnatural character of aggression, that does not permit the natural evolution of the inflammatory phenomenon, limits these models and tissue remodeling that take place in COPD patients. It is well known that cigarette smoking is a major cause of COPD. There have been reported some cases of COPD in never smoking patients exposed to air pollutants. We aimed to create an experimental model of COPD in rat through exposure to smoke resulted from solid combustibles burn for the same period and in the same conditions of cigarette smoke exposure and to compare the pulmonary morphological changes. Thirty Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n = 10): (1) the control group (C), (2) the cigarette smoke group (CS), and (3) the solid combustible smoke group (SCS). Apart from the control group, these were treated with solid combustibles smoke (SCS group) or cigarette smoke (CS group) for six months. Morphological and morphometry studies have been assessed. We have established a rat COPD model based on natural cigarette smoke exposure versus solid combustible burn resulted smoke, usable for a further approach in human

  20. Tumor immunology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, W. den

    1987-01-01

    Tumor immunology, the use of immunological techniques for tumor diagnosis and approaches to immunotherapy of cancer are topics covered in this multi-author volume. Part A, 'Tumor Immunology', deals with present views on tumor-associated antigens, the initiation of immune reactions of tumor cells, effector cell killing, tumor cells and suppression of antitumor immunity, and one chapter dealing with the application of mathematical models in tumor immunology. Part B, 'Tumor Diagnosis and Imaging', concerns the use of markers to locate the tumor in vivo, for the histological diagnosis, and for the monitoring of tumor growth. In Part C, 'Immunotherapy', various experimental approaches to immunotherapy are described, such as the use of monoclonal antibodies to target drugs, the use of interleukin-2 and the use of drugs inhibiting suppression. In the final section, the evaluation, a pathologist and a clinician evaluate the possibilities and limitations of tumor immunology and the extent to which it is useful for diagnosis and therapy. refs.; figs.; tabs

  1. Systemic side effects of isolated limb perfusion with tumor necrosis factor alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaveling, Jan Harm

    1997-01-01

    The main function of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a), a small polypeptide shared by all mammals, is probably protection against invading bacteria, parasites and viruses; killing of these microorganisms is facilitated in the presence of TNF-a. However, as its name suggest, TNF-a is also capable

  2. Induction concurrent chemoradiation therapy for invading apical non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Kenji

    2004-01-01

    Although non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) involving the superior sulcus has been generally treated with radiation therapy (RT) followed by surgery, local recurrence is still a big problem to be solved. We investigated a role of induction therapy, especially induction concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT), on the surgical results of this type of NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients with NSCLC invading the apex of the chest wall who underwent surgery from 1987 to 1996. Ten patients (57±8 years) received surgery alone, 9 (55±13 years) received RT (42±7 Gy) followed by surgery and 11 (51±9 years) received cisplatin based chemotherapy and RT (47±5 Gy) as an induction therapy. Two and 4-year survival rates were 30% and 20% in patients with surgery alone, 22% and 11% in patients with induction RT, and 73% and 53% in patients with induction CRT, respectively. The survival was significantly better in patients with induction CRT than those with induction RT or surgery alone. Univariate analysis demonstrated that curability (yes versus no: p=0.027) and induction therapy (surgery alone and RT versus CRT: p=0.0173) were significant prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis revealed that only induction therapy (p=0.0238) was a significant prognostic factor. Induction CRT seems to improve the survival in patients with NSCLC invading the apex of the chest wall compared with induction RT or surgery alone. (author)

  3. Fungal endophytes which invade insect galls: insect pathogens, benign saprophytes, or fungal inquilines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dennis

    1995-08-01

    Fungi are frequently found within insect galls. However, the origin of these fungi, whether they are acting as pathogens, saprophytes invading already dead galls, or fungal inquilines which invade the gall but kill the gall maker by indirect means, is rarely investigated. A pathogenic role for these fungi is usually inferred but never tested. I chose the following leaf-galling-insect/host-plant pairs (1) a cynipid which forms two-chambered galls on the veins of Oregon white oak, (2) a cynipid which forms single-chambered galls on California coast live oak, and (3) an aphid which forms galls on narrowleaf cottonwood leaves. All pairs were reported to have fungi associated with dead insects inside the gall. These fungi were cultured and identified. For the two cynipids, all fungi found inside the galls were also present in the leaves as fungal endophytes. The cottonwood leaves examined did not harbor fungal endophytes. For the cynipid on Oregon white oak, the fungal endophyte grows from the leaf into the gall and infects all gall tissue but does not directly kill the gall maker. The insect dies as a result of the gall tissue dying from fungal infection. Therefore, the fungus acts as an inquiline. Approximately 12.5% of these galls die as a result of invasion by the fungal endophyte.

  4. Integrating novel chemical weapons and evolutionarily increased competitive ability in success of a tropical invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu-Long; Feng, Yu-Long; Zhang, Li-Kun; Callaway, Ragan M; Valiente-Banuet, Alfonso; Luo, Du-Qiang; Liao, Zhi-Yong; Lei, Yan-Bao; Barclay, Gregor F; Silva-Pereyra, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis and the novel weapons hypothesis (NWH) are two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms for exotic plant invasions, but few studies have simultaneously tested these hypotheses. Here we aimed to integrate them in the context of Chromolaena odorata invasion. We conducted two common garden experiments in order to test the EICA hypothesis, and two laboratory experiments in order to test the NWH. In common conditions, C. odorata plants from the nonnative range were better competitors but not larger than plants from the native range, either with or without the experimental manipulation of consumers. Chromolaena odorata plants from the nonnative range were more poorly defended against aboveground herbivores but better defended against soil-borne enemies. Chromolaena odorata plants from the nonnative range produced more odoratin (Eupatorium) (a unique compound of C. odorata with both allelopathic and defensive activities) and elicited stronger allelopathic effects on species native to China, the nonnative range of the invader, than on natives of Mexico, the native range of the invader. Our results suggest that invasive plants may evolve increased competitive ability after being introduced by increasing the production of novel allelochemicals, potentially in response to naïve competitors and new enemy regimes. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Predicting how altering propagule pressure changes establishment rates of biological invaders across species pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockerhoff, Eckehard G; Kimberley, Mark; Liebhold, Andrew M; Haack, Robert A; Cavey, Joseph F

    2014-03-01

    Biological invasions resulting from international trade can cause major environmental and economic impacts. Propagule pressure is perhaps the most important factor influencing establishment, although actual arrival rates of species are rarely recorded. Furthermore, the pool of potential invaders includes many species that vary in their arrival rate and establishment potential. Therefore, we stress that it is essential to consider the size and composition of species pools arriving from source regions when estimating probabilities of establishment and effects of pathway infestation rates. To address this, we developed a novel framework and modeling approach to enable prediction of future establishments in relation to changes in arrival rate across entire species pools. We utilized 13 828 border interception records from the United States and New Zealand for 444 true bark beetle (Scolytinae) and longhorned beetle (Cerambycidae) species detected between 1949 and 2008 as proxies for arrival rates to model the relationship between arrival and establishment rates. Nonlinearity in this relationship implies that measures intended to reduce the unintended transport of potential invaders (such as phytosanitary treatments) must be highly effective in order to substantially reduce the rate of future invasions, particularly if trade volumes continue to increase.

  6. The role of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy for papillary thyroid carcinoma invading the trachea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Choi, Jae Hyuck; Kim, Kwang Sik [Jeju National University Hospital, Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the effect of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) on local failure-free survival rate (LFFS) for papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) invading the trachea. Fifty-six patients with locally advanced PTC invading the trachea were treated with surgical resection. After surgery, 21 patients received adjuvant EBRT and radioactive iodine therapy (EBRT group) and 35 patients were treated with radioactive iodine therapy (control group). The age range was 26–87 years (median, 56 years). The median follow-up period was 43 months (range, 4 to 145 months). EBRT doses ranged from 50.4 to 66 Gy (median, 60 Gy). Esophagus invasion and gross residual disease was more frequent in the EBRT group. In the control group, local recurrence developed in 9 (9/35, 26%) and new distant metastasis in 2 (2/35, 6%) patients, occurring 4 to 68 months (median, 37 months) and 53 to 68 months (median, 60 months) after surgery, respectively. Two patients had simultaneous local recurrence and new distant metastasis. There was one local failure in the EBRT group at 18 months after surgery (1/21, 5%). The 5-year LFFS was 95% in the EBRT group and 63% in the control group (p = 0.103). In the EBRT group, one late grade 2 xerostomia was developed. Although, EBRT group had a higher incidence of esophagus invasion and gross residual disease, EBRT group showed a better 5-year LFFS. Adjuvant EBRT may have contributed to the better LFFS in these patients.

  7. Life History Variation in Invading Applesnails (Pomacea canaliculata) May Pose Ecological Threats to Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfurt, R. K.; Boland, B. B.; Burks, R. L.

    2005-05-01

    In native habitats, channeled applesnails (Pomacea canaliculata) graze periphyton. However, casual observations from introduced populations suggest these invaders show variation in feeding ecology, predator response and life history strategies. Attempts to predict this consumer influence on ecosystem function suffer from a lack of basic data. We tested how salinity affected snail mortality. Both adults and hatchlings tolerated salinity levels up to 8 ppt. Adult feeding on lettuce increased significantly at 8 ppt compared to 0 ppt (p = 0.002), while hatchling consumption of algae did not vary (p = 0.284). To see how these consumers responded to predators from the invaded ecosystem, we tested behavioural responses to predatory cues from fish, turtles, crayfish and adult applesnails. Results indicated that fish and crayfish prompted similar predator-avoidance behaviors in hatchlings (p's 0.05) between native (ramshorn) and exotic applesnails, whereas adult fish consumed more applesnails (x2, p < 0.001). Our current efforts focus on examining if predator presence or macrophyte choice alters applesnail feeding rates. Research providing insight into the basic ecology of applesnails can foster management efforts at the ecosystem scale.

  8. Invaders do not require high resource levels to maintain physiological advantages in a temperate deciduous forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberling, J Mason; Fridley, Jason D

    2016-04-01

    Non-native, invasive plants are commonly typified by trait strategies associated with high resource demands and plant invasions are often thought to be dependent upon site resource availability or disturbance. However, the invasion of shade-tolerant woody species into deciduous forests of the Eastern United States seems to contradict such generalization, as growth in this ecosystem is strongly constrained by light and, secondarily, nutrient stress. In a factorial manipulation of light and soil nitrogen availability, we established an experimental resource gradient in a secondary deciduous forest to test whether three common, woody, invasive species displayed increased metabolic performance and biomass production compared to six co-occurring woody native species, and whether these predicted differences depend upon resource supply. Using hierarchical Bayesian models of photosynthesis that included leaf trait effects, we found that invasive species exhibited functional strategies associated with higher rates of carbon gain. Further, invader metabolic and growth-related attributes were more responsive to increasing light availability than those of natives, but did not fall below average native responses even in low light. Surprisingly, neither group showed direct trait or growth responses to soil N additions. However, invasive species showed increased photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiencies with decreasing N availability, while that of natives remained constant. Although invader advantage over natives was amplified in higher resource conditions in this forest, our results indicate that some invasive species can maintain physiological advantages over co-occurring natives regardless of resource conditions.

  9. Genomic signatures of rapid adaptive evolution in the bluespotted cornetfish, a Mediterranean Lessepsian invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giacomo; Azzurro, Ernesto; Golani, Daniel; Miller, Michael Ryan

    2016-07-01

    Biological invasions are increasingly creating ecological and economical problems both on land and in aquatic environments. For over a century, the Mediterranean Sea has steadily been invaded by Indian Ocean/Red Sea species (called Lessepsian invaders) via the Suez Canal, with a current estimate of ~450 species. The bluespotted cornetfish, Fistularia commersonii, considered a 'Lessepsian sprinter', entered the Mediterranean in 2000 and by 2007 had spread through the entire basin from Israel to Spain. The situation is unique and interesting both because of its unprecedented rapidity and by the fact that it took this species c. 130 years to immigrate into the Mediterranean. Using genome scans, with restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing, we evaluated neutral and selected genomic regions for Mediterranean vs. Red Sea cornetfish individuals. We found that few fixed neutral changes were detectable among populations. However, almost half of the genes associated with the 47 outlier loci (potentially under selection) were related to disease resistance and osmoregulation. Due to the short time elapsed from the beginning of the invasion to our sampling, we interpret these changes as signatures of rapid adaptation that may be explained by several mechanisms including preadaptation and strong local selection. Such genomic regions are therefore good candidates to further study their role in invasion success. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. CT texture features of liver parenchyma for predicting development of metastatic disease and overall survival in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott J; Zea, Ryan; Kim, David H; Lubner, Meghan G; Deming, Dustin A; Pickhardt, Perry J

    2018-04-01

    To determine if identifiable hepatic textural features are present at abdominal CT in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) prior to the development of CT-detectable hepatic metastases. Four filtration-histogram texture features (standard deviation, skewness, entropy and kurtosis) were extracted from the liver parenchyma on portal venous phase CT images at staging and post-treatment surveillance. Surveillance scans corresponded to the last scan prior to the development of CT-detectable CRC liver metastases in 29 patients (median time interval, 6 months), and these were compared with interval-matched surveillance scans in 60 CRC patients who did not develop liver metastases. Predictive models of liver metastasis-free survival and overall survival were built using regularised Cox proportional hazards regression. Texture features did not significantly differ between cases and controls. For Cox models using all features as predictors, all coefficients were shrunk to zero, suggesting no association between any CT texture features and outcomes. Prognostic indices derived from entropy features at surveillance CT incorrectly classified patients into risk groups for future liver metastases (p < 0.001). On surveillance CT scans immediately prior to the development of CRC liver metastases, we found no evidence suggesting that changes in identifiable hepatic texture features were predictive of their development. • No correlation between liver texture features and metastasis-free survival was observed. • Liver texture features incorrectly classified patients into risk groups for liver metastases. • Standardised texture analysis workflows need to be developed to improve research reproducibility.

  11. Carcinoma of Gall bladder with distant metastasis to breast parenchyma. Report of a case and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaran, D.; Anamalai, M.; Velu, U.; Julka, P.K.; Nambirajan, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gall bladder carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in India. Gall bladder cancer with metastasis to the breast is very rare. Herein we intend to report a case of carcinoma gall bladder with breast metastasis and a short review of the literature. Methods: This report describes an interesting and unusual case of gall bladder carcinoma presenting with breast metastasis. Case report: A 38-year lady presented with complaints of right abdominal pain. Bilateral breast examination showed 2 2 cm palpable lump in the upper outer quadrant of the left breast. Contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed circumferential thickening of gall bladder with the loss of fat plane with the adjacent liver parenchyma. Biopsy from the breast lump was reported as metastatic adenocarcinoma compatible with primary in the gall bladder. Whole body PET-CT showed gall bladder mass with abdominal and pelvic nodes with metastasis to liver, left breast, C7 vertebral body and left supra-clavicular node. She was diagnosed to have disseminated carcinoma gall bladder with liver, breast and supraclavicular nodal metastasis. She received palliative chemotherapy with gemcitabine and carboplatin and radiotherapy to C7 vertebra. After receiving 3 cycles of chemotherapy, chemotherapy was changed to the second line with single agent capecitabine. In spite of two lines of chemotherapy, she succumbed to disease progression and expired. Conclusion: There are limited examples of gall bladder adenocarcinoma with simultaneous metastasis to breast in the English literature. Our case showed an unusual dissemination of gall bladder cancer

  12. The amount of parenchyma and living fibers affects storage of nonstructural carbohydrates in young stems and roots of temperate trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavcová, Lenka; Hoch, Günter; Morris, Hugh; Ghiasi, Sara; Jansen, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Concentrations of nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs) are used as proxies for the net carbon balance of trees and as indicators of carbon starvation resulting from environmental stress. Woody organs are the largest NSC-storing compartments in forest ecosystems; therefore, it is essential to understand the factors that affect the size of this important storage pool. In wood, NSC are predominantly deposited in ray and axial parenchyma (RAP); however, direct links between nutrient storage and RAP anatomy have not yet been established. Here, we tested whether the NSC storage capacity of wood is influenced by the amount of RAP. We measured NSC concentrations and RAP fractions in root and stem sapwood of 12 temperate species sampled at the onset of winter dormancy and in stem sapwood of four tropical trees growing in an evergreen lowland rainforest. The patterns of starch distribution were visualized by staining with Lugol's solution. The concentration of NSCs in sapwood of temperate trees scales tightly with the amount of RAP and living fibers (LFs), with almost all RAP and LFs being densely packed with starch grains. In contrast, the tropical species had lower NSC concentrations despite their higher RAP and LFs fraction and had considerable interspecific differences in starch distribution. The differences in RAP and LFs abundance affect the ability of sapwood to store NSC in temperate trees, whereas a more diverse set of functions of RAP might be pronounced in species growing in a tropical environment with little seasonality. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  13. Abnormalities of the airways and lung parenchyma in asthmatics: CT observations in 50 patients and inter- and intraobserver variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, P.; Mourey-Gerosa, I.; Benali, K.; Brauner, M.W.; Leung, A.N.; Lenoir, S..; Cordeau, M.P.; Mazoyer, B.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the CT abnormalities of airways and lung parenchyma in asthmatic patients and to assess inter- and intraobserver variability for these abnormalities. The CT scans of 50 asthmatic patients and 10 healthy volunteers were assessed independently by four independent chest radiologists who were masked with respect to the clinical informations. Bronchiectasis involving mostly subsegmental and destal bronchi was noted in 28.5% of the asthmatic subjects and none of the non-asthmatics. Bronchial wall thickening, small centrilobular opacities and decreased lung attenuation were observed in 82%, 21% and 31% of asthmatic patients respectively, compared with 7%, 5% and 7% of healthy subjects. The intra- and interobserver agreements for these four CT abnormalities were measured by the kappa statistic and ranged from 0.60 to 0.79 and from 0.40 to 0.64, respectively. It is concluded that asthmatic patients may exhibit bronchial wall thickening, bronchiectasis and morphological abnormalities suggestive of distal airways disease that can be assessed on CT scans with a clinically acceptable observer variability. (orig.)

  14. Tumors of the pineal region: radiological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, G.; Delgado, F.; Cano, A.; Vicente, J.; Ramos, M.

    1997-01-01

    To consider the different radiological findings that, together with age, sex, clinical picture and serum markers, indicate a presumed or even definitive diagnosis in tumors of the pineal region. We reviewed retrospectively 18 patients diagnosed as having pineal region tumors. The lesions in this series consisted of seven germinoma, three meningiomas, one pineoblastoma. two ependymomas, one teratoma, two glial cysts, and arachnoid cyst and a lipoma. All but the arachnoid cysts and the lipoma were confirmed histologically. We took into account mainly the epidemiological data, tumor markers and CT and MR features. The germinoma was the most common lesions, representing 38.8% of the tumors in our series. All developed in men (mean age: 21 years). Small non tumoral calcifications were present in pineal gland in six of these cases. This tumor usually invades adjacent structures and produces metastatic seeding in CSF. The pineoblastoma contained prominent tumor calcifications. Meningiomas were detected only in middle-aged women. In addition to the fact that the behavior of these lesions was typical of that meningiomas in other locations, meningeal enhancement in the vicinity of the extraaxial tumor aided in the diagnosis. The teratoma showed variable attenuation, ranging from a fatty substance to calcium, and elevated fetoprotein levels. The glial cyst is a cyst lesion that does not be-have exactly like the CSF, while the arachnoid cyst was isointense with respect to the CSF in all sequences. Enhancement was observed in the glial cysts, one peripheral and the other nodular. The assessment of age, sex, clinical picture and tumor markers, together with the features observed in CT an MR images are suggestive of the histological diagnosis of pineal region tumors. We recommend the use of CT because of its availability and its ability detect calcifications, thus indicating a specific histological type, and of MR because of its greater anatomical definition and its, ability to

  15. CISS MR imaging findings of epidermoid tumor : comparison with spin-echo images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Sang Yoel; Heo, Jin Sam; Jung, Hoon Sik; Lee, Suck Hong; Kim, Byung Soo [Pusan National Univ. College of Medicine, Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Wha [Ulsan Univ. Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate CISS MR imaging findings of epidermoid tumor in comparison with conventional spin-echo images. We studied 6 cases of epidermoid tumor in the subarachnoid space. We used a 1.5T MR unit to obtain CISS images(TR/TE/FA ; 12.3msec/5.9 msec/700) and T1- and T2- weighted spin-echo images. CISS MR imaging findings were evaluated with respect to tumor's signal intensity , contour, and relation with adjacent structures. Conspicuity of the tumor was compared between CISS and spin-echo images. A quantitative analysis was performed by measuring tumor to CSF contrast. In qualitative analysis, three radiologists independently compared CISS image and conventional spin-echo images for visibility of the tumor and graded them into three categories( poor, good, and excellent). Epidermoid tumors were located in the cerebellopontine angle in 4 cases, the prepontine cisstern in 1 case, and the cerebellopontine angle-prepontine cistern in 1 case. The tumors were hyperintense relative to brain parenchyma and hypointense relative to CSF on CISS images, were lobulated, encased adjacent cranial nerve and vessels, and invaginated into brain parenchyma. In qualitative analysis, CISS images showed clear demarcation between tumor and CSF, exact tumor extension, and tumor's relation with cranial nerves and vessels better than conventional spin-echo images. In quantitative analysis, the mean contrast values of tumor to CSF on T1-, T2-weighted images, and CISS images were 0.12, 0.06, and 0.52, respectively. The contrast value for CISS images was significantly higher than that for T1-and T2-weighted images(p<0.05). Epidermoid tumors in the subarachnoid space are better demonstrated on CISS images than on conventional spin-echo images. This special MR sequence can be added as a routine protocol in the diagnosis of subarachnoid epidermoid tumor.

  16. Propagule pressure, genetic structure, and geographic origins of Chondrilla juncea (Asteraceae): an apomictic invader on three continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, John F; Schwarzländer, Mark; Kinter, C Lynn; Smith, James F; Novak, Stephen J

    2013-09-01

    Assessing propagule pressure and geographic origins of invasive species provides insight into the invasion process. Rush skeletonweed (Chondrilla juncea; Asteraceae) is an apomictic, perennial plant that is invasive in Australia, South America (Argentina), and North America (Canada and the United States). This study comprehensively compares propagule pressure and geographic structure of genotypes to improve our understanding of a clonal invasion and enhance management strategies. • We analyzed 1056 native range plants from Eurasia and 1156 plants from three invaded continents using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) techniques. We used measures of diversity (Simpson's D) and evenness (E), analysis of molecular variance, and Mantel tests to compare invasions, and genotype similarity to determine origins of invasive genotypes. • We found 682 unique genotypes in the native range, but only 13 in the invaded regions. Each invaded region contained distinct AFLP genotypes, suggesting independent introduction events, probably with different geographic origins. Relatively low propagule pressure was associated with each introduction around the globe, but levels of among-population variation differed. We found exact AFLP genotype matches between the native and invaded ranges for five of the 13 invasive genotypes. • Invasion dynamics can vary across invaded ranges within a species. Intensive sampling for molecular analyses can provide insight for understanding intraspecific invasion dynamics, which can hold significance for the management of plant species, especially by finding origins and distributions of invasive genotypes for classical biological control efforts.

  17. [Regression and therapy-resistance of primary liver tumors and liver metastases after regional chemotherapy and local tumor ablation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, H-P

    2005-05-01

    High dosage regional chemotherapy, chemoembolization and other methods of regional treatment are commonly used to treat unresectable primary liver malignancies and liver metastases. In liver malignancies of childhood neoadjuvant chemotherapy is successfully combined with surgical treatment. Chemotherapy and local tumor ablation lead to characteristic histomorphologic changes: Complete destruction of the tumor tissue and its vascular bed is followed by encapsulated necroses. After selective eradication of the tumor cells under preservation of the fibrovasular bed the tumor is replaced by hypocellular edematous and fibrotic tissue. If completely damaged tumor tissue is absorbed quickly, the tumor area is replaced by regenerating liver tissue. Obliterating fibrohyalinosis of tumor vessels, and perivascular edema or necrosis indicate tissue damage along the vascular bed. Degenerative pleomorphism of tumor cells, steatosis, hydropic swelling and Malloryhyalin in HCC can represent cytologic findings of cytotoxic cellular damage. Macroscopic type of HCC influences significantly the response to treatment. Multinodular HCC often contain viable tumor nodules close to destroyed nodules after treatment. Encapsulated uninodular tumors undergo complete necrosis much easier. Large size and a tumor capsule limitate the effect of percutaneous injection of ethanol into HCC. In carcinomas with an infiltrating border, especially in metastases of adenocarcinomas and hepatic cholangiocarcinoma cytostatic treatment damages the tumor tissue mainly in the periphery. Nevertheless the infiltrating rim, portal veins, lymphatic spaces and bile ducts as well as the angle between liver capsule, tumor nodule and bordering parenchyma are the main refugees of viable tumor tissue even after high dosage regional chemotherapy. This local resistance is caused by special local conditions of vascularization and perfusion. These residues are the source of local tumor progression and distant metastases

  18. Neem leaf glycoprotein prophylaxis transduces immune dependent stop signal for tumor angiogenic switch within tumor microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptak Banerjee

    Full Text Available We have reported that prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP induces significant restriction of solid tumor growth in mice. Here, we investigate whether the effect of such pretreatment (25µg/mice; weekly, 4 times benefits regulation of tumor angiogenesis, an obligate factor for tumor progression. We show that NLGP pretreatment results in vascular normalization in melanoma and carcinoma bearing mice along with downregulation of CD31, VEGF and VEGFR2. NLGP pretreatment facilitates profound infiltration of CD8+ T cells within tumor parenchyma, which subsequently regulates VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling in CD31+ vascular endothelial cells to prevent aberrant neovascularization. Pericyte stabilization, VEGF dependent inhibition of VEC proliferation and subsequent vascular normalization are also experienced. Studies in immune compromised mice confirmed that these vascular and intratumoral changes in angiogenic profile are dependent upon active adoptive immunity particularly those mediated by CD8+ T cells. Accumulated evidences suggest that NLGP regulated immunomodulation is active in tumor growth restriction and normalization of tumor angiogenesis as well, thereby, signifying its clinical translation.

  19. Facilitating the recovery of natural evergreen forests in South Africa via invader plant stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coert J. Geldenhuys

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to general belief, planted and naturalized stands of introduced species facilitate the recovery of natural evergreen forests and their diversity. Forest rehabilitation actions are often performed at great cost: mature forest species are planted, while species with adaptations to recover effectively and quickly after severe disturbance are ignored; or stands are cleared of invasive alien species before native tree species are planted. By contrast, cost-effective commercial plantation forestry systems generally use fast-growing pioneer tree species introduced from other natural forest regions. Such planted tree stands often facilitate the recovery of shade-tolerant native forest species. This paper provides a brief overview of disturbance-recovery processes at landscape level, and how pioneer stands of both native and introduced tree species develop from monocultures to diverse mature forest communities. It uses one example of a study of how natural forest species from small forest patches of 3 ha in total invaded a 90-ha stand of the invasive Black wattle, Acacia mearnsii, over a distance of 3.1 ha at Swellendam near Cape Town, South Africa. The study recorded 329 forest species clusters across the wattle stand: more large clusters closer to and more smaller clusters further away from natural forest patches. The 28 recorded forest species (of potentially 40 species in the surrounding forest patches included 79% tree and 21% shrub species. Colonizing forest species had mostly larger fleshy fruit and softer small seeds, and were dispersed by mostly birds and primate species. Maturing forest trees within developing clusters in the wattle stand became a source for forest regeneration away from the clusters, showing different expansion patterns. Four sets of fenced-unfenced plots in the wattle stand showed the impact of browsing by livestock, antelope, rodents and insects on the successful establishment of regenerating forest species, and the

  20. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shellese A. Cannonier

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung, directly invade into bone (head and neck or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  1. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A., E-mail: Julie.sterling@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Veterans Affairs, Tennessee Valley Healthcare System, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Vanderbilt Center for Bone Biology, Department of Medicine, Division of Clinical Pharmacology Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 372335 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-26

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors.

  2. The Role of Hedgehog Signaling in Tumor Induced Bone Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannonier, Shellese A.; Sterling, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant progress in cancer treatments, tumor induced bone disease continues to cause significant morbidities. While tumors show distinct mutations and clinical characteristics, they behave similarly once they establish in bone. Tumors can metastasize to bone from distant sites (breast, prostate, lung), directly invade into bone (head and neck) or originate from the bone (melanoma, chondrosarcoma) where they cause pain, fractures, hypercalcemia, and ultimately, poor prognoses and outcomes. Tumors in bone secrete factors (interleukins and parathyroid hormone-related protein) that induce RANKL expression from osteoblasts, causing an increase in osteoclast mediated bone resorption. While the mechanisms involved varies slightly between tumor types, many tumors display an increase in Hedgehog signaling components that lead to increased tumor growth, therapy failure, and metastasis. The work of multiple laboratories has detailed Hh signaling in several tumor types and revealed that tumor establishment in bone can be controlled by both canonical and non-canonical Hh signaling in a cell type specific manner. This review will explore the role of Hh signaling in the modulation of tumor induced bone disease, and will shed insight into possible therapeutic interventions for blocking Hh signaling in these tumors

  3. Listeria monocytogenes efficiently invades caco-2 cells after low-temperature storage in broth and on deli meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Koch, Anette Granly; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how various growth conditions influence the virulence of Listeria monocytogenes monitored by its ability to invade the epithelial cell lines Caco-2 and INT-407. The growth conditions examined were modified atmosphere-packaged deli meat and brain heart...... infusion broth (BHI) with and without salt. Five strains of L. monocytogenes were selected to investigate their invasiveness and all strains invaded Caco-2 cells at higher levels than INT-407 cells. Further, the clinical strains (3443 and 3734) were more invasive (p ... to invade Caco-2 cells was compared after growth on a fermented sausage and on cured cooked ham to that of bacteria grown in BHI broth supplemented with salt. Samples were stored under chilling conditions for up to 4 weeks. The results showed no difference (p > 0.05) in invasiveness after 7 days at 10...

  4. Extratemporal abnormalities of brain parenchyma in young adults with temporal lobe epilepsy: A diffusion tensor imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, X.-Y.; Qiu, S.-J.; Liu, Z.-Y.; Wang, H.-Z.; Xiong, W.-F.; Li, S.-S.; Wang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To examine extratemporal abnormalities of the cerebral parenchyma in young adult temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Materials and methods: The study comprised 20 adults with unilateral TLE and 20 controls. The fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), parallel eigenvalue (λ ∥ ), and perpendicular eigenvalue (λ ⊥ ) were calculated in the regions of interest (ROIs) using a 3 T MRI system. ROIs included the anterior/posterior limb of the internal capsule (AIC/PIC), external capsule (EC), head of caudate nucleus (HCN), lenticular nucleus (LN), thalamus (TL), and genu/body/splenium of the corpus callosum (GCC/BCC/SCC). Results: Compared to controls, TLE patients showed lower FA in all ROIs; higher ADC in bilateral ECs, HCNs, TLs, and BCC; lower λ ∥ in the ipsilateral LN and bilateral AICs, TL, and GCC; and higher λ ⊥ in all ROIs except the bilateral PICs. In TLE patients, the ipsilateral TL had decreased FA compared with the contralateral TL. Pearson correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between the ADC of the GCC and the age at onset of epilepsy; the λ ∥ of the ipsilateral PIC and age at onset of epilepsy; the λ ⊥ of the contralateral AIC and duration of epilepsy, respectively; and a positive correlation between the ADC of the GCC and the duration of epilepsy and the λ ⊥ of the GCC and the duration of epilepsy, respectively. Conclusion: The study revealed bilateral extratemporal abnormalities in young adult TLE patients compared with controls. In addition, TLE patients with younger age at onset or longer duration of epilepsy may have more serious extratemporal changes

  5. Sleep and rhythm changes at the time of Trypanosoma brucei invasion of the brain parenchyma in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seke Etet, Paul F; Palomba, Maria; Colavito, Valeria; Grassi-Zucconi, Gigliola; Bentivoglio, Marina; Bertini, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or sleeping sickness, is a severe disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei (T.b.). The disease hallmark is sleep alterations. Brain involvement in HAT is a crucial pathogenetic step for disease diagnosis and therapy. In this study, a rat model of African trypanosomiasis was used to assess changes of sleep-wake, rest-activity, and body temperature rhythms in the time window previously shown as crucial for brain parenchyma invasion by T.b. to determine potential biomarkers of this event. Chronic radiotelemetric monitoring in Sprague-Dawley rats was used to continuously record electroencephalogram, electromyogram, rest-activity, and body temperature in the same animals before (baseline recording) and after infection. Rats were infected with T.b. brucei. Data were acquired from 1 to 20 d after infection (parasite neuroinvasion initiates at 11-13 d post-infection in this model), and were compared to baseline values. Sleep parameters were manually scored from electroencephalographic-electromyographic tracings. Circadian rhythms of sleep time, slow-wave activity, rest-activity, and body temperature were studied using cosinor rhythmometry. Results revealed alterations of most of the analyzed parameters. In particular, sleep pattern and sleep-wake organization plus rest-activity and body temperature rhythms exhibited early quantitative and qualitative alterations, which became marked around the time interval crucial for parasite neuroinvasion or shortly after. Data derived from actigrams showed close correspondence with those from hypnograms, suggesting that rest-activity could be useful to monitor sleep-wake alterations in African trypanosomiasis.

  6. A particle-based model to simulate the micromechanics of single-plant parenchyma cells and aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Liedekerke, P; Tijskens, E; Smeedts, B; Ramon, H; Ghysels, P; Samaey, G; Roose, D

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with addressing how plant tissue mechanics is related to the micromechanics of cells. To this end, we propose a mesh-free particle method to simulate the mechanics of both individual plant cells (parenchyma) and cell aggregates in response to external stresses. The model considers two important features in the plant cell: (1) the cell protoplasm, the interior liquid phase inducing hydrodynamic phenomena, and (2) the cell wall material, a viscoelastic solid material that contains the protoplasm. In this particle framework, the cell fluid is modeled by smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a mesh-free method typically used to address problems with gas and fluid dynamics. In the solid phase (cell wall) on the other hand, the particles are connected by pairwise interactions holding them together and preventing the fluid to penetrate the cell wall. The cell wall hydraulic conductivity (permeability) is built in as well through the SPH formulation. Although this model is also meant to be able to deal with dynamic and even violent situations (leading to cell wall rupture or cell–cell debonding), we have concentrated on quasi-static conditions. The results of single-cell compression simulations show that the conclusions found by analytical models and experiments can be reproduced at least qualitatively. Relaxation tests revealed that plant cells have short relaxation times (1 µs–10 µs) compared to mammalian cells. Simulations performed on cell aggregates indicated an influence of the cellular organization to the tissue response, as was also observed in experiments done on tissues with a similar structure

  7. Competitive helping increases with the size of biological markets and invades defection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Pat

    2011-07-21

    Cooperation between unrelated individuals remains a puzzle in evolutionary biology. Recent work indicates that partner choice can select for high levels of helping. More generally, helping can be seen as but one strategy used to compete for partners within a broader biological market, yet giving within such markets has received little mathematical investigation. In the present model, individuals help others to attract attention from them and thus receive a larger share of any help actively or passively provided by those others. The evolutionarily stable level of helping increases with the size of the biological market and the degree of partner choice. Furthermore, if individuals passively produce some no-cost help to partners, competitive helping can then invade populations of non-helpers because helpers directly benefit from increasing their access to potential partners. This framework of competitive helping demonstrates how high helping can be achieved and why different populations may differ in helping levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Composing a Tumor Specific Bacterial Promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V Deyneko

    Full Text Available Systemically applied Salmonella enterica spp. have been shown to invade and colonize neoplastic tissues where it retards the growth of many tumors. This offers the possibility to use the bacteria as a vehicle for the tumor specific delivery of therapeutic molecules. Specificity of such delivery is solely depending on promoter sequences that control the production of a target molecule. We have established the functional structure of bacterial promoters that are transcriptionally active exclusively in tumor tissues after systemic application. We observed that the specific transcriptional activation is accomplished by a combination of a weak basal promoter and a strong FNR binding site. This represents a minimal set of control elements required for such activation. In natural promoters, additional DNA remodeling elements are found that alter the level of transcription quantitatively. Inefficiency of the basal promoter ensures the absence of transcription outside tumors. As a proof of concept, we compiled an artificial promoter sequence from individual motifs representing FNR and basal promoter and showed specific activation in a tumor microenvironment. Our results open possibilities for the generation of promoters with an adjusted level of expression of target proteins in particular for applications in bacterial tumor therapy.

  9. Tumoral tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, E.E.

    1979-01-01

    Direct tumor tracers are subdivided in the following categories:metabolite tracers, antitumoral tracers, radioactive proteins and cations. Use of 67 Ga-citrate as a clinically important tumoral tracer is emphasized and gallium-67 whole-body scintigraphy is discussed in detail. (M.A.) [pt

  10. Control fast or control smart: When should invading pathogens be controlled?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin N Thompson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The intuitive response to an invading pathogen is to start disease management as rapidly as possible, since this would be expected to minimise the future impacts of disease. However, since more spread data become available as an outbreak unfolds, processes underpinning pathogen transmission can almost always be characterised more precisely later in epidemics. This allows the future progression of any outbreak to be forecast more accurately, and so enables control interventions to be targeted more precisely. There is also the chance that the outbreak might die out without any intervention whatsoever, making prophylactic control unnecessary. Optimal decision-making involves continuously balancing these potential benefits of waiting against the possible costs of further spread. We introduce a generic, extensible data-driven algorithm based on parameter estimation and outbreak simulation for making decisions in real-time concerning when and how to control an invading pathogen. The Control Smart Algorithm (CSA resolves the trade-off between the competing advantages of controlling as soon as possible and controlling later when more information has become available. We show-using a generic mathematical model representing the transmission of a pathogen of agricultural animals or plants through a population of farms or fields-how the CSA allows the timing and level of deployment of vaccination or chemical control to be optimised. In particular, the algorithm outperforms simpler strategies such as intervening when the outbreak size reaches a pre-specified threshold, or controlling when the outbreak has persisted for a threshold length of time. This remains the case even if the simpler methods are fully optimised in advance. Our work highlights the potential benefits of giving careful consideration to the question of when to start disease management during emerging outbreaks, and provides a concrete framework to allow policy-makers to make this decision.

