WorldWideScience

Sample records for tubular geometries modeling

  1. Ambient Occlusion Effects for Combined Volumes and Tubular Geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper details a method for interactive direct volume rendering that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube-shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The algorithm extends the recently presented the directional occlusion shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. Stream tube geometries are computed using an effective spline-based interpolation and approximation scheme that avoids self-intersection and maintains coherent orientation of the stream tube segments to avoid surface deforming twists. Furthermore, strategies to reduce the geometric and specular aliasing of the stream tubes are discussed.

  2. Ambient Occlusion Effects for Combined Volumes and Tubular Geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, M.; Martin, T.; Grosset, A. V. P.; Smith, S. T.; Hansen, C. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper details a method for interactive direct volume rendering that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube-shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The algorithm extends the recently presented the directional occlusion shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. Stream tube geometries are computed using an effective spline-based interpolation and approximation scheme that avoids self-intersection and maintains coherent orientation of the stream tube segments to avoid surface deforming twists. Furthermore, strategies to reduce the geometric and specular aliasing of the stream tubes are discussed.

  3. Mechanical testing of adherence of stacked layers in tubular geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correia, L.A.; Schuring, E.W.; Van Delft, Y.C. [ECN Energy Efficiency in the Industry, Petten (Netherlands)

    2007-09-15

    For the development of new molecular separation technologies strong robust tubular membrane systems are required. The fragile membranes, however, need a strong defect free support such as a porous asymmetric ceramic tube. Mechanical failure of these ceramic membrane systems during manufacturing and operation is mainly caused by delamination of the stacked layers. Therefore development is focused on improving the adherence. As no standard mechanical test for tubular samples is available yet, a new tensile test was developed to facilitate the current research. The most important components in the new equipment is a test tool with a curvature matching that of the test sample and a sample casing that align and guide the test tool during the tensile test. With this tensile test the manufacturing procedure for the ECN standard tubular {alpha}-alumina support was optimized. Firing the asymmetric support at 1300C resulted in the highest mechanical strength for the support system with cohesive fracture in the support tube. With the test developed the process condition could be identified where the material of the support tube is the weakest link in the support system.

  4. VALIDATION OF SIMULATION MODELS FOR DIFFERENTLY DESIGNED HEAT-PIPE EVACUATED TUBULAR COLLECTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Jianhua; Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2007-01-01

    Differently designed heat-pipe evacuated tubular collectors have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical work has included development of two TRNSYS [1] simulation models for heat-pipe evacuated tubular collectors utilizing solar radiation from all directions. One model...... coating on both sides. The input to the models is thus not a simple collector efficiency expression but the actual collector geometry. In this study, the TRNSYS models are validated with measurements for four differently designed heat-pipe evacuated tubular collectors. The collectors are produced...

  5. Influence of Steam Reforming Catalyst Geometry on the Performance of Tubular Reformer – Simulation Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franczyk Ewelina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A proper selection of steam reforming catalyst geometry has a direct effect on the efficiency and economy of hydrogen production from natural gas and is a very important technological and engineering issue in terms of process optimisation. This paper determines the influence of widely used seven-hole grain diameter (ranging from 11 to 21 mm, h/d (height/diameter ratio of catalyst grain and Sh/St (hole surface/total cylinder surface in cross-section ratio (ranging from 0.13 to 0.37 on the gas load of catalyst bed, gas flow resistance, maximum wall temperature and the risk of catalyst coking. Calculations were based on the one-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of a steam reforming tubular reactor, with catalyst parameters derived from our investigations. The process analysis shows that it is advantageous, along the whole reformer tube length, to apply catalyst forms of h/d = 1 ratio, relatively large dimensions, possibly high bed porosity and Sh/St ≈ 0.30-0.37 ratio. It enables a considerable process intensification and the processing of more natural gas at the same flow resistance, despite lower bed activity, without catalyst coking risk. Alternatively, plant pressure drop can be reduced maintaining the same gas load, which translates directly into diminishing the operating costs as a result of lowering power consumption for gas compression.

  6. Dynamics of catalytic tubular microjet engines: dependence on geometry and chemical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Huang, Gaoshan; Ye, Mengmeng; Li, Menglin; Liu, Ran; Mei, Yongfeng

    2011-12-01

    Strain-engineered tubular microjet engines with various geometric dimensions hold interesting autonomous motions in an aqueous fuel solution when propelled by catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. The catalytically-generated oxygen bubbles expelled from microtubular cavities propel the microjet step by step in discrete increments. We focus on the dynamics of our tubular microjets in one step and build up a body deformation model to elucidate the interaction between tubular microjets and the bubbles they produce. The average microjet velocity is calculated analytically based on our model and the obtained results demonstrate that the velocity of the microjet increases linearly with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. The geometric dimensions of the microjet, such as length and radius, also influence its dynamic characteristics significantly. A close consistency between experimental and calculated results is achieved despite a small deviation due to the existence of an approximation in the model. The results presented in this work improve our understanding regarding catalytic motions of tubular microjets and demonstrate the controllability of the microjet which may have potential applications in drug delivery and biology.

  7. A Lagrangian cylindrical coordinate system for characterizing dynamic surface geometry of tubular anatomic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, Torbjörn; Suh, Ga-Young; DiGiacomo, Phillip; Cheng, Christopher

    2018-03-03

    Vascular morphology characterization is useful for disease diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment planning, and prediction of treatment durability. To quantify the dynamic surface geometry of tubular-shaped anatomic structures, we propose a simple, rigorous Lagrangian cylindrical coordinate system to monitor well-defined surface points. Specifically, the proposed system enables quantification of surface curvature and cross-sectional eccentricity. Using idealized software phantom examples, we validate the method's ability to accurately quantify longitudinal and circumferential surface curvature, as well as eccentricity and orientation of eccentricity. We then apply the method to several medical imaging data sets of human vascular structures to exemplify the utility of this coordinate system for analyzing morphology and dynamic geometric changes in blood vessels throughout the body. Graphical abstract Pointwise longitudinal curvature of a thoracic aortic endograft surface for systole and diastole, with their absolute difference.

  8. Modeling constrained sintering of bi-layered tubular structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadesse Molla, Tesfaye; Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan; Ni, De Wei

    2015-01-01

    Constrained sintering of tubular bi-layered structures is being used in the development of various technologies. Densification mismatch between the layers making the tubular bi-layer can generate stresses, which may create processing defects. An analytical model is presented to describe the densi...... and thermo-mechanical analysis. Results from the analytical model are found to agree well with finite element simulations as well as measurements from sintering experiment....

  9. MODELING OF TUBULAR ELECTROCHEMICAL REACTOR FOR DYE REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. VIJAYAKUMAR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present investigation is to model a tubular electrochemical reactor for the treatment of synthetic dye wastewater. The tubular reactor was modeled and solved by finite difference method. For the model solution, the column was divided into 11 nodes in the axial direction and the variation in the radial direction has been neglected. An initial dye concentration of 200 mg L-1was taken in the reservoir. The reactor was operated in a batch with recirculation operation. Based on preliminary experiments all parameters have been optimized. The model simulation is compared with the experimental value and it is observed that the model fairly matches well with the experiment. The modeling of tubular electrochemical reactors for dye waste water treatment could be useful in the design and scale up of electrochemical process.

  10. Modeling of heat transfer in wall-cooled tubular reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, G.W.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1999-01-01

    In a pilot scale wall-cooled tubular reactor, temperature profiles have been measured with and without reaction. As a model reaction oxidation of carbon monoxide in air over a copper chromite catalyst has been used. The kinetics of this reaction have been determined separately in two kinetic

  11. Modeling of Unidirectional-Overloaded Transition in Catalytic Tubular Microjets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klingner, Anke; Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Fomin, Vladimir M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Misra, Sarthak

    2017-01-01

    A numerical time-resolved model is presented for predicting the transition between unidirectional and overloaded motion of catalytic tubular microjets (Ti/Fe/Pt rolled-up microtubes) in an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. Unidirectional movement is achieved by periodic ejection of gas bubbles

  12. Stochastic Modelling of River Geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Schaarup-Jensen, K.

    1996-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamic river models are used in a large number of applications to estimate critical events for rivers. These estimates are subject to a number of uncertainties. In this paper, the problem to evaluate these estimates using probabilistic methods is considered. Stochastic models for ...... for river geometries are formulated and a coupling between hydraulic computational methods and numerical reliability methods is presented....

  13. Thermodynamic model and parametric analysis of a tubular SOFC module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanari, Stefano

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been considered in the last years as one of the most promising technologies for very high-efficiency electric energy generation from natural gas, both with simple fuel cell plants and with integrated gas turbine-fuel cell systems. Among the SOFC technologies, tubular SOFC stacks with internal reforming have emerged as one of the most mature technology, with a serious potential for a future commercialization. In this paper, a thermodynamic model of a tubular SOFC stack, with natural gas feeding, internal reforming of hydrocarbons and internal air preheating is proposed. In the first section of the paper, the model is discussed in detail, analyzing its calculating equations and tracing its logical steps; the model is then calibrated on the available data for a recently demonstrated tubular SOFC prototype plant. In the second section of the paper, it is carried out a detailed parametric analysis of the stack working conditions, as a function of the main operating parameters. The discussion of the results of the thermodynamic and parametric analysis yields interesting considerations about partial load SOFC operation and load regulation, and about system design and integration with gas turbine cycles.

  14. Tubular combustion

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    Tubular combustors are cylindrical tubes where flame ignition and propagation occur in a spatially confined, highly controlled environment, in a nearly flat, elongated geometry. This allows for some unique advantages where extremely even heat dispersion is required over a large surface while still maintaining fuel efficiency. Tubular combustors also allow for easy flexibility in type of fuel source, allowing for quick changeover to meet various needs and changing fuel pricing. This new addition to the MP sustainable energy series will provide the most up-to-date research on tubular combustion--some of it only now coming out of private proprietary protection. Plentiful examples of current applications along with a good explanation of background theory will offer readers an invaluable guide on this promising energy technology. Highlights include: * An introduction to the theory of tubular flames * The "how to" of maintaining stability of tubular flames through continuous combustion * Examples of both small-scal...

  15. Experimental investigations and modeling of direct internal reforming of biogases in tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanzini, A.; Leone, P.; Pieroni, M.; Santarelli, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, IT-10129, Torino (Italy); Beretta, D.; Ginocchio, S. [Centro Ricerca e Sviluppo, Edison S.p.a, Via La Pira 2, IT-10028 Trofarello, Torino (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Biogas-fed Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) systems can be considered as interesting integrated systems in the framework of distributed power generation. In particular, bio-methane and bio-hydrogen produced from anaerobic digestion of organic wastes represent renewable carbon-neutral fuels for high efficiency electrochemical generators. With such non-conventional mixtures fed to the anode of the SOFC, the interest lies in understanding the multi-physics phenomena there occurring and optimizing the geometric and operation parameters of the SOFC, while avoiding operating and fuel conditions that can lead to or accelerate degradation processes. In this study, an anode-supported (Ni-YSZ) tubular SOFC was considered; the tubular geometry enables a relatively easy separation of the air and fuel reactants and it allows one to evaluate the temperature field of the fuel gas inside the tube, which is strictly related to the electrochemical and heterogeneous chemical reactions occurring within the anode volume. The experiments have been designed to analyze the behavior of the cell under different load and fuel utilization (FU) conditions, providing efficiency maps for both fuels. The experimental results were used to validate a multi-physics model of the tubular cell. The model showed to be in good agreement with the experimental data, and was used to study the sensitive of some selected geometrical parameters modification over the cell performances. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Tropical geometry of statistical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachter, Lior; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2004-11-16

    This article presents a unified mathematical framework for inference in graphical models, building on the observation that graphical models are algebraic varieties. From this geometric viewpoint, observations generated from a model are coordinates of a point in the variety, and the sum-product algorithm is an efficient tool for evaluating specific coordinates. Here, we address the question of how the solutions to various inference problems depend on the model parameters. The proposed answer is expressed in terms of tropical algebraic geometry. The Newton polytope of a statistical model plays a key role. Our results are applied to the hidden Markov model and the general Markov model on a binary tree.

  17. Dynamic modeling of temperature change in outdoor operated tubular photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androga, Dominic Deo; Uyar, Basar; Koku, Harun; Eroglu, Inci

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional transient model was developed to analyze the temperature variation of tubular photobioreactors operated outdoors and the validity of the model was tested by comparing the predictions of the model with the experimental data. The model included the effects of convection and radiative heat exchange on the reactor temperature throughout the day. The temperatures in the reactors increased with increasing solar radiation and air temperatures, and the predicted reactor temperatures corresponded well to the measured experimental values. The heat transferred to the reactor was mainly through radiation: the radiative heat absorbed by the reactor medium, ground radiation, air radiation, and solar (direct and diffuse) radiation, while heat loss was mainly through the heat transfer to the cooling water and forced convection. The amount of heat transferred by reflected radiation and metabolic activities of the bacteria and pump work was negligible. Counter-current cooling was more effective in controlling reactor temperature than co-current cooling. The model developed identifies major heat transfer mechanisms in outdoor operated tubular photobioreactors, and accurately predicts temperature changes in these systems. This is useful in determining cooling duty under transient conditions and scaling up photobioreactors. The photobioreactor design and the thermal modeling were carried out and experimental results obtained for the case study of photofermentative hydrogen production by Rhodobacter capsulatus, but the approach is applicable to photobiological systems that are to be operated under outdoor conditions with significant cooling demands.

  18. Mechanistic modelling of a cathode-supported tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanwarangkul, R.; Croiset, E.; Pritzker, M. D.; Fowler, M. W.; Douglas, P. L.; Entchev, E.

    A two-dimensional mechanistic model of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) considering momentum, energy, mass and charge transport is developed. The model geometry of a single cell comprises an air-preheating tube, air channel, fuel channel, anode, cathode and electrolyte layers. The heat radiation between cell and air-preheating tube is also incorporated into the model. This allows the model to predict heat transfer between the cell and air-preheating tube accurately. The model is validated and shows good agreement with literature data. It is anticipated that this model can be used to help develop efficient fuel cell designs and set operating variables under practical conditions. The transport phenomena inside the cell, including gas flow behaviour, temperature, overpotential, current density and species concentration, are analysed and discussed in detail. Fuel and air velocities are found to vary along flow passages depending on the local temperature and species concentrations. This model demonstrates the importance of incorporating heat radiation into a tubular SOFC model. Furthermore, the model shows that the overall cell performance is limited by O 2 diffusion through the thick porous cathode and points to the development of new cathode materials and designs being important avenues to enhance cell performance.

  19. Differential Geometry Based Multiscale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atom-istic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier–Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson–Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson–Nernst–Planck equations that

  20. Differential geometry based multiscale models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Guo-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Large chemical and biological systems such as fuel cells, ion channels, molecular motors, and viruses are of great importance to the scientific community and public health. Typically, these complex systems in conjunction with their aquatic environment pose a fabulous challenge to theoretical description, simulation, and prediction. In this work, we propose a differential geometry based multiscale paradigm to model complex macromolecular systems, and to put macroscopic and microscopic descriptions on an equal footing. In our approach, the differential geometry theory of surfaces and geometric measure theory are employed as a natural means to couple the macroscopic continuum mechanical description of the aquatic environment with the microscopic discrete atomistic description of the macromolecule. Multiscale free energy functionals, or multiscale action functionals are constructed as a unified framework to derive the governing equations for the dynamics of different scales and different descriptions. Two types of aqueous macromolecular complexes, ones that are near equilibrium and others that are far from equilibrium, are considered in our formulations. We show that generalized Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid dynamics, generalized Poisson equations or generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equations for electrostatic interactions, and Newton's equation for the molecular dynamics can be derived by the least action principle. These equations are coupled through the continuum-discrete interface whose dynamics is governed by potential driven geometric flows. Comparison is given to classical descriptions of the fluid and electrostatic interactions without geometric flow based micro-macro interfaces. The detailed balance of forces is emphasized in the present work. We further extend the proposed multiscale paradigm to micro-macro analysis of electrohydrodynamics, electrophoresis, fuel cells, and ion channels. We derive generalized Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations that are

  1. Mathematical modeling of methyl ester concentration distribution in a continuous membrane tubular reactor and comparison with conventional tubular reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaghat, M. R.; Jokar, S. M.; Modarres, E.

    2017-10-01

    The reduction of fossil fuel resources and environmental issues made researchers find alternative fuels include biodiesels. One of the most widely used methods for production of biodiesel on a commercial scale is transesterification method. In this work, the biodiesel production by a transesterification method was modeled. Sodium hydroxide was considered as a catalyst to produce biodiesel from canola oil and methanol in a continuous tubular ceramic membranes reactor. As the Biodiesel production reaction from triglycerides is an equilibrium reaction, the reaction rate constants depend on temperature and related linearly to catalyst concentration. By using the mass balance for a membrane tubular reactor and considering the variation of raw materials and products concentration with time, the set of governing equations were solved by numerical methods. The results clearly show the superiority of membrane reactor than conventional tubular reactors. Afterward, the influences of molar ratio of alcohol to oil, weight percentage of the catalyst, and residence time on the performance of biodiesel production reactor were investigated.

  2. Surrogate Modeling for Geometry Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas Larrazabal, Marielba de la Caridad; Abraham, Yonas; Holzwarth, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used.......A new approach for optimizing the nuclear geometry of an atomic system is described. Instead of the original expensive objective function (energy functional), a small number of simpler surrogates is used....

  3. Performance evaluation of two solar stills of different geometries: Tubular versus triangular: Experimental study, numerical simulation, and second law analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbar, Nader; Asadi, Amin; Fotouhi-Bafghi, Ehsan

    2018-01-01

    In this study, two types of solar stills, triangular and tubular one, have been experimentally tested under a real weather condition. Following the same procedure, the experiments were carried out over seven typical winter days and the effects of solar radiation and ambient temperature on water...... are the main reasons to have a better water production in the tubular still. Furthermore, the cost of water production by the triangular solar still was found to be lower due to its lower manufacturing cost compare to that of tubular one. Based on the experimental results, two new correlations have been...... productivity and total efficiency of the stills has been experimentally investigated. Furthuremore, to understand the detail structures of the air flow inside the enclosures, the fluid flow has been numerically simulated using computational fluid dynamics. Having the details of the fluid flow, the values...

  4. Differential geometry in string models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, O.

    1986-01-01

    In this article the author reviews the differential geometric approach to the quantization of strings. A seminal paper demonstrates the connection between the trace anomaly and the critical dimension. The role played by the Faddeev-Popov ghosts has been instrumental in much of the subsequent work on the quantization of strings. This paper discusses the differential geometry of two dimensional surfaces and its importance in the quantization of strings. The path integral quantization approach to strings will be carefully analyzed to determine the correct effective measure for string theories. The choice of measure for the path integral is determined by differential geometric considerations. Once the measure is determined, the manifest diffeomorphism invariance of the theory will have to be broken by using the Faddeev-Popov ansatz. The gauge fixed theory is studied in detail with emphasis on the role of conformal and gravitational anomalies. In the analysis, the path integral formulation of the gauge fixed theory requires summing over all the distinct complex structures on the manifold

  5. Modelling Particulate Removal in Tubular Wet Electrostatic Precipitators Using a Modified Drift Flux Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ramechecandane

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tubular electrostatic precipitators (ESP have been used in a number of chemical processing industries. The tubular ESPs have many advantages over conventional plate-plate and wire-plate ESPs. The present study is concerned with the numerical modeling of particulate removal in a tubular wet single-stage electrostatic precipitator (wESP. The geometric parameters of a model wESP and the corresponding inlet gas velocities for the wESP are chosen from available experimental data. In addition to the RNG k - ε model for the mean turbulent flow field inside the wESP, the Poisson equation for the electric field, the charge continuity equation and the concentration equation are solved sequentially to obtain a full-fledged solution to the problem under investigation. The proposed drift flux model is implemented in the opensource CFD code OpenFOAM®. The paper discusses the influence of the number of charges acquired by the particles and the corresponding inlet gas velocities on particle concentration distribution within the wESP. Two representative cases with monodispersed particles of 1 μm and 10 μm diameter are considered for the numerical analysis. It is seen from the present analysis that the number of units of charge on particles, the particle size and the inlet gas velocities play a vital role in determining the efficiency of electrostatic precipitation.

  6. The choice between cooled tubular reactor models: analysis of the hot spot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerink, E.J.; Koster, N.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    The applicability of the one-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of the cooled tubular reactor is studied. Using the two-dimensional model as the more accurate one we compared both models by studying the influence of the design and operating variables on the conditions in the hot spot of the

  7. Dynamic model of a micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack including an integrated cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hering, Martin; Brouwer, Jacob; Winkler, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    A novel dynamic micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (MT-SOFC) and stack model including an integrated cooling system is developed using a quasi three-dimensional, spatially resolved, transient thermodynamic, physical and electrochemical model that accounts for the complex geometrical relations between the cells and cooling-tubes. The modeling approach includes a simplified tubular geometry and stack design including an integrated cooling structure, detailed pressure drop and gas property calculations, the electrical and physical constraints of the stack design that determine the current, as well as control strategies for the temperature. Moreover, an advanced heat transfer balance with detailed radiative heat transfer between the cells and the integrated cooling-tubes, convective heat transfer between the gas flows and the surrounding structures and conductive heat transfer between the solid structures inside of the stack, is included. The detailed model can be used as a design basis for the novel MT-SOFC stack assembly including an integrated cooling system, as well as for the development of a dynamic system control strategy. The evaluated best-case design achieves very high electrical efficiency between around 75 and 55% in the entire power density range between 50 and 550 mW /cm2 due to the novel stack design comprising an integrated cooling structure.

  8. Parameterized combinatorial geometry modeling in Moritz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Riper, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    We describe the use of named variables as surface and solid body coefficients in the Moritz geometry editing program. Variables can also be used as material numbers, cell densities, and transformation values. A variable is defined as a constant or an arithmetic combination of constants and other variables. A variable reference, such as in a surface coefficient, can be a single variable or an expression containing variables and constants. Moritz can read and write geometry models in MCNP and ITS ACCEPT format; support for other codes will be added. The geometry can be saved with either the variables in place, for modifying the models in Moritz, or with the variables evaluated for use in the transport codes. A program window shows a list of variables and provides fields for editing them. Surface coefficients and other values that use a variable reference are shown in a distinctive style on object property dialogs; associated buttons show fields for editing the reference. We discuss our use of variables in defining geometry models for shielding studies in PET clinics. When a model is parameterized through the use of variables, changes such as room dimensions, shielding layer widths, and cell compositions can be quickly achieved by changing a few numbers without requiring knowledge of the input syntax for the transport code or the tedious and error prone work of recalculating many surface or solid body coefficients. (author)

  9. A quantitative model of the cardiac ventricular cell incorporating the transverse-axial tubular system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pásek, Michal; Christé, G.; Šimurda, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2003), s. 355-368 ISSN 0231-5882 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/02/D129 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2076919 Keywords : cardiac cell * tubular system * quantitative modelling Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 0.794, year: 2003

  10. Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Sossinsky, A B

    2012-01-01

    The book is an innovative modern exposition of geometry, or rather, of geometries; it is the first textbook in which Felix Klein's Erlangen Program (the action of transformation groups) is systematically used as the basis for defining various geometries. The course of study presented is dedicated to the proposition that all geometries are created equal--although some, of course, remain more equal than others. The author concentrates on several of the more distinguished and beautiful ones, which include what he terms "toy geometries", the geometries of Platonic bodies, discrete geometries, and classical continuous geometries. The text is based on first-year semester course lectures delivered at the Independent University of Moscow in 2003 and 2006. It is by no means a formal algebraic or analytic treatment of geometric topics, but rather, a highly visual exposition containing upwards of 200 illustrations. The reader is expected to possess a familiarity with elementary Euclidean geometry, albeit those lacking t...

  11. Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . In the previous article we looked at the origins of synthetic and analytic geometry. More practical minded people, the builders and navigators, were studying two other aspects of geometry- trigonometry and integral calculus. These are actually ...

  12. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF PREFERED SOLUTIONS CHOICE FUNCTION FOR TUBULAR GAS HEATERS BY EXPERIMENTAL INFORMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARSUK R. V.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Annotation. Problems formulation. The article deals with choice functions building of preferred solutions by experimental information for tubular gas heater working on fuel granules - pellets.Further choice functions using for making technical solutions by tubular gas heaters construction and designing. Recently research analysis. There are works about choice functions construction by separate presents are examined. But full chose functions building by separate presents are not examined. Aims and tasks. There are setting aim to develop full choice functions mathematical model on separate presents by authors. The expert are connect to primary experimental data’s evaluation that estimates separate results by output functions (criteria. Its evaluations issue in experimental points paired comparison’s table form. Thus, there are necessary construct binary choice relations presents on experimental “points” set by expert that then using for full choice function’s constructing. Conclusions. There are choice function’s construction’s sequence are sets. There are posed point comparison results that characterized tubular gas heater’s condition with expert’s evaluation using. Also posed output functions comparisons by which can be characterized improving tubular gas heater’s performance or vice versa.

  13. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Prasolov, V V

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a systematic introduction to various geometries, including Euclidean, affine, projective, spherical, and hyperbolic geometries. Also included is a chapter on infinite-dimensional generalizations of Euclidean and affine geometries. A uniform approach to different geometries, based on Klein's Erlangen Program is suggested, and similarities of various phenomena in all geometries are traced. An important notion of duality of geometric objects is highlighted throughout the book. The authors also include a detailed presentation of the theory of conics and quadrics, including the theory of conics for non-Euclidean geometries. The book contains many beautiful geometric facts and has plenty of problems, most of them with solutions, which nicely supplement the main text. With more than 150 figures illustrating the arguments, the book can be recommended as a textbook for undergraduate and graduate-level courses in geometry.

  14. Modelling of alcohol fermentation in a tubular reactor with high biomass recycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narodoslawsky, M; Mittmannsgruber, H; Nagl, W; Moser, A

    1988-05-30

    Fermentation in tubular recycle reactors with high biomass concentrations is a way to boost productivity in alcohol production. A computer model has been developed to investigate the potential as well as to establish the limits of this process from a chemical engineering point of view. The model takes into account the kinetics of the reaction, the nonideality of flow and the segregation in the bioreactor. In accordance with literature, it is shown that tubular reactors with biomass recycle can improve productivity of alcohol fermentation substantially. With the help of the computer based reactor model it was also possible to estimate the detrimental effects of cell damage due to pumping. These effects are shown to play a major role, if the biomass separation is performed by filtration units which need high flow rates, e.g. tangential flow filters.

  15. A Mathematical Model of Renal Blood Distribution Coupling TGF, MR and Tubular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Ci-xiu; YANG Lin; WANG Ke-qiang; XU Shi-xiong; DAI Pei-dong

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the relationship between renal blood distribution and the physiological activities of the kidney. Methods:A mathematical model is developed based on Hagan-Poiseuille law and mass transport, coupling mechanics of myogenic response (MR), tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF) and the tubular system in the renal medulla. The model parameters, including the permeability coefficients, the vascular lumen radius and the solute concentration at the inlet of the tubes, are derived from the experimental results. Simulations of the blood and water flow in the loop of Henel, the collecting duct and vas rectum, are carried out by the model of the tubular system in the renal medulla, based on conservations of water and solutes for transmural transport. Then the tubular model is coupled with MR and TGF mechanics. Results:The results predict the dynamics of renal autoregulation on its blood pressure and flow,and the distributions are 88.5% in the cortex, 10.3% in the medulla, and 1.2% at papilla,respectively. The fluid flow and solute concentrations along the tubules and vasa recta are obtained. Conclusion:The present model could assess renal functions qualitatively and quantitatively and provide a methodological approach for clinical research.

  16. Computational algebraic geometry of epidemic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Vega, Martín.

    2014-06-01

    Computational Algebraic Geometry is applied to the analysis of various epidemic models for Schistosomiasis and Dengue, both, for the case without control measures and for the case where control measures are applied. The models were analyzed using the mathematical software Maple. Explicitly the analysis is performed using Groebner basis, Hilbert dimension and Hilbert polynomials. These computational tools are included automatically in Maple. Each of these models is represented by a system of ordinary differential equations, and for each model the basic reproductive number (R0) is calculated. The effects of the control measures are observed by the changes in the algebraic structure of R0, the changes in Groebner basis, the changes in Hilbert dimension, and the changes in Hilbert polynomials. It is hoped that the results obtained in this paper become of importance for designing control measures against the epidemic diseases described. For future researches it is proposed the use of algebraic epidemiology to analyze models for airborne and waterborne diseases.

  17. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiko Ishida

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy, autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the

  18. Thermal radiation modelling in a tubular solid oxide fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Austin, M.E.; Pharoah, J.G.; Vandersteen, J.D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) are becoming the fuel cell of choice among companies and research groups interested in small power generation units. Questions still exist, however, about the operating characteristics of these devices; in particular the temperature distribution in the fuel cell. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) a model is proposed that incorporates conduction, convection and radiation. Both surface-to-surface and participating media are considered. It is hoped that a more accurate account of the temperature field in the various flow channels and cell components will be made to assist work on design of fuel cell components and reaction mechanisms. The model, when incorporating radiative heat transfer with participating media, predicts substantially lower operating temperatures and smaller temperature gradients than it does without these equations. It also shows the importance of the cathode air channel in cell cooling. (author)

  19. High-fidelity stack and system modeling for tubular solid oxide fuel cell system design and thermal management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattke, K. J.; Braun, R. J.; Colclasure, A. M.; Goldin, G.

    Effective thermal integration of system components is critical to the performance of small-scale (design and simulation tool for a highly-integrated tubular SOFC system. The SOFC is modeled using a high fidelity, one-dimensional tube model coupled to a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Recuperative heat exchange between SOFC tail-gas and inlet cathode air and reformer air/fuel preheat processes are captured within the CFD model. Quasi one-dimensional thermal resistance models of the tail-gas combustor (TGC) and catalytic partial oxidation (CPOx) complete the balance of plant (BoP) and SOFC coupling. The simulation tool is demonstrated on a prototype 66-tube SOFC system with 650 W of nominal gross power. Stack cooling predominately occurs at the external surface of the tubes where radiation accounts for 66-92% of heat transfer. A strong relationship develops between the power output of a tube and its view factor to the relatively cold cylinder wall surrounding the bundle. The bundle geometry yields seven view factor groupings which correspond to seven power groupings with tube powers ranging from 7.6-10.8 W. Furthermore, the low effectiveness of the co-flow recuperator contributes to lower tube powers at the bundle outer periphery.

  20. Modelling and simulation of a pervaporation process using tubular module for production of anhydrous ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieu, Nguyen Huu

    2017-09-01

    Pervaporation is a potential process for the final step of ethanol biofuel production. In this study, a mathematical model was developed based on the resistance-in-series model and a simulation was carried out using the specialized simulation software COMSOL Multiphysics to describe a tubular type pervaporation module with membranes for the dehydration of ethanol solution. The permeance of membranes, operating conditions, and feed conditions in the simulation were referred from experimental data reported previously in literature. Accordingly, the simulated temperature and density profiles of pure water and ethanol-water mixture were validated based on existing published data.

  1. Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Pedoe, Dan

    1988-01-01

    ""A lucid and masterly survey."" - Mathematics Gazette Professor Pedoe is widely known as a fine teacher and a fine geometer. His abilities in both areas are clearly evident in this self-contained, well-written, and lucid introduction to the scope and methods of elementary geometry. It covers the geometry usually included in undergraduate courses in mathematics, except for the theory of convex sets. Based on a course given by the author for several years at the University of Minnesota, the main purpose of the book is to increase geometrical, and therefore mathematical, understanding and to he

  2. Analysis of mass transfer characteristics in a tubular membrane using CFD modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jixiang; Vedantam, Sreepriya; Spanjers, Henri; Nopens, Ingmar; van Lier, Jules B

    2012-10-01

    In contrast to the large amount of research into aerobic membrane bioreactors, little work has been reported on anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AMBRs). As to the application of membrane bioreactors, membrane fouling is a key issue. Membrane fouling generally occurs more seriously in AMBRs than in aerobic membrane bioreactors. However, membrane fouling could be managed through the application of suitable shear stress that can be introduced by the application of a two-phase flow. When the two-phase flow is applied in AMBRs, little is known about the mass transfer characteristics, which is of particular importance, in tubular membranes of AMBRs. In our present work, we have employed fluid dynamic modeling to analyze the mass transfer characteristics in the tubular membrane of a side stream AMBR in which, gas-lift two-phase flow was applied. The modeling indicated that the mass transfer capacity at the membrane surface at the noses of gas bubbles was higher than the mass transfer capacity at the tails of the bubbles, which is in contrast to the results when water instead of sludge is applied. At the given mass transfer rate, the filterability of the sludge was found to have a strong influence on the transmembrane pressure at a steady flux. In addition, the model also showed that the shear stress in the internal space of the tubular membrane was mainly around 20 Pa but could be as high as about 40 Pa due to gas bubble movements. Nonetheless, at these shear stresses a stable particle size distribution was found for sludge particles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Modeling and analysis of mover gaps in tubular moving-magnet linear oscillating motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong LUO

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A tubular moving-magnet linear oscillating motor (TMMLOM has merits of high efficiency and excellent dynamic capability. To enhance the thrust performance, quasi-Halbach permanent magnet (PM arrays are arranged on its mover in the application of a linear electro-hydrostatic actuator in more electric aircraft. The arrays are assembled by several individual segments, which lead to gaps between them inevitably. To investigate the effects of the gaps on the radial magnetic flux density and the machine thrust in this paper, an analytical model is built considering both axial and radial gaps. The model is validated by finite element simulations and experimental results. Distributions of the magnetic flux are described in condition of different sizes of radial and axial gaps. Besides, the output force is also discussed in normal and end windings. Finally, the model has demonstrated that both kinds of gaps have a negative effect on the thrust, and the linear motor is more sensitive to radial ones. Keywords: Air-gap flux density, Linear motor, Mover gaps, Quasi-Halbach array, Thrust output, Tubular moving-magnet linear oscillating motor (TMMLOM

  4. A Statistical Model for Synthesis of Detailed Facial Geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Golovinskiy, Aleksey; Matusik, Wojciech; Pfister, Hanspeter; Rusinkiewicz, Szymon; Funkhouser, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Detailed surface geometry contributes greatly to the visual realism of 3D face models. However, acquiring high-resolution face geometry is often tedious and expensive. Consequently, most face models used in games, virtual reality, or computer vision look unrealistically smooth. In this paper, we introduce a new statistical technique for the analysis and synthesis of small three-dimensional facial features, such as wrinkles and pores. We acquire high-resolution face geometry for people across ...

  5. The VSEPR model of molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gillespie, Ronald J

    2012-01-01

    Valence Shell Electron Pair Repulsion (VSEPR) theory is a simple technique for predicting the geometry of atomic centers in small molecules and molecular ions. This authoritative reference was written by Istvan Hartiggai and the developer of VSEPR theory, Ronald J. Gillespie. In addition to its value as a text for courses in molecular geometry and chemistry, it constitutes a classic reference for professionals.Starting with coverage of the broader aspects of VSEPR, this volume narrows its focus to a succinct survey of the methods of structural determination. Additional topics include the appli

  6. Stages As Models of Scene Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nedović, V.; Smeulders, A.W.M.; Redert, A.; Geusebroek, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Reconstruction of 3D scene geometry is an important element for scene understanding, autonomous vehicle and robot navigation, image retrieval, and 3D television. We propose accounting for the inherent structure of the visual world when trying to solve the scene reconstruction problem. Consequently,

  7. Stages as models of scene geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedović, Vladimir; Smeulders, Arnold W M; Redert, André; Geusebroek, Jan-Mark

    2010-09-01

    Reconstruction of 3D scene geometry is an important element for scene understanding, autonomous vehicle and robot navigation, image retrieval, and 3D television. We propose accounting for the inherent structure of the visual world when trying to solve the scene reconstruction problem. Consequently, we identify geometric scene categorization as the first step toward robust and efficient depth estimation from single images. We introduce 15 typical 3D scene geometries called stages, each with a unique depth profile, which roughly correspond to a large majority of broadcast video frames. Stage information serves as a first approximation of global depth, narrowing down the search space in depth estimation and object localization. We propose different sets of low-level features for depth estimation, and perform stage classification on two diverse data sets of television broadcasts. Classification results demonstrate that stages can often be efficiently learned from low-dimensional image representations.

  8. Multi-Scaled Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Tubular Composites Reinforced with Innovated 3D Weft Knitted Spacer Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Elahe; Hasani, Hossein; Dibajian, Sayed Houssain

    2018-02-01

    Textile composites of 3D integrated spacer configurations have been recently focused by several researchers all over the world. In the present study, newly-designed tubular composites reinforced with 3D spacer weft knitted fabrics were considered and the effects of their structural parameters on some applicable mechanical properties were investigated. For this purpose, two different samples of 3D spacer weft knitted textile types in tubular form were produced on an electronic flat knitting machine, using glass/nylon hybrid yarns. Thermoset tubular-shaped composite parts were manufactured via vacuum infusion molding process using epoxy resin. The mechanical properties of the produced knitted composites in term of external static and internal hydrostatic pressures were evaluated. Resistance of the produced composites against the external static and internal hydrostatic pressures was numerically simulated using multi-scale modeling method. The finding revealed that there is acceptable correlation between experimental and theoretical results.

  9. Adapting Active Shape Models for 3D segmentation of tubular structures in medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; van Ginneken, Bram; Viergever, Max A; Niessen, Wiro J

    2003-07-01

    Active Shape Models (ASM) have proven to be an effective approach for image segmentation. In some applications, however, the linear model of gray level appearance around a contour that is used in ASM is not sufficient for accurate boundary localization. Furthermore, the statistical shape model may be too restricted if the training set is limited. This paper describes modifications to both the shape and the appearance model of the original ASM formulation. Shape model flexibility is increased, for tubular objects, by modeling the axis deformation independent of the cross-sectional deformation, and by adding supplementary cylindrical deformation modes. Furthermore, a novel appearance modeling scheme that effectively deals with a highly varying background is developed. In contrast with the conventional ASM approach, the new appearance model is trained on both boundary and non-boundary points, and the probability that a given point belongs to the boundary is estimated non-parametrically. The methods are evaluated on the complex task of segmenting thrombus in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Shape approximation errors were successfully reduced using the two shape model extensions. Segmentation using the new appearance model significantly outperformed the original ASM scheme; average volume errors are 5.1% and 45% respectively.

  10. Mathematical modelling of flux recovery during chemical cleaning of tubular membrane fouled with whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Jelena Đ.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane process efficiency in the dairy industry is impaired by the formation of deposits during filtration processes. This work describes cleaning procedures for ceramic tubular membrane (50 nm fouled with whey proteins. Also, mathematical modelling was performed to obtain models which allow deeper insight into the mechanisms involved during cleaning procedures. The caustic solutions (0.2%w/w, 0.4%w/w and 1.0%w/w NaOH and the mixture of two commercial detergents (0.8%w/w P3-ultrasil 69+0.5% w/w P3-ultrasil 67 and 1.2% P3-ultrasil 69+0.75 P3-ultrasil 67 were used as chemical cleaning agents. The results showed that the best flux recovery was achieved with 0.4%w/w NaOH solution. After analyzing the experimental data, five parameter and six parameter kinetic models were suggested for alkali and detergent cleaning, respectively. The changes of total and specific resistances, as well as the change of the effective pore diameter and deposit thickness during cleaning are estimated by applying these models.

  11. Almost-commutative geometries beyond the standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, Christoph A

    2006-01-01

    In Iochum et al (2004 J. Math. Phys. 45 5003), Jureit and Stephan (2005 J. Math. Phys. 46 043512), Schuecker T (2005 Preprint hep-th/0501181) and Jureit et al (2005 J. Math. Phys. 46 072303), a conjecture is presented that almost-commutative geometries, with respect to sensible physical constraints, allow only the standard model of particle physics and electro-strong models as Yang-Mills-Higgs theories. In this paper, a counter-example will be given. The corresponding almost-commutative geometry leads to a Yang-Mills-Higgs model which consists of the standard model of particle physics and two new fermions of opposite electro-magnetic charge. This is the second Yang-Mills-Higgs model within noncommutative geometry, after the standard model, which could be compatible with experiments. Combined to a hydrogen-like composite particle, these new particles provide a novel dark matter candidate

  12. Computational modeling of geometry dependent phonon transport in silicon nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Drew A.

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that thermal properties of semiconductor nanostructures depend on nanostructure boundary geometry. Phonons are quantized mechanical vibrations that are the dominant carrier of heat in semiconductor materials and their aggregate behavior determine a nanostructure's thermal performance. Phonon-geometry scattering processes as well as waveguiding effects which result from coherent phonon interference are responsible for the shape dependence of thermal transport in these systems. Nanoscale phonon-geometry interactions provide a mechanism by which nanostructure geometry may be used to create materials with targeted thermal properties. However, the ability to manipulate material thermal properties via controlling nanostructure geometry is contingent upon first obtaining increased theoretical understanding of fundamental geometry induced phonon scattering processes and having robust analytical and computational models capable of exploring the nanostructure design space, simulating the phonon scattering events, and linking the behavior of individual phonon modes to overall thermal behavior. The overall goal of this research is to predict and analyze the effect of nanostructure geometry on thermal transport. To this end, a harmonic lattice-dynamics based atomistic computational modeling tool was created to calculate phonon spectra and modal phonon transmission coefficients in geometrically irregular nanostructures. The computational tool is used to evaluate the accuracy and regimes of applicability of alternative computational techniques based upon continuum elastic wave theory. The model is also used to investigate phonon transmission and thermal conductance in diameter modulated silicon nanowires. Motivated by the complexity of the transmission results, a simplified model based upon long wavelength beam theory was derived and helps explain geometry induced phonon scattering of low frequency nanowire phonon modes.

  13. A 3D Geometry Model Search Engine to Support Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Gary K. L.; Lau, Rynson W. H.; Zhao, Jianmin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the popularity of 3D graphics in animation and games, usage of 3D geometry deformable models increases dramatically. Despite their growing importance, these models are difficult and time consuming to build. A distance learning system for the construction of these models could greatly facilitate students to learn and practice at different…

  14. Noncommutative geometry and the standard model vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, John W.; Dawe Martins, Rachel A.

    2006-01-01

    The space of Dirac operators for the Connes-Chamseddine spectral action for the standard model of particle physics coupled to gravity is studied. The model is extended by including right-handed neutrino states, and the S 0 -reality axiom is not assumed. The possibility of allowing more general fluctuations than the inner fluctuations of the vacuum is proposed. The maximal case of all possible fluctuations is studied by considering the equations of motion for the vacuum. While there are interesting nontrivial vacua with Majorana-type mass terms for the leptons, the conclusion is that the equations are too restrictive to allow solutions with the standard model mass matrix

  15. Constitutive modeling of an electrospun tubular scaffold used for vascular tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jin-Jia

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we sought to model the mechanical behavior of an electrospun tubular scaffold previously reported for vascular tissue engineering with hyperelastic constitutive equations. Specifically, the scaffolds were made by wrapping electrospun polycaprolactone membranes that contain aligned fibers around a mandrel in such a way that they have microstructure similar to the native arterial media. The biaxial stress-stretch data of the scaffolds made of moderately or highly aligned fibers with three different off-axis fiber angles α (30°, 45°, and 60°) were fit by a phenomenological Fung model and a series of structurally motivated models considering fiber directions and fiber angle distributions. In particular, two forms of fiber strain energy in the structurally motivated model for a linear and a nonlinear fiber stress-strain relation, respectively, were tested. An isotropic neo-Hookean strain energy function was also added to the structurally motivated models to examine its contribution. The two forms of fiber strain energy did not result in significantly different goodness of fit for most groups of the scaffolds. The absence of the neo-Hookean term in the structurally motivated model led to obvious nonlinear stress-stretch fits at a greater axial stretch, especially when fitting data from the scaffolds with a small α. Of the models considered, the Fung model had the overall best fitting results; its applications are limited because of its phenomenological nature. Although a structurally motivated model using the nonlinear fiber stress-strain relation with the neo-Hookean term provided fits comparably as good as the Fung model, the values of its model parameters exhibited large within-group variations. Prescribing the dispersion of fiber orientation in the structurally motivated model, however, reduced the variations without compromising the fits and was thus considered to be the best structurally motivated model for the scaffolds. It appeared that the

  16. Modelling of vapour explosion in stratified geometrie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picchi, St.

    1999-01-01

    When a hot liquid comes into contact with a colder volatile liquid, one can obtain in some conditions an explosive vaporization, told vapour explosion, whose consequences can be important on neighbouring structures. This explosion needs the intimate mixing and the fine fragmentation between the two liquids. In a stratified vapour explosion, these two liquids are initially superposed and separated by a vapor film. A triggering of the explosion can induce a propagation of this along the film. A study of experimental results and existent models has allowed to retain the following main points: - the explosion propagation is due to a pressure wave propagating through the medium; - the mixing is due to the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities induced by the shear velocity between the two liquids behind the pressure wave. The presence of the vapour in the volatile liquid explains experimental propagation velocity and the velocity difference between the two fluids at the pressure wave crossing. A first model has been proposed by Brayer in 1994 in order to describe the fragmentation and the mixing of the two fluids. Results of the author do not show explosion propagation. We have therefore built a new mixing-fragmentation model based on the atomization phenomenon that develops itself during the pressure wave crossing. We have also taken into account the transient aspect of the heat transfer between fuel drops and the volatile liquid, and elaborated a model of transient heat transfer. These two models have been introduced in a multi-components, thermal, hydraulic code, MC3D. Results of calculation show a qualitative and quantitative agreement with experimental results and confirm basic options of the model. (author)

  17. Pengembangan Perangkat Pembelajaran Geometri Ruang dengan Model Proving Theorem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Eko Susilo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Kemampuan berpikir kritis dan kreatif mahasiswa masih lemah. Hal ini ditemukan pada mahasiswa yang mengambil mata kuliah Geometri Ruang yaitu dalam membuktikan soal-soal pembuktian (problem to proof. Mahasiswa masih menyelesaikan secara algoritmik atau prosedural sehingga diperlukan pengembangan perangkat pembelajaran Geometri Ruang berbasis kompetensi dan konservasi dengan model Proving Theorem. Dalam penelitian ini perangkat perkuliahan yang dikembangkan yaitu Silabus, Satuan Acara Perkuliahan (SAP, Kontrak Perkuliahan, Media Pembelajaran, Bahan Ajar, Tes UTS dan UAS serta Angket Karakter Konservasi telah dilaksanakan dengan baik dengan kriteria (1 validasi perangkat pembelajaran mata kuliah Geometri ruang berbasis kompetensi dan konservasi dengan model proving theorem berkategori baik dan layak digunakan dan (2 keterlaksanaan RPP pada pembelajaran yang dikembangkan secara keseluruhan berkategori baik.Critical and creative thinking abilities of students still weak. It is found in students who take Space Geometry subjects that is in solving problems to to prove. Students still finish in algorithmic or procedural so that the required the development of Space Geometry learning tools based on competency and conservation with Proving Theorem models. This is a research development which refers to the 4-D models that have been modified for the Space Geometry learning tools, second semester academic year 2014/2015. Instruments used include validation sheet, learning tools and character assessment questionnaire. In this research, the learning tools are developed, namely Syllabus, Lesson Plan, Lecture Contract, Learning Media, Teaching Material, Tests, and Character Conservation Questionnaire had been properly implemented with the criteria (1 validation of Space Geometry learning tools based on competency and conservation with Proving Theorem models categorized good and feasible to use, and (2 the implementation of Lesson Plan on learning categorized

  18. Hurwitz numbers, matrix models and enumerative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchard, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    We propose a new, conjectural recursion solution for Hurwitz numbers at all genera. This conjecture is based on recent progress in solving type B topological string theory on the mirrors of toric Calabi-Yau manifolds, which we briefly review to provide some background for our conjecture. We show in particular how this B-model solution, combined with mirror symmetry for the one-leg, framed topological vertex, leads to a recursion relation for Hodge integrals with three Hodge class insertions. Our conjecture in Hurwitz theory follows from this recursion for the framed vertex in the limit of infinite framing.

  19. Prediction Model of Mechanical Extending Limits in Horizontal Drilling and Design Methods of Tubular Strings to Improve Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical extending limit in horizontal drilling means the maximum horizontal extending length of a horizontal well under certain ground and down-hole mechanical constraint conditions. Around this concept, the constrained optimization model of mechanical extending limits is built and simplified analytical results for pick-up and slack-off operations are deduced. The horizontal extending limits for kinds of tubular strings under different drilling parameters are calculated and drawn. To improve extending limits, an optimal design model of drill strings is built and applied to a case study. The results indicate that horizontal extending limits are underestimated a lot when the effects of friction force on critical helical buckling loads are neglected. Horizontal extending limits firstly increase and tend to stable values with vertical depths. Horizontal extending limits increase faster but finally become smaller with the increase of horizontal pushing forces for tubular strings of smaller modulus-weight ratio. Sliding slack-off is the main limit operation and high axial friction is the main constraint factor constraining horizontal extending limits. A sophisticated installation of multiple tubular strings can greatly inhibit helical buckling and increase horizontal extending limits. The optimal design model is called only once to obtain design results, which greatly increases the calculation efficiency.

  20. Modelling and simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeter, Olav

    1998-12-31

    This thesis presents a three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code (EXSIM94) for modelling and simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries. It gives the theory and validates the following sub-models : (1) the flow resistance and turbulence generation model for densely packed regions, (2) the flow resistance and turbulence generation model for single objects, and (3) the quasi-laminar combustion model. It is found that a simple model for flow resistance and turbulence generation in densely packed beds is able to reproduce the medium and large scale MERGE explosion experiments of the Commission of European Communities (CEC) within a band of factor 2. The model for a single representation is found to predict explosion pressure in better agreement with the experiments with a modified k-{epsilon} model. This modification also gives a slightly improved grid independence for realistic gas explosion approaches. One laminar model is found unsuitable for gas explosion modelling because of strong grid dependence. Another laminar model is found to be relatively grid independent and to work well in harmony with the turbulent combustion model. The code is validated against 40 realistic gas explosion experiments. It is relatively grid independent in predicting explosion pressure in different offshore geometries. It can predict the influence of ignition point location, vent arrangements, different geometries, scaling effects and gas reactivity. The validation study concludes with statistical and uncertainty analyses of the code performance. 98 refs., 96 figs, 12 tabs.

  1. A Model for Analyzing a Five-Phase Fractional-Slot Permanent Magnet Tubular Linear Motor with Modified Winding Function Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for analyzing a five-phase fractional-slot permanent magnet tubular linear motor (FSPMTLM with the modified winding function approach (MWFA. MWFA is a fast modeling method and it gives deep insight into the calculations of the following parameters: air-gap magnetic field, inductances, flux linkages, and detent force, which are essential in modeling the motor. First, using a magnetic circuit model, the air-gap magnetic density is computed from stator magnetomotive force (MMF, flux barrier, and mover geometry. Second, the inductances, flux linkages, and detent force are analytically calculated using modified winding function and the air-gap magnetic density. Finally, a model has been established with the five-phase Park transformation and simulated. The calculations of detent force reveal that the end-effect force is the main component of the detent force. This is also proven by finite element analysis on the motor. The accuracy of the model is validated by comparing with the results obtained using semianalytical method (SAM and measurements to analyze the motor’s transient characteristics. In addition, the proposed method requires less computation time.

  2. DIGA/NSL new calculational model in slab geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makai, M.; Gado, J.; Kereszturi, A.

    1987-04-01

    A new calculational model is presented based on a modified finite-difference algorithm, in which the coefficients are determined by means of the so-called gamma matrices. The DIGA program determines the gamma matrices and the NSL program realizes the modified finite difference model. Both programs assume slab cell geometry, DIGA assumes 2 energy groups and 3 diffusive regions. The DIGA/NSL programs serve to study the new calculational model. (author)

  3. A survey on the geometry of production models in economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Daniela Vîlcu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we survey selected recent results on the geometry of production models, focussing on the main production functions that are usually analyzed in economics, namely homogeneous, homothetic, quasi-sum and quasi-product production functions.

  4. Stochastic geometry, spatial statistics and random fields models and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Providing a graduate level introduction to various aspects of stochastic geometry, spatial statistics and random fields, this volume places a special emphasis on fundamental classes of models and algorithms as well as on their applications, for example in materials science, biology and genetics. This book has a strong focus on simulations and includes extensive codes in Matlab and R, which are widely used in the mathematical community. It can be regarded as a continuation of the recent volume 2068 of Lecture Notes in Mathematics, where other issues of stochastic geometry, spatial statistics and random fields were considered, with a focus on asymptotic methods.

  5. A Wear Geometry Model of Plain Woven Fabric Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Dapeng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper g describes a model meant for analysis of the wear geometry of plain woven fabric composites. The referred model consists of a mathematical description of plain woven fabric based on Peirce’s model coupled with a stratified method for the solution of the wear geometry. The evolutions of the wear area ratio of weft yarn, warp yarn and matrix resin on the worn surface are simulated by MatLab software in combination of warp and weft yarn diameters, warp and weft yarn-to-yarn distances, fabric structure phases (SPs. By comparing theoretical and experimental results from the PTFE/Kevlar fabric wear experiment, it can be concluded that the model can present a trend of the component area ratio variations along with the thickness of fabric, but has a inherently large error in quantitative analysis as an idealized model.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a primary proximal tubular epithelial cell model from human kidney by CD10/CD13 double labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Van der Hauwaert

    Full Text Available Renal proximal tubular epithelial cells play a central role in renal physiology and are among the cell types most sensitive to ischemia and xenobiotic nephrotoxicity. In order to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of kidney injuries, a stable and well-characterized primary culture model of proximal tubular cells is required. An existing model of proximal tubular cells is hampered by the cellular heterogeneity of kidney; a method based on cell sorting for specific markers must therefore be developed. In this study, we present a primary culture model based on the mechanical and enzymatic dissociation of healthy tissue obtained from nephrectomy specimens. Renal epithelial cells were sorted using co-labeling for CD10 and CD13, two renal proximal tubular epithelial markers, by flow cytometry. Their purity, phenotypic stability and functional properties were evaluated over several passages. Our results demonstrate that CD10/CD13 double-positive cells constitute a pure, functional and stable proximal tubular epithelial cell population that displays proximal tubule markers and epithelial characteristics over the long term, whereas cells positive for either CD10 or CD13 alone appear to be heterogeneous. In conclusion, this study describes a method for establishing a robust renal proximal tubular epithelial cell model suitable for further experimentation.

  7. Empirical intrinsic geometry for nonlinear modeling and time series filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmon, Ronen; Coifman, Ronald R

    2013-07-30

    In this paper, we present a method for time series analysis based on empirical intrinsic geometry (EIG). EIG enables one to reveal the low-dimensional parametric manifold as well as to infer the underlying dynamics of high-dimensional time series. By incorporating concepts of information geometry, this method extends existing geometric analysis tools to support stochastic settings and parametrizes the geometry of empirical distributions. However, the statistical models are not required as priors; hence, EIG may be applied to a wide range of real signals without existing definitive models. We show that the inferred model is noise-resilient and invariant under different observation and instrumental modalities. In addition, we show that it can be extended efficiently to newly acquired measurements in a sequential manner. These two advantages enable us to revisit the Bayesian approach and incorporate empirical dynamics and intrinsic geometry into a nonlinear filtering framework. We show applications to nonlinear and non-Gaussian tracking problems as well as to acoustic signal localization.

  8. Slab2 - Updated Subduction Zone Geometries and Modeling Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, G.; Hayes, G. P.; Portner, D. E.; Furtney, M.; Flamme, H. E.; Hearne, M. G.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0), is a highly utilized dataset that has been applied to a wide range of geophysical problems. In 2017, these models have been improved and expanded upon as part of the Slab2 modeling effort. With a new data driven approach that can be applied to a broader range of tectonic settings and geophysical data sets, we have generated a model set that will serve as a more comprehensive, reliable, and reproducible resource for three-dimensional slab geometries at all of the world's convergent margins. The newly developed framework of Slab2 is guided by: (1) a large integrated dataset, consisting of a variety of geophysical sources (e.g., earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active-source seismic survey images of the shallow slab, tomography models, receiver functions, bathymetry, trench ages, and sediment thickness information); (2) a dynamic filtering scheme aimed at constraining incorporated seismicity to only slab related events; (3) a 3-D data interpolation approach which captures both high resolution shallow geometries and instances of slab rollback and overlap at depth; and (4) an algorithm which incorporates uncertainties of contributing datasets to identify the most probable surface depth over the extent of each subduction zone. Further layers will also be added to the base geometry dataset, such as historic moment release, earthquake tectonic providence, and interface coupling. Along with access to several queryable data formats, all components have been wrapped into an open source library in Python, such that suites of updated models can be released as further data becomes available. This presentation will discuss the extent of Slab2 development, as well as the current availability of the model and modeling tools.

