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Sample records for trypanosoma cruzi study

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi , exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote) and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68), T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP), trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF), C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT) and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT). Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH) and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs). All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP), alternative (AP) or lectin pathways (LP). Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host-parasite interplay

  2. Secretome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi by proteomics studies.

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    Jean-Yves Brossas

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a debilitating often fatal disease resulting from infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagas disease is endemic in 21 countries of the Americas, and it is an emerging disease in other countries as a result of migration. Given the chronic nature of the infection where intracellular parasites persist for years, the diagnosis of T. cruzi by direct detection is difficult, whereas serologic tests though sensitive may yield false-positive results. The development of new rapid test based on the identification of soluble parasitic antigens in serum would be a real innovation in the diagnosis of Chagas disease.To identify new soluble biomarkers that may improve diagnostic tests, we investigated the proteins secreted by T. cruzi using mass spectrometric analyses of conditioned culture media devoid of serum collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from infected Vero cells. In addition, we compared the secretomes of two T. cruzi strains from DTU Tc VI (VD and CL Brener.Analysis of the secretome collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from Vero cells led to the identification of 591 T. cruzi proteins. Three hundred sixty three proteins are common to both strains and most belong to different multigenic super families (i.e. TcS, GP63, MASP, and DGF1. Ultimately we have established a list of 94 secreted proteins, common to both DTU Tc VI strains that do not belong to members of multigene families.This study provides the first comparative analysis of the secretomes from two distinct T. cruzi strains of DTU TcVI. This led us to identify a subset of common secreted proteins that could potentially serve as serum markers for T. cruzi infection. Their potential could now be evaluated, with specific antibodies using sera collected from patients and residents from endemic regions.

  3. Secretome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi by proteomics studies.

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    Brossas, Jean-Yves; Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Bisio, Margarita Maria Catalina; Chapelle, Manuel; Marinach-Patrice, Carine; Bordessoules, Mallaury; Palazon Ruiz, George; Vion, Jeremy; Paris, Luc; Altcheh, Jaime; Mazier, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a debilitating often fatal disease resulting from infection by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Chagas disease is endemic in 21 countries of the Americas, and it is an emerging disease in other countries as a result of migration. Given the chronic nature of the infection where intracellular parasites persist for years, the diagnosis of T. cruzi by direct detection is difficult, whereas serologic tests though sensitive may yield false-positive results. The development of new rapid test based on the identification of soluble parasitic antigens in serum would be a real innovation in the diagnosis of Chagas disease. To identify new soluble biomarkers that may improve diagnostic tests, we investigated the proteins secreted by T. cruzi using mass spectrometric analyses of conditioned culture media devoid of serum collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from infected Vero cells. In addition, we compared the secretomes of two T. cruzi strains from DTU Tc VI (VD and CL Brener). Analysis of the secretome collected during the emergence of trypomastigotes from Vero cells led to the identification of 591 T. cruzi proteins. Three hundred sixty three proteins are common to both strains and most belong to different multigenic super families (i.e. TcS, GP63, MASP, and DGF1). Ultimately we have established a list of 94 secreted proteins, common to both DTU Tc VI strains that do not belong to members of multigene families. This study provides the first comparative analysis of the secretomes from two distinct T. cruzi strains of DTU TcVI. This led us to identify a subset of common secreted proteins that could potentially serve as serum markers for T. cruzi infection. Their potential could now be evaluated, with specific antibodies using sera collected from patients and residents from endemic regions.

  4. Comparative studies on the biochemical properties of the malic enzymes from Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Leroux, Alejandro E; Maugeri, Dante A; Opperdoes, Fred R; Cazzulo, Juan J; Nowicki, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Comparative studies showed that, like Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei exhibits functional cytosolic and mitochondrial malic enzymes (MEs), which are specifically linked to NADP. Kinetic studies provided evidence that T. cruzi and T. brucei MEs display similarly high affinities towards NADP(+) and are also almost equally efficient in catalyzing the production of NADPH. Nevertheless, in contrast to the cytosolic ME from T. cruzi, which is highly activated by l-aspartate (over 10-fold), the T. brucei homologue is slightly more active (50%) in the presence of this amino acid. In T. brucei, both isozymes appear to be clearly more abundant in the insect stage, although they can be immunodetected in the bloodstream forms. By contrast, in T. cruzi the expression of the mitochondrial ME seems to be clearly upregulated in amastigotes, whereas the cytosolic isoform appears to be more abundant in the insect stages of the parasite. It might be hypothesized that in those environments where glucose is very low or absent, these pathogens depend on NADP-linked dehydrogenases such as the MEs for NADPH production, as in those conditions the pentose phosphate pathway cannot serve as a source of essential reducing power. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Endocytosis in Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Narcisa Leal da Cunha e; Sant’Anna, Celso; Pereira, Miria Gomes; Souza, Wanderley de

    2010-01-01

    Endocytic activity is particularly intense in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes, while in amastigotes and trypomastigotes it is untraceable. Cargo molecules enters through the cytostome or flagellar pocket at the parasite anterior region, goes along a branched early endosomal network of tubules and vesicles spread from nuclear periphery to the posterior pole, until delivery to reservosomes, the final compartment. Reservosomes are acid compartments that store protein and lipid cargo and also acc...

  6. Removal of Trypanosoma cruzi by white cell-reduction filters: an electronmicroscopic study

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    Fabron Junior Antonio

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available White cell (WBC-reduction filters have been shown to be effective in removing infectious agents from infected blood products. In this study, the mechanisms of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi retention by WBC-reduction filters were assessed. Human packed red blood cell (PRBC and platelet concentrate (PC samples were contaminated with T. cruzi organisms (Y strain; 3.4 x 10(6/ml, and then filtered using WBC-reduction experimental filters that provided about 3 log10 WBC removal. Transmission electron microscopy sections showed that T. cruzi parasites were removed from contaminated PRBC and PC samples primarily by mechanical mechanism without interacting with filter fibbers or blood cells. In addition, we found that T. cruzi parasites were also removed by a direct fibber adhesion. These data indicate that T. cruzi parasites are removed from infected blood not only by mechanical mechanism but also by biological mechanism probably mediated by parasite surface proteins.

  7. Studying nanotoxic effects of CdTe quantum dots in Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Stahl, C. V.; Almeida, D. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Fontes, A.; Menna-Barreto, R. F. S.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Cesar, C. L.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2010-02-01

    Many studies have been done in order to verify the possible nanotoxicity of quantum dots in some cellular types. Protozoan pathogens as Trypanosoma cruzi, etiologic agent of Chagas1 disease is transmitted to humans either by blood-sucking triatomine vectors, blood transfusion, organs transplantation or congenital transmission. The study of the life cycle, biochemical, genetics, morphology and others aspects of the T. cruzi is very important to better understand the interactions with its hosts and the disease evolution on humans. Quantum dot, nanocrystals, highly luminescent has been used as tool for experiments in in vitro and in vivo T. cruzi life cycle development in real time. We are now investigating the quantum dots toxicity on T. cruzi parasite cells using analytical methods. In vitro experiments were been done in order to test the interference of this nanoparticle on parasite development, morphology and viability (live-death). Ours previous results demonstrated that 72 hours after parasite incubation with 200 μM of CdTe altered the development of T. cruzi and induced cell death by necrosis in a rate of 34%. QDs labeling did not effect: (i) on parasite integrity, at least until 7 days; (ii) parasite cell dividing and (iii) parasite motility at a concentration of 2 μM CdTe. This fact confirms the low level of cytotoxicity of these QDs on this parasite cell. In summary our results is showing T. cruzi QDs labeling could be used for in vivo cellular studies in Chagas disease.