  11. Control fast or control smart: When should invading pathogens be controlled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robin N; Gilligan, Christopher A; Cunniffe, Nik J

    2018-02-01

    The intuitive response to an invading pathogen is to start disease management as rapidly as possible, since this would be expected to minimise the future impacts of disease. However, since more spread data become available as an outbreak unfolds, processes underpinning pathogen transmission can almost always be characterised more precisely later in epidemics. This allows the future progression of any outbreak to be forecast more accurately, and so enables control interventions to be targeted more precisely. There is also the chance that the outbreak might die out without any intervention whatsoever, making prophylactic control unnecessary. Optimal decision-making involves continuously balancing these potential benefits of waiting against the possible costs of further spread. We introduce a generic, extensible data-driven algorithm based on parameter estimation and outbreak simulation for making decisions in real-time concerning when and how to control an invading pathogen. The Control Smart Algorithm (CSA) resolves the trade-off between the competing advantages of controlling as soon as possible and controlling later when more information has become available. We show-using a generic mathematical model representing the transmission of a pathogen of agricultural animals or plants through a population of farms or fields-how the CSA allows the timing and level of deployment of vaccination or chemical control to be optimised. In particular, the algorithm outperforms simpler strategies such as intervening when the outbreak size reaches a pre-specified threshold, or controlling when the outbreak has persisted for a threshold length of time. This remains the case even if the simpler methods are fully optimised in advance. Our work highlights the potential benefits of giving careful consideration to the question of when to start disease management during emerging outbreaks, and provides a concrete framework to allow policy-makers to make this decision.

  12. Red Lionfish (Pterois volitans Invade San Salvador, Bahamas: No Early Effects on Coral and Fish Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander, Amanda K.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological invaders are a leading contributor to global losses of biodiversity. A recent invader to the waters surrounding San Salvador, Bahamas, the red lionfish, Pterois volitans, was first reported in 2006; by 2009 they were common in waters 2-40 m deep around the island. Our study collected data on coral communities and fish assemblages at three patch reef complexes (Rice Bay, Rocky Point, Lindsay Reef in 2007, during the initial phase of the invasion, and compared the results to a nearly identical study done in 2001 before P. volitans colonized San Salvador. Prey selection and quantity of consumption by P. volitans were also examined. Coral and fish species richness, diversity, percent cover (corals and abundance (fish were similar in 2001 and 2007. Of the 5,078 fish recorded during our study on shallow patch reefs, only two were P. volitans, but they were more prevalent in deeper water along San Salvador’s “wall.” Captured P. volitans ranged in size from 19-32 cm, all longer than maturity length. Pallid goby (Coryphopterus eidolon, black cap basslet (Gramma melacara and red night shrimp (Rynchocienetes rigens were the most commonly identified stomach contents. The effects of the successful invasion and increasing population of P. volitans on San Salvador’s reef ecosystem are uncertain at this time; future monitoring of potential changes in coral and fish communities on the patch reefs of San Salvador is recommended to determine if population control measures need to be considered. Initial post-invasion data (2007, along with pre-invasion data (2001, are valuable benchmarks for future studies.

  13. Efficacy of prophylactic splenectomy for proximal advanced gastric cancer invading greater curvature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Yu; Haruta, Shusuke; Shindoh, Junichi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Ueno, Masaki; Udagawa, Harushi

    2017-05-25

    For proximal gastric cancer invading the greater curvature, concomitant splenectomy is frequently performed to secure the clearance of lymph node metastases. However, prognostic impact of prophylactic splenectomy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify the oncological significance of prophylactic splenectomy for advanced proximal gastric cancer invading the greater curvature. Retrospective review of 108 patients who underwent total or subtotal gastrectomy for advanced proximal gastric cancer involving the greater curvature was performed. Short-term and long-term outcomes were compared between the patients who underwent splenectomy (n = 63) and those who did not (n = 45). Patients who underwent splenectomy showed higher amount of blood loss (538 vs. 450 mL, p = 0.016) and morbidity rate (30.2 vs. 13.3, p = 0.041) compared with those who did not undergo splenectomy. In particular, pancreas-related complications were frequently observed among patients who received splenectomy (17.4 vs. 0%, p = 0.003). However, no significant improvement of long-term outcomes were confirmed in the cases with splenectomy (5-year recurrence-free rate, 60.2 vs. 67.3%; p = 0.609 and 5-year overall survival rates, 63.7 vs. 73.6%; p = 0.769). On the other hand, splenectomy was correlated with marginally better survival in patients with Borrmann type 1 or 2 gastric cancer (p = 0.072). For advanced proximal gastric cancer involving the greater curvature, prophylactic splenectomy may have no significant prognostic impact despite the increased morbidity rate after surgery. Such surgical procedure should be avoided as long as lymph node involvement is not evident.

  14. Stoichiometric constraints do not limit successful invaders: zebra mussels in Swedish lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddafi, Rahmat; Eklöv, Peter; Pettersson, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Elemental imbalances of carbon (C): nitrogen (N): phosphorus (P) ratios in food resources can constrain the growth of grazers owning to tight coupling between growth rate, RNA allocation and biomass P content in animals. Testing for stoichiometric constraints among invasive species is a novel challenge in invasion ecology to unravel how a successful invader tackles ecological barriers in novel ecosystems. We examined the C:P and N:P ratios and the condition factor of a successful invader in lakes, the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha), collected from two Swedish lakes. Concurrently, we analyzed the elemental composition of the food (seston) and tissue of the mussels in which nutrient composition of food and mussels varied over time. Zebra mussel condition factor was weakly related to the their own tissue N:P and C:P ratios, although the relation with the later ratio was not significant. Smaller mussels had relatively lower tissue N:P ratio and higher condition factor. There was no difference in C:P and N:P ratios between seston and mussels' tissues. Our results indicated that the variation in nutrient stoichiometry of zebra mussels can be explained by food quality and quantity. Our study suggests that fitness of invasive zebra mussels is not constrained by nutrient stoichiometry which is likely to be important for their proliferation in novel ecosystems. The lack of imbalance in C:P and N:P ratios between seston and mussels along with high tissue C:P ratio of the mussel allow them to tolerate potential P limitation and maintain high growth rate. Moreover, zebra mussels are able to change their tissue C:P and N:P ratios in response to the variation in elemental composition of their food. This can also help them to bypass potential nutrient stoichiometric constraints. Our finding is an important step towards understanding the mechanisms contributing to the success of exotic species from stoichiometric principles.

  15. Stoichiometric constraints do not limit successful invaders: zebra mussels in Swedish lakes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmat Naddafi

    Full Text Available Elemental imbalances of carbon (C: nitrogen (N: phosphorus (P ratios in food resources can constrain the growth of grazers owning to tight coupling between growth rate, RNA allocation and biomass P content in animals. Testing for stoichiometric constraints among invasive species is a novel challenge in invasion ecology to unravel how a successful invader tackles ecological barriers in novel ecosystems.We examined the C:P and N:P ratios and the condition factor of a successful invader in lakes, the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha, collected from two Swedish lakes. Concurrently, we analyzed the elemental composition of the food (seston and tissue of the mussels in which nutrient composition of food and mussels varied over time. Zebra mussel condition factor was weakly related to the their own tissue N:P and C:P ratios, although the relation with the later ratio was not significant. Smaller mussels had relatively lower tissue N:P ratio and higher condition factor. There was no difference in C:P and N:P ratios between seston and mussels' tissues. Our results indicated that the variation in nutrient stoichiometry of zebra mussels can be explained by food quality and quantity.Our study suggests that fitness of invasive zebra mussels is not constrained by nutrient stoichiometry which is likely to be important for their proliferation in novel ecosystems. The lack of imbalance in C:P and N:P ratios between seston and mussels along with high tissue C:P ratio of the mussel allow them to tolerate potential P limitation and maintain high growth rate. Moreover, zebra mussels are able to change their tissue C:P and N:P ratios in response to the variation in elemental composition of their food. This can also help them to bypass potential nutrient stoichiometric constraints. Our finding is an important step towards understanding the mechanisms contributing to the success of exotic species from stoichiometric principles.

  16. Linking Native and Invader Traits Explains Native Spider Population Responses to Plant Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer N Smith

    Full Text Available Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe stems to determine if native spiders' web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to structural changes arising from C. stoebe invasion. After two years, irregular web-spiders were >30 times more abundant and orb weavers were >23 times more abundant on simulated invasion plots compared to controls. Additionally, irregular web-spiders on simulated invasion plots built webs that were 4.4 times larger and 5.0 times more likely to capture prey, leading to >2-fold increases in recruitment. Orb-weavers showed no differences in web size or prey captures between treatments. Web-spider responses to simulated invasion mimicked patterns following natural invasions, confirming that C. stoebe's architecture is likely the primary attribute driving native spider responses to these invasions. Differences in spider responses were attributable to differences in web construction behaviors relative to historic web substrate constraints. Orb-weavers in this system constructed webs between multiple plants, so they were limited by the overall quantity of native substrates but not by the architecture of individual native plant species. Irregular web-spiders built their webs within individual plants and were greatly constrained by the diminutive architecture of native plant substrates, so they were limited both by quantity and quality of native substrates. Evaluating native species traits in the context of invader-driven change can explain invasion outcomes and help to identify factors limiting native populations.

  17. Animal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    There are few trained veterinary radiation oncologists and the expense of facilities has limited the extent to which this modality is used. In recent years, a few cobalt teletherapy units and megavoltage x-ray units have been employed in larger veterinary institutions. In addition, some radiation oncologists of human medical institutions are interested and willing to cooperate with veterinarians in the treatment of animal tumors. Carefully designed studies of the response of animal tumors to new modalities serve two valuable purposes. First, these studies may lead to improved tumor control in companion animals. Second, these studies may have important implications to the improvement of therapy of human tumors. Much remains to be learned of animal tumor biology so that appropriate model systems can be described for such studies. Many of the latter studies can be sponsored by agencies interested in the improvement of cancer management

  18. Dynamic-contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of cirrhotic liver parenchyma: A comparison between gadolinium–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid and gadolinium–ethoxybenzyl–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chun-Yi; Chang, Wei-Chou; Chou, Chen-Te; Chen, Ran-Chou

    2015-01-01

    Background: The newly developed magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) hepatocyte-specific contrast agent, gadolinium–ethoxybenzyl–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd–EOB–DTPA), has different excretion pathways from the conventional MRI contrast agent, gadolinium–diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd–DTPA). In this study, we compare the enhancement effect of the liver and renal parenchyma between these two contrast agents for patients with liver cirrhosis. Methods: We retrospectively inclu...

  19. Early-postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in glial tumors: prediction of tumor regrowth and recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, Gazanfer; Akpinar, Ihsan N. E-mail: i.akpinar@mailcity.com; Baltacioglu, Feyyaz; Erzen, Canan; Kilic, Tuerker; Elmaci, Ilhan; Pamir, Necmettin

    2003-02-01

    Objective: This study investigated the value of early-postoperative magnetic resonance (EPMR) imaging in the detection of residual glial tumor and investigated the role of EPMR for the prediction of tumor regrowth and recurrence. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance imaging results from 50 adult patients who underwent surgical treatment for supratentorial glial tumor. There were glioblastoma multiforme in 25 patients, astrocytoma (grades II and III) in 11 patients, oligodendroglioma (grades II and III) in 9 patients, and oligoastrocytoma (grades II and III) in 5 patients. EPMR imaging was performed within 24 h after surgery. EPMR findings were compared with the neurosurgeon's intraoperative estimation of gross tumor removal. Patterns of contrast enhancement at the resection site, in residual and developing tumor tissue and blood at the resection site were evaluated on EPMR and in follow-up studies. 'Residual tumor' was defined as contrast enhancing mass at the operative site on EPMR. 'Regrowth' was defined as contrast enhancing mass detected on follow-up in the same location as the primary tumor. 'Recurrence' was defined as appearance of a mass lesion in the brain parenchyma distant from the resection bed during follow-up. Results: Nineteen patients showed no evidence of residual tumor, regrowth, or recurrence on EPMR or any of the later follow-up radiological examinations. EPMR identified 20 cases of residual tumor. Follow-up showed tumor regrowth in 10 patients, and tumor recurrence in 1 case. EPMR showed contrast enhancement of the resection bed in 45 of the 50 patients. Four of the 20 residual tumors showed a thick linear enhancement pattern, and the other 16 cases exhibited thick linear-nodular enhancement. No thin linear enhancement was observed in the residual tumor group. Nine of the 10-regrowth tumors showed a thick linear-nodular enhancement pattern, and one

  20. Transarticular invasion of the sacroiliac joints by malignant pelvic bone tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hwang Woo; Huh, Jin Do; Kim, Seong Min; Cho, Young Duk [College of Medicine, Kosin Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kil Ho [College of Medicine, Yeungnam Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    To describe modes of transarticular invasion, with reference to the size and location of a tumor, the anatomic characteristics of invaded cartilage,and the existence of ankylosis in SI joint. Eleven histologically confirmed malignant pelvic bone tumors involving transarticular invasion of sacroiliac joints, were retrospectively analysed. Transarticular invasion of a joint was defined as involvement of its opposing bones. The anatomic site and size of the tumors were analysed, and invaded sacroiliac joint was divided into upper, middle and lower parts on the basis of the anatomic characteristics of the intervening cartilage: synovial hyaline or fibrous ligamentous. the existence of ankylosis was determined, and transarticular invasion directly across a joint was classified as direct invasion. Extension of tumors around a joint from its periphery to the opposing bone were considered as indirect invasion. All tumors were located near the sacroiliac joint, eight at the ilium and three at the sacrum. Six invasions were indirect and five were direct. Average tumor area was larger in indirect cases than in direct: 191.8 cm{sup 2} vs. 69.6 cm{sup 2}. In all indirect invasions, a huge soft tissue mass abutted onto the peripheral portion of the sacroiliac joint. In five of six cases of indirect transarticular invasion, the upper part of the joint posteriorly located fibrous ligamentous cartilage. In the other, the lower part was invaded, and this involved a detour around the joint space, avoiding the invasion of intervening cartilage. Ankylosis occurred in one of the indirect cases. Among the five cases of direct invasion, there was invasion of the posteriorly located ligamentous fibrous cartilage in three without ankylosis. In the other two cases, involving ankylosis, the synovial hyaline cartilage was invaded directly at the lower part of the joint. Transarticular invasions of sacroiliac joint via fibrous cartilage are most common. Ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint

  1. Transarticular invasion of the sacroiliac joints by malignant pelvic bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hwang Woo; Huh, Jin Do; Kim, Seong Min; Cho, Young Duk; Cho, Kil Ho

    2002-01-01

    To describe modes of transarticular invasion, with reference to the size and location of a tumor, the anatomic characteristics of invaded cartilage,and the existence of ankylosis in SI joint. Eleven histologically confirmed malignant pelvic bone tumors involving transarticular invasion of sacroiliac joints, were retrospectively analysed. Transarticular invasion of a joint was defined as involvement of its opposing bones. The anatomic site and size of the tumors were analysed, and invaded sacroiliac joint was divided into upper, middle and lower parts on the basis of the anatomic characteristics of the intervening cartilage: synovial hyaline or fibrous ligamentous. the existence of ankylosis was determined, and transarticular invasion directly across a joint was classified as direct invasion. Extension of tumors around a joint from its periphery to the opposing bone were considered as indirect invasion. All tumors were located near the sacroiliac joint, eight at the ilium and three at the sacrum. Six invasions were indirect and five were direct. Average tumor area was larger in indirect cases than in direct: 191.8 cm 2 vs. 69.6 cm 2 . In all indirect invasions, a huge soft tissue mass abutted onto the peripheral portion of the sacroiliac joint. In five of six cases of indirect transarticular invasion, the upper part of the joint posteriorly located fibrous ligamentous cartilage. In the other, the lower part was invaded, and this involved a detour around the joint space, avoiding the invasion of intervening cartilage. Ankylosis occurred in one of the indirect cases. Among the five cases of direct invasion, there was invasion of the posteriorly located ligamentous fibrous cartilage in three without ankylosis. In the other two cases, involving ankylosis, the synovial hyaline cartilage was invaded directly at the lower part of the joint. Transarticular invasions of sacroiliac joint via fibrous cartilage are most common. Ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint facilitates

  2. Normal hepatic parenchyma visibility and ADC quantification on diffusion-weighted MRI at 3 T: influence of age, gender, and iron content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metens, Thierry [MRI Clinics, Department of Radiology, Hopital Erasme, Bruxelles (Belgium); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Magnetic Resonance Imaging Clinics, Department of Radiology, Hopital Erasme, Bruxelles (Belgium); Ferraresi, Kellen Fanstone; Farchione, Alessandra; Bali, Maria Antonietta; Matos, Celso [MRI Clinics, Department of Radiology, Hopital Erasme, Bruxelles (Belgium); Moreno, Christophe [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatopancreatology, and Digestive Oncology, Hopital Erasme, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    2014-12-15

    To investigate how normal liver parenchyma visibility on 3 T diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantification are influenced by age, gender, and iron content. Between February 2011 and April 2013, 86 patients (52 women) with normal livers who underwent respiratory-triggered abdominal 3 T DWI (b = 0, 150, 600, 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}) were retrospectively included. Normal liver and spleen parenchyma visibility was scored independently by two readers. Correlations between visibility scores or ADC with age, gender, T2*, or recent serum ferritin (SF) were investigated. Liver visibility scores in b = 1,000 s/mm{sup 2} images correlated with the age (Spearman R = -0.56 in women, -0.45 in men), T2* (R = 0.75) and SF (R = -0.64) and were significantly higher in women (P < 0.01). SF and T2* were within normal values (T2*: 13 - 31 ms, SF: 14 - 230 μg/L). Liver ADC correlated with visibility scores (R = 0.69) and T2* (R = 0.64) and was age- and gender-dependent. ADC ROI standard deviation negatively correlated with visibility scores (R = -0.65) and T2* (R = -0.62). The spleen visibility did not depend on age or gender. Normal liver parenchyma visibility in DWI is age- and gender-dependent, according to the iron content. Visibility scores and iron content significantly affect ADC quantification in the normal liver. (orig.)

  3. Normal hepatic parenchyma visibility and ADC quantification on diffusion-weighted MRI at 3 T: influence of age, gender, and iron content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metens, Thierry; Ferraresi, Kellen Fanstone; Farchione, Alessandra; Bali, Maria Antonietta; Matos, Celso; Moreno, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    To investigate how normal liver parenchyma visibility on 3 T diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) quantification are influenced by age, gender, and iron content. Between February 2011 and April 2013, 86 patients (52 women) with normal livers who underwent respiratory-triggered abdominal 3 T DWI (b = 0, 150, 600, 1,000 s/mm 2 ) were retrospectively included. Normal liver and spleen parenchyma visibility was scored independently by two readers. Correlations between visibility scores or ADC with age, gender, T2*, or recent serum ferritin (SF) were investigated. Liver visibility scores in b = 1,000 s/mm 2 images correlated with the age (Spearman R = -0.56 in women, -0.45 in men), T2* (R = 0.75) and SF (R = -0.64) and were significantly higher in women (P < 0.01). SF and T2* were within normal values (T2*: 13 - 31 ms, SF: 14 - 230 μg/L). Liver ADC correlated with visibility scores (R = 0.69) and T2* (R = 0.64) and was age- and gender-dependent. ADC ROI standard deviation negatively correlated with visibility scores (R = -0.65) and T2* (R = -0.62). The spleen visibility did not depend on age or gender. Normal liver parenchyma visibility in DWI is age- and gender-dependent, according to the iron content. Visibility scores and iron content significantly affect ADC quantification in the normal liver. (orig.)

  4. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhri, Asim F. [Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Siddiqui, Adeel [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Radiology, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A. [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Memphis, TN (United States); Le Bonheur Children' s Hospital, Le Bonheur Neuroscience Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Memphis, TN (United States); St. Jude Children' s Hospital, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  5. Intraoperative MRI in pediatric brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhri, Asim F.; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A.

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has emerged as an important tool in guiding the surgical management of children with brain tumors. Recent advances have allowed utilization of high field strength systems, including 3-tesla MRI, resulting in diagnostic-quality scans that can be performed while the child is on the operating table. By providing information about the possible presence of residual tumor, it allows the neurosurgeon to both identify and resect any remaining tumor that is thought to be safely accessible. By fusing the newly obtained images with the surgical guidance software, the images have the added value of aiding in navigation to any residual tumor. This is important because parenchyma often shifts during surgery. It also gives the neurosurgeon insight into whether any immediate postoperative complications have occurred. If any complications have occurred, the child is already in the operating room and precious minutes lost in transport and communications are saved. In this article we review the three main approaches to an iMRI system design. We discuss the possible roles for iMRI during intraoperative planning and provide guidance to help radiologists and neurosurgeons alike in the collaborative management of these children. (orig.)

  6. Augmented reality in a tumor resection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvet, Pauline; Collins, Toby; Debize, Clement; Novais-Gameiro, Lorraine; Pereira, Bruno; Bartoli, Adrien; Canis, Michel; Bourdel, Nicolas

    2018-03-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) guidance is a technology that allows a surgeon to see sub-surface structures, by overlaying pre-operative imaging data on a live laparoscopic video. Our objectives were to evaluate a state-of-the-art AR guidance system in a tumor surgical resection model, comparing the accuracy of the resection with and without the system. Our system has three phases. Phase 1: using the MRI images, the kidney's and pseudotumor's surfaces are segmented to construct a 3D model. Phase 2: the intra-operative 3D model of the kidney is computed. Phase 3: the pre-operative and intra-operative models are registered, and the laparoscopic view is augmented with the pre-operative data. We performed a prospective experimental study on ex vivo porcine kidneys. Alginate was injected into the parenchyma to create pseudotumors measuring 4-10 mm. The kidneys were then analyzed by MRI. Next, the kidneys were placed into pelvictrainers, and the pseudotumors were laparoscopically resected. The AR guidance system allows the surgeon to see tumors and margins using classical laparoscopic instruments, and a classical screen. The resection margins were measured microscopically to evaluate the accuracy of resection. Ninety tumors were segmented: 28 were used to optimize the AR software, and 62 were used to randomly compare surgical resection: 29 tumors were resected using AR and 33 without AR. The analysis of our pathological results showed 4 failures (tumor with positive margins) (13.8%) in the AR group, and 10 (30.3%) in the Non-AR group. There was no complete miss in the AR group, while there were 4 complete misses in the non-AR group. In total, 14 (42.4%) tumors were completely missed or had a positive margin in the non-AR group. Our AR system enhances the accuracy of surgical resection, particularly for small tumors. Crucial information such as resection margins and vascularization could also be displayed.

  7. Usefulness of MR angiography in renal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Toshitsugu; Morimoto, Kouji; Nishimura, Kenji; Tsujimura, Akira; Yasunaga, Yutaka; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Takaha, Minato

    1992-01-01

    MR angiography using a gradient-echo, pulse sequence FLASH (fast, low-angle shot) method during breath-hold with a 'MAGNETOM H-15' scanner (1.5 Tesla; Siemens Medical System) was performed on 27 patients with renal tumor at our clinic between Feburary 20, 1990 and September 30, 1991 and we studied to evaluate its usefulness. Of these 27 patients, 22 patients including one patient under hemodialysis treatment had renal cell carcinoma and one patient had oncocytoma pathologically proven from the excised specimens. The remaining four patients including two patients associated with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus were clinically diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on the result of imaging examinations such as excretory urography, ultrasonography, computed tomography and conventional angiography. However, they could not be operated on because their tumors were too advanced. By reconstruction of the data of consecutive coronal scans of the abdominal blood vessels such as the abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava and renal arteries and veins simultaneously without any intravenous contrast materials. Our present study revealed that MR angiography has some advantages, especially with regard to preoperative angiographic information about the abdomen of patients with renal tumor. That is, MR angiography can delineate many kinds of arteries and veins of the abdomen simultaneously and in a broader range, as well as it can be performed on the patients with hypersensitivity to iodinate contrast materials or renal insufficiency in a usual fashion. Furthermore, our present study suggested that the MR angiography is useful for assessing the presence and extent of inferior vena caval tumor thrombus of renal cell carcinoma and for clearly distinguishing tumor lesion and the surrounding normal renal parenchyma in the patients with renal tumor. (author)

  8. Usefulness of MR angiography in renal tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Toshitsugu; Morimoto, Kouji; Nishimura, Kenji; Tsujimura, Akira; Yasunaga, Yutaka; Matsumiya, Kiyomi; Takaha, Minato (Osaka National Hospital (Japan))

    1992-11-01

    MR angiography using a gradient-echo, pulse sequence FLASH (fast, low-angle shot) method during breath-hold with a MAGNETOM H-15 scanner (1.5 Tesla; Siemens Medical System) was performed on 27 patients with renal tumor at our clinic between Feburary 20, 1990 and September 30, 1991 and we studied to evaluate its usefulness. Of these 27 patients, 22 patients including one patient under hemodialysis treatment had renal cell carcinoma and one patient had oncocytoma pathologically proven from the excised specimens. The remaining four patients including two patients associated with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus were clinically diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma based on the result of imaging examinations such as excretory urography, ultrasonography, computed tomography and conventional angiography. However, they could not be operated on because their tumors were too advanced. By reconstruction of the data of consecutive coronal scans of the abdominal blood vessels such as the abdominal aorta, inferior vena cava and renal arteries and veins simultaneously without any intravenous contrast materials. Our present study revealed that MR angiography has some advantages, especially with regard to preoperative angiographic information about the abdomen of patients with renal tumor. That is, MR angiography can delineate many kinds of arteries and veins of the abdomen simultaneously and in a broader range, as well as it can be performed on the patients with hypersensitivity to iodinate contrast materials or renal insufficiency in a usual fashion. Furthermore, our present study suggested that the MR angiography is useful for assessing the presence and extent of inferior vena caval tumor thrombus of renal cell carcinoma and for clearly distinguishing tumor lesion and the surrounding normal renal parenchyma in the patients with renal tumor. (author).

  9. Posterior Mediastinal Tumors: Outcome of Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahman, A.M.; Sedera, M.A.; Mourad, I.A.; Aziz, S.A.; Saber, T.K.H.; Al Sakary, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    adjacent invaded organs) mainly by open technique should be the rule for these patients as there is survival benefit. Great care should be taken when dealing with Dumbbell tumors

  10. Volume-controlled histographic analysis of pulmonary parenchyma in normal and diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyo Yong; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Jong Seob; Won, Chyl Ho; Kang, Duk Sik; Kim, Myoung Nam

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of a home-made histographic analysis system using a lung volume controller. Our study involved ten healthy volunteers, ten emphysema patients, and two idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients. Using a home-made lung volume controller, images were obtained in the upper, middle, and lower lung zones at 70%, 50%, and 20% of vital capacity. Electron beam tomography was used and scanning parameters were single slice mode, 10-mm slice thickness, 0.4-second scan time, and 35-cm field of view. Usinga home-made semi-automated program, pulmonary parenchyma was isolated and a histogrm then obtained. Seven histographic parameters, namely mean density (MD), density at maximal frequency (DMF), maximal ascending gradient (MAG),maximal ascending gradient density (MAGD), maximal sescending gradient (MDG), maximal descending gradient density (MDGD), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) were derived from the histogram. We compared normal controls with abnormal groups including emphysema and IPF patients at the same respiration levels. A normal histographic zone with ± 1 standard deviation was obtained. Histographic curves of normal controls shifted toward the high density level, and the width of the normal zone increased as the level of inspiration decreased. In ten normal controls, MD, DMF, MAG, MAGD, MDG, MDGD, and FWHM readings at a 70% inspiration level were lower than those at 20% (p less than0.05). At the same level of inspiration, histograms of emphysema patients were locatedat a lower density area than those of normal controls. As inspiration status decreased, histograms of emphysema patients showed diminished shift compared with those of normal controls. At 50% and 20% inspiration levels, the MD, DMF, and MAGD readings of emphysema patients were significantly lower than those of normal controls (p less than 0.05). Compared with those of normal controls, histogrms of the two IPF patients obtained at three inspiration levels were

  11. Volume-controlled histographic analysis of pulmonary parenchyma in normal and diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyo Yong; Lee, Jongmin; Kim, Jong Seob; Won, Chyl Ho; Kang, Duk Sik [School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Nam [The University of Iowa (United States)

    2000-06-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of a home-made histographic analysis system using a lung volume controller. Our study involved ten healthy volunteers, ten emphysema patients, and two idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients. Using a home-made lung volume controller, images were obtained in the upper, middle, and lower lung zones at 70%, 50%, and 20% of vital capacity. Electron beam tomography was used and scanning parameters were single slice mode, 10-mm slice thickness, 0.4-second scan time, and 35-cm field of view. Usinga home-made semi-automated program, pulmonary parenchyma was isolated and a histogrm then obtained. Seven histographic parameters, namely mean density (MD), density at maximal frequency (DMF), maximal ascending gradient (MAG),maximal ascending gradient density (MAGD), maximal sescending gradient (MDG), maximal descending gradient density (MDGD), and full width at half maximum (FWHM) were derived from the histogram. We compared normal controls with abnormal groups including emphysema and IPF patients at the same respiration levels. A normal histographic zone with {+-} 1 standard deviation was obtained. Histographic curves of normal controls shifted toward the high density level, and the width of the normal zone increased as the level of inspiration decreased. In ten normal controls, MD, DMF, MAG, MAGD, MDG, MDGD, and FWHM readings at a 70% inspiration level were lower than those at 20% (p less than0.05). At the same level of inspiration, histograms of emphysema patients were locatedat a lower density area than those of normal controls. As inspiration status decreased, histograms of emphysema patients showed diminished shift compared with those of normal controls. At 50% and 20% inspiration levels, the MD, DMF, and MAGD readings of emphysema patients were significantly lower than those of normal controls (p less than 0.05). Compared with those of normal controls, histogrms of the two IPF patients obtained at three inspiration levels were

  12. The impact of failure: unsuccessful bacterial invasions steer the soil microbial community away from the invader's niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, C A; Le Roux, X; van Doorn, G S; Dini-Andreote, F; Poly, F; Salles, J F

    2018-03-01

    Although many environments like soils are constantly subjected to invasion by alien microbes, invaders usually fail to succeed, succumbing to the robust diversity often found in nature. So far, only successful invasions have been explored, and it remains unknown to what extent an unsuccessful invasion can impact resident communities. Here we hypothesized that unsuccessful invasions can cause impacts to soil functioning by decreasing the diversity and niche breadth of resident bacterial communities, which could cause shifts to community composition and niche structure-an effect that is likely exacerbated when diversity is compromised. To examine this question, diversity gradients of soil microbial communities were subjected to invasion by the frequent, yet oft-unsuccessful soil invader, Escherichia coli, and evaluated for changes to diversity, bacterial community composition, niche breadth, and niche structure. Contrary to expectations, diversity and niche breadth increased across treatments upon invasion. Community composition and niche structure were also altered, with shifts of niche structure revealing an escape by the resident community away from the invader's resources. Importantly, the extent of the escape varied in response to the community's diversity, where less diverse communities experienced larger shifts. Thus, although transient and unsuccessful, the invader competed for resources with resident species and caused tangible impacts that modified both the diversity and functioning of resident communities, which can likely generate a legacy effect that influences future invasion attempts.

  13. Darwin's naturalization hypothesis up-close: Intermountain grassland invaders differ morphologically and phenologically from native community dominants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson; Yvette K. Ortega; Samantha J. Sears

    2012-01-01

    Darwin's naturalization hypothesis predicts that successful invaders will tend to differ taxonomically from native species in recipient communities because less related species exhibit lower niche overlap and experience reduced biotic resistance. This hypothesis has garnered substantial support at coarse scales. However, at finer scales, the influence of traits...

  14. Relative roles of climatic suitability and anthropogenic influence in determining the pattern of spread in a global invader

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura-Pascual, Núria; Hui, Cang; Ikeda, Takayoshi

    2011-01-01

    Because invasive species threaten the integrity of natural ecosystems, a major goal in ecology is to develop predictive models to determine which species may become widespread and where they may invade. Indeed, considerable progress has been made in understanding the factors that influence the lo...

  15. Persistence of Native Trees in an Invaded Hawaiian Lowland Wet Forest: Experimental Evaluation of Light and Water Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodie R. Schulten; T. Colleen Cole; Susan Cordell; Keiko M. Publico; Rebecca Ostertag; Jaime E. Enoka; Jené D. Michaud

    2014-01-01

    Hawaiian lowland wet forests are heavily invaded and their restoration is most likely to be successful if native species selected for restoration have efficient resource-use traits. We evaluated growth, survival, and ecophysiological responses of four native and four invasive species in a greenhouse experiment that simulated reduced light and water conditions commonly...

  16. Habitat heterogeneity influences restoration efficacy: Implications of a habitat-specific management regime for an invaded marsh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Long; Gao, Yang; Wang, Cheng-Huan; Li, Bo; Chen, Jia-Kuan; Zhao, Bin

    2013-07-01

    Invasive species have to be managed to prevent adverse consequences. Spartina alterniflora has invaded many marshes where salinity and inundation are often key factors affecting vegetation. The former was surface clipped twice and native Phragmites australis was planted in invaded zones to examine the effects of habitat properties on the efficacy of invader control and native restoration. The results showed that two clipping treatments almost eliminated S. alterniflora in the zones with long inundation periods of 80 h/15 d but stimulated compensatory growth of S. alterniflora in the zones with short inundation periods. Transplanted P. australis performed better over time in zones with low salinity (removal of the above-ground parts of S. alterniflora should be used only in the middle tidal zones and that native vegetation should be planted in zones above the mean high water level while the others zones in the saltmarsh should be restored to mud flats. Usually, invasive plants can flourish in highly heterogeneous habitats, which can influence management efficacy by influencing the re-growth of treated invaders and the performance of restored native species. Therefore, habitat-specific management regimes for invasive species can be expected to be more efficient because of their dependence on specific habitats.

  17. Pituitary Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Association (ABTA) International RadioSurgery Association National Brain Tumor Society National Institute of Child Health and Human Development ... Definition The pituitary is a small, bean-sized gland ...

  18. Hypothalamic tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the brain to reduce spinal fluid pressure. Risks of radiation therapy include damage to healthy brain cells when tumor cells are destroyed. Common side effects from chemotherapy include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, and fatigue.

  19. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-07-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  20. A contribution to improved radiotherapy for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muren, Ludvig PAul

    2002-01-01

    Cystectomy has traditionally been regarded the treatment of choice for muscle invading urinary bladder cancer in most countries. Radiotherapy has been offered patients considered unfit for cystectomy. Since the contraindications of surgery are frequent among bladder cancer patients, a substantial amount of patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (typically 50%) are still managed primarily with radiation. Recently, a tri-modality, organsparing treatment (trans-urethral resection and radio-chemotherapy) has been proposed for bladder cancer, like in the management of a range of other common malignancies. This approach may provide as high control rates as cystectomy yet maintain a higher quality of life for selected patient groups. In both the radical radiotherapy and the combined modality approach, high radiation doses are needed to improve local disease control. Radiation dose escalation requires improved conformation of dose distributions. This PhD programme aimed to develop improved conformal radiotherapy procedures in the management of patients with muscle invading urinary bladder cancer. In the initial phase of this work, computer-controlled movement of the linear accelerator collimator jaws during beam delivery was applied to shape so-called partially wedged beams (PWBs), that were designed specifically to tailor the dose distribution in bladder irradiation closer to the defined bladder target. The dosimetric verification and treatment planning implementation of this beam delivery concept were addressed, and we documented that these dynamic beams were delivered as accurately as standard beams. Particular attention was given to the BMS-96 diode array system, as it was adapted to dynamic beam dosimetry. Next, the potential clinical impact of these beams was analysed. In a retrospectively study of a set of urinary bladder treatment plans, the PWBs were seen to improve the dose homogeneity inside the bladder target as well as to reduce normal tissue (small

  1. [Metastatic lung cancer origin from osteosarcoma of mandible invading tracheal lumen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, K; Noriyuki, T; Furonaka, O; Kuroda, Y; Akimoto, E; Kuranishi, F; Nakahara, M; Fukuda, T; Ishizaki, Y; Okuda, H; Hashimoto, M; Yonehara, S

    2009-07-01

    A 52-year-old woman underwent the surgical treatment for osteosarcoma of the left mandible in 2003 and was followed up afterward. She suffered from dry cough and bloody sputum, and was admitted to our hospital in April 2007. Computed tomography (CT) revealed several nodules in bilateral lung, and bronchofiberscopy showed the endobronchial tumor obstructing in the right main bronchus. The metastatic tumor progressed in the right main bronchus from the right S6 lung segment. The tumor rapidly progressed in the right bronchus in comparison with the CT findings in about 2 weeks, and the possibility of the tracheal obstruction was considered. She underwent the right middle and lower lobectomy, and the endobronchial tumor was pulled through the right main bronchus. The postoperative course was uneventful, the patient was discharged on 14th postoperative day, and the chemotherapy using cisplatin (CDDP) and adriamycin (ADR) is on-going.

  2. Giant Desmoid Tumor of the Anterior Abdominal Wall in a Young Female: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahim Koshariya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmoid tumors (also called desmoids fibromatosis are rare slow growing benign and musculoaponeurotic tumors. Although these tumors have a propensity to invade surrounding tissues, they are not malignant. These tumors are associated with women of fertile age, especially during and after pregnancy. We report a young female patient with a giant desmoid tumor of the anterior abdominal wall who underwent primary resection. The patient had no history of an earlier abdominal surgery. Preoperative evaluation included abdominal ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. The histology revealed a desmoid tumor. Primary surgical resection with immediate reconstruction of abdominal defect is the best management of this rarity. To the best of our knowledge and PubMed search, this is the first case ever reported in the medical literature of such a giant desmoid tumor arising from anterior abdominal wall weighing 6.5 kg treated surgically with successful outcome.