  9. Generalized complex geometry, generalized branes and the Hitchin sigma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    Hitchin's generalized complex geometry has been shown to be relevant in compactifications of superstring theory with fluxes and is expected to lead to a deeper understanding of mirror symmetry. Gualtieri's notion of generalized complex submanifold seems to be a natural candidate for the description of branes in this context. Recently, we introduced a Batalin-Vilkovisky field theoretic realization of generalized complex geometry, the Hitchin sigma model, extending the well known Poisson sigma model. In this paper, exploiting Gualtieri's formalism, we incorporate branes into the model. A detailed study of the boundary conditions obeyed by the world sheet fields is provided. Finally, it is found that, when branes are present, the classical Batalin-Vilkovisky cohomology contains an extra sector that is related non trivially to a novel cohomology associated with the branes as generalized complex submanifolds. (author)

  10. Micromagnetic recording model of writer geometry effects at skew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumer, M. L.; Bozeman, S.; van Ek, J.; Michel, R. P.

    2006-04-01

    The effects of the pole-tip geometry at the air-bearing surface on perpendicular recording at a skew angle are examined through modeling and spin-stand test data. Head fields generated by the finite element method were used to record transitions within our previously described micromagnetic recording model. Write-field contours for a variety of square, rectangular, and trapezoidal pole shapes were evaluated to determine the impact of geometry on field contours. Comparing results for recorded track width, transition width, and media signal to noise ratio at 0° and 15° skew demonstrate the benefits of trapezoidal and reduced aspect-ratio pole shapes. Consistency between these modeled results and test data is demonstrated.

  11. External exposure model for various geometries of contaminated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LePoire, D.; Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model for external exposure was developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's residual radioactive material guideline computer code (RESRAD) on the basis of dose coefficients from Federal Guidance Report No. 12 and the point-kernel method. This model includes the effects of different materials and exposure distances, as well as source geometry (cover thickness, source depth, area, and shape). A material factor is calculated on the basis of the point-kernel method using material-specific photon cross-section data and buildup factors. This present model was incorporated into RESRAD-RECYCLE (a RESRAD family code used for computing radiological impacts of metal recycling) and is being incorporated into RESRAD-BUILD (a DOE recommended code for computing impacts of building decontamination). The model was compared with calculations performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle Code (MCNP) and the Microshield code for three different source geometries, three different radionuclides ( 234 U, 238 U, and 60 Co, representing low, medium, and high energy, respectively), and five different source materials (iron, copper, aluminum, water, and soil). The comparison shows that results of this model are in very good agreement with MCNP calculations (within 5% for 60 Co and within 30% for 238 U and 234 U for all materials and source geometries). Significant differences (greater than 100%) were observed with Microshield for thin 234 U sources

  12. Mathematical model of geometry and fibrous structure of the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, P M; Le Grice, I J; Smaill, B H; Hunter, P J

    1991-04-01

    We developed a mathematical representation of ventricular geometry and muscle fiber organization using three-dimensional finite elements referred to a prolate spheroid coordinate system. Within elements, fields are approximated using basis functions with associated parameters defined at the element nodes. Four parameters per node are used to describe ventricular geometry. The radial coordinate is interpolated using cubic Hermite basis functions that preserve slope continuity, while the angular coordinates are interpolated linearly. Two further nodal parameters describe the orientation of myocardial fibers. The orientation of fibers within coordinate planes bounded by epicardial and endocardial surfaces is interpolated linearly, with transmural variation given by cubic Hermite basis functions. Left and right ventricular geometry and myocardial fiber orientations were characterized for a canine heart arrested in diastole and fixed at zero transmural pressure. The geometry was represented by a 24-element ensemble with 41 nodes. Nodal parameters fitted using least squares provided a realistic description of ventricular epicardial [root mean square (RMS) error less than 0.9 mm] and endocardial (RMS error less than 2.6 mm) surfaces. Measured fiber fields were also fitted (RMS error less than 17 degrees) with a 60-element, 99-node mesh obtained by subdividing the 24-element mesh. These methods provide a compact and accurate anatomic description of the ventricles suitable for use in finite element stress analysis, simulation of cardiac electrical activation, and other cardiac field modeling problems.

  13. Moritz enhancements for visualization of complicated geometry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Riper, K. A.

    2009-01-01

    We describe new features implemented in the Moritz geometry editing and visualization program to enhance the accuracy and efficiency of viewing complex geometry models. The 3D display is based on OpenGL and requires conversion of the combinatorial surface and solid body geometry used by MCNP and other transport codes to a set of polygons. Calculation of those polygons can take many minutes for complex models. Once calculated, the polygons can be saved to a file and reused when the same or a derivative model is loaded; the file can be read and processed in under a second. A cell can be filled with a collection of other cells constituting a universe. A new option bypasses use of the filled cell's boundaries when calculating the polygons for the filling universe. This option, when applicable, speeds processing, improves the 3D image, and permits reuse of the universe's polygons when other cells are filled with transformed instances of the universe. Surfaces and solid bodies used in a cell description must be converted to polygons before calculating the polygonal representation of a cell; this conversion requires truncation of infinite surfaces. A new method for truncating transformed surfaces ensures the finite surface intersects the entire model. When a surface or solid body is processed in a cell description, an optional test detects when that object does not contribute additional polygons; if so, that object May be extraneous for the cell description. (authors)

  14. Geometry modeling for SAM-CE Monte Carlo calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, H.A.; Troubetzkoy, E.S.

    1980-01-01

    Three geometry packages have been developed and incorporated into SAM-CE, for representing in three dimensions the transport medium. These are combinatorial geometry - a general (non-lattice) system, complex combinatorial geometry - a very general system with lattice capability, and special reactor geometry - a special purpose system for light water reactor geometries. Their different attributes are described

  15. ORIGAMI -- The Oak Ridge Geometry Analysis and Modeling Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, T.J.

    1996-01-01

    A revised ''ray-tracing'' package which is a superset of the geometry specifications of the radiation transport codes MORSE, MASH (GIFT Versions 4 and 5), HETC, and TORT has been developed by ORNL. Two additional CAD-based formats are also included as part of the superset: the native format of the BRL-CAD system--MGED, and the solid constructive geometry subset of the IGES specification. As part of this upgrade effort, ORNL has designed an Xwindows-based utility (ORIGAMI) to facilitate the construction, manipulation, and display of the geometric models required by the MASH code. Since the primary design criterion for this effort was that the utility ''see'' the geometric model exactly as the radiation transport code does, ORIGAMI is designed to utilize the same ''ray-tracing'' package as the revised version of MASH. ORIGAMI incorporates the functionality of two previously developed graphical utilities, CGVIEW and ORGBUG, into a single consistent interface

  16. Geometry Modeling Program Implementation of Human Hip Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Mo-nan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Aiming to design a simulate software of human tissue modeling and analysis,Visual Studio 2010 is selected as a development tool to develop a 3 D reconstruction software of human tissue with language C++.It can be used alone. It also can be a module of the virtual surgery systems. The system includes medical image segmentation modules and 3 D reconstruction modules,and can realize the model visualization. This software system has been used to reconstruct hip muscles,femur and hip bone accurately. The results show these geometry models can simulate the structure of hip tissues.

  17. Geometry Modeling Program Implementation of Human Hip Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Monan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to design a simulate software of human tissue modeling and analysis,Visual Studio 2010 is selected as a development tool to develop a 3 D reconstruction software of human tissue with language C++.It can be used alone. It also can be a module of the virtual surgery systems. The system includes medical image segmentation modules and 3 D reconstruction modules,and can realize the model visualization. This software system has been used to reconstruct hip muscles,femur and hip bone accurately. The results show these geometry models can simulate the structure of hip tissues.

  18. Modeling flow for modified concentric cylinder rheometer geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeruche, Karen; Connelly, Kelly; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    Rheology experiments on biological fluids can be difficult when samples are limited in volume, sensitive to degradation, and delicate to extract from tissues. A probe-like geometry has been developed to perform shear creep experiments on biological fluids and to use the creep response to characterize fluid material properties. This probe geometry is a modified concentric cylinder setup, where the gap is large and we assume the inner cylinder rotates in an infinite fluid. To validate this assumption we perform shear creep tests with the designed probe on Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids and vary the outer cylinder container diameter. We have also created a numerical model based on the probe geometry setup to compare with experimental results at different outer cylinder diameters. A creep test is modeled by applying rotation to the inner cylinder and solving for the deformation of the fluid throughout the gap. Steady state viscosity values are calculated from creep compliance curves and compared between experimental and numerical results.

  19. 3D modeling and visualization software for complex geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guse, Guenter; Klotzbuecher, Michael; Mohr, Friedrich

    2011-01-01

    The reactor safety depends on reliable nondestructive testing of reactor components. For 100% detection probability of flaws and the determination of their size using ultrasonic methods the ultrasonic waves have to hit the flaws within a specific incidence and squint angle. For complex test geometries like testing of nozzle welds from the outside of the component these angular ranges can only be determined using elaborate mathematical calculations. The authors developed a 3D modeling and visualization software tool that allows to integrate and present ultrasonic measuring data into the 3D geometry. The software package was verified using 1:1 test samples (example: testing of the nozzle edge of the feedwater nozzle of a steam generator from the outside; testing of the reactor pressure vessel nozzle edge from the inside).

  20. Hydrogen combustion modelling in large-scale geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studer, E.; Beccantini, A.; Kudriakov, S.; Velikorodny, A.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen risk mitigation issues based on catalytic recombiners cannot exclude flammable clouds to be formed during the course of a severe accident in a Nuclear Power Plant. Consequences of combustion processes have to be assessed based on existing knowledge and state of the art in CFD combustion modelling. The Fukushima accidents have also revealed the need for taking into account the hydrogen explosion phenomena in risk management. Thus combustion modelling in a large-scale geometry is one of the remaining severe accident safety issues. At present day there doesn't exist a combustion model which can accurately describe a combustion process inside a geometrical configuration typical of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) environment. Therefore the major attention in model development has to be paid on the adoption of existing approaches or creation of the new ones capable of reliably predicting the possibility of the flame acceleration in the geometries of that type. A set of experiments performed previously in RUT facility and Heiss Dampf Reactor (HDR) facility is used as a validation database for development of three-dimensional gas dynamic model for the simulation of hydrogen-air-steam combustion in large-scale geometries. The combustion regimes include slow deflagration, fast deflagration, and detonation. Modelling is based on Reactive Discrete Equation Method (RDEM) where flame is represented as an interface separating reactants and combustion products. The transport of the progress variable is governed by different flame surface wrinkling factors. The results of numerical simulation are presented together with the comparisons, critical discussions and conclusions. (authors)

  1. Model of the final borehole geometry for helical laser drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroschel, Alexander; Michalowski, Andreas; Graf, Thomas

    2018-05-01

    A model for predicting the borehole geometry for laser drilling is presented based on the calculation of a surface of constant absorbed fluence. It is applicable to helical drilling of through-holes with ultrashort laser pulses. The threshold fluence describing the borehole surface is fitted for best agreement with experimental data in the form of cross-sections of through-holes of different shapes and sizes in stainless steel samples. The fitted value is similar to ablation threshold fluence values reported for laser ablation models.

  2. Expected savings from the relaxation of the limits on some fuel parameters for an HTR tubular interacting fuel element of fixed geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graziani, [EURATOM, Ispra (Italy); Trauwaert, [Belgonucleaire (Belgium)

    1971-06-16

    This note presents some preliminary results of a recent work performed jointly by EURATOM (CCR Ispra) and BELGONUCLEAIRE. The analysis of the results is still in progress and a more comprehensive presentation will be made later. The purpose of the study was the evaluation of the savings in fuel cycle cost which could result from the relaxation of the limits on some fuels parameters - heavy metal loading, burnup and age factor - while keeping unchanged the geometry of the fuel element and that of the reactor. Within the range considered and the economic assumptions used, the most obvious saving which can be obtained from the increase of one of the limits seems that made possible by the increase of heavy metal loading. This saving is 2% in fuel cycle cost without any change in resonance integral and 4.5% with a reduction of 10% in resonance integral. An increase of the admissible burnup is also very rewarding, provided the resonance integral can be increased in order to keep the age factor down to 1.085.

  3. New models of radical polymerization with branching and scission predicting molecular weight distribution in tubular and series of continuous stirred tank reactors allowing for multiradicals and gelation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yaghini, N.; Iedema, P.D.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling of the mol. wt. distribution (MWD) of low-​d. Polyethylene (ldPE) has been carried out for a tubular reactor under realistic non-​isothermal conditions and for a series of CSTR's. The model allows for the existence of multiradicals and the occurrence of gelation. The deterministic model is

  4. Modeling moisture ingress through simplified concrete crack geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2011-01-01

    , considered to have two parts; 1) a coalesced crack length which behaves as a free-surface for moisture ingress, and 2) an isolated microcracking length which resists ingress similarly to the bulk material. Transport model results are compared to experimental results from steel fibre reinforced concrete wedge......This paper introduces a numerical model for ingress in cracked steel fibre reinforced concrete. Details of a simplified crack are preset in the model’s geometry using the cracked hinge model (CHM). The total crack length estimated using the CHM was, based on earlier work on conventional concrete...... on moisture ingress. Results from the transport model indicate the length of the isolated microcracks was approximately 19 mm for the investigated concrete composition....

  5. Cosmological evolution in a two-brane warped geometry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Kumar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We study an effective 4-dimensional scalar–tensor field theory, originated from an underlying brane–bulk warped geometry, to explore the scenario of inflation. It is shown that the inflaton potential naturally emerges from the radion energy–momentum tensor which in turn results in an inflationary model of the Universe on the visible brane that is consistent with the recent results from the Planck's experiment. The dynamics of modulus stabilization from the inflaton rolling condition is demonstrated. The implications of our results in the context of recent BICEP2 results are also discussed.

  6. Conductive solar wind models in rapidly diverging flow geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, T.E.; Leer, E.

    1980-01-01

    A detailed parameter study of conductive models of the solar wind has been carried out, extending the previous similar studies of Durney (1972) and Durney and Hundhausen (1974) by considering collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction, rapidly diverging flow geometries, and the structure of solutions for the entire n 0 -T 0 plane (n 0 and T 0 are the coronal base density and temperature). Primary emphasis is placed on understanding the complex effects of the physical processes operative in conductive solar wind models. There are five points of particular interest that have arisen from the study: (1) neither collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction nor rapidly diverging flow geometries can significantly increase the solar wind speed at 1 AU; (2) there exists a firm upper limit on the coronal base temperature consistent with observed values of the coronal base pressure and solar wind mass flux density; (3) the principal effect of rapidly diverging flow geometries is a decrease in the solar wind mass flux density at 1 AU and an increase in the mass flux density at the coronal base; (4) collisionless inhibition of thermal conduction can lead to a solar wind flow speed that either increases or decreases with increasing coronal base density (n 0 ) and temperature (T 0 , depending on the region of the n 0 -T 0 plane considered; (5) there is a region of the n 0 -T/sub o/ plane at high coronal base densities where low-speed, high-mass-flux, transonic solar wind flows exist: a region not previously considered

  7. A Geometry Deformation Model for Braided Continuum Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Hadi Sadati

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Continuum manipulators have gained significant attention in the robotic community due to their high dexterity, deformability, and reachability. Modeling of such manipulators has been shown to be very complex and challenging. Despite many research attempts, a general and comprehensive modeling method is yet to be established. In this paper, for the first time, we introduce the bending effect in the model of a braided extensile pneumatic actuator with both stiff and bendable threads. Then, the effect of the manipulator cross-section deformation on the constant curvature and variable curvature models is investigated using simple analytical results from a novel geometry deformation method and is compared to experimental results. We achieve 38% mean reference error simulation accuracy using our constant curvature model for a braided continuum manipulator in presence of body load and 10% using our variable curvature model in presence of extensive external loads. With proper model assumptions and taking to account the cross-section deformation, a 7–13% increase in the simulation mean error accuracy is achieved compared to a fixed cross-section model. The presented models can be used for the exact modeling and design optimization of compound continuum manipulators by providing an analytical tool for the sensitivity analysis of the manipulator performance. Our main aim is the application in minimal invasive manipulation with limited workspaces and manipulators with regional tunable stiffness in their cross section.

  8. A self-regulating model of bedrock river channel geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, C. P.

    2006-02-01

    The evolution of many mountain landscapes is controlled by the incision of bedrock river channels. While the rate of incision is set by channel shape through its mediation of flow, the channel shape is itself set by the history of bedrock erosion. This feedback between channel geometry and incision determines the speed of landscape response to tectonic or climatic forcing. Here, a model for the dynamics of bedrock channel shape is derived from geometric arguments, a normal flow approximation for channel flow, and a threshold bed shear stress assumption for bedrock abrasion. The model dynamics describe the competing effects of channel widening, tilting, bending, and variable flow depth. Transient solutions suggest that channels may take ~1-10 ky to adapt to changes in discharge, implying that channel disequilibrium is commonplace. If so, landscape evolution models will need to include bedrock channel dynamics if they are to probe the effects of climate change.

  9. Distal renal tubular acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this disorder. Alternative Names Renal tubular acidosis - distal; Renal tubular acidosis type I; Type I RTA; RTA - distal; Classical RTA Images Kidney anatomy Kidney - blood and urine flow References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney ...

  10. Noncommutative geometry and its application to the standard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinetti, Pierre [Georg-August Universitaet, Goettingen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    We give an overview of the description of the standard model of particle physics minimally coupled to gravity within the framework of noncommutative geometry. Especially we study in detail the metric structure of spacetime that emerges from the spectral triple recently proposed by Chamseddine, Connes and Marcolli. Within this framework points of spacetime acquire an internal structure inherited from the gauge group of the standard model. A distance is defined on this generalized spacetime which is fully encoded by the Yang-Mills gauge fields together with the Higgs field. We focus on some explicit examples, underlying the link between this distance and other distances well known by physicists and mathematicians, such has the Carnot-Caratheodory horizontal distance or the Monge-Kantorovitch transport distance.

  11. Spherical model for superfluidity in a restricted geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishman, S.; Ziman, T.A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The spherical model is solved on a hypercubic lattice in d dimensions, each bond of which is decorated with l spins. The thermodynamic functions and the helicity modulus, analogous to a superfluid density, are calculated. We find that at least two spherical fields are required for the model to exhibit low-temperature properties that can approximate reasonably those of O(n) models. The heuristic prediction that the critical temperature behaves as T/sub c/(l)approx.(l+1) -1 is checked for the model and found to hold quite accurately even for small l(> or approx. =2). The helicity modulus and magnetization of the two-constraint spherical model are found to scale approximately with the critical temperature, but the relation between them is more complex than in the undecorated model. This relation is used to check heuristic arguments concerning the helicity modulus at low temperatures. We comment on the relevance to physical systems, in particular, the problem of boson condensation in a restricted geometry

  12. Novel insights on the relationship between T-tubular defects and contractile dysfunction in a mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocini, C; Ferrantini, C; Scardigli, M; Coppini, R; Mazzoni, L; Lazzeri, E; Pioner, J M; Scellini, B; Guo, A; Song, L S; Yan, P; Loew, L M; Tardiff, J; Tesi, C; Vanzi, F; Cerbai, E; Pavone, F S; Sacconi, L; Poggesi, C

    2016-02-01

    Abnormalities of cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) homeostasis and excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling are early events in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and concomitant determinants of the diastolic dysfunction and arrhythmias typical of the disease. T-tubule remodelling has been reported to occur in HCM but little is known about its role in the E-C coupling alterations of HCM. Here, the role of T-tubule remodelling in the electro-mechanical dysfunction associated to HCM is investigated in the Δ160E cTnT mouse model that expresses a clinically-relevant HCM mutation. Contractile function of intact ventricular trabeculae is assessed in Δ160E mice and wild-type siblings. As compared with wild-type, Δ160E trabeculae show prolonged kinetics of force development and relaxation, blunted force-frequency response with reduced active tension at high stimulation frequency, and increased occurrence of spontaneous contractions. Consistently, prolonged Ca(2+) transient in terms of rise and duration are also observed in Δ160E trabeculae and isolated cardiomyocytes. Confocal imaging in cells isolated from Δ160E mice reveals significant, though modest, remodelling of T-tubular architecture. A two-photon random access microscope is employed to dissect the spatio-temporal relationship between T-tubular electrical activity and local Ca(2+) release in isolated cardiomyocytes. In Δ160E cardiomyocytes, a significant number of T-tubules (>20%) fails to propagate action potentials, with consequent delay of local Ca(2+) release. At variance with wild-type, we also observe significantly increased variability of local Ca(2+) transient rise as well as higher Ca(2+)-spark frequency. Although T-tubule structural remodelling in Δ160E myocytes is modest, T-tubule functional defects determine non-homogeneous Ca(2+) release and delayed myofilament activation that significantly contribute to mechanical dysfunction. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  13. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    Solvation is an elementary process in nature and is of paramount importance to more sophisticated chemical, biological and biomolecular processes. The understanding of solvation is an essential prerequisite for the quantitative description and analysis of biomolecular systems. This work presents a Lagrangian formulation of our differential geometry based solvation models. The Lagrangian representation of biomolecular surfaces has a few utilities/advantages. First, it provides an essential basis for biomolecular visualization, surface electrostatic potential map and visual perception of biomolecules. Additionally, it is consistent with the conventional setting of implicit solvent theories and thus, many existing theoretical algorithms and computational software packages can be directly employed. Finally, the Lagrangian representation does not need to resort to artificially enlarged van der Waals radii as often required by the Eulerian representation in solvation analysis. The main goal of the present work is to analyze the connection, similarity and difference between the Eulerian and Lagrangian formalisms of the solvation model. Such analysis is important to the understanding of the differential geometry based solvation model. The present model extends the scaled particle theory of nonpolar solvation model with a solvent-solute interaction potential. The nonpolar solvation model is completed with a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) theory based polar solvation model. The differential geometry theory of surfaces is employed to provide a natural description of solvent-solute interfaces. The optimization of the total free energy functional, which encompasses the polar and nonpolar contributions, leads to coupled potential driven geometric flow and PB equations. Due to the development of singularities and nonsmooth manifolds in the Lagrangian representation, the resulting potential-driven geometric flow equation is embedded into the Eulerian representation for the purpose of

  14. Parametric exergy analysis of a tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack through finite-volume model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calise, F.; Ferruzzi, G.; Vanoli, L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a very detailed local exergy analysis of a tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) stack. In particular, a complete parametric analysis has been carried out, in order to assess the effects of the synthesis/design parameters on the local irreversibilities in the components of the stack. A finite-volume axial-symmetric model of the tubular internal reforming Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stack under investigation has been used. The stack consists of: SOFC tubes, tube-in-tube pre-reformer and tube and shell catalytic burner. The model takes into account the effects of heat/mass transfer and chemical/electrochemical reactions. The model allows one to predict the performance of a SOFC stack once a series of design and operative parameters are fixed, but also to investigate the source and localization of inefficiency. To this scope, an exergy analysis was implemented. The SOFC tube, the pre-reformer and the catalytic burner are discretized along their longitudinal axes. Detailed models of the kinetics of the reforming, catalytic combustion and electrochemical reactions are implemented. Pressure drops, convection heat transfer and overvoltages are calculated on the basis of the work previously developed by the authors. The heat transfer model includes the contribution of thermal radiation, so improving the models previously used by the authors. Radiative heat transfer is calculated on the basis of the slice-to-slice configuration factors and corresponding radiosities. On the basis of this thermochemical model, an exergy analysis has been carried out, in order to localize the sources and the magnitude of irreversibilities along the components of the stack. In addition, the main synthesis/design variables were varied in order to assess their effect on the exergy destruction within the component to which the parameter directly refers ('endogenous' contribution) and on the exergy destruction of all remaining components ('exogenous' contribution). Then, this analysis

  15. Indoor Modelling Benchmark for 3D Geometry Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, C.; Boehm, J.

    2014-06-01

    A combination of faster, cheaper and more accurate hardware, more sophisticated software, and greater industry acceptance have all laid the foundations for an increased desire for accurate 3D parametric models of buildings. Pointclouds are the data source of choice currently with static terrestrial laser scanning the predominant tool for large, dense volume measurement. The current importance of pointclouds as the primary source of real world representation is endorsed by CAD software vendor acquisitions of pointcloud engines in 2011. Both the capture and modelling of indoor environments require great effort in time by the operator (and therefore cost). Automation is seen as a way to aid this by reducing the workload of the user and some commercial packages have appeared that provide automation to some degree. In the data capture phase, advances in indoor mobile mapping systems are speeding up the process, albeit currently with a reduction in accuracy. As a result this paper presents freely accessible pointcloud datasets of two typical areas of a building each captured with two different capture methods and each with an accurate wholly manually created model. These datasets are provided as a benchmark for the research community to gauge the performance and improvements of various techniques for indoor geometry extraction. With this in mind, non-proprietary, interoperable formats are provided such as E57 for the scans and IFC for the reference model. The datasets can be found at: http://indoor-bench.github.io/indoor-bench.

  16. Computational study of effects of tension imbalance on phonation in a three-dimensional tubular larynx model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qian; Zheng, Xudong; Mittal, Rajat; Bielamowicz, Steven

    2014-07-01

    The present study explores the use of a continuum-based computational model to investigate the effect of left-right tension imbalance on vocal fold (VF) vibrations and glottal aerodynamics, as well as its implication on phonation. The study allows us to gain new insights into the underlying physical mechanism of irregularities induced by VF tension imbalance associated with unilateral cricothyroid muscle paralysis. A three-dimensional simulation of glottal flow and VF dynamics in a tubular laryngeal model with tension imbalance was conducted by using a coupled flow-structure interaction computational model. Tension imbalance was modeled by reducing by 20% the Young's modulus of one of the VFs, while holding VF length constant. Effects of tension imbalance on vibratory characteristic of the VFs and on the time-varying properties of glottal airflow as well as the aerodynamic energy transfer are comprehensively analyzed. The analysis demonstrates that the continuum-based biomechanical model can provide a good description of phonatory dynamics in tension imbalance conditions. It is found that although 20% tension imbalance does not have noticeable effects on the fundamental frequency, it does lead to a larger glottal flow leakage and asymmetric vibrations of the two VFs. A detailed analysis of the energy transfer suggests that the majority of the energy is consumed by the lateral motion of the VFs and the net energy transferred to the softer fold is less than the one transferred to the normal fold. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling of an immobilized lipase tubular reactor for the production of glycerol and fatty acids from oils; Modelado de un reactor tubular de lipasas inmovilizadas para la produccion de glicerol y acidos grasos a partir de aceites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oddone, S.; Grasselli, M.; Cuellas, A.

    2010-07-01

    Advances in the design of a bioreactor in the fats and oils industry have permitted the hydrolysis of triglycerides in mild conditions and improved productivity while avoiding the formation of unwanted byproducts. The present work develops a mathematical model that describes the hydrolytic activity of a tubular reactor with immobilized lipases for the production of glycerol and fatty acids from the oil trade. Runge Kuttas numerical method of high order has been applied, considering that there is no accumulation of the substratum in the surface of the membrane, where the enzyme is. At the same time, different equations based on the kinetic model of Michaelis Mentens and the Ping-Pong bi-bi mechanism were examined. Experimental data in discontinuous systems are the basis for the development of the quantitative mathematical model that was used to simulate the process computationally. The obtained results allow for optimizing both the operative variables and the economic aspects of industrial processes. (Author)

  18. Optimizing multi-pinhole SPECT geometries using an analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rentmeester, M C M; Have, F van der; Beekman, F J

    2007-01-01

    State-of-the-art multi-pinhole SPECT devices allow for sub-mm resolution imaging of radio-molecule distributions in small laboratory animals. The optimization of multi-pinhole and detector geometries using simulations based on ray-tracing or Monte Carlo algorithms is time-consuming, particularly because many system parameters need to be varied. As an efficient alternative we develop a continuous analytical model of a pinhole SPECT system with a stationary detector set-up, which we apply to focused imaging of a mouse. The model assumes that the multi-pinhole collimator and the detector both have the shape of a spherical layer, and uses analytical expressions for effective pinhole diameters, sensitivity and spatial resolution. For fixed fields-of-view, a pinhole-diameter adapting feedback loop allows for the comparison of the system resolution of different systems at equal system sensitivity, and vice versa. The model predicts that (i) for optimal resolution or sensitivity the collimator layer with pinholes should be placed as closely as possible around the animal given a fixed detector layer, (ii) with high-resolution detectors a resolution improvement up to 31% can be achieved compared to optimized systems, (iii) high-resolution detectors can be placed close to the collimator without significant resolution losses, (iv) interestingly, systems with a physical pinhole diameter of 0 mm can have an excellent resolution when high-resolution detectors are used

  19. Unified Stochastic Geometry Model for MIMO Cellular Networks with Retransmissions

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2016-10-11

    This paper presents a unified mathematical paradigm, based on stochastic geometry, for downlink cellular networks with multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) base stations (BSs). The developed paradigm accounts for signal retransmission upon decoding errors, in which the temporal correlation among the signal-to-interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) of the original and retransmitted signals is captured. In addition to modeling the effect of retransmission on the network performance, the developed mathematical model presents twofold analysis unification for MIMO cellular networks literature. First, it integrates the tangible decoding error probability and the abstracted (i.e., modulation scheme and receiver type agnostic) outage probability analysis, which are largely disjoint in the literature. Second, it unifies the analysis for different MIMO configurations. The unified MIMO analysis is achieved by abstracting unnecessary information conveyed within the interfering signals by Gaussian signaling approximation along with an equivalent SISO representation for the per-data stream SINR in MIMO cellular networks. We show that the proposed unification simplifies the analysis without sacrificing the model accuracy. To this end, we discuss the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff imposed by different MIMO schemes and shed light on the diversity loss due to the temporal correlation among the SINRs of the original and retransmitted signals. Finally, several design insights are highlighted.

  20. Unified Stochastic Geometry Model for MIMO Cellular Networks with Retransmissions

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.; Elsawy, Hesham; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a unified mathematical paradigm, based on stochastic geometry, for downlink cellular networks with multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) base stations (BSs). The developed paradigm accounts for signal retransmission upon decoding errors, in which the temporal correlation among the signal-to-interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) of the original and retransmitted signals is captured. In addition to modeling the effect of retransmission on the network performance, the developed mathematical model presents twofold analysis unification for MIMO cellular networks literature. First, it integrates the tangible decoding error probability and the abstracted (i.e., modulation scheme and receiver type agnostic) outage probability analysis, which are largely disjoint in the literature. Second, it unifies the analysis for different MIMO configurations. The unified MIMO analysis is achieved by abstracting unnecessary information conveyed within the interfering signals by Gaussian signaling approximation along with an equivalent SISO representation for the per-data stream SINR in MIMO cellular networks. We show that the proposed unification simplifies the analysis without sacrificing the model accuracy. To this end, we discuss the diversity-multiplexing tradeoff imposed by different MIMO schemes and shed light on the diversity loss due to the temporal correlation among the SINRs of the original and retransmitted signals. Finally, several design insights are highlighted.

  1. Using 3D Geometric Models to Teach Spatial Geometry Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoline, Gary R.

    1991-01-01

    An explanation of 3-D Computer Aided Design (CAD) usage to teach spatial geometry concepts using nontraditional techniques is presented. The software packages CADKEY and AutoCAD are described as well as their usefulness in solving space geometry problems. (KR)

  2. Modelling effects of current distributions on performance of micro-tubular hollow fibre solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doraswami, U.; Droushiotis, N.; Kelsall, G.H.

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional model, considering mass, momentum, energy and charge conservation, was developed and the equations solved to describe the physico-chemical phenomena occurring within a single, micro-tubular hollow fibre solid oxide fuel cell (HF-SOFC). The model was used to investigate the spatial distributions of potential, current and reactants in a 10 mm long HF-SOFC. The predicted effects of location of current collectors, electrode conductivities, cathode thickness and porosity were analysed to minimise the ranges of current density distributions and maximise performance by judicious design. To decrease the computational load, azimuthal symmetry was assumed to model 50 and 100 mm long reactors in 2-D. With connectors at the same end of the HF-SOFC operating at a cell voltage of 0.5 V and a mean 5 kA m -2 , axial potential drops of ca. 0.14 V in the cathode were predicted, comparable to the cathode activation overpotential. Those potential drops caused average current densities to decrease from ca. 6.5 to ca.1 kA m -2 as HF-SOFC length increased from 10 to 100 mm, at which much of the length was inactive. Peak power densities were predicted to vary from 3.8 to -2 , depending on the location of the current collectors; performance increased with increasing cathode thickness and decreasing porosity.

  3. Modeling and Simulation of the Hydrogenation of α-Methylstyrene on Catalytically Active Metal Foams as Tubular Reactor Packing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Lali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a one-dimensional reactor model for a tubular reactor packed with a catalytically active foam packing with a pore density of 30 PPI in cocurrent upward flow in the example of hydrogenation reaction of α-methylstyrene to cumene. This model includes material, enthalpy, and momentum balances as well as continuity equations. The model was solved within the parameter space applied for experimental studies under assumption of a bubbly flow. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was applied. For isothermal and polytropic processes and steady state conditions, axial profiles for concentration, temperature, fluid velocities, pressure, and liquid holdup were computed and the conversions for various gas and liquid flow rates were validated with experimental results. The obtained results were also compared in terms of space time yield and catalytic activity with experimental results and stirred tank and also with random packed bed reactor. The comparison shows that the application of solid foams as reactor packing is advantageous compared to the monolithic honeycombs and random packed beds.

  4. Simulation of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack using AspenPlusTM unit operation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Croiset, E.; Douglas, P.L.; Fowler, M.W.; Entchev, E.

    2005-01-01

    The design of a fuel cell system involves both optimization of the fuel cell stack and the balance of plant with respect to efficiency and economics. Many commercially available process simulators, such as AspenPlus TM , can facilitate the analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. A SOFC system may include fuel pre-processors, heat exchangers, turbines, bottoming cycles, etc., all of which can be very effectively modelled in process simulation software. The current challenge is that AspenPlus TM or any other commercial process simulators do not have a model of a basic SOFC stack. Therefore, to enable performing SOFC system simulation using one of these simulators, one must construct an SOFC stack model that can be implemented in them. The most common approach is to develop a complete SOFC model in a programming language, such as Fortran, Visual Basic or C++, first and then link it to a commercial process simulator as a user defined model or subroutine. This paper introduces a different approach to the development of a SOFC model by utilizing existing AspenPlus TM functions and existing unit operation modules. The developed ''AspenPlus TM SOFC'' model is able to provide detailed thermodynamic and parametric analyses of the SOFC operation and can easily be extended to study the entire power plant consisting of the SOFC and the balance of plant without the requirement for linking with other software. Validation of this model is performed by comparison to a Siemens-Westinghouse 100 kW class tubular SOFC stack. Sensitivity analyses of major operating parameters, such as utilization factor (U f ), current density (I c ) and steam-carbon ratio (S/C), were performed using the developed model, and the results are discussed in this paper

  5. Statistical modelling of railway track geometry degradation using Hierarchical Bayesian models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, A.R.; Teixeira, P.F.

    2015-01-01

    Railway maintenance planners require a predictive model that can assess the railway track geometry degradation. The present paper uses a Hierarchical Bayesian model as a tool to model the main two quality indicators related to railway track geometry degradation: the standard deviation of longitudinal level defects and the standard deviation of horizontal alignment defects. Hierarchical Bayesian Models (HBM) are flexible statistical models that allow specifying different spatially correlated components between consecutive track sections, namely for the deterioration rates and the initial qualities parameters. HBM are developed for both quality indicators, conducting an extensive comparison between candidate models and a sensitivity analysis on prior distributions. HBM is applied to provide an overall assessment of the degradation of railway track geometry, for the main Portuguese railway line Lisbon–Oporto. - Highlights: • Rail track geometry degradation is analysed using Hierarchical Bayesian models. • A Gibbs sampling strategy is put forward to estimate the HBM. • Model comparison and sensitivity analysis find the most suitable model. • We applied the most suitable model to all the segments of the main Portuguese line. • Tackling spatial correlations using CAR structures lead to a better model fit

  6. The Hitchin model, Poisson-quasi-Nijenhuis, geometry and symmetry reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucchini, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    We revisit our earlier work on the AKSZ-like formulation of topological sigma model on generalized complex manifolds, or Hitchin model, [20]. We show that the target space geometry geometry implied by the BV master equations is Poisson-quasi-Nijenhuis geometry recently introduced and studied by Stienon and Xu (in the untwisted case) in [44]. Poisson-quasi-Nijenhuis geometry is more general than generalized complex geometry and comprises it as a particular case. Next, we show how gauging and reduction can be implemented in the Hitchin model. We find that the geometry resulting form the BV master equation is closely related to but more general than that recently described by Lin and Tolman in [40, 41], suggesting a natural framework for the study of reduction of Poisson-quasi-Nijenhuis manifolds

  7. CAD-based automatic modeling method for Geant4 geometry model through MCAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Nie, F.; Wang, G.; Long, P.; LV, Z.

    2013-01-01

    The full text of publication follows. Geant4 is a widely used Monte Carlo transport simulation package. Before calculating using Geant4, the calculation model need be established which could be described by using Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) or C++ language. However, it is time-consuming and error-prone to manually describe the models by GDML. Automatic modeling methods have been developed recently, but there are some problems that exist in most present modeling programs, specially some of them were not accurate or adapted to specifically CAD format. To convert the GDML format models to CAD format accurately, a Geant4 Computer Aided Design (CAD) based modeling method was developed for automatically converting complex CAD geometry model into GDML geometry model. The essence of this method was dealing with CAD model represented with boundary representation (B-REP) and GDML model represented with constructive solid geometry (CSG). At first, CAD model was decomposed to several simple solids which had only one close shell. And then the simple solid was decomposed to convex shell set. Then corresponding GDML convex basic solids were generated by the boundary surfaces getting from the topological characteristic of a convex shell. After the generation of these solids, GDML model was accomplished with series boolean operations. This method was adopted in CAD/Image-based Automatic Modeling Program for Neutronics and Radiation Transport (MCAM), and tested with several models including the examples in Geant4 install package. The results showed that this method could convert standard CAD model accurately, and can be used for Geant4 automatic modeling. (authors)

  8. Finsler Geometry Modeling of an Orientation-Asymmetric Surface Model for Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proutorov, Evgenii; Koibuchi, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a triangulated surface model is studied in the context of Finsler geometry (FG) modeling. This FG model is an extended version of a recently reported model for two-component membranes, and it is asymmetric under surface inversion. We show that the definition of the model is independent of how the Finsler length of a bond is defined. This leads us to understand that the canonical (or Euclidean) surface model is obtained from the FG model such that it is uniquely determined as a trivial model from the viewpoint of well definedness.

  9. Polymer mixtures in confined geometries: Model systems to explore ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to mean field behavior for very long chains, the critical behavior of mixtures confined into thin film geometry falls in the 2d Ising class irrespective of chain length. ..... AB interface does not approach the wall; (b) corresponds to a temperature .... Very recently, these theoretical studies have been extended to polymer mixtures.

  10. Bianchi-IX string cosmological model in Lyra geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    field in Lyra's geometry will either include a creation field and be equal to Hoyle's cre- ation field cosmology or contain a special vacuum field which together with the gauge vector term may be considered as a cosmological term. Subsequent investigations were done by several authors in scalar–tensor theory and cos-.

  11. Accelerating navigation in the VecGeom geometry modeller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Sandro; Zhang, Yang; pre="for the"> VecGeom Developers,

    2017-10-01

    The VecGeom geometry library is a relatively recent effort aiming to provide a modern and high performance geometry service for particle detector simulation in hierarchical detector geometries common to HEP experiments. One of its principal targets is the efficient use of vector SIMD hardware instructions to accelerate geometry calculations for single track as well as multi-track queries. Previously, excellent performance improvements compared to Geant4/ROOT could be reported for elementary geometry algorithms at the level of single shape queries. In this contribution, we will focus on the higher level navigation algorithms in VecGeom, which are the most important components as seen from the simulation engines. We will first report on our R&D effort and developments to implement SIMD enhanced data structures to speed up the well-known “voxelised” navigation algorithms, ubiquitously used for particle tracing in complex detector modules consisting of many daughter parts. Second, we will discuss complementary new approaches to improve navigation algorithms in HEP. These ideas are based on a systematic exploitation of static properties of the detector layout as well as automatic code generation and specialisation of the C++ navigator classes. Such specialisations reduce the overhead of generic- or virtual function based algorithms and enhance the effectiveness of the SIMD vector units. These novel approaches go well beyond the existing solutions available in Geant4 or TGeo/ROOT, achieve a significantly superior performance, and might be of interest for a wide range of simulation backends (GeantV, Geant4). We exemplify this with concrete benchmarks for the CMS and ALICE detectors.

  12. The geometry of terrestrial laser scanning; identification of errors, modeling and mitigation of scanning geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudarissanane, S.S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few decades, Terrestrial Laser Scanners are increasingly being used in a broad spectrum of applications, from surveying to civil engineering, medical modeling and forensics. Especially surveying applications require on one hand a quickly obtainable, high resolution point cloud but also

  13. A Cost-Effective Culture System for the In Vitro Assembly, Maturation, and Stimulation of Advanced Multilayered Multiculture Tubular Tissue Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, Caroline; Pezzoli, Daniele; Candiani, Gabriele; Mantovani, Diego

    2018-01-01

    The development of tubular engineered tissues is a challenging research area aiming to provide tissue substitutes but also in vitro models to test drugs, medical devices, and even to study physiological and pathological processes. In this work, the design, fabrication, and validation of an original cost-effective tubular multilayered-tissue culture system (TMCS) are reported. By exploiting cellularized collagen gel as scaffold, a simple moulding technique and an endothelialization step on a rotating system, TMCS allowed to easily prepare in 48 h, trilayered arterial wall models with finely organized cellular composition and to mature them for 2 weeks without any need of manipulation. Multilayered constructs incorporating different combinations of vascular cells are compared in terms of cell organization and viscoelastic mechanical properties demonstrating that cells always progressively aligned parallel to the longitudinal direction. Also, fibroblast compacted less the collagen matrix and appeared crucial in term of maturation/deposition of elastic extracellular matrix. Preliminary studies under shear stress stimulation upon connection with a flow bioreactor are successfully conducted without damaging the endothelial monolayer. Altogether, the TMCS herein developed, thanks to its versatility and multiple functionalities, holds great promise for vascular tissue engineering applications, but also for other tubular tissues such as trachea or oesophagus. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Modeling photonic crystal waveguides with noncircular geometry using green function method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uvarovaa, I.; Tsyganok, B.; Bashkatov, Y.; Khomenko, V.

    2012-01-01

    Currently in the field of photonics is an acute problem fast and accurate simulation photonic crystal waveguides with complex geometry. This paper describes an improved method of Green's functions for non-circular geometries. Based on comparison of selected efficient numerical method for finding the eigenvalues for the Green's function method for non-circular holes chosen effective method for our purposes. Simulation is realized in Maple environment. The simulation results confirmed experimentally. Key words: photonic crystal, waveguide, modeling, Green function, complex geometry

  15. Numerical simulations and mathematical models of flows in complex geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Garcia, Anier

    The research work of the present thesis was mainly aimed at exploiting one of the strengths of the Lattice Boltzmann methods, namely, the ability to handle complicated geometries to accurately simulate flows in complex geometries. In this thesis, we perform a very detailed theoretical analysis...... and through the Chapman-Enskog multi-scale expansion technique the dependence of the kinetic viscosity on each scheme is investigated. Seeking for optimal numerical schemes to eciently simulate a wide range of complex flows a variant of the finite element, off-lattice Boltzmann method [5], which uses...... the characteristic based integration is also implemented. Using the latter scheme, numerical simulations are conducted in flows of different complexities: flow in a (real) porous network and turbulent flows in ducts with wall irregularities. From the simulations of flows in porous media driven by pressure gradients...

  16. An immersed boundary method for modeling a dirty geometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Keiji; Tsubokura, Makoto

    2017-11-01

    We present a robust, fast, and low preparation cost immersed boundary method (IBM) for simulating an incompressible high Re flow around highly complex geometries. The method is achieved by the dispersion of the momentum by the axial linear projection and the approximate domain assumption satisfying the mass conservation around the wall including cells. This methodology has been verified against an analytical theory and wind tunnel experiment data. Next, we simulate the problem of flow around a rotating object and demonstrate the ability of this methodology to the moving geometry problem. This methodology provides the possibility as a method for obtaining a quick solution at a next large scale supercomputer. This research was supported by MEXT as ``Priority Issue on Post-K computer'' (Development of innovative design and production processes) and used computational resources of the K computer provided by the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science.

  17. Planning for Evolution in a Production Environment: Migration from a Legacy Geometry Code to an Abstract Geometry Modeling Language in STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jason C.; Lauret, Jerome; Perevoztchikov, Victor

    2012-12-01

    Increasingly detailed descriptions of complex detector geometries are required for the simulation and analysis of today's high-energy and nuclear physics experiments. As new tools for the representation of geometry models become available during the course of an experiment, a fundamental challenge arises: how best to migrate from legacy geometry codes developed over many runs to the new technologies, such as the ROOT/TGeo [1] framework, without losing touch with years of development, tuning and validation. One approach, which has been discussed within the community for a number of years, is to represent the geometry model in a higher-level language independent of the concrete implementation of the geometry. The STAR experiment has used this approach to successfully migrate its legacy GEANT 3-era geometry to an Abstract geometry Modelling Language (AgML), which allows us to create both native GEANT 3 and ROOT/TGeo implementations. The language is supported by parsers and a C++ class library which enables the automated conversion of the original source code to AgML, supports export back to the original AgSTAR[5] representation, and creates the concrete ROOT/TGeo geometry implementation used by our track reconstruction software. In this paper we present our approach, design and experience and will demonstrate physical consistency between the original AgSTAR and new AgML geometry representations.

  18. Transient Changes in Molecular Geometries and How to Model Them

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Asmus Ougaard

    Light-induced chemical processes are accompanied by molecular motion on the femtosecond time scale. Uncovering this dynamical motion is central to understanding the chemical reaction on a fundamental level. This thesis focuses on the aspects of excess excitation energy dissipation via dynamic...... observe how the wide distribution of ground state geometries is responsible for decoherence, and that the solvent cage actually facilitates coherent motion, by blocking the newly discovered vibrational mode. We furthermore observe a non-specific, rotational solvent response to the excitation. The second...

  19. Reliability of Tubular Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper the preliminary results obtained by tests on tubular joints are presented. The joints are T-joints and the loading is static. It is the intention in continuation of these tests to perform tests on other types of joints (e.g. Y-joints) and also with dynamic loading. The purpose...... of the test is partly to obtain empirical data for the ultimate load-carrying capacity of tubular T-joints and partly to obtain some experience in performing tests with tubular joints. It is well known that tubular joints are usually designed in offshore engineering on the basis of empirical formulas obtained...... by experimental test results. Therefore, there is a need for performing experimental tests in this area....

  20. Micro-tomography based Geometry Modeling of Three-Dimensional Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guodong; Chen, Chenghua; Yuan, Shenggang; Meng, Songhe; Liang, Jun

    2018-06-01

    A tracking and recognizing algorithm is proposed to automatically generate irregular cross-sections and central path of braid yarn within the 3D braided composites by using sets of high resolution tomography images. Only the initial cross-sections of braid yarns in a tomography image after treatment are required to be calibrated manually as searching cross-section template. The virtual geometry of 3D braided composites including some detailed geometry information, such as the braid yarn squeezing deformation, braid yarn distortion and braid yarn path deviation etc., can be reconstructed. The reconstructed geometry model can reflect the change of braid configurations during solidification process. The geometry configurations and mechanical properties of the braided composites are analyzed by using the reconstructed geometry model.

  1. Entropy Error Model of Planar Geometry Features in GIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dajun; GUAN Yunlan; GONG Jianya; DU Daosheng

    2003-01-01

    Positional error of line segments is usually described by using "g-band", however, its band width is in relation to the confidence level choice. In fact, given different confidence levels, a series of concentric bands can be obtained. To overcome the effect of confidence level on the error indicator, by introducing the union entropy theory, we propose an entropy error ellipse index of point, then extend it to line segment and polygon,and establish an entropy error band of line segment and an entropy error donut of polygon. The research shows that the entropy error index can be determined uniquely and is not influenced by confidence level, and that they are suitable for positional uncertainty of planar geometry features.

  2. On stochastic geometry modeling of cellular uplink transmission with truncated channel inversion power control

    KAUST Repository

    Elsawy, Hesham; Hossain, Ekram

    2014-01-01

    Using stochastic geometry, we develop a tractable uplink modeling paradigm for outage probability and spectral efficiency in both single and multi-tier cellular wireless networks. The analysis accounts for per user equipment (UE) power control

  3. Hillslope hydrological modeling : the role of bedrock geometry and hillslope-stream interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahedi, K.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: Hillslope hydrology, hydrological modeling, bedrock geometry, boundary condition, numerical solution.

    This thesis focuses on hillslope subsurface flow as a dominant control on the hydrological processes defining the catchment response to rainfall. Due to the difficulties

  4. A Stochastic Geometry Model for Multi-hop Highway Vehicular Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Muhammad Junaid; Elsawy, Hesham; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    dissemination. This paper exploits stochastic geometry to develop a tractable and accurate modeling framework to characterize the multi-hop transmissions for vehicular networks in a multi-lane highway setup. In particular, we study the tradeoffs between per

  5. Morphing the feature-based multi-blocks of normative/healthy vertebral geometries to scoliosis vertebral geometries: development of personalized finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadagali, Prasannaah; Peters, James R; Balasubramanian, Sriram

    2018-03-12

    Personalized Finite Element (FE) models and hexahedral elements are preferred for biomechanical investigations. Feature-based multi-block methods are used to develop anatomically accurate personalized FE models with hexahedral mesh. It is tedious to manually construct multi-blocks for large number of geometries on an individual basis to develop personalized FE models. Mesh-morphing method mitigates the aforementioned tediousness in meshing personalized geometries every time, but leads to element warping and loss of geometrical data. Such issues increase in magnitude when normative spine FE model is morphed to scoliosis-affected spinal geometry. The only way to bypass the issue of hex-mesh distortion or loss of geometry as a result of morphing is to rely on manually constructing the multi-blocks for scoliosis-affected spine geometry of each individual, which is time intensive. A method to semi-automate the construction of multi-blocks on the geometry of scoliosis vertebrae from the existing multi-blocks of normative vertebrae is demonstrated in this paper. High-quality hexahedral elements were generated on the scoliosis vertebrae from the morphed multi-blocks of normative vertebrae. Time taken was 3 months to construct the multi-blocks for normative spine and less than a day for scoliosis. Efforts taken to construct multi-blocks on personalized scoliosis spinal geometries are significantly reduced by morphing existing multi-blocks.

  6. Modeling of Neoclassical Tearing Mode Stability for Generalized Toroidal Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.L. Rosenberg; D.A. Gates; A. Pletzer; J.E. Menard; S.E. Kruger; C.C. Hegna; F. Paoletti; S. Sabbagh

    2002-01-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can lead to disruption and loss of confinement. Previous analysis of these modes used large aspect ratio, low beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) approximations to determine the effect of NTMs on tokamak plasmas. A more accurate tool is needed to predict the onset of these instabilities. As a follow-up to recent theoretical work, a code has been written which computes the tearing mode island growth rate for arbitrary tokamak geometry. It calls PEST-3 [A. Pletzer et al., J. Comput. Phys. 115, 530 (1994)] to compute delta prime, the resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) matching parameter. The code also calls the FLUXGRID routines in NIMROD [A.H. Glasser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 41, A747 (1999)] for Dnc, DI and DR [C.C. Hegna, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3980 (1999); A.H. Glasser et al., Phys. Fluids 18, 875 (1975)], which are the bootstrap current driven term and the ideal and resistive interchange mode criterion, respectively. In addition to these components, the NIMROD routines calculate alphas-H, a new correction to the Pfirsch-Schlter term. Finite parallel transport effects were added and a National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] equilibrium was analyzed. Another program takes the output of PEST-3 and allows the user to specify the rational surface, island width, and amount of detail near the perturbed surface to visualize the total helical flux. The results of this work will determine the stability of NTMs in an spherical torus (ST) [Y.-K.M. Peng et al., Nucl. Fusion 26, 769 (1986)] plasma with greater accuracy than previously achieved

  7. MONTE CARLO ANALYSES OF THE YALINA THERMAL FACILITY WITH SERPENT STEREOLITHOGRAPHY GEOMETRY MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the YALINA Thermal subcritical assembly of Belarus using two different Monte Carlo transport programs, SERPENT and MCNP. The MCNP model is based on combinatorial geometry and universes hierarchy, while the SERPENT model is based on Stereolithography geometry. The latter consists of unstructured triangulated surfaces defined by the normal and vertices. This geometry format is used by 3D printers and it has been created by: the CUBIT software, MATLAB scripts, and C coding. All the Monte Carlo simulations have been performed using the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library. Both MCNP and SERPENT share the same geometry specifications, which describe the facility details without using any material homogenization. Three different configurations have been studied with different number of fuel rods. The three fuel configurations use 216, 245, or 280 fuel rods, respectively. The numerical simulations show that the agreement between SERPENT and MCNP results is within few tens of pcms.

  8. COGEDIF - automatic TORT and DORT input generation from MORSE combinatorial geometry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, R.A.; Barnett, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    COGEDIF is an interactive utility which was developed to automate the preparation of two and three dimensional geometrical inputs for the ORNL-TORT and DORT discrete ordinates programs from complex three dimensional models described using the MORSE combinatorial geometry input description. The program creates either continuous or disjoint mesh input based upon the intersections of user defined meshing planes and the MORSE body definitions. The composition overlay of the combinatorial geometry is used to create the composition mapping of the discretized geometry based upon the composition found at the centroid of each of the mesh cells. This program simplifies the process of using discrete orthogonal mesh cells to represent non-orthogonal geometries in large models which require mesh sizes of the order of a million cells or more. The program was specifically written to take advantage of the new TORT disjoint mesh option which was developed at ORNL

  9. Geometry parameters for musculoskeletal modelling of the shoulder system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Helm, F C; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Pronk, G M; Van der Woude, L H; Rozendal, R H

    A dynamical finite-element model of the shoulder mechanism consisting of thorax, clavicula, scapula and humerus is outlined. The parameters needed for the model are obtained in a cadaver experiment consisting of both shoulders of seven cadavers. In this paper, in particular, the derivation of

  10. Thermal CFD Analysis of Tubular Light Guides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Šikula

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tubular light guides are applicable for daylighting of windowless areas in buildings. Despite their many positive indoor climate aspects they can also present some problems with heat losses and condensation. A computer CFD model focused on the evaluation of temperature distribution and air flow inside tubular light guides of different dimensions was studied. The physical model of the tested light guides of lengths more than 0.60 m proves shows that Rayleigh numbers are adequate for a turbulent air flow. The turbulent model was applied despite the small heat flux differences between the turbulent and laminar model. The CFD simulations resulted into conclusions that the growing ratio of length/diameter increases the heat transmission loss/linear transmittance as much as by 50 percent. Tubular light guides of smaller diameters have lower heat transmission losses compared to the wider ones of the same lengths with the same outdoor temperature being taken into account. The simulation results confirmed the thermal bridge effect of the tubular light guide tube inside the insulated flat roof details. The thermal transmittance of the studied light guides in the whole roof area was substituted with the point thermal bridges. This substitution gives possibility for simple thermal evaluation of the tubular light pipes in roof constructions.

  11. Geometry of the Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, L.Eh.; Gliner, Eh.B.

    1978-01-01

    Problems of investigating the Universe space-time geometry are described on a popular level. Immediate space-time geometries, corresponding to three cosmologic models are considered. Space-time geometry of a closed model is the spherical Riemann geonetry, of an open model - is the Lobachevskij geometry; and of a plane model - is the Euclidean geometry. The Universe real geometry in the contemporary epoch of development is based on the data testifying to the fact that the Universe is infinitely expanding

  12. Coalescing colony model: Mean-field, scaling, and geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Giulia; Mallick, Kirone; Barthelemy, Marc

    2017-12-01

    We analyze the coalescing model where a `primary' colony grows and randomly emits secondary colonies that spread and eventually coalesce with it. This model describes population proliferation in theoretical ecology, tumor growth, and is also of great interest for modeling urban sprawl. Assuming the primary colony to be always circular of radius r (t ) and the emission rate proportional to r (t) θ , where θ >0 , we derive the mean-field equations governing the dynamics of the primary colony, calculate the scaling exponents versus θ , and compare our results with numerical simulations. We then critically test the validity of the circular approximation for the colony shape and show that it is sound for a constant emission rate (θ =0 ). However, when the emission rate is proportional to the perimeter, the circular approximation breaks down and the roughness of the primary colony cannot be discarded, thus modifying the scaling exponents.