  8. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Argentina, Honduras, and Mexico: study protocol

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    2013-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi has been divided into Discrete Typing Units I and non-I (II-VI). T. cruzi I is predominant in Mexico and Central America, while non-I is predominant in most of South America, including Argentina. Little is known about congenital transmission of T. cruzi I. The specific aim of this study is to determine the rate of congenital transmission of T. cruzi I compared to non-I. Methods/design We are conducting a prospective study to enroll at delivery, 10,000 women in Argentina, 7,500 women in Honduras, and 13,000 women in Mexico. We are measuring transmitted maternal T. cruzi antibodies by performing two rapid tests in cord blood (Stat-Pak, Chembio, Medford, New York, and Trypanosoma Detect, InBios, Seattle, Washington). If at least one of the results is positive, we are identifying infants who are congenitally infected by performing parasitological examinations on cord blood and at 4–8 weeks, and serological follow-up at 10 months. Serological confirmation by ELISA (Wiener, Rosario, Argentina) is performed in cord and maternal blood, and at 10 months. We also are performing T. cruzi standard PCR, real-time quantitative PCR and genotyping on maternal venous blood and on cord blood, and serological examinations on siblings. Data are managed by a Data Center in Montevideo, Uruguay. Data are entered online at the sites in an OpenClinica data management system, and digital pictures of data forms are sent to the Data Center for quality control. Weekly reports allow for rapid feedback to the sites. Trial registration Observational study with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01787968 PMID:24119247

  9. Immunization of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi polyribosomes.

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    Leon, L L; Leon, W; Chaves, L; Costa, S C; Cruz, M Q; Brascher, H M; Lima, A O

    1980-01-01

    Studies were carried out with a polyribosomal fraction isolated from Trypanosoma cruzi Y epimastigotes, with the intention to determine both its immunogenic activity and the degree of protection it could induce against experimental T. cruzi infection. This fraction was assayed in four groups of mice by using different schedules of vaccination and varying the dose, intervals, and route of administration. Seven days after the last dose, the animals were sacrificed for immunological studies or subjected to challenge with T. cruzi trypomastigotes. The results obtained in all schedules showed that our polyribosomal fraction only induced a weak antibody response, but was capable of evoking an expressive cellular response. It was also shown that this fraction has the capacity of inducing a high degree of protection against T. cruzi infection, as determined by the decrease of parasitemia and the prolonged survival time of immunized animals.

  10. Studying nanotoxic effects of CdTe quantum dots in Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Cecilia Stahl Vieira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanoparticles, such as quantum dots (QDs, were used to carry out experiments in vivo and ex vivo with Trypanosoma cruzi. However, questions have been raised regarding the nanotoxicity of QDs in living cells, microorganisms, tissues and whole animals. The objective of this paper was to conduct a QD nanotoxicity study on living T. cruzi protozoa using analytical methods. This was accomplished using in vitro experiments to test the interference of the QDs on parasite development, morphology and viability. Our results show that after 72 h, a 200 μM cadmium telluride (CdTe QD solution induced important morphological alterations in T. cruzi, such as DNA damage, plasma membrane blebbing and mitochondrial swelling. Flow cytometry assays showed no damage to the plasma membrane when incubated with 200 μM CdTe QDs for up to 72 h (propidium iodide cells, giving no evidence of classical necrosis. Parasites incubated with 2 μM CdTe QDs still proliferated after seven days. In summary, a low concentration of CdTe QDs (2 μM is optimal for bioimaging, whereas a high concentration (200 μM CdTe could be toxic to cells. Taken together, our data indicate that 2 μM QD can be used for the successful long-term study of the parasite-vector interaction in real time.

  11. Integrate Study of a Bolivian Population Infected by Trypanosoma cruzi, the Agent of Chagas Disease

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    Brenière Simone Frédérique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross section of a human population (501 individuals selected at random, and living in a Bolivian community, highly endemic for Chagas disease, was investigated combining together clinical, parasitological and molecular approaches. Conventional serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR indicated an active transmission of the infection, a high seroprevalence (43.3% ranging from around 12% in 45 years, and a high sensitivity (83.8% and specificity of PCR. Abnormal ECG tracing was predominant in chagasic patients and was already present among individuals younger than 13 years. SAPA (shed acute phase antigen recombinant protein and the synthetic peptide R-13 were used as antigens in ELISA tests. The reactivity of SAPA was strongly associated to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and independent of the age of the patients but was not suitable neither for universal serodiagnosis nor for discrimination of specific phases of Chagas infection. Anti-R-13 response was observed in 27.5% only in chagasic patients. Moreover, anti-R13 reactivity was associated with early infection and not to cardiac pathology. This result questioned previous studies, which considered the anti-R-13 response as a marker of chronic Chagas heart disease. The major clonets 20 and 39 (belonging to Trypanosoma cruzi I and T. cruzi II respectively which circulate in equal proportions in vectors of the studied area, were identified in patients' blood by PCR. Clonet 39 was selected over clonet 20 in the circulation whatever the age of the patient. The only factor related to strain detected in patients' blood, was the anti-R-13 reactivity: 37% of the patients infected by clonet 39 (94 cases had anti-R13 antibodies contrasting with only 6% of the patients without clonet 39 (16 cases.

  12. Alterations in pancreatic β cell function and Trypanosoma cruzi infection: evidence from human and animal studies.

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    Dufurrena, Quinn; Amjad, Farhad M; Scherer, Philipp E; Weiss, Louis M; Nagajyothi, Jyothi; Roth, Jesse; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Kuliawat, Regina

    2017-03-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes a persistent infection, Chagas disease, affecting millions of persons in endemic areas of Latin America. As a result of immigration, this disease has now been diagnosed in non-endemic areas worldwide. Although, the heart and gastrointestinal tract are the most studied, the insulin-secreting β cell of the endocrine pancreas is also a target of infection. In this review, we summarize available clinical and laboratory evidence to determine whether T. cruzi-infection-mediated changes of β cell function is likely to contribute to the development of hyperglycemia and diabetes. Our literature survey indicates that T. cruzi infection of humans and of experimental animals relates to altered secretory behavior of β cells. The mechanistic basis of these observations appears to be a change in stimulus-secretion pathway function rather than the loss of insulin-producing β cells. Whether this attenuated insulin release ultimately contributes to the pathogenesis of diabetes in human Chagas disease, however, remains to be determined. Since the etiologies of diabetes are multifactorial including genetic and lifestyle factors, the use of cell- and animal-based investigations, allowing direct manipulation of these factors, are important tools in testing if reduced insulin secretion has a causal influence on diabetes in the setting of Chagas disease. Long-term clinical investigations will be required to investigate this link in humans.