  3. Galectin-3 disruption impaired tumoral angiogenesis by reducing VEGF secretion from TGFβ1-induced macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Camila Maria Longo; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira Sousa; Teixeira, Verônica Rodrigues; Costa, Fabrício Falconi; Melo, Camila Morais; Santos, Sofia Nascimento dos; Nonogaki, Suely; Liu, Fu-Tong; Bernardes, Emerson Soares; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Chammas, Roger

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the role of galectin-3 in tumor angiogenesis associated with tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor parenchyma, the galectin-3 expression was reconstituted in Tm1 melanoma cell line that lacks this protein. Galectin-3-expressing cells (Tm1G3) and mock-vector transfected cells (Tm1N3) were injected into wild-type (WT) and galectin-3 knockout (KO) C57Bl/6 mice. Tumors originated from Tm1G3 were larger in tumor volume with enlarged functional vessels, decreased necrotic areas, and increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels. Galectin-3-nonexpressing-cells injected into WT and KO showed increased levels of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) and, in WT animals this feature was also accompanied by increased VEGFR2 expression and its phosphorylation. In KO animals, tumors derived from galectin-3-expressing cells were infiltrated by CD68 + -cells, whereas in tumors derived from galectin-3-nonexpressing-cells, CD68 + cells failed to infiltrate tumors and accumulated in the periphery of the tumor mass. In vitro studies showed that Tm1G3 secreted more VEGF than Tm1N3 cells. In the latter case, TGFβ1 induced VEGF production. Basal secretion of VEGF was higher in WT-bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) than in KO-BMDM. TGFβ1 induced secretion of VEGF only in WT-BMDM. Tm1G3-induced tumors had the Arginase I mRNA increased, which upregulated alternative macrophage (M2)/TAM induction. M2 stimuli, such as interleukin-4 (IL4) and TGFβ1, increased Arginase I protein levels and galectin-3 expression in WT- BMDM, but not in cells from KO mice. Hence, we report that galectin-3 disruption in tumor stroma and parenchyma decreases angiogenesis through interfering with the responses of macrophages to the interdependent VEGF and TGFβ1 signaling pathways

  4. Hepatocellular carcinoma: IVIM diffusion quantification for prediction of tumor necrosis compared to enhancement ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakite, Suguru; Dyvorne, Hadrien A.; Lee, Karen M.; Jajamovich, Guido H.; Knight-Greenfield, Ashley; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    To correlate intra voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion parameters of liver parenchyma and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with degree of liver/tumor enhancement and necrosis; and to assess the diagnostic performance of diffusion parameters vs. enhancement ratios (ER) for prediction of complete tumor necrosis. In this IRB approved HIPAA compliant study, we included 46 patients with HCC who underwent IVIM diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI in addition to routine sequences at 3.0 T. True diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), perfusion fraction (PF) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were quantified in tumors and liver parenchyma. Tumor ER were calculated using contrast-enhanced imaging, and degree of tumor necrosis was assessed using post-contrast image subtraction. IVIM parameters and ER were compared between HCC and background liver and between necrotic and viable tumor components. ROC analysis for prediction of complete tumor necrosis was performed. 79 HCCs were assessed (mean size 2.5 cm). D, PF and ADC were significantly higher in HCC vs. liver (p < 0.0001). There were weak significant negative/positive correlations between D/PF and ER, and significant correlations between D/PF/ADC and tumor necrosis (for D, r 0.452, p < 0.001). Among diffusion parameters, D had the highest area under the curve (AUC 0.811) for predicting complete tumor necrosis. ER outperformed diffusion parameters for prediction of complete tumor necrosis (AUC > 0.95, p < 0.002). D has a reasonable diagnostic performance for predicting complete tumor necrosis, however lower than that of contrast-enhanced imaging

  5. Using a prescribed fire to test custom and standard fuel models for fire behaviour prediction in a non-native, grass-invaded tropical dry shrubland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Pierce; Sierra McDaniel; Mark Wasser; Alison Ainsworth; Creighton M. Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Susan Cordell; Ralf Ohlemuller

    2014-01-01

    Questions: Do fuel models developed for North American fuel types accurately represent fuel beds found in grass-invaded tropical shrublands? Do standard or custom fuel models for firebehavior models with in situ or RAWS measured fuel moistures affect the accuracy of predicted fire behavior in grass-invaded tropical shrublands? Location: Hawai’i Volcanoes National...

  6. Tumor Types: Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... May cause excessive secretion of hormones Common among men and women in their 50s-80s Accounts for about 13 percent of all brain tumors Symptoms Headache Depression Vision loss Nausea or vomiting Behavioral and cognitive ...

  7. USE OF UAV PLATFORM AS AN AUTONOMOUS TOOL FOR ESTIMATING EXPANSION ON INVADED AGRICULTURAL LAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niarkios Luiz Santos de Salles Graça

    Full Text Available Abstract: For a long time, in many countries, questions involving disputes about land ownership has generated demand for geoinformation and documentation. In most cases, access for researchers is restricted or humanely impossible by eminence of conflicts, even armed. In these cases, researchers use Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry to enable their studies. However, the dynamics of the phenomenon being studied often requires approaches that traditional techniques become unviable or unable to fulfil. This work shows the results of an approach that used a photogrammetric UAV platform to take pictures of an invaded rural area in Brazil and estimate its expansion over two years. From the taken images, mosaics were generated and then classified using Decision Tree to identify tents. Then it was developed a Matlab algorithm, to detect and quantify the tents on the classified Images. It was possible to infer that there was an expansion of 7.3% between the two analyzed dates and probably more than three thousand people occupied the invasion site.

  8. Mechanical properties of metastatic breast cancer cells invading into collagen I matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) are critical to the metastasis of cancer cells. To investigate the mechanical interplay between the cells and ECM during invasion, we created thin bovine collagen I hydrogels ranging from 0.1-5 kPa in Young's modulus that were seeded with highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Significant population fractions invaded the matrices either partially or fully within 24 h. We then combined confocal fluorescence microscopy and indentation with an atomic force microscope to determine the Young's moduli of individual embedded cells and the pericellular matrix using novel analysis methods for heterogeneous samples. In partially embedded cells, we observe a statistically significant correlation between the degree of invasion and the Young's modulus, which was up to an order of magnitude greater than that of the same cells measured in 2D. ROCK inhibition returned the cells' Young's moduli to values similar to 2D and diminished but did not abrogate invasion. This provides evidence that Rho/ROCK-dependent acto-myosin contractility is employed for matrix reorganization during initial invasion, and suggests the observed cell stiffening is due to an attendant increase in actin stress fibers. This work was supported by the National Cancer Institute under the grant U54 CA143862.

  9. Alien roadside species more easily invade alpine than lowland plant communities in a subarctic mountain ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas J Lembrechts

    Full Text Available Effects of roads on plant communities are not well known in cold-climate mountain ecosystems, where road building and development are expected to increase in future decades. Knowledge of the sensitivity of mountain plant communities to disturbance by roads is however important for future conservation purposes. We investigate the effects of roads on species richness and composition, including the plant strategies that are most affected, along three elevational gradients in a subarctic mountain ecosystem. We also examine whether mountain roads promote the introduction and invasion of alien plant species from the lowlands to the alpine zone. Observations of plant community composition were made together with abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors in 60 T-shaped transects. Alpine plant communities reacted differently to road disturbances than their lowland counterparts. On high elevations, the roadside species composition was more similar to that of the local natural communities. Less competitive and ruderal species were present at high compared with lower elevation roadsides. While the effects of roads thus seem to be mitigated in the alpine environment for plant species in general, mountain plant communities are more invasible than lowland communities. More precisely, relatively more alien species present in the roadside were found to invade into the surrounding natural community at high compared to low elevations. We conclude that effects of roads and introduction of alien species in lowlands cannot simply be extrapolated to the alpine and subarctic environment.

  10. Alien roadside species more easily invade alpine than lowland plant communities in a subarctic mountain ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembrechts, Jonas J; Milbau, Ann; Nijs, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Effects of roads on plant communities are not well known in cold-climate mountain ecosystems, where road building and development are expected to increase in future decades. Knowledge of the sensitivity of mountain plant communities to disturbance by roads is however important for future conservation purposes. We investigate the effects of roads on species richness and composition, including the plant strategies that are most affected, along three elevational gradients in a subarctic mountain ecosystem. We also examine whether mountain roads promote the introduction and invasion of alien plant species from the lowlands to the alpine zone. Observations of plant community composition were made together with abiotic, biotic and anthropogenic factors in 60 T-shaped transects. Alpine plant communities reacted differently to road disturbances than their lowland counterparts. On high elevations, the roadside species composition was more similar to that of the local natural communities. Less competitive and ruderal species were present at high compared with lower elevation roadsides. While the effects of roads thus seem to be mitigated in the alpine environment for plant species in general, mountain plant communities are more invasible than lowland communities. More precisely, relatively more alien species present in the roadside were found to invade into the surrounding natural community at high compared to low elevations. We conclude that effects of roads and introduction of alien species in lowlands cannot simply be extrapolated to the alpine and subarctic environment.

  11. Invading species in the Eel River, California: Successes, failures, and relationships with resident species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, L.R.; Moyle, P.B.

    1997-01-01

    We examined invasions of non-native fishes into the Eel River, California. At least 16 species of fish have been introduced into the drainage which originally supported 12-14 fish species. Our study was prompted by the unauthorized introduction in 1979 of Sacramento squawfish, Ptychocheilus grandis, a large predatory cyprinid. From 1986 to 1990, we conducted growth and diet studies of squaw fish, conducted intensive surveys of the distribution and habitat associations of both native and introduced species, and examined the nature of species-habitat and interspecies relationships. We found no evidence for increased growth or expanded feeding habits, compared to native populations, of Sacramento squawfish as they invaded the Eel River drainage. Ten of the introduced species were well established, with four species limited to a reservoir and six species established in streams. The success or failure of introductions of stream species appeared to be a function of the ability of a species to survive the fluctuating, highly seasonal, flow regime. The present mixture of native and exotic species has not formed stable fish assemblages but it seems likely that four habitat-associated assemblages will develop. The overall effect of the successful species introductions has been to assemble a group of species, with some exceptions, that are native to and occur together in many California streams. The assemblages now forming are similar to those found in other California streams. The assemblage characterized by squawfish and suckers is likely to be resistant to invasion, in the absence of human caused habitat modifications.

  12. Irradiation effects for the growth inhibition of weed seeds invaded from foreign countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takatani, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    Weeds of foreign origin have been invaded through imported maize or dried grass which using for animal feeds, and causing serious damages to agricultural crops and farm animals in Japan. These weeds are spreading mainly through animal feeds to feces. For the purpose to decrease the damage from these weeds, we investigated the gamma-irradiation effect on 7 species of the weed seed to suppress the germination or elongation of stem and root. After the irradiation of the weed seeds, all species kept the ability of germination even at 4 kGy in petri dish cultivation, whereas decreased the germination ratio in some species. However, many species of weed decreased the ability on elongation of stem or root below l kGy irradiation. Furthermore, all of species lost the ability on the development of root hair and appearance of first leaf after germination of seeds below 1 kGy irradiation. From this study, necessary dose for growth inhibition was estimated to be 1 kGy which should be able to apply with combination treatment of the animal feeds for elimination of pathogenic bacteria such as salmonellae at 3 to 5 kGy irradiation. (author)

  13. Herbivory more limiting than competition on early and established native plants in an invaded meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Emily K; Arcese, Peter

    2008-12-01

    The dominance of nonnative plants coupled with declines of native plants suggests that competitive displacement drives extinctions, yet empirical examples are rare. Herbivores, however, can alter vegetation structure and reduce diversity when abundant. Herbivores may act on mature, reproductive life stages whereas some of the strongest competitive effects might occur at early life stages that are difficult to observe. For example, competition by perennial nonnative grasses can interfere with the establishment of native seeds. We contrasted the effects of ungulate herbivory and competition by neighboring plants on the performance of native plant species at early and established life stages in invaded oak meadows. We recorded growth, survival, and flowering in two native species transplanted as established plants, six native species grown from seed, and five extant lily species as part of two 2 x 2 factorial experiments that manipulated herbivory and competition. Herbivory reduced the performance of nearly all focal native species at early and established life stages, whereas competition had few measurable effects. Our results suggest that herbivory has a greater local influence on native plant species than competition and that reducing herbivore impacts will be required to successfully restore endangered oak meadows where ungulates are now abundant.

  14. Management of invading pathogens should be informed by epidemiology rather than administrative boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robin N; Cobb, Richard C; Gilligan, Christopher A; Cunniffe, Nik J

    2016-03-24

    Plant and animal disease outbreaks have significant ecological and economic impacts. The spatial extent of control is often informed solely by administrative geography - for example, quarantine of an entire county or state once an invading disease is detected - with little regard for pathogen epidemiology. We present a stochastic model for the spread of a plant pathogen that couples spread in the natural environment and transmission via the nursery trade, and use it to illustrate that control deployed according to administrative boundaries is almost always sub-optimal. We use sudden oak death (caused by Phytophthora ramorum ) in mixed forests in California as motivation for our study, since the decision as to whether or not to deploy plant trade quarantine is currently undertaken on a county-by-county basis for that system. However, our key conclusion is applicable more generally: basing management of any disease entirely upon administrative borders does not balance the cost of control with the possible economic and ecological costs of further spread in the optimal fashion.

  15. Northward invading non-native vascular plant species in and adjacent to Wood Buffalo National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wein, R.W.; Wein, G.; Bahret, S.; Cody, W.J. (Alberta University, Edmonton, AB (Canada). Canadian Circumpolar Institute)

    A survey of the non-native vascular plant species in Wood Buffalo National Park, Canada's largest forested National Park, documented their presence and abundance in key locations. Most of the fifty-four species (nine new records) were found in disturbed sites including roadsides, settlements, farms, areas of altered hydrological regimes, recent bums, and intensive bison grazing. Species that have increased most in geographic area and abundance in recent years include [ital Agropyron repens], [ital Bromus inermis], [ital Chenopodium album], [ital Melilotus spp.], [ital Trifolium spp.], [ital Plantago major], [ital Achillea millefolium], [ital Crepis tectorum] and [ital Sonchus arvensis]. An additional 20 species, now common in the Peace River and Fort Vermilion areas, have the potential to invade the Park if plant communities are subjected to additional stress as northern climates are modified by the greenhouse effect and as other human-caused activities disturb the vegetation. It is recommended that permanent plots be located in key locations and monitored for species invasion and changing abundances as input to management plans.

  16. Bone and soft tissue tumors of hip and pelvis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloem, Johan L., E-mail: j.l.bloem@lumc.nl [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Reidsma, Inge I., E-mail: i.i.reidsma@lumc.nl [Leiden University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Objective is to identify epidemiologic and radiologic criteria allowing specific diagnoses of tumors and tumor-like lesions in the hip region and pelvis, and to optimize pre-operative staging. Patients with pelvic tumors are usually older, and their tumors are larger relative to patients with tumors in extremities. The majority of tumors in the pelvis are malignant (metastases, myeloma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing-, osteo-, and MFH/fibrosarcoma), while those in the proximal femur are in majority benign (fibrous dysplasia, solitary bone cyst, and osteoid osteoma). Soft tissue masses in the thigh in the elderly are typically sarcomas without tumor specific signs. Common tumor-like lesions occurring in the hip and pelvis that can mimic neoplasm are: infections (including tuberculosis), insufficiency/avulsion fractures, cysts, fibrous dysplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, Langerhans cell histiocytosis, and Paget's disease. Local MR staging is based on the compartmental anatomy. The psoas and gluteal muscles are easily invaded by sarcoma originating in the ileum. The pectineus muscle protects the neurovascular bundle at the level of the hip. The thigh is separated into three compartments, some structures (Sartorius muscle) cross borders between compartments. Immobile joints (SI-joints, osteoarthritic hip) are relatively easily crossed by sarcoma and giant cell tumor.

  17. 'Obligate' anaerobic Salmonella strain YB1 suppresses liver tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Xian; Yu, Bin; Shi, Lei; Geng, Wei; Lin, Qiu-Bin; Ling, Chang-Chun; Yang, Mei; Ng, Kevin T P; Huang, Jian-Dong; Man, Kwan

    2017-01-01

    The antitumor properties of bacteria have been demonstrated over the past decades. However, the efficacy is limited and unclear. Furthermore, systemic infection remains a serious concern in bacteria treatment. In this study, the effect of YB1, a rationally designed 'obligate' anaerobic Salmonella typhimurium strain, on liver tumor growth and metastasis in a nude mouse orthotopic liver tumor model was investigated. The orthotopic liver tumor model was established in nude mice using the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line MHCC-97L. Two weeks after orthotopic liver tumor implantation, YB1, SL7207 and saline were respectively administered through the tail vein of the mice. Longitudinal monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis was performed using Xenogen IVIS, and direct measurements of tumor volume were taken 3 weeks after treatment. In vitro , MHCC-97L and PLC cells were incubated with YB1 or SL7207 under anaerobic conditions. YB1 was observed to invade tumor cells and induce tumor cell apoptosis and death. The results revealed that all mice in the YB1 group were alive 3 weeks after YB1 injection while all mice in the SL7207 group died within 11 days of the SL7207 injection. The body weight decreased by ~9% on day 1 after YB1 injection and but subsequently recovered. Liver tumor growth and metastases were significantly inhibited following YB1 treatment. By contrast to the control group, a large number of Gr1-positive cells were detected on days 1 to 21 following YB1 treatment. Furthermore, YB1 also effectively invaded tumor cells and induced tumor cell apoptosis and death. In conclusion, YB1 suppressed liver tumor growth and metastasis in a nude mice liver tumor model. The potential mechanism may be through enhancing innate immune response and inducing tumor cell apoptosis and cell death.

  18. Tumor immunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Lise, Mario; Nitti, Donato

    2007-01-01

    Advances in tumor immunology are supporting the clinical implementation of several immunological approaches to cancer in the clinical setting. However, the alternate success of current immunotherapeutic regimens underscores the fact that the molecular mechanisms underlying immune-mediated tumor rejection are still poorly understood. Given the complexity of the immune system network and the multidimensionality of tumor/host interactions, the comprehension of tumor immunology might greatly benefit from high-throughput microarray analysis, which can portrait the molecular kinetics of immune response on a genome-wide scale, thus accelerating the discovery pace and ultimately catalyzing the development of new hypotheses in cell biology. Although in its infancy, the implementation of microarray technology in tumor immunology studies has already provided investigators with novel data and intriguing new hypotheses on the molecular cascade leading to an effective immune response against cancer. Although the general principles of microarray-based gene profiling have rapidly spread in the scientific community, the need for mastering this technique to produce meaningful data and correctly interpret the enormous output of information generated by this technology is critical and represents a tremendous challenge for investigators, as outlined in the first section of this book. In the present Chapter, we report on some of the most significant results obtained with the application of DNA microarray in this oncology field.

  19. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors; Peptic ulcer - islet cell tumor; Hypoglycemia - islet cell tumor ... stomach acid. Symptoms may include: Abdominal pain Diarrhea ... and small bowel Vomiting blood (occasionally) Glucagonomas make ...

  20. Imaging of brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaensler, E.H.L.

    1995-01-01

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.)

  1. Imaging of brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaensler, E H.L. [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    The contents are diagnostic approaches, general features of tumors -hydrocephalus, edema, attenuation and/or intensity value, hemorrhage, fat, contrast enhancement, intra-axial supratentorial tumors - tumors of glial origin, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, subependymomas, subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, choroid plexus papilloma; midline tumors - colloid cysts, craniopharyngiomas; pineal region tumors and miscellaneous tumors i.e. primary intracerebral lymphoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, hemangioblastomas; extraaxial tumors - meningiomas; nerve sheath tumors -schwannomas, epidermoids, dermoids, lipomas, arachnoid cysts; metastatic tumors (8 refs.).

  2. Differentiation between tuberculosis and primary tumors in the adrenal gland: evaluation with contrast-enhanced CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhi-Gang; Guo, Ying-Kun; Li, Yuan; Min, Peng-Qiu; Yu, Jian-Qun; Ma, En-Sen

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine imaging criteria for differentiating tuberculosis from primary tumors in the adrenal gland on contrast-enhanced CT. Non-contrast and contrast-enhanced CT features in 108 patients with adrenal tuberculosis (n=34) and primary tumor (n=74) were retrospectively assessed for the location, size, calcification and enhancement patterns. The primary tumors included 41 adenomas, 11 pheochromocytomas, 4 carcinomas, 3 lymphomas, 6 myelolipomas, 6 ganglioneuromas, 2 neurilemmomas and 1 ganglioneuroblastoma. Biochemical investigation was performed for all patients. Of the tuberculosis cases, 31 (91%) invaded with bilateral involvement, while 7 (9%) of the primary tumors invaded with bilateral involvement (P<0.001). Tuberculosis often showed calcification (20 of 34; 59%), whereas primary tumors infrequently showed calcification (6 of 74; 8%; P<0.001). Low attenuation in the center with peripheral rim enhancement was more commonly seen in tuberculosis (16 of 34; 47%) than in primary tumors (7 of 74; 9%; P<0.001). In the determination of tuberculosis, the highest sensitivity (91%) and accuracy (91%) were obtained with bilateral involvement, and the highest specificity (99%) was obtained with the contour preserved. In the determination of primary tumors using a combination of having unilateral involvement and being mass-like, the outcome was a sensitivity of 91%, specificity of 94% and accuracy of 92%. CT findings can differentiate tuberculosis from a primary tumor of the adrenal glands with high sensitivity and an acceptable specificity when combined with the endocrinological examination. (orig.)

  3. Temporary Arterial Embolization of Liver Parenchyma with Degradable Starch Microspheres (EmboCept{sup ®}S) in a Swine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieper, Claus C., E-mail: claus.christian.pieper@ukb.uni-bonn.de; Meyer, Carsten, E-mail: Carsten.Meyer@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Vollmar, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.vollmar@med.uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Institute for Experimental Surgery (Germany); Hauenstein, Karlheinz, E-mail: karlheinz.hauenstein@med.uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Schild, Hans H., E-mail: Hans.Schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Germany); Wilhelm, Kai E., E-mail: Kai.Wilhelm@ek-bonn.de [Johanniter Hospital, Evangelische Kliniken Bonn (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    BackgroundThis study aimed to evaluate the embolic properties, time to reperfusion, and histologic changes in temporary embolization of liver tissue with degradable starch microspheres (DSM) in a swine model.MethodsIn four adult minipigs, DSMs were injected into the right or left hepatic artery on the lobar level until complete stasis of the blood flow was detectable angiographically. The time required to complete angiographically determined reperfusion was noted. The animals were killed 3 h after complete reperfusion, and samples were taken from the liver. Histologic examinations of the embolized liver parenchyma and untreated tissue were performed.ResultsHepatic arterial embolization using DSMs was technically successful in all cases, with complete blood flow stasis shown by control angiography. A single vial of DSMs (450 mg/7.5 ml) was sufficient to embolize a whole liver lobe in all cases. Angiography showed complete reconstitution of hepatic arterial perfusion after a mean time to reperfusion of 32 ± 6.1 min (range, 26–39 min). Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed no histologically detectable differences between untreated tissue and parenchyma embolized with DSMs except for mild sinusoidal congestion in one case. Indirect in situ DNA nick end labeling staining (TUNEL) showed only single positive hepatocytes, indicating apoptosis.ConclusionTemporary embolization of the hepatic artery using DSMs is feasible with complete reperfusion after 30 min in pigs. Even after complete arterial blood flow stasis, no extensive tissue damage to the embolized liver parenchyma was observed at histologic examinations in this short-term study.

  4. First insights into the functional role of vasicentric tracheids and parenchyma in eucalyptus species with solitary vessels: do they contribute to xylem efficiency or safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barotto, Antonio José; Fernandez, María Elena; Gyenge, Javier; Meyra, Ariel; Martinez-Meier, Alejandro; Monteoliva, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between hydraulic specific conductivity (k s ) and vulnerability to cavitation (VC) with size and number of vessels has been studied in many angiosperms. However, few of the studies link other cell types (vasicentric tracheids (VT), fibre-tracheids, parenchyma) with these hydraulic functions. Eucalyptus is one of the most important genera in forestry worldwide. It exhibits a complex wood anatomy, with solitary vessels surrounded by VT and parenchyma, which could serve as a good model to investigate the functional role of the different cell types in xylem functioning. Wood anatomy (several traits of vessels, VT, fibres and parenchyma) in conjunction with maximum k s and VC was studied in adult trees of commercial species with medium-to-high wood density (Eucalyptus globulus Labill., Eucalyptus viminalis Labill. and Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh.). Traits of cells accompanying vessels presented correlations with functional variables suggesting that they contribute to both increasing connectivity between adjacent vessels-and, therefore, to xylem conduction efficiency-and decreasing the probability of embolism propagation into the tissue, i.e., xylem safety. All three species presented moderate-to-high resistance to cavitation (mean P 50 values = -2.4 to -4.2 MPa) with no general trade-off between efficiency and safety at the interspecific level. The results in these species do not support some well-established hypotheses of the functional meaning of wood anatomy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The First Results of the Application of Shear Wave Transient Elastography When Determining the State of Pancreatic Parenchyma (Review of Literature and Own Researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Stepanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Elastography is a rapidly developing diagnostic me-thod and enables to identify and to differentiate focal masses of different origin, as well as the stage of fibrous transformation of the liver, as evidenced by many research works. The method is firmly established in the practice of gastroenterology. The appearance of a new generation devices with the function of ARFI (VTQ and SWEI has allowed scientists to begin a transient study of the stiffness of pancreatic parenchyma. However, there is small quantity of these works, it is necessary to standardize the technique of execution of the research and its results in various diseases. The apparatus Ultima PA Expert® (Radmir, Ukraine with the function of SWEI enables to conduct transient elastography of the pancreas, when using certain technical methods, in order to determine the stiffness of the parenchyma in normal and in diffuse pathology. The values of the stiffness obtained with the apparatus Ultima PA Expert® (Radmir, Ukraine presented in kPa and at the same time in m/s, making these data comparable with those obtained by other researchers on the devices having only one measurement function. In apparently healthy individuals, we have received the parameter of the stiffness of pancreatic parenchyma of (4.86 ± 0.05 kPa, (1.33 ± 0.05 m/s. In chronic pancreatitis, this measure is (6.48 ± 0.80 kPa, (1.52 ± 0.17 m/s. The findings make it possible to determine the therapeutic approach, as well as its effectiveness, based on the indicators of stiffness.

  6. Reduced-dose chest CT with 3D automatic exposure control vs. standard chest CT: Quantitative assessment of emphysematous changes in smokers’ lung parenchyma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Hisanobu; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Yamazaki, Youichi; Matsumoto, Keiko; Onishi, Yumiko; Takenaka, Daisuke; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Nishio, Mizuho; Matsumoto, Sumiaki; Murase, Kenya; Nishimura, Yoshihiro

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the capability of reduced-dose chest CT with three-dimensional (3D) automatic exposure control (AEC) on quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma, compared to standard chest CT. Methods: Twenty consecutive smoker patients (mean age 62.8 years) underwent CT examinations using a standard protocol (150 mAs) and a protocol with 3D-AEC. In this study, the targeted standard deviations number was set to 160. For quantitative assessment of emphysematous change in lung parenchyma in each subject using the standard protocol, a percentage of voxels less than −950 HU in the lung (%LAA −950 ) was calculated. The 3D-AEC protocol's %LAA was computed from of voxel percentages under selected threshold CT value. The differences of radiation doses between these two protocols were evaluated, and %LAAs −950 was compared with the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. Results: Mean dose length products were 780.2 ± 145.5 mGy cm (standard protocol), and 192.0 ± 95.9 (3D-AEC protocol). There was significant difference between them (paired Student's t test, p −950 and 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs. In adopting the feasible threshold CT values of the 3D-AEC protocol, the 3D-AEC protocol %LAAs were significantly correlated with %LAAs −950 (r = 0.98, p < 0.001) and limits of agreement from Bland–Altman analysis was 0.52 ± 4.3%. Conclusions: Changing threshold CT values demonstrated that reduced-dose chest CT with 3D-AEC can substitute for the standard protocol in assessments of emphysematous change in smoker’ lung parenchyma.

  7. Magnetic resonance elastography of the lung parenchyma in an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver: correlation of shear stiffness with trans-respiratory system pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariappan, Yogesh K; Kolipaka, Arunark; Manduca, Armando; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Ehman, Richard L; Araoz, Philip; McGee, Kiaran P

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of the mechanical properties of lung parenchyma is an active field of research due to the association of this metric with normal function, disease initiation and progression. A phase contrast MRI-based elasticity imaging technique known as magnetic resonance elastography is being investigated as a method for measuring the shear stiffness of lung parenchyma. Previous experiments performed with small animals using invasive drivers in direct contact with the lungs have indicated that the quantification of lung shear modulus with (1) H based magnetic resonance elastography is feasible. This technique has been extended to an in situ porcine model with a noninvasive mechanical driver placed on the chest wall. This approach was tested to measure the change in parenchymal stiffness as a function of airway opening pressure (P(ao) ) in 10 adult pigs. In all animals, shear stiffness was successfully quantified at four different P(ao) values. Mean (±STD error of mean) pulmonary parenchyma density corrected stiffness values were calculated to be 1.48 (±0.09), 1.68 (±0.10), 2.05 (±0.13), and 2.23 (±0.17) kPa for P(ao) values of 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm H2O, respectively. Shear stiffness increased with increasing P(ao) , in agreement with the literature. It is concluded that in an in situ porcine lung shear stiffness can be quantitated with (1) H magnetic resonance elastography using a noninvasive mechanical driver and that it is feasible to measure the change in shear stiffness due to change in P(ao) . Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Electrophysiological approach to determine kinetic parameters of sucrose uptake by single sieve elements or phloem parenchyma cells in intact Vicia faba plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafke, Jens B; Höll, Sabina-Roxana; Kühn, Christina; van Bel, Aart J E

    2013-01-01

    Apart from cut aphid stylets in combination with electrophysiology, no attempts have been made thus far to measure in vivo sucrose-uptake properties of sieve elements. We investigated the kinetics of sucrose uptake by single sieve elements and phloem parenchyma cells in Vicia faba plants. To this end, microelectrodes were inserted into free-lying phloem cells in the main vein of the youngest fully-expanded leaf, half-way along the stem, in the transition zone between the autotrophic and heterotrophic part of the stem, and in the root axis. A top-to-bottom membrane potential gradient of sieve elements was observed along the stem (-130 mV to -110 mV), while the membrane potential of the phloem parenchyma cells was stable (approx. -100 mV). In roots, the membrane potential of sieve elements dropped abruptly to -55 mV. Bathing solutions having various sucrose concentrations were administered and sucrose/H(+)-induced depolarizations were recorded. Data analysis by non-linear least-square data fittings as well as by linear Eadie-Hofstee (EH) -transformations pointed at biphasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics (2 MM, EH: K m1 1.2-1.8 mM, K m2 6.6-9.0 mM) of sucrose uptake by sieve elements. However, Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) favored single MM kinetics. Using single MM as the best-fitting model, K m values for sucrose uptake by sieve elements decreased along the plant axis from 1 to 7 mM. For phloem parenchyma cells, higher K m values (EH: K m1 10 mM, K m2 70 mM) as compared to sieve elements were found. In preliminary patch-clamp experiments with sieve-element protoplasts, small sucrose-coupled proton currents (-0.1 to -0.3 pA/pF) were detected in the whole-cell mode. In conclusion (a) K m values for sucrose uptake measured by electrophysiology are similar to those obtained with heterologous systems, (b) electrophysiology provides a useful tool for in situ determination of K m values, (c) As yet, it remains unclear if one or two uptake systems are involved in sucrose

  9. Quantitative dual energy CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors: Comparison to perfusion CT measurements and histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Long Jiang; Wu, Shengyong; Wang, Mei; Lu, Li; Chen, Bo; Jin, Lixin; Wang, Jiandong; Larson, Andrew C.; Lu, Guang Ming

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlation between quantitative dual energy CT and perfusion CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors. Materials and methods: This study was approved by the institutional animal care and use committee at our institution. Nine rabbits with VX2 liver tumors underwent contrast-enhanced dual energy CT and perfusion CT. CT attenuation for the tumors and normal liver parenchyma and tumor-to-liver ratio were obtained at the 140 kVp, 80 kVp, average weighted images and dual energy CT iodine maps. Quantitative parameters for the viable tumor and adjacent liver were measured with perfusion CT. The correlation between the enhancement values of the tumor in iodine maps and perfusion CT parameters of each tumor was analyzed. Radiation dose from dual energy CT and perfusion CT was measured. Results: Enhancement values for the tumor were higher than that for normal liver parenchyma at the hepatic arterial phase (P < 0.05). The highest tumor-to-liver ratio was obtained in hepatic arterial phase iodine map. Hepatic blood flow of the tumor was higher than that for adjacent liver (P < 0.05). Enhancement values of hepatic tumors in the iodine maps positively correlated with permeability of capillary vessel surface (r = 0.913, P < 0.001), hepatic blood flow (r = 0.512, P = 0.010), and hepatic blood volume (r = 0.464, P = 0.022) at the hepatic arterial phases. The effective radiation dose from perfusion CT was higher than that from DECT (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The enhancement values for viable tumor tissues measured in iodine maps were well correlated to perfusion CT measurements in rabbit VX2 liver tumors. Compared with perfusion CT, dual energy CT of the liver required a lower radiation dose.

  10. Bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moylan, D.J.; Yelovich, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Primary bone malignancies are relatively rare with less than 4,000 new cases per year. Multiple myeloma (more correctly a hematologic malignancy) accounts for 40%; osteosarcomas, 28%; chondrosarcomas, 13%; fibrosarcomas arising in bone, 4%; and Ewing's sarcoma, 7%. The authors discuss various treatments for bone tumors, including radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery

  11. Wilms Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a child's general health and to detect any adverse side effects (such as low red or white blood cell ... medicine needed, which helps reduce long-term side effects. The most common ... can be completely removed by surgery. About 41% of all Wilms tumors are stage ...

  12. Nephrogenic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesbauer, P.

    2008-01-01

    Nephroblastomas are the most common malignant renal tumors in childhood. According to the guidelines of the SIOP (Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique) and GPOH (Gesellschaft fuer Paediatrische Onkologie und Haematologie) pre-operative chemotherapy can be started without histological confirmation and thus initial imaging studies, in particular ultrasound, play an outstanding role for diagnostic purposes

  13. Alien plants in urban nature reserves: from red-list species to future invaders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Jarošik

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Urban reserves, as other protected areas, are aimed at preserving species richness but the conservation effort in these protected areas is complicated by a high proportion of alien species. We examined which environmental factors determine the representation of alien species in 48 city reserves of Prague, Czech Republic, distinguishing between archaeophytes, i.e. alien species introduced since the beginning of Neolithic agriculture up to 1500 A. D., and neophytes, i.e. modern invaders introduced after that date, with the former group separately analysed for endangered archaeophytes (listed as C1 and C2 categories on national red list. Archaeophytes responded positively to the extent of arable land that was in place at the time of the reserve establishment, and to a low altitudinal range. Neophytes, beside soil properties responded to recent human activities proxied by current proportion of built-up area in the reserves. Endangered archaeophytes, besides the same affinity for past arable land as other archaeophytes, were supported by the presence of current wasteland habitats in the reserve. This suggests that for endangered archaeophytes it might have been difficult to adapt to changing agricultural practices, and ruderal wasteland might act as a refugium for them. From the viewpoint of conservation, ruderal habitats of nature reserves thus can be more important than was previously though. Forty-six of the 155 neophytes recorded in the reserves are classified as invasive. The reserves thus harbour 67% of the 69 invasive neophytes recorded in the country, and particularly warning is that among the most invasive species are many shrubs and trees, a life form that is known to account for widespread invasions with high impacts. Our results thus strongly suggest that in Prague nature reserves there is a warning potential for future invasions.

  14. Generalist dispersers promote germination of an alien fleshy-fruited tree invading natural grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Raúl Amodeo

    Full Text Available Plants with animal-dispersed fruits seem to overcome the barriers that limit their spread into new habitats more easily than other invasive plants and, at the same time, they pose special difficulties for containment, control or eradication. The effects of animals on plant propagules can be very diverse, with positive, neutral or negative consequences for germination and recruitment. Moreover, the environmental conditions where the seeds are deposited and where the post-dispersal processes take place can be crucial for their fate. Prunus mahaleb is a fleshy-fruited tree invading natural grasslands in the Argentine Pampas. In this study, we analyzed the importance of pulp removal, endocarp scarification and the effects of vectors on its germination response, by means of germination experiments both in the laboratory and under semi-natural conditions. Our laboratory results demonstrated that endocarp scarification enhances germination and suggests that vestiges of pulp on the stones have inhibitory effects. Frugivores exert a variety of effects on germination responses and this variation can be explained by their differing influence on pulp removal and endocarp scarification. Most frugivores produced a positive effect on germination under laboratory conditions, in comparison to intact fruits and hand-peeled stones. We observed different degrees of pulp removal from the surface of the stones by the dispersers which was directly correlated to the germination response. On the other hand, all the treatments showed high germination responses under semi-natural conditions suggesting that post-dispersal processes, like seed burial, and the exposure to natural conditions might exert a positive effect on germination response, attenuating the plant's dependence on the dispersers' gut treatment. Our results highlight the need to consider the whole seed dispersal process and the value of combining laboratory and field tests.

  15. Intraperitoneal ectopic infestation of parasites invading through gastrointestinal tract : CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jae Chul [Inje Univ. College of Medicine, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwa; Ham, Soo Youn [Ulsan Univ. Hospital, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of parasitic ectopic infestation in the peritoneal cavity, a transitional route for parasites invading the gastrointestinal tract, to migrate to various target organs. CT scans of nine patients with pathologically(n=8) or serologically(n=1) proven intraperitoneal involvement of parasitic infestation were retrospectively reviewed. The primary causes of parasitic infestation in nine patients were Paragonimus westermani(n=5), Sparganosis(n=2), and hepatic fascioliasis(n=2). We analyzed the CT findings with regard to the sites and patterns of lesions in the peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal track, as well as in other solid organs. The clinical features of these patients were also evaluated. The clinical symptoms and signs were chronic abdominal pain and general weakness in seven patients, while peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed in four. The CT features of these nine patients included multiseptated cystic masses of 2-6cm, diameter (mean 4.1{+-}1.7cm) in the omentum or mesentery in six(67%), omental or mesenteric infiltration in seven(78%), focal peritoneal thickening in seven(78%), 1ymphadenopathy in five(56%), and ascites in four(44%). In six of the nine patients, the gastrointestinal tract(stomach in four, colon in one, both stomach and colon in one) was concomitantly involved with focal wall thickening. Branching patterns of hypoattenuating lesions were noted in the liver of three patients; two of these had hepatic fascioliasis and one had paragonimiasis. Ectopic parasitic infestation in the peritoneal cavity manifests as mass formation, adjacent gastrointestinal wall thickening, and focal peritonitis. An understanding of these image features is important for both early diagnosis and adequate treatment.