  13. Tubular closure device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klahn, F.C.; Nolan, J.H.; Wills, C.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to a closure mechanism for closing openings such as the bore of a conduit and for releasably securing members within the bore. More particularly, this invention relates to a closure mechanism for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in nuclear reactors

  14. Optimized numerical annular flow dryout model using the drift-flux model in tube geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Ji Han; Lee, Un Chul

    2008-01-01

    Many experimental analyses for annular film dryouts, which is one of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) mechanisms, have been performed because of their importance. Numerical approaches must also be developed in order to assess the results from experiments and to perform pre-tests before experiments. Various thermal-hydraulic codes, such as RELAP, COBRATF, MARS, etc., have been used in the assessment of the results of dryout experiments and in experimental pre-tests. These thermal-hydraulic codes are general tools intended for the analysis of various phenomena that could appear in nuclear power plants, and many models applying these codes are unnecessarily complex for the focused analysis of dryout phenomena alone. In this study, a numerical model was developed for annular film dryout using the drift-flux model from uniform heated tube geometry. Several candidates of models that strongly affect dryout, such as the entrainment model, deposition model, and the criterion for the dryout point model, were tested as candidates for inclusion in an optimized annular film dryout model. The optimized model was developed by adopting the best combination of these candidate models, as determined through comparison with experimental data. This optimized model showed reasonable results, which were better than those of MARS code

  15. Convex-based void filling method for CAD-based Monte Carlo geometry modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shengpeng; Cheng, Mengyun; Song, Jing; Long, Pengcheng; Hu, Liqin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a new void filling method named CVF for CAD based MC geometry modeling. • We describe convex based void description based and quality-based space subdivision. • The results showed improvements provided by CVF for both modeling and MC calculation efficiency. - Abstract: CAD based automatic geometry modeling tools have been widely applied to generate Monte Carlo (MC) calculation geometry for complex systems according to CAD models. Automatic void filling is one of the main functions in the CAD based MC geometry modeling tools, because the void space between parts in CAD models is traditionally not modeled while MC codes such as MCNP need all the problem space to be described. A dedicated void filling method, named Convex-based Void Filling (CVF), is proposed in this study for efficient void filling and concise void descriptions. The method subdivides all the problem space into disjointed regions using Quality based Subdivision (QS) and describes the void space in each region with complementary descriptions of the convex volumes intersecting with that region. It has been implemented in SuperMC/MCAM, the Multiple-Physics Coupling Analysis Modeling Program, and tested on International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Alite model. The results showed that the new method reduced both automatic modeling time and MC calculation time

  16. Dynamic hyperbolic geometry: building intuition and understanding mediated by a Euclidean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Armella, Luis; Brady, Corey; Elizondo-Ramirez, Rubén

    2018-05-01

    This paper explores a deep transformation in mathematical epistemology and its consequences for teaching and learning. With the advent of non-Euclidean geometries, direct, iconic correspondences between physical space and the deductive structures of mathematical inquiry were broken. For non-Euclidean ideas even to become thinkable the mathematical community needed to accumulate over twenty centuries of reflection and effort: a precious instance of distributed intelligence at the cultural level. In geometry education after this crisis, relations between intuitions and geometrical reasoning must be established philosophically, rather than taken for granted. One approach seeks intuitive supports only for Euclidean explorations, viewing non-Euclidean inquiry as fundamentally non-intuitive in nature. We argue for moving beyond such an impoverished approach, using dynamic geometry environments to develop new intuitions even in the extremely challenging setting of hyperbolic geometry. Our efforts reverse the typical direction, using formal structures as a source for a new family of intuitions that emerge from exploring a digital model of hyperbolic geometry. This digital model is elaborated within a Euclidean dynamic geometry environment, enabling a conceptual dance that re-configures Euclidean knowledge as a support for building intuitions in hyperbolic space-intuitions based not directly on physical experience but on analogies extending Euclidean concepts.

  17. Conservation laws and geometry of perturbed coset models

    CERN Document Server

    Bakas, Ioannis

    1994-01-01

    We present a Lagrangian description of the $SU(2)/U(1)$ coset model perturbed by its first thermal operator. This is the simplest perturbation that changes sign under Krammers--Wannier duality. The resulting theory, which is a 2--component generalization of the sine--Gordon model, is then taken in Minkowski space. For negative values of the coupling constant $g$, it is classically equivalent to the $O(4)$ non--linear $\\s$--model reduced in a certain frame. For $g > 0$, it describes the relativistic motion of vortices in a constant external field. Viewing the classical equations of motion as a zero curvature condition, we obtain recursive relations for the infinitely many conservation laws by the abelianization method of gauge connections. The higher spin currents are constructed entirely using an off--critical generalization of the $W_{\\infty}$ generators. We give a geometric interpretation to the corresponding charges in terms of embeddings. Applications to the chirally invariant $U(2)$ Gross--Neveu model ar...

  18. Geometry of coexistence in the interacting boson model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Isacker, P.; Frank, A.; Vargas, C.E.

    2004-01-01

    The Interacting Boson Model (IBM) with configuration mixing is applied to describe the phenomenon of coexistence in nuclei. The analysis suggests that the IBM with configuration mixing, used in conjunction with a (matrix) coherent-state method, may be a reliable tool for the study of geometric aspects of shape coexistence in nuclei

  19. Geometry of neural networks and models with singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumizu, Kenji

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses maximum likelihood estimation with unidentifiability of parameters. Unidentifiability is formulated as a conic singularity of the model. It is known that the likelihood ratio may have unusually large order in unidentifiable cases. A sufficient condition for such large order is given and applied to neural networks

  20. Dynamic Modeling Accuracy Dependence on Errors in Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    A nonlinear simulation of the NASA Generic Transport Model was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of dynamic models identified from flight data. Measurements from a typical system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated and then used to estimate stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo analysis. Based on the results, recommendations were provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using other flight conditions, parameter estimation methods, and a full-scale F-16 nonlinear aircraft simulation were compared with these recommendations.

  1. Geometry of surfaces associated to Grassmannian sigma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delisle, L; Hussin, V; Zakrzewski, W J

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the geometric characteristics of constant Gaussian curvature surfaces obtained from solutions of the G(m, n) sigma model. Most of these solutions are related to the Veronese sequence. We show that we can distinguish surfaces with the same Gaussian curvature using additional quantities like the topological charge and the mean curvature. The cases of G(1,n) = CP n-1 and G(2,n) are used to illustrate these characteristics. (paper)

  2. Geometry Based Design Automation : Applied to Aircraft Modelling and Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Amadori, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Product development processes are continuously challenged by demands for increased efficiency. As engineering products become more and more complex, efficient tools and methods for integrated and automated design are needed throughout the development process. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) is one promising technique that has the potential to drastically improve concurrent design. MDO frameworks combine several disciplinary models with the aim of gaining a holistic perspective of ...

  3. Modelling of vapour explosion in a stratified geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brayer, Claude

    1994-01-01

    A vapour explosion is the explosive vaporisation of a volatile liquid in contact with another hotter liquid. Such a violent vaporisation requires an intimate mixing and a fine fragmentation of both liquids. Based on a synthesis of published experimental results, the author of this research thesis reports the development of a new physical model which describes the explosion. In this model, the explosion propagation is due to the propagation of the pressure wave associated with this this explosion, all along the vapour film which initially separates both liquids. The author takes the presence of water in the liquid initially located over the film into account. This presence of vapour explains experimental propagation rates. Another consequence, when the pressure wave passes, is an acceleration of liquids at different rates below and above the film. The author considers that a mixture layer then forms from the point of disappearance of the film, between both liquids, and that fragmentation is due to the turbulence in this mixture layer. This fragmentation model is then introduced into an Euler thermodynamic, three-dimensional and multi-constituents code of calculation, MC3D, to study the influence of fragmentation on thermal exchanges between the various constituents on the volatile liquid vaporisation [fr

  4. [Crop geometry identification based on inversion of semiempirical BRDF models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-jiang; Huang, Wen-jiang; Mu, Xu-han; Wang, Jin-diz; Wang, Ji-hua

    2009-09-01

    With the rapid development of remote sensing technology, the application of remote sensing has extended from single view angle to multi-view angles. It was studied for the qualitative and quantitative effect of average leaf angle (ALA) on crop canopy reflected spectrum. Effect of ALA on canopy reflected spectrum can not be ignored with inversion of leaf area index (LAI) and monitoring of crop growth condition by remote sensing technology. Investigations of the effect of erective and horizontal varieties were conducted by bidirectional canopy reflected spectrum and semiempirical bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) models. The sensitive analysis was done based on the weight for the volumetric kernel (fvol), the weight for the geometric kernel (fgeo), and the weight for constant corresponding to isotropic reflectance (fiso) at red band (680 nm) and near infrared band (800 nm). By combining the weights of the red and near-infrared bands, the semiempirical models can obtain structural information by retrieving biophysical parameters from the physical BRDF model and a number of bidirectional observations. So, it will allow an on-site and non-sampling mode of crop ALA identification, which is useful for using remote sensing for crop growth monitoring and for improving the LAI inversion accuracy, and it will help the farmers in guiding the fertilizer and irrigation management in the farmland without a priori knowledge.

  5. Perbandingan antara Keefektifan Model Guided Discovery Learning dan Project-Based Learning pada Matakuliah Geometri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okky Riswandha Imawan

    2015-12-01

    Abstract This research aims to describe the effectiveness and effectiveness differences of the Guided Discovery Learning (GDL Model and the Project Based Learning (PjBL Model in terms of achievement, self-confidence, and critical thinking skills of students on the Solid Geometry subjects. This research was quasi experimental. The research subjects were two undergraduate classes of Mathematics Education Program, Ahmad Dahlan University, in their second semester, established at random. The data analysis to test the effectiveness of the GDL and PjBL Models in terms of each of the dependent variables used the t-test. The data analysis to test differences between effectiveness of the GDL and that of the PjBL Model used the MANOVA test. The results of this research show that viewed from achievement, self confidence, and critical thinking skills of the students are the application of the GDL Model on Solid Geometry subject is effective, the application of the PjBL Model on Solid Geometry subject is effective, and there is no difference in the effectiveness of GDL and PjBL Models on Solid Geometry subject in terms of achievement, self confidence, and critical thinking skills of the students. Keywords: guided discovery learning model, project-based learning model, achievement, self-confidence, critical thinking skills

  6. Emergence of geometry: A two-dimensional toy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, Jorge; Espriu, Domene; Puigdomenech, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We review the similarities between the effective chiral Lagrangrian, relevant for low-energy strong interactions, and the Einstein-Hilbert action. We use these analogies to suggest a specific mechanism whereby gravitons would emerge as Goldstone bosons of a global SO(D)xGL(D) symmetry broken down to SO(D) by fermion condensation. We propose a two-dimensional toy model where a dynamical zweibein is generated from a topological theory without any preexisting metric structure, the space being endowed only with an affine connection. A metric appears only after the symmetry breaking; thus the notion of distance is an induced effective one. In spite of several nonstandard features this simple toy model appears to be renormalizable and at long distances is described by an effective Lagrangian that corresponds to that of two-dimensional gravity (Liouville theory). The induced cosmological constant is related to the dynamical mass M acquired by the fermion fields in the breaking, which also acts as an infrared regulator. The low-energy expansion is valid for momenta k>M, i.e. for supra-horizon scales. We briefly discuss a possible implementation of a similar mechanism in four dimensions.

  7. The emergence of geometry: a two-dimensional toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Alfaro, Jorge; Puigdomenech, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We review the similarities between the effective chiral lagrangrian, relevant for low-energy strong interactions, and the Einstein-Hilbert action. We use these analogies to suggest a specific mechanism whereby gravitons would emerge as Goldstone bosons of a global SO(D) X GL(D) symmetry broken down to SO(D) by fermion condensation. We propose a two-dimensional toy model where a dynamical zwei-bein is generated from a topological theory without any pre-existing metric structure, the space being endowed only with an affine connection. A metric appears only after the symmetry breaking; thus the notion of distance is an induced effective one. In spite of several non-standard features this simple toy model appears to be renormalizable and at long distances is described by an effective lagrangian that corresponds to that of two-dimensional gravity (Liouville theory). The induced cosmological constant is related to the dynamical mass M acquired by the fermion fields in the breaking, which also acts as an infrared re...

  8. 3D Printing of Molecular Models with Calculated Geometries and p Orbital Isosurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Felix A.; Blauch, David N.

    2017-01-01

    3D printing was used to prepare models of the calculated geometries of unsaturated organic structures. Incorporation of p orbital isosurfaces into the models enables students in introductory organic chemistry courses to have hands-on experience with the concept of orbital alignment in strained and unstrained p systems.

  9. Mathematical modeling for prediction and optimization of TIG welding pool geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Esme

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, nonlinear and multi-objective mathematical models were developed to determine the process parameters corresponding to optimum weld pool geometry. The objectives of the developed mathematical models are to maximize tensile load (TL, penetration (P, area of penetration (AP and/or minimize heat affected zone (HAZ, upper width (UW and upper height (UH depending upon the requirements.

  10. Beyond the Standard Model with noncommutative geometry, strolling towards quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinetti, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Noncommutative geometry in its many incarnations appears at the crossroad of many researches in theoretical and mathematical physics: from models of quantum spacetime(with or without breaking of Lorentz symmetry) to loop gravity and string theory, from early considerations on UV-divergenciesin quantum field theory to recent models of gauge theories on noncommutatives pacetime, from Connes description of the standard model of elementary particles to recent Pati-Salam like extensions. We list several of these applications, emphasizing also the original point of view brought by noncommutative geometry on the nature of time. This text serves as an introduction to the volume of proceedings of the parallel session “Noncommutative geometry and quantum gravity”, as a part of the conference “Conceptual and technical challenges in quantum gravity” organized at the University of Rome La Sapienza sin September 2014. (paper)

  11. Theoretical models of Kapton heating in solar array geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Thomas L.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to understand pyrolysis of Kapton in solar arrays, a computational heat transfer program was developed. This model allows for the different materials and widely divergent length scales of the problem. The present status of the calculation indicates that thin copper traces surrounded by Kapton and carrying large currents can show large temperature increases, but the other configurations seen on solar arrays have adequate heat sinks to prevent substantial heating of the Kapton. Electron currents from the ambient plasma can also contribute to heating of thin traces. Since Kapton is stable at temperatures as high as 600 C, this indicates that it should be suitable for solar array applications. There are indications that the adhesive sued in solar arrays may be a strong contributor to the pyrolysis problem seen in solar array vacuum chamber tests.

  12. Information geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ay, Nihat; Lê, Hông Vân; Schwachhöfer, Lorenz

    2017-01-01

    The book provides a comprehensive introduction and a novel mathematical foundation of the field of information geometry with complete proofs and detailed background material on measure theory, Riemannian geometry and Banach space theory. Parametrised measure models are defined as fundamental geometric objects, which can be both finite or infinite dimensional. Based on these models, canonical tensor fields are introduced and further studied, including the Fisher metric and the Amari-Chentsov tensor, and embeddings of statistical manifolds are investigated. This novel foundation then leads to application highlights, such as generalizations and extensions of the classical uniqueness result of Chentsov or the Cramér-Rao inequality. Additionally, several new application fields of information geometry are highlighted, for instance hierarchical and graphical models, complexity theory, population genetics, or Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The book will be of interest to mathematicians who are interested in geometry, inf...

  13. Morphology and stratal geometry of the Antarctic continental shelf: Insights from models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alan K.; Barker, Peter F.; Brancolini, Giuliano

    1997-01-01

    Reconstruction of past ice-sheet fluctuations from the stratigraphy of glaciated continental shelves requires understanding of the relationships among the stratal geometry, glacial and marine sedimentary processes, and ice dynamics. We investigate the formation of the morphology and the broad stratal geometry of topsets on the Antarctic continental shelf with numerical models. Our models assume that the stratal geometry and morphology are principally the results of time-integrated effects of glacial erosion and sedimentation related to the location of the seaward edge of the grounded ice. The location of the grounding line varies with time almost randomly across the shelf. With these simple assumptions, the models can successfully mimic salient features of the morphology and the stratal geometry. The models suggest that the current shelf has gradually evolved to its present geometry by many glacial advances and retreats of the grounding line to different locations across the shelf. The locations of the grounding line do not appear to be linearly correlated with either fluctuations in the 5 l s O record (which presumably represents changes in the global ice volume) or with the global sea-level curve, suggesting that either a more complex relationship exists or local effects dominate. The models suggest that erosion of preglacial sediments is confined to the inner shelf, and erosion decreases and deposition increases toward the shelf edge. Some of the deposited glacial sediments must be derived from continental erosion. The sediments probably undergo extensive transport and reworking obliterating much of the evidence for their original depositional environment. The flexural rigidity and the tectonic subsidence of the underlying lithosphere modify the bathymetry of the shelf, but probably have little effect on the stratal geometry. Our models provide several guidelines for the interpretation of unconformities, the nature of preserved topset deposits, and the

  14. Geometry optimization method versus predictive ability in QSPR modeling for ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybinska, Anna; Sosnowska, Anita; Barycki, Maciej; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-02-01

    Computational techniques, such as Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship (QSPR) modeling, are very useful in predicting physicochemical properties of various chemicals. Building QSPR models requires calculating molecular descriptors and the proper choice of the geometry optimization method, which will be dedicated to specific structure of tested compounds. Herein, we examine the influence of the ionic liquids' (ILs) geometry optimization methods on the predictive ability of QSPR models by comparing three models. The models were developed based on the same experimental data on density collected for 66 ionic liquids, but with employing molecular descriptors calculated from molecular geometries optimized at three different levels of the theory, namely: (1) semi-empirical (PM7), (2) ab initio (HF/6-311+G*) and (3) density functional theory (B3LYP/6-311+G*). The model in which the descriptors were calculated by using ab initio HF/6-311+G* method indicated the best predictivity capabilities ({{Q}}_{{EXT}}2 = 0.87). However, PM7-based model has comparable values of quality parameters ({{Q}}_{{EXT}}2 = 0.84). Obtained results indicate that semi-empirical methods (faster and less expensive regarding CPU time) can be successfully employed to geometry optimization in QSPR studies for ionic liquids.

  15. Modelling of turbulence and combustion for simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arntzen, Bjoern Johan

    1998-12-31

    This thesis analyses and presents new models for turbulent reactive flows for CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) simulation of gas explosions in complex geometries like offshore modules. The course of a gas explosion in a complex geometry is largely determined by the development of turbulence and the accompanying increased combustion rate. To be able to model the process it is necessary to use a CFD code as a starting point, provided with a suitable turbulence and combustion model. The modelling and calculations are done in a three-dimensional finite volume CFD code, where complex geometries are represented by a porosity concept, which gives porosity on the grid cell faces, depending on what is inside the cell. The turbulent flow field is modelled with a k-{epsilon} turbulence model. Subgrid models are used for production of turbulence from geometry not fully resolved on the grid. Results from laser doppler anemometry measurements around obstructions in steady and transient flows have been analysed and the turbulence models have been improved to handle transient, subgrid and reactive flows. The combustion is modelled with a burning velocity model and a flame model which incorporates the burning velocity into the code. Two different flame models have been developed: SIF (Simple Interface Flame model), which treats the flame as an interface between reactants and products, and the {beta}-model where the reaction zone is resolved with about three grid cells. The flame normally starts with a quasi laminar burning velocity, due to flame instabilities, modelled as a function of flame radius and laminar burning velocity. As the flow field becomes turbulent, the flame uses a turbulent burning velocity model based on experimental data and dependent on turbulence parameters and laminar burning velocity. The laminar burning velocity is modelled as a function of gas mixture, equivalence ratio, pressure and temperature in reactant. Simulations agree well with experiments. 139

  16. Control rod interaction models for use in 2D and 3D reactor geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannerman, R.C.

    1985-11-01

    Control rod interaction models are developed for use in two-dimensional and three-dimensional reactor geometries. These models allow the total worth of any combination of control rods inserted to be determined from the individual worths in conjunction with an algorithm representing interaction effects between them. The validity of the assumptions is demonstrated for fast and thermal systems showing modelling errors of 1#percent# or less in inserted control rod worths. The models are ideally suited for most reactor systems. (UK)

  17. Effects of homogeneous geometry models in simulating the fuel balls in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mengjen; Liang Jenqhorng; Peir Jinnjer; Chao Dersheng

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the core geometry of HTR-10 was simulated using four different models including: (1) model 1 - an explicit double heterogeneous geometry, (2) model 2 - a mixing of UO 2 kernel and four layers in each TRISO particle into one, (3) model 3 - a mixing of 8,335 TRISO particles and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one, and (4) model 4 - a mixing of the outer graphite shell, 8,335 TRISO particles, and the inner graphite matrix in each fuel ball into one. The associated initial core computations were performed using the MCNP version 1.51 computer code. The experimental fuel loading height of 123 cm was employed for each model. The results revealed that the multiplication factors ranged from largest to smallest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. The neutron spectrum in the fuel region of each models varied from the hardest to the softest are model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4 while the averaged neutron spectrum in fuel ball from hardest to softest are model 4, model 3, model 2, and model 1. In addition, the CPU execution times extended from longest to shortest with model 1, model 2, model 3, and model 4. (author)

  18. Modeling and fabrication of an RF MEMS variable capacitor with a fractal geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.

    2013-08-16

    In this paper, we model, fabricate, and measure an electrostatically actuated MEMS variable capacitor that utilizes a fractal geometry and serpentine-like suspension arms. Explicitly, a variable capacitor that possesses a top suspended plate with a specific fractal geometry and also possesses a bottom fixed plate complementary in shape to the top plate has been fabricated in the PolyMUMPS process. An important benefit that was achieved from using the fractal geometry in designing the MEMS variable capacitor is increasing the tuning range of the variable capacitor beyond the typical ratio of 1.5. The modeling was carried out using the commercially available finite element software COMSOL to predict both the tuning range and pull-in voltage. Measurement results show that the tuning range is 2.5 at a maximum actuation voltage of 10V.

  19. Room acoustics modeling using a point-cloud representation of the room geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovic, Milos; Olesen, Søren Krarup; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2013-01-01

    Room acoustics modeling is usually based on the room geometry that is parametrically described prior to a sound transmission calculation. This is a highly room-specific task and rather time consuming if a complex geometry is to be described. Here, a run time generic method for an arbitrary room...... geometry acquisition is presented. The method exploits a depth sensor of the Kinect device that provides a point based information of a scanned room interior. After post-processing of the Kinect output data, a 3D point-cloud model of the room is obtained. Sound transmission between two selected points...... level of user immersion by a real time acoustical simulation of a dynamic scenes....

  20. Spinning geometry = Twisted geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freidel, Laurent; Ziprick, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that the SU(2)-gauge invariant phase space of loop gravity can be represented in terms of twisted geometries. These are piecewise-linear-flat geometries obtained by gluing together polyhedra, but the resulting geometries are not continuous across the faces. Here we show that this phase space can also be represented by continuous, piecewise-flat three-geometries called spinning geometries. These are composed of metric-flat three-cells glued together consistently. The geometry of each cell and the manner in which they are glued is compatible with the choice of fluxes and holonomies. We first remark that the fluxes provide each edge with an angular momentum. By studying the piecewise-flat geometries which minimize edge lengths, we show that these angular momenta can be literally interpreted as the spin of the edges: the geometries of all edges are necessarily helices. We also show that the compatibility of the gluing maps with the holonomy data results in the same conclusion. This shows that a spinning geometry represents a way to glue together the three-cells of a twisted geometry to form a continuous geometry which represents a point in the loop gravity phase space. (paper)

  1. The abstract geometry modeling language (AgML): experience and road map toward eRHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Jason; Lauret, Jerome; Perevoztchikov, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The STAR experiment has adopted an Abstract Geometry Modeling Language (AgML) as the primary description of our geometry model. AgML establishes a level of abstraction, decoupling the definition of the detector from the software libraries used to create the concrete geometry model. Thus, AgML allows us to support both our legacy GEANT 3 simulation application and our ROOT/TGeo based reconstruction software from a single source, which is demonstrably self- consistent. While AgML was developed primarily as a tool to migrate away from our legacy FORTRAN-era geometry codes, it also provides a rich syntax geared towards the rapid development of detector models. AgML has been successfully employed by users to quickly develop and integrate the descriptions of several new detectors in the RHIC/STAR experiment including the Forward GEM Tracker (FGT) and Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) upgrades installed in STAR for the 2012 and 2013 runs. AgML has furthermore been heavily utilized to study future upgrades to the STAR detector as it prepares for the eRHIC era. With its track record of practical use in a live experiment in mind, we present the status, lessons learned and future of the AgML language as well as our experience in bringing the code into our production and development environments. We will discuss the path toward eRHIC and pushing the current model to accommodate for detector miss-alignment and high precision physics.

  2. Geometric optimization of a solar cubic-cavity multi-tubular thermochemical reactor using a Monte Carlo-finite element radiative transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valades-Pelayo, P.J.; Romero-Paredes, H.; Arancibia-Bulnes, C.A.; Villafán-Vidales, H.I.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the optimization of a multi-tubular solar thermochemical cavity reactor is carried out. The reactor consists of a cubic cavity made of woven graphite, housing nine 2.54 cm diameter tungsten tubes. A heat transfer model is developed and implemented considering high-temperature radiative transfer at steady state. The temperature distribution on the receiver tubes is determined by using a hybrid Monte Carlo-finite volume approach. The optimization aims at maximizing average tube temperature by varying tube locations. Optimal tube distributions are explored by using a custom-made stochastic, multi-parameter, global optimization algorithm. A considerable increase in average temperature as well as improvement on temperature uniformity is found in the optimized tube arrays. Patterns among the different optimal distributions are found, and general features are discussed.

  3. Application of adobe flash media to optimize jigsaw learning model on geometry material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, P.; Imam, S.; Ikrar, P.

    2018-05-01

    This study aims to determine and describe the effectiveness of the application of adobe flash media for jigsaw learning model on geometry material. In this study, the modified jigsaw learning with adobe flash media is called jigsaw-flash model. This research was conducted in Surakarta. The research method used is mix method research with exploratory sequential strategy. The results of this study indicate that students feel more comfortable and interested in studying geometry material taught by jigsaw-flash model. In addition, students taught using the jigsaw-flash model are more active and motivated than the students who were taught using ordinary jigsaw models. This shows that the use of the jigsaw-flash model can increase student participation and motivation. It can be concluded that the adobe flash media can be used as a solution to reduce the level of student abstraction in learning mathematics.

  4. KENO3D Visualization Tool for KENO V.a and KENO-VI Geometry Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwedel, J.E.; Bowman, S.M.

    2000-01-01

    Criticality safety analyses often require detailed modeling of complex geometries. Effective visualization tools can enhance checking the accuracy of these models. This report describes the KENO3D visualization tool developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide visualization of KENO V.a and KENO-VI criticality safety models. The development of KENO3D is part of the current efforts to enhance the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system

  5. Experimental, kinetic and numerical modeling of hydrogen production by catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial catalyst in packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboudheir, Ahmed; Akande, Abayomi; Idem, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    The demand for hydrogen energy has increased tremendously in recent years essentially because of the increase in the word energy consumption as well as recent developments in fuel cell technologies. The energy information administration has projected that world energy consumption will increase by 59% over the next two decades, from 1999 to 2020, in which the largest share is still dominated by fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal). Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions resulting from the combustion of these fossil fuels currently are estimated to account for three-fourth of human-caused CO 2 emissions worldwide. Greenhouse gas emission, including CO 2 , should be limited, as recommended at the Kyoto Conference, Japan, in December 1997. In this regard, hydrogen (H 2 ) has a significant future potential as an alternative fuel that can solve the problems of CO 2 emissions as well as the emissions of other air contaminants. One of the techniques to produce hydrogen is by reforming of hydrocarbons or biomass. Crude ethanol (a form of biomass, which essentially is fermentation broth) is easy to produce, is free of sulphur, has low toxicity, and is also safe to handle, transport and store. In addition, crude ethanol consists of oxygenated hydrocarbons, such as ethanol, lactic acid, glycerol, and maltose. These oxygenated hydrocarbons can be reformed completely to H 2 and CO 2 , the latter of which could be separated from H 2 by membrane technology. This provides for CO 2 capture for eventual storage or destruction. In the case of using crude ethanol, this will result in negative CO 2 , emissions. In this paper, we conducted experimental work on production of hydrogen by the catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial promoted Ni-based catalyst in a packed bed tubular reactor as well as a packed bed membrane reactor. As well, a rigorous numerical model was developed to simulate this process in both the catalytic packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane

  6. Advanced DPSM approach for modeling ultrasonic wave scattering in an arbitrary geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Susheel K.; Banerjee, Sourav; Kundu, Tribikram

    2011-04-01

    Several techniques are used to diagnose structural damages. In the ultrasonic technique structures are tested by analyzing ultrasonic signals scattered by damages. The interpretation of these signals requires a good understanding of the interaction between ultrasonic waves and structures. Therefore, researchers need analytical or numerical techniques to have a clear understanding of the interaction between ultrasonic waves and structural damage. However, modeling of wave scattering phenomenon by conventional numerical techniques such as finite element method requires very fine mesh at high frequencies necessitating heavy computational power. Distributed point source method (DPSM) is a newly developed robust mesh free technique to simulate ultrasonic, electrostatic and electromagnetic fields. In most of the previous studies the DPSM technique has been applied to model two dimensional surface geometries and simple three dimensional scatterer geometries. It was difficult to perform the analysis for complex three dimensional geometries. This technique has been extended to model wave scattering in an arbitrary geometry. In this paper a channel section idealized as a thin solid plate with several rivet holes is formulated. The simulation has been carried out with and without cracks near the rivet holes. Further, a comparison study has been also carried out to characterize the crack. A computer code has been developed in C for modeling the ultrasonic field in a solid plate with and without cracks near the rivet holes.

  7. Geometry and transport in a model of two coupled quadratic nonlinear waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stirling, James R.; Bang, Ole; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2008-01-01

    This paper applies geometric methods developed to understand chaos and transport in Hamiltonian systems to the study of power distribution in nonlinear waveguide arrays. The specific case of two linearly coupled X(2) waveguides is modeled and analyzed in terms of transport and geometry in the pha...

  8. Geometry Laboratory (GEOLAB) surface modeling and grid generation technology and services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Patricia A.; Smith, Robert E.; Posenau, Mary-Anne K.

    1995-01-01

    The facilities and services of the GEOmetry LABoratory (GEOLAB) at the NASA Langley Research Center are described. Included in this description are the laboratory functions, the surface modeling and grid generation technologies used in the laboratory, and examples of the tasks performed in the laboratory.

  9. Finite element modeling of the neuron-electrode interface: stimulus transfer and geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenweg, Jan R.; Rutten, Wim; Marani, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The relation between stimulus transfer and the geometry of the neuron-electrode interface can not be determined properly using electrical equivalent circuits, since current that flows from the sealing gap through the neuronal membrane is difficult to model in these circuits. Therefore, finite

  10. Importance of the energy-dependent geometry in the 16O+ 16O optical model potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantis, G.; Ioannidis, K.; Poirier, P.

    1985-01-01

    Optical model potentials with various forms of energy-dependent geometry have been considered for the description of 16 O+ 16 O elastic scattering. It is shown that the variation with energy of the imaginary radius leads to a reasonable fit of the cross-section data, throughout the energy range

  11. KENO3D, Visualisation Tool for KENO V.A and KENO-VI Geometry Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The KENO3D Visualization Tool for KENO Geometry Models is a powerful state-of-the-art visualization tool that enables KENO V.a users and KENO-VI to interactively display their three-dimensional geometry models. The KENO3D interactive options include: - Shaded or wire-frame images ; - Standard views such as top view, side view, front view, and isometric(3-D) view; - Rotating the model ; - Zooming in on selected locations ; - Selecting parts of the model to display ; - Editing colors and displaying legends ; - Displaying properties of any unit in the model ; - Creating cut-away views ; - Removing units from the model; - Printing image or saving image to a common graphics formats. KENO3D was developed for use by criticality safety specialists that use the KENO three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code. KENO V.a and KENO-VI are part of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluations) computer software system developed at Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. 2 - Methods: KENO3D reads CSAS, KENO V.a, or KENO-VI input files. It attempts to verify that the KENO geometry input is 'legal', i.e., it conforms to the code input guidelines. KENO3D prints a warning message for illegal geometry input, and if possible, it displays the illegal KENO geometry to facilitate debugging of the input. Problems with more than 300,000 KENO V.a bodies have been successfully tested and displayed. KENO3D has the look and feel of a typical PC Windows application. Toolbar buttons are included for all major menu options. There is a setup dialog that allows the user to specify toolbars that should be displayed

  12. Modeling cavities exhibiting strong lateral confinement using open geometry Fourier modal method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häyrynen, Teppo; Gregersen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a computationally efficient Fourier-Bessel expansion based open geometry formalism for modeling the optical properties of rotationally symmetric photonic nanostructures. The lateral computation domain is assumed infinite so that no artificial boundary conditions are needed. Instead,...... around a geometry specific dominant transverse wavenumber region. We will use the developed approach to investigate the Q factor and mode confinement in cavities where top DBR mirror has small rectangular defect confining the modes laterally on the defect region....

  13. Study of skin model and geometry effects on thermal performance of thermal protective fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fanglong; Ma, Suqin; Zhang, Weiyuan

    2008-05-01

    Thermal protective clothing has steadily improved over the years as new materials and improved designs have reached the market. A significant method that has brought these improvements to the fire service is the NFPA 1971 standard on structural fire fighters’ protective clothing. However, this testing often neglects the effects of cylindrical geometry on heat transmission in flame resistant fabrics. This paper deals with methods to develop cylindrical geometry testing apparatus incorporating novel skin bioheat transfer model to test flame resistant fabrics used in firefighting. Results show that fabrics which shrink during the test can have reduced thermal protective performance compared with the qualities measured with a planar geometry tester. Results of temperature differences between skin simulant sensors of planar and cylindrical tester are also compared. This test method provides a new technique to accurately and precisely characterize the thermal performance of thermal protective fabrics.

  14. An improved algorithm to convert CAD model to MCNP geometry model based on STEP file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Qingguo; Yang, Jiaming; Wu, Jiong; Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Junqiong; Jiang, Hai; Li, Kuan-Ching

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fully exploits common features of cells, making the processing efficient. • Accurately provide the cell position. • Flexible to add new parameters in the structure. • Application of novel structure in INP file processing, conveniently evaluate cell location. - Abstract: MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle code that can be used for neutron, photon, electron, or coupled neutron/photon/electron transport. Its input file, the INP file, has the characteristics of complicated form and is error-prone when describing geometric models. Due to this, a conversion algorithm that can solve the problem by converting general geometric model to MCNP model during MCNP aided modeling is highly needed. In this paper, we revised and incorporated a number of improvements over our previous work (Yang et al., 2013), which was proposed and targeted after STEP file and INP file were analyzed. Results of experiments show that the revised algorithm is more applicable and efficient than previous work, with the optimized extraction of geometry and topology information of the STEP file, as well as the production efficiency of output INP file. This proposed research is promising, and serves as valuable reference for the majority of researchers involved with MCNP-related researches

  15. Feasibility Study of Ex Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Artery Model for Investigating Pulsatile Variation of Arterial Geometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kweon-Ho Nam

    Full Text Available Despite considerable research efforts on the relationship between arterial geometry and cardiovascular pathology, information is lacking on the pulsatile geometrical variation caused by arterial distensibility and cardiomotility because of the lack of suitable in vivo experimental models and the methodological difficulties in examining the arterial dynamics. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of using a chick embryo system as an experimental model for basic research on the pulsatile variation of arterial geometry. Optical microscope video images of various arterial shapes in chick chorioallantoic circulation were recorded from different locations and different embryo samples. The high optical transparency of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM allowed clear observation of tiny vessels and their movements. Systolic and diastolic changes in arterial geometry were visualized by detecting the wall boundaries from binary images. Several to hundreds of microns of wall displacement variations were recognized during a pulsatile cycle. The spatial maps of the wall motion harmonics and magnitude ratio of harmonic components were obtained by analyzing the temporal brightness variation at each pixel in sequential grayscale images using spectral analysis techniques. The local variations in the spectral characteristics of the arterial wall motion were reflected well in the analysis results. In addition, mapping the phase angle of the fundamental frequency identified the regional variations in the wall motion directivity and phase shift. Regional variations in wall motion phase angle and fundamental-to-second harmonic ratio were remarkable near the bifurcation area. In summary, wall motion in various arterial geometry including straight, curved and bifurcated shapes was well observed in the CAM artery model, and their local and cyclic variations could be characterized by Fourier and wavelet transforms of the acquired video images. The CAM artery model with

  16. A Physically—Based Geometry Model for Transport Distance Estimation of Rainfall-Eroded Soil Sediment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian-Gui Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Estimations of rainfall-induced soil erosion are mostly derived from the weight of sediment measured in natural runoff. The transport distance of eroded soil is important for evaluating landscape evolution but is difficult to estimate, mainly because it cannot be linked directly to the eroded sediment weight. The volume of eroded soil is easier to calculate visually using popular imaging tools, which can aid in estimating the transport distance of eroded soil through geometry relationships. In this study, we present a straightforward geometry model to predict the maximum sediment transport distance incurred by rainfall events of various intensity and duration. In order to verify our geometry prediction model, a series of experiments are reported in the form of a sediment volume. The results show that cumulative rainfall has a linear relationship with the total volume of eroded soil. The geometry model can accurately estimate the maximum transport distance of eroded soil by cumulative rainfall, with a low root-mean-square error (4.7–4.8 and a strong linear correlation (0.74–0.86.

  17. A CAD based geometry model for simulation and analysis of particle detector data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milde, Michael; Losekamm, Martin; Poeschl, Thomas; Greenwald, Daniel; Paul, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The development of a new particle detector requires a good understanding of its setup. A detailed model of the detector's geometry is not only needed during construction, but also for simulation and data analysis. To arrive at a consistent description of the detector geometry a representation is needed that can be easily implemented in different software tools used during data analysis. We developed a geometry representation based on CAD files that can be easily used within the Geant4 simulation framework and analysis tools based on the ROOT framework. This talk presents the structure of the geometry model and show its implementation using the example of the event reconstruction developed for the Multi-purpose Active-target Particle Telescope (MAPT). The detector consists of scintillating plastic fibers and can be used as a tracking detector and calorimeter with omnidirectional acceptance. To optimize the angular resolution and the energy reconstruction of measured particles, a detailed detector model is needed at all stages of the reconstruction.

  18. Almost-commutative geometries beyond the standard model II: new colours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, Christoph A

    2007-01-01

    We will present an extension of the standard model of particle physics in its almost-commutative formulation. This extension is guided by the minimal approach to almost-commutative geometries employed by Iochum et al (2004 J. Math. Phys. 45 5003 (Preprint hep-th/0312276)), Jureit and Stephan (2005 J. Math. Phys. 46 043512 (Preprint hep-th/0501134)), Schuecker (2005 Preprint hep-th/0501181), Jureit et al (2005 J. Math. Phys. 46 072303 (Preprint hep-th/0503190)) and Jureit and Stephan (2006 Preprint hep-th/0610040), although the model presented here is not minimal itself. The corresponding almost-commutative geometry leads to a Yang-Mills-Higgs model which consists of the standard model and two new fermions of opposite electromagnetic charge which may possess a new colour-like gauge group. As a new phenomenon, grand unification is no longer required by the spectral action

  19. Slab1.0: A three-dimensional model of global subduction zone geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Gavin P.; Wald, David J.; Johnson, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    We describe and present a new model of global subduction zone geometries, called Slab1.0. An extension of previous efforts to constrain the two-dimensional non-planar geometry of subduction zones around the focus of large earthquakes, Slab1.0 describes the detailed, non-planar, three-dimensional geometry of approximately 85% of subduction zones worldwide. While the model focuses on the detailed form of each slab from their trenches through the seismogenic zone, where it combines data sets from active source and passive seismology, it also continues to the limits of their seismic extent in the upper-mid mantle, providing a uniform approach to the definition of the entire seismically active slab geometry. Examples are shown for two well-constrained global locations; models for many other regions are available and can be freely downloaded in several formats from our new Slab1.0 website, http://on.doi.gov/d9ARbS. We describe improvements in our two-dimensional geometry constraint inversion, including the use of ‘average’ active source seismic data profiles in the shallow trench regions where data are otherwise lacking, derived from the interpolation between other active source seismic data along-strike in the same subduction zone. We include several analyses of the uncertainty and robustness of our three-dimensional interpolation methods. In addition, we use the filtered, subduction-related earthquake data sets compiled to build Slab1.0 in a reassessment of previous analyses of the deep limit of the thrust interface seismogenic zone for all subduction zones included in our global model thus far, concluding that the width of these seismogenic zones is on average 30% larger than previous studies have suggested.

  20. Self consistent MHD modeling of the solar wind from coronal holes with distinct geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, G. A.; Bravo, S.

    1995-01-01

    Utilizing an iterative scheme, a self-consistent axisymmetric MHD model for the solar wind has been developed. We use this model to evaluate the properties of the solar wind issuing from the open polar coronal hole regions of the Sun, during solar minimum. We explore the variation of solar wind parameters across the extent of the hole and we investigate how these variations are affected by the geometry of the hole and the strength of the field at the coronal base.

  1. (U) Influence of Compaction Model Form on Planar and Cylindrical Compaction Geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carney, Theodore Clayton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fichtl, Christopher Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-05

    The dynamic compaction response of CeO2 is examined within the frameworks of the Ramp and P-a compaction models. Hydrocode calculations simulating the dynamic response of CeO2 at several distinct pressures within the compaction region are investigated in both planar and cylindrically convergent geometries. Findings suggest additional validation of the compaction models is warranted under complex loading configurations.

  2. Free-energy analysis of spin models on hyperbolic lattice geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serina, Marcel; Genzor, Jozef; Lee, Yoju; Gendiar, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    We investigate relations between spatial properties of the free energy and the radius of Gaussian curvature of the underlying curved lattice geometries. For this purpose we derive recurrence relations for the analysis of the free energy normalized per lattice site of various multistate spin models in the thermal equilibrium on distinct non-Euclidean surface lattices of the infinite sizes. Whereas the free energy is calculated numerically by means of the corner transfer matrix renormalization group algorithm, the radius of curvature has an analytic expression. Two tasks are considered in this work. First, we search for such a lattice geometry, which minimizes the free energy per site. We conjecture that the only Euclidean flat geometry results in the minimal free energy per site regardless of the spin model. Second, the relations among the free energy, the radius of curvature, and the phase transition temperatures are analyzed. We found out that both the free energy and the phase transition temperature inherit the structure of the lattice geometry and asymptotically approach the profile of the Gaussian radius of curvature. This achievement opens new perspectives in the AdS-CFT correspondence theories.

  3. Geometry modeling of single track cladding deposited by high power diode laser with rectangular beam spot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaming; Qin, Xunpeng; Huang, Song; Hu, Zeqi; Ni, Mao

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the relationship between the process parameters and geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile for the single track cladding (STC) deposited by High Power Diode Laser (HPDL) with rectangle beam spot (RBS). To obtain the geometry parameters, namely cladding width Wc and height Hc of the sectional profile, a full factorial design (FFD) of experiment was used to conduct the experiments with a total of 27. The pre-placed powder technique has been employed during laser cladding. The influence of the process parameters including laser power, powder thickness and scanning speed on the Wc and Hc was analyzed in detail. A nonlinear fitting model was used to fit the relationship between the process parameters and geometry parameters. And a circular arc was adopted to describe the geometry profile of the cross-section of STC. The above models were confirmed by all the experiments. The results indicated that the geometrical characteristics of the sectional profile of STC can be described as the circular arc, and the other geometry parameters of the sectional profile can be calculated only using Wc and Hc. Meanwhile, the Wc and Hc can be predicted through the process parameters.

  4. Geometry characteristics modeling and process optimization in coaxial laser inside wire cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jianjun; Zhu, Ping; Fu, Geyan; Shi, Shihong

    2018-05-01

    Coaxial laser inside wire cladding method is very promising as it has a very high efficiency and a consistent interaction between the laser and wire. In this paper, the energy and mass conservation law, and the regression algorithm are used together for establishing the mathematical models to study the relationship between the layer geometry characteristics (width, height and cross section area) and process parameters (laser power, scanning velocity and wire feeding speed). At the selected parameter ranges, the predicted values from the models are compared with the experimental measured results, and there is minor error existing, but they reflect the same regularity. From the models, it is seen the width of the cladding layer is proportional to both the laser power and wire feeding speed, while it firstly increases and then decreases with the increasing of the scanning velocity. The height of the cladding layer is proportional to the scanning velocity and feeding speed and inversely proportional to the laser power. The cross section area increases with the increasing of feeding speed and decreasing of scanning velocity. By using the mathematical models, the geometry characteristics of the cladding layer can be predicted by the known process parameters. Conversely, the process parameters can be calculated by the targeted geometry characteristics. The models are also suitable for multi-layer forming process. By using the optimized process parameters calculated from the models, a 45 mm-high thin-wall part is formed with smooth side surfaces.

  5. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    This invention relates to a closure mechanism for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holder used in nuclear reactors. The closure mechanism is composed of a latching member which includes a generally circular chamber with a plurality of elongated latches depending therefrom. The latching member circumscribes part of an actuator member which is disposed within the latching member so as to be axially movable. The axial movement of the actuator actuates positioning of the latches between positions in which the latches are locked and secured within the actuator member. Means, capable of being remotely manipulated, are provided to move the actuator in order to position the latches and load the articles within the tube

  6. Modelling and sequential simulation of multi-tubular metallic membrane and techno-economics of a hydrogen production process employing thin-layer membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Shafiee, Alireza

    2016-09-24

    A theoretical model for multi-tubular palladium-based membrane is proposed in this paper and validated against experimental data for two different sized membrane modules that operate at high temperatures. The model is used in a sequential simulation format to describe and analyse pure hydrogen and hydrogen binary mixture separations, and then extended to simulate an industrial scale membrane unit. This model is used as a sub-routine within an ASPEN Plus model to simulate a membrane reactor in a steam reforming hydrogen production plant. A techno-economic analysis is then conducted using the validated model for a plant producing 300 TPD of hydrogen. The plant utilises a thin (2.5 μm) defect-free and selective layer (Pd75Ag25 alloy) membrane reactor. The economic sensitivity analysis results show usefulness in finding the optimum operating condition that achieves minimum hydrogen production cost at break-even point. A hydrogen production cost of 1.98 $/kg is estimated while the cost of the thin-layer selective membrane is found to constitute 29% of total process capital cost. These results indicate the competiveness of this thin-layer membrane process against conventional methods of hydrogen production. © 2016 Hydrogen Energy Publications LLC

  7. Representing Misalignments of the STAR Geometry Model using AgML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jason C.; Lauret, Jérôme; Perevotchikov, Victor; Smirnov, Dmitri; Van Buren, Gene

    2017-10-01

    The STAR Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was designed to provide high-precision tracking for the identification of charmed hadron decays in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. It consists of three independently mounted subsystems, providing four precision measurements along the track trajectory, with the goal of pointing decay daughters back to vertices displaced by less than 100 microns from the primary event vertex. The ultimate efficiency and resolution of the physics analysis will be driven by the quality of the simulation and reconstruction of events in heavy-ion collisions. In particular, it is important that the geometry model properly accounts for the relative misalignments of the HFT subsystems, along with the alignment of the HFT relative to STARs primary tracking detector, the Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The Abstract Geometry Modeling Language (AgML) provides a single description of the STAR geometry, generating both our simulation (GEANT 3) and reconstruction geometries (ROOT). AgML implements an ideal detector model, while misalignments are stored separately in database tables. These have historically been applied at the hit level. Simulated detector hits are projected from their ideal position along the track’s trajectory, until they intersect the misaligned detector volume, where the struck detector element is calculated for hit digitization. This scheme has worked well as hit errors have been negligible compared with the size of sensitive volumes. The precision and complexity of the HFT detector require us to apply misalignments to the detector volumes themselves. In this paper we summarize the extension of the AgML language and support libraries to enable the static misalignment of our reconstruction and simulation geometries, discussing the design goals, limitations and path to full misalignment support in ROOT/VMC-based simulation.

  8. Dependence of Dynamic Modeling Accuracy on Sensor Measurements, Mass Properties, and Aircraft Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM) nonlinear simulation was used to investigate the effects of errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry on the accuracy of identified parameters in mathematical models describing the flight dynamics and determined from flight data. Measurements from a typical flight condition and system identification maneuver were systematically and progressively deteriorated by introducing noise, resolution errors, and bias errors. The data were then used to estimate nondimensional stability and control derivatives within a Monte Carlo simulation. Based on these results, recommendations are provided for maximum allowable errors in sensor measurements, mass properties, and aircraft geometry to achieve desired levels of dynamic modeling accuracy. Results using additional flight conditions and parameter estimation methods, as well as a nonlinear flight simulation of the General Dynamics F-16 aircraft, were compared with these recommendations

  9. LRS Bianchi Type II Massive String Cosmological Models with Magnetic Field in Lyra's Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Bali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bianchi type II massive string cosmological models with magnetic field and time dependent gauge function ( in the frame work of Lyra's geometry are investigated. The magnetic field is in -plane. To get the deterministic solution, we have assumed that the shear ( is proportional to the expansion (. This leads to , where and are metric potentials and is a constant. We find that the models start with a big bang at initial singularity and expansion decreases due to lapse of time. The anisotropy is maintained throughout but the model isotropizes when . The physical and geometrical aspects of the model in the presence and absence of magnetic field are also discussed.

  10. 2d forward modelling of marine CSEM survey geometry for seabed logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, N.; Noh, M.; Yahya, N.B.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrocarbon reserve exploration in deep water is done by geophysical surveys. Previously seismic geophysical surveys were explicitly used but it has indistinct results for both water and hydrocarbon saturated reservoir. Recent development for the detection of hydrocarbon reservoir in deeper water is Marine Controlled Source Electromagnetic (MCSEM) geophysical survey. MCSEM is sensitive to electrical conductivity of rocks by which it can differentiate between hydrocarbon reservoir and water saturated reservoir. MCSEM survey geometry put vital role and may causes for anomalies in synthetic data. Consequentially MCSEM is sensitive to survey geometry (e.g. source dipping, rotation and speed, receivers' orientation etc) which causes anomalies. The interpretation for delineating subsurface structure from survey data need to well understand the effects of survey geometry anomalies. Forward modelling is an alternative rather real time survey to study the aforementioned anomalies. In this paper finite difference method (FDM) is implemented for 2D forward modelling in the sense of qualitative understanding to how induced Electromagnetic (EM) signal changes its overall pattern while interact with physical earth properties. A stratified earth structure is developed and modelled in MatLabTM software to study the behaviour of EM field with physical earth properties. Obtained results of 2D geological models are also discussed in this paper. (author)

  11. Formation and degradation pathways of intermediate products formed during the hydropyrolysis of glucose as a model substance for wet biomass in a tubular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinag, A. [Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey); Kruse, A.; Schwarzkopf, V. [Institut fuer Technische Chemie - CPV, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-12-10

    In this study, glucose as a model substance for cellulose is pyrolyzed in supercritical water. The experiments are conducted in a continuously operated tubular reactor. From the usage of model substances, key information on the degradation pathway of biomass in supercritical water can be obtained. With this knowledge, it is tried to optimize a new method for gasification of wet biomass considering high yields of hydrogen and methane and also the suppressing of tar and char formation. The gaseous products mainly contain hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane and a small amount of carbon monoxide. The effect of experimental conditions, such as pressure, temperature and reaction time, on the degradation of glucose is investigated in the experiments. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the gas and liquid phases formed are determined. The results show that only the amount of phenols increases with increasing temperature in the liquid phase. No complete gasification of glucose is achieved in the studied temperature range between 400 C and 500 C. The addition of alkali salts leads to a higher gas generation and to a decrease in carbon monoxide concentration via water-gas-shift reaction. A lower furfural concentration is obtained in the presence of KHCO{sub 3}. Furthermore, this study shows that there is a wide conformity between the results of real and model biomass. A simplified scheme for glucose degradation is also presented with the help of the results found. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  12. FUZZY REGRESSION MODEL TO PREDICT THE BEAD GEOMETRY IN THE ROBOTIC WELDING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.S. Sung; I.S. Kim; Y. Xue; H.H. Kim; Y.H. Cha

    2007-01-01

    Recently, there has been a rapid development in computer technology, which has in turn led todevelop the fully robotic welding system using artificial intelligence (AI) technology. However, therobotic welding system has not been achieved due to difficulties of the mathematical model andsensor technologies. The possibilities of the fuzzy regression method to predict the bead geometry,such as bead width, bead height, bead penetration and bead area in the robotic GMA (gas metalarc) welding process is presented. The approach, a well-known method to deal with the problemswith a high degree of fuzziness, is used to build the relationship between four process variablesand the four quality characteristics, respectively. Using these models, the proper prediction of theprocess variables for obtaining the optimal bead geometry can be determined.

  13. Numerical modeling of optical coherent transient processes with complex configurations - I. Angled beam geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Tiejun; Tian Mingzhen; Randall Babbitt, Wm.

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for optical coherent transient (OCT) processes based on Maxwell-Bloch equations for angled beam geometry. This geometry is critical in various OCT applications where the desired coherence outputs need to be spatially separated from the rest of the field. The model takes into account both the local interactions between inhomogeneously broadened two-level atoms and the laser fields, and the field propagation in optically thick media. Under the small-angle condition, the spatial dimensions transversing to the main propagation direction were treated with spatial Fourier transform to make the numerical computations for the practical settings confined within a reasonable time frame. The simulations for analog correlators and continuous processing based on stimulated photon echo have been performed using the simulator developed using the theory

  14. Mathematical Modeling of Resonant Processes in Confined Geometry of Atomic and Atom-Ion Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melezhik, Vladimir S.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss computational aspects of the developed mathematical models for resonant processes in confined geometry of atomic and atom-ion traps. The main attention is paid to formulation in the nondirect product discrete-variable representation (npDVR) of the multichannel scattering problem with nonseparable angular part in confining traps as the boundary-value problem. Computational efficiency of this approach is demonstrated in application to atomic and atom-ion confinement-induced resonances we predicted recently.

  15. Three dimensional modeling of depositional geometries. A case study from Tofane Group (Dolomites, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattolin, G.; Franceschi, M.; Breda, A.; Teza, G.; Preto, N.

    2012-04-01

    At the end of the Early Carnian, the Carnian Pluvial Event (CPE) resulted in a major crisis of carbonate factories. The sharp change in carbonate production lead to a dramatic modifications in depositional geometries. Steep clinoforms of the high-relief pre-crisis carbonate platforms were replaced by low-angle ramps. Spatial characters of depositional geometries can be decisive in identifying the genesis of geological bodies. We here show how 3D modeling techniques can be applied to help in quantifying and highlighting their variations. As case study we considered two outcrops in the Tofane Group (Dolomites, Italy). The first outcrop (bottom of southern walls of Tofana di Rozes) exposes a platform-to-basin transect of pre- and post-crisis platforms, the second (Dibona hut) a clinostratified carbonate body deposited during the Carnian crisis. Outcrop conditions at both sites, with vertical and hardly accessible walls, make the field tracing of depositional geometries particularly challenging. Line drawing on high resolution pictures can help (e.g. for clinoforms), but its use for quantification is hampered by perspective deformation. Three dimensional acquisition and modeling allow to retrieve the true spatial characters of sedimentary bodies in these outcrops. The geometry of the carbonate body at Dibona (~ 15000 sqm) was acquired with terrestrial LiDAR, while for Tofana photogrammetric techniques were applied because of the extension of the outcrop itself (~ 240000 sqm) and the lack of suitable points of view for terrestrial laser scanning. At Tofana, field observations reveal the presence of tens-hundreds m large carbonate mounds grown on a pre-existing inclined surface, intercalated with skeletal carbonates and siltites-arenites. This system rapidly evolves into a carbonate-clastic ramp. Photogrammetric topography acquisition permitted to place and visualize geological features in a three dimensional frame, thus obtaining a conceptual sedimentological model. A 3

  16. A statistical skull geometry model for children 0-3 years old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    Full Text Available Head injury is the leading cause of fatality and long-term disability for children. Pediatric heads change rapidly in both size and shape during growth, especially for children under 3 years old (YO. To accurately assess the head injury risks for children, it is necessary to understand the geometry of the pediatric head and how morphologic features influence injury causation within the 0-3 YO population. In this study, head CT scans from fifty-six 0-3 YO children were used to develop a statistical model of pediatric skull geometry. Geometric features important for injury prediction, including skull size and shape, skull thickness and suture width, along with their variations among the sample population, were quantified through a series of image and statistical analyses. The size and shape of the pediatric skull change significantly with age and head circumference. The skull thickness and suture width vary with age, head circumference and location, which will have important effects on skull stiffness and injury prediction. The statistical geometry model developed in this study can provide a geometrical basis for future development of child anthropomorphic test devices and pediatric head finite element models.

  17. Continuous energy Monte Carlo calculations for randomly distributed spherical fuels based on statistical geometry model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan); Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Itakura, Hirofumi

    1996-03-01

    The method to calculate neutronics parameters of a core composed of randomly distributed spherical fuels has been developed based on a statistical geometry model with a continuous energy Monte Carlo method. This method was implemented in a general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP, and a new code MCNP-CFP had been developed. This paper describes the model and method how to use it and the validation results. In the Monte Carlo calculation, the location of a spherical fuel is sampled probabilistically along the particle flight path from the spatial probability distribution of spherical fuels, called nearest neighbor distribution (NND). This sampling method was validated through the following two comparisons: (1) Calculations of inventory of coated fuel particles (CFPs) in a fuel compact by both track length estimator and direct evaluation method, and (2) Criticality calculations for ordered packed geometries. This method was also confined by applying to an analysis of the critical assembly experiment at VHTRC. The method established in the present study is quite unique so as to a probabilistic model of the geometry with a great number of spherical fuels distributed randomly. Realizing the speed-up by vector or parallel computations in future, it is expected to be widely used in calculation of a nuclear reactor core, especially HTGR cores. (author).