  13. 3-H-[1,2]Dithiole as a New Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Chemotype: Biological and Mechanism of Action Studies.

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    Couto, Marcos; Sánchez, Carina; Dávila, Belén; Machín, Valentina; Varela, Javier; Álvarez, Guzmán; Cabrera, Mauricio; Celano, Laura; Aguirre-López, Beatriz; Cabrera, Nallely; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Gómez-Puyou, Armando; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2015-08-12

    The current pharmacological Chagas disease treatments, using Nifurtimox or Benznidazole, show limited therapeutic results and are associated with potential side effects, like mutagenicity. Using random screening we have identified new chemotypes that were able to inhibit relevant targets of the Trypanosoma cruzi. We found 3H-[1,2]dithioles with the ability to inhibit Trypanosoma cruzi triosephosphate isomerase (TcTIM). Herein, we studied the structural modifications of this chemotype to analyze the influence of volume, lipophilicity and electronic properties in the anti-T. cruzi activity. Their selectivity to parasites vs. mammalian cells was also examined. To get insights into a possible mechanism of action, the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of TcTIM and cruzipain, using the isolated enzymes, and the inhibition of membrane sterol biosynthesis and excreted metabolites, using the whole parasite, were achieved. We found that this structural framework is interesting for the generation of innovative drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  14. 3-H-[1,2]Dithiole as a New Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Chemotype: Biological and Mechanism of Action Studies

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    Marcos Couto

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The current pharmacological Chagas disease treatments, using Nifurtimox or Benznidazole, show limited therapeutic results and are associated with potential side effects, like mutagenicity. Using random screening we have identified new chemotypes that were able to inhibit relevant targets of the Trypanosoma cruzi. We found 3H-[1,2]dithioles with the ability to inhibit Trypanosoma cruzi triosephosphate isomerase (TcTIM. Herein, we studied the structural modifications of this chemotype to analyze the influence of volume, lipophilicity and electronic properties in the anti-T. cruzi activity. Their selectivity to parasites vs. mammalian cells was also examined. To get insights into a possible mechanism of action, the inhibition of the enzymatic activity of TcTIM and cruzipain, using the isolated enzymes, and the inhibition of membrane sterol biosynthesis and excreted metabolites, using the whole parasite, were achieved. We found that this structural framework is interesting for the generation of innovative drugs for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  15. Nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Schenkman, Sergio; Pascoalino, Bruno dos Santos; Nardelli, Sheila C

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nucleus in living organisms characterizes the Eukaryote domain. The nucleus compartmentalizes the genetic material surrounded by a double membrane called nuclear envelope. The nucleus has been observed since the advent of the light microscope, and sub-compartments such as nucleoli, diverse nuclear bodies and condensed chromosomes have been later recognized, being part of highly organized and dynamic structure. The significance and function of such organization has increased with the understanding of transcription, replication, DNA repair, recombination processes. It is now recognized as consequence of adding complexity and regulation in more complex eukaryotic cells. Here we provide a description of the actual stage of knowledge of the nuclear structure of Trypanosoma cruzi. As an early divergent eukaryote, it presents unique and/or reduced events of DNA replication, transcription and repair as well as RNA processing and transport to the cytosol. Nevertheless, it shows peculiar structure changes accordingly to the cell cycle and stage of differentiation. T. cruzi proliferates only as epimastigote and amastigote stages, and when these forms differentiate in trypomastigote forms, their cell cycle is arrested. This arrested stage is capable of invading mammalian cells and of surviving harsh conditions, such as the gut of the insect vector and mammalian macrophages. Transcription and replication decrease during transformation in trypomastigotes implicating large alterations in the nuclear structure. Recent evidences also suggest that T. cruzi nucleus respond to oxidative and nutritional stresses. Due to the phylogenetic proximity with other well-known trypanosomes, such as Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, they are expected to have similar nuclear organization, although differences are noticed due to distinct life cycles, cellular organizations and the specific adaptations for surviving in different host environments. Therefore, the general

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi recognition by macrophages and muscle cells: perspectives after a 15-year study

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    Tania C. de Araujo-Jorge

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages and muscle cells are the main targets for invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi. Ultrastructural studies of this phenomenon in vitro showed that invasion occurs by endocytosis, with attachment and internalization being mediated by different components capable of recognizing epi-or trypomastigotes (TRY. A parasitophorus vacuole was formed in both cell types, thereafter fusing with lysosomes. Then, the mechanism of T. cruzi invasion of host cells (HC is essentially similar (during a primary infection in the abscence of a specific immune response, regardless of wether the target cell is a professional or a non-professional phagocytic cell. Using sugars, lectins, glycosidases, proteinases and proteinase inhibitors, we observed that the relative balance between exposed sialic acid and galactose/N-acetyl galactosamine (GAL residues on the TRY surface, determines the parasite's capacity to invade HC, and that lectin-mediated phagocytosis with GAL specificity is important for internalization of T. cruzi into macrophages. On the other hand, GAL on the surface to heart muscle cells participate on TRY adhesion. TRY need to process proteolytically both the HC and their own surface, to expose the necessary ligands and receptors that allow binding to, and internalization in the host cell. The diverse range of molecular mechanisms which the parasite could use to invade the host cell may correspond to differences in the available "receptors"on the surface of each specific cell type. Acute phase components, with lectin or proteinase inhibitory activities (a-macroglobulins, may also be involved in T. cruzi-host cell interaction.

  17. [Entomological study of Trypanosoma cruzi vectors in the rural communities of Sucre state, Venezuela].

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    García-Jordán, Noris; Berrizbeitia, Mariolga; Concepción, Juan Luis; Aldana, Elis; Cáceres, Ana; Quiñones, Wilfredo

    2015-01-01

    The ecological niche of Reduvidae vectors has been modified due to environmental changes and human encroachment into the rural areas. This study evaluates the current entomological indices of triatomines responsible for Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Sucre State, Venezuela. A cross-sectional and prospective study was conducted in 95 towns and 577 dwellings in the 15 municipalities of the state of Sucre, Venezuela, from August to November, 2008. Triatomine bugs were identified on the basis of morphological characteristics, and their feces examined for T. cruzi infection through direct microscopy. Positive slides were stained with Giemsa and parasites were identified by morphologic characterization. The entomological indices expressing the highest values were dispersion (16.67%) and household colonization (33.33%). The triatomine species captured were: Rhodnius prolixus , Rhodnius main intradomiciliary vector. Despite the low index of vector infection (1.72%), the existence of species with domiciliary and peridomiciliary reproductive success ensures the persistence of the epidemiological chain both for the disease and the parasite.