  16. Intraperitoneal ectopic infestation of parasites invading through gastrointestinal tract : CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Kon; Rha, Sung Eun; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho; Choi, Byung Ihn; Shim, Jae Chul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Jong Hwa; Ham, Soo Youn

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the CT findings of parasitic ectopic infestation in the peritoneal cavity, a transitional route for parasites invading the gastrointestinal tract, to migrate to various target organs. CT scans of nine patients with pathologically(n=8) or serologically(n=1) proven intraperitoneal involvement of parasitic infestation were retrospectively reviewed. The primary causes of parasitic infestation in nine patients were Paragonimus westermani(n=5), Sparganosis(n=2), and hepatic fascioliasis(n=2). We analyzed the CT findings with regard to the sites and patterns of lesions in the peritoneal cavity and gastrointestinal track, as well as in other solid organs. The clinical features of these patients were also evaluated. The clinical symptoms and signs were chronic abdominal pain and general weakness in seven patients, while peripheral blood eosinophilia was observed in four. The CT features of these nine patients included multiseptated cystic masses of 2-6cm, diameter (mean 4.1±1.7cm) in the omentum or mesentery in six(67%), omental or mesenteric infiltration in seven(78%), focal peritoneal thickening in seven(78%), 1ymphadenopathy in five(56%), and ascites in four(44%). In six of the nine patients, the gastrointestinal tract(stomach in four, colon in one, both stomach and colon in one) was concomitantly involved with focal wall thickening. Branching patterns of hypoattenuating lesions were noted in the liver of three patients; two of these had hepatic fascioliasis and one had paragonimiasis. Ectopic parasitic infestation in the peritoneal cavity manifests as mass formation, adjacent gastrointestinal wall thickening, and focal peritonitis. An understanding of these image features is important for both early diagnosis and adequate treatment

  17. Role of proline and pyrroline-5-carboxylate metabolism in plant defense against invading pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Aarzoo; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa

    2015-01-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) is an intermediate product of both proline biosynthesis and catabolism. Recent evidences indicate that proline-P5C metabolism is tightly regulated in plants, especially during pathogen infection and abiotic stress. However, role of P5C and its metabolism in plants has not yet been fully understood. Studies indicate that P5C synthesized in mitochondria has a role in both resistance (R)-gene-mediated and non-host resistance against invading pathogens. Proline dehydrogenase and delta-ornithine amino transferase-encoding genes, both involved in P5C synthesis in mitochondria are implicated in defense response of Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana against bacterial pathogens. Such defense response is proposed to involve salicylic acid-dependent pathway, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitive response (HR)-associated cell death. Recently HR, a form of programmed cell death (PCD), has been proposed to be induced by changes in mitochondrial P5C synthesis or the increase in P5C levels per se in plants inoculated with either a host pathogen carrying suitable avirulent (Avr) gene or a non-host pathogen. Consistently, A. thaliana mutant plants deficient in P5C catabolism showed HR like cell death when grown in external P5C or proline supplemented medium. Similarly, yeast and plant cells under oxidative stress were shown to increase ROS production and PCD due to increase in P5C levels. Similar mechanism has also been reported as one of the triggers for apoptosis in mammalian cells. This review critically analyzes results from various studies and enumerates the pathways for regulation of P5C levels in the plant cell, especially in mitochondria, during pathogen infection. Further, mechanisms regulating P5C- mediated defense responses, namely HR are outlined. This review also provides new insights into the differential role of proline-P5C metabolism in plants exposed to pathogen infection. PMID:26217357

  18. The ant genomes have been invaded by several types of mariner transposable elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, Pedro; Maside, Xulio; Sanllorente, Olivia; Torres, María I.; Periquet, Georges; Palomeque, Teresa

    2012-12-01

    To date, only three types of full-length mariner elements have been described in ants, each one in a different genus of the Myrmicinae subfamily: Sinvmar was isolated from various Solenopsis species, Myrmar from Myrmica ruginodis, and Mboumar from Messor bouvieri. In this study, we report the coexistence of three mariner elements ( Tnigmar- Si, Tnigmar- Mr, and Tnigmar- Mb) in the genome of a single species, Tapinoma nigerrimum (subfamily Dolichoderinae). Molecular evolutionary analyses of the nucleotide sequence data revealed a general agreement between the evolutionary history of most the elements and the ant species that harbour them, and suggest that they are at the vertical inactivation stage of the so-called Mariner Life Cycle. In contrast, significantly reduced levels of synonymous divergence between Mboumar and Tnigmar- Mb and between Myrmar and Botmar (a mariner element isolated from Bombus terrestris), relative to those observed between their hosts, suggest that these elements arrived to the species that host them by horizontal transfer, long after the species' split. The horizontal transfer events for the two pairs of elements could be roughly dated within the last 2 million years and about 14 million years, respectively. As would be expected under this scenario, the coding sequences of the youngest elements, Tnigmar- Mb and Mboumar, are intact and, thus, potentially functional. Each mariner element has a different chromosomal distribution pattern according to their stage within the Mariner Life Cycle. Finally, a new defective transposable element ( Azteca) has also been found inserted into the Tnigmar- Mr sequences showing that the ant genomes have been invaded by at least four different types of mariner elements.

  19. Mapping areas invaded by Prosopis juliflora in Somaliland on Landsat 8 imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembold, Felix; Leonardi, Ugo; Ng, Wai-Tim; Gadain, Hussein; Meroni, Michele; Atzberger, Clement

    2015-10-01

    Prosopis juliflora is a fast growing tree species originating from South and Central America with a high invasion potential in semi-arid areas around the globe. It was introduced to East Africa for the stabilization of dune systems and for providing fuel wood after prolonged droughts and deforestation in the 1970s and 1980s. In many dry lands in East Africa the species has expanded rapidly and has become challenging to control. The species generally starts its colonization on deep soils with high water availability while in later stages or on poorer soils, its thorny thickets expand into drier grasslands and rangelands. Abandoned or low input farmland is also highly susceptible for invasion as P. juliflora has competitive advantages to native species and is extremely drought tolerant. In this work we describe a rapid approach to detect and map P. juliflora invasion at country level for the whole of Somaliland. Field observations were used to delineate training sites for a supervised classification of Landsat 8 imagery collected during the driest period of the year (i.e., from late February to early April). The choice of such a period allowed to maximise the spectral differences between P. juliflora and other species present in the area, as P. juliflora tends to maintain a higher vigour and canopy water content than native vegetation, when exposed to water stress. The results of our classification map the current status of invasion of Prosopis in Somaliland showing where the plant is invading natural vegetation or agricultural areas. These results have been verified for two spatial subsets of the whole study area with very high resolution (VHR) imagery, proving that Landsat 8 imagery is highly adequate to map P. juliflora. The produced map represents a baseline for understanding spatial distribution of P. juliflora across Somaliland but also for change detection and monitoring of long term dynamics in support to P. juliflora management and control activities.

  20. Wilms tumor in adult: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albuquerque, Mauro Guimaraes; Vieira, Sabas Carlos; Rego, Cristiane Fortes Napoleao do; Fortes, Emanuel Augusto de C.; Santana, Gerusia Ibiapina

    2004-01-01

    Wilms' tumor is the renal tumor with the higher incidence on the childhood, however it rarely occurs in adults.The incidence in this group is estimated at about 1% of all the cases and they have an obscure prognosis. In this report is related a new case in a 52 years old man presenting intensive abdominal pain associated by weightiness. Abdominal ultrasound revealed expansive and complex lesion with indefinite contour in the left flank. Computed tomography of abdomen demonstrated solid lesion on antero-superior pole of the left kidney invading para-vertebral musculature, peri and para-renal spaces. Total nephrectomy and the histopathologic analysis were realized. A nephroblastoma (Wilms' tumor) in stage II without anaplasia was diagnosed by the anatomopathological studies.Local radiotherapy was applied. Thereafter was diagnosed pulmonary and hepatic metastasis, and then initiated the chemotherapy with adriamycin, actinomycin and vincristine. The prognosis of Wilms' tumor is worse in adult and it requires an aggressive therapeutic and follow up. (author)

  1. Elucidating mechanical transition effects of invading cancer cells with a subnucleus-scaled microfluidic serial dimensional modulation device†

    OpenAIRE

    Mak, Michael; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.; Erickson, David

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical boundaries that define and regulate biological processes, such as cell-cell junctions and dense extracellular matrix networks, exist throughout the physiological landscape. During metastasis, cancer cells are able to invade across these barriers and spread to distant tissues. While transgressing boundaries is a necessary step for distal colonies to form, little is known about interface effects on cell behavior during invasion. Here we introduce a device and metric to assess cell tr...

  2. Invading of intrauterine contraceptive device into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a blunt trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodabadi, Abdoulhossein; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Amirbeigi, Mahdieh; Jazayeri, Hoda

    2015-01-01

    Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) is relatively safe but still with some serious risks. Uterus perforation is rare and would be fatal. A case of Cu-7 IUCD invading into the sigmoid colon through uterine perforation caused by a pelvic blunt trauma was presented. Our case showed that uterus perforation by an IUCD could induce utero-sigmoid fistula which is likely to be missed. Imaging is required when the patients with IUCD present abdominal pain, particularly with a history of trauma.

  3. Responses to invasion and invader removal differ between native and exotic plant groups in a coastal dune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, Susan M; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R; Cushman, J Hall

    2013-12-01

    The spread of exotic, invasive species is a global phenomenon that is recognized as a major source of environmental change. Although many studies have addressed the effects of exotic plants on the communities they invade, few have quantified the effects of invader removal on plant communities, or considered the degree to which different plant groups vary in response to invasion and invader removal. We evaluated the effects of an exotic succulent, iceplant (Carpobrotus edulis), on a coastal dune plant community in northern California, as well as the community responses to its removal. To assess possible mechanisms by which iceplant affects other plants, we also evaluated its above- and belowground influences on the germination and growth of a dominant exotic annual grass, Bromus diandrus. We found that iceplant invasion was associated with reduced native plant cover as well as increased cover and density of some exotic plants-especially exotic annual grasses. However, iceplant removal did not necessarily lead to a reversal of these effects: removal increased the cover and density of both native and exotic species. We also found that B. diandrus grown in iceplant patches, or in soil where iceplant had been removed, had poorer germination and growth than B. diandrus grown in soil not influenced by iceplant. This suggests that the influence of iceplant on this dune plant community occurs, at least in part, due to belowground effects, and that these effects remain after iceplant has been removed. Our study demonstrates the importance of considering how exotic invasive plants affect not only native species, but also co-occurring exotic taxa. It also shows that combining observational studies with removal experiments can lead to important insights into the influence of invaders and the mechanisms of their effects.

  4. Radiodiagnostic methods in determining the structure of tumor thrombus in the inferior vena cava in kidney cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Vikhrova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the most common primary tumor of the renal parenchyma. Venous involvement is one of the most important anatomic characteristics of tumor. It is known that venous spread influences the survival of patients with RCC. Tumor thrombosis of IVC in patients with renal cell carcinoma has been reported in 4–10 %. The reference standard for RCC with tumor thrombus remains surgical resection. The structure of thrombus determines some technical difficulties in the management of tumor. Spongeous thrombus correlate with higher risk of thrombus detachment during surgery resulting in PE. Therefore determination of IVC thrombus consistency is very important part of preoperative radiologic assessment of tumor in patients with RCC.

  5. CT staging of renal pelvis tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Soo Woong; Cho, Kyoung Sik; Lee, Jong Hwa; Ham, Su Yeon; Won, Yeong Cheol; Ji, Eun Kyung; Choi, Seong Hun; Shin, Byung Suck

    1999-01-01

    To assess the value of computed tomography (CT) in the preoperative staging of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the renal pelvis. We retrospectively evaluated the CT TNM staging of 38 patients with TCC of the renal pelvis who had undergone preoperative abdominal CT examination between January 1990 and January 1998. In CT staging for differentiation between early-stage (T0-2) and advanced-stage disease (T3-T4), three criteria were used, namely the presence or obliteration of the renal sinus fat layer, the smoothness or irregularity of margin between the tumor and renal parenchyma, and the presence or absence of hydronephrosis proximal to the tumor. CT staging was performed by two genitourinary radiologists blinded to the pathologic results, and was compared with pathologic staging. Pathologic results revealed 19 cases of early stage disease (T0=8, T1=9, T2=2) and 19 of advanced stage (T3=12, T4=7). Overall CT staging accuracy was 82%(31/38) ; four cases were overstaged and three were understaged. In early-stage disease, sensitivity and specificity were 79%, and 84%, and in advanced stage disease were 83% and 80%. Three of four overstaged cases showed hydronephrosis proximal to the tumor. In the second CT staging, using proximal hydronephrosis of the tumor as a criterion for early-stage disease, the sensitivity and specificity of early-stage disease were 95% and 75%, respectively, and the specificity of advanced-stage disease was 95%. When hydronephrosis proximal to a tumor was considered to be a sign of early stage disease, the CT staging of renal pelvic TCC was highly accurate

  6. Candida albicans: The Ability to Invade Epithelial Cells and Survive under Oxidative Stress Is Unlinked to Hyphal Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma K. Maza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In its hyphal form, Candida albicans invades epithelial and endothelial cells by two distinct mechanisms: active penetration and induced endocytosis. The latter is dependent on a reorganization of the host cytoskeleton (actin/cortactin recruitment, whilst active penetration does not rely on the host's cellular machinery. The first obstacle for the fungus to reach deep tissues is the epithelial barrier and this interaction is crucial for commensal growth, fungal pathogenicity and host defense. This study aimed to characterize in vitro epithelial HeLa cell invasion by four different isolates of C. albicans with distinct clinical backgrounds, including a C. albicans SC5314 reference strain. All isolates invaded HeLa cells, recruited actin and cortactin, and induced the phosphorylation of both Src-family kinases (SFK and cortactin. Curiously, L3881 isolated from blood culture of a patient exhibited the highest resistance to oxidative stress, although this isolate showed reduced hyphal length and displayed the lowest cell damage and invasion rates. Collectively, these data suggest that the ability of C. albicans to invade HeLa cells, and to reach and adapt to the host's blood, including resistance to oxidative stress, may be independent of hyphal length.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes efficiently invades Caco-2 cells after low-temperature storage in broth and on deli meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Marianne Halberg; Koch, Anette Granly; Ingmer, Hanne

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate how various growth conditions influence the virulence of Listeria monocytogenes monitored by its ability to invade the epithelial cell lines Caco-2 and INT-407. The growth conditions examined were modified atmosphere-packaged deli meat and brain heart infusion broth (BHI) with and without salt. Five strains of L. monocytogenes were selected to investigate their invasiveness and all strains invaded Caco-2 cells at higher levels than INT-407 cells. Further, the clinical strains (3443 and 3734) were more invasive (p 0.05) in invasiveness after 7 days at 10 degrees C in BHI broth or on sausage, whereas a slight increase (p < 0.05) was observed after incubation on ham for 2 and 4 weeks compared to that in BHI broth. Most importantly, our results show that L. monocytogenes efficiently invade Caco-2 cells even after 4 weeks of storage at chilled temperature. This is highly relevant for safety assessment of this organism in food as these conditions reflect storage of ready-to-eat food products in domestic refrigerators.

  8. Placenta Percreta Invading Broad Ligament and Parametrium in a Woman with Two Previous Cesarean Sections: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Vahdat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The incidence of placenta accreta has dramatically increased due to increasing caesarean section rate all over the world. Placenta percreta is the most severe form of placenta accretes. It frequently results in maternal morbidity and mortality mainly caused by massive obstetric hemorrhage or emergency hysterectomy. Percreta invading into the broad ligament has rarely been previously reported. Case presenting. We presented a case of placenta percreta invading left broad ligament and parametrium in a woman with two previous cesarean sections, which led to massive intraoperative hemorrhage during hysterectomy and transient ischemic encephalopathy. Conclusion. In cases of parametrial involvement, it would be more difficult to decide whether to remove placenta or leave it in site. In surgical removal neither local excision of placental bed and uterine repair nor traditional hysterectomy is adequate if parametrium invaded by placenta. We suggest delayed elective hysterectomy in such cases. So, pregnancy-induced pelvic congestion would be decreased, we can gather an expert team of gynecologists, urologists, and vascular surgeons, we could get plenty of blood products, and we may have the chance to administer methotrexate.

  9. Liver parenchyma transection-first approach in hemihepatectomy with en bloc caudate lobectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: A safe technique to secure favorable surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Yasunari; Hayashi, Hikota; Yano, Seiji; Tajima, Yoshitsugu

    2017-06-01

    Although hemihepatectomy with total caudate lobectomy (hemiHx-tc) is essential for the surgical treatment of hilar cholangiocarcinoma, the advantage of an anterior approach for hemiHx-tc has not been fully discussed technically; the significance of an anterior approach without liver mobilization for preventing infectious complications also remains unknown. The liver parenchyma transection-first approach (Hp-first) technique is an early transection of the hepatic parenchyma without mobilization of the liver that utilizes a modified liver-hanging maneuver to avoid damaging the future remnant liver. Between May 2010 and August 2016, a total of 40 consecutive patients underwent surgery for hilar cholangiocarcinoma. Of these, 19 patients underwent a conventional hemihepatectomy with total caudate lobectomy (cHx), while 21 patients received a Hp-first. The patients in the Hp-first group had significantly less intraoperative blood loss (P hilar cholangiocarcinoma because it resulted in improved surgical outcomes as compared with the conventional approach. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Long-distance transport of mRNA via parenchyma cells and phloem across the host-parasite junction in Cuscuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Schwartz, Rakefet; Runo, Steven; Townsley, Brad; Machuka, Jesse; Sinha, Neelima

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown that the parasitic plant dodder (Cuscuta pentagona) establishes a continuous vascular system through which water and nutrients are drawn. Along with solutes, viruses and proteins, mRNA transcripts are transported from the host to the parasite. The path of the transcripts and their stability in the parasite have yet to be revealed. To discover the route of mRNA transportation, the in situ reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique was used to locally amplify host transcript within parasitic tissue. The stability of host mRNA molecules was also checked by monitoring specific transcripts along the growing dodder thread. Four mRNAs, alpha and beta subunits of PYROPHOSPHATE (PPi)-DEPENDENT PHOSPHOFRUCTOKINASE (LePFP), the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), and GIBBERELLIC ACID INSENSITIVE (LeGAI), were found to move from host (tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)) to dodder. LePFP mRNA was localized to the dodder parenchyma cells and to the phloem. LePFP transcripts were found in the growing dodder stem up to 30 cm from the tomato-dodder connection. These results suggest that mRNA molecules are transferred from host to parasite via symplastic connections between parenchyma cells, move towards the phloem, and are stable for a long distance in the parasite. This may allow developmental coordination between the parasite and its host.

  11. CT evaluation of gastric cancer. Depth of tumor invasion and pancreas invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banba, Yoshihisa; Kanazawa, Tadayoshi; Seto, Hikaru

    1998-01-01

    To compare the internal structure of tumor and the contiguous organ configuration on computed tomography (CT) with the depth of tumor invasion on the pathological specimen. Sixty-four gastric cancers depicted on incremental dynamic CT were classified according to the internal structure of the tumor, and correlated with the depth of tumor invasion. In addition, the cancers were classified according to the contiguous pancreatic configuration, and correlated with the degree of pancreatic invasion. Eleven tumors with thickened gastric wall consisting of both a thick inner layer of high attenuation and a thin outer layer of low attenuation (two-layered tumor with a thin outer layer) did not invade the serosa: mucosa (n=5) and submucosa (n=6). Of 59 gastric cancers with a regular margin to the contiguous pancreas, pancreatic invasion was absent in 58 and present in one. Pancreatic invasion was present in all of five gastric cancers with an irregular margin. Our results indicate that two-layered gastric tumors with a thin outer layer never invade the serosa. Furthermore, pancreatic invasion is predicted only when the margin of the contiguous pancreas is irregular. (author)

  12. Effects of Mechanical Properties on Tumor Invasion: Insights from a Cellular Model

    KAUST Repository

    Li, YZ

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the regulating mechanism of tumor invasion is of crucial importance for both fundamental cancer research and clinical applications. Previous in vivo experiments have shown that invasive cancer cells dissociate from the primary tumor and invade into the stroma, forming an irregular invasive morphology. Although cell movements involved in tumor invasion are ultimately driven by mechanical forces of cell-cell interactions and tumor-host interactions, how these mechanical properties affect tumor invasion is still poorly understood. In this study, we use a recently developed two-dimensional cellular model to study the effects of mechanical properties on tumor invasion. We study the effects of cell-cell adhesions as well as the degree of degradation and stiffness of extracellular matrix (ECM). Our simulation results show that cell-cell adhesion relationship must be satisfied for tumor invasion. Increased adhesion to ECM and decreased adhesion among tumor cells result in invasive tumor behaviors. When this invasive behavior occurs, ECM plays an important role for both tumor morphology and the shape of invasive cancer cells. Increased stiffness and stronger degree of degradation of ECM promote tumor invasion, generating more aggressive tumor invasive morphologies. It can also generate irregular shape of invasive cancer cells, protruding towards ECM. The capability of our model suggests it a useful tool to study tumor invasion and might be used to propose optimal treatment in clinical applications.

  13. Morphogenesis and Complexity of the Tumor Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    directly proportional to the invasion capacity. The proposed model assumes: i) only interface cells proliferate and invade the host, and ii) the fractal dimension of tumoral cell patterns, can reproduce the Gompertzian growth law. A mathematical model was obtained to describe the relation between the tissue morphology of cervix carcinoma and both dynamic processes of mitosis and apoptosis, and an expression to quantify the tumor aggressiveness, which in this context is associated with the tumor growth rate. The proposed model was applied to Stage III cervix carcinoma in vivo studies. In this study we found that the apoptosis rate was significantly smaller in the tumor tissues and both the mitosis rate and aggressiveness index decrease with Stage III patient's age. These quantitative results correspond to observed behavior in clinical and genetics studies. Finally, the entropy production rate was determined for avascular tumor growth. The proposed formula relates the fractal dimension of the tumor contour with the quotient between mitosis and apoptosis rate, which can be used to characterize the degree of proliferation of tumor cells. The entropy production rate was determined for fourteen tumor cell lines as a physical function of cancer robustness. The entropy production rate is a hallmark that allows us the possibility of prognosis of tumor proliferation and invasion capacities, key factors to improve cancer therapy.

  14. "Cancer tumor".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronshtehn, V. A.

    The title is a phrase borrowed from a speech by a Leningrad pressman, V. E. Lvov, who called upon those attending a theoretical conference on ideological issues in astronomy held by the Leningrad Branch of the All-Union Astronomic and Geodetic Society (13 - 4 December 1948), "to make a more radical emphasis on the negative role of relativistic cosmology which is a cancer tumor disintegrating the contemporary astronomy theory, and a major ideological enemy of a materialist astronomy".

  15. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E

    2004-01-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines

  16. Cost-effective treatment of low-risk carcinoma not invading bladder muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David A; Rink, Michael; Cha, Eugene K; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Chughtai, Bilal; Scherr, Douglas S; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Lee, Richard K

    2013-03-01

    Study Type - Therapy (cost effectiveness analysis) Level of Evidence 2a What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Bladder cancer is one of the costliest malignancies to treat throughout the life of a patient. The most cost-effective management for low-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer is not known. The current study shows that employing cystoscopic office fulguration for low-risk appearing bladder cancer recurrences can materially impact the cost-effectiveness of therapy. In a follow-up protocol where office fulguration is routinely employed for low-risk bladder cancers, peri-operative intravesical chemotherapy may not provide any additional cost-effectiveness benefit. To examine the cost-effectiveness of fulguration vs transurethral resection of bladder tumour (TURBT) with and without perioperative intravesical chemotherapy (PIC) for managing low-risk carcinoma not invading bladder muscle (NMIBC). Low-risk NMIBC carries a low progression rate, lending support to the use of office-based fulguration for small recurrences rather than traditional TURBT. A Markov state transition model was created to simulate treatment of NMIBC with vs without PIC, with recurrence treated by formal TURBT vs treatment with fulguration. Costing data were obtained from the Medicare Resource Based Relative Value Scale. Data regarding the success of PIC were obtained from the peer-reviewed literature, as were corresponding utilities for bladder cancer-related procedures. Sensitivity analyses were performed. At 5-year follow-up, a strategy of fulguration without PIC was the most cost-effective (mean cost-effectiveness = US $654.8/quality-adjusted life year), despite a lower recurrence rate with PIC. Both fulguration strategies dominated each TURBT strategy. Sensitivity analysis showed that fulguration without PIC dominated all other strategies when the recurrence rate after PIC was increased to ≥14.2% per year. Similarly, the cost-effectiveness of TURBT becomes more

  17. Linking removal targets to the ecological effects of invaders: a predictive model and field test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Stephanie J; Dulvy, Nicholas K; Brooks, Annabelle M L; Akins, John L; Cooper, Andrew B; Miller, Skylar; Côté, Isabelle M

    , means that we could not identify a single rule of thumb for guiding control efforts. However, our model provides a method for setting reef-specific targets for population control using local monitoring data. Our work is the first to demonstrate that for ongoing invasions, suppressing invaders below densities that cause environmental harm can have a similar effect, in terms of protecting the native ecosystem on a local scale, to achieving complete eradication.

  18. Spreaders, igniters, and burning shrubs: plant flammability explains novel fire dynamics in grass-invaded deserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Ramirez, Andres; Veldman, Joseph W; Holzapfel, Claus; Moloney, Kirk A

    2016-10-01

    Novel fire regimes are an important cause and consequence of global environmental change that involve interactions among biotic, climatic, and human components of ecosystems. Plant flammability is key to these interactions, yet few studies directly measure flammability or consider how multiple species with different flammabilities interact to produce novel fire regimes. Deserts of the southwestern United States are an ideal system for exploring how novel fire regimes can emerge when fire-promoting species invade ecosystems comprised of species that did not evolve with fire. In these deserts, exotic annual grasses provide fuel continuity across landscapes that did not historically burn. These fires often ignite a keystone desert shrub, the fire-intolerant creosote bush, Larrea tridentata (DC.) Coville. Ignition of Larrea is likely catalyzed by fuels produced by native plants that grow beneath the shrubs. We hypothesize that invasive and native species exhibit distinct flammability characteristics that in combination determine spatial patterns of fire spread and intensity. We measured flammability metrics of Larrea, two invasive grasses, Schismus arabicus and Bromus madritensis, and two native plants, the sub-shrub Ambrosia dumosa and the annual herb Amsinckia menziesii. Results of laboratory experiments show that the grasses carry fire quickly (1.32 cm/s), but burn for short duration (0.5 min) at low temperatures. In contrast, native plants spread fire slowly (0.12 cm/s), but burn up to eight times longer (4 min) and produced hotter fires. Additional experiments on the ignition requirements of Larrea suggest that native plants burn with sufficient temperature and duration to ignite dead Larrea branches (time to ignition, 2 min; temperature at ignition 692°C). Once burning, these dead branches ignite living branches in the upper portions of the shrub. Our study provides support for a conceptual model in which exotic grasses are "spreaders" of fire and native

  19. Cultivation of zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within their invaded range to improve water quality in reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlan, C; Aldridge, D C

    2013-09-01

    Algal and cyanobacterial blooms in reservoirs are driven by nutrient enrichment and may present economic and conservation challenges for water managers. Current approaches such as suppression of algal growth with barley straw, ferric dosing or manipulation of fish stocks have not yielded long term successes. A possibility that has sparked growing interest is the encouragement and cultivation of natural filter feeders, such as mussels, which remove suspended matter from the water and reduce nutrient levels through biodeposition and assimilation. This review focusses on the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) as a tool for enhancement of water quality in reservoirs. Native to the Ponto-Caspian region, this species has invaded many lakes and reservoirs across North America and Western Europe, where it occurs in very high densities. While purposeful introduction of a non-native species into new sites is socially unacceptable, we investigate the possible benefits of encouraging increased abundance of zebra mussels in sites where the species is already established. We estimate that the annual nitrogen and phosphorus input into a large UK reservoir (Grafham Water) could be assimilated into zebra mussel biomass by encouraging settlement onto 3075 m and 1400 m of commercial mussel ropes, respectively. While zebra mussel cultivation has an incredible capacity to push eutrophic systems towards a clear water state, there are many risks associated with encouraging an invasive species, even within sites where it has already established. The zebra mussel is a prominent biofouler of native unionid mussels and raw water pipes, it changes the physical characteristics of the places it inhabits, in sites low in phosphorus it can be responsible for toxic cyanobacterial blooms, it alters nutrient cycling and community structure and it can have negative impacts on amenity value. Increased propagule pressure from elevated numbers of veliger larvae in the water column may increase the risk

  20. The Escape of Cancer from T Cell-Mediated Immune Surveillance: HLA Class I Loss and Tumor Tissue Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Garrido

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor immune escape is associated with the loss of tumor HLA class I (HLA-I expression commonly found in malignant cells. Accumulating evidence suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy depends on the expression levels of HLA class I molecules on tumors cells. It also depends on the molecular mechanism underlying the loss of HLA expression, which could be reversible/“soft” or irreversible/“hard” due to genetic alterations in HLA, β2-microglobulin or IFN genes. Immune selection of HLA-I negative tumor cells harboring structural/irreversible alterations has been demonstrated after immunotherapy in cancer patients and in experimental cancer models. Here, we summarize recent findings indicating that tumor HLA-I loss also correlates with a reduced intra-tumor T cell infiltration and with a specific reorganization of tumor tissue. T cell immune selection of HLA-I negative tumors results in a clear separation between the stroma and the tumor parenchyma with leucocytes, macrophages and other mononuclear cells restrained outside the tumor mass. Better understanding of the structural and functional changes taking place in the tumor microenvironment may help to overcome cancer immune escape and improve the efficacy of different immunotherapeutic strategies. We also underline the urgent need for designing strategies to enhance tumor HLA class I expression that could improve tumor rejection by cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL.

  1. Understanding Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Know About Brain Tumors . What is a Brain Tumor? A brain tumor is an abnormal growth
 ... Tumors” from Frankly Speaking Frankly Speaking About Cancer: Brain Tumors Download the full book Questions to ask ...

  2. Brain tumor - primary - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vestibular schwannoma (acoustic neuroma) - adults; Meningioma - adults; Cancer - brain tumor (adults) ... Primary brain tumors include any tumor that starts in the brain. Primary brain tumors can start from brain cells, ...

  3. Brain tumor - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children; Neuroglioma - children; Oligodendroglioma - children; Meningioma - children; Cancer - brain tumor (children) ... The cause of primary brain tumors is unknown. Primary brain tumors may ... (spread to nearby areas) Cancerous (malignant) Brain tumors ...

  4. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  5. SU-E-J-248: Contributions of Tumor and Stroma Phenotyping in Computer-Aided Diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H; Lan, L; Sennett, C; Giger, M [Univ Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To gain insight into the role of parenchyma stroma in the characterization of breast tumors by incorporating computerized mammographic parenchyma assessment into breast CADx in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions. Methods: This study was performed on 182 biopsy-proven breast mass lesions, including 76 benign and 106 malignant lesions. For each full-field digital mammogram (FFDM) case, our quantitative imaging analysis was performed on both the tumor and a region-of-interest (ROI) from the normal contralateral breast. The lesion characterization includes automatic lesion segmentation and feature extraction. Radiographic texture analysis (RTA) was applied on the normal ROIs to assess the mammographic parenchymal patterns of these contralateral normal breasts. Classification performance of both individual computer extracted features and the output from a Bayesian artificial neural network (BANN) were evaluated with a leave-one-lesion-out method using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis with area under the curve (AUC) as the figure of merit. Results: Lesion characterization included computer-extracted phenotypes of spiculation, size, shape, and margin. For parenchymal pattern characterization, five texture features were selected, including power law beta, contrast, and edge gradient. Merging of these computer-selected features using BANN classifiers yielded AUC values of 0.79 (SE=0.03) and 0.67 (SE=0.04) in the task of distinguishing between malignant and benign lesions using only tumor phenotypes and texture features from the contralateral breasts, respectively. Incorporation of tumor phenotypes with parenchyma texture features into the BANN yielded improved classification performance with an AUC value of 0.83 (SE=0.03) in the task of differentiating malignant from benign lesions. Conclusion: Combining computerized tumor and parenchyma phenotyping was found to significantly improve breast cancer diagnostic accuracy

  6. Dome-type carcinoma of the colon; a rare variant of adenocarcinoma resembling a submucosal tumor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamada Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dome-type carcinoma (DC is a distinct variant of colorectal adenocarcinoma and less than 10 cases have been described in the literature. Most of the previously reported cases were early lesions and no endoscopic observations have been described so far. We herein report a case of a DC invading the subserosal layer, including endoscopic findings. Case presentation A highly elevated lesion in the transverse colon was diagnosed by colonoscopy in a 77-year-old man. The tumor appeared to be similar to a submucosal tumor (SMT, however, a demarcated area of reddish and irregular mucosa was observed at the top of the tumor. There were no erosions or ulcers. Laparoscopic-assisted right hemicolectomy was performed and pathological examination revealed a well-circumscribed tumor invading the subserosal layer. The tumor was a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma associated with a dense lymphocytic infiltration and showed expansive growth. The overlying mucosal layer showed high-grade dysplasia. Conclusion The present lesion was diagnosed as a DC of the colon invading the subserosal layer. Because the association of mucosal dysplasia is common in DCs, the detection of dysplastic epithelium would be important to discriminate DCs from SMTs.

  7. Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa: a case report with a review of literatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Son

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas are very rare. We report a primary hepatic PEComa with a review of the literature. A 56-year-old women presented with a nodular mass detected during the management of chronic renal failure and chronic hepatitis C. Diagnostic imaging studies suggested a nodular hepatocellular carcinoma in segment 5 of the liver. The patient underwent partial hepatectomy. A brown-colored expansile mass measuring 3.2×3.0 cm was relatively demarcated from the surrounding liver parenchyma. The tumor was mainly composed of epithelioid cells that were arranged in a trabecular growth pattern. Adipose tissue and thick-walled blood vessels were minimally identified. A small amount of extramedullary hematopoiesis was observed in the sinusoidal spaces between tumor cells. Tumor cells were diffusely immunoreactive for human melanoma black 45 (HMB45 and Melan A, focally immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, but not for hepatocyte specific antigen (HSA.

  8. Clear cell hidradenocarcinoma of the breast: a very rare breast skin tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzabotta, Maurizio; Declich, Paolo; Cardarelli, Mery; Bellone, Stefano; Pacilli, Paolo; Riggio, Eliana; Pallino, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Hidradenocarcinoma is an uncommon malignant intradermal tumor of sweat gland origin with a predilection for the face and extremities. It is encountered equally in males and females, usually in the second half of life. These tumors tend to be locally aggressive. In our case, the tumor was located relatively superficially but without any apparent connection to the overlying skin. The typical disease course includes local and sometimes multiple recurrences, and some patients develop regional lymph node and distant metastases. These type of tumors in the parenchyma of the breast are extremely rare. We report a case of hidradenocarcinoma in a 77-year-old woman who presented with a palpable inflammatory nodule in the right breast.

  9. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  10. Clinical evaluation of multishot echo planar imaging after administration of superparamagnetic iron oxide for hepatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugai, Yukio; Watanabe, Yorihisa; Ito, Kazushi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    Ten cases of hepatocellular carcinoma and three cases of metastatic liver tumor were evaluated using breath-hold multishot echo planar imaging (EPI) before and after administration of super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), and the results were compared to those with breath-hold fast multi-planar SPGR (T 1 WI) and fat-suppressed respiratory-triggered FSE (T 2 WI). Qualitative imaging evaluation of lesion detectability showed that T 2 WI was much more useful than T 1 WI as previously reported, and more useful than EPI. Quantitative evaluation showed that the signal to noise (S/N) ratios of the liver parenchyma decreased after administration of SPIO and the changes were significant on all pulse sequences. The change ratio of the S/N ratio of the liver parenchyma after administration of SPIO on EPI was significantly higher than on T 1 WI and T 2 WI. The tumor-liver contrast to noise (C/N) ratios increased after administration of SPIO and the changes were significant on T 1 WI and T 2 WI, but not on EPI. These results suggested that the tumor S/N ratio decreased after administration of SPIO on EPI. The tumor diameters on EPI were significantly reduced after administration of SPIO. Magnetization and flow artifacts on EPI were detected in all cases and caused distortion: the signal decreased in the liver parenchyma. We concluded that EPI after administration of SPIO is not currently useful compared to other pulse sequences and cannot yet replace T 2 WI. (author)

  11. WHO Grade 2 Neuroendocrine Tumor in a 15-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Johannesen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroendocrine tumors, distinguished from adenocarcinomas by their neuroendocrine differentiation, are the most common pediatric epithelial malignancy that most often occurs in the appendix. In 2010, the WHO classified neuroendocrine neoplasms into three grades based on morphology, mitotic count, and Ki67 proliferation index. A 15-year-old male with a history of anemia and failure to thrive was diagnosed with a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor in the jejunum that invaded into the subserosal soft tissue and metastasized to four lymph nodes. Pediatric neuroendocrine tumors frequently arise within hereditary tumor syndromes with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors being the most common. Several studies also indicate an elevated risk of small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors in which children born to a parent with a history of neuroendocrine tumors in the small intestine have a significant increased risk of developing one.

  12. Invader Relative Impact Potential: a new metric to understand and predict the ecological impacts of existing, emerging and future invasive alien species

    OpenAIRE

    Dick, JTA; Laverty, C; Lennon, JJ; Barrios-O'Neill, D; Mensink, PJ; Britton, JR; Medoc, V; Boets, P; Alexander, ME; Taylor, NG; Dunn, AM; Hatcher, MJ; Rosewarne, PJ; Crookes, S; MacIsaac, HJ

    2017-01-01

    1. Predictions of the identities and ecological impacts of invasive alien species are critical for risk assessment, but presently we lack universal and standardized metrics that reliably predict the likelihood and degree of impact of such invaders (i.e. measurable changes in populations of affected species). This need is especially pressing for emerging and potential future invaders that have no invasion history. Such a metric would also ideally apply across diverse taxonomic and trophic gro...

  13. An unusual case of isolated, serial metastases of gallbladder carcinoma involving the chest wall, axilla, breast and lung parenchyma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Iott

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the English literature, only 9 cases of adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder with cutaneous metastasis have been reported so far. One case of multiple cutaneous metastases along with deposits in the breast tissue has been reported. We present a case of incidental metastatic gallbladder carcinoma with no intra-abdominal disease presenting as a series of four isolated cutaneous right chest wall, axillary nodal, breast and pulmonary metastases following resection and adjuvant chemoradiation for her primary tumor. In spite of the metastatic disease coupled with the aggressive nature of the cancer, this patient reported that her energy level had returned to baseline with a good appetite and a stable weight indicating a good performance status and now is alive at 25 months since diagnosis. Her serially-presented, oligometastatic diseases were well-controlled by concurrent chemoradiation and stereotactic radiation therapy. We report this case study because of its rarity and for the purpose of complementing current literature with an additional example of cutaneous metastasis from adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder.