  18. A computational approach to modeling cellular-scale blood flow in complex geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    We present a computational methodology for modeling cellular-scale blood flow in arbitrary and highly complex geometry. Our approach is based on immersed-boundary methods, which allow modeling flows in arbitrary geometry while resolving the large deformation and dynamics of every blood cell with high fidelity. The present methodology seamlessly integrates different modeling components dealing with stationary rigid boundaries of complex shape, moving rigid bodies, and highly deformable interfaces governed by nonlinear elasticity. Thus it enables us to simulate 'whole' blood suspensions flowing through physiologically realistic microvascular networks that are characterized by multiple bifurcating and merging vessels, as well as geometrically complex lab-on-chip devices. The focus of the present work is on the development of a versatile numerical technique that is able to consider deformable cells and rigid bodies flowing in three-dimensional arbitrarily complex geometries over a diverse range of scenarios. After describing the methodology, a series of validation studies are presented against analytical theory, experimental data, and previous numerical results. Then, the capability of the methodology is demonstrated by simulating flows of deformable blood cells and heterogeneous cell suspensions in both physiologically realistic microvascular networks and geometrically intricate microfluidic devices. It is shown that the methodology can predict several complex microhemodynamic phenomena observed in vascular networks and microfluidic devices. The present methodology is robust and versatile, and has the potential to scale up to very large microvascular networks at organ levels.

  19. A statistical skull geometry model for children 0-3 years old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Park, Byoung-Keon; Liu, Weiguo; Zhang, Jinhuan; Reed, Matthew P; Rupp, Jonathan D; Hoff, Carrie N; Hu, Jingwen

    2015-01-01

    Head injury is the leading cause of fatality and long-term disability for children. Pediatric heads change rapidly in both size and shape during growth, especially for children under 3 years old (YO). To accurately assess the head injury risks for children, it is necessary to understand the geometry of the pediatric head and how morphologic features influence injury causation within the 0-3 YO population. In this study, head CT scans from fifty-six 0-3 YO children were used to develop a statistical model of pediatric skull geometry. Geometric features important for injury prediction, including skull size and shape, skull thickness and suture width, along with their variations among the sample population, were quantified through a series of image and statistical analyses. The size and shape of the pediatric skull change significantly with age and head circumference. The skull thickness and suture width vary with age, head circumference and location, which will have important effects on skull stiffness and injury prediction. The statistical geometry model developed in this study can provide a geometrical basis for future development of child anthropomorphic test devices and pediatric head finite element models.

  20. Visualizing Three-dimensional Slab Geometries with ShowEarthModel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, B.; Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.; Kreylos, O.; Yikilmaz, M. B.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic data that characterize the morphology of modern subducted slabs on Earth suggest that a two-dimensional paradigm is no longer adequate to describe the subduction process. Here we demonstrate the effect of data exploration of three-dimensional (3D) global slab geometries with the open source program ShowEarthModel. ShowEarthModel was designed specifically to support data exploration, by focusing on interactivity and real-time response using the Vrui toolkit. Sixteen movies are presented that explore the 3D complexity of modern subduction zones on Earth. The first movie provides a guided tour through the Earth's major subduction zones, comparing the global slab geometry data sets of Gudmundsson and Sambridge (1998), Syracuse and Abers (2006), and Hayes et al. (2012). Fifteen regional movies explore the individual subduction zones and regions intersecting slabs, using the Hayes et al. (2012) slab geometry models where available and the Engdahl and Villasenor (2002) global earthquake data set. Viewing the subduction zones in this way provides an improved conceptualization of the 3D morphology within a given subduction zone as well as the 3D spatial relations between the intersecting slabs. This approach provides a powerful tool for rendering earth properties and broadening capabilities in both Earth Science research and education by allowing for whole earth visualization. The 3D characterization of global slab geometries is placed in the context of 3D slab-driven mantle flow and observations of shear wave splitting in subduction zones. These visualizations contribute to the paradigm shift from a 2D to 3D subduction framework by facilitating the conceptualization of the modern subduction system on Earth in 3D space.

  1. Expandable tubulars for use in geologic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spray, Jeffery A.; Svedeman, Steven; Walter, David; Mckeighan, Peter; Siebanaler, Shane; Dewhurst, Peter; Hobson, Steven; Foss, Doug; Wirz, Holger; Sharpe, Aaron; Apostal, Michael

    2014-08-12

    An expandable tubular includes a plurality of leaves formed from sheet material that have curved surfaces. The leaves extend around a portion or fully around the diameter of the tubular structure. Some of the adjacent leaves of the tubular are coupled together. The tubular is compressed to a smaller diameter so that it can be inserted through previously deployed tubular assemblies. Once the tubular is properly positioned, it is deployed and coupled or not coupled to a previously deployed tubular assembly. The tubular is useful for all types of wells and boreholes.

  2. Tubular closure mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for closing the bore of a tube and releasably securing articles within the tube under longitudinal load. A latching member has a cylindrical section and several circumferentially-spaced elongated latches hanging down from one end of the cylinder. An elongated actuator has integral cam and spline and is partly located within the latch with the cam radially contacting the latches and the spline projecting into the circumferential spaces between the latches. The actuator is axially movable between a position in which the latches are locked to the tube walls and a position in which the latches are secured from contact with the tube walls. Means are provided for axially moving the actuator such that the cam positions the latches; and means are also provided for engaging the articles within the tube. The closure is particularly applicable to tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in reactors

  3. Path integral representation of Lorentzian spinfoam model, asymptotics and simplicial geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Muxin; Krajewski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A new path integral representation of Lorentzian Engle–Pereira–Rovelli–Livine spinfoam model is derived by employing the theory of unitary representation of SL(2,C). The path integral representation is taken as a starting point of semiclassical analysis. The relation between the spinfoam model and classical simplicial geometry is studied via the large-spin asymptotic expansion of the spinfoam amplitude with all spins uniformly large. More precisely, in the large-spin regime, there is an equivalence between the spinfoam critical configuration (with certain nondegeneracy assumption) and a classical Lorentzian simplicial geometry. Such an equivalence relation allows us to classify the spinfoam critical configurations by their geometrical interpretations, via two types of solution-generating maps. The equivalence between spinfoam critical configuration and simplical geometry also allows us to define the notion of globally oriented and time-oriented spinfoam critical configuration. It is shown that only at the globally oriented and time-oriented spinfoam critical configuration, the leading-order contribution of spinfoam large-spin asymptotics gives precisely an exponential of Lorentzian Regge action of General Relativity. At all other (unphysical) critical configurations, spinfoam large-spin asymptotics modifies the Regge action at the leading-order approximation. (paper)

  4. KENO3D visualization tool for KENO V.a geometry models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.M.; Horwedel, J.E.

    1999-01-01

    The standardized computer analyses for licensing evaluations (SCALE) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. SCALE includes the well-known KENO V.a three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code. Criticality safety analysis often require detailed modeling of complex geometries. Checking the accuracy of these models can be enhanced by effective visualization tools. To address this need, ORNL has recently developed a powerful state-of-the-art visualization tool called KENO3D that enables KENO V.a users to interactively display their three-dimensional geometry models. The interactive options include the following: (1) having shaded or wireframe images; (2) showing standard views, such as top view, side view, front view, and isometric three-dimensional view; (3) rotating the model; (4) zooming in on selected locations; (5) selecting parts of the model to display; (6) editing colors and displaying legends; (7) displaying properties of any unit in the model; (8) creating cutaway views; (9) removing units from the model; and (10) printing image or saving image to common graphics formats

  5. Unified tractable model for downlink MIMO cellular networks using stochastic geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2016-07-26

    Several research efforts are invested to develop stochastic geometry models for cellular networks with multiple antenna transmission and reception (MIMO). On one hand, there are models that target abstract outage probability and ergodic rate for simplicity. On the other hand, there are models that sacrifice simplicity to target more tangible performance metrics such as the error probability. Both types of models are completely disjoint in terms of the analytic steps to obtain the performance measures, which makes it challenging to conduct studies that account for different performance metrics. This paper unifies both techniques and proposes a unified stochastic-geometry based mathematical paradigm to account for error probability, outage probability, and ergodic rates in MIMO cellular networks. The proposed model is also unified in terms of the antenna configurations and leads to simpler error probability analysis compared to existing state-of-the-art models. The core part of the analysis is based on abstracting unnecessary information conveyed within the interfering signals by assuming Gaussian signaling. To this end, the accuracy of the proposed framework is verified against state-of-the-art models as well as system level simulations. We provide via this unified study insights on network design by reflecting system parameters effect on different performance metrics. © 2016 IEEE.

  6. Modeling cavities exhibiting strong lateral confinement using open geometry Fourier modal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häyrynen, Teppo; Gregersen, Niels

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a computationally efficient Fourier-Bessel expansion based open geometry formalism for modeling the optical properties of rotationally symmetric photonic nanostructures. The lateral computation domain is assumed infinite so that no artificial boundary conditions are needed. Instead, the leakage of the modes due to an imperfect field confinement is taken into account by using a basis functions that expand the whole infinite space. The computational efficiency is obtained by using a non-uniform discretization in the frequency space in which the lateral expansion modes are more densely sampled around a geometry specific dominant transverse wavenumber region. We will use the developed approach to investigate the Q factor and mode confinement in cavities where top DBR mirror has small rectangular defect confining the modes laterally on the defect region.

  7. Scenario analysis of large scale algae production in tubular photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.; Beveren, van P.J.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae productivity in tubular photobioreactors depends on algae species, location, tube diameter, biomass concentration, distance between tubes and for vertically stacked systems, the number of horizontal tubes per stack. A simulation model for horizontal and vertically stacked horizontal

  8. A Monte Carlo modeling on charging effect for structures with arbitrary geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Mao, S. F.; Zou, Y. B.; Li, Yong Gang; Zhang, P.; Li, H. M.; Ding, Z. J.

    2018-04-01

    Insulating materials usually suffer charging effects when irradiated by charged particles. In this paper, we present a Monte Carlo study on the charging effect caused by electron beam irradiation for sample structures with any complex geometry. When transporting in an insulating solid, electrons encounter elastic and inelastic scattering events; the Mott cross section and a Lorentz-type dielectric function are respectively employed to describe such scatterings. In addition, the band gap and the electron–long optical phonon interaction are taken into account. The electronic excitation in inelastic scattering causes generation of electron–hole pairs; these negative and positive charges establish an inner electric field, which in turn induces the drift of charges to be trapped by impurities, defects, vacancies etc in the solid, where the distributions of trapping sites are assumed to have uniform density. Under charging conditions, the inner electric field distorts electron trajectories, and the surface electric potential dynamically alters secondary electron emission. We present, in this work, an iterative modeling method for a self-consistent calculation of electric potential; the method has advantages in treating any structure with arbitrary complex geometry, in comparison with the image charge method—which is limited to a quite simple boundary geometry. Our modeling is based on: the combination of the finite triangle mesh method for an arbitrary geometry construction; a self-consistent method for the spatial potential calculation; and a full dynamic description for the motion of deposited charges. Example calculations have been done to simulate secondary electron yield of SiO2 for a semi-infinite solid, the charging for a heterostructure of SiO2 film grown on an Au substrate, and SEM imaging of a SiO2 line structure with rough surfaces and SiO2 nanoparticles with irregular shapes. The simulations have explored interesting interlaced charge layer distribution

  9. A new control-oriented transient model of variable geometry turbocharger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahiuddin, Irfan; Mazlan, Saiful Amri; Imaduddin, Fitrian; Ubaidillah

    2017-01-01

    The flow input of a variable geometry turbocharger turbine is highly unsteady due to rapid and periodic pressure dynamics in engine combustion chambers. Several VGT control methods have been developed to recover more energy from the highly pulsating exhaust gas flow. To develop a control system for the highly pulsating flow condition, an accurate and valid unsteady model is required. This study focuses on the derivation of governing the unsteady control-oriented model (COM) for a turbine of an actively controlled turbocharger (ACT). The COM has the capability to predict the turbocharger behaviour regarding the instantaneous turbine actual and isentropic powers in different effective throat areas. The COM is a modified version of a conventional mean value model (MVM) with an additional feature to calculate the turbine angular velocity and torque for determining the actual power. The simulation results were further compared with experimental data in two general scenarios. The first scenario was simulations on fixed geometry positions. The second simulation scenario considered the nozzle movement after receiving a signal from the controller in different cases. The comparison between simulation and experimental results showed similarities in the recovered power behaviours the turbine inlet area increases or vice versa. The model also has proved its reliability to replicate general behaviour as in the example of ACT cases presented in this paper. However, the model is incapable to replicate the detailed and complicated phenomena, such as choking effect and hysteresis effect. - Highlights: • A control-oriented model of a variable geometry turbocharger turbine is proposed. • Isentropic and actual power behaviour estimations on turbocharger turbine. • A simulation tool for developing active control systems of turbocharger turbines.

  10. Diffraction patterns from 7-Angstroms tubular halloysite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggleton, T.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The diffraction patterns from 7-Angstroms tubular halloysite are superficially like those from kaolinite. Diffraction from a tubular aggregate of atoms, however, differs from that from a crystal because there is no linear repetition in two of the three conventional crystallographic directions. In tubular halloysite, the tube axis is [010] or [110] and in this direction the unit cell repeats in the normal linear fashion. The x-axis, by contrast, changes direction tangentially around the tube circumference, and there can be no true z-axis, because unit cells in the radial direction do not superimpose, since each successive tubular layer has a larger radius than its predecessor and therefore must contain more unit cells than its predecessor. Because tubular 'crystals' do not have a lattice repeat, use of Bragg 'hkl' indices is not appropriate. In the xy plane, a small area of the structure approximates a flat layer silicate, and hk indices may been used to label diffraction maxima. Similarly, successive 1:1 layers tangential to the tube walls yield a series of apparent 001 diffraction maxima. Measurement of these shows that the d-spacings do not form an exact integral series. The reason for this lies in the curvature of the structure. Calculated electron and powder X-ray diffraction patterns, based on a model of concentric 1:1 layers with no regular relation between them other than the 7.2 Angstroms spacing, closely simulate the observed data. Evidence for the 2-layer structure that is generally accepted may need to be reassessed in the light of these results

  11. Almost-commutative geometries beyond the standard model: III. Vector doublets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squellari, Romain; Stephan, Christoph A

    2007-01-01

    We will present a new extension of the standard model of particle physics in its almost-commutative formulation. This extension has as its basis the algebra of the standard model with four summands (Iochum et al 2004 J. Math. Phys. 45 5003 (Preprint hep-th/0312276), Jureit J-H and Stephan C 2005 J. Math. Phys. 46 043512 (Preprint hep-th/0501134), Schuecker T 2005 Krajewski diagrams and spin lifts Preprint hep-th/0501181, Jureit et al 2005 J. Math. Phys. 46 072303 (Preprint hep-th/0503190), Jureit J-H and Stephan C 2006 On a classification of irreducible almost commutative geometries: IV (Preprint hep-th/0610040)), and enlarges only the particle content by an arbitrary number of generations of left-right symmetric doublets which couple vectorially to the U(1) Y x SU(2) w subgroup of the standard model. As in the model presented in Stephan (2007 Almost-commutative geometries beyond the standard model: II. New Colours Preprint hep-th/0706.0595), which introduced particles with a new colour, grand unification is no longer required by the spectral action. The new model may also possess a candidate for dark matter in the hundred TeV mass range with neutrino-like cross section

  12. Digital Tomosynthesis System Geometry Analysis Using Convolution-Based Blur-and-Add (BAA) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng; Yoon, Sungwon; Solomon, Edward G; Star-Lack, Josh; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis is a three-dimensional imaging technique with a lower radiation dose than computed tomography (CT). Due to the missing data in tomosynthesis systems, out-of-plane structures in the depth direction cannot be completely removed by the reconstruction algorithms. In this work, we analyzed the impulse responses of common tomosynthesis systems on a plane-to-plane basis and proposed a fast and accurate convolution-based blur-and-add (BAA) model to simulate the backprojected images. In addition, the analysis formalism describing the impulse response of out-of-plane structures can be generalized to both rotating and parallel gantries. We implemented a ray tracing forward projection and backprojection (ray-based model) algorithm and the convolution-based BAA model to simulate the shift-and-add (backproject) tomosynthesis reconstructions. The convolution-based BAA model with proper geometry distortion correction provides reasonably accurate estimates of the tomosynthesis reconstruction. A numerical comparison indicates that the simulated images using the two models differ by less than 6% in terms of the root-mean-squared error. This convolution-based BAA model can be used in efficient system geometry analysis, reconstruction algorithm design, out-of-plane artifacts suppression, and CT-tomosynthesis registration.

  13. Thermal characterization of tubular SiC/SiC composite structures for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duquesne, Loys

    2015-01-01

    Researches on the development on SiCf/SiC refractory composites for generation IV nuclear fuel cladding led the CEA to focus on the thermal behavior of these materials. In particular, knowledge of the thermal properties is essential for designing the components. Regarding the development of the 'sandwich' cladding concept, for which the complexity and the geometry differ from the conventionally used flat tubes, usual measurement methods are unsuitable. This study reports on the characterization and modeling of the thermal behavior of these structures. The first part deals with the identification of the global thermal parameters for the different layers of a 'sandwich' cladding. For this purpose, a flash method is used and an experimental device suitable for tubular geometries was developed. A new estimation method based on the combination of both collected signals in front and rear faces allows the identification of the thermal diffusivity of tubular composites using infrared thermography. The second part focuses on a virtual material approach, established to describe the thermal behavior of a 'sandwich' cladding, starting from the measured properties of the elementary components (fibers and matrix). They are then used as input data for the heat transfer modeling. Confrontations between experimental measurements and numerical results finally allow us to understand the importance of the various key parameters governing the heat transfer. (author) [fr

  14. Human eye analytical and mesh-geometry models for ophthalmic dosimetry using MCNP6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelocci, Lucas V.; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio

    2015-01-01

    Eye tumors can be treated with brachytherapy using Co-60 plaques, I-125 seeds, among others materials. The human eye has regions particularly vulnerable to ionizing radiation (e.g. crystalline) and dosimetry for this region must be taken carefully. A mathematical model was proposed in the past [1] for the eye anatomy to be used in Monte Carlo simulations to account for dose distribution in ophthalmic brachytherapy. The model includes the description for internal structures of the eye that were not treated in previous works. The aim of this present work was to develop a new eye model based on the Mesh geometries of the MCNP6 code. The methodology utilized the ABAQUS/CAE (Simulia 3DS) software to build the Mesh geometry. For this work, an ophthalmic applicator containing up to 24 model Amersham 6711 I-125 seeds (Oncoseed) was used, positioned in contact with a generic tumor defined analytically inside the eye. The absorbed dose in eye structures like cornea, sclera, choroid, retina, vitreous body, lens, optical nerve and optical nerve wall were calculated using both models: analytical and MESH. (author)

  15. Human eye analytical and mesh-geometry models for ophthalmic dosimetry using MCNP6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelocci, Lucas V.; Fonseca, Gabriel P.; Yoriyaz, Helio, E-mail: hyoriyaz@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Eye tumors can be treated with brachytherapy using Co-60 plaques, I-125 seeds, among others materials. The human eye has regions particularly vulnerable to ionizing radiation (e.g. crystalline) and dosimetry for this region must be taken carefully. A mathematical model was proposed in the past [1] for the eye anatomy to be used in Monte Carlo simulations to account for dose distribution in ophthalmic brachytherapy. The model includes the description for internal structures of the eye that were not treated in previous works. The aim of this present work was to develop a new eye model based on the Mesh geometries of the MCNP6 code. The methodology utilized the ABAQUS/CAE (Simulia 3DS) software to build the Mesh geometry. For this work, an ophthalmic applicator containing up to 24 model Amersham 6711 I-125 seeds (Oncoseed) was used, positioned in contact with a generic tumor defined analytically inside the eye. The absorbed dose in eye structures like cornea, sclera, choroid, retina, vitreous body, lens, optical nerve and optical nerve wall were calculated using both models: analytical and MESH. (author)

  16. Numerical algebraic geometry for model selection and its application to the life sciences

    KAUST Repository

    Gross, Elizabeth

    2016-10-12

    Researchers working with mathematical models are often confronted by the related problems of parameter estimation, model validation and model selection. These are all optimization problems, well known to be challenging due to nonlinearity, non-convexity and multiple local optima. Furthermore, the challenges are compounded when only partial data are available. Here, we consider polynomial models (e.g. mass-action chemical reaction networks at steady state) and describe a framework for their analysis based on optimization using numerical algebraic geometry. Specifically, we use probability-one polynomial homotopy continuation methods to compute all critical points of the objective function, then filter to recover the global optima. Our approach exploits the geometrical structures relating models and data, and we demonstrate its utility on examples from cell signalling, synthetic biology and epidemiology.

  17. Fatigue Life of High-Strength Steel Offshore Tubular Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Ingomar; Agerskov, Henning; Lopez Martinez, Luis

    1996-01-01

    In the present investigation, the fatigue life of tubular joints in offshore steel structures is studied. Two test series on full-scale tubular joints have been carried through. One series was on joints in conventional offshore structural steel, and the other series was on joints in high-strength......In the present investigation, the fatigue life of tubular joints in offshore steel structures is studied. Two test series on full-scale tubular joints have been carried through. One series was on joints in conventional offshore structural steel, and the other series was on joints in high......-strength steel with a yield stress of 820-830 MPa and with high weldability and toughness properties. The test specimens of both series had the same geometry. The present report concentrates on the results obtained in the investigation on the high-strength steel tubular joints.The test specimens were fabricated...... from Ø 324-610 mm tubes, and the joints were loaded in in-plane bending. Both fatigue tests under constant amplitude loading and tests with a stochastic loading that is realistic in relation to offshore structures, are included in the investigation.A comparison between constant amplitude and variable...

  18. Morphing methods to parameterize specimen-specific finite element model geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, Ian A; Yang, Hongli; Roberts, Michael D; Downs, J Crawford

    2010-01-19

    Shape plays an important role in determining the biomechanical response of a structure. Specimen-specific finite element (FE) models have been developed to capture the details of the shape of biological structures and predict their biomechanics. Shape, however, can vary considerably across individuals or change due to aging or disease, and analysis of the sensitivity of specimen-specific models to these variations has proven challenging. An alternative to specimen-specific representation has been to develop generic models with simplified geometries whose shape is relatively easy to parameterize, and can therefore be readily used in sensitivity studies. Despite many successful applications, generic models are limited in that they cannot make predictions for individual specimens. We propose that it is possible to harness the detail available in specimen-specific models while leveraging the power of the parameterization techniques common in generic models. In this work we show that this can be accomplished by using morphing techniques to parameterize the geometry of specimen-specific FE models such that the model shape can be varied in a controlled and systematic way suitable for sensitivity analysis. We demonstrate three morphing techniques by using them on a model of the load-bearing tissues of the posterior pole of the eye. We show that using relatively straightforward procedures these morphing techniques can be combined, which allows the study of factor interactions. Finally, we illustrate that the techniques can be used in other systems by applying them to morph a femur. Morphing techniques provide an exciting new possibility for the analysis of the biomechanical role of shape, independently or in interaction with loading and material properties. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. An empirical model of diagnostic x-ray attenuation under narrow-beam geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu; White, R. Allen; Atkinson, E. Neely; Cody, Dianna D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe narrow-beam attenuation of kilovoltage x-ray beams for the intended applications of half-value layer (HVL) and quarter-value layer (QVL) estimations, patient organ shielding, and computer modeling. Methods: An empirical model, which uses the Lambert W function and represents a generalized Lambert-Beer law, was developed. To validate this model, transmission of diagnostic energy x-ray beams was measured over a wide range of attenuator thicknesses [0.49-33.03 mm Al on a computed tomography (CT) scanner, 0.09-1.93 mm Al on two mammography systems, and 0.1-0.45 mm Cu and 0.49-14.87 mm Al using general radiography]. Exposure measurements were acquired under narrow-beam geometry using standard methods, including the appropriate ionization chamber, for each radiographic system. Nonlinear regression was used to find the best-fit curve of the proposed Lambert W model to each measured transmission versus attenuator thickness data set. In addition to validating the Lambert W model, we also assessed the performance of two-point Lambert W interpolation compared to traditional methods for estimating the HVL and QVL [i.e., semilogarithmic (exponential) and linear interpolation]. Results: The Lambert W model was validated for modeling attenuation versus attenuator thickness with respect to the data collected in this study (R 2 > 0.99). Furthermore, Lambert W interpolation was more accurate and less sensitive to the choice of interpolation points used to estimate the HVL and/or QVL than the traditional methods of semilogarithmic and linear interpolation. Conclusions: The proposed Lambert W model accurately describes attenuation of both monoenergetic radiation and (kilovoltage) polyenergetic beams (under narrow-beam geometry).

  20. An empirical model of diagnostic x-ray attenuation under narrow-beam geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B; Kappadath, S Cheenu; White, R Allen; Atkinson, E Neely; Cody, Dianna D

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a mathematical model to describe narrow-beam attenuation of kilovoltage x-ray beams for the intended applications of half-value layer (HVL) and quarter-value layer (QVL) estimations, patient organ shielding, and computer modeling. An empirical model, which uses the Lambert W function and represents a generalized Lambert-Beer law, was developed. To validate this model, transmission of diagnostic energy x-ray beams was measured over a wide range of attenuator thicknesses [0.49-33.03 mm Al on a computed tomography (CT) scanner, 0.09-1.93 mm Al on two mammography systems, and 0.1-0.45 mm Cu and 0.49-14.87 mm Al using general radiography]. Exposure measurements were acquired under narrow-beam geometry using standard methods, including the appropriate ionization chamber, for each radiographic system. Nonlinear regression was used to find the best-fit curve of the proposed Lambert W model to each measured transmission versus attenuator thickness data set. In addition to validating the Lambert W model, we also assessed the performance of two-point Lambert W interpolation compared to traditional methods for estimating the HVL and QVL [i.e., semi-logarithmic (exponential) and linear interpolation]. The Lambert W model was validated for modeling attenuation versus attenuator thickness with respect to the data collected in this study (R2 > 0.99). Furthermore, Lambert W interpolation was more accurate and less sensitive to the choice of interpolation points used to estimate the HVL and/or QVL than the traditional methods of semilogarithmic and linear interpolation. The proposed Lambert W model accurately describes attenuation of both monoenergetic radiation and (kilovoltage) polyenergetic beams (under narrow-beam geometry).

  1. Tubular nanostructured materials for bioapplications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jining; Chen, Linfeng; Srivatsan, Malathi; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2009-03-01

    Tubular nanomaterials possess hollow structures as well as high aspect ratios. In addition to their unique physical and chemical properties induced by their nanoscale dimensions, their inner voids and outer surfaces make them ideal candidates for a number of biomedical applications. In this work, three types of tubular nanomaterials including carbon nanotubes, hematite nanotubes, and maghemite nanotubes, were synthesized by different chemical techniques. Their structural and crystalline properties were characterized. For potential bioapplications of tubular nanomaterials, experimental investigations were carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of using carbon nanotubes, hematite nanotubes, and maghemite nanotubes in glucose sensing, neuronal growth, and drug delivery, respectively. Preliminary results show the promise of tubular nanomaterials in future biomedical applications.

  2. A model of gas cavity breakup behind a blockage in fast breeder reactor subassembly geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Y.

    1980-05-01

    A semi-empirical model has been developed to describe the transient behaviour of a gas cavity due to breakup behind a blockage in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor subassembly geometry. The main mechanisms assumed for gas cavity breakup in the present model are as follows: The gas cavity is broken up by the pressure fluctuation at the interface due to turbulence in the liquid. The centrifugal force on the liquid opposes breakup. The model is able to describe experimental results on the transient behaviour of a gas cavity due to breakup after the termination of gas injection. On the basis of the present model the residence time of a gas cavity behind a blockage in sodium is predicted and the dependence of the residence time on blockage size is discussed. (orig.) [de

  3. Interactive Modeling of Architectural Freeform Structures - Combining Geometry with Fabrication and Statics

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Caigui

    2014-09-01

    This paper builds on recent progress in computing with geometric constraints, which is particularly relevant to architectural geometry. Not only do various kinds of meshes with additional properties (like planar faces, or with equilibrium forces in their edges) become available for interactive geometric modeling, but so do other arrangements of geometric primitives, like honeycomb structures. The latter constitute an important class of geometric objects, with relations to “Lobel” meshes, and to freeform polyhedral patterns. Such patterns are particularly interesting and pose research problems which go beyond what is known for meshes, e.g. with regard to their computing, their flexibility, and the assessment of their fairness.

  4. Modelling Plane Geometry: the connection between Geometrical Visualization and Algebraic Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L. R.; Jardim, D. F.; da Silva, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The teaching and learning of Mathematics contents have been challenging along the history of the education, both for the teacher, in his dedicated task of teaching, as for the student, in his arduous and constant task of learning. One of the topics that are most discussed in these contents is the difference between the concepts of proof and demonstration. This work presents an interesting discussion about such concepts considering the use of the mathematical modeling approach for teaching, applied to some examples developed in the classroom with a group of students enrolled in the discipline of Geometry of the Mathematics curse of UFVJM.

  5. Literature Reviews on Modeling Internal Geometry of Textile Composites and Rate-Independent Continuum Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su-Yuen, Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Textile composite materials have good potential for constructing composite structures where the effects of three-dimensional stresses are critical or geometric complexity is a manufacturing concern. There is a recent interest in advancing competence within Langley Research Center for modeling the degradation of mechanical properties of textile composites. In an initial effort, two critical areas are identified to pursue: (1) Construction of internal geometry of textile composites, and (2) Rate-independent continuum damage mechanics. This report documents reviews on the two subjects. Various reviewed approaches are categorized, their assumptions, methods, and progress are briefed, and then critiques are presented. Each review ends with recommended research.

  6. Modeling of quench front progression and heat transfer by radiation during reflooding of a tubular test section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, P.; Deruaz, R.

    1976-01-01

    Heat transfer modeling is presented in the scope of emergency core cooling. The rewetting of a hot dry wall during reflooding is a conduction-controlled phenomenon described by a model of heat-transfer coefficient. Upstream of the quench front, a two-dimensional approach involving both axial and transverse (or radial) heat conduction is discussed in view of thick walls, high quench front velocities and nucleate boiling. Downstream of the quench-front, high wall temperatures are reached so that a thermal radiation model is required to separate the different mechanisms of heat transfer. An attempt is made to consider radiation between walls, water droplets and vapor, with scattering emission and absorption of the two phases

  7. Experimental Validation and Model Verification for a Novel Geometry ICPC Solar Collector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perers, Bengt; Duff, William S.; Daosukho, Jirachote

    A novel geometry ICPC solar collector was developed at the University of Chicago and Colorado State University. A ray tracing model has been designed to investigate the optical performance of both the horizontal and vertical fin versions of this collector. Solar radiation is modeled as discrete...... to the desired incident angle of the sun’s rays, performance of the novel ICPC solar collector at various specified angles along the transverse and longitudinal evacuated tube directions were experimentally determined. To validate the ray tracing model, transverse and longitudinal performance predictions...... at the corresponding specified incident angles are compared to the Sandia results. A 100 m2 336 Novel ICPC evacuated tube solar collector array has been in continuous operation at a demonstration project in Sacramento California since 1998. Data from the initial operation of the array are used to further validate...

  8. Information geometry and population genetics the mathematical structure of the Wright-Fisher model

    CERN Document Server

    Hofrichter, Julian; Tran, Tat Dat

    2017-01-01

    The present monograph develops a versatile and profound mathematical perspective of the Wright--Fisher model of population genetics. This well-known and intensively studied model carries a rich and beautiful mathematical structure, which is uncovered here in a systematic manner. In addition to approaches by means of analysis, combinatorics and PDE, a geometric perspective is brought in through Amari's and Chentsov's information geometry. This concept allows us to calculate many quantities of interest systematically; likewise, the employed global perspective elucidates the stratification of the model in an unprecedented manner. Furthermore, the links to statistical mechanics and large deviation theory are explored and developed into powerful tools. Altogether, the manuscript provides a solid and broad working basis for graduate students and researchers interested in this field.

  9. 3D Digital Surveying and Modelling of Cave Geometry: Application to Paleolithic Rock Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Aguilera, Diego; Muñoz-Nieto, Angel; Gómez-Lahoz, Javier; Herrero-Pascual, Jesus; Gutierrez-Alonso, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    3D digital surveying and modelling of cave geometry represents a relevant approach for research, management and preservation of our cultural and geological legacy. In this paper, a multi-sensor approach based on a terrestrial laser scanner, a high-resolution digital camera and a total station is presented. Two emblematic caves of Paleolithic human occupation and situated in northern Spain, "Las Caldas" and "Peña de Candamo", have been chosen to put in practise this approach. As a result, an integral and multi-scalable 3D model is generated which may allow other scientists, pre-historians, geologists…, to work on two different levels, integrating different Paleolithic Art datasets: (1) a basic level based on the accurate and metric support provided by the laser scanner; and (2) a advanced level using the range and image-based modelling.

  10. Programming While Construction of Engineering 3D Models of Complex Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheyfets, A. L.

    2017-11-01

    The capabilities of geometrically accurate computational 3D models construction with the use of programming are presented. The construction of models of an architectural arch and a glo-boid worm gear is considered as an example. The models are designed in the AutoCAD pack-age. Three programs of construction are given. The first program is for designing a multi-section architectural arch. The control of the arch’s geometry by impacting its main parameters is shown. The second program is for designing and studying the working surface of a globoid gear’s worm. The article shows how to make the animation for this surface’s formation. The third program is for formation of a worm gear cavity surface. The cavity formation dynamics is studied. The programs are written in the AutoLisp programming language. The program texts are provided.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling of fiber-scintillator flow-cell radiation detector geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, T.L.; Ross, H.H.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville; Schweitzer, G.K.

    1988-01-01

    A Monte Carlo computer calculation is described which models the geometric efficiency of a fiber-scintillator flow-cell radiation detector designed to detect radiolabeled compounds in liquid chromatography eluates. By using special mathematical techniques, an efficiency prediction with a precision of 1% is obtained after generating only 1000 random events. Good agreement is seen between predicted and experimental efficiency except for very low energy beta emission where the geometric limitation on efficiency is overcome by pulse height limitations which the model does not consider. The modeling results show that in the test system, the detection efficiency for low energy beta emitters is limited primarily by light generation and collection rather than geometry. (orig.)

  12. Effects of dwell time of excitation waveform on meniscus movements for a tubular piezoelectric print-head: experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jiaqing; Liu, Yaxin; Huang, Bo

    2017-07-01

    In inkjet applications, it is normal to search for an optimal drive waveform when dispensing a fresh fluid or adjusting a newly fabricated print-head. To test trial waveforms with different dwell times, a camera and a strobe light were used to image the protruding or retracting liquid tongues without ejecting any droplets. An edge detection method was used to calculate the lengths of the liquid tongues to draw the meniscus movement curves. The meniscus movement is determined by the time-domain response of the acoustic pressure at the nozzle of the print-head. Starting at the inverse piezoelectric effect, a mathematical model which considers the liquid viscosity in acoustic propagation is constructed to study the acoustic pressure response at the nozzle of the print-head. The liquid viscosity retards the propagation speed and dampens the harmonic amplitude. The pressure response, which is the combined effect of the acoustic pressures generated during the rising time and the falling time and after their propagations and reflections, explains the meniscus movements well. Finally, the optimal dwell time for droplet ejections is discussed.

  13. Effects of dwell time of excitation waveform on meniscus movements for a tubular piezoelectric print-head: experiments and model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Jiaqing; Liu, Yaxin; Huang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    In inkjet applications, it is normal to search for an optimal drive waveform when dispensing a fresh fluid or adjusting a newly fabricated print-head. To test trial waveforms with different dwell times, a camera and a strobe light were used to image the protruding or retracting liquid tongues without ejecting any droplets. An edge detection method was used to calculate the lengths of the liquid tongues to draw the meniscus movement curves. The meniscus movement is determined by the time-domain response of the acoustic pressure at the nozzle of the print-head. Starting at the inverse piezoelectric effect, a mathematical model which considers the liquid viscosity in acoustic propagation is constructed to study the acoustic pressure response at the nozzle of the print-head. The liquid viscosity retards the propagation speed and dampens the harmonic amplitude. The pressure response, which is the combined effect of the acoustic pressures generated during the rising time and the falling time and after their propagations and reflections, explains the meniscus movements well. Finally, the optimal dwell time for droplet ejections is discussed. (paper)

  14. Simulation of hydrogen release and combustion in large scale geometries: models and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccantini, A.; Dabbene, F.; Kudriakov, S.; Magnaud, J.P.; Paillere, H.; Studer, E.

    2003-01-01

    The simulation of H2 distribution and combustion in confined geometries such as nuclear reactor containments is a challenging task from the point of view of numerical simulation, as it involves quite disparate length and time scales, which need to resolved appropriately and efficiently. Cea is involved in the development and validation of codes to model such problems, for external clients such as IRSN (TONUS code), Technicatome (NAUTILUS code) or for its own safety studies. This paper provides an overview of the physical and numerical models developed for such applications, as well as some insight into the current research topics which are being pursued. Examples of H2 mixing and combustion simulations are given. (authors)

  15. Modeling and optimization of sunflower oil methanolysis over quicklime bits in a packed bed tubular reactor using the response surface methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miladinović, Marija R.; Stamenković, Olivera S.; Banković, Predrag T.; Milutinović-Nikolić, Aleksandra D.; Jovanović, Dušan M.; Veljković, Vlada B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Sunflower oil methanolysis in a continuous packed bed reactor was optimized. • Thermally-activated, low-cost quicklime bits were used as a catalyst. • Process was optimized by 3"3 full factorial design and Box-Behnken design. • Box-Behnken design is recommended for optimizing biodiesel production processes. • FAME content in the ester phase obtained under the optimum conditions was >98%. - Abstract: The effect of the residence time (i.e. liquid flow rate through the reactor), methanol-to-oil molar ratio and reaction temperature on the fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) content at the output of a continuous packed bed tubular reactor was modeled by the response surface methodology (RSM) combined with the 3"3 full factorial design (FFD) with replication or the Box-Behnken design (BBD) with five center points. The methanolysis of sunflower oil was carried out at the residence time of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 h, the methanol-to-oil molar ratios of 6:1, 12:1 and 18:1 and the reaction temperature of 40, 50 and 60 °C under the atmospheric pressure. Based on the used experimental designs, the model equations containing only linear and two-factor interaction terms were developed for predicting the FAME content, which were validated through the use of the unseen data. Applying the analysis of variance (ANOVA), all three factors were shown to have a significant influence on the FAME content. Acceptable statistical predictability and accuracy resulted from both designs since the values of the coefficient of determination were close to unity while the values of the mean relative percentage deviation were relatively low (<±10%). In addition, both designs predicted the maximum FAME content of above 99%, which agreed closely with the actual FAME content (98.8%). The same optimal reaction temperature (60 °C) and residence time (2.0 h) were determined by both designs while the BBD model suggested a slightly lower methanol-to-oil molar ratio (12.2:1) than the 3"3 FFD

  16. Modeling earthquake sequences along the Manila subduction zone: Effects of three-dimensional fault geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongyu; Liu, Yajing; Yang, Hongfeng; Ning, Jieyuan

    2018-05-01

    To assess the potential of catastrophic megathrust earthquakes (MW > 8) along the Manila Trench, the eastern boundary of the South China Sea, we incorporate a 3D non-planar fault geometry in the framework of rate-state friction to simulate earthquake rupture sequences along the fault segment between 15°N-19°N of northern Luzon. Our simulation results demonstrate that the first-order fault geometry heterogeneity, the transitional-segment (possibly related to the subducting Scarborough seamount chain) connecting the steeper south segment and the flatter north segment, controls earthquake rupture behaviors. The strong along-strike curvature at the transitional-segment typically leads to partial ruptures of MW 8.3 and MW 7.8 along the southern and northern segments respectively. The entire fault occasionally ruptures in MW 8.8 events when the cumulative stress in the transitional-segment is sufficiently high to overcome the geometrical inhibition. Fault shear stress evolution, represented by the S-ratio, is clearly modulated by the width of seismogenic zone (W). At a constant plate convergence rate, a larger W indicates on average lower interseismic stress loading rate and longer rupture recurrence period, and could slow down or sometimes stop ruptures that initiated from a narrower portion. Moreover, the modeled interseismic slip rate before whole-fault rupture events is comparable with the coupling state that was inferred from the interplate seismicity distribution, suggesting the Manila trench could potentially rupture in a M8+ earthquake.

  17. Dispersive versus constant-geometry models of the neutron-208Pb mean field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahaux, C.; Sartor, R.

    1990-01-01

    Phenomenological optical-model analyses of differential elastic scattering cross sections of neutrons by 208 Pb indicate that the radius of the real part of the potential decreases with increasing energy in the domain 4< E<40 MeV. On the other hand, the experimental total cross section is compatible with a real potential whose radial shape is energy independent. In order to clarify this situation, we compare a 'constant geometry' model whose real part has an energy-independent radial shape with a 'dispersive model' whose real part has an energy-dependent radial shape calculated from the dispersion relation which connects the real and imaginary parts of the field. The following three main features are considered. (i) The junction of the optical-model potential with the shell-model potential at negative energy. (ii) The agreement between the calculated total and differential cross sections and their experimental values. (iii) The extent to which the real part of the optical-model potential can be accurately determined by analyzing the total cross section only. It is concluded that the presently available experimental data support the existence of an energy dependence of the radial shape of the real potential, in keeping with the dispersion relation. A new parametrization of a 'dispersive' mean field is also presented. It does not involve more parameters than the previously published one but takes better account of the physical properties of the spectral functions; it is shown to improve the agreement between predicted and experimental scattering data. (orig.)

  18. The relation between geometry, hydrology and stability of complex hillslopes examined using low-dimensional hydrological models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talebi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Key words: Hillslope geometry, Hillslope hydrology, Hillslope stability, Complex hillslopes, Modeling shallow landslides, HSB model, HSB-SM model.

    The hydrologic response of a hillslope to rainfall involves a complex, transient saturated-unsaturated interaction that usually leads to a

  19. Fracture network modelling: an integrated approach for realisation of complex fracture network geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    In its efforts to improve geological support of the safety case, Ontario Power Generation's Deep Geologic Repository Technology Programme (DGRTP) has developed a procedure (Srivastava, 2002) for creating realistic 3-D fracture network models (FNMs) that honor information typically available at the time of preliminary site characterisation: By accommodating all of the these various pieces of 'hard' and 'soft' data, these FNMs provide a single, coherent and consistent model that can serve the needs of many preliminary site characterisation studies. The detailed, complex and realistic models of 3-D fracture geometry produced by this method can serve as the basis for developing rock property models to be used in flow and transport studies. They can also be used for exploring the suitability of a proposed site by providing quantitative assessments of the probability that a proposed repository with a specified geometry will be intersected by fractures. When integrated with state-of-the-art scientific visualisation, these models can also help in the planning of additional data gathering activities by identifying critical fractures that merit further detailed investigation. Finally, these FNMs can serve as one of the central elements of the presentation and explanation of the Descriptive Conceptual Geosphere Model (DCM) to other interested parties, including non-technical audiences. In addition to being ideally suited to preliminary site characterisation, the approach also readily incorporates field data that may become available during subsequent site investigations, including ground reconnaissance, borehole programmes and other subsurface studies. A single approach can therefore serve the needs of the site characterisation from its inception through several years of data collection and more detailed site-specific investigations, accommodating new data as they become available and updating the FNMs accordingly. The FNMs from this method are probabilistic in the sense that

  20. Fractal Geometry Enables Classification of Different Lung Morphologies in a Model of Experimental Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obert, Martin; Hagner, Stefanie; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Inan, Selcuk; Renz, Harald

    2015-06-01

    Animal models represent the basis of our current understanding of the pathophysiology of asthma and are of central importance in the preclinical development of drug therapies. The characterization of irregular lung shapes is a major issue in radiological imaging of mice in these models. The aim of this study was to find out whether differences in lung morphology can be described by fractal geometry. Healthy and asthmatic mouse groups, before and after an acute asthma attack induced by methacholine, were studied. In vivo flat-panel-based high-resolution Computed Tomography (CT) was used for mice's thorax imaging. The digital image data of the mice's lungs were segmented from the surrounding tissue. After that, the lungs were divided by image gray-level thresholds into two additional subsets. One subset contained basically the air transporting bronchial system. The other subset corresponds mainly to the blood vessel system. We estimated the fractal dimension of all sets of the different mouse groups using the mass radius relation (mrr). We found that the air transporting subset of the bronchial lung tissue enables a complete and significant differentiation between all four mouse groups (mean D of control mice before methacholine treatment: 2.64 ± 0.06; after treatment: 2.76 ± 0.03; asthma mice before methacholine treatment: 2.37 ± 0.16; after treatment: 2.71 ± 0.03; p < 0.05). We conclude that the concept of fractal geometry allows a well-defined, quantitative numerical and objective differentiation of lung shapes — applicable most likely also in human asthma diagnostics.

  1. Radionuclide transport in running waters, sensitivity analysis of bed-load, channel geometry and model discretisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, Karin; Elert, Mark

    2006-08-01

    In this report, further investigations of the model concept for radionuclide transport in stream, developed in the SKB report TR-05-03 is presented. Especially three issues have been the focus of the model investigations. The first issue was to investigate the influence of assumed channel geometry on the simulation results. The second issue was to reconsider the applicability of the equation for the bed-load transport in the stream model, and finally the last issue was to investigate how the model discretisation will influence the simulation results. The simulations showed that there were relatively small differences in results when applying different cross-sections in the model. The inclusion of the exact shape of the cross-section in the model is therefore not crucial, however, if cross-sectional data exist, the overall shape of the cross-section should be used in the model formulation. This could e.g. be accomplished by using measured values of the stream width and depth in the middle of the stream and by assuming a triangular shape. The bed-load transport was in this study determined for different sediment characteristics which can be used as an order of magnitude estimation if no exact determinations of the bed-load are available. The difference in the calculated bed-load transport for the different materials was, however, found to be limited. The investigation of model discretisation showed that a fine model discretisation to account for numerical effects is probably not important for the performed simulations. However, it can be necessary for being able to account for different conditions along a stream. For example, the application of mean slopes instead of individual values in the different stream reaches can result in very different predicted concentrations

  2. Molecular dynamics modeling on the role of initial void geometry in a thin aluminum film under uniaxial tension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Yi; Chen, Zengtao

    2015-01-01

    The effect of initial void geometry on damage progression in a thin aluminum film under uniaxial load is studied via molecular dynamics (MD) method. The embedded voids are with different initial geometries regarding shape, porosity and intervoid ligament distance (ILD). Major simulations are run upon twelve MD geometries with each containing 8–27 million atoms. The corresponding stress–strain relation is monitored during the microstructure evolution of the specimens. The critical stress to trigger the dislocation emission is found in line with the prediction of the Lubarda model. The simulation results reveal that the initial void geometry has substantial impact on the stress–strain relation especially for a specimen with larger initial porosity. (paper)

  3. Stability of a two-volume MRxMHD model in slab geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuen, Li Huey

    Ideal MHD models are known to be inadequate to describe various physical attributes of a toroidal field with non-continuous symmetry, such as magnetic islands and stochastic regions. Motivated by this omission, a new variational principle MRXMHD was developed; rather than include an infinity of magnetic flux surfaces, MRxMHD has a finite number of flux surfaces, and thus supports partial plasma relaxation. The model comprises of relaxed plasma regions which are separated by nested ideal MHD interfaces (flux surfaces), and can be encased in a perfectly conducting wall. In each region the pressure is constant, but can jump across interfaces. The field and field pitch, or rotational transform, can also jump across the interfaces. Unlike ideal MHD, MRxMHD plasmas can support toroidally non-axisymmetric confined magnetic fields, magnetic islands and stochastic regions. In toroidally non-axisymmetric plasma, the existence of interfaces in MRxMHD is contingent on the irrationality of the rotational transform of flux surfaces. That is, the KAM theorem shows that invariant tori (flux surfaces) continue to exist for sufficiently small perturbations to an integrable system (which describes flux surfaces), provided that the rotational transform is sufficiently irrational. Building upon the MRxMHD stability model, we study the effects of irrationality of the rotational transform at interfaces in MRxMHD on plasma stability. We present an MRxMHD equilibrium model to investigate the effects of magnetic field pitch within the plasma and across the aforementioned flux surfaces within a chosen geometry. In this model, it is found that the 2D system stability conditions are dependent on the interface and resonant surface magnetic field pitch at minimised energy states, and the stability of a system as a function of magnetic field pitch destabilises at particular values of magnetic field pitch. We benchmark the treatment of a two-volume system, along with the calculations for

  4. Fractal solutions of recirculation tubular chemical reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezowski, Marek

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of fractal solutions of model of recirculation non-adiabatic tubular chemical reactors are presented. The first kind concerns the structure of Feigenbaum's diagram on the limit of chaos. The second kind and the third one concern the effect of initial conditions on the dynamic solutions of models. In the course of computations two types of recirculation were considered, viz. the recirculation of mass (return of a part of products' stream) and recirculation of heat (heat exchange in the external heat exchanger)

  5. Theoretical modeling of electroosmotic flow in soft microchannels: A variational approach applied to the rectangular geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Arman

    2018-03-01

    Modeling of fluid flow in polyelectrolyte layer (PEL)-grafted microchannels is challenging due to their two-layer nature. Hence, the pertinent studies are limited only to circular and slit geometries for which matching the solutions for inside and outside the PEL is simple. In this paper, a simple variational-based approach is presented for the modeling of fully developed electroosmotic flow in PEL-grafted microchannels by which the whole fluidic area is considered as a single porous medium of variable properties. The model is capable of being applied to microchannels of a complex cross-sectional area. As an application of the method, it is applied to a rectangular microchannel of uniform PEL properties. It is shown that modeling a rectangular channel as a slit may lead to considerable overestimation of the mean velocity especially when both the PEL and electric double layer (EDL) are thick. It is also demonstrated that the mean velocity is an increasing function of the fixed charge density and PEL thickness and a decreasing function of the EDL thickness and PEL friction coefficient. The influence of the PEL thickness on the mean velocity, however, vanishes when both the PEL thickness and friction coefficient are sufficiently high.

  6. Cooperative learning model with high order thinking skills questions: an understanding on geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, P. P.; Budiyono; Slamet, I.

    2018-05-01

    Geometry, a branch of mathematics, has an important role in mathematics learning. This research aims to find out the effect of learning model, emotional intelligence, and the interaction between learning model and emotional intelligence toward students’ mathematics achievement. This research is quasi-experimental research with 2 × 3 factorial design. The sample in this research included 179 Senior High School students on 11th grade in Sukoharjo Regency, Central Java, Indonesia in academic year of 2016/2017. The sample was taken by using stratified cluster random sampling. The results showed that: the student are taught by Thinking Aloud Pairs Problem-Solving using HOTs questions provides better mathematics learning achievement than Make A Match using HOTs questions. High emotional intelligence students have better mathematics learning achievement than moderate and low emotional intelligence students, and moderate emotional intelligence students have better mathematics learning achievement than low emotional intelligence students. There is an interaction between learning model and emotional intelligence, and these affect mathematics learning achievement. We conclude that appropriate learning model can support learning activities become more meaningful and facilitate students to understand material. For further research, we suggest to explore the contribution of other aspects in cooperative learning modification to mathematics achievement.

  7. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Mathias F.; Johnson, Carl J.; Tang, Chuyang; Jensen, Mogens H.; Yde, Lars; Hélix-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    In forward osmosis (FO), an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer. PMID:24958428

  8. Validation and Analysis of Forward Osmosis CFD Model in Complex 3D Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Yde

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In forward osmosis (FO, an osmotic pressure gradient generated across a semi-permeable membrane is used to generate water transport from a dilute feed solution into a concentrated draw solution. This principle has shown great promise in the areas of water purification, wastewater treatment, seawater desalination and power generation. To ease optimization and increase understanding of membrane systems, it is desirable to have a comprehensive model that allows for easy investigation of all the major parameters in the separation process. Here we present experimental validation of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD model developed to simulate FO experiments with asymmetric membranes. Simulations are compared with experimental results obtained from using two distinctly different complex three-dimensional membrane chambers. It is found that the CFD model accurately describes the solute separation process and water permeation through membranes under various flow conditions. It is furthermore demonstrated how the CFD model can be used to optimize membrane geometry in such as way as to promote the mass transfer.

  9. Physical modeling and numerical simulation of subcooled boiling in one- and three-dimensional representation of bundle geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottoni, M.; Lyczkowski, R.; Ahuja, S.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical simulation of subcooled boiling in one-dimensional geometry with the Homogeneous Equilibrium Model (HEM) may yield difficulties related to the very low sonic velocity associated with the HEM. These difficulties do not arise with subcritical flow. Possible solutions of the problem include introducing a relaxation of the vapor production rate. Three-dimensional simulations of subcooled boiling in bundle geometry typical of fast reactors can be performed by using two systems of conservation equations, one for the HEM and the other for a Separated Phases Model (SPM), with a smooth transition between the two models

  10. Using geometry to improve model fitting and experiment design for glacial isostasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachuck, S. B.; Cathles, L. M.

    2017-12-01

    As scientists we routinely deal with models, which are geometric objects at their core - the manifestation of a set of parameters as predictions for comparison with observations. When the number of observations exceeds the number of parameters, the model is a hypersurface (the model manifold) in the space of all possible predictions. The object of parameter fitting is to find the parameters corresponding to the point on the model manifold as close to the vector of observations as possible. But the geometry of the model manifold can make this difficult. By curving, ending abruptly (where, for instance, parameters go to zero or infinity), and by stretching and compressing the parameters together in unexpected directions, it can be difficult to design algorithms that efficiently adjust the parameters. Even at the optimal point on the model manifold, parameters might not be individually resolved well enough to be applied to new contexts. In our context of glacial isostatic adjustment, models of sparse surface observations have a broad spread of sensitivity to mixtures of the earth's viscous structure and the surface distribution of ice over the last glacial cycle. This impedes precise statements about crucial geophysical processes, such as the planet's thermal history or the climates that controlled the ice age. We employ geometric methods developed in the field of systems biology to improve the efficiency of fitting (geodesic accelerated Levenberg-Marquardt) and to identify the maximally informative sources of additional data to make better predictions of sea levels and ice configurations (optimal experiment design). We demonstrate this in particular in reconstructions of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet, where we show that only certain kinds of data from the central Barents have the power to distinguish between proposed models.

  11. The estimation of geometry and motion of a surface from image sequences by means of linearisation of a paramatric model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korsten, Maarten J.; Houkes, Z.

    1990-01-01

    A method is given to estimate the geometry and motion of a moving body surface from image sequences. To this aim a parametric model of the surface is used, in order to reformulate the problem to one of parameter estimation. After linearization of the model standard linear estimation methods can be

  12. Tractable Stochastic Geometry Model for IoT Access in LTE Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Gharbieh, Mohammad; Elsawy, Hesham; Bader, Ahmed; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is large-scale by nature. This is not only manifested by the large number of connected devices, but also by the high volumes of traffic that must be accommodated. Cellular networks are indeed a natural candidate for the data tsunami the IoT is expected to generate in conjunction with legacy human-type traffic. However, the random access process for scheduling request represents a major bottleneck to support IoT via LTE cellular networks. Accordingly, this paper develops a mathematical framework to model and study the random access channel (RACH) scalability to accommodate IoT traffic. The developed model is based on stochastic geometry and discrete time Markov chains (DTMC) to account for different access strategies and possible sources of inter-cell and intra-cell interferences. To this end, the developed model is utilized to assess and compare three different access strategies, which incorporate a combination of transmission persistency, back-off, and power ramping. The analysis and the results showcased herewith clearly illustrate the vulnerability of the random access procedure as the IoT intensity grows. Finally, the paper offers insights into effective scenarios for each transmission strategy in terms of IoT intensity and RACH detection thresholds.

  13. Tractable Stochastic Geometry Model for IoT Access in LTE Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Gharbieh, Mohammad

    2017-02-07

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is large-scale by nature. This is not only manifested by the large number of connected devices, but also by the high volumes of traffic that must be accommodated. Cellular networks are indeed a natural candidate for the data tsunami the IoT is expected to generate in conjunction with legacy human-type traffic. However, the random access process for scheduling request represents a major bottleneck to support IoT via LTE cellular networks. Accordingly, this paper develops a mathematical framework to model and study the random access channel (RACH) scalability to accommodate IoT traffic. The developed model is based on stochastic geometry and discrete time Markov chains (DTMC) to account for different access strategies and possible sources of inter-cell and intra-cell interferences. To this end, the developed model is utilized to assess and compare three different access strategies, which incorporate a combination of transmission persistency, back-off, and power ramping. The analysis and the results showcased herewith clearly illustrate the vulnerability of the random access procedure as the IoT intensity grows. Finally, the paper offers insights into effective scenarios for each transmission strategy in terms of IoT intensity and RACH detection thresholds.