  18. The trans-sialidase, the major Trypanosoma cruzi virulence factor: Three decades of studies.

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    Freire-de-Lima, L; Fonseca, L M; Oeltmann, T; Mendonça-Previato, L; Previato, J O

    2015-11-01

    Chagas' disease is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Since the description of Chagas'disease in 1909 extensive research has identified important events in the disease in order to understand the biochemical mechanism that modulates T. cruzi-host cell interactions and the ability of the parasite to ensure its survival in the infected host. Exactly 30 years ago, we presented evidence for the first time of a trans-sialidase activity in T. cruzi (T. cruzi-TS). This enzyme transfers sialic acid from the host glycoconjugates to the terminal β-galactopyranosyl residues of mucin-like molecules on the parasite's cell surface. Thenceforth, many articles have provided convincing data showing that T. cruzi-TS is able to govern relevant mechanisms involved in the parasite's survival in the mammalian host, such as invasion, escape from the phagolysosomal vacuole, differentiation, down-modulation of host immune responses, among others. The aim of this review is to cover the history of the discovery of T. cruzi-TS, as well as some well-documented biological effects encompassed by this parasite's virulence factor, an enzyme with potential attributes to become a drug target against Chagas disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Sexual transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

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    Ribeiro, Marcelle; Nitz, Nadjar; Santana, Camilla; Moraes, Aline; Hagström, Luciana; Andrade, Rafael; Rios, Adriano; Sousa, Alessandro; Dallago, Bruno; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Hecht, Mariana

    2016-03-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is mainly transmitted by blood-sucking triatomines, but other routes also have epidemiological importance, such as blood transfusion and congenital transmission. Although the possibility of sexual transmission of T. cruzi has been suggested since its discovery, few studies have been published on this subject. We investigated acquisition of T. cruzi by sexual intercourse in an experimental murine model. Male and female mice in the chronic phase of Chagas disease were mated with naive partners. Parasitological, serological and molecular tests demonstrated the parasites in tissues and blood of partners. These results confirm the sexual transmission of T. cruzi in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Toxicity of oleoresins from the genus Copaifera in Trypanosoma cruzi: a comparative study.

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    Izumi, Erika; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Veiga-Júnior, Valdir F; Nakamura, Celso V

    2013-07-01

    Several members of the genus Copaifera are present in Latin America, mainly in the Amazon region. These plants produce oleoresins that are used by indigenous people for medicinal purposes, with no distinction among species. Their medicinal properties include the treatment of cutaneous ulcerations associated with leishmaniasis and wounds caused by insect bites. However, to date, no comparative studies of the antiparasitic activity of copaiba oleoresins from different species against Trypanosoma cruzi have been published. In the present study, copaiba oleoresins from eight species were evaluated for activity against T. cruzi, including observations of cytotoxic effects in mammalian cells and parasite cells. All of the copaiba oleoresins exerted effects on all parasite life stages, especially against the replicative forms. C. martii and C. officinalis exhibited the best activity. For intracellular amastigotes, the IC50 values varied from less than 5.0 µg/mL to 10.0 µg/mL. For epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, the maximum inhibition was obtained with IC50 values of 17.0 µg/mL and 97.0 µg/mL, respectively. Oleoresins showed moderate cytotoxicity to nucleated cells, 17.5 to 32.5 µg/mL being the concentration range needed to reduce the monolayer integrity by 50 %. Toxicity to erythrocytes was observed by a hemolytic effect of 50 % above 500 µg/mL for half of the oleoresins from different species. Different oleoresins caused lipid peroxidation, increased cell-membrane permeability and changed the mitochondrial potential. Ultrastructural changes were observed after the treatment of the intracellular amastigote forms of the parasite. The toxic potential differed among oleoresins from distinct copaiba species, which can influence medicinal efficacy. This is especially relevant for people who live far from medical assistance and depend on medicinal plants. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Usefulness of microsatellite typing in population genetic studies of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Macedo Andrea M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Through microsatellite analysis of 53 monoclonal populations of Trypanosoma cruzi, we found a remarkable degree of genetic polymorphism with no single multilocus genotype being observed more than once. The microsatellite profile proved to be stable during 70 generations of the CL Brener clone in culture. The microsatellite profiling presented also high diagnostic sensitivity since DNA amplifications could be achieved with less than 100 fg DNA, corresponding to half parasite total DNA content. Based on these technical attributes the microsatellite assay turns out to be an important tool for direct typing T. cruzi in biological samples. By using this approach we were able to type T. cruzi in feces of artificially infected bugs and in single cells sorted by FACS. The microsatellites have shown to be excellent markers for T. cruzi phylogenetic reconstruction. We used maximum parsimony based on the minimum number of mutational steps to build an unrooted Wagner network, which confirms previous conclusions based on the analysis of the D7 domain of the LSU rDNA gene that T. cruzi is composed by two major groups. We also obtained evidence that strains belonging to rRNA group 2 are subdivided into two genetically distant clusters, and that one of these clusters is more related to rRNA group 1/2. These results suggest different origins for these strains.

  2. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in central Brazil. A study of 1,211 individuals born to infected mothers

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    Alejandro O Luquetti

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi during pregnancy is estimated to occur in less than 20% of infected mothers; however, the etiopathogenesis is not completely understood. The Centre for Studies on Chagas Disease provides confirmation of T. cruzi infection for individuals living in central Brazil. In this retrospective hospital-based study, all requests for diagnosis of T. cruzi infection in individuals less than 21 years old from 1994-2014 were searched. We end with 1,211 individuals and their respective infected mothers. Congenital transmission of infection was confirmed in 24 individuals (2% in central Brazil, an area where the main T. cruzi lineage circulating in humans is TcII. This low prevalence of congenital Chagas disease is discussed in relation to recent findings in the south region of Brazil, where TcV is the main lineage and congenital transmission has a higher prevalence (approximately 5%, similar to frequencies reported in Argentina, Paraguay and Bolivia. This is the first report to show geographical differences in the rates of congenital transmission of T. cruzi and the relationship between the prevalence of congenital transmission and the type of Tc prevalent in each region.

  3. Electrocardiographic alteration among first degree relatives with serologic evidence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection: a sibship study

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    Julio C. Morini

    1994-09-01

    Full Text Available To analyze whether electrocardiographic alterations (ECGA in patients with antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi showed a patttern of familial aggregation, a sample of 379 young adults (166 men and 213 women distributed in sibships, were assessed for the presence of anti-T.cruzi antibodies, and subjected to a complete clinical examination and a standard resting electrocardiogram (ECG. Positive T. cruzi serology was detected in 165 individuals, 48 of them showing an abnormal ECG (overall prevalence 29 por cento. One hundred and eleven seropositive individuals were distributed in 45 sibships, each of them constituted by more than one seropositive sib, with ECGA being present in 34 out of these patients. Seropositive subjects with ECGA were detected in 27 sibships. Since the index case within each sibship is counted exactly once, affected individuals selected at random as propositi were extracted to calculate the prevalence of ECGA among first degree relatives of probands. Abnormal ECGs were recorded in 7 out of 45 sibs yielding a prevalence that did not differ from estimations registered in the general population or seropositive sibs. Data from the present sample show no familial aggregation for the occurrence of ECGA in patients with T.cruzi infection.