  14. Testis tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.L.; Maier, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    Clinical trials are evaluating new combinations of drugs with the goal of diminishing the toxicity associated with the current regimens while not compromising the chance for cure. The evolution of information and staging studies such as tumor markers, CT scanning and MR scanning has made possible the detection of residual metastatic disease while obviating the need for surgical staging procedures. This has made less treatment possible for a large number of patients. The regularity of follow-up studies has made early detection of recurrences a possibility, so that effective and curative treatment is generally possible

  15. Diagnosis and evaluation of surveying examination by intracranial tumor in dogs CT; Diagnostico e avaliacao topografica de neoplasias intracranianas pelo exame de TC em caes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaldini, Andre Fonseca; Santos, Debora Rodrigues dos; Oliveira, Juliana Messias; Abreu, Felipe Andrei Suarez; Wallace, Verena; Pacheco, Eduardo Nelson da Silva, E-mail: andreromaldini@gmail.com [Hospital Santa Ines de Sao Paulo, Santana, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) revolutionized image diagnostic in veterinary medicine and currently can be considered one of the most useful tools for the imaging evaluation of intracranial tumor in dogs. Computed tomography of the brain in small animals allows visualization of intracranial tumor, compression of adjacent structures such as cerebral parenchyma, falx or lateral ventricles, and evaluate secondary hemorrhages and edema. The CT imaging provides essential information to indicate the surgical approach for a possible tumor resection or biopsy, including the correct location and boundaries structures involved, and also can be used to monitor the clinical treatment. However, only histopathological examination is able to confirm the final diagnosis. (author)

  16. Teratoid Wilms′ tumor - A rare renal tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswanath Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Teratoid Wilms′ tumor is an extremely rare renal tumor. We report a case of unilateral teratoid Wilms′ tumor in a 4-year-old girl. The patient was admitted with a right-sided abdominal mass. The mass was arising from the right kidney. Radical nephrectomy was done and the patient had an uneventful recovery. Histopathology report showed teratoid Wilms′ tumor.

  17. Imaging of breast tumors using MR-elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, J.; Sinkus, R.; Leussler, C.; Dargatz, M.; Roeschmann, P.; Schrader, D.; Lorenzen, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Imaging of breast tumors using MR-Elastography. Material and method: Low-frequency mechanical waves are transmitted into breast-tissue by means of an oscillator. The local characteristics of the mechanical wave are determined by the elastic properties of the tissue. By means of a motion-sensitive spin-echo-sequence these waves can be displayed within the phase of the MR image. Subsequently, these images can be used to reconstruct the local distribution of elasticity. In-vivo measurements were performed in 3 female patients with malignant tumors of the breast. Results: All patients tolerated the measurement set-up without any untoward sensation in the contact area of skin and oscillator. The waves completely penetrated the breast, encompassing the axilla and regions close to the chest wall. All tumors were localized by MRE as structures of markedly stiffer tissue when compared to the surrounding tissue. Furthermore, in one patient, a metastasis in an axillary lymph node was detected. In all patients, local regions of increased elasticity were found in the remaining parenchyma of the breast, which, however, did not reach the high levels of elasticity found in the tumors. Conclusion: MRE is an imaging modality enabling adjunct tissue differentiation of mammary tumors. (orig.) [de

  18. Natural killer/T-cell lymphoma invading the orbit and globe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lance J; Vrcek, Ivan; Somogyi, Marie; Taheri, Kevin; Admirand, Joan H; Chexal, Saradha; Loukas, Demetrius F; Nakra, Tanuj

    2017-10-01

    Natural killer/T-cell lymphomas are extremely rare and carry high mortality rates. Epidemiologically, these cancers tend to affect mainly Asian and South American patients and are associated with Epstein-Barr virus seropositivity. This report details a 78-year-old Vietnamese woman who presented initially with vitritis of unknown cause, but later developed proptosis and conjunctival involvement as her disease spread. Biopsies of the orbit, ethmoid sinus, and conjunctiva were found to be significant for natural killer/T-cell lymphoma. The case highlights the diagnostic difficulty of this tumor given its rarity and ability to mimic other disorders.

  19. Utility of Electrocardiography (ECG)-Gated Computed Tomography (CT) for Preoperative Evaluations of Thymic Epithelial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Yoshiyuki; Hara, Masaki; Nakagawa, Motoo; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative evaluation of invasion to the adjacent organs is important for the thymic epithelial tumors on CT. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the utility of electrocardiography (ECG)-gated CT for assessing thymic epithelial tumors with regard to the motion artifacts produced and the preoperative diagnostic accuracy of the technique. Forty thymic epithelial tumors (36 thymomas and 4 thymic carcinomas) were examined with ECG-gated contrast-enhanced CT using a dual source scanner. The scan delay after the contrast media injection was 30 s for the non-ECG-gated CT and 100 s for the ECG-gated CT. Two radiologists blindly evaluated both the non-ECG-gated and ECG-gated CT images for motion artifacts and determined whether the tumors had invaded adjacent structures (mediastinal fat, superior vena cava, brachiocephalic veins, aorta, pulmonary artery, pericardium, or lungs) on each image. Motion artifacts were evaluated using a 3-grade scale. Surgical and pathological findings were used as a reference standard for tumor invasion. Motion artifacts were significantly reduced for all structures by ECG gating ( p =0.0089 for the lungs and p ECG-gated CT and ECG-gated CT demonstrated 79% and 95% accuracy, respectively, during assessments of pericardial invasion ( p =0.03). ECG-gated CT reduced the severity of motion artifacts and might be useful for preoperative assessment whether thymic epithelial tumors have invaded adjacent structures.

  20. Gamma knife radiosurgery for secreting pituitary tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noren, G.; Jackson, I.M.D.; Chougule, P.; Zheng, Z.; Epstein, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery usually represents first line treatment for pituitary adenomas with the aim of removing the tumor, decompressing the optic apparatus and, in secreting tumors, eliminating the hypersecretion. Gamma Knife radiosurgery is indicated for tumor remnants or recurrences in or above the sella including those invading the cavernous sinus and also as initial treatment in patients who are unable to tolerate an open surgical procedure and where medication has failed. In this study, the target definition was retrospectively studied and when necessary corrected in 10 acromegalic patients, 8 with Cushing's disease, and 12 with prolactinomas undergoing Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The dose plan was analyzed and the volume of the target covered by a minimum of 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 Gy was estimated. A dose/volume profile for each treatment was created and correlated to the endocrinological and clinical outcome. Cure, according to strict endocrinological criteria, was seen in 6 of the acromegalic patients, in 2 of the patients with ACTH hypersecretion, and in 2 of the patients with prolactinomas. Analysis of these profiles, also for the patients with partial effect, show that a minimum radiation dose of 20 Gy may be adequate to eliminate the hypersecretion in acromegalic patients whereas a dose of at least 25 Gy may be required in patients with Cushing's disease and prolactinoma. (author)

  1. Structural organization of the thyroid gland and interrenal tissue with reference to endocrine parenchyma in short mackerel, Rastrelliger brachysoma (Bleeker, 1851

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinlapachai Senarat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The first investigations of the thyroid gland and interrenal tissue with reference to the endocrine parenchyma of short mackerel Rastrelliger brachysoma were subjected to histological analysis. Specimens were collected during the fishing season (October to November 2013 from the Upper Gulf of Thailand. Under a light microscope, the thyroid gland of R. brachysoma was distinctly found located within the branchial region. Within this gland, it consists of several follicles among afferent brachial arteries. Each follicle exclusively contained a colloid that was surrounded by a simple, cuboidal, follicle epithelium. Histological study showed that the localization of interrenal tissue was in the anterior kidney. This tissue was composed of two parts based on the structural compositions and cell types; (i the stromal compartment was constituted of various interrenal cells and (ii the interstitial compartment contained the connective tissue, leucocytes and blood sinuses, with reference to the lymphatic tissue.

  2. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper B.; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing...... the possibility of delivering neuroactive drugs by way of receptors already present on the brain endothelium has been of interest for many years. The transferrin receptor is of special interest since its expression is limited to the endothelium of the brain as opposed to peripheral endothelium. Here, we...... investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does...

  3. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System Phase I: Hypo-Elastic Model for CFD Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2011-04-14

    An isotropic constitutive model for the parenchyma of lung has been derived from the theory of hypo-elasticity. The intent is to use it to represent the mechanical response of this soft tissue in sophisticated, computational, fluid-dynamic models of the lung. This demands that the continuum model be accurate, yet simple and effcient. An objective algorithm for its numeric integration is provided. The response of the model is determined for several boundary-value problems whose experiments are used for material characterization. The effective elastic, bulk, and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio, as tangent functions, are also derived. The model is characterized against published experimental data for lung. A bridge between this continuum model and a dodecahedral model of alveolar geometry is investigated, with preliminary findings being reported.

  4. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Kasper B.; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing the possibi...... cargo uptake in the brain endothelium and subsequent cargo transport into the brain. These findings suggest that transferrin receptor-targeting is a relevant strategy of increasing drug exposure to the brain....... investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does...... not correlate with increased cargo transcytosis. Furthermore, we show that the transferrin receptor-targeted immunoliposomes accumulate along the microvessels of the brains of rats, but find no evidence for transcytosis of the immunoliposome. Conversely, the increased accumulation correlated both with increased...

  5. Antigen-Induced but Not Innate Memory CD8 T Cells Express NKG2D and Are Recruited to the Lung Parenchyma upon Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Morgan; Valsesia, Séverine; Mafille, Julien; Djebali, Sophia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Laubreton, Daphné; de Bernard, Simon; Jouve, Pierre-Emmanuel; Ventre, Erwan; Buffat, Laurent; Walzer, Thierry; Leverrier, Yann; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2018-05-15

    The pool of memory-phenotype CD8 T cells is composed of Ag-induced (AI) and cytokine-induced innate (IN) cells. IN cells have been described as having properties similar to those of AI memory cells. However, we found that pathogen-induced AI memory cells can be distinguished in mice from naturally generated IN memory cells by surface expression of NKG2D. Using this marker, we described the increased functionalities of AI and IN memory CD8 T cells compared with naive cells, as shown by comprehensive analysis of cytokine secretion and gene expression. However, AI differed from IN memory CD8 T cells by their capacity to migrate to the lung parenchyma upon inflammation or infection, a process dependent on their expression of ITGA1/CD49a and ITGA4/CD49d integrins. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Local Effects on Lung Parenchyma Using a 600 µm Bare Fiber with the Diode-Pumped Nd:YAG Laser LIMAX® 120

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Rexin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Lung metastases are frequently removed with an Nd:YAG laser. The aim is to perform a non-anatomic resection of all intraoperatively palpable lung metastases completely in order to preserve the largest possible amount of healthy lung parenchyma. The surgeon can either work with a focusing handpiece or use a laser fiber of the so-called bare fiber with direct contact to the lung parenchyma. We currently use a 600 µm bare fiber for applications involving the lung parenchyma. Precise data on the local effect of the laser fiber on the lung parenchyma are not available, especially with regard to an increase in the laser energy. We want to study this question within the scope of an experimental model in pig lungs by means of systematic and reproducible tests. The lung lobes were removed from animals recently slaughtered in the abattoir and taken to the laboratory immediately, where the lobes were stored such that the surface of the lungs was parallel to the floor. A 600 µm bare fiber was attached to a mounting bracket vertically above the lung surface at a distance of either 0, 5, or 10 mm. This mounting bracket was in turn connected to a hydraulic feed motor. The feed motor is capable of moving the bare fiber forward across the lungs consistently at three different speeds (5 mm/s, 10 mm/s, or 20 mm/s. The bare fiber itself was connected to the diode-pumped Nd: YAG Laser LIMAX® 120 (Gebrüder Martin GmbH & Co KG, Tuttlingen, Germany. We carried out the tests using three different laser powers: 20 W, 60 W, and 120 W. The lung lesions caused by the laser in each of the lungs were resected and sent in for histological analysis. The exact size of the vaporization and coagulation zone was measured using the HE sections, and the respective mean values (with standard deviations were ascertained. For all laser powers, the extent of the vaporization was greatest with a motion speed of 5 mm/s for the respective laser power: 756.4 ± 1.2 µm (20 W, 1411.0 ± 2

  7. C-arm CT for chemo-embolization of liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huppert, P.E.; Firlbeck, G.; Meissner, O.A.; Wietholtz, H.

    2009-01-01

    Local efficacy of transarterial chemo-embolization (TACE) is enhanced if selective treatment is performed. Selectivity of TACE mainly depends on vascular anatomy but also on the identification and catheterization of tumor feeding arteries. Correlation of vascular territories and target tumor volume in angiographic projection images is more difficult if tumors are not hypervascularized and contrast of liver parenchyma is inhomogeneous. C-arm CT offers the option of selective perfusion imaging via tumor-feeding arteries. This allows the comparison of perfusion images and baseline cross-sectional imaging to evaluate if tumors are covered completely by local treatment and to change the catheter position if necessary. Furthermore the uptake of embolization material, such as lipiodol can be checked by C-arm CT. In a prospective study of 75 TACE of liver tumors and liver metastases we evaluated the appropriateness of 85 catheter positions ready for delivery by perfusion C-arm CT and compared the diagnostic confidence of angiography and perfusion C-arm CT in terms of judgment of correct catheter position for the planned treatment. Diagnostic confidence was improved by perfusion C-arm CT in 55% of cases and in 11 cases (13%) catheter positions were inappropriate and had to be corrected. The reasons for catheter repositioning were incomplete coverage of the target tumor by perfusion volume (mismatch) in 6 cases, inappropriate perfusion of adjacent liver parenchyma in 2 cases and non-selective tumor perfusion via collateral arteries in 3 cases. C-arm CT allowed sufficient visualization of uptake of lipiodol in all cases evaluated. The diagnostic benefit of C-arm CT increases if tumors are treated more selectively, are not strongly hypervascular, are located centrally and if the enhancement of liver parenchyma is inhomogeneous. C-arm CT causes additional working time and contrast load, which is relatively low compared to angiography. Radiation exposure of 151 μGy per C

  8. Measuring landscape-scale spread and persistence of an invaded submerged plant community from airborne remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria J; Khanna, Shruti; Hestir, Erin L; Greenberg, Jonathan A; Ustin, Susan L

    2016-09-01

    Processes of spread and patterns of persistence of invasive species affect species and communities in the new environment. Predicting future rates of spread is of great interest for timely management decisions, but this depends on models that rely on understanding the processes of invasion and historic observations of spread and persistence. Unfortunately, the rates of spread and patterns of persistence are difficult to model or directly observe, especially when multiple rates of spread and diverse persistence patterns may be co-occurring over the geographic distribution of the invaded ecosystem. Remote sensing systematically acquires data over large areas at fine spatial and spectral resolutions over multiple time periods that can be used to quantify spread processes and persistence patterns. We used airborne imaging spectroscopy data acquired once a year for 5 years from 2004 to 2008 to map an invaded submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) community across 2220 km 2 of waterways in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California, USA, and measured its spread rate and its persistence. Submerged aquatic vegetation covered 13-23 km 2 of the waterways (6-11%) every year. Yearly new growth accounted for 40-60% of the SAV area, ~50% of which survived to following year. Spread rates were overall negative and persistence decreased with time. From this dataset, we were able to identify both radial and saltatorial spread of the invaded SAV in the entire extent of the Delta over time. With both decreasing spread rate and persistence, it is possible that over time the invasion of this SAV community could decrease its ecological impact. A landscape-scale approach allows measurements of all invasion fronts and the spatial anisotropies associated with spread processes and persistence patterns, without spatial interpolation, at locations both proximate and distant to the focus of invasion at multiple points in time. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  9. Wilms tumor in adult: case report; Tumor de Wilms em adulto: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, Mauro Guimaraes; Vieira, Sabas Carlos; Rego, Cristiane Fortes Napoleao do [Universidade Estadual do Piaui (UESPI), Teresina, PI (Brazil); Fortes, Emanuel Augusto de C.; Santana, Gerusia Ibiapina [Hospital Sao Marcos, Teresina, PI (Brazil)]. E-mail: sabasvieira@uol.com.br

    2004-07-01

    Wilms' tumor is the renal tumor with the higher incidence on the childhood, however it rarely occurs in adults.The incidence in this group is estimated at about 1% of all the cases and they have an obscure prognosis. In this report is related a new case in a 52 years old man presenting intensive abdominal pain associated by weightiness. Abdominal ultrasound revealed expansive and complex lesion with indefinite contour in the left flank. Computed tomography of abdomen demonstrated solid lesion on antero-superior pole of the left kidney invading para-vertebral musculature, peri and para-renal spaces. Total nephrectomy and the histopathologic analysis were realized. A nephroblastoma (Wilms' tumor) in stage II without anaplasia was diagnosed by the anatomopathological studies.Local radiotherapy was applied. Thereafter was diagnosed pulmonary and hepatic metastasis, and then initiated the chemotherapy with adriamycin, actinomycin and vincristine. The prognosis of Wilms' tumor is worse in adult and it requires an aggressive therapeutic and follow up. (author)

  10. Evaluation of liver parenchyma and perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in captive green iguanas (Iguana iguana) under general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Giordano; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Leopardi, Stefania; Paganelli, Irene; Zaghini, Anna; Origgi, Francesco C; Vignoli, Massimo

    2014-05-13

    Contrast-enhanced diagnostic imaging techniques are considered useful in veterinary and human medicine to evaluate liver perfusion and focal hepatic lesions. Although hepatic diseases are a common occurrence in reptile medicine, there is no reference to the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) to evaluate the liver in lizards. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the pattern of change in echogenicity and attenuation of the liver in green iguanas (Iguana iguana) after administration of specific contrast media. An increase in liver echogenicity and density was evident during CEUS and CECT, respectively. In CEUS, the mean ± SD (median; range) peak enhancement was 19.9% ± 7.5 (18.3; 11.7-34.6). Time to peak enhancement was 134.0 ± 125.1 (68.4; 59.6-364.5) seconds. During CECT, first visualization of the contrast medium was at 3.6 ± 0.5 (4; 3-4) seconds in the aorta, 10.7 ± 2.2 (10.5; 7-14) seconds in the hepatic arteries, and 15 ± 4.5 (14.5; 10-24) seconds in the liver parenchyma. Time to peak was 14.1 ± 3.4 (13; 11-21) and 31 ± 9.6 (29; 23-45) seconds in the aorta and the liver parenchyma, respectively. CEUS and dynamic CECT are practical means to determine liver hemodynamics in green iguanas. Distribution of contrast medium in iguana differed from mammals. Specific reference ranges of hepatic perfusion for diagnostic evaluation of the liver in iguanas are necessary since the use of mammalian references may lead the clinician to formulate incorrect diagnostic suspicions.

  11. Trypanosoma brucei Invasion and T-Cell Infiltration of the Brain Parenchyma in Experimental Sleeping Sickness: Timing and Correlation with Functional Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Laperchia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The timing of Trypanosoma brucei entry into the brain parenchyma to initiate the second, meningoencephalitic stage of human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is currently debated and even parasite invasion of the neuropil has been recently questioned. Furthermore, the relationship between neurological features and disease stage are unclear, despite the important diagnostic and therapeutic implications.Using a rat model of chronic Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection we determined the timing of parasite and T-cell neuropil infiltration and its correlation with functional changes. Parasite DNA was detected using trypanosome-specific PCR. Body weight and sleep structure alterations represented by sleep-onset rapid eye movement (SOREM periods, reported in human and experimental African trypanosomiasis, were monitored. The presence of parasites, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in the neuropil was assessed over time in the brain of the same animals by immunocytochemistry and quantitative analyses.Trypanosome DNA was present in the brain at day 6 post-infection and increased more than 15-fold by day 21. Parasites and T-cells were observed in the parenchyma from day 9 onwards. Parasites traversing blood vessel walls were observed in the hypothalamus and other brain regions. Body weight gain was reduced from day 7 onwards. SOREM episodes started in most cases early after infection, with an increase in number and duration after parasite neuroinvasion.These findings demonstrate invasion of the neuropil over time, after an initial interval, by parasites and lymphocytes crossing the blood-brain barrier, and show that neurological features can precede this event. The data thus challenge the current clinical and cerebrospinal fluid criteria of disease staging.

  12. Trypanosoma brucei Invasion and T-Cell Infiltration of the Brain Parenchyma in Experimental Sleeping Sickness: Timing and Correlation with Functional Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laperchia, Claudia; Palomba, Maria; Seke Etet, Paul F; Rodgers, Jean; Bradley, Barbara; Montague, Paul; Grassi-Zucconi, Gigliola; Kennedy, Peter G E; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2016-12-01

    The timing of Trypanosoma brucei entry into the brain parenchyma to initiate the second, meningoencephalitic stage of human African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness is currently debated and even parasite invasion of the neuropil has been recently questioned. Furthermore, the relationship between neurological features and disease stage are unclear, despite the important diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Using a rat model of chronic Trypanosoma brucei brucei infection we determined the timing of parasite and T-cell neuropil infiltration and its correlation with functional changes. Parasite DNA was detected using trypanosome-specific PCR. Body weight and sleep structure alterations represented by sleep-onset rapid eye movement (SOREM) periods, reported in human and experimental African trypanosomiasis, were monitored. The presence of parasites, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in the neuropil was assessed over time in the brain of the same animals by immunocytochemistry and quantitative analyses. Trypanosome DNA was present in the brain at day 6 post-infection and increased more than 15-fold by day 21. Parasites and T-cells were observed in the parenchyma from day 9 onwards. Parasites traversing blood vessel walls were observed in the hypothalamus and other brain regions. Body weight gain was reduced from day 7 onwards. SOREM episodes started in most cases early after infection, with an increase in number and duration after parasite neuroinvasion. These findings demonstrate invasion of the neuropil over time, after an initial interval, by parasites and lymphocytes crossing the blood-brain barrier, and show that neurological features can precede this event. The data thus challenge the current clinical and cerebrospinal fluid criteria of disease staging.

  13. Long-term progress of six cases of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the mediastinum that underwent surgical treatment: Case report series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakajima

    2016-01-01

    Discussion and conclusions: Nerve sheath tumors localized within the membrane offer good long-term prognosis even if malignant. Furthermore, long-term survival is possible even if the tumor has invaded neighboring organs, provided it can be completely excised. In cases where complete excision is difficult, a multidisciplinary approach including radiotherapy and anti-cancer drug treatment may contribute to improved prognosis but this is a subject that requires further study.

  14. Invaded depth of extrahepatic bile duct cancer diagnosed on angiographic CT during late contrast enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuyama, Masataka; Sasada, Yuzo; Koide, Shigeki; Hirai, Ritsuko; Oota, Yuji

    2006-01-01

    Thirteen patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer were evaluated for enhancement pattern and tumor feature during late contrast enhancement on angiographic CT (AG-CT), performed before surgery. Eleven patients with late contrast enhancement had advanced cancers with invasion over the subserosal layer. Eight of these patients whose cancer had an irregular outer layer had invasion over the serosal layer (≥panc 1 b, General Rules for Surgical and Pathological Studies on Cancer of the Biliary Tract, Japanese Society of Biliary Surgery). Seven of the 13 patients had intra-pancreatic bile duct cancer. Among them, five had an irregular outer layer of the intra-pancreatic bile duct cancer; one of three with a wall thickness under 5 mm on AG-CT had panc 1 b invasion, and the other two had panc 2 (General Rules for Surgical and Pathological Studies on Cancer of the Biliary Tract, Japanese Society of Biliary Surgery) invasion. Two with a wall thickness over 5 mm on AG-CT had panc 2 invasion. These results suggest that late contrast enhancement on AG-CT is effective for diagnosing the depth of tumor invasion of the bile duct. (author)

  15. CT features of invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Yi; Xiao Jiahe; Zhou Xiangping; Deng Kaihong

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT features of the invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors in order to provide more accurate information for clinical treatment. Methods: Fifty-eight cases of pathologically proven malignant oropharyngeal tumors were collected and retrospectively analyzed. Results: Among all the cases, invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors could be seen in 14 cases, of which, 7 cases got access to sublingual space through tongue base, 3 cases through parapharyngeal space, 2 cases through pterygomandibular raphe, 2 cases through uncertain routes. Invasion of sublingual space manifested on CT scan as obliteration of fat plane in sublingual space and involvement of the sublingual vessels in the space. Conclusion: Malignant oropharyngeal tumors can invade the adjacent sublingual space via tongue base, pterygomandibular raphe, and parapharyngeal space. The invasion of sublingual space by malignant oropharyngeal tumors manifests in CT as effacement of sublingual fat plane and envelopment of hyoid artery

  16. The use of steady state neutron flux measurement to determine the size of an invaded region following fluid injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    By using a combination of Monte-Carlo and diffusion theory techniques, the behaviour of the thermal neutron flux during fluid injection is studied. It is shown that the change in neutron flux induced by the fluid injection, is equal to the neutron flux due to a certain thermal neutron source distribution. Using this result, a method of estimating the size of an elliptical invaded region is given. This choice of region shape is not a necessity but a convenience and it is possible that the method may be generalised to include higher order shapes. (author)

  17. The mechanisms by which polyamines accelerate tumor spread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soda Kuniyasu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increased polyamine concentrations in the blood and urine of cancer patients reflect the enhanced levels of polyamine synthesis in cancer tissues arising from increased activity of enzymes responsible for polyamine synthesis. In addition to their de novo polyamine synthesis, cells can take up polyamines from extracellular sources, such as cancer tissues, food, and intestinal microbiota. Because polyamines are indispensable for cell growth, increased polyamine availability enhances cell growth. However, the malignant potential of cancer is determined by its capability to invade to surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant organs. The mechanisms by which increased polyamine levels enhance the malignant potential of cancer cells and decrease anti-tumor immunity are reviewed. Cancer cells with a greater capability to synthesize polyamines are associated with increased production of proteinases, such as serine proteinase, matrix metalloproteinases, cathepsins, and plasminogen activator, which can degrade surrounding tissues. Although cancer tissues produce vascular growth factors, their deregulated growth induces hypoxia, which in turn enhances polyamine uptake by cancer cells to further augment cell migration and suppress CD44 expression. Increased polyamine uptake by immune cells also results in reduced cytokine production needed for anti-tumor activities and decreases expression of adhesion molecules involved in anti-tumor immunity, such as CD11a and CD56. Immune cells in an environment with increased polyamine levels lose anti-tumor immune functions, such as lymphokine activated killer activities. Recent investigations revealed that increased polyamine availability enhances the capability of cancer cells to invade and metastasize to new tissues while diminishing immune cells' anti-tumor immune functions.

  18. Tumor Macroenvironment and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S.; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organ...

  19. A 3-D model of tumor progression based on complex automata driven by particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wcisło, Rafał; Dzwinel, Witold; Yuen, David A; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2009-12-01

    The dynamics of a growing tumor involving mechanical remodeling of healthy tissue and vasculature is neglected in most of the existing tumor models. This is due to the lack of efficient computational framework allowing for simulation of mechanical interactions. Meanwhile, just these interactions trigger critical changes in tumor growth dynamics and are responsible for its volumetric and directional progression. We describe here a novel 3-D model of tumor growth, which combines particle dynamics with cellular automata concept. The particles represent both tissue cells and fragments of the vascular network. They interact with their closest neighbors via semi-harmonic central forces simulating mechanical resistance of the cell walls. The particle dynamics is governed by both the Newtonian laws of motion and the cellular automata rules. These rules can represent cell life-cycle and other biological interactions involving smaller spatio-temporal scales. We show that our complex automata, particle based model can reproduce realistic 3-D dynamics of the entire system consisting of the tumor, normal tissue cells, blood vessels and blood flow. It can explain phenomena such as the inward cell motion in avascular tumor, stabilization of tumor growth by the external pressure, tumor vascularization due to the process of angiogenesis, trapping of healthy cells by invading tumor, and influence of external (boundary) conditions on the direction of tumor progression. We conclude that the particle model can serve as a general framework for designing advanced multiscale models of tumor dynamics and it is very competitive to the modeling approaches presented before.

  20. Expression profiling of migrated and invaded breast cancer cells predicts early metastatic relapse and reveals Krüppel-like factor 9 as a potential suppressor of invasive growth in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limame, Ridha; de Beeck, Ken Op; Van Laere, Steven; Croes, Lieselot; De Wilde, Annemieke; Dirix, Luc; Van Camp, Guy; Peeters, Marc; De Wever, Olivier; Lardon, Filip; Pauwels, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Cell motility and invasion initiate metastasis. However, only a subpopulation of cancer cells within a tumor will ultimately become invasive. Due to this stochastic and transient nature, in an experimental setting, migrating and invading cells need to be isolated from the general population in order to study the gene expression profiles linked to these processes. This report describes microarray analysis on RNA derived from migrated or invaded subpopulations of triple negative breast cancer cells in a Transwell set-up, at two different time points during motility and invasion, pre-determined as “early” and “late” in real-time kinetic assessments. Invasion- and migration-related gene expression signatures were generated through comparison with non-invasive cells, remaining at the upper side of the Transwell membranes. Late-phase signatures of both invasion and migration indicated poor prognosis in a series of breast cancer data sets. Furthermore, evaluation of the genes constituting the prognostic invasion-related gene signature revealed Krüppel-like factor 9 (KLF9) as a putative suppressor of invasive growth in breast cancer. Next to loss in invasive vs non-invasive cell lines, KLF9 also showed significantly lower expression levels in the “early” invasive cell population, in several public expression data sets and in clinical breast cancer samples when compared to normal tissue. Overexpression of EGFP-KLF9 fusion protein significantly altered morphology and blocked invasion and growth of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro. In addition, KLF9 expression correlated inversely with mitotic activity in clinical samples, indicating anti-proliferative effects. PMID:25593984

  1. Radiotherapy Plus Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Invading the Portal Vein: Long-Term Patient Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Young-Suk [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Won, Hyung Jin [Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hoon, E-mail: jhkim2@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kang Mo; Lee, Han Chu; Chung, Young-Hwa; Lee, Yung Sang [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Gyu [Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jin-hong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong Jin [Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: We have evaluated the clinical outcomes of patients after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods and Materials: A registry database of 412 patients treated with TACE and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for HCC with PVTT between August 2002 and August 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. The radiotherapy volume included the PVTT, with a 2- to 3-cm margin to cover adjacent HCC. Intrahepatic primary HCC was managed by TACE before or after radiotherapy. Results: Median patient age was 52 years old, and 88.1% of patients were male. Main or bilateral PVTT was observed in 200 (48.5%) patients. Median radiation dose was 40 Gy (range, 21-60 Gy) delivered in 2- to 5-Gy fractions. We found that 3.6% of patients achieved a complete response and that 24.3% of patients achieved a partial response. The response and progression-free rates of PVTT were 39.6% and 85.6%, respectively. Median patient survival was 10.6 months, and the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 42.5% and 22.8%, respectively. Significant independent variables associated with overall survival included advanced tumor stage, alpha-fetoprotein level, degree of PVTT, and response to radiotherapy. Forty-one patients (10.0%) showed grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity during or 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. Grades 2-3 gastroduodenal complications were observed in 15 patients (3.6%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a safe and effective treatment for PVTT in patients with HCC. These results suggested that the combination of TACE and radiotherapy is a treatment option for relieving and/or stabilizing PVTT in patients with advanced HCC.

  2. [A Case of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma with Invasion to the Transverse Colon and Gallbladder, Forming an Intra-Tumor Abscess].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Nami; Kametaka, Hisashi; Koyama, Takashi; Seike, Kazuhiro; Makino, Hironobu; Fukada, Tadaomi; Sato, Yutaka; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2015-11-01

    An 81-year-old man was referred to our institution for evaluation of high fever and a liver tumor that had been detected by ultrasonography. Computed tomography revealed a low-density mass with peripheral ring-like enhancement in S5 of the liver. The liver mass was in contact with the gallbladder, and the boundary between the mass and the gallbladder was unclear. On the suspicion of liver abscess, percutaneous transhepatic drainage was performed. The cavity of the abscess communicated with the gallbladder. Because the cavity had no tendency to reduce in size, we performed surgical resection under a preoperative diagnosis of liver abscess or primary liver carcinoma invading to the gallbladder. Intraoperative findings revealed a liver tumor invading the transverse colon and gallbladder. Subsegmentectomy of S4a and S5 of the liver combined with gallbladder and transverse colon resection was performed. Histopathological findings indicated the growth of a mass forming type intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma with invasion to the transverse colon and gallbladder, and the pathological stage of the tumor was pT3N0M0, fStage Ⅲ. Thus far, the patient is alive without recurrence 9 months after surgery. Here, we report an extremely rare case of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma that invaded other organs and was associated with an intra-tumor abscess.

  3. Wilms′ tumor with right heart extension: Report of a post-chemotherapeutic fatality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vaideeswar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wilms′ tumor (WT has a strong propensity to invade the vasculature in the form of tumor-thrombus, into the renal veins, and inferior vena cava and even into the right atrium. This cavo-atrial propagation does not alter the prognosis and pre-operative chemotherapy produces shrinkage to the extent of even disappearance of caval or atrial extensions. We present a case of sudden death due to hemorrhagic expansion of the intra-atrial component of WT, immediately after commencement of chemotherapy, an uncommon incident.

  4. Variations of selected soil properties in the grass fields invaded and uninvaded by invasive goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranová Beáta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the invasion of exotic plants has been recognised as the serious cause of the biodiversity loss and natural habitats degradation and threat to the ecosystems functions, just the little attention has been paid to the potential impacts of the goldenrod invasion on the soil properties. Equally, currently obtained results are contrary and ambiguous. We tested whether the grass fields invaded and uninvaded by Canadian goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L. differ in pH, soil moisture, organic carbon (Cox, humus and P, K and Mg contents and related the variations to the chosen environmental variables. We did not find significant distinctions of the studied types of habitats in the selected physico-chemical soil properties as well as the relation between the goldenrod invasion and the changes in soil properties. Nevertheless, whereas the soil reaction, soil moisture and Mg content were higher in the invaded soils, the Cox, humus and P and K contents were higher in the uninvaded ones. Doubtless, further attention need to be paid to this problem.

  5. The fungus that came in from the cold: dry rot's pre-adapted ability to invade buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasundaram, S V; Hess, J; Durling, M B; Moody, S C; Thorbek, L; Progida, C; LaButti, K; Aerts, A; Barry, K; Grigoriev, I V; Boddy, L; Högberg, N; Kauserud, H; Eastwood, D C; Skrede, I

    2018-03-01

    Many organisms benefit from being pre-adapted to niches shaped by human activity, and have successfully invaded man-made habitats. One such species is the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, which has a wide distribution in buildings in temperate and boreal regions, where it decomposes coniferous construction wood. Comparative genomic analyses and growth experiments using this species and its wild relatives revealed that S. lacrymans evolved a very effective brown rot decay compared to its wild relatives, enabling an extremely rapid decay in buildings under suitable conditions. Adaptations in intracellular transport machineries promoting hyphal growth, and nutrient and water transport may explain why it is has become a successful invader of timber in houses. Further, we demonstrate that S. lacrymans has poor combative ability in our experimental setup, compared to other brown rot fungi. In sheltered indoor conditions, the dry rot fungus may have limited encounters with other wood decay fungi compared to its wild relatives. Overall, our analyses indicate that the dry rot fungus is an ecological specialist with poor combative ability against other fungi.

  6. Human sepsis-associated Escherichia coli (SEPEC) is able to adhere to and invade kidney epithelial cells in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceição, R.A. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ludovico, M.S. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Andrade, C.G.T.J. [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Yano, T. [Departamento de Genética, Evolução e Bioagentes, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-04-13

    The adhesins of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli are essential for mediating direct interactions between the microbes and the host cell surfaces that they infect. Using fluorescence microscopy and gentamycin protection assays, we observed that 49 sepsis-associated E. coli (SEPEC) strains isolated from human adults adhered to and invaded Vero cells in the presence of D-mannose (100%). In addition, bacteria concentrations of approximately 2 × 10{sup 7} CFU/mL were recovered from Vero cells following an invasion assay. Furthermore, PCR analysis of adhesin genes showed that 98.0% of these SEPEC strains tested positive for fimH, 69.4% for flu, 53.1% for csgA, 38.8% for mat, and 32.7% for iha. Analysis of the invasin genes showed that 16.3% of the SEPEC strains were positive for tia, 12.3% for gimB, and 10.2% for ibeA. Therefore, these data suggest that SEPEC adhesion to cell surfaces occurs through non-fimH mechanisms. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of microcolonies on the Vero cell surface. SEPEC invasiveness was also confirmed by the presence of intracellular bacteria, and ultrastructural analysis using electron transmission microscopy revealed bacteria inside the Vero cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that these SEPEC strains had the ability to adhere to and invade Vero cells. Moreover, these data support the theory that renal cells may be the predominant pathway through which SEPEC enters human blood vessels.

  7. Spatial Pattern and Scale Influence Invader Demographic Response to Simulated Precipitation Change in an Annual Grassland Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan J Skaer Thomason

    Full Text Available It is important to predict which invasive species will benefit from future changes in climate, and thereby identify those invaders that need particular attention and prioritization of management efforts. Because establishment, persistence, and spread determine invasion success, this prediction requires detailed demographic information. Explicit study of the impact of pattern on demographic response is particularly important for species that are naturally patchy, such as the invasive grass, Aegilops triuncialis. In the northern California Coast Range, where climate change may increase or decrease mean annual rainfall, we conducted a field experiment to understand the interaction of climate change and local-scale patterning on the demography of A. triuncialis. We manipulated precipitation (reduced, ambient, or augmented, seed density, and seeding pattern. Demographic and environmental data were collected for three years following initial seeding. Pattern and scale figure prominently in the demographic response of A. triuncialis to precipitation manipulation. Pattern interacts with precipitation and seeding density in its influence on per-plant seed output. Although per-plot seed production was highest when seeds were not aggregated, per-plant seed output was higher in aggregated patches. Results suggest aggregation of invasive A. triuncialis reduces the detrimental impact of interspecific competition in its invaded community, and that interspecific competition per se has a stronger impact than intraspecific competition.

  8. Co-invading symbiotic mutualists of Medicago polymorpha retain high ancestral diversity and contain diverse accessory genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephanie S; Faber-Hammond, Joshua J; Friesen, Maren L

    2018-01-01

    Exotic, invasive plants and animals can wreak havoc on ecosystems by displacing natives and altering environmental conditions. However, much less is known about the identities or evolutionary dynamics of the symbiotic microbes that accompany invasive species. Most leguminous plants rely upon symbiotic rhizobium bacteria to fix nitrogen and are incapable of colonizing areas devoid of compatible rhizobia. We compare the genomes of symbiotic rhizobia in a portion of the legume's invaded range with those of the rhizobium symbionts from across the legume's native range. We show that in an area of California the legume Medicago polymorpha has invaded, its Ensifer medicae symbionts: (i) exhibit genome-wide patterns of relatedness that together with historical evidence support host-symbiont co-invasion from Europe into California, (ii) exhibit population genomic patterns consistent with the introduction of the majority of deep diversity from the native range, rather than a genetic bottleneck during colonization of California and (iii) harbor a large set of accessory genes uniquely enriched in binding functions, which could play a role in habitat invasion. Examining microbial symbiont genome dynamics during biological invasions is critical for assessing host-symbiont co-invasions whereby microbial symbiont range expansion underlies plant and animal invasions. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Invasion Age and Invader Removal Alter Species Cover and Composition at the Suisun Tidal Marsh, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Estrella

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Wetland ecosystems are vulnerable to plant species invasions, which can greatly alter species composition and ecosystem functioning. The response of these communities to restoration can vary following invader removal, but few studies have evaluated how recent and long-term invasions can affect the plant community’s restoration potential. Perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium has invaded thousands of hectares of marshland in the San Francisco Estuary, California, United States of America, while the effects of invasion and removal of this weed remain poorly studied. In this study, perennial pepperweed was removed along a gradient of invasion age in brackish tidal marshes of Suisun Marsh, within the Estuary. In removal plots, resident plant cover significantly increased during the 2-year study period, particularly in the densest and oldest parts of the perennial pepperweed colonies, while species richness did not change significantly. In bare areas created by removal of perennial pepperweed, recolonization was dominated by three-square bulrush (Schoenoplectus americanus. Ultimately, removal of invasive perennial pepperweed led to reinvasion of the resident plant community within two years. This study illustrates that it is important to consider invasion age, along with exotic species removal, when developing a restoration strategy in wetland ecosystems.