  14. Development of neural network models for the prediction of solidification mode, weld bead geometry and sensitisation in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, M.; Raj, B.; Prasad Rao, K.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative models describing the effect of weld composition on the solidification mode, ferrite content and process parameters on the weld bead geometry are necessary in order to design composition of the welding consumable to ensure primary ferritic solidification mode, proper ferrite content and to ensure right choice of process parameters to achieve good bead geometry. A quantitative model on sensitisation behaviour of austenitic stainless steels is also necessary to optimise the composition of the austenitic stainless steel and to limit the strain on the material in order to enhance the resistance to sensitisation. The present paper discuss the development of quantitative models using artificial neural networks to correlate weld metal composition with solidification mode, process parameter with weld bead geometry and time for sensitisation with composition, strain in the material before welding and the temperature of exposure in austenitic stainless steels. (author)

  15. SU-G-TeP1-08: LINAC Head Geometry Modeling for Cyber Knife System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, B; Li, Y; Liu, B; Guo, B; Xu, X; Wei, R; Zhou, F [Beihang University, Beijing, Beijing (China); Xu, S [PLA General Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China); Wu, Q [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Knowledge of the LINAC head information is critical for model based dose calculation algorithms. However, the geometries are difficult to measure precisely. The purpose of this study is to develop linac head models for Cyber Knife system (CKS). Methods: For CKS, the commissioning data were measured in water at 800mm SAD. The measured full width at half maximum (FWHM) for each cone was found greater than the nominal value, this was further confirmed by additional film measurement in air. Diameter correction, cone shift and source shift models (DCM, CSM and SSM) are proposed to account for the differences. In DCM, a cone-specific correction is applied. For CSM and SSM, a single shift is applied to the cone or source physical position. All three models were validated with an in-house developed pencil beam dose calculation algorithm, and further evaluated by the collimator scatter factor (Sc) correction. Results: The mean square error (MSE) between nominal diameter and the FWHM derived from commissioning data and in-air measurement are 0.54mm and 0.44mm, with the discrepancy increasing with cone size. Optimal shift for CSM and SSM is found to be 9mm upward and 18mm downward, respectively. The MSE in FWHM is reduced to 0.04mm and 0.14mm for DCM and CSM (SSM). Both DCM and CSM result in the same set of Sc values. Combining all cones at SAD 600–1000mm, the average deviation from 1 in Sc of DCM (CSM) and SSM is 2.6% and 2.2%, and reduced to 0.9% and 0.7% for the cones with diameter greater than 15mm. Conclusion: We developed three geometrical models for CKS. All models can handle the discrepancy between vendor specifications and commissioning data. And SSM has the best performance for Sc correction. The study also validated that a point source can be used in CKS dose calculation algorithms.

  16. Hyperbolic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Iversen, Birger

    1992-01-01

    Although it arose from purely theoretical considerations of the underlying axioms of geometry, the work of Einstein and Dirac has demonstrated that hyperbolic geometry is a fundamental aspect of modern physics

  17. Estimation of exhaust gas aerodynamic force on the variable geometry turbocharger actuator: 1D flow model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Fayez Shakil; Laghrouche, Salah; Mehmood, Adeel; El Bagdouri, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Estimation of aerodynamic force on variable turbine geometry vanes and actuator. • Method based on exhaust gas flow modeling. • Simulation tool for integration of aerodynamic force in automotive simulation software. - Abstract: This paper provides a reliable tool for simulating the effects of exhaust gas flow through the variable turbine geometry section of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), on flow control mechanism. The main objective is to estimate the resistive aerodynamic force exerted by the flow upon the variable geometry vanes and the controlling actuator, in order to improve the control of vane angles. To achieve this, a 1D model of the exhaust flow is developed using Navier–Stokes equations. As the flow characteristics depend upon the volute geometry, impeller blade force and the existing viscous friction, the related source terms (losses) are also included in the model. In order to guarantee stability, an implicit numerical solver has been developed for the resolution of the Navier–Stokes problem. The resulting simulation tool has been validated through comparison with experimentally obtained values of turbine inlet pressure and the aerodynamic force as measured at the actuator shaft. The simulator shows good compliance with experimental results

  18. Twistor geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a detailed exposition of the relation between the geometry of twistor space and the geometry of Minkowski space. The paper has a didactical purpose; no use has been made of differential geometry and cohomology.

  19. A Stochastic Geometry Model for Multi-hop Highway Vehicular Communication

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Muhammad Junaid

    2015-11-19

    Carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) protocol is standardized for vehicular communication to ensure a distributed and efficient communication between vehicles. However, several vehicular applications require efficient multi-hop information dissemination. This paper exploits stochastic geometry to develop a tractable and accurate modeling framework to characterize the multi-hop transmissions for vehicular networks in a multi-lane highway setup. In particular, we study the tradeoffs between per-hop packet forward progress, per-hop transmission success probability, and spatial frequency reuse (SFR) efficiency imposed by different packet forwarding schemes, namely, most forward with fixed radius (MFR), the nearest with forward progress (NFP), and the random with forward progress (RFP). We also define a new performance metric, denoted as the aggregate packet progress (APP), which is a dimensionless quantity that captures the aforementioned tradeoffs. To this end, the developed model reveals the interplay between the spectrum sensing threshold (th) of the CSMA protocol and the packet forwarding scheme. Our results show that, in contrary to ALOHA networks which always favor NFP, MFR may achieve the highest APP in CSMA networks if th is properly chosen.

  20. Probing emergent geometry through phase transitions in free vector and matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amado, Irene; Sundborg, Bo [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Thorlacius, Larus [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhaga 3, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Wintergerst, Nico [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Department of Physics, Stockholm University,AlbaNova, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-02-01

    Boundary correlation functions provide insight into the emergence of an effective geometry in higher spin gravity duals of O(N) or U(N) symmetric field theories. On a compact manifold, the singlet constraint leads to nontrivial dynamics at finite temperature and large N phase transitions even at vanishing ’t Hooft coupling. At low temperature, the leading behavior of boundary two-point functions is consistent with propagation through a bulk thermal anti de Sitter space. Above the phase transition, the two-point function shows significant departure from thermal AdS space and the emergence of localized black hole like objects in the bulk. In adjoint models, these objects appear at length scales of order of the AdS radius, consistent with a Hawking-Page transition, but in vector models they are parametrically larger than the AdS scale. In low dimensions, we find another crossover at large distances beyond which the correlation function again takes a thermal AdS form, albeit with a temperature dependent normalization factor.

  1. Thrust initiation and its control on tectonic wedge geometry: An insight from physical and numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Santanu; Mandal, Nibir; Saha, Puspendu; Sarkar, Shamik; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2014-10-01

    We performed a series of sandbox experiments to investigate the initiation of thrust ramping in tectonic wedges on a mechanically continuous basal decollement. The experiments show that the decollement slope (β) is the key factor in controlling the location of thrust initiation with respect to the backstop (i.e. tectonic suture line). For β = 0, the ramping begins right at the backstop, followed by sequential thrusting in the frontal direction, leading to a typical mono-vergent wedge. In contrast, the ramp initiates away from the backstop as β > 0. Under this boundary condition an event of sequential back thrusting takes place prior to the onset of frontal thrust progression. These two-coupled processes eventually give rise to a bi-vergent geometry of the thrust wedge. Using the Drucker-Prager failure criterion in finite element (FE) models, we show the location of stress intensification to render a mechanical basis for the thrust initiation away from the backstop if β > 0. Our physical and FE model results explain why the Main Central Thrust (MCT) is located far away from the Indo-Tibetan plate contact (ITSZ) in the Himalayan fold-and-thrust belts.

  2. Stem cell factor expression after renal ischemia promotes tubular epithelial survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geurt Stokman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal ischemia leads to apoptosis of tubular epithelial cells and results in decreased renal function. Tissue repair involves re-epithelialization of the tubular basement membrane. Survival of the tubular epithelium following ischemia is therefore important in the successful regeneration of renal tissue. The cytokine stem cell factor (SCF has been shown to protect the tubular epithelium against apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a mouse model for renal ischemia/reperfusion injury, we studied how expression of c-KIT on tubular epithelium and its ligand SCF protect cells against apoptosis. Administration of SCF specific antisense oligonucleotides significantly decreased specific staining of SCF following ischemia. Reduced SCF expression resulted in impaired renal function, increased tubular damage and increased tubular epithelial apoptosis, independent of inflammation. In an in vitro hypoxia model, stimulation of tubular epithelial cells with SCF activated survival signaling and decreased apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate an important role for c-KIT and SCF in mediating tubular epithelial cell survival via an autocrine pathway.

  3. Effect of inlet geometry on macrosegregation during the direct chill casting of 7050 alloy billets: experiments and computer modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L; Miroux, A; Subroto, T; Katgerman, L; Eskin, D G

    2012-01-01

    Controlling macrosegregation is one of the major challenges in direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys. In this paper, the effect of the inlet geometry (which influences the melt distribution) on macrosegregation during the DC casting of 7050 alloy billets was studied experimentally and by using 2D computer modelling. The ALSIM model was used to determine the temperature and flow patterns during DC casting. The results from the computer simulations show that the sump profiles and flow patterns in the billet are strongly influenced by the melt flow distribution determined by the inlet geometry. These observations were correlated to the actual macrosegregation patterns found in the as-cast billets produced by having two different inlet geometries. The macrosegregation analysis presented here may assist in determining the critical parameters to consider for improving the casting of 7XXX aluminium alloys.

  4. Effect of inlet geometry on macrosegregation during the direct chill casting of 7050 alloy billets: experiments and computer modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Eskin, D. G.; Miroux, A.; Subroto, T.; Katgerman, L.

    2012-07-01

    Controlling macrosegregation is one of the major challenges in direct-chill (DC) casting of aluminium alloys. In this paper, the effect of the inlet geometry (which influences the melt distribution) on macrosegregation during the DC casting of 7050 alloy billets was studied experimentally and by using 2D computer modelling. The ALSIM model was used to determine the temperature and flow patterns during DC casting. The results from the computer simulations show that the sump profiles and flow patterns in the billet are strongly influenced by the melt flow distribution determined by the inlet geometry. These observations were correlated to the actual macrosegregation patterns found in the as-cast billets produced by having two different inlet geometries. The macrosegregation analysis presented here may assist in determining the critical parameters to consider for improving the casting of 7XXX aluminium alloys.

  5. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to errors in musculo-skeletal geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, V; van der Krogt, M M; Koopman, H F J M; Verdonschot, N

    2012-09-21

    Subject-specific musculo-skeletal models of the lower extremity are an important tool for investigating various biomechanical problems, for instance the results of surgery such as joint replacements and tendon transfers. The aim of this study was to assess the potential effects of errors in musculo-skeletal geometry on subject-specific model results. We performed an extensive sensitivity analysis to quantify the effect of the perturbation of origin, insertion and via points of each of the 56 musculo-tendon parts contained in the model. We used two metrics, namely a Local Sensitivity Index (LSI) and an Overall Sensitivity Index (OSI), to distinguish the effect of the perturbation on the predicted force produced by only the perturbed musculo-tendon parts and by all the remaining musculo-tendon parts, respectively, during a simulated gait cycle. Results indicated that, for each musculo-tendon part, only two points show a significant sensitivity: its origin, or pseudo-origin, point and its insertion, or pseudo-insertion, point. The most sensitive points belong to those musculo-tendon parts that act as prime movers in the walking movement (insertion point of the Achilles Tendon: LSI=15.56%, OSI=7.17%; origin points of the Rectus Femoris: LSI=13.89%, OSI=2.44%) and as hip stabilizers (insertion points of the Gluteus Medius Anterior: LSI=17.92%, OSI=2.79%; insertion point of the Gluteus Minimus: LSI=21.71%, OSI=2.41%). The proposed priority list provides quantitative information to improve the predictive accuracy of subject-specific musculo-skeletal models. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Geometry Modeling and Adaptive Control of Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Tyler Joseph

    Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles have the potential to provide global reach and affordable access to space. Recent technological advancements have made scramjet-powered flight achievable, as evidenced by the successes of the X-43A and X-51A flight test programs over the last decade. Air-breathing hypersonic vehicles present unique modeling and control challenges in large part due to the fact that scramjet propulsion systems are highly integrated into the airframe, resulting in strongly coupled and often unstable dynamics. Additionally, the extreme flight conditions and inability to test fully integrated vehicle systems larger than X-51 before flight leads to inherent uncertainty in hypersonic flight. This thesis presents a means to design vehicle geometries, simulate vehicle dynamics, and develop and analyze control systems for hypersonic vehicles. First, a software tool for generating three-dimensional watertight vehicle surface meshes from simple design parameters is developed. These surface meshes are compatible with existing vehicle analysis tools, with which databases of aerodynamic and propulsive forces and moments can be constructed. A six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear dynamics simulation model which incorporates this data is presented. Inner-loop longitudinal and lateral control systems are designed and analyzed utilizing the simulation model. The first is an output feedback proportional-integral linear controller designed using linear quadratic regulator techniques. The second is a model reference adaptive controller (MRAC) which augments this baseline linear controller with an adaptive element. The performance and robustness of each controller are analyzed through simulated time responses to angle-of-attack and bank angle commands, while various uncertainties are introduced. The MRAC architecture enables the controller to adapt in a nonlinear fashion to deviations from the desired response, allowing for improved tracking performance, stability, and

  7. Tailoring weld geometry during keyhole mode laser welding using a genetic algorithm and a heat transfer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, R; DebRoy, T

    2006-01-01

    Tailoring of weld attributes based on scientific principles remains an important goal in welding research. The current generation of unidirectional laser keyhole models cannot determine sets of welding variables that can lead to a particular weld attribute such as specific weld geometry. Here we show how a computational heat transfer model of keyhole mode laser welding can be restructured for systematic tailoring of weld attributes based on scientific principles. Furthermore, the model presented here can calculate multiple sets of laser welding variables, i.e. laser power, welding speed and beam defocus, with each set leading to the same weld pool geometry. Many sets of welding variables were obtained via a global search using a real number-based genetic algorithm, which was combined with a numerical heat transfer model of keyhole laser welding. The reliability of the numerical heat transfer calculations was significantly improved by optimizing values of the uncertain input parameters from a limited volume of experimental data. The computational procedure was applied to the keyhole mode laser welding of the 5182 Al-Mg alloy to calculate various sets of welding variables to achieve a specified weld geometry. The calculated welding parameter sets showed wide variations of the values of welding parameters, but each set resulted in a similar fusion zone geometry. The effectiveness of the computational procedure was examined by comparing the computed weld geometry for each set of welding parameters with the corresponding experimental geometry. The results provide hope that systematic tailoring of weld attributes via multiple pathways, each representing alternative welding parameter sets, is attainable based on scientific principles

  8. Mathematical rationalization for the renal tubular transport: revised concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mioni, Roberto; Marega, Alessandra; Romano, Giulio; Montanaro, Domenico

    2017-09-01

    The current emphasis on kinetics and in situ control of molecular exchanges, across the tubular membrane, has not been paralleled by corresponding improvements in our understanding of tubular behaviour at the macroscopic level of classical physiology. In this paper, we propose a mathematical rationalization of macroscopic tubular transport by means of a principal transport equation, originating from the law of mass action between substrate and carrier. The other equations, derived from the main one, demonstrate the possibility of distinguishing between transporters with low affinity and high capacity and transporters with high affinity and low capacity. Moreover, our model formalizes both tubular reabsorption and tubular secretion. Regarding the renal calcium handling, our model confirms the two-compartment system proposed by Mioni in 1971, with some important variants, which are in agreement with the fractional reabsorptions of this cation along the tubule, as verified by micro-puncture technique. To obtain the frequency distribution of saturated tubules, we have utilized the infinitesimal analysis method, starting from the equations proposed by Smith in 1943, concluding that all titration curves result from the combined effect of enzymatic approach and anatomical heterogeneity of the nephrons. The theoretical equations included in our manuscript reflect substantial and palpable physiological mechanisms able to suggest diagnosis and therapy of some electrolyte and hormonal disorders. At the end of this paper, we highlight advantages and disadvantages detectable by comparing our mathematical approach with Marshall's and Bijvoet's methods, proposed, respectively, in 1976 and 1984.

  9. A facile-operation tubular electro-Fenton system combined with oxygen evolution reaction for flutriafol degradation: Modeling and Parameters optimizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Anlin; Wei, Kajia; Zhang, Yonghao; Han, Weiqing; Li, Jiansheng; Sun, Xiuyun; Shen, Jinyou; Wang, Lianjun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •A novel tubular cathode coated by carbon black and Fe 2 O 3 -NPs was fabricated and tested. •Effective flutriafol degradation of in dual tubular EF reactor was optimized by RSM. •Ti/RuO 2 and Ti/SnO 2 -Sb anode as oxygen provider can reach high oxygen utilization (78.8%). •The best flutriafol removal (76.5%) without circulation was gained if Ti/RuO 2 was selected as anode. •The simplest operation by the EOC process without aeration, pH and iron adjustment was obtained in the system. -- Abstract: An effective tubular membrane cathode coated by heterogeneous Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles with carbon black (CB), combined with oxygen evolution reaction (OER), was fabricated to simplify the operation of electro-Fenton system. It was demonstrated that the cathode had a favorable suitability for this system owing to the excellent performance presented on Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Cyclic voltammetry (CV). An optimal condition was obtained by response surface methodology (RSM) including pH of 6.7, current density of 13.0 A m −2 , membrane flux of 82.9 L m −2 h −1 , and CB/Fe of 6.2:1. Meanwhile, we achieved an estimated degradation efficiency of flutriafol (79.6%) in optimal condition without circulation of the influent. Effects of OER on the degradation of flutriafol via Ti/RuO 2 and Ti/SnO 2 -Sb tubular anodes were further interpreted by the gas production rate and the H 2 /O 2 value. High oxygen utilization of 78.8% was acquired when Ti/RuO 2 anode served as a sufficient oxygen provider. The electrocatalytic oxygen cycle, a key loop process, was firstly interpreted in this system, which achieved a great comprehensive electrocatalytic effect with the simplest operation and had a 74.5% removal of flutriafol in the verified experiment.

  10. Experimental and modeling analysis of fast ionization wave discharge propagation in a rectangular geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashima, Keisuke; Adamovich, Igor V.; Xiong Zhongmin; Kushner, Mark J.; Starikovskaia, Svetlana; Czarnetzki, Uwe; Luggenhoelscher, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Fast ionization wave (FIW), nanosecond pulse discharge propagation in nitrogen and helium in a rectangular geometry channel/waveguide is studied experimentally using calibrated capacitive probe measurements. The repetitive nanosecond pulse discharge in the channel was generated using a custom designed pulsed plasma generator (peak voltage 10-40 kV, pulse duration 30-100 ns, and voltage rise time ∼1 kV/ns), generating a sequence of alternating polarity high-voltage pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 20 Hz. Both negative polarity and positive polarity ionization waves have been studied. Ionization wave speed, as well as time-resolved potential distributions and axial electric field distributions in the propagating discharge are inferred from the capacitive probe data. ICCD images show that at the present conditions the FIW discharge in helium is diffuse and volume-filling, while in nitrogen the discharge propagates along the walls of the channel. FIW discharge propagation has been analyzed numerically using quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional kinetic models in a hydrodynamic (drift-diffusion), local ionization approximation. The wave speed and the electric field distribution in the wave front predicted by the model are in good agreement with the experimental results. A self-similar analytic solution of the fast ionization wave propagation equations has also been obtained. The analytic model of the FIW discharge predicts key ionization wave parameters, such as wave speed, peak electric field in the front, potential difference across the wave, and electron density as functions of the waveform on the high voltage electrode, in good agreement with the numerical calculations and the experimental results.

  11. Modeling and Analysis of Cellular Networks using Stochastic Geometry: A Tutorial

    KAUST Repository

    Elsawy, Hesham; Salem, Ahmed Sultan; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim; Win, Moe Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a tutorial on stochastic geometry (SG) based analysis for cellular networks. This tutorial is distinguished by its depth with respect to wireless communication details and its focus on cellular networks. The paper starts by modeling and analyzing the baseband interference in a baseline single-tier downlink cellular network with single antenna base stations and universal frequency reuse. Then, it characterizes signal-to-interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) and its related performance metrics. In particular, a unified approach to conduct error probability, outage probability, and transmission rate analysis is presented. Although the main focus of the paper is on cellular networks, the presented unified approach applies for other types of wireless networks that impose interference protection around receivers. The paper then extends the unified approach to capture cellular network characteristics (e.g., frequency reuse, multiple antenna, power control, etc.). It also presents numerical examples associated with demonstrations and discussions. To this end, the paper highlights the state-of-the- art research and points out future research directions.

  12. Fractional cable equation for general geometry: A model of axons with swellings and anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, Erick J.; Romero, Juan M.; Yépez-Martínez, Huitzilin

    2017-09-01

    Different experimental studies have reported anomalous diffusion in brain tissues and notably this anomalous diffusion is expressed through fractional derivatives. Axons are important to understand neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Indeed, abnormal accumulation of proteins and organelles in axons is a hallmark of these diseases. The diffusion in the axons can become anomalous as a result of this abnormality. In this case the voltage propagation in axons is affected. Another hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases is given by discrete swellings along the axon. In order to model the voltage propagation in axons with anomalous diffusion and swellings, in this paper we propose a fractional cable equation for a general geometry. This generalized equation depends on fractional parameters and geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. For a cable with a constant radius we show that the voltage decreases when the fractional effect increases. In cables with swellings we find that when the fractional effect or the swelling radius increases, the voltage decreases. Similar behavior is obtained when the number of swellings and the fractional effect increase. Moreover, we find that when the radius swelling (or the number of swellings) and the fractional effect increase at the same time, the voltage dramatically decreases.

  13. Computational modelling for diffusion of neutrons problems inside nuclear multiplying medium on bidimensional cartesian rectangular geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Nozimar do

    2003-01-01

    Diffusion theory is traditionally applied to nuclear reactor global calculations. Based on the good results generated by the one-dimensional spectral nodal diffusion (SND) method for benchmark problems, we offer the SND method for nuclear reactor global calculations in X,Y geometry. In this method, the continuity equation and Flick law are transverse integrated in each spatial direction leading to a system of two 'one-dimensional' equations coupled by the transverse leakage terms. We then apply the SND method to numerically solve this system with constant approximations for the transverse leakage terms. We perform a spectral analysis to determine the local general solution of each 'one-dimensional' nodal equation with flat approximation for the transverse leakages. We used special auxiliary equations with parameters that are to be determined in order to preserve the analytical general solutions in the numerical algorithm. By considering continuity conditions at the node interfaces and appropriate boundary conditions, we obtain a solvable system of discretized equations involving the node-edge average scalar fluxes at each estimate of the dominant eigenvalue (k eff ) in the outer power iterations. As we considered approximations to the transverse leakages, the SND method is not free of spatial truncation errors. Nevertheless, it generated good results for the typical model problems that we considered. (author)

  14. Modeling and Analysis of Cellular Networks using Stochastic Geometry: A Tutorial

    KAUST Repository

    Elsawy, Hesham

    2016-11-03

    This paper presents a tutorial on stochastic geometry (SG) based analysis for cellular networks. This tutorial is distinguished by its depth with respect to wireless communication details and its focus on cellular networks. The paper starts by modeling and analyzing the baseband interference in a baseline single-tier downlink cellular network with single antenna base stations and universal frequency reuse. Then, it characterizes signal-to-interference-plus-noise-ratio (SINR) and its related performance metrics. In particular, a unified approach to conduct error probability, outage probability, and transmission rate analysis is presented. Although the main focus of the paper is on cellular networks, the presented unified approach applies for other types of wireless networks that impose interference protection around receivers. The paper then extends the unified approach to capture cellular network characteristics (e.g., frequency reuse, multiple antenna, power control, etc.). It also presents numerical examples associated with demonstrations and discussions. To this end, the paper highlights the state-of-the- art research and points out future research directions.

  15. Effect of section shape on frequencies of natural oscillations of tubular springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirogov, S. P.; Chuba, A. Yu; Cherentsov, D. A.

    2018-05-01

    The necessity of determining the frequencies of natural oscillations of manometric tubular springs is substantiated. Based on the mathematical model and computer program, numerical experiments were performed that allowed us to reveal the effect of geometric parameters on the frequencies of free oscillations of manometric tubular springs.

  16. Molecular geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rodger, Alison

    1995-01-01

    Molecular Geometry discusses topics relevant to the arrangement of atoms. The book is comprised of seven chapters that tackle several areas of molecular geometry. Chapter 1 reviews the definition and determination of molecular geometry, while Chapter 2 discusses the unified view of stereochemistry and stereochemical changes. Chapter 3 covers the geometry of molecules of second row atoms, and Chapter 4 deals with the main group elements beyond the second row. The book also talks about the complexes of transition metals and f-block elements, and then covers the organometallic compounds and trans

  17. Sensitivity Analysis for Iceberg Geometry Shape in Ship-Iceberg Collision in View of Different Material Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing marine activities in Arctic area have brought growing interest in ship-iceberg collision study. The purpose of this paper is to study the iceberg geometry shape effect on the collision process. In order to estimate the sensitivity parameter, five different geometry iceberg models and two iceberg material models are adopted in the analysis. The FEM numerical simulation is used to predict the scenario and the related responses. The simulation results including energy dissipation and impact force are investigated and compared. It is shown that the collision process and energy dissipation are more sensitive to iceberg local shape than other factors when the elastic-plastic iceberg material model is applied. The blunt iceberg models act rigidly while the sharp ones crush easily during the simulation process. With respect to the crushable foam iceberg material model, the iceberg geometry has relatively small influence on the collision process. The spherical iceberg model shows the most rigidity for both iceberg material models and should be paid the most attention for ice-resist design for ships.

  18. CFD modeling of thermal mixing in a T-junction geometry using LES model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayhan, Hueseyin, E-mail: huseyinayhan@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Soekmen, Cemal Niyazi, E-mail: cemalniyazi.sokmen@hacettepe.edu.tr [Hacettepe University, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Beytepe, Ankara 06800 (Turkey)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CFD simulations of temperature and velocity fluctuations for thermal mixing cases in T-junction are performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is found that the frequency range of 2-5 Hz contains most of the energy; therefore, may cause thermal fatigue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study shows that RANS based calculations fail to predict a realistic mixing between the fluids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LES model can predict instantaneous turbulence behavior. - Abstract: Turbulent mixing of fluids at different temperatures can lead to temperature fluctuations at the pipe material. These fluctuations, or thermal striping, inducing cyclical thermal stresses and resulting thermal fatigue, may cause unexpected failure of pipe material. Therefore, an accurate characterization of temperature fluctuations is important in order to estimate the lifetime of pipe material. Thermal fatigue of the coolant circuits of nuclear power plants is one of the major issues in nuclear safety. To investigate thermal fatigue damage, the OECD/NEA has recently organized a blind benchmark study including some of results of present work for prediction of temperature and velocity fluctuations performing a thermal mixing experiment in a T-junction. This paper aims to estimate the frequency of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the mixing region using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to simulate turbulence. CFD results were compared with the available experimental results. Predicted LES results, even in coarse mesh, were found to be in well-agreement with the experimental results in terms of amplitude and frequency of temperature and velocity fluctuations. Analysis of the temperature fluctuations and the power spectrum densities (PSD) at the locations having the strongest temperature fluctuations in the tee junction shows that the frequency range of 2-5 Hz

  19. Geometry, kinematics and tectonic models of the Kazakhstan Orocline, Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Sun, Min; Rosenbaum, Gideon; Yuan, Chao; Safonova, Inna; Cai, Keda; Jiang, Yingde; Zhang, Yunying

    2018-03-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) is one of the largest accretionary orogens on Earth and is characterized by the occurrence of tight oroclines (Kazakhstan and Tuva-Mongolian oroclines). The origin of these large-scale orogenic curvatures is not quite understood, but is fundamentally important for understanding crustal growth and tectonic evolution of the CAOB. Here we provide an outline of available geological and paleomagnetic data around the Kazakhstan Orocline, with an aim of clarifying the geometry, kinematics and geodynamic origin of the orocline. The Kazakhstan Orocline is evident in a total magmatic image, and can be traced by the continuation of high magnetic anomalies associated with the Devonian Volcanic Belt and the Late Devonian to Carboniferous Balkhash-Yili arc. Paleomagnetic data show ∼112-126° clockwise rotation of the northern limb relative to the southern limb in the Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous, as well as ∼15-28° clockwise rotation of the northern limb and ∼39-40° anticlockwise rotation of the southern limb relative to the hinge of the orocline during the Late Carboniferous to Permian. We argue that the Kazakhstan Orocline experienced two-stage bending with the early stage of bending (Late Devonian to Early Carboniferous; ∼112-126°) driven by slab rollback, and the later stage (Late Carboniferous to Permian; 54-68°) possibly associated with the amalgamation of the Siberian, Tarim and Baltic cratons. This new tectonic model is compatible with the occurrence of rift basins, the spatial migration of magmatic arc, and the development of large-scale strike-slip fault systems during oroclinal bending.

  20. On stochastic geometry modeling of cellular uplink transmission with truncated channel inversion power control

    KAUST Repository

    Elsawy, Hesham

    2014-08-01

    Using stochastic geometry, we develop a tractable uplink modeling paradigm for outage probability and spectral efficiency in both single and multi-tier cellular wireless networks. The analysis accounts for per user equipment (UE) power control as well as the maximum power limitations for UEs. More specifically, for interference mitigation and robust uplink communication, each UE is required to control its transmit power such that the average received signal power at its serving base station (BS) is equal to a certain threshold ρo. Due to the limited transmit power, the UEs employ a truncated channel inversion power control policy with a cutoff threshold of ρo. We show that there exists a transfer point in the uplink system performance that depends on the following tuple: BS intensity λ, maximum transmit power of UEs Pu, and ρo. That is, when Pu is a tight operational constraint with respect to (w.r.t.) λ and ρo, the uplink outage probability and spectral efficiency highly depend on the values of λ and ρo. In this case, there exists an optimal cutoff threshold ρ*o, which depends on the system parameters, that minimizes the outage probability. On the other hand, when Pu is not a binding operational constraint w.r.t. λ and ρo, the uplink outage probability and spectral efficiency become independent of λ and ρo. We obtain approximate yet accurate simple expressions for outage probability and spectral efficiency, which reduce to closed forms in some special cases. © 2002-2012 IEEE.

  1. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Wong, John

    2015-07-07

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal ('tubular' geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal ('pancake' geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry, respectively.

  2. Effects of generation time on spray aerosol transport and deposition in models of the mouth-throat geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael; Das Choudhuri, Suparna

    2009-06-01

    For most newly developed spray aerosol inhalers, the generation time is a potentially important variable that can be fully controlled. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of spray aerosol generation time on transport and deposition in a standard induction port (IP) and more realistic mouth-throat (MT) geometry. Capillary aerosol generation (CAG) was selected as a representative system in which spray momentum was expected to significantly impact deposition. Sectional and total depositions in the IP and MT geometries were assessed at a constant CAG flow rate of 25 mg/sec for aerosol generation times of 1, 2, and 4 sec using both in vitro experiments and a previously developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Both the in vitro and numerical results indicated that extending the generation time of the spray aerosol, delivered at a constant mass flow rate, significantly reduced deposition in the IP and more realistic MT geometry. Specifically, increasing the generation time of the CAG system from 1 to 4 sec reduced the deposition fraction in the IP and MT geometries by approximately 60 and 33%, respectively. Furthermore, the CFD predictions of deposition fraction were found to be in good agreement with the in vitro results for all times considered in both the IP and MT geometries. The numerical results indicated that the reduction in deposition fraction over time was associated with temporal dissipation of what was termed the spray aerosol "burst effect." Based on these results, increasing the spray aerosol generation time, at a constant mass flow rate, may be an effective strategy for reducing deposition in the standard IP and in more realistic MT geometries.

  3. Boundary Conditions and SGS Models for LES of Wall-Bounded Separated Flows: An Application to Engine-Like Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piscaglia F.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The implementation and the combination of advanced boundary conditions and subgrid scale models for Large Eddy Simulations are presented. The goal is to perform reliable cold flow LES simulations in complex geometries, such as in the cylinders of internal combustion engines. The implementation of an inlet boundary condition for synthetic turbulence generation and of two subgrid scale models, the local Dynamic Smagorinsky and the Wall-Adapting Local Eddy-viscosity SGS model ( WALE is described. The WALE model is based on the square of the velocity gradient tensor and it accounts for the effects of both the strain and the rotation rate of the smallest resolved turbulent fluctuations and it recovers the proper y3 near-wall scaling for the eddy viscosity without requiring dynamic pressure; hence, it is supposed to be a very reliable model for ICE simulation. Model validation has been performed separately on two steady state flow benches: a backward facing step geometry and a simple IC engine geometry with one axed central valve. A discussion on the completeness of the LES simulation (i.e. LES simulation quality is given.

  4. Modeling and Analysis of Inter-Vehicle Communication: A Stochastic Geometry Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Muhammad Junaid

    2015-05-01

    Vehicular communication is the enabling technology for the development of the intelligent transportation systems (ITS), which aims to improve the efficiency and safety of transportation. It can be used for a variety of useful applications such as adaptive traffic control, coordinated braking, emergency messaging, peer-to-peer networking for infotainment services and automatic toll collection etc... Accurate yet simple models for vehicular networks are required in order to understand and optimize their operation. For reliable communication between vehicles, the spectrum access is coordinated via carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) protocol. Existing models either use a simplified network abstraction and access control scheme for analysis or depend on simulation studies. Therefore it is important to develop an analytical model for CSMA coordinated communication between vehicles. In the first part of the thesis, stochastic geometry is exploited to develop a modeling framework for CSMA coordinated inter-vehicle communication (IVC) in a multi-lane highway scenario. The performance of IVC is studied in multi-lane highways taking into account the inter-lane separations and the number of traffic lanes and it is shown that for wide multi-lane highways, the line abstraction model that is widely used in literature loses accuracy and hence the analysis is not reliable. Since the analysis of CSMA in the vehicular setting makes the analysis intractable, an aggressive interference approximation and a conservative interference approximation is proposed for the probability of transmission success. These approximations are tight in the low traffic and high traffic densities respectively. In the subsequent part of the thesis, the developed model is extended to multi-hop IVC because several vehicular applications require going beyond the local communication and efficiently disseminate information across the roads via multi-hops. Two well-known greedy packet forwarding schemes are

  5. Water modelling studies of blockage with discrete permeabilities in an 11 pin geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.P.

    1977-06-01

    A linear array of 11 pins, representing a radial section through a 325 pin bundle, has been used to investigate the effect of discrete permeabilities on the wake geometry behind a local blockage in water. Three series of experiments were performed in each of which a different position of the permeability was considered. The complex wake geometries, visualised by the injection of air, are shown to be controlled by the position of, and flowrate through the permeability. Good agreement is shown between the experimental flow patterns and predictions by SABRE 1. (author)

  6. Optical geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, I.; Trautman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The geometry of classical physics is Lorentzian; but weaker geometries are often more appropriate: null geodesics and electromagnetic fields, for example, are well known to be objects of conformal geometry. To deal with a single null congruence, or with the radiative electromagnetic fields associated with it, even less is needed: flag geometry for the first, optical geometry, with which this paper is chiefly concerned, for the second. The authors establish a natural one-to-one correspondence between optical geometries, considered locally, and three-dimensional Cauchy-Riemann structures. A number of Lorentzian geometries are shown to be equivalent from the optical point of view. For example the Goedel universe, the Taub-NUT metric and Hauser's twisting null solution have an optical geometry isomorphic to the one underlying the Robinson congruence in Minkowski space. The authors present general results on the problem of lifting a CR structure to a Lorentz manifold and, in particular, to Minkowski space; and exhibit the relevance of the deviation form to this problem

  7. Modeling Stokes flow in real pore geometries derived by high resolution micro CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halisch, M.; Müller, C.

    2012-04-01

    tool, 3D rock data can be assessed and interpreted by petrophysical means. Furthermore, pore structures can be directly segmented and hence could be used for so called image based modeling approach. The special XLabHydro module grants a finite volume solver for the direct assessment of Stokes flow (incompressible fluid, constant dynamic viscosity, stationary conditions and laminar flow) in real pore geometries. Nevertheless, also pore network extraction and numerical modeling with standard FE or lattice Boltzmann solvers is possible. By using the achieved voxel resolution as smallest node distance, fluid flow properties can be analyzed even in very small sample structures and hence with very high accuracy, especially with interaction to bigger parts of the pore network. The so derived results in combination with a direct 3D visualization within the structures offer great new insights and understanding in range of meso- and microscopic pore space phenomena.

  8. The Fourier transform of tubular densities

    KAUST Repository

    Prior, C B

    2012-05-18

    We consider the Fourier transform of tubular volume densities, with arbitrary axial geometry and (possibly) twisted internal structure. This density can be used to represent, among others, magnetic flux or the electron density of biopolymer molecules. We consider tubes of both finite radii and unrestricted radius. When there is overlap of the tube structure the net density is calculated using the super-position principle. The Fourier transform of this density is composed of two expressions, one for which the radius of the tube is less than the curvature of the axis and one for which the radius is greater (which must have density overlap). This expression can accommodate an asymmetric density distribution and a tube structure which has non-uniform twisting. In addition we give several simpler expressions for isotropic densities, densities of finite radius, densities which decay at a rate sufficient to minimize local overlap and finally individual surfaces of the tube manifold. These simplified cases can often be expressed as arclength integrals and can be evaluated using a system of first-order ODEs. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  9. The Fourier transform of tubular densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, C B; Goriely, A

    2012-01-01

    We consider the Fourier transform of tubular volume densities, with arbitrary axial geometry and (possibly) twisted internal structure. This density can be used to represent, among others, magnetic flux or the electron density of biopolymer molecules. We consider tubes of both finite radii and unrestricted radius. When there is overlap of the tube structure the net density is calculated using the super-position principle. The Fourier transform of this density is composed of two expressions, one for which the radius of the tube is less than the curvature of the axis and one for which the radius is greater (which must have density overlap). This expression can accommodate an asymmetric density distribution and a tube structure which has non-uniform twisting. In addition we give several simpler expressions for isotropic densities, densities of finite radius, densities which decay at a rate sufficient to minimize local overlap and finally individual surfaces of the tube manifold. These simplified cases can often be expressed as arclength integrals and can be evaluated using a system of first-order ODEs. (paper)

  10. Finite element analysis of tubular joints in offshore structures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... representing a 2-D model of the joint between the brace and the chord walls. This was subsequently followed but finite element analysis of six tubular joints. A global analysis was initially undertaken, then the submodel analysis carried in the areas of stress concentration. Journal of Civil Engineering, JKUAT (2001) Vol 6, ...

  11. Unified Tractable Model for Large-Scale Networks Using Stochastic Geometry: Analysis and Design

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2016-12-01

    The ever-growing demands for wireless technologies necessitate the evolution of next generation wireless networks that fulfill the diverse wireless users requirements. However, upscaling existing wireless networks implies upscaling an intrinsic component in the wireless domain; the aggregate network interference. Being the main performance limiting factor, it becomes crucial to develop a rigorous analytical framework to accurately characterize the out-of-cell interference, to reap the benefits of emerging networks. Due to the different network setups and key performance indicators, it is essential to conduct a comprehensive study that unifies the various network configurations together with the different tangible performance metrics. In that regard, the focus of this thesis is to present a unified mathematical paradigm, based on Stochastic Geometry, for large-scale networks with different antenna/network configurations. By exploiting such a unified study, we propose an efficient automated network design strategy to satisfy the desired network objectives. First, this thesis studies the exact aggregate network interference characterization, by accounting for each of the interferers signals in the large-scale network. Second, we show that the information about the interferers symbols can be approximated via the Gaussian signaling approach. The developed mathematical model presents twofold analysis unification for uplink and downlink cellular networks literature. It aligns the tangible decoding error probability analysis with the abstract outage probability and ergodic rate analysis. Furthermore, it unifies the analysis for different antenna configurations, i.e., various multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) systems. Accordingly, we propose a novel reliable network design strategy that is capable of appropriately adjusting the network parameters to meet desired design criteria. In addition, we discuss the diversity-multiplexing tradeoffs imposed by differently favored

  12. A free geometry model-independent neural eye-gaze tracking system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gneo Massimo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eye Gaze Tracking Systems (EGTSs estimate the Point Of Gaze (POG of a user. In diagnostic applications EGTSs are used to study oculomotor characteristics and abnormalities, whereas in interactive applications EGTSs are proposed as input devices for human computer interfaces (HCI, e.g. to move a cursor on the screen when mouse control is not possible, such as in the case of assistive devices for people suffering from locked-in syndrome. If the user’s head remains still and the cornea rotates around its fixed centre, the pupil follows the eye in the images captured from one or more cameras, whereas the outer corneal reflection generated by an IR light source, i.e. glint, can be assumed as a fixed reference point. According to the so-called pupil centre corneal reflection method (PCCR, the POG can be thus estimated from the pupil-glint vector. Methods A new model-independent EGTS based on the PCCR is proposed. The mapping function based on artificial neural networks allows to avoid any specific model assumption and approximation either for the user’s eye physiology or for the system initial setup admitting a free geometry positioning for the user and the system components. The robustness of the proposed EGTS is proven by assessing its accuracy when tested on real data coming from: i different healthy users; ii different geometric settings of the camera and the light sources; iii different protocols based on the observation of points on a calibration grid and halfway points of a test grid. Results The achieved accuracy is approximately 0.49°, 0.41°, and 0.62° for respectively the horizontal, vertical and radial error of the POG. Conclusions The results prove the validity of the proposed approach as the proposed system performs better than EGTSs designed for HCI which, even if equipped with superior hardware, show accuracy values in the range 0.6°-1°.

  13. Geometry of human vocal folds and glottal channel for mathematical and biomechanical modeling of voice production

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šidlof, Petr; Švec, J. G.; Horáček, Jaromír; Veselý, Jan; Klepáček, I.; Havlík, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 41, - (2008), s. 985-995 ISSN 0021-9290 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2076401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : vocal fold geometry * glottal channel shape * quantitative description Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 2.784, year: 2008

  14. Discrete processes modelling and geometry description in RTS and T code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyarev, I.I.; Liashenko, O.A.; Lokhovitskii, A.E.; Yazynin, I.A.; Belyakov-Bodin, V.I.; Blokhin, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the recent version of the RTS and T code system. RTS and T performs detailed simulations of many types of particles transport in complex 3D geometries in the energy range from a part of eV up to 20 TeV. A description of the main processes is given. (author)

  15. Modelling Mathematics Teachers' Intention to Use the Dynamic Geometry Environments in Macau: An SEM Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingming; Chan, Kan Kan; Teo, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic geometry environments (DGEs) provide computer-based environments to construct and manipulate geometric figures with great ease. Research has shown that DGEs has positive impact on student motivation, engagement, and achievement in mathematics learning. However, the adoption of DGEs by mathematics teachers varies substantially worldwide.…

  16. Open-geometry Fourier modal method: modeling nanophotonic structures in infinite domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häyrynen, Teppo; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    We present an open-geometry Fourier modal method based on a new combination of open boundary conditions and an efficient k-space discretization. The open boundary of the computational domain is obtained using basis functions that expand the whole space, and the integrals subsequently appearing due...

  17. CFD modelling of cooling channel geometry of PEM fuel cell for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, a numerical investigation was carried out to deter mine the impact of cooling channel geometry in combination with temperature dependent operating parameters on thermal management and overall performance of a PEM fuel cell system. The evaluation is performed using a computational fluid dynamics ...

  18. A general three-dimensional parametric geometry of the native aortic valve and root for biomechanical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Ali, Rami; Marom, Gil; Ben Zekry, Sagit; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Raanani, Ehud

    2012-09-21

    The complex three-dimensional (3D) geometry of the native tricuspid aortic valve (AV) is represented by select parametric curves allowing for a general construction and representation of the 3D-AV structure including the cusps, commissures and sinuses. The proposed general mathematical description is performed by using three independent parametric curves, two for the cusp and one for the sinuses. These curves are used to generate different surfaces that form the structure of the AV. Additional dependent curves are also generated and utilized in this process, such as the joint curve between the cusps and the sinuses. The model's feasibility to generate patient-specific parametric geometry is examined against 3D-transesophageal echocardiogram (3D-TEE) measurements from a non-pathological AV. Computational finite-element (FE) mesh can then be easily constructed from these surfaces. Examples are given for constructing several 3D-AV geometries by estimating the needed parameters from echocardiographic measurements. The average distance (error) between the calculated geometry and the 3D-TEE measurements was only 0.78±0.63mm. The proposed general 3D parametric method is very effective in quantitatively representing a wide range of native AV structures, with and without pathology. It can also facilitate a methodical quantitative investigation over the effect of pathology and mechanical loading on these major AV parameters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a numerical methodology for flowforming process simulation of complex geometry tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Sonia; Santos, Maite; Arroyo, Amaia; Pérez, Iñaki; Puigjaner, Joan Francesc; Puigjaner, Blanca

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays, the incremental flowforming process is widely explored because of the usage of complex tubular products is increasing due to the light-weighting trend and the use of expensive materials. The enhanced mechanical properties of finished parts combined with the process efficiency in terms of raw material and energy consumption are the key factors for its competitiveness and sustainability, which is consistent with EU industry policy. As a promising technology, additional steps for extending the existing flowforming limits in the production of tubular products are required. The objective of the present research is to further expand the current state of the art regarding limitations on tube thickness and diameter, exploring the feasibility to flowform complex geometries as tubes of elevated thickness of up to 60 mm. In this study, the analysis of the backward flowforming process of 7075 aluminum tubular preform is carried out to define the optimum process parameters, machine requirements and tooling geometry as demonstration case. Numerical simulation studies on flowforming of thin walled tubular components have been considered to increase the knowledge of the technology. The calculation of the rotational movement of the mesh preform, the high ratio thickness/length and the thermomechanical condition increase significantly the computation time of the numerical simulation model. This means that efficient and reliable tools able to predict the forming loads and the quality of flowformed thick tubes are not available. This paper aims to overcome this situation by developing a simulation methodology based on FEM simulation code including new strategies. Material characterization has also been performed through tensile test to able to design the process. Finally, to check the reliability of the model, flowforming tests at industrial environment have been developed.

  20. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut; Eigensatz, Michael; Vaxman, Amir; Wallner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  1. Architectural geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2014-11-26

    Around 2005 it became apparent in the geometry processing community that freeform architecture contains many problems of a geometric nature to be solved, and many opportunities for optimization which however require geometric understanding. This area of research, which has been called architectural geometry, meanwhile contains a great wealth of individual contributions which are relevant in various fields. For mathematicians, the relation to discrete differential geometry is significant, in particular the integrable system viewpoint. Besides, new application contexts have become available for quite some old-established concepts. Regarding graphics and geometry processing, architectural geometry yields interesting new questions but also new objects, e.g. replacing meshes by other combinatorial arrangements. Numerical optimization plays a major role but in itself would be powerless without geometric understanding. Summing up, architectural geometry has become a rewarding field of study. We here survey the main directions which have been pursued, we show real projects where geometric considerations have played a role, and we outline open problems which we think are significant for the future development of both theory and practice of architectural geometry.

  2. Modeling the effect of preexisting joints on normal fault geometries using a brittle and cohesive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettermann, M.; van Gent, H. W.; Urai, J. L.

    2012-04-01

    Brittle rocks, such as for example those hosting many carbonate or sandstone reservoirs, are often affected by different kinds of fractures that influence each other. Understanding the effects of these interactions on fault geometries and the formation of cavities and potential fluid pathways might be useful for reservoir quality prediction and production. Analogue modeling has proven to be a useful tool to study faulting processes, although usually the used materials do not provide cohesion and tensile strength, which are essential to create open fractures. Therefore, very fine-grained, cohesive, hemihydrate powder was used for our experiments. The mechanical properties of the material are scaling well for natural prototypes. Due to the fine grain size structures are preserved in in great detail. The used deformation box allows the formation of a half-graben and has initial dimensions of 30 cm width, 28 cm length and 20 cm height. The maximum dip-slip along the 60° dipping predefined basement fault is 4.5 cm and was fully used in all experiments. To setup open joints prior to faulting, sheets of paper placed vertically within the box to a depth of about 5 cm from top. The powder was then sieved into the box, embedding the paper almost entirely. Finally strings were used to remove the paper carefully, leaving open voids. Using this method allows the creation of cohesionless open joints while ensuring a minimum impact on the sensitive surrounding material. The presented series of experiments aims to investigate the effect of different angles between the strike of a rigid basement fault and a distinct joint set. All experiments were performed with a joint spacing of 2.5 cm and the fault-joint angles incrementally covered 0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 16°, 20° and 25°. During the deformation time lapse photography from the top and side captured every structural change and provided data for post-processing analysis using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). Additionally

  3. Generalizing Source Geometry of Site Contamination by Simulating and Analyzing Analytical Solution of Three-Dimensional Solute Transport Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the uneven distribution of pollutions and blur edge of pollutant area, there will exist uncertainty of source term shape in advective-diffusion equation model of contaminant transport. How to generalize those irregular source terms and deal with those uncertainties is very critical but rarely studied in previous research. In this study, the fate and transport of contaminant from rectangular and elliptic source geometry were simulated based on a three-dimensional analytical solute transport model, and the source geometry generalization guideline was developed by comparing the migration of contaminant. The result indicated that the variation of source area size had no effect on pollution plume migration when the plume migrated as far as five times of source side length. The migration of pollution plume became slower with the increase of aquifer thickness. The contaminant concentration was decreasing with scale factor rising, and the differences among various scale factors became smaller with the distance to field increasing.

  4. Beautiful geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Maor, Eli

    2014-01-01

    If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configur

  5. Testing the effects of topography, geometry, and kinematics on modeled thermochronometer cooling ages in the eastern Bhutan Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Michelle E.; McQuarrie, Nadine; Eizenhöfer, Paul R.; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2018-05-01

    In this study, reconstructions of a balanced geologic cross section in the Himalayan fold-thrust belt of eastern Bhutan are used in flexural-kinematic and thermokinematic models to understand the sensitivity of predicted cooling ages to changes in fault kinematics, geometry, topography, and radiogenic heat production. The kinematics for each scenario are created by sequentially deforming the cross section with ˜ 10 km deformation steps while applying flexural loading and erosional unloading at each step to develop a high-resolution evolution of deformation, erosion, and burial over time. By assigning ages to each increment of displacement, we create a suite of modeled scenarios that are input into a 2-D thermokinematic model to predict cooling ages. Comparison of model-predicted cooling ages to published thermochronometer data reveals that cooling ages are most sensitive to (1) the location and size of fault ramps, (2) the variable shortening rates between 68 and 6.4 mm yr-1, and (3) the timing and magnitude of out-of-sequence faulting. The predicted ages are less sensitive to (4) radiogenic heat production and (5) estimates of topographic evolution. We used the observed misfit of predicted to measured cooling ages to revise the cross section geometry and separate one large ramp previously proposed for the modern décollement into two smaller ramps. The revised geometry results in an improved fit to observed ages, particularly young AFT ages (2-6 Ma) located north of the Main Central Thrust. This study presents a successful approach for using thermochronometer data to test the viability of a proposed cross section geometry and kinematics and describes a viable approach to estimating the first-order topographic evolution of a compressional orogen.

  6. The sensitivity of biological finite element models to the resolution of surface geometry: a case study of crocodilian crania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. McCurry

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The reliability of finite element analysis (FEA in biomechanical investigations depends upon understanding the influence of model assumptions. In producing finite element models, surface mesh resolution is influenced by the resolution of input geometry, and influences the resolution of the ensuing solid mesh used for numerical analysis. Despite a large number of studies incorporating sensitivity studies of the effects of solid mesh resolution there has not yet been any investigation into the effect of surface mesh resolution upon results in a comparative context. Here we use a dataset of crocodile crania to examine the effects of surface resolution on FEA results in a comparative context. Seven high-resolution surface meshes were each down-sampled to varying degrees while keeping the resulting number of solid elements constant. These models were then subjected to bite and shake load cases using finite element analysis. The results show that incremental decreases in surface resolution can result in fluctuations in strain magnitudes, but that it is possible to obtain stable results using lower resolution surface in a comparative FEA study. As surface mesh resolution links input geometry with the resulting solid mesh, the implication of these results is that low resolution input geometry and solid meshes may provide valid results in a comparative context.

  7. Hydraulic Geometry, GIS and Remote Sensing, Techniques against Rainfall-Runoff Models for Estimating Flood Magnitude in Ephemeral Fluvial Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Garcia-Lorenzo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the combined use of remotely sensed data and hydraulic geometry methods as an alternative to rainfall-runoff models. Hydraulic geometric data and boolean images of water sheets obtained from satellite images after storm events were integrated in a Geographical Information System. Channel cross-sections were extracted from a high resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM and superimposed on the image cover to estimate the peak flow using HEC-RAS. The proposed methodology has been tested in ephemeral channels (ramblas on the coastal zone in south-eastern Spain. These fluvial systems constitute an important natural hazard due to their high discharges and sediment loads. In particular, different areas affected by floods during the period 1997 to 2009 were delimited through HEC-GeoRAs from hydraulic geometry data and Landsat images of these floods (Landsat‑TM5 and Landsat-ETM+7. Such an approach has been validated against rainfall-surface runoff models (SCS Dimensionless Unit Hydrograph, SCSD, Témez gamma HU Tγ and the Modified Rational method, MRM comparing their results with flood hydrographs of the Automatic Hydrologic Information System (AHIS in several ephemeral channels in the Murcia Region. The results obtained from the method providing a better fit were used to calculate different hydraulic geometry parameters, especially in residual flood areas.

  8. Approximation methods in loop quantum cosmology: from Gowdy cosmologies to inhomogeneous models in Friedmann–Robertson–Walker geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martín-Benito, Mercedes; Martín-de Blas, Daniel; Marugán, Guillermo A Mena

    2014-01-01

    We develop approximation methods in the hybrid quantization of the Gowdy model with linear polarization and a massless scalar field, for the case of three-torus spatial topology. The loop quantization of the homogeneous gravitational sector of the Gowdy model (according to the improved dynamics prescription) and the presence of inhomogeneities lead to a very complicated Hamiltonian constraint. Therefore, the extraction of physical results calls for the introduction of well justified approximations. We first show how to approximate the homogeneous part of the Hamiltonian constraint, corresponding to Bianchi I geometries, as if it described a Friedmann–Robertson–Walker (FRW) model corrected with anisotropies. This approximation is valid in the sector of high energies of the FRW geometry (concerning its contribution to the constraint) and for anisotropy profiles that are sufficiently smooth. In addition, for certain families of states related to regimes of physical interest, with negligible quantum effects of the anisotropies and small inhomogeneities, one can approximate the Hamiltonian constraint of the inhomogeneous system by that of an FRW geometry with a relatively simple matter content, and then obtain its solutions. (paper)

  9. Image-based reconstruction of three-dimensional myocardial infarct geometry for patient-specific modeling of cardiac electrophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukwatta, Eranga, E-mail: eukwatt1@jhu.edu; Arevalo, Hermenegild; Pashakhanloo, Farhad; Prakosa, Adityo; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy [Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Rajchl, Martin [Department of Computing, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); White, James [Stephenson Cardiovascular MR Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9 (Canada); Herzka, Daniel A.; McVeigh, Elliot [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Lardo, Albert C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins Institute of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21224 (United States); Trayanova, Natalia A. [Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins Institute of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Accurate three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of myocardial infarct geometry is crucial to patient-specific modeling of the heart aimed at providing therapeutic guidance in ischemic cardiomyopathy. However, myocardial infarct imaging is clinically performed using two-dimensional (2D) late-gadolinium enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) techniques, and a method to build accurate 3D infarct reconstructions from the 2D LGE-CMR images has been lacking. The purpose of this study was to address this need. Methods: The authors developed a novel methodology to reconstruct 3D infarct geometry from segmented low-resolution (Lo-res) clinical LGE-CMR images. Their methodology employed the so-called logarithm of odds (LogOdds) function to implicitly represent the shape of the infarct in segmented image slices as LogOdds maps. These 2D maps were then interpolated into a 3D image, and the result transformed via the inverse of LogOdds to a binary image representing the 3D infarct geometry. To assess the efficacy of this method, the authors utilized 39 high-resolution (Hi-res) LGE-CMR images, including 36 in vivo acquisitions of human subjects with prior myocardial infarction and 3 ex vivo scans of canine hearts following coronary ligation to induce infarction. The infarct was manually segmented by trained experts in each slice of the Hi-res images, and the segmented data were downsampled to typical clinical resolution. The proposed method was then used to reconstruct 3D infarct geometry from the downsampled images, and the resulting reconstructions were compared with the manually segmented data. The method was extensively evaluated using metrics based on geometry as well as results of electrophysiological simulations of cardiac sinus rhythm and ventricular tachycardia in individual hearts. Several alternative reconstruction techniques were also implemented and compared with the proposed method. Results: The accuracy of the LogOdds method in reconstructing 3D

  10. Analytische Geometrie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemnitz, Arnfried

    Der Grundgedanke der Analytischen Geometrie besteht darin, dass geometrische Untersuchungen mit rechnerischen Mitteln geführt werden. Geometrische Objekte werden dabei durch Gleichungen beschrieben und mit algebraischen Methoden untersucht.

  11. Algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Lefschetz, Solomon

    2005-01-01

    An introduction to algebraic geometry and a bridge between its analytical-topological and algebraical aspects, this text for advanced undergraduate students is particularly relevant to those more familiar with analysis than algebra. 1953 edition.