  4. The Effectiveness of Natural Diarylheptanoids against Trypanosoma cruzi: Cytotoxicity, Ultrastructural Alterations and Molecular Modeling Studies.

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    Vitor Sueth-Santiago

    Full Text Available Curcumin (CUR is the major constituent of the rhizomes of Curcuma longa and has been widely investigated for its chemotherapeutic properties. The well-known activity of CUR against Leishmania sp., Trypanosoma brucei and Plasmodium falciparum led us to investigate its activity against Trypanosoma cruzi. In this work, we tested the cytotoxic effects of CUR and other natural curcuminoids on different forms of T. cruzi, as well as the ultrastructural changes induced in epimastigote form of the parasite. CUR was verified as the curcuminoid with more significant trypanocidal properties (IC50 10.13 μM on epimastigotes. Demethoxycurcumin (DMC was equipotent to CUR (IC50 11.07 μM, but bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC was less active (IC50 45.33 μM and cyclocurcumin (CC was inactive. In the experiment with infected murine peritoneal macrophages all diarylheptanoids were more active than the control in the inhibition of the trypomastigotes release. The electron microscopy images showed ultrastructural changes associated with the cytoskeleton of the parasite, indicating tubulin as possible target of CUR in T. cruzi. The results obtained by flow cytometry analysis of DNA content of the parasites treated with natural curcuminoids suggested a mechanism of action on microtubules related to the paclitaxel`s mode of action. To better understand the mechanism of action highlighted by electron microscopy and flow cytometry experiments we performed the molecular docking of natural curcuminoids on tubulin of T. cruzi in a homology model and the results obtained showed that the observed interactions are in accordance with the IC50 values found, since there CUR and DMC perform similar interactions at the binding site on tubulin while BDMC do not realize a hydrogen bond with Lys163 residue due to the absence of methoxyl groups. These results indicate that trypanocidal properties of CUR may be related to the cytoskeletal alterations.

  5. Studies on the virulence and attenuation of Trypanosoma cruzi using immunodeficient animals

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    Basombrío Miguel Ángel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue invasion and pathology by Trypanosoma cruzi result from an interaction between parasite virulence and host immunity. Successive in vivo generations of the parasite select populations with increasing ability to invade the host. Conversely, prolonged in vitro selection of the parasite produces attenuated sublines with low infectivity for mammals. One such subline (TCC clone has been extensively used in our laboratory as experimental vaccine and tested in comparative experiments with its virulent ancestor (TUL. The experiments here reviewed aimed at the use of immunodeficient mice for testing the infectivity of TCC parasites. It has not been possible to obtain virulent, revertant sublines by prolonged passaged in such mice.

  6. Targeting polyamine transport in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Phanstiel, Otto; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2018-03-10

    Polyamines play critical roles as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is auxotrophic for polyamines. Therefore, their intracellular availability depends exclusively on polyamine transport and inhibition of these uptake processes can alter the viability of the parasite. The polyamine analogues used in this work were successfully tested as antiproliferative agents in cancer cells, bacteria, fungi and also showed a potent antiplasmodial effect. We evaluated the activity of these compounds on polyamine transport in T. cruzi and assessed the effects on parasite viability. Three polyamine derivatives, AMXT1501, Ant4 and Ant44, inhibited the putrescine transport in epimastigotes (the insect stage of T. cruzi) with calculated IC 50 values of 2.43, 5.02 and 3.98 μM, respectively. In addition, only Ant4 and Ant44 inhibited spermidine transport with IC 50 of 8.78 μM and 13.34 μM, respectively. The Ant4 analogue showed a high trypanocidal effect on trypomastigotes (the bloodstream stage of T. cruzi) with an IC 50 of 460 nM, (SI = 12.7) while in epimastigotes the IC 50 was significantly higher (16.97 μM). In addition, we studied the effect of the combination of benznidazole, a drug used in treating Chagas disease, with Ant4 on the viability of epimastigotes. The combined treatment produced a significant increase on the inhibition of parasites growth compared with individual treatments. In summary, these results suggest that Ant4, a putrescine conjugate, is a promising compound for the treatment of Chagas disease because it showed a potent trypanocidal effect via its inhibition of polyamine import. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Maternal-fetal transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, a health problem slightly studied in Mexico: case Chiapas

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    Guillermina Campos-Valdez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence in 1125 pregnant women and the transmission frequency to their children from Tapachula and Palenque, Chiapas. Materials and methods. We determined the prevalence by serology tests and the transmission frequency by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and T. cruzi reactivity capacity after 12 months. Results. Total maternal infection prevalence were 23/1 125 (2.04%, 9/600 (1.5% were from Tapachula and 14/525 (2.6% from Palenque. The seropositive women were between 20 and 35 years old, 31.8% have Premature Rapture of Membrane and 9.1% have history of perinatal death. The total percentage of positive newborns by PCR was 9/23 (39.13%, out of those 2/9 (22.2% are from Tapachula and 7/14 (50% from Palenque. The Maternal Fetal transmission frequency was. 2/9 (22.2% in Tapachula and 1/14 (7.14% in Palenque, all positive infants were asynthomatic. Conclusion. The maternal-fetal transmission rate in Chiapas State is variable; the reason could be the maternal immunological status and T. cruzi strain.

  8. Effective gene delivery to Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes through nucleofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Lugo, Lisandro; Díaz-Olmos, Yirys; Sáenz-García, José; Probst, Christian Macagnan; DaRocha, Wanderson Duarte

    2017-06-01

    New opportunities have raised to study the gene function approaches of Trypanosoma cruzi after its genome sequencing in 2005. Functional genomic approaches in Trypanosoma cruzi are challenging due to the reduced tools available for genetic manipulation, as well as to the reduced efficiency of the transient transfection conducted through conventional methods. The Amaxa nucleofector device was systematically tested in the present study in order to improve the electroporation conditions in the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi. The transfection efficiency was quantified using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as reporter gene followed by cell survival assessment. The herein used nucleofection parameters have increased the survival rates (>90%) and the transfection efficiency by approximately 35%. The small amount of epimastigotes and DNA required for the nucleofection can turn the method adopted here into an attractive tool for high throughput screening (HTS) applications, and for gene editing in parasites where genetic manipulation tools remain relatively scarce. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential tissue tropism of Trypanosoma cruzi strains: an in vitro study

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    Luciana O Andrade

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We have previously demonstrated selection favoring the JG strain of Trypanosoma cruziin hearts of BALB/c mice that were chronically infected with an equal mixture of the monoclonal JG strain and a clone of the Colombian strain, Col1.7G2. To evaluate whether cell invasion efficiency drives this selection, we infected primary cultures of BALB/c cardiomyocytes using these same T. cruzi populations. Contrary to expectation, Col1.7G2 parasites invaded heart cell cultures in higher numbers than JG parasites; however, intracellular multiplication of JG parasites was more efficient than that of Col1.7G2 parasites. This phenomenon was only observed for cardiomyocytes and not for cultured Vero cells. Double infections (Col1.7G2 + JG showed similar results. Even though invasion might influence tissue selection, our data strongly suggest that intracellular development is important to determine parasite tissue tropism.