  10. Bronchoplasty for Primary Broncho-Pulmonary Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABDEL RAHMAN, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Parenchyma-sparing procedures are widely used in patients with low-grade malignancies of the airway when anatomically suited lesions exist. This study was conducted to evaluate the short-term and the long-term results of bronchoplastic procedures for patients with centrally located primary bronchopulmonary tumors. Methods: Between 2000 and 2009, 36 patients with primary lung tumors required bronchoplasty were retrospectively analyzed. Preoperative assessment included computed tomography (CT) of the chest, bronchoscopy, and spirometry. Pre operative diagnosis was achieved by bronchoscopy for all patients, mediastinoscopy was done for patients with primary lung cancer. Neo adjuvant chemotherapy was given for 6 patients with non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results: We had 15 males and 21 female, the mean age was 37 years and the mean hospital stay was 7.2 days. Operative procedures performed were:Sleeve lobectomy in 30 patients (13 right, 17 left), partial sleeve right pneumonectomy in 3 and bronchial resection with re-anastomosis in 3 (2 left, 1 right). Twelve patients (33.3%) suffered post-operative problems. There was one operative related mortality. Post operative pathology revealed: 27 patients with typical carcinoid, 2 with atypical carcinoid, 4 with squamous cell carcinoma, 2 with adenocarcifioma and one with hamartoma. Pathological TNM staging revealed: 17 patients with stage 1A, 11 with IB, 5 with IIA and 2 with stage IIIA. Follow-up data were available for all patients except two. Two patients died with disseminated disease 1.5 year and 2 years after surgery. The patient with hamartoma developed local recurrence 5 years later and re-excision was done. One patient with lung cancer developed bone metastases and was alive with disease, while the remaining 30 patient's were alive and disease free. The overall 5 years survival was 83.3%. Conclusion: Bronchoplastic resections achieve local control and long-term survival comparable to the standard resections in

  11. Segmentation of liver tumors on CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pescia, D.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to 3D segmentation of liver tumors in CT images. This is a task of great clinical interest since it allows physicians benefiting from reproducible and reliable methods for segmenting such lesions. Accurate segmentation would indeed help them during the evaluation of the lesions, the choice of treatment and treatment planning. Such a complex segmentation task should cope with three main scientific challenges: (i) the highly variable shape of the structures being sought, (ii) their similarity of appearance compared with their surrounding medium and finally (iii) the low signal to noise ratio being observed in these images. This problem is addressed in a clinical context through a two step approach, consisting of the segmentation of the entire liver envelope, before segmenting the tumors which are present within the envelope. We begin by proposing an atlas-based approach for computing pathological liver envelopes. Initially images are pre-processed to compute the envelopes that wrap around binary masks in an attempt to obtain liver envelopes from estimated segmentation of healthy liver parenchyma. A new statistical atlas is then introduced and used to segmentation through its diffeomorphic registration to the new image. This segmentation is achieved through the combination of image matching costs as well as spatial and appearance prior using a multi-scale approach with MRF. The second step of our approach is dedicated to lesions segmentation contained within the envelopes using a combination of machine learning techniques and graph based methods. First, an appropriate feature space is considered that involves texture descriptors being determined through filtering using various scales and orientations. Then, state of the art machine learning techniques are used to determine the most relevant features, as well as the hyper plane that separates the feature space of tumoral voxels to the ones corresponding to healthy tissues. Segmentation is then

  12. Involvement of host stroma cells and tissue fibrosis in pancreatic tumor development in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Spector

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Stroma cells and extracellular matrix (ECM components provide the pivotal microenvironment for tumor development. The study aimed to evaluate the importance of the pancreatic stroma for tumor development. METHODS: Pancreatic tumor cells were implanted subcutaneously into green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, and stroma cells invading the tumors were identified through immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of tumor invasion by stroma cells was achieved with halofuginone, an inhibitor of TGFβ/Smad3 signaling, alone or in combination with chemotherapy. The origin of tumor ECM was evaluated with species-specific collagen I antibodies and in situ hybridization of collagen α1(I gene. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced by cerulean injection and tumors by spleen injection of pancreatic tumor cells. RESULTS: Inhibition of stroma cell infiltration and reduction of tumor ECM levels by halofuginone inhibited development of tumors derived from mouse and human pancreatic cancer cells. Halofuginone reduced the number only of stroma myofibroblasts expressing both contractile and collagen biosynthesis markers. Both stroma myofibroblasts and tumor cells generated ECM that contributes to tumor growth. Combination of treatments that inhibit stroma cell infiltration, cause apoptosis of myofibroblasts and inhibit Smad3 phosphorylation, with chemotherapy that increases tumor-cell apoptosis without affecting Smad3 phosphorylation was more efficacious than either treatment alone. More tumors developed in fibrotic than in normal pancreas, and prevention of tissue fibrosis greatly reduced tumor development. CONCLUSIONS: The utmost importance of tissue fibrosis and of stroma cells for tumor development presents potential new therapy targets, suggesting combination therapy against stroma and neoplastic cells as a treatment of choice.

  13. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  14. Brain Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Brain Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Brain Tumors What's in ... radiation therapy or chemotherapy, or both. Types of Brain Tumors There are many different types of brain ...

  15. Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain tumors are abnormal growths inside the skull. They are among the most common types of childhood ... still be serious. Malignant tumors are cancerous. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors can cause headaches and ...

  16. Malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zedgenidze, G.A.; Kishkovskij, A.N.; Elashov, Yu.G.

    1984-01-01

    Clinicoroentgenologic semiotics of malignant bone tumors as well as metastatic bone tumors are presented. Diagnosis of malignant and metastatic bone tumors should be always complex, representing a result of cooperation of a physician, roentgenologist, pathoanatomist

  17. Tumors and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumors during pregnancy are rare, but they can happen. Tumors can be either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. The most common cancers in pregnancy are breast cancer, cervical cancer, lymphoma, and melanoma. ...

  18. Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumor > Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Neuroendocrine Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 01/ ... the body. It is important to remember that statistics on the survival rates for people with a ...

  19. Computerized tomography for diagnosis and staging of renal pelvic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Goto, Akihiko; Kitamura, Hajime

    1985-01-01

    Although we have no definite criteria available yet for clinical staging of renal pelvic tumor, the preoperative staging of this disease is nevertheless important in view of the current tendency that the necessity for renal conservative operation is considered. CT is now a routine work also for diagnosing renal pelvic tumor. The present study was performed in order to validate its usefulness for diagnosing and staging the disease. Our series consisted of 8 patients with renal pelvic tumor, in 6 of whom a definite diagnosis was established after demonstrating filling defect on pyelogram, but in the remaining two with extensive infiltration, and squamous cell carcinoma associated with staghorn calculus respectively, CT failed to provide a definite diagnosis. CT findings of an extension of the mass in the renal pelvis or renal calyces into adipose tissue of the renal sinus or renal parenchyma were judged to indicate an invasive type (Stage III), while a non-invasive type (Stage I or II) was defined on the basis of otherwise CT findings. Consistency with pathological stages was noted in 7 of the 8 cases (87.5 %). It was difficult to differentiate Stage I and Stage II on CT findings. CT was considered to be extremely useful tool for preoperative staging of renal pelvic tumor. (author)

  20. Splenic angiomyxoma with intravascular tumor embolus in a dog: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Mi; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Joo; Park, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Park, Se-Il; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2016-07-01

    A 13-year-old castrated male Yorkshire terrier dog had a soft splenic mass, which measured 11 cm in the greatest diameter. Microscopically, the parenchyma of the spleen was completely replaced by myxoid substances. Numerous spindle and stellate cells were loosely arranged in the myxoid stroma, and variable vessels of variable sizes were observed in a loose matrix with poorly defined margins. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that tumor cells were positive for desmin and alpha-SMA, but negative for S-100. Interestingly, intravascular tumor embolus with positive α-SMA expression was observed. This case is meaningful, because angiomyxoma, a rare tumor of dogs, occurs in the spleen. Even in human cases, splenic angiomyxoma was not reported.

  1. Influence of gamma radiation on the growth and metabolism in vitro culture of potato parenchyma; Influencia de la radiacion gamma sobre el desarrollo y metabolismo del parenquina amilifero de patata cultado in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Gonzalez, J; Monzon Matanzo, M P

    1977-07-01

    The present work studies the growth in vitro of the parenchyma tissues coming from control and irradiated potato tubers with doses of 3, 6, 9 and 12 Krad. At the end of a four months cultivation period the cellular proliferation, respiratory activity, content in ascorbic acid, conductivity and ph was studied. Some differences between control and irradiated tissues were observed. (Author) 22 refs.

  2. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  3. Attenuation values of renal parenchyma in virtual noncontrast images acquired from multiphase renal dual-energy CT: Comparison with standard noncontrast CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan-Mao; Chiou, Yi-You; Wu, Mei-Han; Huang, Shan-Su; Shen, Shu-Huei

    2018-04-01

    To compare the renal parenchyma attenuation of virtual noncontrast (VNC) images derived from multiphase renal dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) with standard noncontrast (SNC) images, and to determine the optimum phase for VNC images. Twenty-nine men and 16 women (mean age, 61 ± 13 years; range, 37-89 years) underwent dynamic renal DECT (100/Sn140 kVp) were included in this institutional review board-approved retrospective study. There were four phases of the scan, which included noncontrast, corticomedullary (CMP), nephrographic (NP), and excretory phases (EP). The VNC images was generated from CMP, NP and EP. CT numbers of SNC images and VNC images of each phases were measured in the renal cortex and medulla. Mean standard deviation of subcutaneous fat was measured as image noise on SNC and VNC images. Radiation dose was recorded and potential radiation dose reduction was estimated. Results were tested for statistical significance using the unpaired t-test and agreement using Bland-Altman plot analysis. The difference in mean attenuation between SNC and each phase of VNC images were ≤4 HU. The mean attenuation of renal cortex and medulla was 33.2 ± 4.4 HU, and 34.2 ± 4.8 HU in SNC, 33.6 ± 7.6 HU and 31.1 ± 8.3 HU in VNC of CMP, 34.8 ± 8.6 HU and 35.6 ± 8.5 HU in VNC of NP, 31.5 ± 7.6 HU and 32.4 ± 7.5 HU in VNC of EP. In VNC of CMP, the attenuation of the cortex was higher than the medulla (p VNC of NP, the attenuation of renal cortex was higher than SNC (p VNC of EP, the attenuation of cortex and medulla were lower than SNC (p VNC images from multiphase renal DECT were similar to SNC images. Using the nephrographic phase can gives more comparable VNC images to SNC images in renal parenchyma than other phases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Radiological diagnostics of skeletal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhl, M.; Herget, G.W.

    2008-01-01

    The book contains contributions concerning the following topics: 1. introduction and fundamentals: WHO classification of bone tumors, imaging diagnostics and their function; localization, typical clinical and radiological criteria, TNM classification and status classification, invasive tumor diagnostics; 2. specific tumor diagnostics: chondrogenic bone tumors, osseous tumors, connective tissue bony tumors, osteoclastoma, osteomyelogenic bone tumors, vascular bone tumors, neurogenic bone tumors, chordoma; adamantinoma of the long tubular bone; tumor-like lesions, bony metastases, bone granulomas, differential diagnostics: tumor-like lesions

  5. The importance of the human footprint in shaping the global distribution of terrestrial, freshwater and marine invaders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Gallardo

    Full Text Available Human activities such as transport, trade and tourism are likely to influence the spatial distribution of non-native species and yet, Species Distribution Models (SDMs that aim to predict the future broad scale distribution of invaders often rely on environmental (e.g. climatic information only. This study investigates if and to what extent do human activities that directly or indirectly influence nature (hereafter the human footprint affect the global distribution of invasive species in terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems. We selected 72 species including terrestrial plants, terrestrial animals, freshwater and marine invasive species of concern in a focus area located in NW Europe (encompassing Great Britain, France, The Netherlands and Belgium. Species Distribution Models were calibrated with the global occurrence of species and a set of high-resolution (9×9 km environmental (e.g. topography, climate, geology layers and human footprint proxies (e.g. the human influence index, population density, road proximity. Our analyses suggest that the global occurrence of a wide range of invaders is primarily limited by climate. Temperature tolerance was the most important factor and explained on average 42% of species distribution. Nevertheless, factors related to the human footprint explained a substantial amount (23% on average of species distributions. When global models were projected into the focus area, spatial predictions integrating the human footprint featured the highest cumulative risk scores close to transport networks (proxy for invasion pathways and in habitats with a high human influence index (proxy for propagule pressure. We conclude that human related information-currently available in the form of easily accessible maps and databases-should be routinely implemented into predictive frameworks to inform upon policies to prevent and manage invasions. Otherwise we might be seriously underestimating the species and areas under

  6. Mercury and persistent organic pollutants in native and invading forage species of the Canadian Arctic: Consequences for food web dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Sara; Fisk, Aaron T; Tomy, Gregg T; Ferguson, Steven H; Hussey, Nigel E; Kessel, Steven T; McKinney, Melissa A

    2017-10-01

    Contaminant dynamics within Arctic marine food webs may be altered through the climate-driven northward invasions of temperate/boreal species. Here, we compare tissue concentrations of total mercury (THg) and legacy and emerging persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in native versus invading forage species sampled from 2012 to 2014 near Arviat, Clyde River, and Resolute Bay, NU, representing, low, mid- and high eastern Canadian Arctic regions, respectively. Concentrations of THg, legacy Σ-polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCB) and Σ-organochlorine (ΣOC) pesticides were detected in all forage species, whereas emerging halogenated flame retardants were detected in only a few individuals. Concentrations of major contaminant groups among regions did not vary for Arctic cod (Boreogadus saida), while for sculpin (Cottoidea) there was no clear latitudinal trend. Thus, considering interspecific variation, native sculpin and northern shrimp (Pandalus borealis) had the highest overall concentrations of THg (0.17 ± 0.02 and 0.21 ± 0.01 μg g -1 wet weight, respectively), ΣPCB (322 ± 35 and 245 ± 25 ng g -1 lipid weight (lw), respectively), and ΣOC (413 ± 38 and 734 ± 64 ng g -1 lw, respectively). Comparing the keystone native species, Arctic cod, to its 'replacement' species, capelin (Mallotus villosus) and sandlance (Ammodytes spp.), THg concentrations were higher in Arctic cod compared to capelin (p compound patterns, in capelin and sandlance relative to Arctic cod seem, therefore, more likely related to a more "temperate"-type contaminant signature in the invaders. Nevertheless, the relatively small (up to two-fold) magnitude of these differences suggested limited effects of these ecological changes on contaminant uptake by Arctic piscivores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Structural and functional changes of soft-bottom ecosystems in northern fjords invaded by the red king crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oug, Eivind; Sundet, Jan H.; Cochrane, Sabine K. J.

    2018-04-01

    The red king crab invaded Norwegian coastal waters in the early 1990s after having been introduced from the northern Pacific to the Russian Barents Sea coast. The crab stock increased rapidly in NE northern Norway in the latter half of the 1990s, and since 2002 there has been a commercial fishery in the eastern invaded areas. The crab is an active predator on benthic fauna especially feeding in deep soft-bottom environments. The present study is a follow-up of previous studies (2007-09) to assess the effects of the king crab predation on soft bottom species composition, ecological functioning and sediment quality. Macroinfauna (> 1 mm) was investigated in three fjord areas in the Varanger region with low, moderate and very high crab abundances, respectively. Compared with data from 1994, most benthic species were markedly reduced in abundance, in particular non-moving burrowing and tube-dwelling polychaetes, bivalves and echinoderms. However, a few species appeared to recover from 2007-09 to 2012. Changes in ecological functioning were assessed using 'biological traits analysis (BTA)'. Following the crab invasion there was a relative reduction of suspension and surface deposit feeding species, an increase in mobile and predatory organisms and an increase in those with planktotrophic larval development. From low to high crab abundances functioning changed from tube-building, deep deposit feeding and fairly large size to free-living, shallow burrowing and rather small size. With regard to sediment reworking, downward and upward conveyors were reduced whereas surficial modifiers increased. The changes imply that sediment biomixing and bioirrigation were reduced leading to a degraded sedimentary environment. It is suggested that establishing relationships between ecosystem functioning and crab abundances may form the basis for estimating ecological costs of the crab invasion. Such knowledge is important for managing the crab in the Barents Sea area being both a non

  8. Planting sentinel European trees in eastern Asia as a novel method to identify potential insect pest invaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roques, Alain; Fan, Jian-Ting; Courtial, Béatrice; Zhang, Yan-Zhuo; Yart, Annie; Auger-Rozenberg, Marie-Anne; Denux, Olivier; Kenis, Marc; Baker, Richard; Sun, Jiang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Quarantine measures to prevent insect invasions tend to focus on well-known pests but a large proportion of the recent invaders were not known to cause significant damage in their native range, or were not even known to science before their introduction. A novel method is proposed to detect new potential pests of woody plants in their region of origin before they are introduced to a new continent. Since Asia is currently considered to be the main supplier of insect invaders to Europe, sentinel trees were planted in China during 2007-2011 as an early warning tool to identify the potential for additional Asian insect species to colonize European trees. Seedlings (1-1.5 m tall) of five broadleaved (Quercus petraea, Q. suber, Q. ilex, Fagus sylvatica, and Carpinus betulus) and two conifer species (Abies alba and Cupressus sempervirens) were planted in blocks of 100 seedlings at two widely separated sites (one in a nursery near Beijing and the other in a forest environment near Fuyang in eastern China), and then regularly surveyed for colonization by insects. A total of 104 insect species, mostly defoliators, were observed on these new hosts, and at least six species were capable of larval development. Although a number of the insects observed were probably incidental feeders, 38 species had more than five colonization events, mostly infesting Q. petraea, and could be considered as being capable of switching to European trees if introduced to Europe. Three years was shown to be an appropriate duration for the experiment, since the rate of colonization then tended to plateau. A majority of the identified species appeared to have switched from agricultural crops and fruit trees rather than from forest trees. Although these results are promising, the method is not appropriate for xylophagous pests and other groups developing on larger trees. Apart from the logistical problems, the identification to species level of the specimens collected was a major difficulty. This

  9. The potential distribution of invading Helicoverpa armigera in North America: is it just a matter of time?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Kriticos

    Full Text Available Helicoverpa armigera has recently invaded South and Central America, and appears to be spreading rapidly. We update a previously developed potential distribution model to highlight the global invasion threat, with emphasis on the risks to the United States. The continued range expansion of H. armigera in Central America is likely to change the invasion threat it poses to North America qualitatively, making natural dispersal from either the Caribbean islands or Mexico feasible. To characterise the threat posed by H. armigera, we collated the value of the major host crops in the United States growing within its modelled potential range, including that area where it could expand its range during favourable seasons. We found that the annual value of crops that would be exposed to H. armigera totalled approximately US$78 billion p.a., with US$843 million p.a. worth growing in climates that are optimal for the pest. Elsewhere, H. armigera has developed broad-spectrum pesticide resistance; meaning that if it invades the United States, protecting these crops from significant production impacts could be challenging. It may be cost-effective to undertake pre-emptive biosecurity activities such as slowing the spread of H. armigera throughout the Americas, improving the system for detecting H. armigera, and methods for rapid identification, especially distinguishing between H. armigera, H. zea and potential H. armigera x H. zea hybrids. Developing biological control programs, especially using inundative techniques with entomopathogens and parasitoids could slow the spread of H. armigera, and reduce selective pressure for pesticide resistance. The rapid spread of H. armigera through South America into Central America suggests that its spread into North America is a matter of time. The likely natural dispersal routes preclude aggressive incursion responses, emphasizing the value of preparatory communication with agricultural producers in areas suitable for

  10. Different combinations of maternal and postnatal diet are reflected in changes of hepatic parenchyma and hepatic TNF-alpha expression in male rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kačarević, Željka Perić; Grgić, Anđela; Šnajder, Darija; Bijelić, Nikola; Belovari, Tatjana; Cvijanović, Olga; Blažičević, Valerija; Radić, Radivoje

    2017-09-01

    Obesity is related to increased TNF-alpha production in different tissues. TNF-alpha is connected to mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and also development of fatty infiltration of the liver. Also, postnatal change from normal to high-fat diet causes a significant increase in TNF-alpha serum levels. The aim of this research was to determine how maternal diet and switching male offspring to a different dietary regime after lactation influences rat liver. Ten female Sprague Dawley rats at nine weeks of age were randomly divided in two groups and fed either standard laboratory chow or high-fat diet during six weeks, and then mated with the same male subject. After birth and lactation male offspring from both groups were further divided into four subgroups depending on their subsequent diet. At 22 weeks of age, the animals were weighted, sacrificed and major organs were collected and weighted. Immunohistochemistry for TNF-alpha was performed on liver, and liver samples were analyzed for pathohistological changes. The group in which mothers were fed standard chow and offspring high-fat diet had the most pronounced changes: heaviest liver, poorest histopathological findings and strongest TNF-alpha immunohistochemical staining of liver parenchyma. High-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation and switching to high-fat diet postnatally affects liver weight, histological structure and TNF-alpha expression in male offspring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Renal Parenchyma to Hydronephrosis Area Ratio (PHAR) as a Predictor of Future Surgical Intervention for Infants With High-grade Prenatal Hydronephrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Mandy; Lorenzo, Armando J; Braga, Luis H

    2017-03-01

    To explore the potential value of an objective assessment, renal parenchyma to hydronephrosis area ratio (PHAR), as an early predictor of surgery. Initial sagittal renal ultrasound (US) images of patients prospectively entered into a prenatal hydronephrosis database from January 2008 to January 2016 with baseline Society for Fetal Urology (SFU) grades III and IV prenatal hydronephrosis, without vesicoureteral reflux, were evaluated using the National Institutes of Health-sponsored image processing software. PHAR, anteroposterior diameter, SFU grade, and urinary tract dilation risk categories were contrasted with nuclear scan data (differential renal function and drainage time [t 1/2 ]) and analyzed for predictive value in determining the decision to proceed with surgery by drawing receiver operating characteristic curves. Out of 196 infants (162 male; 138 left sided hydronephrosis), 58 (30%) underwent surgery to address obstruction. Surgical patients compared with those managed conservatively had longer t 1/2 (60 vs 18 min; P hydronephrosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Contrast enhancement kinetics of normal breast parenchyma in dynamic MR mammography: effects of menopausal status, oral contraceptives, and postmenopausal hormone therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegenscheid, Katrin; Seipel, Rebecca; Laqua, Rene; Hosten, Norbert; Puls, Ralf; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Ohlinger, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    To investigate effects of menopausal status, oral contraceptives (OC), and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on normal breast parenchymal contrast enhancement (CE) and non-mass-like enhancing areas in magnetic resonance mammography (MRM). A total of 459 female volunteers (mean age 49.1 ± 12.5 years) underwent T1-weighted 3D MRM 1-5 min after bolus injection of gadobutrol. Quantitative analysis was performed in normal breast parenchyma by manually tracing regions of interest and calculating percentage CE. Semiquantitative analysis was performed in non-mass-like enhancing areas, and signal intensity changes were characterised by five predefined kinetic curve types. The influence of OC (n = 69) and HT (n = 24) on CE was studied using random effects models. Breast parenchymal enhancement was significantly higher in premenopausal than in postmenopausal women (P < 0.001). CE decreased significantly with the use of OC (P = 0.01), while HT had negligible effects (P = 0.52). Prevalence of kinetic curve types of non-mass-like enhancement differed strongly between pre- and postmenopausal women (P < 0.0001), but was similar in OC users and non-OC users (P = 0.61) as well as HT users and non-HT users (P = 0.77). Normal breast parenchymal enhancement and non-mass-like enhancing areas were strongly affected by menopausal status, while they were not affected by HT use and only moderately by OC use. (orig.)

  13. Targeting transferrin receptors at the blood-brain barrier improves the uptake of immunoliposomes and subsequent cargo transport into the brain parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Kasper Bendix; Burkhart, Annette; Melander, Fredrik; Kempen, Paul Joseph; Vejlebo, Jonas Bruun; Siupka, Piotr; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Moos, Torben

    2017-09-04

    Drug delivery to the brain is hampered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier, which excludes most molecules from freely diffusing into the brain, and tightly regulates the active transport mechanisms that ensure sufficient delivery of nutrients to the brain parenchyma. Harnessing the possibility of delivering neuroactive drugs by way of receptors already present on the brain endothelium has been of interest for many years. The transferrin receptor is of special interest since its expression is limited to the endothelium of the brain as opposed to peripheral endothelium. Here, we investigate the possibility of delivering immunoliposomes and their encapsulated cargo to the brain via targeting of the transferrin receptor. We find that transferrin receptor-targeting increases the association between the immunoliposomes and primary endothelial cells in vitro, but that this does not correlate with increased cargo transcytosis. Furthermore, we show that the transferrin receptor-targeted immunoliposomes accumulate along the microvessels of the brains of rats, but find no evidence for transcytosis of the immunoliposome. Conversely, the increased accumulation correlated both with increased cargo uptake in the brain endothelium and subsequent cargo transport into the brain. These findings suggest that transferrin receptor-targeting is a relevant strategy of increasing drug exposure to the brain.

  14. Contrast enhancement kinetics of normal breast parenchyma in dynamic MR mammography: effects of menopausal status, oral contraceptives, and postmenopausal hormone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegenscheid, Katrin; Seipel, Rebecca; Laqua, Rene; Hosten, Norbert; Puls, Ralf [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Medical Center Greifswald, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald (Germany); Schmidt, Carsten O. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Medical Center Greifswald, Institute for Community Medicine, Greifswald (Germany); Ohlinger, Ralf [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Medical Center Greifswald, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    To investigate effects of menopausal status, oral contraceptives (OC), and postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on normal breast parenchymal contrast enhancement (CE) and non-mass-like enhancing areas in magnetic resonance mammography (MRM). A total of 459 female volunteers (mean age 49.1 {+-} 12.5 years) underwent T1-weighted 3D MRM 1-5 min after bolus injection of gadobutrol. Quantitative analysis was performed in normal breast parenchyma by manually tracing regions of interest and calculating percentage CE. Semiquantitative analysis was performed in non-mass-like enhancing areas, and signal intensity changes were characterised by five predefined kinetic curve types. The influence of OC (n = 69) and HT (n = 24) on CE was studied using random effects models. Breast parenchymal enhancement was significantly higher in premenopausal than in postmenopausal women (P < 0.001). CE decreased significantly with the use of OC (P = 0.01), while HT had negligible effects (P = 0.52). Prevalence of kinetic curve types of non-mass-like enhancement differed strongly between pre- and postmenopausal women (P < 0.0001), but was similar in OC users and non-OC users (P = 0.61) as well as HT users and non-HT users (P = 0.77). Normal breast parenchymal enhancement and non-mass-like enhancing areas were strongly affected by menopausal status, while they were not affected by HT use and only moderately by OC use. (orig.)

  15. Phloem as Capacitor: Radial Transfer of Water into Xylem of Tree Stems Occurs via Symplastic Transport in Ray Parenchyma[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Justine; Tjoelker, Mark G.; Salih, Anya

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of water from phloem into xylem is thought to mitigate increasing hydraulic tension in the vascular system of trees during the diel cycle of transpiration. Although a putative plant function, to date there is no direct evidence of such water transfer or the contributing pathways. Here, we trace the radial flow of water from the phloem into the xylem and investigate its diel variation. Introducing a fluorescent dye (0.1% [w/w] fluorescein) into the phloem water of the tree species Eucalyptus saligna allowed localization of the dye in phloem and xylem tissues using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Our results show that the majority of water transferred between the two tissues is facilitated via the symplast of horizontal ray parenchyma cells. The method also permitted assessment of the radial transfer of water during the diel cycle, where changes in water potential gradients between phloem and xylem determine the extent and direction of radial transfer. When injected during the morning, when xylem water potential rapidly declined, fluorescein was translocated, on average, farther into mature xylem (447 ± 188 µm) compared with nighttime, when xylem water potential was close to zero (155 ± 42 µm). These findings provide empirical evidence to support theoretical predictions of the role of phloem-xylem water transfer in the hydraulic functioning of plants. This method enables investigation of the role of phloem tissue as a dynamic capacitor for water storage and transfer and its contribution toward the maintenance of the functional integrity of xylem in trees. PMID:25588734

  16. MRI findings of experimentally induced hepatic infarction: Correlation between changes of MRI findings of liver parenchyma and capsule with time lapse and histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Gang Deuk; Min, Kyung Yoon; Choi, See Sung; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Noh, Byung Suk; Won, Jong Jin

    1994-01-01

    We experimentally induced hepatic infarction in rabbit to evaluate MR findings of liver parenchyma and capsule and its changes with time and to confirm the capsular structure correlating with its histologic findings. After ligation of hepatic artery, vein and duct of right inferior posterior lobe of liver, T1, T2 weighted and enhanced T1 weighted images were obtained at several time intervals. Histologic samples were taken of two rabbits or more at each time intervals. During the first several days, the signal intensity of the ischemic necrosis showed strong high signal intensity relative to normal liver on both T1 and T2 weighted images. After 2 weeks , however, the necrotic areas gradually changed to isointensity or low signal intensity. Capsule structure was observed as slightly high signal intensity compare to ischemic areas on both enhanced T1 and T2 weighted images in six cases, and five cases of 12, retrospectively. From the first day, homogeneous coagulation necrosis without hemorrhage or liquefaction was observed. Fibrous thickening with rich vascularity was observed along the surface of the necrosis area after two weeks. During the first several days, the signal intensity of the ischemic necrosis showed strong high signal intensity on both T1 and T2 weighted images and gradually changed to isointensity or low signal intensity. Liver capsule was shown and slightly high signal intensity along the surface of the necrosis area and could be explained by fibrous thickening of the liver capsule and rich vascularity within in it

  17. Site-targeted non-viral gene delivery by direct DNA injection into the pancreatic parenchyma and subsequent in vivo electroporation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masahiro; Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Ohtsuka, Masato; Nakamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Takayuki; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2013-11-01

    The pancreas is considered an important gene therapy target because the organ is the site of several high burden diseases, including diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, and pancreatic cancer. We aimed to develop an efficient in vivo gene delivery system using non-viral DNA. Direct intra-parenchymal injection of a solution containing circular plasmid pmaxGFP DNA was performed on adult anesthetized ICR female mice. The injection site was sandwiched with a pair of tweezer-type electrode disks, and electroporated using a square-pulse generator. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression within the injected pancreatic portion was observed one day after gene delivery. GFP expression reduced to baseline within a week of transfection. Application of voltages over 40 V resulted in tissue damage during electroporation. We demonstrate that electroporation is effective for safe and efficient transfection of pancreatic cells. This novel gene delivery method to the pancreatic parenchyma may find application in gene therapy strategies for pancreatic diseases and in investigation of specific gene function in situ. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptions are made.

  18. In Patients with a Soft Pancreas, a Thick Parenchyma, a Small Duct, and Fatty Infiltration Are Significant Risks for Pancreatic Fistula After Pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Motokazu; Takahashi, Shinichiro; Kojima, Motohiro; Kobayashi, Tatsushi; Gotohda, Naoto; Konishi, Masaru

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to characterize soft and hard pancreatic textures radiologically and histologically, and to identify specific risks in a soft pancreas associated with postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) formation after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). Consecutive 145 patients who underwent PD at a single institution between January 2010 and May 2013 were studied. Pancreatic consistency was intraoperatively judged as soft or hard. Pancreatic configuration was assessed using preoperative CT. Histologic components of the pancreatic stump were evaluated using a morphometric analysis. Clinicopathologic parameters were then analyzed for the risk of clinically relevant POPF. Compared with patients with a hard pancreas (n = 66), those with a soft pancreas (n = 79) had a smaller main pancreatic duct (MPD) diameter and a larger parenchymal thickness on CT, had a smaller fibrosis ratio and a larger lobular ratio histologically, and developed clinically relevant POPF more frequently (P pancreas, an MPD diameter pancreas, a thick parenchyma, a small MPD, and fatty infiltration were strongly associated with clinically relevant POPF after PD.

  19. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion and perfusion characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulakbasi, Nail; Kocaoglu, Murat; Sanal, Tuba H.; Tayfun, Cem [Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Department of Radiology, Military Medical Faculty, Ankara (Turkey)

    2007-10-15

    We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNT) and discuss their differential diagnosis. Proton MR spectroscopy (TE 30 and 136 ms), diffusion-weighted and perfusion images were retrospectively evaluated in 22 patients with pathologically proven DNT (17 male and 5 female, mean age 18.7 years) and 14 control subjects (10 male and 4 female, mean age 16.9 years). The results from the DNT patients and from the control subjects were compared using an independent sample t-test and the degree of correlation was tested by Pearson's correlation. All DNTs were solitary and in a supratentorial cortical or subcortical location (ten temporal, eight frontal and four parietal). They had low-signal on T1-weighted images and high-signal on T2-weighted images without a prominent mass effect. Additionally a cystic appearance (six patients, 27.3%), cortical dysplasia (six patients, 27.3%) and contrast enhancement (four patients, 18.2%) were also noted. No significant differences were detected in NAA/Cho, NAA/Cr, NAA/Cho+Cr or Cho/Cr ratios between DNT and normal brain. DNTs had a significantly higher mI/Cr ratio and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and lower cerebral blood values than normal parenchyma (P < 0.001). ADC had the highest correlation with the diagnosis of DNT (r = 0.996) followed by relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) (r = -0.883) and mI/Cr ratio (r = 0.663). Proton MR spectroscopy, diffusion-weighted and perfusion imaging characteristics of DNTs provide additional information to their MR imaging findings. The MR spectrum showing a slight increase in mI/Cr ratio, and higher ADC and lower rCBV values than normal parenchyma help to differentiate DNTs from other cortical tumors, which had higher rCBV and lower ADC values than DNTs. (orig.)

  20. Liver Tumors (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Liver Tumors KidsHealth / For Parents / Liver Tumors What's in this article? Types of Tumors ... Cancerous) Tumors Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment Coping Print The liver is the body's largest solid organ. Lying next ...

  1. Endocrine tumors other than thyroid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeichi, Norio; Dohi, Kiyohiko

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the tendency for the occurrence of tumors in the endocrine glands, other than the thyroid gland, in A-bomb survivors using both autopsy and clinical data. ABCC-RERF sample data using 4136 autopsy cases (1961-1977) revealed parathyroid tumors in 13 A-bomb survivors, including 3 with the associated hyperparathyroidism, with the suggestion of dose-dependent increase in the occurrence of tumors. Based on clinical data from Hiroshima University, 7 (46.7%) of 15 parathyroid tumors cases were A-bomb survivors. Data (1974-1987) from the Tumor Registry Committee (TRC) in Hiroshima Prefecture revealed that a relative risk of parathyroid tumors was 5.6 times higher in the entire group of A-bomb survivors and 16.2 times higher in the group of heavily exposed A-bomb survivors, suggesting the dose-dependent increase in their occurrence. Adrenal tumors were detected in 47 of 123 cases from the TRC data, and 15 (31.5%) of these 47 were A-bomb survivors. Particularly, 11 cases of adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome included 6 A-bomb survivors (54.5%). The incidence of multiple endocrine gonadial tumors (MEGT) tended to be higher with increasing exposure doses; and the 1-9 rad group, the 10-99 rad group, and the 100 or more rad group had a risk of developing MEGT of 4.1, 5.7, and 7.1, respectively, relative to both the not-in the city group and the 0 rad group. These findings suggested that there is a correlation between A-bomb radiation and the occurrence of parathyroid tumors (including hyperparathyroidism), adrenal tumors associated with Cushing syndrome and MEGT (especially, the combined thyroid and ovarian tumors and the combined thyroid and parathyroid tumors). (N.K.)

  2. A Case of Renal Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor Confirmed by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiki Etani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET is a member of the Ewing's sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT. We report a case of PNET in a 66-year-old male who presented with a large solid tumor within the parenchyma of the middle pole of the left kidney with metastases to the left adrenal gland and right ischium. A fine-needle biopsy was performed and showed a small round cell tumor. Results of immunohistochemical staining suggested this tumor belonged to ESFT. Preoperative VDC-IE (combined vincristine, doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by another combination of ifosfamide and etoposide chemotherapy and left radical nephrectomy and adrenalectomy were performed. The histopathological findings of the resected tumor were similar to those in the biopsy specimen, but the results of AE1/AE3 were different. For the diagnosis, fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed. Split signals of the EWSR1 gene were detected, and transmission electron microscopy showed neuroendocrine granules and microtubules. The final diagnosis of this tumor was PNET of the kidney.

  3. CT of abdominal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Kenji; Ito, Masatoshi; Ito, Hisao; Yamaura, Harutsugu

    1981-01-01

    CT findings in 33 patients who had an abdominal tumor were evaluated. CT revealed a tumor in 31 cases. The organ from which the tumor originated was correctly diagnosed in 18 patients. Whether the tumor was solid or cystic was correctly predicted in 28 patients. The diagnosis malignant or benign nature of tumor was correct, incorrect and impossible, in 23, 3, and five patiens, respectively. (Kondo, M.)