  12. Modified tubularized incised plate urethroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaji Mane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To share our experience of doing tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with modifications. Materials and Methods: This is a single surgeon personal series from 2004 to 2009. One hundred patients of distal hypospadias were subjected for Snodgrass urethroplasty with preputioplasty. The age range was 1 to 5 year with mean age of 2.7 years. Selection criteria were good urethral plate, without chordee and torsion needing complete degloving. Main technical modification from original Snodgrass procedure was spongioplasty, preputioplasty, and dorsal slit when inability to retract prepuce during surgery. Results: Average follow-up period is 23 months. Seven (7% patients developed fistula and one patient had complete preputial dehiscence. Phimosis developed in three (3% patients and required circumcision. Dorsal slit was required in seven patients. One patient developed meatal stenosis in postoperative period. All other patients are passing single urinary stream and have cosmesis that is acceptable. Conclusions: Modified tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with preputioplasty effectively gives cosmetically normal looking penis with low complications.

  13. Application of advanced model of radiative heat transfer in a rod geometry to QUENCH and PARAMETER tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasiliev, A.D.; Kobelev, G.V.; Astafieva, V.O.

    2007-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is very important in different fields of mechanical engineering and related technologies including nuclear reactors, heat transfer in furnaces, aerospace, different high-temperature assemblies. In particular, in the course of a hypothetical severe accident at PWR-type nuclear reactor the temperatures inside the reactor vessel reach high values at which taking into account of radiative heat exchange between the structures of reactor (including core and other reactor vessel elements) gets important. Radiative heat transfer dominates the late phase of severe accident because radiative heat fluxes (proportional to T4, where T is the temperature) are generally considerably higher than convective and conductive heat fluxes in a system. In particular, heat transfer due to radiation determines the heating and degradation of the core and surrounding steel in-vessel structures and finally influences the composition, temperature and mass of materials pouring out of the reactor vessel after its loss of integrity. Existing models of radiative heat exchange use many limitations and approximations: approximate estimation of view factors and beam lengths; the geometry change in the course of the accident is neglected; the database for emissivities of materials is not complete; absorption/emission by steam-noncondensable medium is taken into account approximately. The module MRAD was developed in this paper to model the radiative heat exchange in rod-like geometry typical of PWR-type reactor. Radiative heat exchange is computed using dividing on zones (zonal method) as in existing radiation models implemented to severe accident numerical codes such as ICARE, SCDAP/RELAP, MELCOR but improved in following aspects: new approach to evaluation of view factors and mean beam length; detailed evaluation of gas absorptivity and emissivity; account of effective radiative thermal conductivity for the large core; account of geometry modification in the course of severe

  14. How much does geometry of seismic sources matter in tsunami modeling? A sensitivity analysis for the Calabrian subduction interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, R.; Maesano, F. E.; Tiberti, M. M.; Romano, F.; Scala, A.; Lorito, S.; Volpe, M.; Basili, R.

    2017-12-01

    The geometry of seismogenic sources could be one of the most important factors concurring to control the generation and the propagation of earthquake-generated tsunamis and their effects on the coasts. Since the majority of potentially tsunamigenic earthquakes occur offshore, the corresponding faults are generally poorly constrained and, consequently, their geometry is often oversimplified as a planar fault. The rupture area of mega-thrust earthquakes in subduction zones, where most of the greatest tsunamis have occurred, extends for tens to hundreds of kilometers both down dip and along strike, and generally deviates from the planar geometry. Therefore, the larger the earthquake size is, the weaker the planar fault assumption become. In this work, we present a sensitivity analysis aimed to explore the effects on modeled tsunamis generated by seismic sources with different degrees of geometric complexities. We focused on the Calabrian subduction zone, located in the Mediterranean Sea, which is characterized by the convergence between the African and European plates, with rates of up to 5 mm/yr. This subduction zone has been considered to have generated some past large earthquakes and tsunamis, despite it shows only in-slab significant seismic activity below 40 km depth and no relevant seismicity in the shallower portion of the interface. Our analysis is performed by defining and modeling an exhaustive set of tsunami scenarios located in the Calabrian subduction and using different models of the subduction interface with increasing geometrical complexity, from a planar surface to a highly detailed 3D surface. The latter was obtained from the interpretation of a dense network of seismic reflection profiles coupled with the analysis of the seismicity distribution. The more relevant effects due to the inclusion of 3D complexities in the seismic source geometry are finally highlighted in terms of the resulting tsunami impact.

  15. ANALYSIS OF ELASTIC DEFORMATION OF BRAIDED TUBULAR STRUCTURES FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin YÜKSEKKAYA

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, self-expanding stents were fabricated and analyzed. These stents are in the form of 3-D tubular braided structures made of polymeric materials. This type of structures is used in medicine to open clogged artheries and veins by exerting radial force. The amount of radial force exerted into the membrane should not give any damage to the veins. Therefore, the geometry of the three dimensional tubular braided fabric is analyzed to give an optimum radial force for medical applications.

  16. Tubular lining material for pipelines having bends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moringa, A.; Sakaguchi, Y.; Hyodo, M.; Yagi, I.

    1987-03-24

    A tubular lining material for pipelines having bends or curved portions comprises a tubular textile jacket made of warps and wefts woven in a tubular form overlaid with a coating of a flexible synthetic resin. It is applicable onto the inner surface of a pipeline having bends or curved portions in such manner that the tubular lining material with a binder onto the inner surface thereof is inserted into the pipeline and allowed to advance within the pipeline, with or without the aid of a leading rope-like elongated element, while turning the tubular lining material inside out under fluid pressure. In this manner the tubular lining material is applied onto the inner surface of the pipeline with the binder being interposed between the pipeline and the tubular lining material. The lining material is characterized in that a part of all of the warps are comprised of an elastic yarn around which, over the full length thereof, a synthetic fiber yarn or yarns have been left-and/or right-handedly coiled. This tubular lining material is particularly suitable for lining a pipeline having an inner diameter of 25-200 mm and a plurality of bends, such as gas service pipelines or house pipelines, without occurrence of wrinkles in the lining material in a bend.

  17. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  18. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  19. Nerve regeneration using tubular scaffolds from biodegradable polyurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausner, T; Schmidhammer, R; Zandieh, S; Hopf, R; Schultz, A; Gogolewski, S; Hertz, H; Redl, H

    2007-01-01

    In severe nerve lesion, nerve defects and in brachial plexus reconstruction, autologous nerve grafting is the golden standard. Although, nerve grafting technique is the best available approach a major disadvantages exists: there is a limited source of autologous nerve grafts. This study presents data on the use of tubular scaffolds with uniaxial pore orientation from experimental biodegradable polyurethanes coated with fibrin sealant to regenerate a 8 mm resected segment of rat sciatic nerve. Tubular scaffolds: prepared by extrusion of the polymer solution in DMF into water coagulation bath. The polymer used for the preparation of tubular scaffolds was a biodegradable polyurethane based on hexamethylene diisocyanate, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) and dianhydro-D-sorbitol. EXPERIMENTAL MODEL: Eighteen Sprague Dawley rats underwent mid-thigh sciatic nerve transection and were randomly assigned to two experimental groups with immediate repair: (1) tubular scaffold, (2) 180 degrees rotated sciatic nerve segment (control). Serial functional measurements (toe spread test, placing tests) were performed weekly from 3rd to 12th week after nerve repair. On week 12, electrophysiological assessment was performed. Sciatic nerve and scaffold/nerve grafts were harvested for histomorphometric analysis. Collagenic connective tissue, Schwann cells and axons were evaluated in the proximal nerve stump, the scaffold/nerve graft and the distal nerve stump. The implants have uniaxially-oriented pore structure with a pore size in the range of 2 micorm (the pore wall) and 75 x 700 microm (elongated pores in the implant lumen). The skin of the tubular implants was nonporous. Animals which underwent repair with tubular scaffolds of biodegradable polyurethanes coated with diluted fibrin sealant had no significant functional differences compared with the nerve graft group. Control group resulted in a trend-wise better electrophysiological recovery but did not show statistically significant

  20. Unsteady two-dimensional potential-flow model for thin variable geometry airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunaa, Mac

    2010-01-01

    In the present work, analytical expressions for distributed and integral unsteady two-dimensional forces on a variable geometry airfoil undergoing arbitrary motion are derived under the assumption of incompressible, irrotational, inviscid flow. The airfoil is represented by its camber line...... in their equivalent state-space form, allowing for use of the present theory in problems employing the eigenvalue approach, such as stability analysis. The analytical expressions for the integral forces can be reduced to Munk's steady and Theodorsen's unsteady results for thin airfoils, and numerical evaluation shows...

  1. 78 FR 14361 - U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation, Mckeesport, PA; Notice of Initiation of Investigation To Terminate Certification of Eligibility Pursuant to... Tubular Products, McKeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation...

  2. Defining the effect of sweep tillage tool cutting edge geometry on tillage forces using 3D discrete element modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ucgul

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The energy required for tillage processes accounts for a significant proportion of total energy used in crop production. In many tillage processes decreasing the draft and upward vertical forces is often desired for reduced fuel use and improved penetration, respectively. Recent studies have proved that the discrete element modelling (DEM can effectively be used to model the soil–tool interaction. In his study, Fielke (1994 [1] examined the effect of the various tool cutting edge geometries, namely; cutting edge height, length of underside rub, angle of underside clearance, on draft and vertical forces. In this paper the experimental parameters of Fielke (1994 [1] were simulated using 3D discrete element modelling techniques. In the simulations a hysteretic spring contact model integrated with a linear cohesion model that considers the plastic deformation behaviour of the soil hence provides better vertical force prediction was employed. DEM parameters were determined by comparing the experimental and simulation results of angle of repose and penetration tests. The results of the study showed that the simulation results of the soil-various tool cutting edge geometries agreed well with the experimental results of Fielke (1994 [1]. The modelling was then used to simulate a further range of cutting edge geometries to better define the effect of sweep tool cutting edge geometry parameters on tillage forces. The extra simulations were able to show that by using a sharper cutting edge with zero vertical cutting edge height the draft and upward vertical force were further reduced indicating there is benefit from having a really sharp cutting edge. The extra simulations also confirmed that the interpolated trends for angle of underside clearance as suggested by Fielke (1994 [1] where correct with a linear reduction in draft and upward vertical force for angle of underside clearance between the ranges of −25 and −5°, and between −5 and 0°. The

  3. Evaluation of a cone beam computed tomography geometry for image guided small animal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yidong; Armour, Michael; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; Gandhi, Nishant; Wong, John; Iordachita, Iulian; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The conventional imaging geometry for small animal cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is that a detector panel rotates around the head-to-tail axis of an imaged animal (‘tubular’ geometry). Another unusual but possible imaging geometry is that the detector panel rotates around the anterior-to-posterior axis of the animal (‘pancake’ geometry). The small animal radiation research platform developed at Johns Hopkins University employs the pancake geometry where a prone-positioned animal is rotated horizontally between an x-ray source and detector panel. This study is to assess the CBCT image quality in the pancake geometry and investigate potential methods for improvement. We compared CBCT images acquired in the pancake geometry with those acquired in the tubular geometry when the phantom/animal was placed upright simulating the conventional CBCT geometry. Results showed signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios in the pancake geometry were reduced in comparison to the tubular geometry at the same dose level. But the overall spatial resolution within the transverse plane of the imaged cylinder/animal was better in the pancake geometry. A modest exposure increase to two folds in the pancake geometry can improve image quality to a level close to the tubular geometry. Image quality can also be improved by inclining the animal, which reduces streak artifacts caused by bony structures. The major factor resulting in the inferior image quality in the pancake geometry is the elevated beam attenuation along the long axis of the phantom/animal and consequently increased scatter-to-primary ratio in that orientation. Not withstanding, the image quality in the pancake-geometry CBCT is adequate to support image guided animal positioning, while providing unique advantages of non-coplanar and multiple mice irradiation. This study also provides useful knowledge about the image quality in the two very different imaging geometries, i.e. pancake and tubular geometry

  4. MODELING MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION CORONA USING NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELDS IN SPHERICAL GEOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Y.; Ding, M. D.; Liu, Y.; Sun, X. D.; DeRosa, M. L.; Wiegelmann, T.

    2012-01-01

    We test a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) optimization code in spherical geometry using an analytical solution from Low and Lou. Several tests are run, ranging from idealized cases where exact vector field data are provided on all boundaries, to cases where noisy vector data are provided on only the lower boundary (approximating the solar problem). Analytical tests also show that the NLFFF code in the spherical geometry performs better than that in the Cartesian one when the field of view of the bottom boundary is large, say, 20° × 20°. Additionally, we apply the NLFFF model to an active region observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) both before and after an M8.7 flare. For each observation time, we initialize the models using potential field source surface (PFSS) extrapolations based on either a synoptic chart or a flux-dispersal model, and compare the resulting NLFFF models. The results show that NLFFF extrapolations using the flux-dispersal model as the boundary condition have slightly lower, therefore better, force-free, and divergence-free metrics, and contain larger free magnetic energy. By comparing the extrapolated magnetic field lines with the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we find that the NLFFF performs better than the PFSS not only for the core field of the flare productive region, but also for large EUV loops higher than 50 Mm.

  5. Spatial model of the gecko foot hair: functional significance of highly specialized non-uniform geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-02-06

    One of the important problems appearing in experimental realizations of artificial adhesives inspired by gecko foot hair is so-called clusterization. If an artificially produced structure is flexible enough to allow efficient contact with natural rough surfaces, after a few attachment-detachment cycles, the fibres of the structure tend to adhere one to another and form clusters. Normally, such clusters are much larger than original fibres and, because they are less flexible, form much worse adhesive contacts especially with the rough surfaces. Main problem here is that the forces responsible for the clusterization are the same intermolecular forces which attract fibres to fractal surface of the substrate. However, arrays of real gecko setae are much less susceptible to this problem. One of the possible reasons for this is that ends of the seta have more sophisticated non-uniformly distributed three-dimensional structure than that of existing artificial systems. In this paper, we simulated three-dimensional spatial geometry of non-uniformly distributed branches of nanofibres of the setal tip numerically, studied its attachment-detachment dynamics and discussed its advantages versus uniformly distributed geometry.

  6. Diagnostics of electron-heated solar flare models. III - Effects of tapered loop geometry and preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, A. G.; Li, Peng; Mariska, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A series of hydrodynamic numerical simulations of nonthermal electron-heated solar flare atmospheres and their corresponding soft X-ray Ca XIX emission-line profiles, under the conditions of tapered flare loop geometry and/or a preheated atmosphere, is presented. The degree of tapering is parameterized by the magnetic mirror ratio, while the preheated atmosphere is parameterized by the initial upper chromospheric pressure. In a tapered flare loop, it is found that the upward motion of evaporated material is faster compared with the case where the flare loop is uniform. This is due to the diverging nozzle seen by the upflowing material. In the case where the flare atmosphere is preheated and the flare geometry is uniform, the response of the atmosphere to the electron collisional heating is slow. The upward velocity of the hydrodynamic gas is reduced due not only to the large coronal column depth, but also to the increased inertia of the overlying material. It is concluded that the only possible electron-heated scenario in which the predicted Ca XIX line profiles agree with the BCS observations is when the impulsive flare starts in a preheated dense corona.

  7. Analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Burdette, A C

    1971-01-01

    Analytic Geometry covers several fundamental aspects of analytic geometry needed for advanced subjects, including calculus.This book is composed of 12 chapters that review the principles, concepts, and analytic proofs of geometric theorems, families of lines, the normal equation of the line, and related matters. Other chapters highlight the application of graphing, foci, directrices, eccentricity, and conic-related topics. The remaining chapters deal with the concept polar and rectangular coordinates, surfaces and curves, and planes.This book will prove useful to undergraduate trigonometric st

  8. Geometry Revealed

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Marcel

    2010-01-01

    Both classical geometry and modern differential geometry have been active subjects of research throughout the 20th century and lie at the heart of many recent advances in mathematics and physics. The underlying motivating concept for the present book is that it offers readers the elements of a modern geometric culture by means of a whole series of visually appealing unsolved (or recently solved) problems that require the creation of concepts and tools of varying abstraction. Starting with such natural, classical objects as lines, planes, circles, spheres, polygons, polyhedra, curves, surfaces,

  9. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  10. Noncommutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Connes, Alain

    1994-01-01

    This English version of the path-breaking French book on this subject gives the definitive treatment of the revolutionary approach to measure theory, geometry, and mathematical physics developed by Alain Connes. Profusely illustrated and invitingly written, this book is ideal for anyone who wants to know what noncommutative geometry is, what it can do, or how it can be used in various areas of mathematics, quantization, and elementary particles and fields.Key Features* First full treatment of the subject and its applications* Written by the pioneer of this field* Broad applications in mathemat

  11. Oscillations of manometric tubular springs with rigid end

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherentsov, D. A.; Pirogov, S. P.; Dorofeev, S. M.; Ryabova, Y. S.

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of attenuating oscillations of manometric tubular springs (MTS) taking into account the rigid tip. The dynamic MTS model is presented in the form of a thin-walled curved rod oscillating in the plane of curvature of the central axis. Equations for MTS oscillations are obtained in accordance with the d’Alembert principle in projections onto the normal and tangential. The Bubnov-Galerkin method is used to solve the equations obtained.

  12. 99mTc renal tubular function agents: Current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshima, D.; Fritzberg, A.R.; Taylor, A. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Orthoiodohippuric (OIH) acid labeled with 131I is a widely used renal radiopharmaceutical agent and has been the standard radiopharmaceutical agent for the measurement of effective renal plasma flow (EPRF). Limitations to the routine clinical use of 131I OIH are related to the suboptimal imaging properties of the 131I radionuclide and its relatively high radiation dose. 123I has been substituted for 131I; however, its high cost and short shelf-life have limited its widespread use. Recent work has centered on the development of a new 99mTc renal tubular function agent, which would use the optimal radionuclidic properties and availability of 99mTc and combine the clinical information provided by OIH. The search for a suitable 99mTc renal tubular function agent has focused on the diamide dithiolate (N2S2), the paraaminohippuric iminodiacetic acid (PAHIDA), and the triamide mercaptide (N3S) donor ligand systems. To date, the most promising 99mTc tubular function agent is the N3S complex: 99mTc mercaptoacetyltriglycine (99mTc MAG3). Studies in animal models in diuresis, dehydration, acid or base imbalance, ischemia, and renal artery stenosis demonstrate that 99mTc MAG3 behaves similarly to 131I OIH. A simple kit formulation is available that yields the 99mTc MAG3 complex in high radiochemical purity. Studies in normal subjects and patients indicate that 99mTc MAG3 is an excellent 99mTc renal tubular agent, but its plasma clearance is only 50% to 60% that of OIH. In an effort to develop an improved 99mTc renal tubular function agent, changes have been made in the core N3S donor ligand system, but to date no agent has been synthesized that is clinically superior to 99mTc MAG3. 61 references

  13. FloorspaceJS - A New, Open Source, Web-Based Geometry Editor for Building Energy Modeling (BEM): Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macumber, Daniel L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Horowitz, Scott G [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schott, Marjorie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nolan, Katie [Devetry; Schiller, Brian [Devetry

    2018-03-19

    Across most industries, desktop applications are being rapidly migrated to web applications for a variety of reasons. Web applications are inherently cross platform, mobile, and easier to distribute than desktop applications. Fueling this trend are a wide range of free, open source libraries and frameworks that make it incredibly easy to develop powerful web applications. The building energy modeling community is just beginning to pick up on these larger trends, with a small but growing number of building energy modeling applications starting on or moving to the web. This paper presents a new, open source, web based geometry editor for Building Energy Modeling (BEM). The editor is written completely in JavaScript and runs in a modern web browser. The editor works on a custom JSON file format and is designed to be integrated into a variety of web and desktop applications. The web based editor is available to use as a standalone web application at: https://nrel.github.io/openstudio-geometry-editor/. An example integration is demonstrated with the OpenStudio desktop application. Finally, the editor can be easily integrated with a wide range of possible building energy modeling web applications.

  14. Projective Geometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mathematicians are trained to use very precise language, and so find it hard to simplify and state .... thing. If you take a plane on which there are two such triangles which enjoy the above ... within this geometry to simplify things if needed.

  15. Geometry -----------~--------------RESONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parallel: A pair of lines in a plane is said to be parallel if they do not meet. Mathematicians were at war ... Subsequently, Poincare, Klein, Beltrami and others refined non-. Euclidean geometry. ... plane divides the plane into two half planes and.

  16. Using SpaceClaimTD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabanich, William A., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractor's thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces/solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing/repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the "mark-up" of that geometry. These so-called "mark-ups" control how finite element (FE) meshes are to be generated through the "tagging" of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. "Domain-tags" were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine the objects each time as one would if using TDMesher. The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct helps simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It also saves time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  17. Using SpaceClaim/TD Direct for Modeling Components with Complex Geometries for the Thermal Desktop-Based Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabanich, William

    2014-01-01

    SpaceClaim/TD Direct has been used extensively in the development of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) thermal model. This paper outlines the workflow for that aspect of the task and includes proposed best practices and lessons learned. The ASRG thermal model was developed to predict component temperatures and power output and to provide insight into the prime contractors thermal modeling efforts. The insulation blocks, heat collectors, and cold side adapter flanges (CSAFs) were modeled with this approach. The model was constructed using mostly TD finite difference (FD) surfaces solids. However, some complex geometry could not be reproduced with TD primitives while maintaining the desired degree of geometric fidelity. Using SpaceClaim permitted the import of original CAD files and enabled the defeaturing repair of those geometries. TD Direct (a SpaceClaim add-on from CRTech) adds features that allowed the mark-up of that geometry. These so-called mark-ups control how finite element (FE) meshes were generated and allowed the tagging of features (e.g. edges, solids, surfaces). These tags represent parameters that include: submodels, material properties, material orienters, optical properties, and radiation analysis groups. TD aliases were used for most tags to allow analysis to be performed with a variety of parameter values. Domain-tags were also attached to individual and groups of surfaces and solids to allow them to be used later within TD to populate objects like, for example, heaters and contactors. These tools allow the user to make changes to the geometry in SpaceClaim and then easily synchronize the mesh in TD without having to redefine these objects each time as one would if using TD Mesher.The use of SpaceClaim/TD Direct has helped simplify the process for importing existing geometries and in the creation of high fidelity FE meshes to represent complex parts. It has also saved time and effort in the subsequent analysis.

  18. Mechanical behavior analysis of small-scale modeling of ceramic block masonry structures: geometries effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rizzatti

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results of a research program with ceramic block masonry under compression. Four different block geometries were investigated. Two of them had circular hollows with different net area. The third one had two rectangular hollow and the last block was with rectangular hollows and a double central webs. The prisms and walls were built with two mortar type 1:1:6 (I and 1:0,5:4 (II (proportions by volume of cement: lime: sand. One:three small scale blocks were used to test block, prisms and walls on compression. It was possible to conclude that the block with double central webs gave better results of compressive strength showing to be more efficient. The mortar didn't influenced the compressive strength of prisms and walls.

  19. Navigation by environmental geometry: the use of zebrafish as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Vallortigara, Giorgio; Flore, Michele; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Sovrano, Valeria A

    2013-10-01

    Sensitivity to environmental shape in spatial navigation has been found, at both behavioural and neural levels, in virtually every species tested, starting early in development. Moreover, evidence that genetic deletions can cause selective deficits in such navigation behaviours suggests a genetic basis to navigation by environmental geometry. Nevertheless, the geometric computations underlying navigation have not been specified in any species. The present study teases apart the geometric components within the traditionally used rectangular enclosure and finds that zebrafish selectively represent distance and directional relationships between extended boundary surfaces. Similar behavioural results in geometric navigation tasks with human children provide prima facie evidence for similar underlying cognitive computations and open new doors for probing the genetic foundations that give rise to these computations.

  20. Model theory and algebraic geometry an introduction to E. Hrushovski’s proof of the geometric Mordell-Lang conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    1998-01-01

    This introduction to the recent exciting developments in the applications of model theory to algebraic geometry, illustrated by E. Hrushovski's model-theoretic proof of the geometric Mordell-Lang Conjecture starts from very basic background and works up to the detailed exposition of Hrushovski's proof, explaining the necessary tools and results from stability theory on the way. The first chapter is an informal introduction to model theory itself, making the book accessible (with a little effort) to readers with no previous knowledge of model theory. The authors have collaborated closely to achieve a coherent and self- contained presentation, whereby the completeness of exposition of the chapters varies according to the existence of other good references, but comments and examples are always provided to give the reader some intuitive understanding of the subject.

  1. Tubular bioreactor and its application; Tubular bioreactor to sono tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, I.; Nagamune, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yuki, K. [Nikka Whisky Distilling Co. Ltd. Tokyo (Japan); Inaba, H. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-09-05

    The loop type tubular bioreactor (TBR) was developed where biocatalysts are trapped in the reactor by membrane module. A UF membrane or MF membrane and crossflow filtration were adopted for the membrane module, and the reactor loop was composed of four membrane modules. The reactor was operated at 2-4 m/s in membrane surface velocity and 300-400 kPa in filtration pressure. As the result of the high-density culture of lactic acid bacteria and yeast, a biomass concentration was more than 10 times that in batch culture, suggesting the remarkable enhancement of a production efficiency. As the result of the continuous fermentation of cider, the fast fermentation more than 60 times that in conventional ones was obtained together with the same quality as conventional ones. Such a fast fermentation was probably achieved by yeast suspended in the fermenter of TBR, by yeast hardly affected physico-chemically as compared with immobilized reactors, and by small effect of mass transfer on reaction systems. 4 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Computation of Surface Laplacian for tri-polar ring electrodes on high-density realistic geometry head model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junwei Ma; Han Yuan; Sunderam, Sridhar; Besio, Walter; Lei Ding

    2017-07-01

    Neural activity inside the human brain generate electrical signals that can be detected on the scalp. Electroencephalograph (EEG) is one of the most widely utilized techniques helping physicians and researchers to diagnose and understand various brain diseases. Due to its nature, EEG signals have very high temporal resolution but poor spatial resolution. To achieve higher spatial resolution, a novel tri-polar concentric ring electrode (TCRE) has been developed to directly measure Surface Laplacian (SL). The objective of the present study is to accurately calculate SL for TCRE based on a realistic geometry head model. A locally dense mesh was proposed to represent the head surface, where the local dense parts were to match the small structural components in TCRE. Other areas without dense mesh were used for the purpose of reducing computational load. We conducted computer simulations to evaluate the performance of the proposed mesh and evaluated possible numerical errors as compared with a low-density model. Finally, with achieved accuracy, we presented the computed forward lead field of SL for TCRE for the first time in a realistic geometry head model and demonstrated that it has better spatial resolution than computed SL from classic EEG recordings.

  3. Tides in the Last Interglacial: insights from notch geometry and palaeo tidal models in Bonaire, Netherland Antilles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorscheid, Thomas; Felis, Thomas; Stocchi, Paolo; Obert, J Christina; Scholz, Denis; Rovere, Alessio

    2017-11-24

    The study of past sea levels relies largely on the interpretation of sea-level indicators. Palaeo tidal notches are considered as one of the most precise sea-level indicators as their formation is closely tied to the local tidal range. We present geometric measurements of modern and palaeo (Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e) tidal notches on Bonaire (southern Caribbean Sea) and results from two tidal simulations, using the present-day bathymetry and a palaeo-bathymetry. We use these two tools to investigate changes in the tidal range since MIS 5e. Our models show that the tidal range changes most significantly in shallow areas, whereas both, notch geometry and models results, suggest that steeper continental shelves, such as the ones bordering the island of Bonaire, are less affected to changes in tidal range in conditions of MIS 5e sea levels. We use our data and results to discuss the importance of considering changes in tidal range while reconstructing MIS 5e sea level histories, and we remark that it is possible to use hydrodynamic modelling and notch geometry as first-order proxies to assess whether, in a particular area, tidal range might have been different in MIS 5e with respect to today.

  4. Simultaneous travel time tomography for updating both velocity and reflector geometry in triangular/tetrahedral cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chao-ying; He, Lei-yu; Li, Xing-wang; Sun, Jia-yu

    2018-05-01

    To conduct forward and simultaneous inversion in a complex geological model, including an irregular topography (or irregular reflector or velocity anomaly), we in this paper combined our previous multiphase arrival tracking method (referred as triangular shortest-path method, TSPM) in triangular (2D) or tetrahedral (3D) cell model and a linearized inversion solver (referred to as damped minimum norms and constrained least squares problem solved using the conjugate gradient method, DMNCLS-CG) to formulate a simultaneous travel time inversion method for updating both velocity and reflector geometry by using multiphase arrival times. In the triangular/tetrahedral cells, we deduced the partial derivative of velocity variation with respective to the depth change of reflector. The numerical simulation results show that the computational accuracy can be tuned to a high precision in forward modeling and the irregular velocity anomaly and reflector geometry can be accurately captured in the simultaneous inversion, because the triangular/tetrahedral cell can be easily used to stitch the irregular topography or subsurface interface.

  5. Introduction to combinatorial geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, T.A.; Emmett, M.B.

    1985-01-01

    The combinatorial geometry package as used in many three-dimensional multimedia Monte Carlo radiation transport codes, such as HETC, MORSE, and EGS, is becoming the preferred way to describe simple and complicated systems. Just about any system can be modeled using the package with relatively few input statements. This can be contrasted against the older style geometry packages in which the required input statements could be large even for relatively simple systems. However, with advancements come some difficulties. The users of combinatorial geometry must be able to visualize more, and, in some instances, all of the system at a time. Errors can be introduced into the modeling which, though slight, and at times hard to detect, can have devastating effects on the calculated results. As with all modeling packages, the best way to learn the combinatorial geometry is to use it, first on a simple system then on more complicated systems. The basic technique for the description of the geometry consists of defining the location and shape of the various zones in terms of the intersections and unions of geometric bodies. The geometric bodies which are generally included in most combinatorial geometry packages are: (1) box, (2) right parallelepiped, (3) sphere, (4) right circular cylinder, (5) right elliptic cylinder, (6) ellipsoid, (7) truncated right cone, (8) right angle wedge, and (9) arbitrary polyhedron. The data necessary to describe each of these bodies are given. As can be easily noted, there are some subsets included for simplicity

  6. The optimization of a tubular condensation cryopump for pressures below 10/sup -13/ Torr (for intersecting storage rings for protons)

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, C

    1974-01-01

    A cryopump design of tubular geometry is presented, which incorporates in its vacuum system only a very small fraction of ambient temperature walls. Furthermore, the total amount of the 300K radiation reaching the cold baffles is reduced by about two orders of magnitude. This has the double advantage that the baffles can be cooled at lower temperatures and can be allowed to be more 'transparent' to radiation and hence to molecules. The new model has been entirely optimised both for molecular and radiation transmission by a Monte Carlo method. It is designed to have a pumping speed of 3000 ls/sup -1/ for H/sub 2/ at the two entrances, an axial conductance providing a pressure drop across the pump of a factor of ten and a limit pressure in the 10/sup -14/ Torr range. (6 refs).

  7. Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Intended for a one year course, this text serves as a single source, introducing readers to the important techniques and theorems, while also containing enough background on advanced topics to appeal to those students wishing to specialize in Riemannian geometry. This is one of the few Works to combine both the geometric parts of Riemannian geometry and the analytic aspects of the theory. The book will appeal to a readership that have a basic knowledge of standard manifold theory, including tensors, forms, and Lie groups. Important revisions to the third edition include: a substantial addition of unique and enriching exercises scattered throughout the text; inclusion of an increased number of coordinate calculations of connection and curvature; addition of general formulas for curvature on Lie Groups and submersions; integration of variational calculus into the text allowing for an early treatment of the Sphere theorem using a proof by Berger; incorporation of several recent results about manifolds with posit...

  8. Special geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strominger, A.

    1990-01-01

    A special manifold is an allowed target manifold for the vector multiplets of D=4, N=2 supergravity. These manifolds are of interest for string theory because the moduli spaces of Calabi-Yau threefolds and c=9, (2,2) conformal field theories are special. Previous work has given a local, coordinate-dependent characterization of special geometry. A global description of special geometries is given herein, and their properties are studied. A special manifold M of complex dimension n is characterized by the existence of a holomorphic Sp(2n+2,R)xGL(1,C) vector bundle over M with a nowhere-vanishing holomorphic section Ω. The Kaehler potential on M is the logarithm of the Sp(2n+2,R) invariant norm of Ω. (orig.)

  9. Confined diffusion in tubular structures analyzed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy on a mirror

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etienne, Emilien; Lenne, Pierre-Francois; Sturgis, James N.; Rigneault, Herve

    2006-01-01

    In fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis it is generally assumed that molecular species diffuse freely in volumes much larger than the three-dimensional FCS observation volume. However, this standard assumption is not valid in many measurement conditions, particularly in tubular structures with diameters in the micrometer range, such as those found in living cells (organelles, dendrites) and microfluidic devices (capillaries,reaction chambers). As a result the measured autocorrelation functions (ACFs) deviate from those predicted for free diffusion, and this can shift the measured diffusion coefficient by as much as ∼50% when the tube diameter is comparable with the axial extension of the FCS observation volume. We show that the range of validity of the FCS measurements can be drastically improved if the tubular structures are located in the close vicinity of a mirror on which FCS is performed. In this case a new fluctuation time in the ACF, arising from the diffusion of fluorescent probes in optical fringes,permits measurement of the real diffusion coefficient within the tubular structure without assumptions about either the confined geometry orthe FCS observation volume geometry. We show that such a measurement can be done when the tubular structure contains at least one pair of dark and bright fringes resulting from interference between the incoming and the reflected excitation beams on the mirror surface. Measurement of the diffusion coefficient of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and IscS-EGFP in the cytoplasm of living Escherichiacoli illustrates the capabilities of the technique

  10. Proximal tubular hypertrophy and enlarged glomerular and proximal tubular urinary space in obese subjects with proteinuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tobar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with glomerular hyperfiltration, increased proximal tubular sodium reabsorption, glomerular enlargement and renal hypertrophy. A single experimental study reported an increased glomerular urinary space in obese dogs. Whether proximal tubular volume is increased in obese subjects and whether their glomerular and tubular urinary spaces are enlarged is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether proximal tubules and glomerular and tubular urinary space are enlarged in obese subjects with proteinuria and glomerular hyperfiltration. METHODS: Kidney biopsies from 11 non-diabetic obese with proteinuria and 14 non-diabetic lean patients with a creatinine clearance above 50 ml/min and with mild or no interstitial fibrosis were retrospectively analyzed using morphometric methods. The cross-sectional area of the proximal tubular epithelium and lumen, the volume of the glomerular tuft and of Bowman's space and the nuclei number per tubular profile were estimated. RESULTS: Creatinine clearance was higher in the obese than in the lean group (P=0.03. Proteinuria was similarly increased in both groups. Compared to the lean group, the obese group displayed a 104% higher glomerular tuft volume (P=0.001, a 94% higher Bowman's space volume (P=0.003, a 33% higher cross-sectional area of the proximal tubular epithelium (P=0.02 and a 54% higher cross-sectional area of the proximal tubular lumen (P=0.01. The nuclei number per proximal tubular profile was similar in both groups, suggesting that the increase in tubular volume is due to hypertrophy and not to hyperplasia. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity-related glomerular hyperfiltration is associated with proximal tubular epithelial hypertrophy and increased glomerular and tubular urinary space volume in subjects with proteinuria. The expanded glomerular and urinary space is probably a direct consequence of glomerular hyperfiltration. These effects may be involved in the pathogenesis of obesity

  11. A tubular dielectric elastomer actuator: Fabrication, characterization and active vibration isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarban, R.; Jones, R. W.; Mace, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    This contribution reviews the fabrication, characterization and active vibration isolation performance of a core-free rolled tubular dielectric elastomer (DE) actuator, which has been designed and developed by Danfoss PolyPower A/S. PolyPower DE material, PolyPower (TM), is produced in thin sheets...... of 80 mu m thickness with corrugated metallic electrodes on both sides. Tubular actuators are manufactured by rolling the DE sheets in a cylindrical shape. The electromechanical characteristics of such actuators are modeled based on equilibrium pressure equation. The model is validated with experimental...... the dominant dynamic characteristics of the core-free tubular actuator. It has been observed that all actuators have similar dynamic characteristics in a frequency range up to 1 kHz. A tubular actuator is then used to provide active vibration isolation (AVI) of a 250 g mass subject to shaker generated 'ground...

  12. Iatrogenic Digital Compromise with Tubular Dressings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corre, Kenneth A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case report describes a digit amputation resulting from an improperly applied tubular dressing. The safe application of digital tubular dressings, and the rationale behind it, is detailed to raise emergency physician (EP awareness.Methods: We present a case report of a recent iatrogenic-induced digit ischemia caused by improperly applied tube gauze. We review the literature on the subject and the likely sources of poor outcomes presented. The proper application of tubular gauze dressings is then outlined.Conclusion: EPs and emergency department personnel must be educated on the safe application of tubular gauze dressings to avoid dire outcomes associated with improper applications.[WestJEM. 2009;10:190-192.

  13. Renal Tubular Function in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immune' diseases such as. Sjogren's syndrome,'" systemic lupus erythematosus. (SLE),3 alveolitis' and chronic active hepatitis.' The reported abnormalities of renal tubular function include impairment of acid excretion and urinary concentration.

  14. Two-Dimensional Model for Reactive-Sorption Columns of Cylindrical Geometry: Analytical Solutions and Moment Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farman U; Qamar, Shamsul

    2017-05-01

    A set of analytical solutions are presented for a model describing the transport of a solute in a fixed-bed reactor of cylindrical geometry subjected to the first (Dirichlet) and third (Danckwerts) type inlet boundary conditions. Linear sorption kinetic process and first-order decay are considered. Cylindrical geometry allows the use of large columns to investigate dispersion, adsorption/desorption and reaction kinetic mechanisms. The finite Hankel and Laplace transform techniques are adopted to solve the model equations. For further analysis, statistical temporal moments are derived from the Laplace-transformed solutions. The developed analytical solutions are compared with the numerical solutions of high-resolution finite volume scheme. Different case studies are presented and discussed for a series of numerical values corresponding to a wide range of mass transfer and reaction kinetics. A good agreement was observed in the analytical and numerical concentration profiles and moments. The developed solutions are efficient tools for analyzing numerical algorithms, sensitivity analysis and simultaneous determination of the longitudinal and transverse dispersion coefficients from a laboratory-scale radial column experiment. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Stochastic geometry model for multi-channel fog radio access networks

    KAUST Repository

    Emara, Mostafa

    2017-06-29

    Cache-enabled base station (BS) densification, denoted as a fog radio access network (F-RAN), is foreseen as a key component of 5G cellular networks. F-RAN enables storing popular files at the network edge (i.e., BS caches), which empowers local communication and alleviates traffic congestions at the core/backhaul network. The hitting probability, which is the probability of successfully transmitting popular files request from the network edge, is a fundamental key performance indicator (KPI) for F-RAN. This paper develops a scheduling aware mathematical framework, based on stochastic geometry, to characterize the hitting probability of F-RAN in a multi-channel environment. To this end, we assess and compare the performance of two caching distribution schemes, namely, uniform caching and Zipf caching. The numerical results show that the commonly used single channel environment leads to pessimistic assessment for the hitting probability of F-RAN. Furthermore, the numerical results manifest the superiority of the Zipf caching scheme and quantify the hitting probability gains in terms of the number of channels and cache size.

  16. Modeling Cellular Networks with Full Duplex D2D Communication: A Stochastic Geometry Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Konpal S.

    2016-08-24

    Full-duplex (FD) communication is optimistically promoted to double the spectral efficiency if sufficient self-interference cancellation (SIC) is achieved. However, this is not true when deploying FD-communication in a large-scale setup due to the induced mutual interference. Therefore, a large-scale study is necessary to draw legitimate conclusions about gains associated with FD-communication. This paper studies the FD operation for underlay device-to-device (D2D) communication sharing the uplink resources in cellular networks. We propose a disjoint fine-tuned selection criterion for the D2D and FD modes of operation. Then, we develop a tractable analytical paradigm, based on stochastic geometry, to calculate the outage probability and rate for cellular and D2D users. The results reveal that even in the case of perfect SIC, due to the increased interference injected to the network by FD-D2D communication, having all proximity UEs transmit in FD-D2D is not beneficial for the network. However, if the system parameters are carefully tuned, non-trivial network spectral-efficiency gains (64% shown) can be harvested. We also investigate the effects of imperfect SIC and D2D-link distance distribution on the harvested FD gains.

  17. From the topological development of matrix models to the topological string theory: arrangement of surfaces through algebraic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orantin, N.

    2007-09-01

    The 2-matrix model has been introduced to study Ising model on random surfaces. Since then, the link between matrix models and arrangement of discrete surfaces has strongly tightened. This manuscript aims to investigate these deep links and extend them beyond the matrix models, following my work's evolution. First, I take care to define properly the hermitian 2 matrix model which gives rise to generating functions of discrete surfaces equipped with a spin structure. Then, I show how to compute all the terms in the topological expansion of any observable by using algebraic geometry tools. They are obtained as differential forms on an algebraic curve associated to the model: the spectral curve. In a second part, I show how to define such differentials on any algebraic curve even if it does not come from a matrix model. I then study their numerous symmetry properties under deformations of the algebraic curve. In particular, I show that these objects coincide with the topological expansion of the observable of a matrix model if the algebraic curve is the spectral curve of this model. Finally, I show that the fine tuning of the parameters ensures that these objects can be promoted to modular invariants and satisfy the holomorphic anomaly equation of the Kodaira-Spencer theory. This gives a new hint that the Dijkgraaf-Vafa conjecture is correct. (author)

  18. Complex algebraic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Kollár, János

    1997-01-01

    This volume contains the lectures presented at the third Regional Geometry Institute at Park City in 1993. The lectures provide an introduction to the subject, complex algebraic geometry, making the book suitable as a text for second- and third-year graduate students. The book deals with topics in algebraic geometry where one can reach the level of current research while starting with the basics. Topics covered include the theory of surfaces from the viewpoint of recent higher-dimensional developments, providing an excellent introduction to more advanced topics such as the minimal model program. Also included is an introduction to Hodge theory and intersection homology based on the simple topological ideas of Lefschetz and an overview of the recent interactions between algebraic geometry and theoretical physics, which involve mirror symmetry and string theory.

  19. Full Core modeling techniques for research reactors with irregular geometries using Serpent and PARCS applied to the CROCUS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefman, Daniel J.; Girardin, Gaëtan; Rais, Adolfo; Pautz, Andreas; Hursin, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Modeling of research reactors. • Serpent and PARCS coupling. • Lattice physics codes modeling techniques. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the results of modeling methodologies developed for the zero-power (100 W) teaching and research reactor CROCUS located in the Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behavior (LRS) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). The study gives evidence that the Monte Carlo code Serpent can be used effectively as a lattice physics tool for small reactors. CROCUS’ core has an irregular geometry with two fuel zones of different lattice pitches. This and the reactor’s small size necessitate the use of nonstandard cross-section homogenization techniques when modeling the full core with a 3D nodal diffusion code (e.g. PARCS). The primary goal of this work is the development of these techniques for steady-state neutronics and future transient neutronics analyses of not only CROCUS, but research reactors in general. In addition, the modeling methods can provide useful insight for analyzing small modular reactor concepts based on light water technology. Static computational models of CROCUS with the codes Serpent and MCNP5 are presented and methodologies are analyzed for using Serpent and SerpentXS to prepare macroscopic homogenized group cross-sections for a pin-by-pin model of CROCUS with PARCS. The most accurate homogenization scheme lead to a difference in terms of k eff of 385 pcm between the Serpent and PARCS model, while the MCNP5 and Serpent models differed in terms of k eff by 13 pcm (within the statistical error of each simulation). Comparisons of the axial power profiles between the Serpent model as a reference and a set of PARCS models using different homogenization techniques showed a consistent root-mean-square deviation of ∼8%, indicating that the differences are not due to the homogenization technique but rather arise from the definition of the diffusion coefficients

  20. A neglected case of Renal Tubular Acidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derakhshan, A.; Basiratnia, M.; Fallahzadeh, M.H.; Al-Hashemi, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of a child with distal renal tubular acidosis, severe failure to thrive and profound rickets, who was only 7.8 Kg when presented at 6 years of age. His response to treatment and his follow up for four years is discussed. Although failure to thrive is a common finding in renal tubular acidosis but the physical and x-ray findings in our case were unique. (author)

  1. General Geometry and Geometry of Electromagnetism

    OpenAIRE

    Shahverdiyev, Shervgi S.

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that Electromagnetism creates geometry different from Riemannian geometry. General geometry including Riemannian geometry as a special case is constructed. It is proven that the most simplest special case of General Geometry is geometry underlying Electromagnetism. Action for electromagnetic field and Maxwell equations are derived from curvature function of geometry underlying Electromagnetism. And it is shown that equation of motion for a particle interacting with electromagnetic...

  2. Neutron transport in hexagonal reactor cores modeled by trigonal-geometry diffusion and simplified P{sub 3} nodal methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerigen, Susan

    2013-05-15

    The superior advantage of a nodal method for reactor cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies discretized as cells consisting of equilateral triangles is its mesh refinement capability. In this thesis, a diffusion and a simplified P{sub 3} (or SP{sub 3}) neutron transport nodal method are developed based on trigonal geometry. Both models are implemented in the reactor dynamics code DYN3D. As yet, no other well-established nodal core analysis code comprises an SP{sub 3} transport theory model based on trigonal meshes. The development of two methods based on different neutron transport approximations but using identical underlying spatial trigonal discretization allows a profound comparative analysis of both methods with regard to their mathematical derivations, nodal expansion approaches, solution procedures, and their physical performance. The developed nodal approaches can be regarded as a hybrid NEM/AFEN form. They are based on the transverse-integration procedure, which renders them computationally efficient, and they use a combination of polynomial and exponential functions to represent the neutron flux moments of the SP{sub 3} and diffusion equations, which guarantees high accuracy. The SP{sub 3} equations are derived in within-group form thus being of diffusion type. On this basis, the conventional diffusion solver structure can be retained also for the solution of the SP{sub 3} transport problem. The verification analysis provides proof of the methodological reliability of both trigonal DYN3D models. By means of diverse hexagonal academic benchmark and realistic detailed-geometry full-transport-theory problems, the superiority of the SP{sub 3} transport over the diffusion model is demonstrated in cases with pronounced anisotropy effects, which is, e.g., highly relevant to the modeling of fuel assemblies comprising absorber material.

  3. Effective leaf area index retrieving from terrestrial point cloud data: coupling computational geometry application and Gaussian mixture model clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Tamura, M.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is one of the most important structural parameters of forestry studies which manifests the ability of the green vegetation interacted with the solar illumination. Classic understanding about LAI is to consider the green canopy as integration of horizontal leaf layers. Since multi-angle remote sensing technique developed, LAI obliged to be deliberated according to the observation geometry. Effective LAI could formulate the leaf-light interaction virtually and precisely. To retrieve the LAI/effective LAI from remotely sensed data therefore becomes a challenge during the past decades. Laser scanning technique can provide accurate surface echoed coordinates with densely scanned intervals. To utilize the density based statistical algorithm for analyzing the voluminous amount of the 3-D points data is one of the subjects of the laser scanning applications. Computational geometry also provides some mature applications for point cloud data (PCD) processing and analysing. In this paper, authors investigated the feasibility of a new application for retrieving the effective LAI of an isolated broad leaf tree. Simplified curvature was calculated for each point in order to remove those non-photosynthetic tissues. Then PCD were discretized into voxel, and clustered by using Gaussian mixture model. Subsequently the area of each cluster was calculated by employing the computational geometry applications. In order to validate our application, we chose an indoor plant to estimate the leaf area, the correlation coefficient between calculation and measurement was 98.28 %. We finally calculated the effective LAI of the tree with 6 × 6 assumed observation directions.

  4. Validation of new 3-D neutronics model in APROS for hexagonal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintala, J.

    2010-01-01

    APROS - Advanced PROcess Simulation environment-is a widely used simulation tool for nuclear power plant modelling. Earlier the three-dimensional neutronics calculation has been based on model using the difference method. The original three-dimensional core model is mainly used in power plant simulator applications, where it fits well because of its speed. For safety analysis purposes, however, a new model was considered to be an important improvement to meet the accuracy requirements. A sophisticated nodal model used already in HEXTRAN and TRAB-3D was decided to be implemented into APROS. The hexagonal part of the model has now been implemented and tested. For practical reasons, the model was programmed from scratch into APROS and also some small improvements were added and thus, an extensive validation program was necessary to prove the correct behaviour of the model. In this paper, the most important results from AER kinetic benchmarks 2 and 3 calculations are shown as well as the calculation results against data achieved LR-0 test reactor space-time kinetic experiments. Since the model is similar to the one in HEXTRAN, the results in benchmarks are compared to the results by it. In LR-0 calculations, results by both, original and new model are presented and compared to the measurements. The results shows that the implementation of the model has been successful and the new model improves the accuracy of three-dimensional neutronics calculation in APROS into the level required in safety analyses. (Author)

  5. Heat transfer correlation models for electrospray evaporative cooling chambers of different geometry types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hsiu-Che; Mamishev, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    Development of future electronics for high speed computing requires a silent thermal management method capable of dissipating a broad range of heat generated from application-specific integrated circuits, while keeping the skin temperature below 45 °C. Electrospray evaporative cooling (ESEC) chambers show promise because of their ability to dissipate a broad range of heat within a relatively small size. However, the development and the optimization of ESEC chambers are currently restricted, in part due to the lack of sufficient empirical heat transfer correlations. This paper investigates empirical heat transfer correlations for ESEC chambers with three different geometry types. Since the unstable multi-jet behavior of an ESEC chamber is similar to that of a free-surface traditional impinging liquid jet, these correlations are based on the traditional impinging liquid jet’s empirical correlations, yet are modified to factor in the electric field effect. The results show that the heat transfer enhancement ratio correlations and the Nusselt number correlations for different ESEC chambers cover more than 83% of the experimental data, within ±10% deviation. The sensitivity analysis results and experimental data prove that the variation in the enhancement ratio is sensitive to that of the potential and the flow rate. It is not sensitive to the geometric factor of the same ESEC type. This paper presents a natural convection correlation for chip-scale, heated, flat surfaces when the Rayleigh number is below 3000. Further investigation is necessary to extend these heat transfer correlations to cover additional parameters for different thermal management applications. - Highlights: ► We develop empirical heat transfer correlations for electrospray evaporative cooling chambers. ► The developed heat transfer enhancement correlations fit more than 83% experimental data. ► The developed Nusselt number correlations fit more than 89% experimental data. ► We present a

  6. Adaptation of Sing Lee's model to the Filippov type plasma focus geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siahpoush, V; Tafreshi, M A; Sobhanian, S; Khorram, S

    2005-01-01

    A new model for plasma behaviour in Filippov type plasma focus (PF) systems has been described and used. This model is based on the so-called slug model and Sing Lee's model for Mather type PF devices. Using the model, the discharge current and its derivative as a function of time, and the pinch time and the maximum discharge current as a function of pressure, have been predicted. At the end, the predicted data are compared with the experimental data obtained through a Filippov type PF facility with a nominal maximum energy of 90 kJ

  7. Model-Based Optimization of Scaffold Geometry and Operating Conditions of Radial Flow Packed-Bed Bioreactors for Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Donato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial flow perfusion of cell-seeded hollow cylindrical porous scaffolds may overcome the transport limitations of pure diffusion and direct axial perfusion in the realization of bioengineered substitutes of failing or missing tissues. Little has been reported on the optimization criteria of such bioreactors. A steady-state model was developed, combining convective and dispersive transport of dissolved oxygen with Michaelis-Menten cellular consumption kinetics. Dimensional analysis was used to combine more effectively geometric and operational variables in the dimensionless groups determining bioreactor performance. The effectiveness of cell oxygenation was expressed in terms of non-hypoxic fractional construct volume. The model permits the optimization of the geometry of hollow cylindrical constructs, and direction and magnitude of perfusion flow, to ensure cell oxygenation and culture at controlled oxygen concentration profiles. This may help engineer tissues suitable for therapeutic and drug screening purposes.

  8. MENENTUKAN PORTOFOLIO OPTIMAL PADA PASAR SAHAM YANG BERGERAK DENGAN MODEL GERAK BROWN GEOMETRI MULTIDIMENSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RISKA YUNITA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Model of stock price movements that follow stochastic process can be formulated in Stochastic Diferential Equation (SDE. The exact solution of SDE model is called Geometric Brownian Motion (GBM model. Determination the optimal portfolio of three asset that follows Multidimensional GBM model is to be carried out in this research.Multidimensional GBM model represents stock price in the future is affected by three parameter, there are expectation of stock return, risk stock, and correlation between stock return. Therefore, theory of portfolio Markowitz is used on formation of optimal portfolio. Portfolio Markowitz formulates three of same parameter that is calculated on Multidimensional GBM model. The result of this research are optimal portfolio reaches with the proportion of fund are 39,38% for stock BBCA, 59,82% for stock ICBP, and 0,80% for stock INTP. This proportion of fund represents value of parameters that is calculated on modelling stock price.

  9. Advances in tubular solid oxide fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singhal, S.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The design, materials and fabrication processes for the earlier technology Westinghouse tubular geometry cell have been described in detail previously. In that design, the active cell components were deposited in the form of thin layers on a ceramic porous support tube (PST). The tubular design of these cells and the materials used therein have been validated by successful electrical testing for over 65,000 h (>7 years). In these early technology PST cells, the support tube, although sufficiently porous, presented an inherent impedance to air flow toward air electrode. In order to reduce such impedance to air flow, the wall thickness of the PST was first decreased from the original 2 mm (the thick-wall PST) to 1.2 mm (the thin-wall PST). The calcia-stabilized zirconia support tube has now been completely eliminated and replaced by a doped lanthanum manganite tube in state-of-the-art SOFCs. This doped lanthanum manganite tube is extruded and sintered to about 30 to 35 percent porosity, and serves as the air electrode onto which the other cell components are fabricated in thin layer form. These latest technology cells are designated as air electrode supported (AES) cells.

  10. 3D modeling to characterize lamina cribrosa surface and pore geometries using in vivo images from normal and glaucomatous eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sredar, Nripun; Ivers, Kevin M.; Queener, Hope M.; Zouridakis, George; Porter, Jason

    2013-01-01

    En face adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AOSLO) images of the anterior lamina cribrosa surface (ALCS) represent a 2D projected view of a 3D laminar surface. Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography images acquired in living monkey eyes, a thin plate spline was used to model the ALCS in 3D. The 2D AOSLO images were registered and projected onto the 3D surface that was then tessellated into a triangular mesh to characterize differences in pore geometry between 2D and 3D images. Following 3D transformation of the anterior laminar surface in 11 normal eyes, mean pore area increased by 5.1 ± 2.0% with a minimal change in pore elongation (mean change = 0.0 ± 0.2%). These small changes were due to the relatively flat laminar surfaces inherent in normal eyes (mean radius of curvature = 3.0 ± 0.5 mm). The mean increase in pore area was larger following 3D transformation in 4 glaucomatous eyes (16.2 ± 6.0%) due to their more steeply curved laminar surfaces (mean radius of curvature = 1.3 ± 0.1 mm), while the change in pore elongation was comparable to that in normal eyes (−0.2 ± 2.0%). This 3D transformation and tessellation method can be used to better characterize and track 3D changes in laminar pore and surface geometries in glaucoma. PMID:23847739

  11. Differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ciarlet, Philippe G

    2007-01-01

    This book gives the basic notions of differential geometry, such as the metric tensor, the Riemann curvature tensor, the fundamental forms of a surface, covariant derivatives, and the fundamental theorem of surface theory in a selfcontained and accessible manner. Although the field is often considered a classical one, it has recently been rejuvenated, thanks to the manifold applications where it plays an essential role. The book presents some important applications to shells, such as the theory of linearly and nonlinearly elastic shells, the implementation of numerical methods for shells, and

  12. Experimental verification of computational model for wind turbine blade geometry design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štorch Vít

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3D potential flow solver with unsteady force free wake model intended for optimization of blade shape for wind power generation is applied on a test case scenario formed by a wind turbine with vertical axis of rotation. The calculation is sensitive to correct modelling of wake and its interaction with blades. The validity of the flow solver is verified by comparing experimentally obtained performance data of model rotor with numerical results.

  13. CMS geometry through 2020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osborne, I; Brownson, E; Eulisse, G; Jones, C D; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Lange, D J

    2014-01-01

    CMS faces real challenges with upgrade of the CMS detector through 2020 and beyond. One of the challenges, from the software point of view, is managing upgrade simulations with the same software release as the 2013 scenario. We present the CMS geometry description software model, its integration with the CMS event setup and core software. The CMS geometry configuration and selection is implemented in Python. The tools collect the Python configuration fragments into a script used in CMS workflow. This flexible and automated geometry configuration allows choosing either transient or persistent version of the same scenario and specific version of the same scenario. We describe how the geometries are integrated and validated, and how we define and handle different geometry scenarios in simulation and reconstruction. We discuss how to transparently manage multiple incompatible geometries in the same software release. Several examples are shown based on current implementation assuring consistent choice of scenario conditions. The consequences and implications for multiple/different code algorithms are discussed.