  10. Morpho-Structural Effects Caused by 660 nm Laser Diode in Epimastigotes Forms of Trypanosoma cruzi: In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Artur F. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Pitta, Ivan R.; Galdino, Suely L.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-08-01

    Parasitic diseases represent a major public health problems in Latin America, in particular, Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, infects more than 18 million people in all countries of Latin America. Visible light induces a photochemical reaction, that induces the activation of enzymes used mainly in the respiratory chain, and that light has the primary targets lysosomes and mitochondria of cells, increasing, the mitochondrial ATP production. The purpose of this study was to assess the morpho-structural generated in the epimastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi, after irradiation with a semiconductor laser InGaAlP, at a wavelength (λ) equal to 660 nm±10 nm, 40 mW optical Power, emitting red light in the visible spectrum, with a dose of 6 J/cm2 in continuous mode. Then the parasites that have undergone irradiation were analyzed by optical microscopy and compared to untreated. It found the increase in size of the kinetoplast (structure with high concentration of extracellular DNA-kDNA, whose main function is to encode the respiratory chain enzymes such as ATPase and citocromoxidase), the cell nucleus and the cell volume of the parasite, leaving the more rounded.

  11. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of nicotinamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Milena B P; Silva, Cinara V; Bastos, Tanira M; Guimarães, Elisalva T; Figueira, Claudio P; Smirlis, Despina; Azevedo, Walter F

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania spp. sirtuins has shown promising antiparasitic activity, indicating that these enzymes may be used as targets for drug discovery against trypanosomatid infections. In the present work we carried out a virtual screening focused on the C pocket of Sir2 from Trypanosoma cruzi. Using this approach, the best ligand found was nicotinamide. In vitro tests confirmed the anti-T. cruzi activity of nicotinamide on epimastigote and trypomastigote forms. Moreover, treatment of T. cruzi-infected macrophages with nicotinamide caused a significant reduction in the number of amastigotes. In addition, alterations in the mitochondria and an increase in the vacuolization in the cytoplasm were observed in epimastigotes treated with nicotinamide. Analysis of the complex of Sir2 and nicotinamide revealed the details of the possible ligand-target interaction. Our data reveal a potential use of TcSir2 as a target for anti-T. cruzi drug discovery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli induces resistance of guinea pigs to virulent Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, B; Moretti, E; Fretes, R

    2014-01-15

    Chagas' disease, endemic in Latin America, is spread in natural environments through animal reservoirs, including marsupials, mice and guinea pigs. Farms breeding guinea pigs for food are located in some Latin-American countries with consequent risk of digestive infection. The aim of this work was to study the effect of vaccination with Trypanosoma rangeli in guinea pigs challenged with Trypanosoma cruzi. Animals were vaccinated with fixated epimastigotes of T. rangeli, emulsified with saponin. Controls received only PBS. Before being challenged with T. cruzi, parasitemia, survival rates and histological studies were performed. The vaccinated guinea pigs revealed significantly lower parasitemia than controls (pguinea pigs and dogs. The development of vaccines for use in animals, like domestic dogs and guinea pigs in captivity, opens up new opportunities for preventive tools, and could reduce the risk of infection with T. cruzi in the community. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. QSAR study and conformational analysis of 4-arylthiazolylhydrazones derived from 1-indanones with anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguera, Guido J; Fabian, Lucas E; Lombardo, Elisa; Finkielsztein, Liliana

    2015-10-12

    A set of 4-arylthiazolylhydrazones derived from 1-indanones (TZHs) previously synthesized and assayed against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, were explored in terms of conformational analysis. We found that TZHs can adopt four minimum energy conformations: cis (A, B and C) and trans. The possible bioactive conformation was selected by a 3D-QSAR model. Different molecular parameters were calculated to produce QSAR second-generation models. These QSAR results are discussed in conjunction with conformational analysis from molecular modeling studies. The main factor to determine the activity of the compounds was the partial charge at the N(3) atom (qN3). The predictive ability of the QSAR equations proposed was experimentally validated. The QSAR models developed in this study will be helpful to design novel potent TZHs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural studies of the Trypanosoma cruzi Old Yellow Enzyme: insights into enzyme dynamics and specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mário T; Rodrigues, Nathalia C; Gava, Lisandra M; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Canduri, Fernanda; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Oliva, Glaucius; Borges, Júlio C

    2013-12-31

    The flavoprotein old yellow enzyme of Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOYE) is an oxidoreductase that uses NAD(P)H as cofactor. This enzyme is clinically relevant due to its role in the action mechanism of some trypanocidal drugs used in the treatment of Chagas' disease by producing reactive oxygen species. In this work, the recombinant enzyme TcOYE was produced and collectively, X-ray crystallography, small angle X-ray scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular dynamics provided a detailed description of its structure, specificity and hydrodynamic behavior. The crystallographic structure at 1.27Å showed a classical (α/β)8 fold with the FMN prosthetic group buried at the positively-charged active-site cleft. In solution, TcOYE behaved as a globular monomer, but it exhibited a molecular envelope larger than that observed in the crystal structure, suggesting intrinsic protein flexibility. Moreover, the binding mode of β-lapachone, a trypanocidal agent, and other naphthoquinones was investigated by molecular docking and dynamics suggesting that their binding to TcOYE are stabilized mainly by interactions with the isoalloxazine ring from FMN and residues from the active-site pocket. © 2013.

  15. The Unfolding and Refolding Reactions of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma Cruzi Follow Similar Pathways. Guanidinium Hydrochloride Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Contreras, Edgar; Pérez Hernández, Gerardo; Sánchez-Rebollar, Brenda Guadalupe; Chánez-Cárdenas, María Elena

    2005-04-01

    The unfolding and refolding reactions of Trypanosoma cruzi triosephosphate isomerase (TcTIM) was studied under equilibrium conditions at increasing guanidinium hydrochloride concentrations. The changes in activity intrinsic fluorescence and far-ultraviolet circular dichroism as a function of denaturant were used as a quaternary, tertiary and secondary structural probes respectively. The change in extrinsic ANS fluorescence intensity was also investigated. The results show that the transition between the homodimeric native enzyme to the unfolded monomers (unfolding), and its inverse reaction (refolding) are described by similar pathways and two equilibrium intermediates were detected in both reactions. The mild denaturant concentrations intermediate is active and contains significant amount of secondary and tertiary structures. The medium denaturant concentrations intermediate is inactive and able to bind the fluorescent dye. This intermediates are maybe related with those observed in the denaturation pattern of TIMs from other species; the results are discussed in this context.