  4. The Management of Synchronous Bilateral Wilms Tumor: A Report from the National Wilms Tumor Study Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Thomas E.; Ritchey, Michael L.; Haase, Gerald M.; Argani, Pedram; Peterson, Susan M.; Anderson, James R.; Green, Daniel M.; Shamberger, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To provide guidelines for future trials, we reviewed the outcomes of children with synchronous bilateral Wilms tumors (BWT) treated on National Wilms Tumor Study-4 (NWTS-4). Methods NWTS-4 enrolled 3,335 patients (pts) including 188 pts with BWT (5.6%). Treatment and outcome data were collected. Results Among 188 BWT pts registered with NWTS-4, 195 kidneys in 123 patients had initial open biopsy, 44 kidneys in 31 pts had needle biopsies. Although pre-resection chemotherapy was recommended, 87 kidneys in 83 pts were managed with primary resection: Complete nephrectomy 48 in 48 pts, 31 partial/wedge nephrectomies in 27 pts, enucleations 8 in 8 pts. No initial surgery was performed in 45 kidneys in 43 pts, 5 kidneys in 3 pts not coded. Anaplasia was diagnosed after completion of the initial course of chemotherapy in 14 pts (initial surgical procedure: 9 open biopsies, 4 needle biopsies, 1 partial nephrectomy). The average number of days from the start of chemotherapy to diagnosis of anaplasia was 390 (range 44–1,925 days). Relapse or progression of disease occurred in 54 children. End stage renal failure occurred in 23 children, 6 of whom had bilateral nephrectomies. The 8 year event free survival (EFS) for BWT with favorable histology was 74%, and overall survival (OS) was 89%; while the EFS for BWT with unfavorable histology was 40%, OS was 45%. Conclusion The current analysis of patients with BWT treated on NWTS-4 shows that preservation of renal parenchyma is possible in many pts following initial preoperative chemotherapy. The incidence of end-stage renal disease remains significantly higher in children with BWT. Future studies are warranted to address the need for earlier biopsy in non-responsive tumors and earlier definitive surgery to recognize unfavorable histology in these high risk patients. PMID:21394016

  5. Magnetic resonance diagnosis of intramedullary tumors of the spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scotti, G.; Scialfa, G.; Colombo, N.; Landoni, L.

    1987-03-01

    Fifty patients with intramedullary space occupying lesions were studied with MR from October 1983. Of these 32 were operated on and histological diagnosis together with gross morphological description was available. MR findings were reviewed in search for morphological and signal characteristics capable of providing a better preoperative diagnosis. There were 11 astrocytomas, 10 ependymomas, 5 vascular lesions and 6 ''gliomas''. All lesions usually had signal characteristics different from those of the normal cord, mainly because of prolonged T1 and T2 relaxation times. No specific patterns related either to morphology or signal were found, capable of differentiating the two main historical types. Vascular malformations may be suspected from the presence of serpiginous areas without signal. Tumor nodules within cysts can however be well recognized, thus providing the neurosurgeon with very useful preoperative information. Some characteristics of signal and morphology, are more common for one or the other of the two main groups of tumors. A tumor involving all the cord with a homogeneously prolonged T2 relaxation time is most likely to be an astrocytoma. A small nodule with signal close to normal parenchyma, associated with extensive cysts, is most likely to be an ependymoma.

  6. Plant litter effects on soil nutrient availability and vegetation dynamics: changes that occur when annual grasses invade shrub-steppe communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel Bansal; Roger L. Sheley; Bob Blank; Edward A. Vasquez

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the quantity and quality of plant litter occur in many ecosystems as they are invaded by exotic species, which impact soil nutrient cycling and plant community composition. Such changes in sagebrush-steppe communities are occurring with invasion of annual grasses (AG) into a perennial grass (PG) dominated system. We conducted a 5-year litter manipulation...

  7. The effects of insect biological control on a Tamarix invaded ecosystem: ecosystem water and carbon fluxes and plant-level responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background / Questions / Methods: Tamarix spp. (saltcedar) has invaded many river systems in the western United States with detrimental impacts to flora and fauna. Traditional methods of invasive plant control have been ineffective or costly. Therefore, insect biological control of Tamarix with Di...

  8. Three-dimensional T1 and T2* mapping of human lung parenchyma using interleaved saturation recovery with dual echo ultrashort echo time imaging (ITSR-DUTE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Neville D; Malayeri, Ashkan A; Bluemke, David A

    2017-04-01

    To develop and assess a new technique for three-dimensional (3D) full lung T1 and T2* mapping using a single free breathing scan during a clinically feasible time. A 3D stack of dual-echo ultrashort echo time (UTE) radial acquisition interleaved with and without a WET (water suppression enhanced through T1 effects) saturation pulse was used to map T1 and T2* simultaneously in a single scan. Correction for modulation due to multiple views per segment was derived. Bloch simulations were performed to study saturation pulse excitation profile on lung tissue. Optimization of the saturation delay time (for T1 mapping) and echo time (for T2* mapping) was performed. Monte Carlo simulation was done to predict accuracy and precision of the sequence with signal-to-noise ratio of in vivo images used in the simulation. A phantom study was carried out using the 3D interleaved saturation recovery with dual echo ultrashort echo time imaging (ITSR-DUTE) sequence and reference standard inversion recovery spin echo sequence (IR-SE) to compare accuracy of the sequence. Nine healthy volunteers were imaged and mean (SD) of T1 and T2* in lung parenchyma at 3T were estimated through manually assisted segmentation. 3D lung coverage with a resolution of 2.5 × 2.5 × 6 mm 3 was performed and nominal scan time was recorded for the scans. Repeatability was assessed in three of the volunteers. Regional differences in T1/T2* values were also assessed. The phantom study showed accuracy of T1 values to be within 2.3% of values obtained from IR-SE. Mean T1 value in lung parenchyma was 1002 ± 82 ms while T2* was 0.85 ± 0.1 ms. Scan time was ∼10 min for volunteer scans. Mean coefficient of variation (CV) across slices was 0.057 and 0.09, respectively. Regional variation along the gravitational direction and between right and left lung were not significant (P = 0.25 and P = 0.06, respectively) for T1. T2* showed significant variation (P = 0.03) along the

  9. Targeted hyperthermia after selective embolization with ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a VX2 rabbit liver tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun HL

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hongliang Sun,1 Linfeng Xu,1 Tianyuan Fan,2 Hongzhi Zhan,3 Xiaodong Wang,3 Yanfei Zhou,2 Ren-jie Yang3 1Department of Interventional Therapy, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 2Pharmacy School of Beijing University, Beijing, 3Department of Interventional Therapy, Peking University School of Oncology, Beijing Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, People's Republic of China Background: The purpose of this study was to observe the effect and feasibility of hyperthermia and the influence of heat on surrounding organs in a VX2 rabbit liver model exposed to an alternating magnetic field after embolization with ferromagnetic nanoparticles. Methods: Forty rabbits containing implanted hepatic VX2 carcinomas were divided into four groups, each containing ten rabbits. Fourteen days after tumor transplantation, we opened the abdomen to observe the size and shape of the tumor. A transfemoral retrograde approach was then used for hepatic arterial catheterization in groups B, C, and D to perform angiography and embolization. The next day, three rabbits in group B and all rabbits in group D were exposed to an alternating magnetic field, and the temperature was recorded simultaneously in the center of the tumor, at the edge of the tumor, and in the normal liver parenchyma. On day 28, all animals was euthanized to observe changes in the implanted liver tumor and the condition of the abdomen. A pathologic examination was also done. Results: Before surgery, there was no significant difference in tumor volume between the four groups. Three different temperature points (center of the tumor, edge of the tumor, and in the normal liver parenchyma of group B under an alternating magnetic field were 37.2°C ± 1.1°C, 36.8°C ± 1.2°C, and 36.9°C ± 2.1°C, none of which were significantly different from pretreatment values. Three points basal temperature in group D showed no significant difference (F = 1.038, P = 0.413. Seven to 26

  10. Photodynamic Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Jiro

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) using talaporfin sodium together with a semiconductor laser was approved in Japan in October 2003 as a less invasive therapy for early-stage lung cancer. The author believes that the principle of PDT would be applicable for controlling the invading front of malignant brain tumors and verified its efficacy through experiments using glioma cell lines and glioma xenograft models. An investigator-initiated clinical study was jointly conducted with Tokyo Women's Medical University with the support of the Japan Medical Association. Patient enrollment was started in May 2009 and a total of 27 patients were enrolled by March 2012. Of 22 patients included in efficacy analysis, 13 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma showed progression-free survival of 12 months, progression-free survival at the site of laser irradiation of 20 months, 1-year survival of 100%, and overall survival of 24.8 months. In addition, the safety analysis of the 27 patients showed that adverse events directly related to PDT were mild. PDT was approved in Japan for health insurance coverage as a new intraoperative therapy with the indication for malignant brain tumors in September 2013. Currently, the post-marketing investigation in the accumulated patients has been conducted, and the preparation of guidelines, holding training courses, and dissemination of information on the safe implementation of PDT using web sites and videos, have been promoted. PDT is expected to be a breakthrough for the treatment of malignant glioma as a tumor cell-selective less invasive therapy for the infiltrated functional brain area.

  11. Tumor macroenvironment and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zoughbi, Wael; Al-Zhoughbi, Wael; Huang, Jianfeng; Paramasivan, Ganapathy S; Till, Holger; Pichler, Martin; Guertl-Lackner, Barbara; Hoefler, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    In this review we introduce the concept of the tumor macroenvironment and explore it in the context of metabolism. Tumor cells interact with the tumor microenvironment including immune cells. Blood and lymph vessels are the critical components that deliver nutrients to the tumor and also connect the tumor to the macroenvironment. Several factors are then released from the tumor itself but potentially also from the tumor microenvironment, influencing the metabolism of distant tissues and organs. Amino acids, and distinct lipid and lipoprotein species can be essential for further tumor growth. The role of glucose in tumor metabolism has been studied extensively. Cancer-associated cachexia is the most important tumor-associated systemic syndrome and not only affects the quality of life of patients with various malignancies but is estimated to be the cause of death in 15%-20% of all cancer patients. On the other hand, systemic metabolic diseases such as obesity and diabetes are known to influence tumor development. Furthermore, the clinical implications of the tumor macroenvironment are explored in the context of the patient's outcome with special consideration for pediatric tumors. Finally, ways to target the tumor macroenvironment that will provide new approaches for therapeutic concepts are described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcript Profiling Identifies NAC-Domain Genes Involved in Regulating Wall Ingrowth Deposition in Phloem Parenchyma Transfer Cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhou Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfer cells (TCs play important roles in facilitating enhanced rates of nutrient transport at key apoplasmic/symplasmic junctions along the nutrient acquisition and transport pathways in plants. TCs achieve this capacity by developing elaborate wall ingrowth networks which serve to increase plasma membrane surface area thus increasing the cell's surface area-to-volume ratio to achieve increased flux of nutrients across the plasma membrane. Phloem parenchyma (PP cells of Arabidopsis leaf veins trans-differentiate to become PP TCs which likely function in a two-step phloem loading mechanism by facilitating unloading of photoassimilates into the apoplasm for subsequent energy-dependent uptake into the sieve element/companion cell (SE/CC complex. We are using PP TCs in Arabidopsis as a genetic model to identify transcription factors involved in coordinating deposition of the wall ingrowth network. Confocal imaging of pseudo-Schiff propidium iodide-stained tissue revealed different profiles of temporal development of wall ingrowth deposition across maturing cotyledons and juvenile leaves, and a basipetal gradient of deposition across mature adult leaves. RNA-Seq analysis was undertaken to identify differentially expressed genes common to these three different profiles of wall ingrowth deposition. This analysis identified 68 transcription factors up-regulated two-fold or more in at least two of the three experimental comparisons, with six of these transcription factors belonging to Clade III of the NAC-domain family. Phenotypic analysis of these NAC genes using insertional mutants revealed significant reductions in levels of wall ingrowth deposition, particularly in a double mutant of NAC056 and NAC018, as well as compromised sucrose-dependent root growth, indicating impaired capacity for phloem loading. Collectively, these results support the proposition that Clade III members of the NAC-domain family in Arabidopsis play important roles in

  13. Comparison of muscle-to-nodule and parenchyma-to-nodule strain ratios in the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules: Which one should we use?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, Ramazan, E-mail: raydin1984@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Samsun Education and Research Hospital, Samsun (Turkey); Elmali, Muzaffer, E-mail: muzafel@yahoo.com.tr [Department of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Polat, Ahmet Veysel, E-mail: veyselp@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Danaci, Murat, E-mail: danacim55@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey); Akpolat, Ilkser, E-mail: ilkserakpolat@yahoo.com [Department of Pathology, Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine, Samsun (Turkey)

    2014-03-15

    Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of muscle-to-nodule strain ratio (MNSR) in the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules and to see if there was a difference between MNSR and parenchyma-to-nodule strain ratios (PNSR) in diagnosis. Methods: A total of 106 consecutive patients (88 women and 18 men; age range 19–79 years) with thyroid nodules were prospectively examined using ultrasound and sonoelastography before the fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The mean MNSR and PNSR were calculated for each nodule and the elasticity score was determined according to four-point scoring system. Results: According to the four-point scoring system, 44 of the 83 benign nodules had a score of one or two while 22 of the 23 malignant nodules had a score of three or four (p < 0.001). Using ROC analysis, the best cutoff point for MNSR 1.85 and for PNSR 3.14 was calculated. The sensitivity and specificity for the MNSR were 95.6%, 92.8%, respectively; for the PNSR were 95.6%, 93.4%, respectively, when the best cutoff points were used (p < 0.001). The κ value for the PNSR and MNSR methods was 0.87, which indicated an almost perfect agreement (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Sonoelastography has a high diagnostic accuracy in the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules. There was no significant difference between MNSR and PNSR in the differentiation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules. Therefore, we think that MNSR could safely be used in situations where PNSR could not be used.

  14. Tumor invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is accompanied by strong hemorrhage promoted by TNF-alpha.

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    Sara Leschner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several facultative anaerobic bacteria with potential therapeutic abilities are known to preferentially colonize solid tumors after systemic administration. How they efficiently find and invade the tumors is still unclear. However, this is an important issue to be clarified when bacteria should be tailored for application in cancer therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the initial events of colonization of an ectopic transplantable tumor by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Initially, after intravenous administration, bacteria were found in blood, spleen, and liver. Low numbers were also detected in tumors associated with blood vessels as could be observed by immunohistochemistry. A rapid increase of TNF-alpha in blood was observed at that time, in addition to other pro-inflammatory cytokines. This induced a tremendous influx of blood into the tumors by vascular disruption that could be visualized in H&E stainings and quantified by hemoglobin measurements of tumor homogenate. Most likely, together with the blood, bacteria were flushed into the tumor. In addition, blood influx was followed by necrosis formation, bacterial growth, and infiltration of neutrophilic granulocytes. Depletion of TNF-alpha retarded blood influx and delayed bacterial tumor-colonization. CONCLUSION: Our findings emphasize similarities between Gram-negative tumor-colonizing bacteria and tumor vascular disrupting agents and show the involvement of TNF-alpha in the initial phase of tumor-colonization by bacteria.

  15. Planting sentinel European trees in eastern Asia as a novel method to identify potential insect pest invaders.

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    Alain Roques

    Full Text Available Quarantine measures to prevent insect invasions tend to focus on well-known pests but a large proportion of the recent invaders were not known to cause significant damage in their native range, or were not even known to science before their introduction. A novel method is proposed to detect new potential pests of woody plants in their region of origin before they are introduced to a new continent. Since Asia is currently considered to be the main supplier of insect invaders to Europe, sentinel trees were planted in China during 2007-2011 as an early warning tool to identify the potential for additional Asian insect species to colonize European trees. Seedlings (1-1.5 m tall of five broadleaved (Quercus petraea, Q. suber, Q. ilex, Fagus sylvatica, and Carpinus betulus and two conifer species (Abies alba and Cupressus sempervirens were planted in blocks of 100 seedlings at two widely separated sites (one in a nursery near Beijing and the other in a forest environment near Fuyang in eastern China, and then regularly surveyed for colonization by insects. A total of 104 insect species, mostly defoliators, were observed on these new hosts, and at least six species were capable of larval development. Although a number of the insects observed were probably incidental feeders, 38 species had more than five colonization events, mostly infesting Q. petraea, and could be considered as being capable of switching to European trees if introduced to Europe. Three years was shown to be an appropriate duration for the experiment, since the rate of colonization then tended to plateau. A majority of the identified species appeared to have switched from agricultural crops and fruit trees rather than from forest trees. Although these results are promising, the method is not appropriate for xylophagous pests and other groups developing on larger trees. Apart from the logistical problems, the identification to species level of the specimens collected was a major

  16. The Arf GTPase-activating protein family is exploited by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to invade nonphagocytic host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Anthony C; Humphreys, Daniel; Brooks, Andrew B E; Hume, Peter J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2015-02-10

    To establish intracellular infections, Salmonella bacteria trigger host cell membrane ruffling and invasion by subverting cellular Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases by promoting GTP binding. A family of cellular Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) can downregulate Arf signaling by stimulating GTP hydrolysis, but whether they do this during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered a remarkable role for distinct Arf GAP family members in Salmonella invasion. The Arf6 GAPs ACAP1 and ADAP1 and the Arf1 GAP ASAP1 localized at Salmonella-induced ruffles, which was not the case for the plasma membrane-localized Arf6 GAPs ARAP3 and GIT1 or the Golgi-associated Arf1 GAP1. Surprisingly, we found that loss of ACAP1, ADAP1, or ASAP1 impaired Salmonella invasion, revealing that GAPs cannot be considered mere terminators of cytoskeleton remodeling. Salmonella invasion was restored in Arf GAP-depleted cells by expressing fast-cycling Arf derivatives, demonstrating that Arf GTP/GDP cycles facilitate Salmonella invasion. Consistent with this view, both constitutively active and dominant-negative Arf derivatives that cannot undergo GTP/GDP cycles inhibited invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Arf GEFs and GAPs colocalize at invading Salmonella and collaborate to drive Arf1-dependent pathogen invasion. This study revealed that Salmonella bacteria exploit a remarkable interplay between Arf GEFs and GAPs to direct cycles of Arf GTPase activation and inactivation. These cycles drive Salmonella cytoskeleton remodeling and enable intracellular infections. To initiate infections, the Salmonella bacterial pathogen remodels the mammalian actin cytoskeleton and invades host cells by subverting host Arf GEFs that activate Arf1 and Arf6 GTPases. Cellular Arf GAPs deactivate Arf GTPases and negatively regulate cell processes, but whether they target Arfs during infection is unknown. Here, we uncovered an important role for the Arf GAP

  17. Linking niche theory to ecological impacts of successful invaders: insights from resource fluctuation-specialist herbivore interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidoin, Cindy; Roques, Lionel; Boivin, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Theories of species coexistence and invasion ecology are fundamentally connected and provide a common theoretical framework for studying the mechanisms underlying successful invasions and their ecological impacts. Temporal fluctuations in resource availability and differences in life-history traits between invasive and resident species are considered as likely drivers of the dynamics of invaded communities. Current critical issues in invasion ecology thus relate to the extent to which such mechanisms influence coexistence between invasive and resident species and to the ability of resident species to persist in an invasive-dominated ecosystem. We tested how a fluctuating resource, and species trait differences may explain and help predict long-term impacts of biological invasions in forest specialist insect communities. We used a simple invasion system comprising closely related invasive and resident seed-specialized wasps (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) competing for a well-known fluctuating resource and displaying divergent diapause, reproductive and phenological traits. Based on extensive long-term field observations (1977-2010), we developed a combination of mechanistic and statistical models aiming to (i) obtain a realistic description of the population dynamics of these interacting species over time, and (ii) clarify the respective contributions of fluctuation-dependent and fluctuation-independent mechanisms to long-term impact of invasion on the population dynamics of the resident wasp species. We showed that a fluctuation-dependent mechanism was unable to promote coexistence of the resident and invasive species. Earlier phenology of the invasive species was the main driver of invasion success, enabling the invader to exploit an empty niche. Phenology also had the greatest power to explain the long-term negative impact of the invasive on the resident species, through resource pre-emption. This study provides strong support for the critical role of species

  18. Bronchial carcinoid tumors: A rare malignant tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-02-03

    Feb 3, 2015 ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice • Sep-Oct 2015 • Vol 18 • Issue 5. Abstract. Bronchial carcinoid tumors (BCTs) are an uncommon group of lung tumors. They commonly affect the young adults and the middle aged, the same age group affected by other more common chronic lung conditions such as ...

  19. Multilobular tumor of the zygomatic bone in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leonardi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Multilobular tumor of bone (MTB (also known as Multilobular Osteochondrosarcoma is an uncommon bone tumor frequently located on the skull of dogs, rarely on the ribs or pelvis. These neoplasms are slow growing, locally invasive, and have the potential to compress and invade the brain. A 10-year-old mixed breed dog was presented with a history of approximately 4 months of progressive growth of a left zygomatic mass. Radiographic investigation revealed a finely granular or stippled non homogeneous radiopaque mass involving the zygomatic arch. After surgery, grossly the neoplasm consisted of multiple, variably sized, grayish-white to yellow nodules separated by collagenous septa of different thickness. Histologically, the tumor was characterized by the presence of multiple lobules containing osteoid and cartilage, separated by a net of fibrous septae. This neoplastic pattern was consistent with a typical multilobular tumor of bone and based on clinical, radiographical, gross and light microscopic findings the definitive diagnosis was made. While reviewing veterinary literature only few cases of MTB were found in dogs.

  20. Preoperative Visualization of Cranial Nerves in Skull Base Tumor Surgery Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Su, Shaobo; Yue, Shuyuan; Zhao, Yan; Li, Yonggang; Chen, Xiaochen; Ma, Hui

    2016-01-01

    To visualize cranial nerves (CNs) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with special parameters. This study also involved the evaluation of preoperative estimates and intraoperative confirmation of the relationship between nerves and tumor by verifying the accuracy of visualization. 3T magnetic resonance imaging scans including 3D-FSPGR, FIESTA, and DTI were used to collect information from 18 patients with skull base tumor. DTI data were integrated into the 3D slicer for fiber tracking and overlapped anatomic images to determine course of nerves. 3D reconstruction of tumors was achieved to perform neighboring, encasing, and invading relationship between lesion and nerves. Optic pathway including the optic chiasm could be traced in cases of tuberculum sellae meningioma and hypophysoma (pituitary tumor). The oculomotor nerve, from the interpeduncular fossa out of the brain stem to supraorbital fissure, was clearly visible in parasellar meningioma cases. Meanwhile, cisternal parts of trigeminal nerve and abducens nerve, facial nerve were also imaged well in vestibular schwannomas and petroclival meningioma cases. The 3D-spatial relationship between CNs and skull base tumor estimated preoperatively by tumor modeling and tractography corresponded to the results determined during surgery. Supported by DTI and 3D slicer, preoperative 3D reconstruction of most CNs related to skull base tumor is feasible in pathological circumstances. We consider DTI Technology to be a useful tool for predicting the course and location of most CNs, and syntopy between them and skull base tumor.

  1. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  2. Congenital juvenile granulosa cell tumor of the testis: Case report and literature review

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    Carolina Talini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile granulosa cell tumor (JGCT is a very rarely diagnosed benign tumor, accounting for 1.2% of all prepubertal testicular tumors. A full-term healthy neonate was diagnosed with a painless left scrotal mass. During evaluation it was identified to have about two times the volume of the contralateral testis, presenting a firm consistency, not as hard as the consistency of a prenatal testicular torsion. Doppler ultrasound detected a multicystic left testicular mass, with normal blood flow, but failed in detecting normal-appearing testis. Human chorionic gonadotropin (β-HCG and serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP were normal. Inguinal approach was performed, section of the lesion was sent to frozen biopsy and excluded yolk sac tumor, and however the impossibility of detecting normal testis tissue indicated orchiectomy with high ligation of the spermatic cord. Histological evaluation demonstrated gray testicular parenchyma with multicystic aspect fulfilled with yellow fluid. The usual clinical presentation of JGCT is a painless scrotal mass, radiological imaging demonstrates a multicystic tumor. Tumoral markers levels are normal and the standard treatment is the inguinal orchiectomy.

  3. Effects of Arsenic Trioxide on Radiofrequency Ablation of VX2 Liver Tumor: Intraarterial versus Intravenous Administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Nak Jong; Yoon, Chang Jin; Kang, Sung Gwon; Chung, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyo Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (As 2 O 3 ) can be used as a possible pharmaceutical alternative that augments radiofrequency (RF) ablation by reducing tumor blood flow. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of intraarterial and intravenous administration of As 2 O 3 on RF-induced ablation in an experimentally induced liver tumor. VX2 carcinoma was grown in the livers of 30 rabbits. As 2 O 3 (1 mg/kg) was administered through the hepatic artery (n = 10, group A) or ear vein (n = 10, group B), 30 minutes before RF ablation (125 mA ± 35; 90 ± 5 degrees Celsius). As a control group, 10 rabbits were treated with RF ablation alone (group C). RF was intentionally applied to the peripheral margin of the tumor so that ablation can cover the tumor and adjacent hepatic parenchyma. Ablation areas of the tumor and adjacent parenchymal changes among three groups were compared by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. The overall ablation areas were 156 ± 28.9 mm 2 (group A), 119 ± 31.7 (group B), and 92 ± 17.4 (group C, p 2 ) than both group B (50 ± 19.4, p = 0.02) and group C (28 ± 2.2, p 2 O 3 . The intraarterial administration of As 2 O 3 seems to be helpful for the selective ablation of the tumor.

  4. MR muscle tractography study on VX2 soft-tissue tumor in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yonggang; Guo Liang; Xie Daohai; Hu Chunhogn; Guo Maofeng; Zhu Wei; Chen Jianhua; Xing Jianming; Wang Renfa

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine if diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and muscle fiber tracts of muscle disease are feasible. Methods: Twenty Newzealand white rabbits were implanted with 0.2 ml VX 2 tumor tissue suspension in the right proximal thighs. MRI and DTI were performed on these rabbits and DTI of muscle fiber tracts in the muscles around the lesions were reconstructed. The fractional anisotropy(FA) and volume ratio anisotropy(VrA) of the tumor and the normal muscle were analyzed. The correlation study between MRI and pathological findings was done. Results: All experimental animal models of rabbit VX 2 soft tissue tumors were successfully established. The difference of FA between the central parenchyma area and the necrosis area, the peripheral area of the tumor, the adjacent and contralateral normal muscle was statistically significant (P 0.05). The difference of FA and VrA between the adjacent and contralateral normal muscle was not statistically significant (P>0.05). The arrangement of normal muscle was regular on DTI of muscle tract. The muscle around the tumor lesions was infiltrated and destructed, which demonstrated irregular and interrupted muscle fiber on muscle tractography. Conclusion: DTI is advantageous to demonstrate the structure of soft tissue tumors and its border, which should be helpful in the structure and function research of muscle, as well as in the diagnosis of muscle diseases. (authors)

  5. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Family Donate Volunteer Justin's Hope Fund Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  6. Metaphyseal giant cell tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.F.; Hemais, P.M.P.G.; Aymore, I.L.; Carmo, M.C.R. do; Cunha, M.E.P.R. da; Resende, C.M.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three cases of metaphyseal giant cell tumor are presented. A review of the literature is done, demostrating the lesion is rare and that there are few articles about it. Age incidence and characteristics of the tumor are discussed. (Author) [pt

  7. Testicular germinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fresco, R.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of testicular germinal tumors. The presumed diagnosis is based in the anamnesis, clinical examination, testicular ultrasound and tumor markers. The definitive diagnosis is obtained through the inguinal radical orchidectomy

  8. Characterization of a newly established aggregation of the invasive ladybeetle Harmonia axyridis and current status of the invader in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pons, X.; Roca, M.; Lumbierres, B.; Lucas, E.

    2015-07-01

    The multicoloured Asian ladybeetle, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), an invasive biocontrol agent introduced in North and South America, as well as in Europe for aphid control, drastically affected assemblages of native coccinellid species, local communities and people. Although the insect is common in several European countries and it was released in Spain for aphid control in 1995, no evidence of population establishment has been reported until 2011. In the present paper, 1) we summarize the records of the invasive ladybeetle in Spain and provide numerous new mentions, and 2) we follow for the first time an overwintering aggregation from autumn to spring and characterize some individual features which allow us to determine its phenology of the establishment and spreading. The results establish clearly that: 1) H. axyridis is (until now) restricted to Catalonia (NE Spain) but the invading process is in progress and the insect is able to occupy different habitats; 2) the ladybeetle overwinters successfully in Spain without significant natural mortality or parasitism; 3) the form succinea represents 73-81% of the overwintering individuals, and 4) the invasion takes probably its origin from Southern France. The potential impact of the invasion by H. axyridis in Spain is discussed. (Author)

  9. Secondary Contact and Admixture between Independently Invading Populations of the Western Corn Rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermond, Gérald; Ciosi, Marc; Lombaert, Eric; Blin, Aurélie; Boriani, Marco; Furlan, Lorenzo; Toepfer, Stefan; Guillemaud, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is one of the most destructive pests of corn in North America and is currently invading Europe. The two major invasive outbreaks of rootworm in Europe have occurred, in North-West Italy and in Central and South-Eastern Europe. These two outbreaks originated from independent introductions from North America. Secondary contact probably occurred in North Italy between these two outbreaks, in 2008. We used 13 microsatellite markers to conduct a population genetics study, to demonstrate that this geographic contact resulted in a zone of admixture in the Italian region of Veneto. We show that i) genetic variation is greater in the contact zone than in the parental outbreaks; ii) several signs of admixture were detected in some Venetian samples, in a Bayesian analysis of the population structure and in an approximate Bayesian computation analysis of historical scenarios and, finally, iii) allelic frequency clines were observed at microsatellite loci. The contact between the invasive outbreaks in North-West Italy and Central and South-Eastern Europe resulted in a zone of admixture, with particular characteristics. The evolutionary implications of the existence of a zone of admixture in Northern Italy and their possible impact on the invasion success of the western corn rootworm are discussed. PMID:23189184

  10. Geographic structuring and transgenerational maternal effects shape germination in native, but not introduced, populations of a widespread plant invader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Christina; Moravcová, Lenka; Pyšek, Petr

    2016-05-01

    Germination is critical in determining species distributions and invasion dynamics. However, is it unclear how often invasive populations evolve germination characteristics different from native populations, because few studies have isolated genetic variation by using seed from garden-grown plants. Additionally, while herbivore-induced transgenerational effects are common, it is unknown whether maternal herbivory differentially shapes germination in native and introduced offspring. We explored germination in native and introduced populations of the North American invader Verbascum thapsus using seed from garden-grown maternal plants, half of which were protected from herbivores. To elucidate (1) germination niche breadth and (2) whether germination conditions affected expression of genetic structuring among populations, we germinated seed under four ecologically relevant temperature regimes. Native populations had a wide germination niche breadth, germinating as well as or better than introduced populations. At cooler temperatures, native populations exhibited a genetically based environmental cline indicative of local adaptation, with populations from warmer locales germinating better than populations from cooler locales. However, this cline was obscured when maternal plants were attacked by herbivores, revealing that local stressors can override the expression of geographic structuring. Introduced populations did not exhibit clinal variation, suggesting its disruption during the introduction process. Native and introduced populations have evolved genetic differences in germination. The result of this difference manifests in a wider germination niche breadth in natives, suggesting that the invasive behavior of V. thapsus in North America is attributable to other factors. © 2016 Botanical Society of America.

  11. Fusarium spp. is able to grow and invade healthy human nails as a single source of nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletti, J; Negri, M; Grassi, F L; Kioshima-Cotica, É S; Svidzinski, T I E

    2015-09-01

    Onychomycosis caused by Fusarium spp. is emerging, but some factors associated with its development remain unclear, such as whether this genus is keratinolytic. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the ability of Fusarium to use the human nail as a single source of nutrients. We also performed an epidemiological study and antifungal susceptibility testing of Fusarium spp. that were isolated from patients with onychomycosis. The epidemiological study showed that Fusarium species accounted for 12.4 % of onychomycosis cases, and it was the most common among nondermatophyte molds. The most frequent species identified were F. oxysporum (36.5 %), F. solani (31.8 %), and F. subglutinans (8.3 %). Fluconazole was not active against Fusarium spp., and the response to terbinafine varied according to species. Fusarium was able to grow in vitro without the addition of nutrients and invade healthy nails. Thus, we found that Fusarium uses keratin as a single source of nutrients, and the model proposed herein may be useful for future studies on the pathogenesis of onychomycosis.

  12. Potential Asteraceae Invaders in Taiwan: Insights from the Flora and Herbarium Records of Casual and Naturalized Alien Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Huah Wu

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Naturalization has been shown to be one of the primary stages of plant invasions; therefore, studies on naturalized plant species may generate valuable insights of possible invaders and invasions. Background information of casual and naturalized Asteraceae species provided by a comprehensive list of casual and naturalized species in Taiwan was examined to estimate the basic biological traits and geological origins of potential invasive species in this study. Besides, herbarium records were collected and analyzed to predict the invasiveness of casual and naturalized Asteraceae species. Our results showed that 44.0% out of the 51 casual and naturalized Asteraceae species were classified as invasive in the field, and a notable portion of these species were probably introduced accidently. Tropical Americas were the most important origins of casual and naturalized Asteraceae species, followed by Europe and temperate Americas. Most of the casual and naturalized Asteraceae species were annual herbs, and a few perennial species categorized as invasive may cause profound environmental problems. The herbarium record showed that species possessed different numbers of localities within the same time frame. We suggested that casual and naturalized Asteraceae species collected in more localities are more invasive than those species found in fewer localities within the same period of time.

  13. Detection of virulence genes determining the ability to adhere and invade in Campylobacter spp. from cattle and swine in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysok, Beata; Wojtacka, Joanna

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of virulence genes responsible for the adhesion (flaA, cadF and racR) and invasion (virB11, iam and pldA) in Campylobacter isolates from cattle and swine and determine their adherence and invasion abilities. The studies conducted revealed high prevalence rate of adherence and invasion associated genes irrespective of the isolates origin. All Campylobacter strains of swine and cattle origin adhered to HeLa cells at mean level 0.1099% ± SD 0.1341% and 0.0845% ± SD 0.1304% of starting viable inoculum, respectively. However swine isolates exhibited higher invasion abilities (0.0012% ± SD 0.0011%) compared to bovine isolates (0.00038% ± SD 0.00055%). The results obtained revealed significantly positive correlation between invasion and adherence abilities of swine origin isolates (R = 0.4867 in regard to C. jejuni and R = 0.4507 in regard to C. coli) and bovine origin isolates (R = 0.726 in regard to C. jejuni). Bacterial virulence is multifactorial and it is affected by the expression of virulence genes. Moreover the presence of virulence genes determines the ability of Campylobacter isolates to adhere and invade the cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Host persistence or extinction from emerging infectious disease: insights from white-nose syndrome in endemic and invading regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Joseph R; Langwig, Kate E; Sun, Keping; Lu, Guanjun; Parise, Katy L; Jiang, Tinglei; Frick, Winifred F; Foster, Jeffrey T; Feng, Jiang; Kilpatrick, A Marm

    2016-03-16

    Predicting species' fates following the introduction of a novel pathogen is a significant and growing problem in conservation. Comparing disease dynamics between introduced and endemic regions can offer insight into which naive hosts will persist or go extinct, with disease acting as a filter on host communities. We examined four hypothesized mechanisms for host-pathogen persistence by comparing host infection patterns and environmental reservoirs for Pseudogymnoascus destructans (the causative agent of white-nose syndrome) in Asia, an endemic region, and North America, where the pathogen has recently invaded. Although colony sizes of bats and hibernacula temperatures were very similar, both infection prevalence and fungal loads were much lower on bats and in the environment in Asia than North America. These results indicate that transmission intensity and pathogen growth are lower in Asia, likely due to higher host resistance to pathogen growth in this endemic region, and not due to host tolerance, lower transmission due to smaller populations, or lower environmentally driven pathogen growth rate. Disease filtering also appears to be favouring initially resistant species in North America. More broadly, determining the mechanisms allowing species persistence in endemic regions can help identify species at greater risk of extinction in introduced regions, and determine the consequences for disease dynamics and host-pathogen coevolution. © 2016 The Author(s).

  15. [A Case Report on Successful Larynx-Preserving Surgery for a Cervical Esophageal Cancer That Invaded the Hypopharynx].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Osamu; Kato, Hiroaki; Iwama, Mitsuru; Hiraki, Yoko; Yasuda, Atsushi; Shinkai, Masayuki; Imano, Motohiro; Kimura, Yutaka; Imamoto, Haruhiko; Yasuda, Takushi

    2017-11-01

    The patient was a 58-year-old man suffering from dysphagia. He was diagnosed with T3 cervicalesophagealcancer that invaded the posterior hypopharyngealwal lwith lymph node metastasis. The patient received neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (30 Gy with CDDP/5-FU), followed by larynx-preserving surgery(LPS)for cervicalesophagealcancer. Two techniques for successfulLPS consist of the dissections of cricopharyngealmuscl e and the inferior pharyngealsphincter, and the complete division of the bilateral infrahyoid muscles attached to the sternum(CDBIMS). The former technique of releasing the esophagus from the trachea at the cricoid cartilage level results in the extension of the oral surgical margin. The latter technique is expected to prevent postoperative aspiration pneumonia, as the lack of flexibility of scarred infrahyoid muscles is regarded as one of the major causes of dysfunction in swallowing. Free jejunum was transferred for cervical reconstruction. Pathological examination indicated degenerated squamous cell carcinoma(ypT2, INF b, ly0, v0, PM0, ypN0, ypStage II A). Although the patient had recurrent nerve palsy, he could eat meals without aspiration. He returned to normal life after discharge from the hospital. Five years after surgery, no recurrence had been observed.

  16. Stable isotopes of nitrogen and carbon in an aquatic food web recently invaded by Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, M.J.; Mills, E.L.; Idrisi, N.; Michener, R.

    1996-01-01

    The carbon and nitrogen concentrations and the stable isotopic compositions (δ 13 C and δ 15 N) of major abiotic and biotic constituents were determined in Oneida Lake, New York. This lake was invaded by the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in 1990 and there have been concomitant changes in various biotic and abiotic lake properties. The C (46-49%) and N (12%) concentrations and C:N ratios (3.9-4) of zebra mussel flesh were similar to those reported for other lakes. Trophic positions were reflected in the δ 15 N values for which walleye > gizzard shad and yellow perch > Daphnia spp. and zebra mussel flesh > seston and sediment. There was an average increase of 3.6% 0 15 N per trophic transfer. Results from the δ 13 C analysis suggest that Daphnia spp. were using a distinct source of organic carbon whereas zebra mussel were using the entire seston resource. Only yellow perch showed a significant shift in δ 13 C values (1.1% 0 ), possibly reflecting a shift in a food source and diet from 1992 to 1993. (author). 48 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs

  17. Stress tolerance and ecophysiological ability of an invader and a native species in a seasonally dry tropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marciel Teixeira; Matzek, Virginia; Dias Medeiros, Camila; Rivas, Rebeca; Falcão, Hiram Marinho; Santos, Mauro Guida

    2014-01-01

    Ecophysiological traits of Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) DC. and a phylogenetically and ecologically similar native species, Anadenanthera colubrina (Vell.) Brenan, were studied to understand the invasive species' success in caatinga, a seasonally dry tropical forest ecosystem of the Brazilian Northeast. To determine if the invader exhibited a superior resource-capture or a resource-conservative strategy, we measured biophysical and biochemical parameters in both species during dry and wet months over the course of two years. The results show that P. juliflora benefits from a flexible strategy in which it frequently outperforms the native species in resource capture traits under favorable conditions (e.g., photosynthesis), while also showing better stress tolerance (e.g., antioxidant activity) and water-use efficiency in unfavorable conditions. In addition, across both seasons the invasive has the advantage over the native with higher chlorophyll/carotenoids and chlorophyll a/b ratios, percent N, and leaf protein. We conclude that Prosopis juliflora utilizes light, water and nutrients more efficiently than Anadenanthera colubrina, and suffers lower intensity oxidative stress in environments with reduced water availability and high light radiation.