  14. The linear stability analysis of MHD models in axisymmetric toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manickam, J.; Grimm, R.C.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    A computational model to analyze the linear stability properties of general toroidal systems in the ideal magnetohydrodynamic limits is presented. This model includes an explicit treatment of the asymptotic singular behaviour at rational surfaces. It is verified through applications to internal kink modes. (orig.)

  15. Unified tractable model for downlink MIMO cellular networks using stochastic geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.; Elsawy, Hesham; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    for simplicity. On the other hand, there are models that sacrifice simplicity to target more tangible performance metrics such as the error probability. Both types of models are completely disjoint in terms of the analytic steps to obtain the performance measures

  16. Introduction to Solar Motion Geometry on the Basis of a Simple Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavrus, Vyacheslav; Shelevytsky, Ihor

    2010-01-01

    By means of a simple mathematical model developed by the authors, the apparent movement of the Sun can be studied for arbitrary latitudes. Using this model, it is easy to gain insight into various phenomena, such as the passage of the seasons, dependences of position and time of sunrise or sunset on a specific day of year, day duration for…

  17. A unified spray forming model for the prediction of billet shape geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattel, J.H.; Pryds, N.H.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work a unified model for simulating the spray forming process has been developed. Models for the atomization and the deposition processes have been coupled together in order to obtain a new unified description of the spray forming process. The model is able to predict the shape and the temperatures of a spray-formed billet and takes into account the thermal coupling between the gas and the droplets, the change in droplet size distribution along the r-axis in the spray cone and the shading effect. The deposition describes the evolution of the preform with time. For this stage a novel 3D model, which allows the atomizer to be placed asymmetrically over the substrate and also includes the withdrawal of the deposit, was developed. This makes it possible to model not only the growth of a Gaussian shaped preform in which case the spray axis and the rotation axis coincide, but also the surface evolution during billet growth. For this purpose, shading must be taken into account as a core part of the surface evolution algorithm. The unified model involves coupling of three sub models for the atomization, the deposition and the shape of the billet. This coupling, which is a central part of the present work, is also described. Results from the integrated model are presented and the potential for better process understanding as well as process optimization is evident

  18. A Hybrid PO - Higher-Order Hierarchical MoM Formulation using Curvilinear Geometry Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, E.; Meincke, Peter; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2003-01-01

    which implies a very modest memory requirement. Nevertheless, the hierarchical feature of the basis functions maintains the ability to treat small geometrical details efficiently. In addition, the scatterer is modelled with higher-order curved patches which allows accurate modelling of curved surfaces...

  19. Measurement of laser welding pool geometry using a closed convex active contour model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Rui; Zhang, Pu; Duan, Aiqing; Xiao, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computer vision method to measure geometric parameters of the weld pool in a deep penetration CO 2 laser welding system. Accurate measurement was achieved by removing a huge amount of interference caused by spatter, arc light and plasma to extract the true weld pool contour. This paper introduces a closed convex active contour (CCAC) model derived from the active contour model (snake model), which is a more robust high-level vision method than the traditional low-level vision methods. We made an improvement by integrating an active contour with the information that the weld pool contour is almost a closed convex curve. An effective thresholding method and an improved greedy algorithm are also given to complement the CCAC model. These influences can be effectively removed by using the CCAC model to acquire and measure the weld pool contour accurately and relatively fast. (paper)

  20. Models of thermal transfer by radiation and by conduction, in any geometry, in multiphase multicomponent medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanne, T.

    1990-03-01

    A conduction model and a radiation model are proposed for the calculation of heat transfer. A multiphase multicomponent medium is considered. The conduction model allows the calculation of heat exchanges between two configurations. The heat flow from each component can be obtained. This model is well adapted to the calculation of thermal shocks in an ensemble of materials. The radiation model shows how the radiative transfers can be calculated in a cylinder composed of two opaque surfaces, with the same axis of rotation, and separated by a transparent medium. The form factors are obtained from Herman and Nusselt methods. The parts of the face-to-face surfaces which are seen and not seen are evaluated [fr

  1. A unified spray forming model for the prediction of billet shape geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper; Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    In the present work a unified model for simulating the spray forming process has been developed. Models for the atomization and the deposition processes have been coupled together in order to obtain a new unified description of the spray forming process. The model is able to predict the shape...... and the temperatures of a spray-formed billet and takes into account the thermal coupling between the gas and the droplets, the change in droplet size distribution along the r-axis in the spray cone and the shading effect. The deposition describes the evolution of the preform with time. For this stage a novel 3D model......, which allows the atomizer to be placed asymmetrically over the substrate and also includes the withdrawal of the deposit, was developed. This makes it possible to model not only the growth of a Gaussian shaped preform in which case the spray axis and the rotation axis coincide, but also the surface...

  2. Modelling the geometry of a moving laser melt pool and deposition track via energy and mass balances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkerton, Andrew J; Li Lin [Laser Processing Research Centre, Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 88, Sackville Street, Manchester M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-21

    The additive manufacturing technique of laser direct metal deposition allows multiple tracks of full density metallic material to be built to form complex parts for rapid tooling and manufacture. Practical results and theoretical models have shown that the geometries of the tracks are governed by multiple factors. Original work with single layer cladding identified three basic clad profiles but, so far, models of multiple layer, powder-feed deposition have been based on only two of them. At higher powder mass flow rates, experimental results have shown that a layer's width can become greater than the melt pool width at the substrate surface, but previous analytical models have not been able to accommodate this. In this paper, a model based on this third profile is established and experimentally verified. The model concentrates on mathematical analysis of the melt pool and establishes mass and energy balances based on one-dimensional heat conduction to the substrate. Deposition track limits are considered as arcs of circles rather than of ellipses, as used in most established models, reflecting the dominance of surface tension forces in the melt pool, and expressions for elongation of the melt pool with increasing traverse speed are incorporated. Trends in layer width and height with major process parameters are captured and predicted layer dimensions correspond well to the experimental values.

  3. Unified Tractable Model for Large-Scale Networks Using Stochastic Geometry: Analysis and Design

    KAUST Repository

    Afify, Laila H.

    2016-01-01

    about the interferers symbols can be approximated via the Gaussian signaling approach. The developed mathematical model presents twofold analysis unification for uplink and downlink cellular networks literature. It aligns the tangible decoding error

  4. A space-fractional Monodomain model for cardiac electrophysiology combining anisotropy and heterogeneity on realistic geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusimano, N.; Gerardo-Giorda, L.

    2018-06-01

    Classical models of electrophysiology do not typically account for the effects of high structural heterogeneity in the spatio-temporal description of excitation waves propagation. We consider a modification of the Monodomain model obtained by replacing the diffusive term of the classical formulation with a fractional power of the operator, defined in the spectral sense. The resulting nonlocal model describes different levels of tissue heterogeneity as the fractional exponent is varied. The numerical method for the solution of the fractional Monodomain relies on an integral representation of the nonlocal operator combined with a finite element discretisation in space, allowing to handle in a natural way bounded domains in more than one spatial dimension. Numerical tests in two spatial dimensions illustrate the features of the model. Activation times, action potential duration and its dispersion throughout the domain are studied as a function of the fractional parameter: the expected peculiar behaviour driven by tissue heterogeneities is recovered.

  5. The Standard Model in noncommutative geometry: fundamental fermions as internal forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, Ludwik; D'Andrea, Francesco; Sitarz, Andrzej

    2018-05-01

    Given the algebra, Hilbert space H, grading and real structure of the finite spectral triple of the Standard Model, we classify all possible Dirac operators such that H is a self-Morita equivalence bimodule for the associated Clifford algebra.

  6. Technical note: Representing glacier geometry changes in a semi-distributed hydrological model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Seibert

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers play an important role in high-mountain hydrology. While changing glacier areas are considered of highest importance for the understanding of future changes in runoff, glaciers are often only poorly represented in hydrological models. Most importantly, the direct coupling between the simulated glacier mass balances and changing glacier areas needs feasible solutions. The use of a complex glacier model is often not possible due to data and computational limitations. The Δh parameterization is a simple approach to consider the spatial variation of glacier thickness and area changes. Here, we describe a conceptual implementation of the Δh parameterization in the semi-distributed hydrological model HBV-light, which also allows for the representation of glacier advance phases and for comparison between the different versions of the implementation. The coupled glacio-hydrological simulation approach, which could also be implemented in many other semi-distributed hydrological models, is illustrated based on an example application.

  7. A statistical model for the wettability of surfaces with heterogeneous pore geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockway, Lance; Taylor, Hayden

    2016-10-01

    We describe a new approach to modeling the wetting behavior of micro- and nano-textured surfaces with varying degrees of geometrical heterogeneity. Surfaces are modeled as pore arrays with a Gaussian distribution of sidewall reentrant angles and a characteristic wall roughness. Unlike conventional wettability models, our model considers the fraction of a surface’s pores that are filled at any time, allowing us to capture more subtle dependences of a liquid’s apparent contact angle on its surface tension. The model has four fitting parameters and is calibrated for a particular surface by measuring the apparent contact angles between the surface and at least four probe liquids. We have calibrated the model for three heterogeneous nanoporous surfaces that we have fabricated: a hydrothermally grown zinc oxide, a film of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microspheres formed by spinodal decomposition, and a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film with pores defined by sacrificial polystyrene microspheres. These three surfaces show markedly different dependences of a liquid’s apparent contact angle on the liquid’s surface tension, and the results can be explained by considering geometric variability. The highly variable PTFE pores yield the most gradual variation of apparent contact angle with probe liquid surface tension. The PVDF microspheres are more regular in diameter and, although connected in an irregular manner, result in a much sharper transition from non-wetting to wetting behavior as surface tension reduces. We also demonstrate, by terminating porous zinc oxide with three alternative hydrophobic molecules, that a single geometrical model can capture a structure’s wetting behavior for multiple surface chemistries and liquids. Finally, we contrast our results with those from a highly regular, lithographically-produced structure which shows an extremely sharp dependence of wettability on surface tension. This new model could be valuable in designing and

  8. Ethnophysics, Mathematical Modeling, Geometry... All in the same Manzuá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ednilson Sergio Ramalho de Souza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective this is paper is to show partial results of research for project of doctorate whose intention is to analyze the Ethnophysics of the amazon fisherman end to develop innovative didactic resources for the conceptual approach in Physics and Mathematics in the classroom of the high school and higher education in environment of Mathematical Modeling. The research question was: How the build the Manzuá can contextualize lessons of Physics and Mathematics in high school? The methodology used was ethnographicresearch. The theoretical foundations were Ethnomathematics (D’AMBROSIO, 2008, Mental Models (JONHSON-LAIRD, 1983, Mathematical Modeling (CHAVES e ESPÍRITO SANTO, 2008 end Conceptual Field ((VERGNAUD, 2007. The initial results suggest which the traditional physical knowledge is strongly related to mental models formed in function long years practice in the construction of the Manzuá end the operational invariants take part in the mental models. The situations lived during the construction of the Manzuá can base situations-problem in the classes of Physics and Mathematics in environment of Mathematical Modeling. We can, therefore, develop didactics resources that relate the traditional knowledge to the school knowledge

  9. Research on the Integration of Bionic Geometry Modeling and Simulation of Robot Foot Based on Characteristic Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhu, H.; Xu, J.; Gao, K.; Zhu, D.

    2017-09-01

    The bionic research of shape is an important aspect of the research on bionic robot, and its implementation cannot be separated from the shape modeling and numerical simulation of the bionic object, which is tedious and time-consuming. In order to improve the efficiency of shape bionic design, the feet of animals living in soft soil and swamp environment are taken as bionic objects, and characteristic skeleton curve, section curve, joint rotation variable, position and other parameters are used to describe the shape and position information of bionic object’s sole, toes and flipper. The geometry modeling of the bionic object is established by using the parameterization of characteristic curves and variables. Based on this, the integration framework of parametric modeling and finite element modeling, dynamic analysis and post-processing of sinking process in soil is proposed in this paper. The examples of bionic ostrich foot and bionic duck foot are also given. The parametric modeling and integration technique can achieve rapid improved design based on bionic object, and it can also greatly improve the efficiency and quality of robot foot bionic design, and has important practical significance to improve the level of bionic design of robot foot’s shape and structure.

  10. VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagor Malem Sembiring

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT VALIDATION OF FULL CORE GEOMETRY MODEL OF THE NODAL3 CODE IN THE PWR TRANSIENT BENCHMARK PROBLEMS. The coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (T/H code, NODAL3 code, has been validated in some PWR static benchmark and the NEACRP PWR transient benchmark cases. However, the NODAL3 code have not yet validated in the transient benchmark cases of a control rod assembly (CR ejection at peripheral core using a full core geometry model, the C1 and C2 cases.  By this research work, the accuracy of the NODAL3 code for one CR ejection or the unsymmetrical group of CRs ejection case can be validated. The calculations by the NODAL3 code have been carried out by the adiabatic method (AM and the improved quasistatic method (IQS. All calculated transient parameters by the NODAL3 code were compared with the reference results by the PANTHER code. The maximum relative difference of 16% occurs in the calculated time of power maximum parameter by using the IQS method, while the relative difference of the AM method is 4% for C2 case.  All calculation results by the NODAL3 code shows there is no systematic difference, it means the neutronic and T/H modules are adopted in the code are considered correct. Therefore, all calculation results by using the NODAL3 code are very good agreement with the reference results. Keywords: nodal method, coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic code, PWR, transient case, control rod ejection.   ABSTRAK VALIDASI MODEL GEOMETRI TERAS PENUH PAKET PROGRAM NODAL3 DALAM PROBLEM BENCHMARK GAYUT WAKTU PWR. Paket program kopel neutronik dan termohidraulika (T/H, NODAL3, telah divalidasi dengan beberapa kasus benchmark statis PWR dan kasus benchmark gayut waktu PWR NEACRP.  Akan tetapi, paket program NODAL3 belum divalidasi dalam kasus benchmark gayut waktu akibat penarikan sebuah perangkat batang kendali (CR di tepi teras menggunakan model geometri teras penuh, yaitu kasus C1 dan C2. Dengan penelitian ini, akurasi paket program

  11. A tubular electrode for radiofrequency ablation therapy

    KAUST Repository

    Antunes, Carlos Lemos Lemos Lemos

    2012-07-06

    Purpose – Due to its good mechanical and biocompatibility characteristics, nitinol SEMS is a popular endoprothesis used for relieving stricture problems in hollow organs due to carcinomas. Besides its mechanical application, SEMS can be regarded as well as potential electrode for performing RF ablation therapy on the tumor. The purpose of this work is to perform numerical and experimental analyses in order to characterize the lesion volume induced in biological tissue using this kind of tubular electrode. Design/methodology/approach – Data concerning electrical conductivity and dimension of the damaged tissue after RF ablation procedure were obtained from ex vivo samples. Next, numerical models using 3D finite element method were obtained reassembling the conditions considered at experimentation setup and results were compared. Findings – Numerical and experimental results show that a regular volume of damaged tissue can be obtained considering this type of electrode. Also, results obtained from numerical simulation are close to those obtained by experimentation. Originality/value – SEMSs, commonly used as devices to minimize obstruction problems due to the growth of tumors, may still be considered as an active electrode for RF ablation procedures. A method considering this observation is presented in this paper. Also, numerical simulation can be regarded in this case as a tool for determining the lesion volume.

  12. Tubular Initial Conditions and Ridge Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Borysova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2D azimuth and rapidity structure of the two-particle correlations in relativistic A+A collisions is altered significantly by the presence of sharp inhomogeneities in superdense matter formed in such processes. The causality constraints enforce one to associate the long-range longitudinal correlations observed in a narrow angular interval, the so-called (soft ridge, with peculiarities of the initial conditions of collision process. This study's objective is to analyze whether multiform initial tubular structures, undergoing the subsequent hydrodynamic evolution and gradual decoupling, can form the soft ridges. Motivated by the flux-tube scenarios, the initial energy density distribution contains the different numbers of high density tube-like boost-invariant inclusions that form a bumpy structure in the transverse plane. The influence of various structures of such initial conditions in the most central A+A events on the collective evolution of matter, resulting spectra, angular particle correlations and vn-coefficients is studied in the framework of the hydrokinetic model (HKM.

  13. Peaks, plateaus, canyons, and craters: The complex geometry of simple mid-domain effect models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colwell, Robert K.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.; Rahbek, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    dye algorithm to place assemblages of species of uniform We used a spreading dye algorithm to place assemblages of species of uniform range size in one-dimensional or two-dimensional bounded domains. In some models, we allowed dispersal to introduce range discontinuity. Results: As uniform range size...... increases from small to medium, a flat pattern of species As uniform range size increases from small to medium, a flat pattern of species richness is replaced by a pair of peripheral peaks, separated by a valley (one-dimensional models), or by a cratered ring (two-dimensional models) of species richness...... of a uniform size generate more complex patterns, including peaks, plateaus, canyons, and craters of species richness....

  14. Finsler Geometry Modeling of Phase Separation in Multi-Component Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Usui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A Finsler geometric surface model is studied as a coarse-grained model for membranes of three components, such as zwitterionic phospholipid (DOPC, lipid (DPPC and an organic molecule (cholesterol. To understand the phase separation of liquid-ordered (DPPC rich L o and liquid-disordered (DOPC rich L d , we introduce a binary variable σ ( = ± 1 into the triangulated surface model. We numerically determine that two circular and stripe domains appear on the surface. The dependence of the morphological change on the area fraction of L o is consistent with existing experimental results. This provides us with a clear understanding of the origin of the line tension energy, which has been used to understand these morphological changes in three-component membranes. In addition to these two circular and stripe domains, a raft-like domain and budding domain are also observed, and the several corresponding phase diagrams are obtained.

  15. Computational algebraic geometry for statistical modeling FY09Q2 progress.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David C.; Rojas, Joseph Maurice; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2009-03-01

    This is a progress report on polynomial system solving for statistical modeling. This is a progress report on polynomial system solving for statistical modeling. This quarter we have developed our first model of shock response data and an algorithm for identifying the chamber cone containing a polynomial system in n variables with n+k terms within polynomial time - a significant improvement over previous algorithms, all having exponential worst-case complexity. We have implemented and verified the chamber cone algorithm for n+3 and are working to extend the implementation to handle arbitrary k. Later sections of this report explain chamber cones in more detail; the next section provides an overview of the project and how the current progress fits into it.

  16. Numerical modeling of sandwich panel response to ballistic loading - energy balance for varying impactor geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepler, Jørgen Asbøl; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2007-01-01

    thickness but significantly smaller than panel length dimensions. Experimental data for the total loss in impactor kinetic energy and momentum and estimated damage energy are described. For a selection of impactor tip shapes, the numerical model is used to evaluate different simplified force histories...... between the impactor and the panel during penetration. The force histories are selected from a primary criterion of conservation of linear momentum in the impactor-panel system, and evaluated according to agreement with the total measured energy balance.......A sandwich panel is described by an axisymmetric lumped mass- spring model. The panel compliance is simplified, considering only core shear deformation uniformly distributed across the core thickness. Transverse penetrating impact is modeled for impactors of diameters comparable to the panel...

  17. Neural network modelling of planform geometry of headland-bay beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, G.; López, I.; Castro, A.; Carballo, R.

    2009-02-01

    The shoreline of beaches in the lee of coastal salients or man-made structures, usually known as headland-bay beaches, has a distinctive curvature; wave fronts curve as a result of wave diffraction at the headland and in turn cause the shoreline to bend. The ensuing curved planform is of great interest both as a peculiar landform and in the context of engineering projects in which it is necessary to predict how a coastal structure will affect the sandy shoreline in its lee. A number of empirical models have been put forward, each based on a specific equation. A novel approach, based on the application of artificial neural networks, is presented in this work. Unlike the conventional method, no particular equation of the planform is embedded in the model. Instead, it is the model itself that learns about the problem from a series of examples of headland-bay beaches (the training set) and thereafter applies this self-acquired knowledge to other cases (the test set) for validation. Twenty-three headland-bay beaches from around the world were selected, of which sixteen and seven make up the training and test sets, respectively. As there is no well-developed theory for deciding upon the most convenient neural network architecture to deal with a particular data set, an experimental study was conducted in which ten different architectures with one and two hidden neuron layers and five training algorithms - 50 different options combining network architecture and training algorithm - were compared. Each of these options was implemented, trained and tested in order to find the best-performing approach for modelling the planform of headland-bay beaches. Finally, the selected neural network model was compared with a state-of-the-art planform model and was shown to outperform it.

  18. A prediction model of compressor with variable-geometry diffuser based on elliptic equation and partial least squares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Yang, Chuanlei; Wang, Yinyan; Wang, Hechun

    2018-01-01

    To achieve a much more extensive intake air flow range of the diesel engine, a variable-geometry compressor (VGC) is introduced into a turbocharged diesel engine. However, due to the variable diffuser vane angle (DVA), the prediction for the performance of the VGC becomes more difficult than for a normal compressor. In the present study, a prediction model comprising an elliptical equation and a PLS (partial least-squares) model was proposed to predict the performance of the VGC. The speed lines of the pressure ratio map and the efficiency map were fitted with the elliptical equation, and the coefficients of the elliptical equation were introduced into the PLS model to build the polynomial relationship between the coefficients and the relative speed, the DVA. Further, the maximal order of the polynomial was investigated in detail to reduce the number of sub-coefficients and achieve acceptable fit accuracy simultaneously. The prediction model was validated with sample data and in order to present the superiority of compressor performance prediction, the prediction results of this model were compared with those of the look-up table and back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs). The validation and comparison results show that the prediction accuracy of the new developed model is acceptable, and this model is much more suitable than the look-up table and the BPNN methods under the same condition in VGC performance prediction. Moreover, the new developed prediction model provides a novel and effective prediction solution for the VGC and can be used to improve the accuracy of the thermodynamic model for turbocharged diesel engines in the future.

  19. Large scale FCI experiments in subassembly geometry. Test facility and model experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beutel, H.; Gast, K.

    A program is outlined for the study of fuel/coolant interaction under SNR conditions. The program consists of a) under water explosion experiments with full size models of the SNR-core, in which the fuel/coolant system is simulated by a pyrotechnic mixture. b) large scale fuel/coolant interaction experiments with up to 5kg of molten UO 2 interacting with liquid sodium at 300 deg C to 600 deg C in a highly instrumented test facility simulating an SNR subassembly. The experimental results will be compared to theoretical models under development at Karlsruhe. Commencement of the experiments is expected for the beginning of 1975

  20. THEORETICAL MODELING OF THE FEEDBACK STABILIZATION OF EXTERNAL MHD MODES IN TOROIDAL GEOMETRY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHANCE, M.S.; CHU, M.S.; OKABAYASHI, M.; TURNBULL, A.D.

    2001-02-01

    OAK-B135 A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism against external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools--the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code--have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modeled in θ, with only a single harmonic variation in φ. Time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell are calculated. An optimized configuration based on an idealized model have been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved

  1. Calculating Nuclear Power Plant Vulnerability Using Integrated Geometry and Event/Fault-Tree Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peplow, Douglas E.; Sulfredge, C. David; Sanders, Robert L.; Morris, Robert H.; Hann, Todd A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the events of September 11, 2001, the vulnerability of nuclear power plants to terrorist attacks has become a national concern. The results of vulnerability analysis are greatly influenced by the computational approaches used. Standard approximations used in fault-tree analysis are not applicable for attacks, where high component failure probabilities are expected; two methods that do work with high failure probabilities are presented. Different blast modeling approaches can also affect the end results. Modeling the structural details of facility buildings and the geometric layout of components within the buildings is required to yield meaningful results

  2. Sources of hyperbolic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Stillwell, John

    1996-01-01

    This book presents, for the first time in English, the papers of Beltrami, Klein, and Poincaré that brought hyperbolic geometry into the mainstream of mathematics. A recognition of Beltrami comparable to that given the pioneering works of Bolyai and Lobachevsky seems long overdue-not only because Beltrami rescued hyperbolic geometry from oblivion by proving it to be logically consistent, but because he gave it a concrete meaning (a model) that made hyperbolic geometry part of ordinary mathematics. The models subsequently discovered by Klein and Poincaré brought hyperbolic geometry even further down to earth and paved the way for the current explosion of activity in low-dimensional geometry and topology. By placing the works of these three mathematicians side by side and providing commentaries, this book gives the student, historian, or professional geometer a bird's-eye view of one of the great episodes in mathematics. The unified setting and historical context reveal the insights of Beltrami, Klein, and Po...

  3. Semiparametric Gaussian copula models : Geometry and efficient rank-based estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, J.; van den Akker, R.; Werker, B.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We propose, for multivariate Gaussian copula models with unknown margins and structured correlation matrices, a rank-based, semiparametrically efficient estimator for the Euclidean copula parameter. This estimator is defined as a one-step update of a rank-based pilot estimator in the direction of

  4. Numerical algebraic geometry for model selection and its application to the life sciences

    KAUST Repository

    Gross, Elizabeth; Davis, Brent; Ho, Kenneth L.; Bates, Daniel J.; Harrington, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    -convexity and multiple local optima. Furthermore, the challenges are compounded when only partial data are available. Here, we consider polynomial models (e.g. mass-action chemical reaction networks at steady state) and describe a framework for their analysis based

  5. Modeling and fabrication of an RF MEMS variable capacitor with a fractal geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Elshurafa, Amro M.; Ho, P.H.; Salama, Khaled N.

    2013-01-01

    capacitor is increasing the tuning range of the variable capacitor beyond the typical ratio of 1.5. The modeling was carried out using the commercially available finite element software COMSOL to predict both the tuning range and pull-in voltage. Measurement

  6. Quantum Hall conductivity in a Landau type model with a realistic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandelier, F.; Georgelin, Y.; Masson, T.; Wallet, J.-C.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we revisit some quantum mechanical aspects related to the quantum Hall effect. We consider a Landau type model, paying a special attention to the experimental and geometrical features of quantum Hall experiments. The resulting formalism is then used to compute explicitly the Hall conductivity from a Kubo formula

  7. Modeling and Analysis of Inter-Vehicle Communication: A Stochastic Geometry Approach

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Muhammad Junaid

    2015-01-01

    -hop transmission success probability and the average forward progress for vehicular networks in a multi-lane highway setup. The developed model reveals the interplay between the spectrum sensing threshold of the CSMA protocol and the packet forwarding scheme. A new

  8. On the geometry of two-dimensional anisotropic non-linear Sigma-models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco, D.H.; Negrao, M.G.; Helayel Neto, J.A.; Pereira, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    One discusses here the connection between α-model gauge anomalies and the existence of a connection with torsion that does not flatten the Ricci tensor of the target manifold. The influence of an eventual anisotropy along a certain internal direction is also contemplated. (author)

  9. Sensitivity of subject-specific models to errors in musculo-skeletal geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, V.; van der Krogt, M.M.; Koopman, H.F.J.M.; Verdonschot, N.

    2012-01-01

    Subject-specific musculo-skeletal models of the lower extremity are an important tool for investigating various biomechanical problems, for instance the results of surgery such as joint replacements and tendon transfers. The aim of this study was to assess the potential effects of errors in

  10. Flat-ramp vs. convex-concave thrust geometries in a deformable hanging wall: new insights from analogue modeling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Pedro; Tomas, Ricardo; Rosas, Filipe; Duarte, Joao; Terrinha, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Different modes of strain accommodation affecting a deformable hanging-wall in a flat-ramp-flat thrust system were previously addressed through several (sandbox) analog modeling studies, focusing on the influence of different variables, such as: a) thrust ramp dip angle and friction (Bonini et al, 2000); b) prescribed thickness of the hanging-wall (Koy and Maillot, 2007); and c) sin-thrust erosion (compensating for topographic thrust edification, e.g. Persson and Sokoutis, 2002). In the present work we reproduce the same experimental procedure to investigate the influence of two different parameters on hanging-wall deformation: 1) the geometry of the thrusting surface; and 2) the absence of a velocity discontinuity (VD) that is always present in previous similar analogue modeling studies. Considering the first variable we use two end member ramp geometries, flat-ramp-flat and convex-concave, to understand the control exerted by the abrupt ramp edges in the hanging-wall stress-strain distribution, comparing the obtain results with the situation in which such edge singularities are absent (convex-concave thrust ramp). Considering the second investigated parameter, our motivation was the recognition that the VD found in the different analogue modeling settings simply does not exist in nature, despite the fact that it has a major influence on strain accommodation in the deformable hanging-wall. We thus eliminate such apparatus artifact from our models and compare the obtained results with the previous ones. Our preliminary results suggest that both investigated variables play a non-negligible role on the structural style characterizing the hanging-wall deformation of convergent tectonic settings were such thrust-ramp systems were recognized. Acknowledgments This work was sponsored by the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia (FCT) through project MODELINK EXPL/GEO-GEO/0714/2013. Pedro Almeida wants to thank to FCT for the Ph.D. grant (SFRH/BD/52556/2014) under the

  11. Restoration of optimal ellipsoid left ventricular geometry: lessons learnt from in silico surgical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhyapak, Srilakshmi M; Menon, Prahlad G; Rao Parachuri, V

    2014-02-01

    Several issues that are inherent in the surgical techniques of surgical ventricular restoration (SVR) need specialized devices or techniques to overcome them, which may not always result in optimal outcomes. We used a non-invasive novel in silico modelling technique to study left ventricular (LV) morphology and function before and after SVR. The cardiac magnetic resonance imaging derived actual pre- and postoperative endocardial morphology and function was compared with the in silico analysis of the same. Cardiac magnetic resonance steady state free precession (SSFP) cine images were employed to segment endocardial surface contours over the cardiac cycle. Using the principle of Hausdorff distance to examine phase-to-phase regional endocardial displacement, dyskinetic/akinetic areas were identified at the instant of peak basal contraction velocity. Using a three-dimensional (3D) surface clipping tool, the maximally scarred, dyskinetic or akinetic LV antero-apical areas were virtually resected and a new apex was created. A virtual rectangular patch was created upon the clipped surface LV model by 3D Delaunay triangulation. Presurgical endocardial mechanical function quantified from cine cardiac magnetic resonance, using a technique of spherical harmonics (SPHARM) surface parameterization, was applied onto the virtually clipped and patched LV surface model. Finally, the in silico model of post-SVR LV shape was analysed for quantification of regional left ventricular volumes (RLVVs) and function. This was tested in 2 patients with post-myocardial infarction antero-apical LV aneuryms. Left ventricular mechanical dysynchrony was evaluated by RLVV analysis of pre-SVR, in silico post-SVR and actual post-SVR LV endocardial surface data. Following exclusion of the scarred areas, the virtual resected LV model demonstrated significantly lesser areas of akinesia. The decreases in regional LV volumes in the in silico modelling were significant and comparable with the actual

  12. Spectral nudging to eliminate the effects of domain position and geometry in regional climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez-Macho, Gonzalo; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Robock, Alan

    2004-07-01

    It is well known that regional climate simulations are sensitive to the size and position of the domain chosen for calculations. Here we study the physical mechanisms of this sensitivity. We conducted simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) for June 2000 over North America at 50 km horizontal resolution using a 7500 km × 5400 km grid and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis as boundary conditions. The position of the domain was displaced in several directions, always maintaining the U.S. in the interior, out of the buffer zone along the lateral boundaries. Circulation biases developed a large scale structure, organized by the Rocky Mountains, resulting from a systematic shifting of the synoptic wave trains that crossed the domain. The distortion of the large-scale circulation was produced by interaction of the modeled flow with the lateral boundaries of the nested domain and varied when the position of the grid was altered. This changed the large-scale environment among the different simulations and translated into diverse conditions for the development of the mesoscale processes that produce most of precipitation for the Great Plains in the summer season. As a consequence, precipitation results varied, sometimes greatly, among the experiments with the different grid positions. To eliminate the dependence of results on the position of the domain, we used spectral nudging of waves longer than 2500 km above the boundary layer. Moisture was not nudged at any level. This constrained the synoptic scales to follow reanalysis while allowing the model to develop the small-scale dynamics responsible for the rainfall. Nudging of the large scales successfully eliminated the variation of precipitation results when the grid was moved. We suggest that this technique is necessary for all downscaling studies with regional models with domain sizes of a few thousand kilometers and larger embedded in global models.

  13. Kaehler geometry and SUSY mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellucci, Stefano; Nersessian, Armen

    2001-01-01

    We present two examples of SUSY mechanics related with Kaehler geometry. The first system is the N = 4 supersymmetric one-dimensional sigma-model proposed in hep-th/0101065. Another system is the N = 2 SUSY mechanics whose phase space is the external algebra of an arbitrary Kaehler manifold. The relation of these models with antisymplectic geometry is discussed

  14. Rotating Turbulent Flow Simulation with LES and Vreman Subgrid-Scale Models in Complex Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Guo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large eddy simulation (LES method based on Vreman subgrid-scale model and SIMPIEC algorithm were applied to accurately capture the flowing character in Francis turbine passage under the small opening condition. The methodology proposed is effective to understand the flow structure well. It overcomes the limitation of eddy-viscosity model which is excessive, dissipative. Distributions of pressure, velocity, and vorticity as well as some special flow structure in guide vane near-wall zones and blade passage were gained. The results show that the tangential velocity component of fluid has absolute superiority under small opening condition. This situation aggravates the impact between the wake vortices that shed from guide vanes. The critical influence on the balance of unit by spiral vortex in blade passage and the nonuniform flow around guide vane, combined with the transmitting of stress wave, has been confirmed.

  15. Matter density perturbations in modified gravity models with arbitrary coupling between matter and geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nesseris, Savvas

    2009-01-01

    We consider theories with an arbitrary coupling between matter and gravity and obtain the perturbation equation of matter on subhorizon scales. Also, we derive the effective gravitational constant $G_{eff}$ and two parameters $\\Sigma$ and $\\eta$, which along with the perturbation equation...... of the matter density are useful to constrain the theory from growth factor and weak lensing observations. Finally, we use a completely solvable toy model which exhibits nontrivial phenomenology to investigate specific features of the theory. We obtain the analytic solution of the modified Friedmann equation...... for the scale factor $a$ in terms of time $t$ and use the age of the oldest star clusters and the primordial nucleosynthesis bounds in order to constrain the parameters of our toy model....

  16. CHANNEL MORPHOLOGY TOOL (CMT): A GIS-BASED AUTOMATED EXTRACTION MODEL FOR CHANNEL GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JUDI, DAVID [Los Alamos National Laboratory; KALYANAPU, ALFRED [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BERSCHEID, ALAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-17

    This paper describes an automated Channel Morphology Tool (CMT) developed in ArcGIS 9.1 environment. The CMT creates cross-sections along a stream centerline and uses a digital elevation model (DEM) to create station points with elevations along each of the cross-sections. The generated cross-sections may then be exported into a hydraulic model. Along with the rapid cross-section generation the CMT also eliminates any cross-section overlaps that might occur due to the sinuosity of the channels using the Cross-section Overlap Correction Algorithm (COCoA). The CMT was tested by extracting cross-sections from a 5-m DEM for a 50-km channel length in Houston, Texas. The extracted cross-sections were compared directly with surveyed cross-sections in terms of the cross-section area. Results indicated that the CMT-generated cross-sections satisfactorily matched the surveyed data.

  17. Computational Flow Modeling of a Simplified Integrated Tractor-Trailer Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salari, K.; McWherter-Payne, M.

    2003-01-01

    For several years, Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have been part of a consortium funded by the Department of Energy to improve fuel efficiency of heavy vehicles such as Class 8 trucks through aerodynamic drag reduction. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using the steady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approach to predict the flow field around heavy vehicles, with special emphasis on the base region of the trailer, and to compute the aerodynamic forces. In particular, Sandia's computational fluid dynamics code, SACCARA, was used to simulate the flow on a simplified model of a tractor-trailer vehicle. The results are presented and compared with NASA Ames experimental data to assess the predictive capability of RANS to model the flow field and predict the aerodynamic forces

  18. Matter density perturbations in modified gravity models with arbitrary coupling between matter and geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesseris, Savvas

    2009-01-01

    We consider theories with an arbitrary coupling between matter and gravity and obtain the perturbation equation of matter on subhorizon scales. Also, we derive the effective gravitational constant G eff and two parameters Σ and η, which along with the perturbation equation of the matter density are useful to constrain the theory from growth factor and weak lensing observations. Finally, we use a completely solvable toy model which exhibits nontrivial phenomenology to investigate specific features of the theory. We obtain the analytic solution of the modified Friedmann equation for the scale factor a in terms of time t and use the age of the oldest star clusters and the primordial nucleosynthesis bounds in order to constrain the parameters of our toy model.

  19. PENGARUH PENGGUNAAN ALAT PERAGA BERBASIS KONSEP GEOMETRI PADA MODEL PEMBELAJARAN KOOPERATIF TIPE THINK PAIR SHARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Sulaiman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The research is experimental research. This study aims to determine the difference in average mathematics students learning outcomes between learning with and without the use of props Pythagoras on cooperative learning model Think Pair Share (TPS. The population was all the students in second grade of SMP Negeri 1 Sukoharjo in the academic year 2014-2015. The samples of the research were taken by using the cluster random sampling technique.Data analysis is using chi-square test andstatistical t-test. Based onthe results ofhypothesis test obtained that there is difference in the averageresult of learningmathematicsbetween experimental classandcontrol class and the averageresults oflearning mathematicsin experimental class is higherthan in control class. Thus,the averageresult of learningthatlearningto usepropsPythagorasoncooperative learning modelThink Pair Share (TPSis higherthanlearningwithout the use ofpropsPythagoras. Keywords:Props, Phytagoras, Think Pair Share

  20. Force on Force Modeling with Formal Task Structures and Dynamic Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-24

    their main rival. They require the capability to legally move the football over 40 yards in cold weather on a muddy field against a very tough defense...kilometers before system aborts for an AMPV, 117 kilometers for this study. • SP_Time. This field contained the start time in simulation minutes for...Kilometers Before System Aborts for each entity type and was modelled as an exponential distribution with a mean of 117 KM. This field was used in

  1. Numerical modelling of flow structures over idealized transverse aeolian dunes of varying geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Daniel R.; Walker, Ian J.; Wiggs, Giles F. S.

    2004-04-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model (PHOENICS™ 3.5) previously validated for wind tunnel measurements is used to simulate the streamwise and vertical velocity flow fields over idealized transverse dunes of varying height ( h) and stoss slope basal length ( L). The model accurately reproduced patterns of: flow deceleration at the dune toe; stoss flow acceleration; vertical lift in the crest region; lee-side flow separation, re-attachment and reversal; and flow recovery distance. Results indicate that the flow field over transverse dunes is particularly sensitive to changes in dune height, with an increase in height resulting in flow deceleration at the toe, streamwise acceleration and vertical lift at the crest, and an increase in the extent of, and strength of reversed flows within, the lee-side separation cell. In general, the length of the separation zone varied from 3 to 15 h from the crest and increased over taller, steeper dunes. Similarly, the flow recovery distance ranged from 45 to >75 h and was more sensitive to changes in dune height. For the range of dune shapes investigated in this study, the differing effects of height and stoss slope length raise questions regarding the applicability of dune aspect ratio as a parameter for explaining airflow over transverse dunes. Evidence is also provided to support existing research on: streamline curvature and the maintenance of sand transport in the toe region; vertical lift in the crest region and its effect on grainfall delivery; relations between the turbulent shear layer and downward forcing of flow re-attachment; and extended flow recovery distances beyond the separation cell. Field validation is required to test these findings in natural settings. Future applications of the model will characterize turbulence and shear stress fields, examine the effects of more complex isolated dune forms and investigate flow over multiple dunes.

  2. Theoretical modeling of the feedback stabilization of external MHD modes of toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chance, M.S.; Chu, M.S.; Okabayashi, M.

    2001-01-01

    A theoretical framework for understanding the feedback mechanism against external MHD modes has been formulated. Efficient computational tools - the GATO stability code coupled with a substantially modified VACUUM code - have been developed to effectively design viable feedback systems against these modes. The analysis assumed a thin resistive shell and a feedback coil structure accurately modeled in θ, with only a single harmonic variation in φ. An optimized configuration and placement of the feedback and sensor coils as well as the time constants and induced currents in the enclosing resistive shell have been computed for the DIII-D device. Up to 90% of the effectiveness of an ideal wall can be achieved. (author)

  3. Transition piece for joining together tubular pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holko, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    A transition piece for joining together tubular pieces formed respectively from a low alloy or carbon steel and a high temperature alloy containing at least 16% chromium includes a plurality of tubular parts welded together and formed from materials of selected composition with a maximum chromium content difference of 5% between adjacent parts when the chromium content of each part is below 10% and a maximum chromium difference of 7% between adjacent parts when the chromium content of either part is above 10%. The transition parts are also graded as to such characteristics as thermal expansion coefficient. The transition parts at opposite ends of the transition joint have chromium percentages similar to the tubular pieces to which they are to be joined. The parts may be joined by fusion and/or friction welding and parts may be formed by fusion weld deposition. (author)

  4. Towards a Nano Geometry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies I.M. Gelfand's distinction between adequate and non-adequate use of mathematical language in different contexts to the newly opened window of model-based measurements of intracellular dynamics. The specifics of geometry and dynamics on the mesoscale of cell physiology are elabo...

  5. Toward the modeling of mucus draining from the human lung: role of the geometry of the airway tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauroy, Benjamin; Merckx, Jacques; Flaud, Patrice; Fausser, Christian; Pelca, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Mucociliary clearance and cough are the two main natural mucus draining methods in the bronchial tree. If they are affected by a pathology, they can become insufficient or even ineffective, then therapeutic draining of mucus plays a critical role to keep mucus levels in the lungs acceptable. The manipulations of physical therapists are known to be very efficient clinically but they are mostly empirical since the biophysical mechanisms involved in these manipulations have never been studied. We develop in this work a model of mucus clearance in idealized rigid human bronchial trees and focus our study on the interaction between (1) tree geometry, (2) mucus physical properties and (3) amplitude of flow rate in the tree. The mucus is considered as a Bingham fluid (gel-like) which is moved upward in the tree thanks to its viscous interaction with air flow. Our studies point out the important roles played both by the geometry and by the physical properties of mucus (yield stress and viscosity). More particularly, the yield stress has to be overcome to make mucus flow. Air flow rate and yield stress determine the maximal possible mucus thickness in each branch of the tree at equilibrium. This forms a specific distribution of mucus in the tree whose characteristics are strongly related to the multi-scaled structure of the tree. The behavior of any mucus distribution is then dependent on this distribution. Finally, our results indicate that increasing air flow rates ought to be more efficient to drain mucus out of the bronchial tree while minimizing patient discomfort

  6. Modelling bacterial behaviour close to a no-slip plane boundary: the influence of bacterial geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Shum, H.; Gaffney, E. A.; Smith, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a boundary-element method used to model the hydrodynamics of a bacterium propelled by a single helical flagellum. Using this model, we optimize the power efficiency of swimming with respect to cell body and flagellum geometrical parameters, and find that optima for swimming in unbounded fluid and near a no-slip plane boundary are nearly indistinguishable. We also consider the novel optimization objective of torque efficiency and find a very different optimal shape. Excluding effects such as Brownian motion and electrostatic interactions, it is demonstrated that hydrodynamic forces may trap the bacterium in a stable, circular orbit near the boundary, leading to the empirically observable surface accumulation of bacteria. Furthermore, the details and even the existence of this stable orbit depend on geometrical parameters of the bacterium, as described in this article. These results shed some light on the phenomenon of surface accumulation of micro-organisms and offer hydrodynamic explanations as to why some bacteria may accumulate more readily than others based on morphology. © 2010 The Royal Society.

  7. Modelling bacterial behaviour close to a no-slip plane boundary: the influence of bacterial geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Shum, H.

    2010-01-13

    We describe a boundary-element method used to model the hydrodynamics of a bacterium propelled by a single helical flagellum. Using this model, we optimize the power efficiency of swimming with respect to cell body and flagellum geometrical parameters, and find that optima for swimming in unbounded fluid and near a no-slip plane boundary are nearly indistinguishable. We also consider the novel optimization objective of torque efficiency and find a very different optimal shape. Excluding effects such as Brownian motion and electrostatic interactions, it is demonstrated that hydrodynamic forces may trap the bacterium in a stable, circular orbit near the boundary, leading to the empirically observable surface accumulation of bacteria. Furthermore, the details and even the existence of this stable orbit depend on geometrical parameters of the bacterium, as described in this article. These results shed some light on the phenomenon of surface accumulation of micro-organisms and offer hydrodynamic explanations as to why some bacteria may accumulate more readily than others based on morphology. © 2010 The Royal Society.

  8. CFD Modelling of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm on Hemodynamic Loads Using a Realistic Geometry with CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Soudah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to find a correlation between the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA geometric parameters, wall stress shear (WSS, abdominal flow patterns, intraluminal thrombus (ILT, and AAA arterial wall rupture using computational fluid dynamics (CFD. Real AAA 3D models were created by three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of in vivo acquired computed tomography (CT images from 5 patients. Based on 3D AAA models, high quality volume meshes were created using an optimal tetrahedral aspect ratio for the whole domain. In order to quantify the WSS and the recirculation inside the AAA, a 3D CFD using finite elements analysis was used. The CFD computation was performed assuming that the arterial wall is rigid and the blood is considered a homogeneous Newtonian fluid with a density of 1050 kg/m3 and a kinematic viscosity of 4×10-3 Pa·s. Parallelization procedures were used in order to increase the performance of the CFD calculations. A relation between AAA geometric parameters (asymmetry index (β, saccular index (γ, deformation diameter ratio (χ, and tortuosity index (ε and hemodynamic loads was observed, and it could be used as a potential predictor of AAA arterial wall rupture and potential ILT formation.

  9. Equivalent-circuit model for stacked slot-based 2D periodic arrays of arbitrary geometry for broadband analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Maria Denise; Frezza, Fabrizio; Tedeschi, Nicola

    2018-03-01

    The analysis of the transmission and reflection spectra of stacked slot-based 2D periodic structures of arbitrary geometry and the ability to devise and control their electromagnetic responses have been a matter of extensive research for many decades. The purpose of this paper is to develop an equivalent Π circuit model based on the transmission-line theory and Floquet harmonic interactions, for broadband and short longitudinal period analysis. The proposed circuit model overcomes the limits of identical and symmetrical configurations imposed by the even/odd excitation approach, exploiting both the circuit topology of a single 2D periodic array of apertures and the ABCD matrix formalism. The transmission spectra obtained through the equivalent-circuit model have been validated by comparison with full-wave simulations carried out with a finite-element commercial electromagnetic solver. This allowed for a physical insight into the spectral and angular responses of multilayer devices with arbitrary aperture shapes, guaranteeing a noticeable saving of computational resources.

  10. Modelling and sequential simulation of multi-tubular metallic membrane and techno-economics of a hydrogen production process employing thin-layer membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Shafiee, Alireza; Arab, Mobin; Lai, Zhiping; Liu, Zongwen; Abbas, Ali

    2016-01-01

    reforming hydrogen production plant. A techno-economic analysis is then conducted using the validated model for a plant producing 300 TPD of hydrogen. The plant utilises a thin (2.5 μm) defect-free and selective layer (Pd75Ag25 alloy) membrane reactor

  11. Different Densities of Na-Ca Exchange Current in T-Tubular and Surface Membranes and Their Impact on Cellular Activity in a Model of Rat Ventricular Cardiomyocyte

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pásek, Michal; Šimurda, J.; Christé, G.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 2017 (2017), č. článku 6343821. ISSN 2314-6133 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : rat ventricular cell * mathematical model * Na-Ca current * t-tubules Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 2.476, year: 2016

  12. Geometry and time scales of self-consistent orbits in a modified SU(2) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezek, D.M.; Hernandez, E.S.; Solari, H.G.

    1986-01-01

    We investigate the time-dependent Hartree-Fock flow pattern of a two-level many fermion system interacting via a two-body interaction which does not preserve the parity symmetry of standard SU(2) models. The geometrical features of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock energy surface are analyzed and a phase instability is clearly recognized. The time evolution of one-body observables along self-consistent and exact trajectories are examined together with the overlaps between both orbits. Typical time scales for the determinantal motion can be set and the validity of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach in the various regions of quasispin phase space is discussed

  13. 3-D world modeling based on combinatorial geometry for autonomous robot navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, M.; Pin, F.G.; De Saussure, G.; Weisbin, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    In applications of robotics to surveillance and mapping at nuclear facilities the scene to be described is three-dimensional. Using range data a 3-D model of the environment can be built. First, each measured point on the object surface is surrounded by a solid sphere with a radius determined by the range to that point. Then the 3-D shapes of the visible surfaces are obtained by taking the (Boolean) union of the spheres. Using this representation distances to boundary surfaces can be efficiently calculated. This feature is particularly useful for navigation purposes. The efficiency of the proposed approach is illustrated by a simulation of a spherical robot navigating in a 3-D room with static obstacles

  14. Modelling anisotropic covariance using stochastic development and sub-Riemannian frame bundle geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Stefan Horst; Svane, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    distributions. We discuss a factorization of the frame bundle projection map through this bundle, the natural sub-Riemannian structure of the frame bundle, the effect of holonomy, and the existence of subbundles where the Hormander condition is satisfied such that the Brownian motions have smooth transition......We discuss the geometric foundation behind the use of stochastic processes in the frame bundle of a smooth manifold to build stochastic models with applications in statistical analysis of non-linear data. The transition densities for the projection to the manifold of Brownian motions developed...... in the frame bundle lead to a family of probability distributions on the manifold. We explain how data mean and covariance can be interpreted as points in the frame bundle or, more precisely, in the bundle of symmetric positive definite 2-tensors analogously to the parameters describing Euclidean normal...

  15. Generalized Ehrenfest Relations, Deformation Quantization, and the Geometry of Inter-model Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosaler, Joshua

    2018-03-01

    This study attempts to spell out more explicitly than has been done previously the connection between two types of formal correspondence that arise in the study of quantum-classical relations: one the one hand, deformation quantization and the associated continuity between quantum and classical algebras of observables in the limit \\hbar → 0, and, on the other, a certain generalization of Ehrenfest's Theorem and the result that expectation values of position and momentum evolve approximately classically for narrow wave packet states. While deformation quantization establishes a direct continuity between the abstract algebras of quantum and classical observables, the latter result makes in-eliminable reference to the quantum and classical state spaces on which these structures act—specifically, via restriction to narrow wave packet states. Here, we describe a certain geometrical re-formulation and extension of the result that expectation values evolve approximately classically for narrow wave packet states, which relies essentially on the postulates of deformation quantization, but describes a relationship between the actions of quantum and classical algebras and groups over their respective state spaces that is non-trivially distinct from deformation quantization. The goals of the discussion are partly pedagogical in that it aims to provide a clear, explicit synthesis of known results; however, the particular synthesis offered aspires to some novelty in its emphasis on a certain general type of mathematical and physical relationship between the state spaces of different models that represent the same physical system, and in the explicitness with which it details the above-mentioned connection between quantum and classical models.

  16. Tubular membrane bioreactors for biotechnological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Christoph; Beutel, Sascha; Scheper, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    This article is an overview of bioreactors using tubular membranes such as hollow fibers or ceramic capillaries for cultivation processes. This diverse group of bioreactor is described here in regard to the membrane materials used, operational modes, and configurations. The typical advantages of this kind of system such as environments with low shear stress together with high cell densities and also disadvantages like poor oxygen supply are summed up. As the usage of tubular membrane bioreactors is not restricted to a certain organism, a brief overview of various applications covering nearly all types of cells from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells is also given here.

  17. Performance of a fine-grained parallel model for multi-group nodal-transport calculations in three-dimensional pin-by-pin reactor geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masahiro, Tatsumi; Akio, Yamamoto

    2003-01-01

    A production code SCOPE2 was developed based on the fine-grained parallel algorithm by the red/black iterative method targeting parallel computing environments such as a PC-cluster. It can perform a depletion calculation in a few hours using a PC-cluster with the model based on a 9-group nodal-SP3 transport method in 3-dimensional pin-by-pin geometry for in-core fuel management of commercial PWRs. The present algorithm guarantees the identical convergence process as that in serial execution, which is very important from the viewpoint of quality management. The fine-mesh geometry is constructed by hierarchical decomposition with introduction of intermediate management layer as a block that is a quarter piece of a fuel assembly in radial direction. A combination of a mesh division scheme forcing even meshes on each edge and a latency-hidden communication algorithm provided simplicity and efficiency to message passing to enhance parallel performance. Inter-processor communication and parallel I/O access were realized using the MPI functions. Parallel performance was measured for depletion calculations by the 9-group nodal-SP3 transport method in 3-dimensional pin-by-pin geometry with 340 x 340 x 26 meshes for full core geometry and 170 x 170 x 26 for quarter core geometry. A PC cluster that consists of 24 Pentium-4 processors connected by the Fast Ethernet was used for the performance measurement. Calculations in full core geometry gave better speedups compared to those in quarter core geometry because of larger granularity. Fine-mesh sweep and feedback calculation parts gave almost perfect scalability since granularity is large enough, while 1-group coarse-mesh diffusion acceleration gave only around 80%. The speedup and parallel efficiency for total computation time were 22.6 and 94%, respectively, for the calculation in full core geometry with 24 processors. (authors)

  18. Modelling of a mecanum wheel taking into account the geometry of road rollers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniewicz, P.; Gwiazda, A.; Banaś, W.; Sękala, A.; Foit, K.

    2017-08-01

    During the process planning in a company one of the basic factors associated with the production costs is the operation time for particular technological jobs. The operation time consists of time units associated with the machining tasks of a workpiece as well as the time associated with loading and unloading and the transport operations of this workpiece between machining stands. Full automation of manufacturing in industry companies tends to a maximal reduction in machine downtimes, thereby the fixed costs simultaneously decreasing. The new construction of wheeled vehicles, using Mecanum wheels, reduces the transport time of materials and workpieces between machining stands. These vehicles have the ability to simultaneously move in two axes and thus more rapid positioning of the vehicle relative to the machining stand. The Mecanum wheel construction implies placing, around the wheel free rollers that are mounted at an angle 450, which allow the movement of the vehicle not only in its axis but also perpendicular thereto. The improper selection of the rollers can cause unwanted vertical movement of the vehicle, which may cause difficulty in positioning of the vehicle in relation to the machining stand and the need for stabilisation. Hence the proper design of the free rollers is essential in designing the whole Mecanum wheel construction. It allows avoiding the disadvantageous and unwanted vertical vibrations of a whole vehicle with these wheels. In the article the process of modelling the free rollers, in order to obtain the desired shape of unchanging, horizontal trajectory of the vehicle is presented. This shape depends on the desired diameter of the whole Mecanum wheel, together with the road rollers, and the width of the drive wheel. Another factor related with the curvature of the trajectory shape is the length of the road roller and its diameter decreases depending on the position with respect to its centre. The additional factor, limiting construction of

  19. Modelling of a tubular membrane contactor for pre-combustion CO2 capture using ionic liquids: Influence of the membrane configuration, absorbent properties and operation parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongde Dai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A membrane contactor using ionic liquids (ILs as solvent for pre-combustion capture CO2 at elevated temperature (303–393 K and pressure (20 bar has been studied using mathematic model in the present work. A comprehensive two-dimensional (2D mass-transfer model was developed based on finite element method. The effects of liquid properties, membrane configurations, as well as operation parameters on the CO2 removal efficiency were systematically studied. The simulation results show that CO2 can be effectively removed in this process. In addition, it is found that the liquid phase mass transfer dominated the overall mass transfer. Membranes with high porosity and small thickness could apparently reduce the membrane resistance and thus increase the separation efficiency. On the other hand, the membrane diameter and membrane length have a relatively small influence on separation performance within the operation range. Keywords: CO2 capture, Pre-combustion, Membrane contactor, Ionic liquids, Modelling

  20. Bending, force recovery, and D-cones in origami inspired model geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldar, Theresa; Rozairo, Damith; Croll, Andrew B.

    The need for materials with advanced functionality has driven a considerable amount of modern materials science. One idea that has gained significant traction is combining of the ideas Origami and Kirigami with existing materials to build in advanced functionality. In most origami damage is induced in order to trap areas of high curvature in desirable locations in a material. However, the long term and dynamic consequences of local failure are largely unknown. In order to gauge the complex interplay of material properties, relaxation and failure in a set of model thin films, a series of bending and force recovery experiments were carried out. We focus on three materials; polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), polycarbonate (PC), and polystyrene (PS) chosen for their varying responses to stress. We first measured the load bearing capacity of a single bend in each material, examining the force recovery of bends at various curvatures. Next we examined a doubly folded system in which a single developable cone was created in a similar manner. While the D-cone clearly has massive local consequences for each system, it plays an insignificant role in the system's overall behavior. Finally, we considered higher order combinations of d-cones, ridges and bends. AFOSR under the Young Investigator Program (FA9550-15-1-0168).

  1. Inverse Modeling of Human Knee Joint Based on Geometry and Vision Systems for Exoskeleton Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Piña-Martínez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current trends in Robotics aim to close the gap that separates technology and humans, bringing novel robotic devices in order to improve human performance. Although robotic exoskeletons represent a breakthrough in mobility enhancement, there are design challenges related to the forces exerted to the users’ joints that result in severe injuries. This occurs due to the fact that most of the current developments consider the joints as noninvariant rotational axes. This paper proposes the use of commercial vision systems in order to perform biomimetic joint design for robotic exoskeletons. This work proposes a kinematic model based on irregular shaped cams as the joint mechanism that emulates the bone-to-bone joints in the human body. The paper follows a geometric approach for determining the location of the instantaneous center of rotation in order to design the cam contours. Furthermore, the use of a commercial vision system is proposed as the main measurement tool due to its noninvasive feature and for allowing subjects under measurement to move freely. The application of this method resulted in relevant information about the displacements of the instantaneous center of rotation at the human knee joint.