  16. Preliminary study on applicability of microsatellite DNA primers from parasite protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi in free-living protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Yu, Yuhe; Shen, Yunfen; Miao, Wei; Feng, Weisong

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, we took the lead in studying on specificity of the microsatellite DNA loci and applicability of microsatellite DNA primers in protozoa. In order to study characters of microsatellites in free-living protozoa, eight microsatellite loci primers developed from Trypanosoma cruzi (MCLE01, SCLE10, MCLE08, SCLE11, MCLF10, MCLG10, MCL03, MCL05) were employed to amplify microsatellite in four free-living protozoa, including Bodo designis, Euglena gracilis FACHB848, Paramecium bruzise and Tetrahymena thermophila BF1. In the amplification systems of P. bruzise, four loci (SCLE10, SCLE11, MCLF10, MCL03) were amplified successfully, and four amplification fragments were in proper size. In genome of E. gracilis FACHB848, five of eight primers brought five clear amplification bands. In B. designis, three (No.4, 5 and 7) of eight loci produced clear and sharp products without stutter bands, whereas no bands appeared in T. thermophila BF1. Further, eight 300 500 bp amplification fragments were cloned and sequenced. Nevertheless, all sequenced products did not contain corresponding microsatellite sequence, although Bodo is in the same order and has the nearest phylogenetic relation with Trypanosoma among these four species. Thus, the microsatellite DNA primers can not be applied among order or more far taxa, and the specificity of microsatellite DNA is very high in protozoa. The results of this study will contribute to our understanding of microsatellite DNA in protozoa.

  17. Role of dystrophin in acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestio, Lygia M; Celes, Mara R N; Milanezi, Cristiane; Silva, João S; Jelicks, Linda A; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Rossi, Marcos A; Prado, Cibele M

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated loss/reduction of dystrophin in cardiomyocytes in both acute and chronic stages of experimental Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection in mice. The mechanisms responsible for dystrophin disruption in the hearts of mice acutely infected with T. cruzi are not completely understood. The present in vivo and in vitro studies were undertaken to evaluate the role of inflammation in dystrophin disruption and its correlation with the high mortality rate during acute infection. C57BL/6 mice were infected with T. cruzi and killed 14, 20 and 26 days post infection (dpi). The intensity of inflammation, cardiac expression of dystrophin, calpain-1, NF-κB, TNF-α, and sarcolemmal permeability were evaluated. Cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocytes were incubated with serum, collected at the peak of cytokine production and free of parasites, from T. cruzi-infected mice and dystrophin, calpain-1, and NF-κB expression analyzed. Dystrophin disruption occurs at the peak of mortality and inflammation and is associated with increased expression of calpain-1, TNF-α, NF-κB, and increased sarcolemmal permeability in the heart of T. cruzi-infected mice at 20 dpi confirmed by in vitro studies. The peak of mortality occurred only when significant loss of dystrophin in the hearts of infected animals occurred, highlighting the correlation between inflammation, dystrophin loss and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Photodynamic Antimicrobial Therapy (PACT) against Trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi: In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Artur F. S.; Soares, Luiz G. P.; Aciole, Jouber M. S.; Aciole, Gilberth T. S.; Pitta, Ivan R.; Galdino, Suely L.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.

    2011-08-01

    Policies to combat Chagas disease presents a considerable degree of negligence and is classified at level III by TDR, where the focus of research is based on the improvement and wider dissemination of existing tools and strategies for combating them. The PACT is based on topical or systemic administration of a nontoxic dye sensitive to light, followed by low dose irradiation with visible light of wavelength appropriate. In the presence of oxygen found in the cells, the photosensitizer (FS) enabled may react with molecules in its vicinity by electron transfer or hydrogen, leading to production of free radicals (type I reaction) or by energy transfer to oxygen (type II reaction), leading to production of singlet oxygen. Both paths can lead to cell death and the destruction of diseased tissue. In this work, we verify the effectiveness of PACT associated with a semiconductor laser InGaAlP, a wavelength (λ) equal to 660 nm±10 nm, 30 mW optical power, emitting red light in the visible spectrum, with a dose of 4 J/cm2 in continuous mode, using methylene blue in five differents concentrations on the infective trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. To determine the viability of the parasites, one sample from each treatment group at each concentration was removed and analyzed in a hemocytometer, observing the decrease in the number of live parasites for the solution without treatment. The results demonstrated significant percentage of parasite lysis (up to 86% lethality), what can not be observed in the groups treated with laser or with the FS.

  19. Pentamidine exerts in vitro and in vivo anti Trypanosoma cruzi activity and inhibits the polyamine transport in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, María V; Miranda, Mariana R; Campos-Estrada, Carolina; Reigada, Chantal; Maya, Juan D; Pereira, Claudio A; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Pentamidine is an antiprotozoal and fungicide drug used in the treatment of leishmaniasis and African trypanosomiasis. Despite its extensive use as antiparasitic drug, little evidence exists about the effect of pentamidine in Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Recent studies have shown that pentamidine blocks a polyamine transporter present in Leishmania major; consequently, its might also block these transporters in T. cruzi. Considering that T. cruzi lacks the ability to synthesize putrescine de novo, the inhibition of polyamine transport can bring a new therapeutic target against the parasite. In this work, we show that pentamidine decreases, not only the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes, but also the parasite burden of infected cells. In T. cruzi-infected mice pentamidine decreases the inflammation and parasite burden in hearts from infected mice. The treatment also decreases parasitemia, resulting in an increased survival rate. In addition, pentamidine strongly inhibits the putrescine and spermidine transport in T. cruzi epimastigotes and amastigotes. Thus, this study points to reevaluate the utility of pentamidine and introduce evidence of a potential new action mechanism. In the quest of new therapeutic strategies against Chagas disease, the extensive use of pentamidine in human has led to a well-known clinical profile, which could be an advantage over newly synthesized molecules that require more comprehensive trials prior to their clinical use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. DNA content analysis allows discrimination between Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naves, Lucila Langoni; da Silva, Marcos Vinícius; Fajardo, Emanuella Francisco; da Silva, Raíssa Bernardes; De Vito, Fernanda Bernadelli; Rodrigues, Virmondes; Lages-Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo; Pedrosa, André Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, a human protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of Chagas disease. Currently the species is divided into six taxonomic groups. The genome of the CL Brener clone has been estimated to be 106.4-110.7 Mb, and DNA content analyses revealed that it is a diploid hybrid clone. Trypanosoma rangeli is a hemoflagellate that has the same reservoirs and vectors as T. cruzi; however, it is non-pathogenic to vertebrate hosts. The haploid genome of T. rangeli was previously estimated to be 24 Mb. The parasitic strains of T. rangeli are divided into KP1(+) and KP1(-). Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the DNA content in different strains of T. cruzi and T. rangeli by flow cytometry. All T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains yielded cell cycle profiles with clearly identifiable G1-0 (2n) and G2-M (4n) peaks. T. cruzi and T. rangeli genome sizes were estimated using the clone CL Brener and the Leishmania major CC1 as reference cell lines because their genome sequences have been previously determined. The DNA content of T. cruzi strains ranged from 87,41 to 108,16 Mb, and the DNA content of T. rangeli strains ranged from 63,25 Mb to 68,66 Mb. No differences in DNA content were observed between KP1(+) and KP1(-) T. rangeli strains. Cultures containing mixtures of the epimastigote forms of T. cruzi and T. rangeli strains resulted in cell cycle profiles with distinct G1 peaks for strains of each species. These results demonstrate that DNA content analysis by flow cytometry is a reliable technique for discrimination between T. cruzi and T. rangeli isolated from different hosts.