  18. Metabolic Profiling of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Foliage of Two Echium spp. Invaders in Australia—A Case of Novel Weapons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Skoneczny

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic profiling allows for simultaneous and rapid annotation of biochemically similar organismal metabolites. An effective platform for profiling of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs and their N-oxides (PANOs was developed using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (UHPLC-QTOF mass spectrometry. Field-collected populations of invasive Australian weeds, Echium plantagineum and E. vulgare were raised under controlled glasshouse conditions and surveyed for the presence of related PAs and PANOs in leaf tissues at various growth stages. Echium plantagineum possessed numerous related and abundant PANOs (>17 by seven days following seed germination, and these were also observed in rosette and flowering growth stages. In contrast, the less invasive E. vulgare accumulated significantly lower levels of most PANOs under identical glasshouse conditions. Several previously unreported PAs were also found at trace levels. Field-grown populations of both species were also evaluated for PA production and highly toxic echimidine N-oxide was amongst the most abundant PANOs in foliage of both species. PAs in field and glasshouse plants were more abundant in the more widely invasive species, E. plantagineum, and may provide competitive advantage by increasing the plant’s capacity to deter natural enemies in its invaded range through production of novel weapons.

  19. Metabolic Profiling of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Foliage of Two Echium spp. Invaders in Australia—A Case of Novel Weapons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoneczny, Dominik; Weston, Paul A.; Zhu, Xiaocheng; Gurr, Geoff M.; Callaway, Ragan M.; Weston, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic profiling allows for simultaneous and rapid annotation of biochemically similar organismal metabolites. An effective platform for profiling of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and their N-oxides (PANOs) was developed using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (UHPLC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Field-collected populations of invasive Australian weeds, Echium plantagineum and E. vulgare were raised under controlled glasshouse conditions and surveyed for the presence of related PAs and PANOs in leaf tissues at various growth stages. Echium plantagineum possessed numerous related and abundant PANOs (>17) by seven days following seed germination, and these were also observed in rosette and flowering growth stages. In contrast, the less invasive E. vulgare accumulated significantly lower levels of most PANOs under identical glasshouse conditions. Several previously unreported PAs were also found at trace levels. Field-grown populations of both species were also evaluated for PA production and highly toxic echimidine N-oxide was amongst the most abundant PANOs in foliage of both species. PAs in field and glasshouse plants were more abundant in the more widely invasive species, E. plantagineum, and may provide competitive advantage by increasing the plant’s capacity to deter natural enemies in its invaded range through production of novel weapons. PMID:26561809

  20. Metabolic Profiling of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Foliage of Two Echium spp. Invaders in Australia--A Case of Novel Weapons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoneczny, Dominik; Weston, Paul A; Zhu, Xiaocheng; Gurr, Geoff M; Callaway, Ragan M; Weston, Leslie A

    2015-11-06

    Metabolic profiling allows for simultaneous and rapid annotation of biochemically similar organismal metabolites. An effective platform for profiling of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and their N-oxides (PANOs) was developed using ultra high pressure liquid chromatography quadrupole time-of-flight (UHPLC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Field-collected populations of invasive Australian weeds, Echium plantagineum and E. vulgare were raised under controlled glasshouse conditions and surveyed for the presence of related PAs and PANOs in leaf tissues at various growth stages. Echium plantagineum possessed numerous related and abundant PANOs (>17) by seven days following seed germination, and these were also observed in rosette and flowering growth stages. In contrast, the less invasive E. vulgare accumulated significantly lower levels of most PANOs under identical glasshouse conditions. Several previously unreported PAs were also found at trace levels. Field-grown populations of both species were also evaluated for PA production and highly toxic echimidine N-oxide was amongst the most abundant PANOs in foliage of both species. PAs in field and glasshouse plants were more abundant in the more widely invasive species, E. plantagineum, and may provide competitive advantage by increasing the plant's capacity to deter natural enemies in its invaded range through production of novel weapons.

  1. In Situ Malignant Transformation and Progenitor-Mediated Cell Budding: Two Different Pathways for Breast Ductal and Lobular Tumor Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-gao Man, Mina Izadjoo, Guohong Song, Alexander Stojadinovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The human breast lobular and ductal structures and the derived tumors from these structures differ substantial in their morphology, microenvironment, biological presentation, functions, and clinical prognosis. Based on these differences, we have proposed that pre-invasive lobular tumors may progress to invasive lesions through “in situ malignant transformation”, in which the entire myoepithelial cell layer within a given lobule or lobular clusters undergoes extensive degeneration and disruptions, which allows the entire epithelial cell population associated with these myoepithelial cell layers directly invade the stroma or vascular structures. In contrast, pre-invasive ductal tumors may invade the stroma or vascular structures through “progenitor-mediated cell budding”, in which focal myoepithelial cell degeneration-induced aberrant leukocyte infiltration causes focal disruptions in the tumor capsules, which selectively favor monoclonal proliferation of the overlying tumor stem cells or a biologically more aggressive cell clone. Our current study attempted to provide more direct morphological and immunohistochemical data that are consistent with our hypotheses.

  2. Tissue engineered tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M; Techy, G B; Ward, B R; Imam, S A; Atkinson, R; Ho, H; Taylor, C R

    2010-08-01

    Many research programs use well-characterized tumor cell lines as tumor models for in vitro studies. Because tumor cells grown as three-dimensional (3-D) structures have been shown to behave more like tumors in vivo than do cells growing in monolayer culture, a growing number of investigators now use tumor cell spheroids as models. Single cell type spheroids, however, do not model the stromal-epithelial interactions that have an important role in controlling tumor growth and development in vivo. We describe here a method for generating, reproducibly, more realistic 3-D tumor models that contain both stromal and malignant epithelial cells with an architecture that closely resembles that of tumor microlesions in vivo. Because they are so tissue-like we refer to them as tumor histoids. They can be generated reproducibly in substantial quantities. The bioreactor developed to generate histoid constructs is described and illustrated. It accommodates disposable culture chambers that have filled volumes of either 10 or 64 ml, each culture yielding on the order of 100 or 600 histoid particles, respectively. Each particle is a few tenths of a millimeter in diameter. Examples of histological sections of tumor histoids representing cancers of breast, prostate, colon, pancreas and urinary bladder are presented. Potential applications of tumor histoids include, but are not limited to, use as surrogate tumors for pre-screening anti-solid tumor pharmaceutical agents, as reference specimens for immunostaining in the surgical pathology laboratory and use in studies of invasive properties of cells or other aspects of tumor development and progression. Histoids containing nonmalignant cells also may have potential as "seeds" in tissue engineering. For drug testing, histoids probably will have to meet certain criteria of size and tumor cell content. Using a COPAS Plus flow cytometer, histoids containing fluorescent tumor cells were analyzed successfully and sorted using such criteria.

  3. Prediction of tumor-brain adhesion in intracranial meningiomas by MR imaging and DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeguchi, Takashi; Miki, Hitoshi; Shimizu, Teruhiko; Kikuchi, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ohue, Shiro; Ohnishi, Takanori

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and DSA (digital subtraction angiography) by using preoperative MRI and DSA findings in the examination of meningiomas before excision. In particular, we focused on their usefulness in predicting tumor-brain adhesion during surgery. The subjects were 36 patients with intracranial meningioma who underwent tumor excision at which time neurosurgeons examined the tumor-brain adhesion. Two neurosurgeons evaluated the degree of tumor-brain adhesion from operation records and videotapes recorded during surgery. Two neuroradiologists retrospectively evaluated the preoperative MRI findings including tumor diameter, signal intensity of the tumor parenchyma obtained with T 2 -weighted imaging (T 2 WI), characteristics of the tumor-brain interface, and degree of peritumoral brain edema. The vascular supply was also evaluated from the preoperative DSA findings. The relationship between these MRI and DSA findings and the degree of tumor-brain adhesion during surgery as classified by the neurosurgeons was statistically analyzed. The degree of peritumoral brain edema and the shapes and characteristics of the tumor-brain interface, including the findings of FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) imaging and vascular supply observed by DSA, were significantly correlated with tumor-brain adhesion. In particular, the shapes and characteristics of the tumor-brain interface as observed by T 1 -weighted imaging (T 1 WI), T2WI, and FLAIR, respectively, as well as the vascular supply observed by DSA, were closely correlated with the degree of tumor-brain adhesion encountered during surgery. According to these results, we developed a method of predicting tumor-brain adhesion that considers the shape of the tumor-brain interface revealed by MRI and the vascular supply revealed by DSA. We retrospectively examined the findings of MRI and DSA performed before excision of meningioma and clarified

  4. Tumor interstitial fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromov, Pavel; Gromova, Irina; Olsen, Charlotta J.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) is a proximal fluid that, in addition to the set of blood soluble phase-borne proteins, holds a subset of aberrantly externalized components, mainly proteins, released by tumor cells and tumor microenvironment through various mechanisms, which include classical...

  5. Multi-Parametric MRI and Texture Analysis to Visualize Spatial Histologic Heterogeneity and Tumor Extent in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Leland S; Ning, Shuluo; Eschbacher, Jennifer M; Gaw, Nathan; Dueck, Amylou C; Smith, Kris A; Nakaji, Peter; Plasencia, Jonathan; Ranjbar, Sara; Price, Stephen J; Tran, Nhan; Loftus, Joseph; Jenkins, Robert; O'Neill, Brian P; Elmquist, William; Baxter, Leslie C; Gao, Fei; Frakes, David; Karis, John P; Zwart, Christine; Swanson, Kristin R; Sarkaria, Jann; Wu, Teresa; Mitchell, J Ross; Li, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Genetic profiling represents the future of neuro-oncology but suffers from inadequate biopsies in heterogeneous tumors like Glioblastoma (GBM). Contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) targets enhancing core (ENH) but yields adequate tumor in only ~60% of cases. Further, CE-MRI poorly localizes infiltrative tumor within surrounding non-enhancing parenchyma, or brain-around-tumor (BAT), despite the importance of characterizing this tumor segment, which universally recurs. In this study, we use multiple texture analysis and machine learning (ML) algorithms to analyze multi-parametric MRI, and produce new images indicating tumor-rich targets in GBM. We recruited primary GBM patients undergoing image-guided biopsies and acquired pre-operative MRI: CE-MRI, Dynamic-Susceptibility-weighted-Contrast-enhanced-MRI, and Diffusion Tensor Imaging. Following image coregistration and region of interest placement at biopsy locations, we compared MRI metrics and regional texture with histologic diagnoses of high- vs low-tumor content (≥80% vs heterogeneity to identify regional tumor-rich biopsy targets.

  6. Availability of perfluoroctylbromide (PFOB) emulsion used as agent in the liver tumor imaging of computed tomography (CT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Takachika

    1986-01-01

    We carried out a fundamental study on the availability of perfluoroctylbromide (PFOB) emulsion used as an agent in the liver tumor imaging of computed tomography (CT). For this study, we used emulsified yolk phospolipid as a surfactant for PFOB emulsion because it is generally considered to have higher safety relative to the administration to the humans. In the rabbits' liver tumor model in which VX 2 tumor cell was implanted into their livers, we observed increases in the CT values of the livers when 5 to 10 ml/kg of PFOB emulsion (20 % w/v) was administered into the vein, and also ringlike enhancement and increases in the CT values on the tumor rim when 20 ml/kg of PFOB emulsion was administered. In addition, in the chemical analysis of a gas chromatography, we also observed significant increases in the PFOB concentration on the tumor rim, compared with those of normal liver parenchyma, when 20 ml/kg of PFOB emulsion was given. In the finding of CT values in the human liver tumor by means of organ perfusion system, we recognized increases in the CT values (induced by the accumulation of PFOB emulsion) on the rim of the metastatic tumor of colon cancer. These results suggest that PFOB emulsion has certain availability as an agent for the liver tumor imaging of computed tomography (CT). (author)

  7. Functional and gene network analyses of transcriptional signatures characterizing pre-weaned bovine mammary parenchyma or fat pad uncovered novel inter-tissue signaling networks during development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The neonatal bovine mammary fat pad (MFP surrounding the mammary parenchyma (PAR is thought to exert proliferative effects on the PAR through secretion of local modulators of growth induced by systemic hormones. We used bioinformatics to characterize transcriptomics differences between PAR and MFP from ~65 d old Holstein heifers. Data were mined to uncover potential crosstalk through the analyses of signaling molecules preferentially expressed in one tissue relative to the other. Results Over 9,000 differentially expressed genes (DEG; False discovery rate ≤ 0.05 were found of which 1,478 had a ≥1.5-fold difference between PAR and MFP. Within the DEG highly-expressed in PAR vs. MFP (n = 736 we noted significant enrichment of functions related to cell cycle, structural organization, signaling, and DNA/RNA metabolism. Only actin cytoskeletal signaling was significant among canonical pathways. DEG more highly-expressed in MFP vs. PAR (n = 742 belong to lipid metabolism, signaling, cell movement, and immune-related functions. Canonical pathways associated with metabolism and signaling, particularly immune- and metabolism-related were significantly-enriched. Network analysis uncovered a central role of MYC, TP53, and CTNNB1 in controlling expression of DEG highly-expressed in PAR vs. MFP. Similar analysis suggested a central role for PPARG, KLF2, EGR2, and EPAS1 in regulating expression of more highly-expressed DEG in MFP vs. PAR. Gene network analyses revealed putative inter-tissue crosstalk between cytokines and growth factors preferentially expressed in one tissue (e.g., ANGPTL1, SPP1, IL1B in PAR vs. MFP; ADIPOQ, IL13, FGF2, LEP in MFP vs. PAR with DEG preferentially expressed in the other tissue, particularly transcription factors or pathways (e.g., MYC, TP53, and actin cytoskeletal signaling in PAR vs. MFP; PPARG and LXR/RXR Signaling in MFP vs. PAR. Conclusions Functional analyses underscored a reciprocal influence in

  8. Intraoperative radiation therapy in patients with bladder cancer. A review of techniques allowing improved tumor doses and providing high cure rates without loss of bladder function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, W.U.; Kaufman, S.D.; Prout, G.R. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional external beam irradiation, using modern megavoltage techniques and doses that do not harm bladder function, will permanently eradicate local bladder cancer in 30% to 50% of patients, compared with 70% to 90% with cystectomy. In appropriately chosen patients, open surgery can safely provide excellent exposure for the selective delivery of more radiant energy directly to the tumor and less to the uninvolved portion of the bladder. Intraoperative radiation therapy, by either a removable radium or iridium implant or a large single dose of electrons, has been reported to be safe and can permanently cure the bladder of cancer and also preserve bladder function in more than 75% of patients with solitary tumors that invade into but not beyond the bladder muscle. With the increasing interest in and availability of intraoperative radiation therapy in the US, this curative and bladder-sparing treatment for operable patients with bladder cancer invading the trigone is appropriate for careful clinical trial. 13 references

  9. PET and endocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rigo, P.; Belhocine, T.; Hustinx, R.; Foidart-Willems, J.

    2000-01-01

    The authors review the main indications of PET examination, and specifically of 18 FDG, in the assessment of endocrine tumors: of the thyroid, of the parathyroid, of the adrenal and of the pituitary glands. Neuroendocrine tumors, gastro-entero-pancreatic or carcinoid tumors are also under the scope. Usually, the most differentiated tumors show only poor uptake of the FDG as they have a weak metabolic and proliferative activity. In the assessment of endocrine tumors, FDG-PET should be used only after most specific nuclear examinations been performed. (author)

  10. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  11. Early outcomes of empiric embolization of tumor-related gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients with advanced malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandberg, Daniel J; Smith, Tony P; Suhocki, Paul V; Pabon-Ramos, Waleska; Nelson, Rendon C; Desai, Svetang; Branch, Stanley; Kim, Charles Y

    2012-11-01

    To report short-term results of empiric transcatheter embolization for patients with advanced malignancy and gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage directly from a tumor invading the GI tract wall. Between 2005 and 2011, 37 mesenteric angiograms were obtained in 26 patients with advanced malignancy (20 men, six women; mean age, 56.2 y) with endoscopically confirmed symptomatic GI hemorrhage from a tumor invading the GI tract wall. Angiographic findings and clinical outcomes were retrospectively evaluated. Clinical success was defined as absence of signs and symptoms of hemorrhage for at least 30 day following embolization. Active extravasation was demonstrated in three cases. Angiographic abnormalities related to a GI tract tumor were identified on 35 of 37 angiograms, including tumor neovascularity (n = 21), tumor enhancement (n = 24), and luminal irregularity (n = 5). In the absence of active extravasation, empiric embolization with particles and/or coils was performed in 25 procedures. Cessation of hemorrhage (ie, clinical success) occurred more frequently when empiric embolization was performed (17 of 25 procedures; 68%) than when embolization was not performed (two of nine; 22%; P = .03). Empiric embolization resulted in clinical success in 10 of 11 patients with acute GI bleeding (91%), compared with seven of 14 patients (50%) with chronic GI bleeding (P = .04). No ischemic complications were encountered. In patients with advanced malignancy, in the absence of active extravasation, empiric transcatheter arterial embolization for treatment of GI hemorrhage from a direct tumor source demonstrated a 68% short-term success rate, without any ischemic complications. Copyright © 2012 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Epilepsy and Brain Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-yi Sha

    2009-01-01

    @@ Epidemiology It is estimated 61,414 new cases of primary brain tumors are expected to be diagnosed in 2009 in the U.S. The incidence statistic of 61,414 persons diagnosed per year includes both malignant (22,738) and non-malignant (38,677) brain tumors. (Data from American Brain Tumor Association). During the years 2004-2005, approximately 359,000 people in the United States were living with the diagnosis of a primary brain or central nervous system tumor. Specifically, more than 81,000 persons were living with a malignant tumor, more than 267,000 persons with a benign tumor. For every 100,000 people in the United States, approximately 131 are living following the diagnosis of a brain tumor. This represents a prevalence rate of 130.8 per 100,000 person years[1].

  13. Clinical and pathological analysis of benign brain tumors resected after Gamma Knife surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ali; Wang, Jun-Mei; Li, Gui-Lin; Sun, Yi-Lin; Sun, Shi-Bin; Luo, Bin; Wang, Mei-Hua

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the clinical and pathological features of benign brain tumors that had been treated with Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) followed by resection. In this retrospective chart review, the authors identified 61 patients with intracranial benign tumors who had undergone neurosurgical intervention after GKS. Of these 61 patients, 27 were male and 34 were female; mean age was 49.1 years (range 19-73 years). There were 24 meningiomas, 18 schwannomas, 14 pituitary adenomas, 3 hemangioblastomas, and 2 craniopharyngiomas. The interval between GKS and craniotomy was 2-168 months, with a median of 24 months; for 7 patients, the interval was 10 years or longer. For 21 patients, a craniotomy was performed before and after GKS; in 9 patients, pathological specimens were obtained before and after GKS. A total of 29 patients underwent GKS at the Beijing Tiantan Hospital. All specimens obtained by surgical intervention underwent histopathological examination. Most patients underwent craniotomy because of tumor recurrence and/or exacerbation of clinical signs and symptoms. Neuroimaging analyses indicated tumor growth in 42 patients, hydrocephalus in 10 patients with vestibular schwannoma, cystic formation with mass effect in 7 patients, and tumor hemorrhage in 13 patients, of whom 10 had pituitary adenoma. Pathological examination demonstrated that, regardless of the type of tumor, GKS mainly induced coagulative necrosis of tumor parenchyma and stroma with some apoptosis and, ultimately, scar formation. In addition, irradiation induced vasculature stenosis and occlusion and tumor degeneration as a result of reduced blood supply. GKS-induced vasculature reaction was rarely observed in patients with pituitary adenoma. Pathological analysis of tumor specimens obtained before and after GKS did not indicate increased tumor proliferation after GKS. Radiosurgery is effective for intracranial benign tumors of small size and deep location and for tumor recurrence

  14. Evaluation of selective boron absorption in liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaraviglio, D.; Grazia, F. De; Zonta, A.; Altieri, S.; Pedroni, P.; Braghieri, B.; Fossati, F.; Pinelli, T.; Perotti, A.; Specchiarello, S.; Perlini, G.; Rief, H.

    1988-01-01

    The first step was a pharmacokinetic study to identify substances which are good boron transporters and are therefore able to provide a high concentration of the nuclide with respect to the healthy hepatic tissue in the MHN. For this purpose the tumor M5076/73 (M5), which matastasizes spontaneously in liver, was inoculated subcutaneously in a group of C57B1/6 mice. Thirty days after the inoculation, when 90% of the liver was invaded by metastases, a boric acid 0.3 M solution enriched to 96% 10 B was injected into the caudal vein. The mice were sacrificed and the liver was frozen for measurements. Boron concentration in the various samples was achieved by measuring the energy distribution of α particles produced in the nuclear reaction 10 B(n, α) 7 Li induced by a thermal neutron beam extracted from the Triga Mark II reactor,

  15. Ombud's corner: space invaders

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2015-01-01

    When normal communication breaks down and there is no sharing anymore, office-mates can become ‘space invaders’. Very often, the situation can be resolved effectively by taking just a few simple steps...   The lack of office space at CERN is a permanent issue that the various departments regularly have to address. As a result, very often this precious space where we spend the entire day has to be shared with other colleagues. Office-mates may come from different backgrounds and cultures and may have very different habits and behaviours; they may also have different activities during the day, sometimes requiring unusual, (perhaps even strange?) interactions with the space they occupy; finally, their presence might be irregular, making it very difficult for us to establish a stable relationship. Mark and Claire share an office as well as some professional activities. In the beginning, the relationship seems to work normally but, over time, the communication between them ste...

  16. Verdi Invades the Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, Paula Ifft

    1995-01-01

    Children can complement all areas of their language learning with music, and can enhance their musical activities with language. Opportunities to experience sounds, language, and rhythmic movement support the learning and development of the whole child. Activities dealing with children's books that have musical themes, song picture books, and…

  17. Increasing Potential Risk of a Global Aquatic Invader in Europe in Contrast to Other Continents under Future Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Guo, Zhongwei; Ke, Zunwei; Wang, Supen; Li, Yiming

    2011-01-01

    Background Anthropogenically-induced climate change can alter the current climatic habitat of non-native species and can have complex effects on potentially invasive species. Predictions of the potential distributions of invasive species under climate change will provide critical information for future conservation and management strategies. Aquatic ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to invasive species and climate change, but the effect of climate change on invasive species distributions has been rather neglected, especially for notorious global invaders. Methodology/Principal Findings We used ecological niche models (ENMs) to assess the risks and opportunities that climate change presents for the red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), which is a worldwide aquatic invasive species. Linking the factors of climate, topography, habitat and human influence, we developed predictive models incorporating both native and non-native distribution data of the crayfish to identify present areas of potential distribution and project the effects of future climate change based on a consensus-forecast approach combining the CCCMA and HADCM3 climate models under two emission scenarios (A2a and B2a) by 2050. The minimum temperature from the coldest month, the human footprint and precipitation of the driest quarter contributed most to the species distribution models. Under both the A2a and B2a scenarios, P. clarkii shifted to higher latitudes in continents of both the northern and southern hemispheres. However, the effect of climate change varied considerately among continents with an expanding potential in Europe and contracting changes in others. Conclusions/Significance Our findings are the first to predict the impact of climate change on the future distribution of a globally invasive aquatic species. We confirmed the complexities of the likely effects of climate change on the potential distribution of globally invasive species, and it is extremely important to develop

  18. Brown trout as an invader: A synthesis of problems and perspectives in western North America: Chapter 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budy, Phaedra; Gaeta, Jereme W.; Lobón-Cerviá, Javier; Sanz, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    Brown trout are one of the most pervasive and successful invaders worldwide and are ubiquitous across the Intermountain West, USA (IMW). This species is the foundation of extremely popular and economically significant sport fisheries despite well-established negative effects on native fishes and ecosystems, resulting in very challenging, and often opposing, conservation and management goals. Herein, we review the direct (e.g., competition and predation) and indirect (e.g., disease vectors) pathways through which brown trout across the IMW have posed a threat to native species. We discuss the importance of brown trout as economically and culturally important fisheries, especially in novel tailwater ecosystems created by damming. To this end, we surveyed 24 experts from eight states across the IMW to document the relevance of novel brown trout fisheries in 51 tailwaters and found brown trout are thriving in these novel ecosystems, which are often unsuitable for native fishes. We discuss the challenging interplay between protecting native species and managing novel brown trout fisheries. Notably, the future of exotic brown trout in the IMW is shifting as the prestige of native fisheries is growing and many non-native eradication efforts have occurred. The future of exotic brown trout in the IMW, will depend on the nexus of public sentiment and policy, the effectiveness of eradication efforts, and the effect of climate change on both the native fishes and exotic brown trout. Regardless, because brown trout are pervasive and have a broad distribution through the IMW, populations of this species will likely persist at least in some locations into the future.

  19. Comparative Transcriptomic Exploration Reveals Unique Molecular Adaptations of Neuropathogenic Trichobilharzia to Invade and Parasitize Its Avian Definitive Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Leontovyč

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, most molecular investigations of schistosomatids have focused principally on blood flukes (schistosomes of humans. Despite the clinical importance of cercarial dermatitis in humans caused by Trichobilharzia regenti and the serious neuropathologic disease that this parasite causes in its permissive avian hosts and accidental mammalian hosts, almost nothing is known about the molecular aspects of how this fluke invades its hosts, migrates in host tissues and how it interacts with its hosts' immune system. Here, we explored selected aspects using a transcriptomic-bioinformatic approach. To do this, we sequenced, assembled and annotated the transcriptome representing two consecutive life stages (cercariae and schistosomula of T. regenti involved in the first phases of infection of the avian host. We identified key biological and metabolic pathways specific to each of these two developmental stages and also undertook comparative analyses using data available for taxonomically related blood flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Detailed comparative analyses revealed the unique involvement of carbohydrate metabolism, translation and amino acid metabolism, and calcium in T. regenti cercariae during their invasion and in growth and development, as well as the roles of cell adhesion molecules, microaerobic metabolism (citrate cycle and oxidative phosphorylation, peptidases (cathepsins and other histolytic and lysozomal proteins in schistosomula during their particular migration in neural tissues of the avian host. In conclusion, the present transcriptomic exploration provides new and significant insights into the molecular biology of T. regenti, which should underpin future genomic and proteomic investigations of T. regenti and, importantly, provides a useful starting point for a range of comparative studies of schistosomatids and other trematodes.

  20. Knocking on Heaven's Door: Are Novel Invaders Necessarily Facing Naïve Native Species on Islands?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathe Gérard

    Full Text Available The impact of alien predator species on insular native biota has often been attributed to island prey naïveté (i.e. lack of, or inefficient, anti-predator behavior. Only rarely, however, has the concept of island prey naïveté been tested, and then only a posteriori (i.e. hundreds or thousands of years after alien species introduction. The presence of native or anciently introduced predators or competitors may be crucial for the recognition and development of adaptive behavior toward unknown predators or competitors of the same archetype (i.e. a set of species that occupy a similar ecological niche and show similar morphological and behavioral traits when interacting with other species. Here, we tested whether two squamates endemic to New Caledonia, a skink, Caledoniscincus austrocaledonicus, and a gecko, Bavayia septuiclavis, recognized and responded to the odor of two major invaders introduced into the Pacific islands, but not yet into New Caledonia. We chose one predator, the small Indian mongoose Herpestes javanicus and one competitor, the cane toad Rhinella marina, which belong respectively to the same archetype as the following two species already introduced into New Caledonia in the nineteenth century: the feral cat Felis catus and the golden bell frog Litoria aurea. Our experiment reveals that geckos are naïve with respect to the odors of both an unknown predator and an unknown competitor, as well as to the odors of a predator and a competitor they have lived with for centuries. In contrast, skinks seem to have lost some naïveté regarding the odor of a predator they have lived with for centuries and seem "predisposed" to avoid the odor of an unknown potential competitor. These results indicate that insular species living in contact with invasive alien species for centuries may be, although not systematically, predisposed toward developing adaptive behavior with respect to species belonging to the same archetype and introduced into

  1. Habitat complexity and fish size affect the detection of Indo-Pacific lionfish on invaded coral reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S. J.; Tamburello, N.; Miller, S. E.; Akins, J. L.; Côté, I. M.

    2013-06-01

    A standard approach to improving the accuracy of reef fish population estimates derived from underwater visual censuses (UVCs) is the application of species-specific correction factors, which assumes that a species' detectability is constant under all conditions. To test this assumption, we quantified detection rates for invasive Indo-Pacific lionfish ( Pterois volitans and P. miles), which are now a primary threat to coral reef conservation throughout the Caribbean. Estimates of lionfish population density and distribution, which are essential for managing the invasion, are currently obtained through standard UVCs. Using two conventional UVC methods, the belt transect and stationary visual census (SVC), we assessed how lionfish detection rates vary with lionfish body size and habitat complexity (measured as rugosity) on invaded continuous and patch reefs off Cape Eleuthera, the Bahamas. Belt transect and SVC surveys performed equally poorly, with both methods failing to detect the presence of lionfish in >50 % of surveys where thorough, lionfish-focussed searches yielded one or more individuals. Conventional methods underestimated lionfish biomass by ~200 %. Crucially, detection rate varied significantly with both lionfish size and reef rugosity, indicating that the application of a single correction factor across habitats and stages of invasion is unlikely to accurately characterize local populations. Applying variable correction factors that account for site-specific lionfish size and rugosity to conventional survey data increased estimates of lionfish biomass, but these remained significantly lower than actual biomass. To increase the accuracy and reliability of estimates of lionfish density and distribution, monitoring programs should use detailed area searches rather than standard visual survey methods. Our study highlights the importance of accounting for sources of spatial and temporal variation in detection to increase the accuracy of survey data from

  2. Irradiation as a quarantine treatment against the invader fruit fly (Bactrocera Invadens, Drew) in mangoes (Mangifera Indica L,)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odai, B.T.

    2010-06-01

    The detection of the African invader fly, Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta and White, in Ghana has led to limitations in the export of mango fruits from Ghana to other countries. The limitations ranging from increased control costs to outright rejection of exports has necessitated a study in the area of quarantine treatment. A study was conducted to ascertain the effectiveness of gamma radiation for control of Bactrocera invadens in fruit destined for export. Pupae were obtained from the incubation of mango fruits collected from various locations. Adults were reared and infestation levels were determined after fruits were exposed to 5, 10, 20 females in different cages. Late instar larvae in fruits were irradiated at 15, 25, 35, 45, 50, 60 and 75 Gy to determine an effective dose for B. invadens. The mortality of the fly was determined at the various doses to obtain a probit 9 figure of 68.06 Gy (rounded to 70 Gy). The confirmatory test for 3050 larvae endorsed the effective dose as the probit 9 dose. Non-infested mature green export grade mango fruits were irradiated with 0, 70 and 150 Gy to determine its effect on ascorbic acid and total acidity content, sweetness, colour, juiciness, sourness, aroma and firmness of the mango fruits. Ascorbic acid and total acidity were not irradiation dependent. Varietal differences (p 0.05) by irradiation. Varietal differences did not affect the acceptability of the sweetness, sourness and colour of the fruits (p>0.05). Storage days significantly affected (p<0.05) the acceptability of all the sensory attributes. (au)

  3. Count your eggs before they invade: identifying and quantifying egg clutches of two invasive apple snail species (Pomacea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin H Kyle

    Full Text Available Winning the war against invasive species requires early detection of invasions. Compared to terrestrial invaders, aquatic species often thrive undetected under water and do not garner notice until too late for early action. However, fortunately for managers, apple snails (Family Ampullariidae, Genus Pomacea provide their own conspicuous sign of invasion in the form of vibrantly colored egg clutches. Managers can potentially use egg clutches laid in the riparian zone as a means of early detection and species identification. To facilitate such efforts, we quantified differences in characteristics (length, width, depth, mass, egg number of field-laid clutches for the two most common invasive species of apple snail, P. canaliculata and P. maculata, in native and non-native populations. Pomacea canaliculata native and non-native populations differed noticeably only in width. Native P. maculata clutches possessed significantly greater width, mass and eggs numbers compared with native P. canaliculata. Non-native P. maculata clutches significantly exceeded all other populations in all measured characteristics. Consequently, these traits may successfully distinguish between species. Fecundity data also allowed us to develop models that accurately estimated the number of eggs per clutch for each species based on clutch dimensions. We tested one, two and three dimensional models of clutches, including rendering a clutch as either a complete ellipsoid or an ellipsoid intersected by a cylinder to represent the oviposition site. Model comparisons found the product of length and depth, with a different function for each population, best predicted egg number for both species. Comparisons of egg number to clutch volume and mass implied non-native P. canaliculata may be food limited, while non-native P. maculata appeared to produce such enormous clutches by having access to greater nutrients than the native population. With these new tools, researchers and

  4. Fungal and bacterial contributions to nitrogen cycling in cheatgrass-invaded and uninvaded native sagebrush soils of the western USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCrappeo, Nicole; DeLorenze, Elizabeth J.; Giguere, Andrew T; Pyke, David A.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    AimThere is interest in determining how cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) modifies N cycling in sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) soils of the western USA.MethodsTo gain insight into the roles of fungi and bacteria in N cycling of cheatgrass-invaded and uninvaded sagebrush soils, the fungal protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (CHX), and the bacteriocidal compound, bronopol (BRO) were combined with a 15NH4+ isotope pool dilution approach.ResultsCHX reduced gross N mineralization to the same rate in both sagebrush and cheatgrass soils indicating a role for fungi in N mineralization in both soil types. In cheatgrass soils BRO completely inhibited gross N mineralization, whereas, in sagebrush soils a BRO-resistant gross N mineralization rate was detected that was slower than CHX sensitive gross N mineralization, suggesting that the microbial drivers of gross N mineralization were different in sagebrush and cheatgrass soils. Net N mineralization was stimulated to a higher rate in sagebrush than in cheatgrass soils by CHX, implying that a CHX inhibited N sink was larger in the former than the latter soils. Initial gross NH4+ consumption rates were reduced significantly by both CHX and BRO in both soil types, yet, consumption rates recovered significantly between 24 and 48 h in CHX-treated sagebrush soils. The recovery of NH4+ consumption in sagebrush soils corresponded with an increase in the rate of net nitrification.ConclusionsThese results suggest that cheatgrass invasion of sagebrush soils of the northern Great Basin reduces the capacity of the fungal N consumption sink, enhances the capacity of a CHX resistant N sink and alters the contributions of bacteria and fungi to gross N mineralization.

  5. A novel pre-clinical in vivo mouse model for malignant brain tumor growth and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Laura M; Mukherjee, Purna; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; Urits, Ivan; Rosenberg, Joshua A; Seyfried, Thomas N

    2010-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a rapidly progressive disease of morbidity and mortality and is the most common form of primary brain cancer in adults. Lack of appropriate in vivo models has been a major roadblock to developing effective therapies for GBM. A new highly invasive in vivo GBM model is described that was derived from a spontaneous brain tumor (VM-M3) in the VM mouse strain. Highly invasive tumor cells could be identified histologically on the hemisphere contralateral to the hemisphere implanted with tumor cells or tissue. Tumor cells were highly expressive for the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and the proliferation marker Ki-67 and could be identified invading through the pia mater, the vascular system, the ventricular system, around neurons, and over white matter tracts including the corpus callosum. In addition, the brain tumor cells were labeled with the firefly luciferase gene, allowing for non-invasive detection and quantitation through bioluminescent imaging. The VM-M3 tumor has a short incubation time with mortality occurring in 100% of the animals within approximately 15 days. The VM-M3 brain tumor model therefore can be used in a pre-clinical setting for the rapid evaluation of novel anti-invasive therapies.

  6. Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor in a Teenager with Unusual Infiltration Into the Jugular Foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaka, Yoko T; Yoon, Janet M; Malicki, Denise M; Khanna, Paritosh C; Levy, Michael L; Crawford, John R

    2015-12-01

    Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor is a rare malignant neoplasm that represents 1%-2% of all pediatric central nervous system tumors. Immunohistochemistry plays an important role in establishing the diagnosis with a loss of INI-1 staining in tumor cells. In this case report, we describe a teenager with an unusual presentation and pattern of infiltration of the tumor. A 13-year-old boy presented with a history over several months of progressive nausea, weight loss, and hoarseness of voice associated with multiple lower cranial nerve palsies on neurologic examination. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large heterogeneously enhancing extra-axial neoplasm with extension and bony expansion of the jugular foramen. After near total resection, neuropathology demonstrated the absence of INI-1 expression consistent with a diagnosis of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor. This case highlights the diverse clinical presentation and infiltrative potential of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors, thus expanding the differential diagnosis of extra-axial tumors invading the jugular foramen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Do species differ in their ability to coexist with the dominant alien Lupinus polyphyllus? A comparison between two distinct invaded ranges and a native range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hejda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The community-level impacts of invasive plants are likely to vary depending on the character of native species of the target communities and their ability to thrive within the stands of the dominant alien invader. Therefore, I examined the response of native species richness to the cover of the dominant alien Lupinus polyphyllus in two distinct invaded ranges: Czech Republic (Central Europe and New Zealand. I compared the relation between native species richness and the cover of the dominant alien L. polyphyllus with that in its native range, Pacific Northwest, USA.In the native range, I found no response of native species richness to the cover of L. polyphyllus. In the Czech Republic (central Europe, the richness of native species related to it negativelly, but the relation was only marginally significant. Contrary to that, the richness of species native to New Zealand related to the cover of L. polyphyllus strongly negatively and the negative relation was significantly stronger than that of species native to Europe.Of the two invaded ranges, species native to New Zealand have been documented to be much more vulnerable to the conditions associated with the invasion and dominance of L. polyphyllus, compared to species native to central Europe. This principle has been shown both across these two invaded ranges and in New Zealand, where the aliens of european origin successfully coexist with the dominant invasive alien L. polyphyllus. Similarly, species in the native range of L. polyphyllus showed no relation to its cover, indicating their ability to thrive even in dense stands of this dominant species.

  8. One-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection of T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Seijiro; Goto, Tatsuya; Koike, Terumoto; Okamoto, Takeshi; Shoji, Hirokazu; Ohashi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Kei; Tsuchida, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy of one-stage surgery in combination with thoracic endovascular grafting and resection for T4 lung cancer invading the thoracic aorta and spine is described. A 56-year-old man with loca