  2. An evaluation of a manganese bath system having a new geometry through MCNP modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Rahim

    2012-12-01

    In this study, an approximate symmetric cylindrical manganese bath system with equal diameter and height was appraised using a Monte Carlo simulation. For nine sizes of the tank filled with MnSO(4).H(2)O solution of three different concentrations, the necessary correction factors involved in the absolute measurement of neutron emission rate were determined by a detailed modelling of the MCNP4C code with the ENDF/B-VII.0 neutron cross section data library. The results obtained were also used to determine the optimum dimensions of the bath for each concentration of solution in the calibration of (241)Am-Be and (252)Cf sources. Also, the amount of gamma radiation produced as a result of (n,γ) the reaction with the nuclei of the manganese sulphate solution that escaped from the boundary of each tank was evaluated. This gamma can be important for the background in NaI(Tl) detectors and issues concerned with radiation protection.

  3. A size dependent dynamic model for piezoelectric nanogenerators: effects of geometry, structural and environmental parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghzadeh, Sadegh; Farshad Mir Saeed Ghazi, Seyyed

    2018-03-01

    Piezoelectric Nanogenerator (PENG) is one of the novel energy harvester systems that recently, has been a subject of interest for researchers. By the use of nanogenerators, it’s possible to harvest different forms of energy in the environment like mechanical vibrations and generate electricity. The structure of a PENG consists of vertical arrays of nanowires between two electrodes. In this paper, dynamic analysis of a PENG is studied numerically. The modified couple stress theory which includes one length scale material parameter is used to study the size-dependent behavior of PENGs. Then, by application of a complete form of linear hybrid piezoelectric—pyroelectric equations, and using the Euler-Bernoulli beam model, the equations of motion has been derived. Generalized Differential Quadrature (GDQ) method was employed to solve the equations of motion. The effect of damping ratio, temperature rise, excitation frequency and length scale parameter was studied. It was found that the PENG voltage maximizes at the resonant frequency of nanowire. The temperature rise has a significant effect on PENG’s efficiency. When temperature increases about 10 {{K}}, the maximum voltage increases about 26%. Increasing the damping ratio, the maximum voltage decreases gradually.

  4. Bending and Twisting the Embryonic Heart: A Computational Model for C-Looping Based on Realistic Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei eShi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The morphogenetic process of cardiac looping transforms the straight heart tube into a curved tube that resembles the shape of the future four-chambered heart. Although great progress has been made in identifying the molecular and genetic factors involved in looping, the physical mechanisms that drive this process have remained poorly understood. Recent work, however, has shed new light on this complicated problem. After briefly reviewing the current state of knowledge, we propose a relatively comprehensive hypothesis for the mechanics of the first phase of looping, termed c-looping, as the straight heart tube deforms into a c-shaped tube. According to this hypothesis, differential hypertrophic growth in the myocardium supplies the main forces that cause the heart tube to bend ventrally, while regional growth and contraction in the omphalomesenteric veins (primitive atria and compressive loads exerted by the splanchnopleuric membrane drive rightward torsion. A computational model based on realistic embryonic heart geometry is used to test this hypothesis. The behavior of the model is in reasonable agreement with available experimental data from control and perturbed embryos, offering support for our hypothesis. The results also suggest, however, that several other mechanisms contribute secondarily to normal looping, and we speculate that these mechanisms play backup roles when looping is perturbed. Finally, some outstanding questions are discussed for future study.

  5. Ranitidine has no influence on tubular creatinine secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, J. G.; Koopman, M. G.; Arisz, L.

    1996-01-01

    Oral cimetidine competitively inhibits tubular secretion of creatinine. We investigated the potential of oral ranitidine, a comparable H2-receptor antagonist, to block tubular creatinine secretion. In 10 healthy subjects, clearances of inulin and endogenous creatinine were simultaneously measured

  6. Dynamic testing and analysis of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Renee C.; Izapanah, Amir P.; Baucon, Robert M.

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist elastic coupling are presented. A set of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars, representative of the primary load carrying structure within a helicopter rotor blade, was manufactured using four plies of woven graphite/epoxy cloth 'prepreg.' These spars were non-circular in cross section design and were therefore subject to warping deformations. Three cross-sectional geometries were developed: square, D-shape, and flattened ellipse. Results from free-free vibration tests of the spars were compared with results from normal modes and frequency analyses of companion shell-finite-element models developed in MSC/NASTRAN. Five global or 'non-shell' modes were identified within the 0-2000 Hz range for each spar. The frequencies and associated mode shapes for the D-shape spar were correlated with analytical results, showing agreement within 13.8 percent. Frequencies corresponding to the five global mode shapes for the square spar agreed within 9.5 percent of the analytical results. Five global modes were similarly identified for the elliptical spar and agreed within 4.9 percent of the respective analytical results.

  7. Dynamic testing and analysis of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Renee C.; Izapanah, Amir P.; Baucon, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    The results from a study aimed at improving the dynamic and aerodynamic characteristics of composite rotor blades through the use of extension-twist elastic coupling are presented. A set of extension-twist-coupled composite tubular spars, representative of the primary load carrying structure within a helicopter rotor blade, was manufactured using four plies of woven graphite/epoxy cloth 'prepreg.' These spars were non-circular in cross section design and were therefore subject to warping deformations. Three cross-sectional geometries were developed: square, D-shape, and flattened ellipse. Results from free-free vibration tests of the spars were compared with results from normal modes and frequency analyses of companion shell-finite-element models developed in MSC/NASTRAN. Five global or 'non-shell' modes were identified within the 0-2000 Hz range for each spar. The frequencies and associated mode shapes for the D-shape spar were correlated with analytical results, showing agreement within 13.8 percent. Frequencies corresponding to the five global mode shapes for the square spar agreed within 9.5 percent of the analytical results. Five global modes were similarly identified for the elliptical spar and agreed within 4.9 percent of the respective analytical results.

  8. Hydroforming of flanged tubular part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, B. D.; Jang, J. H.; Choi, M. K.; Moon, Y. H.

    2010-01-01

    Tube hydroforming is the technology that utilizes hydraulic pressure to form a tube into desired shapes inside die cavities. Recently, tube hydroforming technology draws attentions of automotive industries due to its advantages such as weight reduction, increased strength, improved quality and reduced tooling cost. Hydroformed automotive parts used as structural components in vehicle body frame or subframe often have to be structurally joined at some point. Therefore it is useful if the hydroformed automotive parts can be given a localized attachment flange. In this study, a tube hydroformed product which has flange has been formed at various processing conditions. To accomplish successful flange hydroforming process, thorough investigation on proper combination of process parameters such as internal hydraulic pressure and tool geometry has been performed. For the process design FE analysis was performed with Dynaform 5.5. With optimized die parting angle and circumferential expansion ratio, hydroforming experiments to form flange were performed and forming characteristics at various process conditions were analyzed. The results show that flanged parts can be successfully produced by tube hydroforming process.

  9. Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Kong, Fang; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Longteng; Sonam, Surabhi; Dao, Ming; Gong, Xiaobo; Teck Lim, Chwee

    2017-10-01

    Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making reiterations in design very time-consuming and costly. To address these intrinsic drawbacks of microfabrication, we present an alternative solution for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic elements such as microtubes, valves, and pumps. In addition, we demonstrate how microtubes with channels of various lengths and cross-sections can be attached modularly into 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for functional applications. We introduce a facile method of fabricating elastomeric microtubes as the basic building blocks for microfluidic devices. These microtubes are transparent, biocompatible, highly deformable, and customizable to various sizes and cross-sectional geometries. By configuring the microtubes into deterministic geometry, we enable rapid, low-cost formation of microfluidic assemblies without compromising their precision and functionality. We demonstrate configurable 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for applications in different domains. These include microparticle sorting, microdroplet generation, biocatalytic micromotor, triboelectric sensor, and even wearable sensing. Our approach, termed soft tubular microfluidics, provides a simple, cheaper, and faster solution for users lacking proficiency and access to cleanroom facilities to design and rapidly construct microfluidic devices for their various applications and needs.

  10. Drill pipes and casings utilizing multi-conduit tubulars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curlett, H.B.

    1989-01-24

    A seal adapted for use with a multi-conduit well tubular, or the like, is described which consists of: a plate with fluid passages, each passage corresponding to an opening of a conduit of the multiconduit tubular, and a groove on the plate around each passage; and elastomer means partially embeddable into each groove for sealing each conduit of a tubular to a corresponding conduit of another similar tubular.

  11. Development of Partial Tubular Flat Knitting Fabric Composite Preform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Wei Qing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After building some structures of partial tubular flat knitting fabric composite preform, the influencing factor on tubular section was analyzed and the fabric was knitted selectively. The partial tubular flat knitting fabric composite preform were Knitted by changing different yarn, row number and two-sided partial tubular flat knitting fabric. Multilayer sheet would be got after hot pressing and it has big market prospects and good application value.

  12. Tubular permanent magnet actuators: cogging forces characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulides, J.J.H.; Janssen, J.L.G.; Encica, L.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    Tubular permanent magnet actuators are evermore used in demanding industrial and automotive applications. However, these actuators can suffer from large cogging forces, which have a destabilizing effect on the servo control system and compromise position and speed control accuracy. This paper

  13. Work tool in a tubular element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffaton, J.

    1991-01-01

    The stand, which is positioned in relation with the tubular element, has clutch disengagement means for a working rod in rotation, with at least two positioning regions on the rod. Application for laser welding a sleeve into PWR steam generator tubes [fr

  14. Boron--epoxy tubular structure members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, W. B. J.; Nelson, P. T.; Lindkvist, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Composite materials fabricate thin-walled tubular members which have same load-carrying capabilities as aluminum, titanium, or other metals, but are lighter. Interface between stepped end fitting and tube lends itself to attachments by primary as well as secondary bonding. Interlaminar shear and hoop stress buildup in attachment at end fitting is avoided.

  15. Pointlike Inclusion Interactions in Tubular Membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vahid Belarghou, A.; Idema, T.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane tubes and tubular networks are ubiquitous in living cells. Inclusions like proteins are vital for both the stability and the dynamics of such networks. These inclusions interact via the curvature deformations they impose on the membrane. We analytically study the resulting membrane

  16. Fabrication and characterization of an all-diamond tubular flow microelectrode for electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Laura A; Vidotti, Marcio; Iacobini, James G; Kelly, Chris; Newton, Mark E; Unwin, Patrick R; Macpherson, Julie V

    2011-07-15

    The development of the first all-diamond hydrodynamic flow device for electroanalytical applications is described. Here alternate layers of intrinsic (insulating), conducting (heavily boron doped), and intrinsic polycrystalline diamond are grown to create a sandwich structure. By laser cutting a hole through the material, it is possible to produce a tubular flow ring electrode of a characteristic length defined by the thickness of the conducting layer (for these studies ∼90 μm). The inside of the tube can be polished to 17 ± 10 nm surface roughness using a diamond impregnanted wire resulting in a coplanar, smooth, all-diamond surface. The steady-state limiting current versus volume flow rate characteristics for the one electron oxidation of FcTMA(+) are in agreement with those expected for laminar flow in a tubular electrode geometry. For dopamine detection, it is shown that the combination of the reduced fouling properties of boron doped diamond, coupled with the flow geometry design where the products of electrolysis are washed away downstream of the electrode, completely eradicates fouling during electrolysis. This paves the way for incorporation of this flow design into online electroanalytical detection systems. Finally, the all diamond tubular flow electrode system described here provides a platform for future developments including the development of ultrathin ring electrodes, multiple apertures for increased current response, and multiple, individually addressable ring electrodes incorporated into the same flow tube.

  17. Mucin 4 Gene Silencing Reduces Oxidative Stress and Calcium Oxalate Crystal Formation in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Through the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Pathway in Nephrolithiasis Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Sun

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephrolithiasis plagues a great number of patients all over the world. Increasing evidence shows that the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling pathway and renal tubular epithelial cell (RTEC dysfunction and attrition are central to the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. Mucin 4 (MUC4 is reported as an activator of ERK signaling pathway in epithelial cells. In this study, using rat models of calcium oxalate (CaOx nephrolithiasis, the present study aims to define the roles of MUC4 and ERK signaling pathway as contributors to oxidative stress and CaOx crystal formation in RTEC. Methods: Data sets of nephrolithiasis were searched using GEO database and a heat flow map was drawn. Then MUC4 function was predicted. Wistar rats were prepared for the purpose of model establishment of ethylene glycol and ammonium chloride induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. In order to assess the detailed regulatory mechanism of MUC4 silencing on the ERK signaling pathway and RTEC, we used recombinant plasmid to downregulate MUC4 expression in Wistar rat-based models. Samples from rat urine, serum and kidney tissues were reviewed to identify oxalic acid and calcium contents, BUN, Cr, Ca2+ and P3+ levels, calcium crystal formation in renal tubules and MUC4 positive expression rate. Finally, RT-qPCR, Western blot analysis, and ELISA were employed to access oxidative stress state and CaOx crystal formation in RTEC. Results: Initially, MUC4 was found to have an influence on the process of nephrolithiasis. MUC4 was upregulated in the CaOx nephrolithiasis model rats. We proved that the silencing of MUC4 triggered the inactivation of ERK signaling pathway. Following the silencing of MUC4 or the inhibition of ERK signaling pathway, the oxalic acid and calcium contents in rat urine, BUN, Cr, Ca2+ and P3+ levels in rat serum, p-ERK1/2, MCP-1 and OPN expressions in RTEC and H2O2 and MDA levels in the cultured supernatant were downregulated, but the GSH

  18. Reliability Analysis of Tubular Joints in Offshore Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    1987-01-01

    Reliability analysis of single tubular joints and offshore platforms with tubular joints is" presented. The failure modes considered are yielding, punching, buckling and fatigue failure. Element reliability as well as systems reliability approaches are used and illustrated by several examples....... Finally, optimal design of tubular.joints with reliability constraints is discussed and illustrated by an example....

  19. 3D implicit modeling of the Sishen Mine: new resolution of the geometry and origin of Fe mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoch, B.; Anthonissen, C. J.; McCall, M.-J.; Basson, I. J.; Deacon, J.; Cloete, E.; Botha, J.; Britz, J.; Strydom, M.; Nel, D.; Bester, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Sishen deposit is one of the largest iron ore concentrations in current production. Hematite mineralization occurs along a strike length of 14 km, with a width of 3.2 km and a maximum vertical extent of 400 m below the original surface. The 986-Mt reserve incorporates a suite of individual orebodies, beneath a locally preserved tectonized unconformity, with a wide range of geometries, depths, and orientations. Fully constrained, implicit 3D modeling of the entire mining volume (> 70 km3), was undertaken to the original, pre-mining topography. The model incorporates 5287 mapping points and > 21,000 drillholes and provides exceptional insight into the original configuration of ore and its relationship to contacts, unconformities, and structures in the enclosing country rock. The bulk of ore occurs to the west of a strike-extensive, partially inverted normal fault (Sloep Fault), within an asymmetrical synclinal structure on its western flank. This linear, N-S distribution of deep, thick ore is punctuated by palaeosinkholes, wherein base-of-ore dips of greater than 45°, are concentrically arranged. Localized ore volumes also occur along faults and in fault-bounded, downthrown blocks, to the north of NW-SE- and NE-SW-trending strike-slip faults that show relatively minor uplift to the south, probably due to the Lomanian Namaqua-Natal Orogeny. The revised model demonstrates the proximity of ore to a tectonized unconformity and highlights the structural control on ore volumes, implying that Fe mineralization at Sishen cannot be exclusively attributed to supergene enrichment and concentric palaeosinkhole formation.

  20. The properties of SIRT, TVM, and DART for 3D imaging of tubular domains in nanocomposite thin-films and sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Delei; Goris, Bart; Bleichrodt, Folkert; Mezerji, Hamed Heidari; Bals, Sara; Batenburg, Kees Joost; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2014-12-01

    In electron tomography, the fidelity of the 3D reconstruction strongly depends on the employed reconstruction algorithm. In this paper, the properties of SIRT, TVM and DART reconstructions are studied with respect to having only a limited number of electrons available for imaging and applying different angular sampling schemes. A well-defined realistic model is generated, which consists of tubular domains within a matrix having slab-geometry. Subsequently, the electron tomography workflow is simulated from calculated tilt-series over experimental effects to reconstruction. In comparison with the model, the fidelity of each reconstruction method is evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively based on global and local edge profiles and resolvable distance between particles. Results show that the performance of all reconstruction methods declines with the total electron dose. Overall, SIRT algorithm is the most stable method and insensitive to changes in angular sampling. TVM algorithm yields significantly sharper edges in the reconstruction, but the edge positions are strongly influenced by the tilt scheme and the tubular objects become thinned. The DART algorithm markedly suppresses the elongation artifacts along the beam direction and moreover segments the reconstruction which can be considered a significant advantage for quantification. Finally, no advantage of TVM and DART to deal better with fewer projections was observed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The urinary excretion of metformin, ceftizoxime and ofloxacin in high serum creatinine rats: Can creatinine predict renal tubular elimination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Rong; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Jing; Qin, Hong-Yan; Wang, Pei; Wu, Xin-An

    2018-03-01

    The renal excretion of creatinine and most drugs are the net result of glomerular filtration and tubular secretion, and their tubular secretions are mediated by individual transporters. Thus, we hypothesized that the increase of serum creatinine (SCr) levels attributing to inhibiting tubular transporters but not glomerular filtration rate (GFR) could be used to evaluate the tubular excretion of drugs mediated by identical or partial overlap transporter with creatinine. In this work, we firstly developed the creatinine excretion inhibition model with normal GFR by competitively inhibiting tubular transporters, and investigated the renal excretion of metformin, ceftizoxime and ofloxacin in vivo and in vitro. The results showed that the 24-hour urinary excretion of metformin and ceftizoxime in model rats were decreased by 25% and 17% compared to that in control rats, respectively. The uptake amount and urinary excretion of metformin and ceftizoxime could be inhibited by creatinine in renal cortical slices and isolated kidney perfusion. However, the urinary excretion of ofloxacin was not affected by high SCr. These results showed that the inhibition of tubular creatinine transporters by high SCr resulted to the decrease of urinary excretion of metformin and ceftizoxime, but not ofloxacin, which implied that the increase of SCr could also be used to evaluate the tubular excretion of drugs mediated by identical or partial overlap transporter with creatinine in normal GFR rats. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A numerical model of mantle convection with deformable, mobile continental lithosphere within three-dimensional spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M.

    2010-12-01

    A new numerical simulation model of mantle convection with a compositionally and rheologically heterogeneous, deformable, mobile continental lithosphere is presented for the first time by using three-dimensional regional spherical-shell geometry (Yoshida, 2010, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett.). The numerical results revealed that one of major factor that realizes the supercontinental breakup and subsequent continental drift is a pre-existing, weak (low-viscosity) continental margin (WCM) in the supercontinent. Characteristic tectonic structures such as young orogenic belts and suture zones in a continent are expected to be mechanically weaker than the stable part of the continental lithosphere with the cratonic root (or cratonic lithosphere) and yield lateral viscosity variations in the continental lithosphere. In the present-day Earth's lithosphere, the pre-existing, mechanically weak zones emerge as a diffuse plate boundary. However, the dynamic role of the WCM in the stability of continental lithosphere has not been understood in terms of geophysics. In my numerical model, a compositionally buoyant and highly viscous continental assemblage with pre-existing WCMs, analogous to the past supercontinent, is modeled and imposed on well-developed mantle convection whose vigor of convection, internal heating rate, and rheological parameters are appropriate for the Earth's mantle. The visco-plastic oceanic lithosphere and the associated subduction of oceanic plates are incorporated. The time integration of the advection of continental materials with zero chemical diffusion is performed by a tracer particle method. The time evolution of mantle convection after setting the model supercontinent is followed over 800 Myr. Earth-like continental drift is successfully reproduced, and the characteristic thermal interaction between the mantle and the continent/supercontinent is observed in my new numerical model. Results reveal that the WCM protects the cratonic lithosphere from being

  3. Fourier and Gegenbauer expansions for a fundamental solution of the Laplacian in the hyperboloid model of hyperbolic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohl, H S; Kalnins, E G

    2012-01-01

    Due to the isotropy of d-dimensional hyperbolic space, there exists a spherically symmetric fundamental solution for its corresponding Laplace–Beltrami operator. The R-radius hyperboloid model of hyperbolic geometry with R > 0 represents a Riemannian manifold with negative-constant sectional curvature. We obtain a spherically symmetric fundamental solution of Laplace’s equation on this manifold in terms of its geodesic radius. We give several matching expressions for this fundamental solution including a definite integral over reciprocal powers of the hyperbolic sine, finite summation expressions over hyperbolic functions, Gauss hypergeometric functions and in terms of the associated Legendre function of the second kind with order and degree given by d/2 − 1 with real argument greater than unity. We also demonstrate uniqueness for a fundamental solution of Laplace’s equation on this manifold in terms of a vanishing decay at infinity. In rotationally invariant coordinate systems, we compute the azimuthal Fourier coefficients for a fundamental solution of Laplace’s equation on the R-radius hyperboloid. For d ⩾ 2, we compute the Gegenbauer polynomial expansion in geodesic polar coordinates for a fundamental solution of Laplace’s equation on this negative-constant curvature Riemannian manifold. In three dimensions, an addition theorem for the azimuthal Fourier coefficients of a fundamental solution for Laplace’s equation is obtained through comparison with its corresponding Gegenbauer expansion. (paper)

  4. Validation of full core geometry model of the NODAL3 code in the PWR transient Benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T-M Sembiring; S-Pinem; P-H Liem

    2015-01-01

    The coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (T/H) code, NODAL3 code, has been validated in some PWR static benchmark and the NEACRP PWR transient benchmark cases. However, the NODAL3 code have not yet validated in the transient benchmark cases of a control rod assembly (CR) ejection at peripheral core using a full core geometry model, the C1 and C2 cases. By this research work, the accuracy of the NODAL3 code for one CR ejection or the unsymmetrical group of CRs ejection case can be validated. The calculations by the NODAL3 code have been carried out by the adiabatic method (AM) and the improved quasistatic method (IQS). All calculated transient parameters by the NODAL3 code were compared with the reference results by the PANTHER code. The maximum relative difference of 16 % occurs in the calculated time of power maximum parameter by using the IQS method, while the relative difference of the AM method is 4 % for C2 case. All calculation results by the NODAL3 code shows there is no systematic difference, it means the neutronic and T/H modules are adopted in the code are considered correct. Therefore, all calculation results by using the NODAL3 code are very good agreement with the reference results. (author)

  5. Testing a Model of Planck-Scale Quantum Geometry With Broadband Correlation of Colocated 40m Interferometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCuller, Lee Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Holometer is designed to test for a Planck diffractive-scaling uncertainty in long-baseline position measurements due to an underlying noncommutative geometry normalized to relate Black hole entropy bounds of the Holographic principle to the now-finite number of position states. The experiment overlaps two independent 40 meter optical Michelson interferometers to detect the proposed uncertainty as a common broadband length fluctuation. 150 hours of instrument cross-correlation data are analyzed to test the prediction of a correlated noise magnitude of 7·10 -21 m/√Hz with an effective bandwidth of 750kHz. The interferometers each have a quantum-limited sensitivity of 2.5·10 -18 m/√Hz, but their correlation with a time-bandwidth product of 4·10 11 digs between the noise floors in search for the covarying geometric jitter. The data presents an exclusion of 5 standard deviations for the tested model. This exclusion is defended through analysis of the calibration methods for the instrument as well as further sub shot noise characterization of the optical systems to limit spurious background-correlations from undermining the signal.

  6. Testing a Model of Planck-Scale Quantum Geometry With Broadband Correlation of Colocated 40m Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCuller, Lee Patrick [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Holometer is designed to test for a Planck diffractive-scaling uncertainty in long-baseline position measurements due to an underlying noncommutative geometry normalized to relate Black hole entropy bounds of the Holographic principle to the now-finite number of position states. The experiment overlaps two independent 40 meter optical Michelson interferometers to detect the proposed uncertainty as a common broadband length fluctuation. 150 hours of instrument cross-correlation data are analyzed to test the prediction of a correlated noise magnitude of $7\\times10^{−21}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$ with an effective bandwidth of 750kHz. The interferometers each have a quantum-limited sensitivity of $2.5\\times 10^{−18}$ m/$\\sqrt{\\rm Hz}$, but their correlation with a time-bandwidth product of $4\\times 10^{11}$ digs between the noise floors in search for the covarying geometric jitter. The data presents an exclusion of 5 standard deviations for the tested model. This exclusion is defended through analysis of the calibration methods for the instrument as well as further sub shot noise characterization of the optical systems to limit spurious background-correlations from undermining the signal.

  7. Effects of canyon geometry on the distribution of traffic-related air pollution in a large urban area: Implications of a multi-canyon air pollution dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiangwen; Liu, Junfeng; Ban-Weiss, George A.; Zhang, Jiachen; Huang, Xin; Ouyang, Bin; Popoola, Olalekan; Tao, Shu

    2017-09-01

    Street canyons are ubiquitous in urban areas. Traffic-related air pollutants in street canyons can adversely affect human health. In this study, an urban-scale traffic pollution dispersion model is developed considering street distribution, canyon geometry, background meteorology, traffic assignment, traffic emissions and air pollutant dispersion. In the model, vehicle exhausts generated from traffic flows first disperse inside street canyons along the micro-scale wind field generated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. Then, pollutants leave the street canyon and further disperse over the urban area. On the basis of this model, the effects of canyon geometry on the distribution of NOx and CO from traffic emissions were studied over the center of Beijing. We found that an increase in building height leads to heavier pollution inside canyons and lower pollution outside canyons at pedestrian level, resulting in higher domain-averaged concentrations over the area. In addition, canyons with highly even or highly uneven building heights on each side of the street tend to lower the urban-scale air pollution concentrations at pedestrian level. Further, increasing street widths tends to lead to lower pollutant concentrations by reducing emissions and enhancing ventilation simultaneously. Our results indicate that canyon geometry strongly influences human exposure to traffic pollutants in the populated urban area. Carefully planning street layout and canyon geometry while considering traffic demand as well as local weather patterns may significantly reduce inhalation of unhealthy air by urban residents.

  8. 78 FR 37584 - U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... make the following certification: All workers of U.S. Steel Tubular Products, McKeesport Tubular... Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation, Mckeesport, Pennsylvania; Notice of Amended Certification Pursuant to Section 221 of the Trade Act of 1974...

  9. Geometry Euclid and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Hartshorne, Robin

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, I have been teaching a junior-senior-level course on the classi­ cal geometries. This book has grown out of that teaching experience. I assume only high-school geometry and some abstract algebra. The course begins in Chapter 1 with a critical examination of Euclid's Elements. Students are expected to read concurrently Books I-IV of Euclid's text, which must be obtained sepa­ rately. The remainder of the book is an exploration of questions that arise natu­ rally from this reading, together with their modern answers. To shore up the foundations we use Hilbert's axioms. The Cartesian plane over a field provides an analytic model of the theory, and conversely, we see that one can introduce coordinates into an abstract geometry. The theory of area is analyzed by cutting figures into triangles. The algebra of field extensions provides a method for deciding which geometrical constructions are possible. The investigation of the parallel postulate leads to the various non-Euclidean geometries. And ...

  10. Modeling the defrost process in complex geometries – Part 1: Development of a one-dimensional defrost model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Buren Simon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Frost formation is a common, often undesired phenomenon in heat exchanges such as air coolers. Thus, air coolers have to be defrosted periodically, causing significant energy consumption. For the design and optimization, prediction of defrosting by a CFD tool is desired. This paper presents a one-dimensional transient model approach suitable to be used as a zero-dimensional wall-function in CFD for modeling the defrost process at the fin and tube interfaces. In accordance to previous work a multi stage defrost model is introduced (e.g. [1, 2]. In the first instance the multi stage model is implemented and validated using MATLAB. The defrost process of a one-dimensional frost segment is investigated. Fixed boundary conditions are provided at the frost interfaces. The simulation results verify the plausibility of the designed model. The evaluation of the simulated defrost process shows the expected convergent behavior of the three-stage sequence.

  11. Normalization of time-series satellite reflectance data to a standard sun-target-sensor geometry using a semi-empirical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongguang; Li, Chuanrong; Ma, Lingling; Tang, Lingli; Wang, Ning; Zhou, Chuncheng; Qian, Yonggang

    2017-10-01

    Time series of satellite reflectance data have been widely used to characterize environmental phenomena, describe trends in vegetation dynamics and study climate change. However, several sensors with wide spatial coverage and high observation frequency are usually designed to have large field of view (FOV), which cause variations in the sun-targetsensor geometry in time-series reflectance data. In this study, on the basis of semiempirical kernel-driven BRDF model, a new semi-empirical model was proposed to normalize the sun-target-sensor geometry of remote sensing image. To evaluate the proposed model, bidirectional reflectance under different canopy growth conditions simulated by Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model were used. The semi-empirical model was first fitted by using all simulated bidirectional reflectance. Experimental result showed a good fit between the bidirectional reflectance estimated by the proposed model and the simulated value. Then, MODIS time-series reflectance data was normalized to a common sun-target-sensor geometry by the proposed model. The experimental results showed the proposed model yielded good fits between the observed and estimated values. The noise-like fluctuations in time-series reflectance data was also reduced after the sun-target-sensor normalization process.

  12. Complex geometries in wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette; Riiber Nielsen, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The versatility of wood constructions and traditional wood joints for the production of non standard elements was in focus of a design based research. Herein we established a seamless process from digital design to fabrication. A first research phase centered on the development of a robust...... parametric model and a generic design language a later explored the possibilities to construct complex shaped geometries with self registering joints on modern wood crafting machines. The research was carried out as collaboration with industrial partners....

  13. Electroweak vacuum geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepora, N.; Kibble, T.

    1999-01-01

    We analyse symmetry breaking in the Weinberg-Salam model paying particular attention to the underlying geometry of the theory. In this context we find two natural metrics upon the vacuum manifold: an isotropic metric associated with the scalar sector, and a squashed metric associated with the gauge sector. Physically, the interplay between these metrics gives rise to many of the non-perturbative features of Weinberg-Salam theory. (author)

  14. Development of drift-flux model based on 8 x 8 BWR rod bundle geometry experiments under prototypic temperature and pressure conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Tetsuhiro; Suzuki, Riichiro; Mashiko, Hiroyuki; Hibiki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The drift-flux model is one of the imperative concepts used to consider the effects of phase coupling on two-phase flow dynamics. Several drift-flux models are available that apply to rod bundle geometries and some of these are implemented in several nuclear safety analysis codes. However, these models are not validated by well-designed prototypic full bundle test data, and therefore, the scalability of these models has not necessarily been verified. The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) conducted void fraction measurement tests in Japan with prototypic 8 x 8 BWR (boiling water reactor) rod bundles under prototypic temperature and pressure conditions. Based on these NUPEC data, a new drift-flux model applicable to predicting the void fraction in a rod bundle geometry has been developed. The newly developed drift-flux model is compared with the other existing data such as the two-phase flow test facility (TPTF) data taken at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) [currently, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)] and low pressure adiabatic 8 x 8 bundle test data taken at Purdue University in the United States. The results of these comparisons show good agreement between the test data and the predictions. The effects of power distribution, spacer grids, and the bundle geometry on the newly developed drift-flux model have been discussed using the NUPEC data. (author)

  15. Analysis and design of a slotless tubular permanent magnet actuator for high acceleration applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meessen, K.J.; Paulides, J.J.H.; Lomonova, E.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a linear actuator for high acceleration applications. In the analysis, a slotless tubular permanent magnet actuator is modeled by means of semianalytical field solutions. Several slotless topologies are modeled and compared to achieve the highest acceleration. A

  16. Complex analysis and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    The papers in this wide-ranging collection report on the results of investigations from a number of linked disciplines, including complex algebraic geometry, complex analytic geometry of manifolds and spaces, and complex differential geometry.

  17. Non-Riemannian geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenhart, Luther Pfahler

    2005-01-01

    This concise text by a prominent mathematician deals chiefly with manifolds dominated by the geometry of paths. Topics include asymmetric and symmetric connections, the projective geometry of paths, and the geometry of sub-spaces. 1927 edition.

  18. Tubular overexpression of gremlin induces renal damage susceptibility in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Droguett

    Full Text Available A growing number of patients are recognized worldwide to have chronic kidney disease. Glomerular and interstitial fibrosis are hallmarks of renal progression. However, fibrosis of the kidney remains an unresolved challenge, and its molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Gremlin is an embryogenic gene that has been shown to play a key role in nephrogenesis, and its expression is generally low in the normal adult kidney. However, gremlin expression is elevated in many human renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy, pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and chronic allograft nephropathy. Several studies have proposed that gremlin may be involved in renal damage by acting as a downstream mediator of TGF-β. To examine the in vivo role of gremlin in kidney pathophysiology, we generated seven viable transgenic mouse lines expressing human gremlin (GREM1 specifically in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells under the control of an androgen-regulated promoter. These lines demonstrated 1.2- to 200-fold increased GREM1 expression. GREM1 transgenic mice presented a normal phenotype and were without proteinuria and renal function involvement. In response to the acute renal damage cause by folic acid nephrotoxicity, tubule-specific GREM1 transgenic mice developed increased proteinuria after 7 and 14 days compared with wild-type treated mice. At 14 days tubular lesions, such as dilatation, epithelium flattening and hyaline casts, with interstitial cell infiltration and mild fibrosis were significantly more prominent in transgenic mice than wild-type mice. Tubular GREM1 overexpression was correlated with the renal upregulation of profibrotic factors, such as TGF-β and αSMA, and with increased numbers of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, our results suggest that GREM1-overexpressing mice have an increased susceptibility to renal damage, supporting the involvement of gremlin in renal damage

  19. SOFC mini-tubulares basadas en YSZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campana, R.

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Tubular SOFC have the advantage over planar SOFC of the low temperature sealing and more resistance to thermal shock. On the other hand the volumetric power density of tubular Fuel Cells goes with the inverse of the tube diameter which added to the faster warm-up kinetics makes low diameter tubular SOFC favorable for low power applications. Anode supported tubular SOFC of 3mm diameter and 150 mm length with YSZ electrolyte were fabricated and tested by V-I measurements using H2-Ar (5, 10, 100 vol% as fuel and air for the cathode. The NiO-YSZ tubes of about 400 μm thickness were produced by hydrostatic pressure and then coated with an YSZ film of 15-20 μm. The electrolyte was deposited using a manual aerograph. After sintering either Pt paste or LSF (with YSZ or SDC coatings of about 20-50 μm thickness were deposited for the cathode. The OCV of the cells were excellent, very close to the expected Nernst law prediction indicating that there were not gas leaks. The maximun electrical power of the cell was near to 500mW/cm2 at 850ºC operation temperature. Complex impedance measurements of the cells were performed in order to determine the resistance of the different cell components.

    La principal ventaja de las SOFC tubulares frente a las planares es el sellado de la cámara anódica y catódica a bajas temperaturas. Además la densidad de energía volumétrica de las pilas tubulares es inversamente proporcional al diámetro del tubo, que añadido a los tiempos cortos de encendido y apagado hacen que las mini-tubulares sean interesantes para usos de baja potencia. Se han fabricado y caracterizado SOFC tubulares soportadas en ánodo de 3mm de diámetro y de 150 mm de longitud, 400μm de espesor, con electrolito de YSZ depositado por spray de 15-20 μm. Los tubos de NiO-YSZ son producidos por prensado isostático. La caracterización eléctrica se ha realizado empleando H2-Ar como combustible an

  20. Experimental investigation and numerical simulation of 3He gas diffusion in simple geometries: implications for analytical models of 3He MR lung morphometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Robles, J; Ajraoui, S; Deppe, M H; Parnell, S R; Wild, J M

    2010-06-01

    Models of lung acinar geometry have been proposed to analytically describe the diffusion of (3)He in the lung (as measured with pulsed gradient spin echo (PGSE) methods) as a possible means of characterizing lung microstructure from measurement of the (3)He ADC. In this work, major limitations in these analytical models are highlighted in simple diffusion weighted experiments with (3)He in cylindrical models of known geometry. The findings are substantiated with numerical simulations based on the same geometry using finite difference representation of the Bloch-Torrey equation. The validity of the existing "cylinder model" is discussed in terms of the physical diffusion regimes experienced and the basic reliance of the cylinder model and other ADC-based approaches on a Gaussian diffusion behaviour is highlighted. The results presented here demonstrate that physical assumptions of the cylinder model are not valid for large diffusion gradient strengths (above approximately 15 mT/m), which are commonly used for (3)He ADC measurements in human lungs. (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modeling study on the effect of piston bowl geometries in a gasoline/biodiesel fueled RCCI engine at high speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Yang, W.M.; Zhou, D.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The RCCI engine fueled with gasoline and biodiesel is simulated. • The effect of piston bowl geometry is investigated. • The throat diameter of a piston can affect combustion process. • SCC shows superiority among three investigated geometries for RCCI combustion. - Abstract: This paper reports the numerical investigation on the effects of three bowl geometries on a gasoline/biodiesel fueled RCCI engine operated at high engine speed. The three bowl geometries are HCC (Hemispherical Combustion Chamber), SCC (Shallow depth Combustion Chamber) and OCC (Omega Combustion Chamber). To simulate the combustion in an RCCI engine, coupled KIVA4–CHEMKIN code was used. One recently developed reaction mechanism, which contains 107 species and 425 reactions, was adopted in this study to mimic the combustion of gasoline and biodiesel. During the simulation, the engine speed was fixed at 3600 rpm. The low reactivity fuel gasoline was premixed with air with energy percentages of 20% and 40%; accordingly, to maintain the same energy input, the percentages of biodiesel were 80% and 60% (B80 and B60). In addition, the SOI timing was varied at three levels: −11, −35 and −60 deg ATDC for B80 and B60, respectively. With SOI timing of −11 deg ATDC, the combustion is mixing-controlled; in contrast, advancing SOI timing to −60 deg ATDC, the combustion turns into the reactivity-controlled. Comparing the results on combustion characteristics, engine performance and emissions among different bowl geometries, it is concluded that the original OCC design for Toyota diesel engine is better for mixing-controlled combustion; whereas, SCC is the most suitable piston design for RCCI combustion among the three selected geometries under the investigated operating conditions of the engine. With SCC, better combustion and performance can be achieved while maintaining relatively lower CO, NO and soot emissions.

  2. Preliminary Empirical Models for Predicting Shrinkage, Part Geometry and Metallurgical Aspects of Ti-6Al-4V Shaped Metal Deposition Builds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Palafox, Gustavo; Gault, Rosemary; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-12-01

    Shaped Metal Deposition (SMD) is an additive manufacturing process which creates parts layer by layer by weld depositions. In this work, empirical models that predict part geometry (wall thickness and outer diameter) and some metallurgical aspects (i.e. surface texture, portion of finer Widmanstätten microstructure) for the SMD process were developed. The models are based on an orthogonal fractional factorial design of experiments with four factors at two levels. The factors considered were energy level (a relationship between heat source power and the rate of raw material input.), step size, programmed diameter and travel speed. The models were validated using previous builds; the prediction error for part geometry was under 11%. Several relationships between the factors and responses were identified. Current had a significant effect on wall thickness; thickness increases with increasing current. Programmed diameter had a significant effect on percentage of shrinkage; this decreased with increasing component size. Surface finish decreased with decreasing step size and current.

  3. Preliminary Empirical Models for Predicting Shrinkage, Part Geometry and Metallurgical Aspects of Ti-6Al-4V Shaped Metal Deposition Builds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar-Palafox, Gustavo; Gault, Rosemary; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Shaped Metal Deposition (SMD) is an additive manufacturing process which creates parts layer by layer by weld depositions. In this work, empirical models that predict part geometry (wall thickness and outer diameter) and some metallurgical aspects (i.e. surface texture, portion of finer Widmanstätten microstructure) for the SMD process were developed. The models are based on an orthogonal fractional factorial design of experiments with four factors at two levels. The factors considered were energy level (a relationship between heat source power and the rate of raw material input.), step size, programmed diameter and travel speed. The models were validated using previous builds; the prediction error for part geometry was under 11%. Several relationships between the factors and responses were identified. Current had a significant effect on wall thickness; thickness increases with increasing current. Programmed diameter had a significant effect on percentage of shrinkage; this decreased with increasing component size. Surface finish decreased with decreasing step size and current.

  4. Investigation of piston bowl geometry and speed effects in a motored HSDI diesel engine using a CFD against a quasi-dimensional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakopoulos, C.D.; Kosmadakis, G.M.; Pariotis, E.G.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigates the effect of varying the combustion chamber geometry and engine rotational speed on the gas flow and temperature field, using a new quasi-dimensional engine simulation model in conjunction with an in-house developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code served to validate the predicted in-cylinder flow field and gas temperature distribution calculated by the quasi-dimensional model, for three alternative piston bowl geometries and three rotational speeds. This CFD code can simulate three-dimensional curvilinear domains using the finite volume method in a collocated grid; it solves the generalized transport equation for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy, and incorporates the standard k-ε turbulence model with some slight modifications to introduce the compressibility of a fluid in generalized coordinates. On the other hand, the quasi-dimensional model solves the general transport equation for the conservation of mass and energy by a finite volume method throughout the entire in-cylinder volume, while for the estimation of the flow field a new simplified three dimensional air motion model is used. To compare these two models the in-cylinder spatial and temporal temperature distribution, the mean cylinder pressure diagram, as well as the mean in-cylinder radial and axial velocity are examined, for the three piston bowl geometries and the three speeds, for a high speed direct injection (HSDI) diesel engine operating under motoring conditions. From the comparison of calculated results, it becomes apparent that the two models predict similar in-cylinder temperature distributions and mean air velocity fields at each crank angle, for all cases examined. Thus, it is shown that the quasi-dimensional model with the proposed simplified air motion model is capable of capturing the physical effect of combustion chamber geometry and speed on the in-cylinder velocity and temperature field, while needing significantly lower computing

  5. On the value of geometry-based models for left ventricular volumetry in magnetic resonance imaging and electron beam tomography: a Bland-Altman analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiter, Gert; Reiter, Ursula; Rienmueller, Rainer; Gagarina, Nina; Ryabikin, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Methodological comparison of ellipsoid model-based approaches and Simpson method to evaluate left ventricular volumetric parameters by magnetic resonance (MR) and electron beam tomography (EBT) and analysis of the origin of possible discrepancies. Methods and material: 100 subjects (87 patients, 13 healthy volunteers) were studied in MR in various cardiac views and EBT long axis view to determine left ventricular volumes and masses by applying (rotational) ellipsoid and Simpson model. Observer variation and method agreement was quantified by means of variance component and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Simpson approach showed smaller observer variability than all ellipsoid approaches. All geometry-based models gave smaller left ventricular volumes than Simpson approach, the bias in mass determination was minimal. Whereas high correlation coefficients (typically 0.85-0.95) for left ventricular volume and mass measurements indicated satisfying correspondence between methods, large 95% limits of agreement made a transfer of results for single subjects between Simpson and ellipsoid approaches difficult and between different geometry-based models almost impossible. Because 95% limits of agreement and observer variability of geometry-based approaches were of equal order, the latter could be identified as main limiting factor of methodological agreement. Conclusion: MR Simpson approach is superior to all ellipsoid model-based approaches, because observer variability is smaller

  6. Micro-Drilling of Polymer Tubular Ultramicroelectrode Arrays for Electrochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels B. Larsen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a reproducible fast prototyping procedure based on micro-drilling to produce homogeneous tubular ultramicroelectrode arrays made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (PEDOT, a conductive polymer. Arrays of Ø 100 µm tubular electrodes each having a height of 0.37 ± 0.06 µm were reproducibly fabricated. The electrode dimensions were analyzed by SEM after deposition of silver dendrites to visualize the electroactive electrode area. The electrochemical applicability of the electrodes was demonstrated by voltammetric and amperometric detection of ferri-/ferrocyanide. Recorded signals were in agreement with results from finite element modelling of the system. The tubular PEDOT ultramicroelectrode arrays were modified by prussian blue to enable the detection of hydrogen peroxide. A linear sensor response was demonstrated for hydrogen peroxide concentrations from 0.1 mM to 1 mM.

  7. Species diversity regarding the presence of proximal tubular progenitor cells of the kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hansson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The cellular source for tubular regeneration following kidney injury is a matter of dispute, with reports suggesting a stem or progenitor cells as the regeneration source while linage tracing studies in mice seemingly favor the classical theory, where regeneration is performed by randomly surviving cells. We, and others have previously described a scattered cell population localized to the tubules of human kidney, which increases in number following injury. Here we have characterized the species distribution of these proximal tubular progenitor cells (PTPCs in kidney tissue from chimpanzee, pig, rat and mouse using a set of human PTPC markers. We detected PTPCs in chimpanzee and pig kidneys, but not in mouse tissue. Also, subjecting mice to the unilateral urethral obstruction model, caused clear signs of tubular injury, but failed to induce the PTPC phenotype in renal tubules.

  8. Evaluation of seismic behavior of a braced tubular steel structure by pseudodynamic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiny, P.B.; Javadian-Gilani, A.S.; Mahin, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    The inelastic seismic behavior of an X-braced, tubular steel frame is studied experimentally by means of pseudodynamic testing. The pseudodynamic method, which utilizes a numerical algorithm in the on-line computer control of a test specimen, can realistically simulate the seismic response of a structural model. This paper presents a brief outline of the experimental procedure and the results of the tubular frame tests, including the global responses, the inelastic energy-dissipation capabilities, and the failure mechanism of the frame at various excitation levels. Correlation of these results with previous experimental studies illustrates the feasibility and accuracy of the new test method

  9. Cellular neural network to the spherical harmonics approximation of neutron transport equation in x-y geometry. Part I: Modeling and verification for time-independent solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirouzmand, Ahmad; Hadad, Kamal

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper describes the solution of time-independent neutron transport equation. → Using a novel method based on cellular neural networks (CNNs) coupled with P N method. → Utilize the CNN model to simulate spatial scalar flux distribution in steady state. → The accuracy, stability, and capabilities of CNN model are examined in x-y geometry. - Abstract: This paper describes a novel method based on using cellular neural networks (CNN) coupled with spherical harmonics method (P N ) to solve the time-independent neutron transport equation in x-y geometry. To achieve this, an equivalent electrical circuit based on second-order form of neutron transport equation and relevant boundary conditions is obtained using CNN method. We use the CNN model to simulate spatial response of scalar flux distribution in the steady state condition for different order of spherical harmonics approximations. The accuracy, stability, and capabilities of CNN model are examined in 2D Cartesian geometry for fixed source and criticality problems.

  10. Advances in discrete differential geometry

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This is one of the first books on a newly emerging field of discrete differential geometry and an excellent way to access this exciting area. It surveys the fascinating connections between discrete models in differential geometry and complex analysis, integrable systems and applications in computer graphics. The authors take a closer look at discrete models in differential geometry and dynamical systems. Their curves are polygonal, surfaces are made from triangles and quadrilaterals, and time is discrete. Nevertheless, the difference between the corresponding smooth curves, surfaces and classical dynamical systems with continuous time can hardly be seen. This is the paradigm of structure-preserving discretizations. Current advances in this field are stimulated to a large extent by its relevance for computer graphics and mathematical physics. This book is written by specialists working together on a common research project. It is about differential geometry and dynamical systems, smooth and discrete theories, ...

  11. High-Performance and Omnidirectional Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Modules Achieved by 3D Geometry Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongliang; Yin, Min; Lu, Linfeng; Zhang, Hanzhong; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Zhu, Xufei; Che, Jianfei; Li, Dongdong

    2015-11-01

    High-performance thin-film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells are achieved by combining macroscale 3D tubular substrates and nanoscaled 3D cone-like antireflective films. The tubular geometry delivers a series of advantages for large-scale deployment of photovoltaics, such as omnidirectional performance, easier encapsulation, decreased wind resistance, and easy integration with a second device inside the glass tube. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Rocket-inspired tubular catalytic microjets with grating-structured walls as guiding empennages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gaoshan; Wang, Jiyuan; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhou, Dekai; Tian, Ziao; Xu, Borui; Li, Longqiu; Mei, Yongfeng

    2017-12-07

    Controllable locomotion in the micro-/nanoscale is challenging and attracts increasing research interest. Tubular microjets self-propelled by microbubbles are intensively investigated due to their high energy conversion efficiency, but the imperfection of the tubular geometry makes it harder to realize linear motion. Inspired by the macro rocket, we designed a tubular microjet with a grating-structured wall which mimics the guiding empennage of the macro rocket, and we found that the fluid can be effectively guided by the grooves. Both theoretical simulation and experimental work have been carried out, and the obtained results demonstrate that the stability margin of the grating-structured microjet can be enhanced. Compared with microjets with smooth walls, the structured microjets show an enhanced ability of moving linearly. In 10% H 2 O 2 , only 20% of the smooth microjets demonstrate linear trajectories, while 80% of the grating-structured microjets keep moving straight. The grating-structured microjet can maintain linear motion under external disturbance. We further propose to increase the stability by introducing a helical grating structure.

  13. Distal renal tubular acidosis and hepatic lipidosis in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S A; Spyridakis, L K; Crowell, W A

    1986-11-15

    Clinical and laboratory evidence of hepatic failure was found in a chronically anorectic cat. Simultaneous blood and urine pH determinations established a diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis. The cat did not respond to treatment. Necropsy revealed distal tubular nephrosis and hepatic lipidosis. The finding of distal renal tubular acidosis in a cat with hepatic lipidosis emphasizes the importance of complete evaluation of acid-base disorders in patients.

  14. Growth dynamics and composition of tubular structures in a reaction-precipitation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagano, Jason John

    Self-organization in reaction precipitation systems occurs in many physical, chemical, biological, and geological systems. In particular, chemical reactions provide a wealth of examples for this intriguing process. Permanent tubular structures arise from the interplay of chemical and transport phenomena such as diffusion and fluid flow. These astonishing tubular structures are prevalent throughout nature. Examples include black smokers at hydrothermal vents, silica tubes in setting cement, soda-straw stalactites in caves, and biological structures such as the outer skeleton of certain algae. In this work, the aim is to establish and understand a laboratory scale model by examining the, seemingly simple, precipitation reaction between sodium silicate and copper sulfate as well as zinc sulfate. The tubular precipitation structures in so-called silica gardens are known to many scientists and non-scientists alike. However, little is known regarding their growth dynamics and chemical composition. We devised an injection technique which provides control over parameters that are not accessible in the classic silica garden system. For the example of cupric sulfate injection into waterglass solution, we identify three distinct growth regimes (jetting, popping, and budding) and study their concentration dependent transitions. Here we describe the composition and morphology of the tube material using techniques such as electron microscopy and vibrational spectroscopy. Specifically, we find that the tube wall consists of metal hydroxide that is stabilized by a thin, exterior silica layer. After synthesis the tubes can be further modified by using chemical and/or physical means. A second study aims to understand tubule formation under "reverse" conditions. More specifically, waterglass is being injected into lighter cupric sulfate solution. In these experiments, single, downward growing precipitation tubes are created. Four distinct growth regimes are observed and their

  15. Modeling the Geometry of Plate Boundary and Seismic Structure in the Southern Ryukyu Trench Subduction Zone, Japan, Using Amphibious Seismic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Ishihara, Y.; Kaiho, Y.; Arai, R.; Obana, K.; Nakanishi, A.; Miura, S.; Kodaira, S.; Kaneda, Y.

    2018-02-01

    Here we present the new model, the geometry of the subducted Philippine Sea Plate interface beneath the southern Ryukyu Trench subduction zone, estimated from seismic tomography and focal mechanism estimation by using passive and active data from a temporary amphibious seismic network and permanent land stations. Using relocated low-angle thrust-type earthquakes, repeating earthquakes, and structural information, we constrained the geometry of plate boundary from the trench axis to a 60 km depth with uncertainties of less than 5 km. The estimated plate geometry model exhibited large variation, including a pronounced convex structure that may be evidence of a subducted seamount in the eastern portion of study area, whereas the western part appeared smooth. We also found that the active earthquake region near the plate boundary, defined by the distance from our plate geometry model, was clearly separated from the area dominated by short-term slow-slip events (SSEs). The oceanic crust just beneath the SSE-dominant region, the western part of the study area, showed high Vp/Vs ratios (>1.8), whereas the eastern side showed moderate or low Vp/Vs (<1.75). We interpreted this as an indication that high fluid pressures near the surface of the slab are contributing to the SSE activities. Within the toe of the mantle wedge, P and S wave velocities (<7.5 and <4.2 km/s, respectively) lower than those observed through normal mantle peridotite might suggest that some portions of the mantle may be at least 40% serpentinized.

  16. TUBULAR DISORDERS WITH RICKETS-LIKE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.N. Kartamysheva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Often under the guise of «ordinary» Rickets are more severe kidney diseases, developing as a result of inherited or acquired, primary or secondary defects in the renal tubules. Incorrect diagnosis leads to an inadequate therapy, rapid progression of disease and renal failure. The article describes the main approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of tubular rachitis similar syndrome, presents a number of clinical cases in author's practice.Key words: tubulopathy, acidosis, electrolyte disorders, rickets, rickets-like syndrome, diagnostics, treatment, children.

  17. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, E.R.; Cracraft, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  18. Thermal characteristics of tubular receivers of solar radiation line concentrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klychev, Sh.I.; Zakhidov, R.A.; Khuzhanov, R. et al.

    2013-01-01

    A stationary thermal model of an LCS-HR system is considered, taking into account the basic parameters of the problem: availability of a transparent screen, selectivity of the receiver, characteristics of the heat carrier and average concentration on the surface of the tubular receiver C"". Based on this model, an algorithm and program of numerical research of the thermal characteristics of the HR-temperature of heating and local and average coefficients of efficiency are developed. For possible concentrations, the selectivity of the receiver and the transparency of the screen in linear concentrators, the potential stationary heating temperatures, and the coefficients of efficiency for main three types of heat carriers - air, water, and liquid metal coolant are studied. The time of achieving stationary values by the temperatures of the heat carrier is estimated. (author)

  19. High-frequency background modulation fringe patterns based on a fringe-wavelength geometry-constraint model for 3D surface-shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinran; Kofman, Jonathan

    2017-07-10

    A new fringe projection method for surface-shape measurement was developed using four high-frequency phase-shifted background modulation fringe patterns. The pattern frequency is determined using a new fringe-wavelength geometry-constraint model that allows only two corresponding-point candidates in the measurement volume. The correct corresponding point is selected with high reliability using a binary pattern computed from intensity background encoded in the fringe patterns. Equations of geometry-constraint parameters permit parameter calculation prior to measurement, thus reducing measurement computational cost. Experiments demonstrated the ability of the method to perform 3D shape measurement for a surface with geometric discontinuity, and for spatially isolated objects.

  20. PENGURANGAN KADAR CO2 MENGGUNAKAN SPIRULINA PLATENSIS DALAM TUBULAR BIOREACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Syam Arifin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the population impact on increasing energy demand. On the other hand, the energy generation industry has been blamed as one of the contributors of carbon dioxide about 25% of total CO2 emissions worldwide. Meanwhile, the production of biogas, which aims to address the increasing need of energy, produces carbon dioxide in the range of 25–50% by volume. To overcome this, a cheap method, optimum and efficient as well as environmentally friendly in reducing CO2 levels by using Spirulina platensis is needed. This research aims to created a mathematical models and found the optimum flow rate to reduced levels of CO2 by using Spirulina platensis. This study used a glass tubular bioreactor (D = 2.6 cm at a temperature of 30°C and irradiated with a fluorescent lamp Philips TL 36 Watt, color temperature: 6,200K cool daylight, light output: 2,600 lm, 72 lm/W. Tubular reactor was placed in a box lined with silver foil walls on three sides. With mathematical models of tubular reactor, the reaction rate constants could be predicted. Based on calculations of data and graphs, optimum volumetric velocity could also be predicted. Variation of flowrate to observed the reduction rate of CO2 was 0.25 mL/sec, 0.35 mL/sec, 0.5 mL/sec, 0.75 mL/sec, 1 mL/sec. Carbon source was 99.99% CO2.Observations of Spirulina growth was made on the flow rate of 0.25 mL/sec at the initial levels of dry weight 2.1208 g/L. The results of this study indicated that the low flowratewas a more effective way to reduced carbon dioxide levels using Spirulina platensis (= 2.82×10-4 sec-1. The highest conversion was obtained at a volumetric flow rate of 0.25 mL/sec and optimum speeds in the range of 0.3 to 0.4 mL/sec. The rate of incoming CO2 flux should be less than 0.047 mL/cm2.detik. Specific Growth Rate (µ of Spirulina platensis in this study was 2.56×10-2 minute-1.   Keywords: Spirulina platensis, a vertical tubular bioreactor, CO2 reduction     ABSTRAK