  1. Genome wide association study (GWAS) of Chagas cardiomyopathy in Trypanosoma cruzi seropositive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xutao; Sabino, Ester C; Cunha-Neto, Edecio; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Ianni, Barbara; Mady, Charles; Busch, Michael P; Seielstad, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Familial aggregation of Chagas cardiac disease in T. cruzi-infected persons suggests that human genetic variation may be an important determinant of disease progression. To perform a GWAS using a well-characterized cohort to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes associated with cardiac outcomes. A retrospective cohort study was developed by the NHLBI REDS-II program in Brazil. Samples were collected from 499 T. cruzi seropositive blood donors who had donated between 1996 and 2002, and 101 patients with clinically diagnosed Chagas cardiomyopathy. In 2008-2010, all subjects underwent a complete medical examination. After genotype calling, quality control filtering with exclusion of 20 cases, and imputation of 1,000 genomes variants; association analysis was performed for 7 cardiac and parasite related traits, adjusting for population stratification. The cohort showed a wide range of African, European, and modest Native American admixture proportions, consistent with the recent history of Brazil. No SNPs were found to be highly (P<10(-8)) associated with cardiomyopathy. The two mostly highly associated SNPs for cardiomyopathy (rs4149018 and rs12582717; P-values <10(-6)) are located on Chromosome 12p12.2 in the SLCO1B1 gene, a solute carrier family member. We identified 44 additional genic SNPs associated with six traits at P-value <10(-6): Ejection Fraction, PR, QRS, QT intervals, antibody levels by EIA, and parasitemia by PCR. This GWAS identified suggestive SNPs that may impact the risk of progression to cardiomyopathy. Although this Chagas cohort is the largest examined by GWAS to date, (580 subjects), moderate sample size may explain in part the limited number of significant SNP variants. Enlarging the current sample through expanded cohorts and meta-analyses, and targeted studies of candidate genes, will be required to confirm and extend the results reported here. Future studies should also include exposed seronegative controls to investigate

  2. Risk Factors and Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection of Dutch Blood Donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slot, Ed; Hogema, Boris M.; Molier, Michel; Bart, Aldert; Zaaijer, Hans L.

    2016-01-01

    Blood donors unaware of Trypanosoma cruzi infection may donate infectious blood. Risk factors and the presence of T. cruzi antibodies in at-risk Dutch blood donors were studied to assess whether specific blood safety measures are warranted in the Netherlands. Birth in a country endemic for Chagas

  3. Comprehensive glycoprofiling of the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Kawahara, Rebeca; Viner, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle involving insect and mammalian hosts and distinct developmental stages. During T. cruzi developmental stages, glycoproteins play important role in the host-parasite interaction, such as cellular recognition, host......-specific characterization of the N- and O-linked glycan heterogeneity in the two life stages of T. cruzi was achieved by intact glycopeptide analysis, revealing 144/466 unique N-linked and 10/97 unique O-linked intact glycopeptides in epimastigotes/trypomastigotes, respectively. Conclusively, this study documents...... the significant T. cruzi stage-specific expression of glycoproteins that can help to better understand the T. cruzi phenotype and response caused by the interaction with different hosts during its complex life cycle. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is a neglected...

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Infection in Neotropical Wild Carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora): At the Top of the T. cruzi Transmission Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Fabiana Lopes; Roque, André Luiz Rodrigues; de Lima, Juliane Saab; Cheida, Carolina Carvalho; Lemos, Frederico Gemesio; de Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa; Bilac, Daniele; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia; Mourão, Guilherme; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I) and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus) harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua) harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU) and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis’ isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores’ literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that can be

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in neotropical wild carnivores (Mammalia: Carnivora: at the top of the T. cruzi transmission chain.

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    Fabiana Lopes Rocha

    Full Text Available Little is known on the role played by Neotropical wild carnivores in the Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles. We investigated T. cruzi infection in wild carnivores from three sites in Brazil through parasitological and serological tests. The seven carnivore species examined were infected by T. cruzi, but high parasitemias detectable by hemoculture were found only in two Procyonidae species. Genotyping by Mini-exon gene, PCR-RFLP (1f8/Akw21I and kDNA genomic targets revealed that the raccoon (Procyon cancrivorus harbored TcI and the coatis (Nasua nasua harbored TcI, TcII, TcIII-IV and Trypanosoma rangeli, in single and mixed infections, besides four T. cruzi isolates that displayed odd band patterns in the Mini-exon assay. These findings corroborate the coati can be a bioaccumulator of T. cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTU and may act as a transmission hub, a connection point joining sylvatic transmission cycles within terrestrial and arboreal mammals and vectors. Also, the odd band patterns observed in coatis' isolates reinforce that T. cruzi diversity might be much higher than currently acknowledged. Additionally, we assembled our data with T. cruzi infection on Neotropical carnivores' literature records to provide a comprehensive analysis of the infection patterns among distinct carnivore species, especially considering their ecological traits and phylogeny. Altogether, fifteen Neotropical carnivore species were found naturally infected by T. cruzi. Species diet was associated with T. cruzi infection rates, supporting the hypothesis that predator-prey links are important mechanisms for T. cruzi maintenance and dispersion in the wild. Distinct T. cruzi infection patterns across carnivore species and study sites were notable. Musteloidea species consistently exhibit high parasitemias in different studies which indicate their high infectivity potential. Mesocarnivores that feed on both invertebrates and mammals, including the coati, a host that

  6. Identification of novel benzimidazole derivatives as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents: solid-phase synthesis, structure-activity relationships and molecular docking studies.

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    Ríos, Natalia; Varela, Javier; Birriel, Estefania; González, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo; Merlino, Alicia; Porcal, Williams

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we report the solid-phase synthesis of 33 novel 1,2,5-tri-substituted benzimidazole derivatives and their in vitro activity on cruzipain and Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. Seven compounds were potent inhibitors of T. cruzi growth with IC50 values in the range 6-16 µM. Applying structure-activity relationships and principal component analysis strategies we were able to determine ring substituent effects and physicochemical properties that are important for the antichagasic activity of these novel derivatives, as well as get an insight into their possible mechanisms of action. Molecular docking studies revealed the binding orientation of the ligands in the active site of cruzipain providing new guidelines for the further design of better inhibitors. Compound 2a constitute a promising hit compound for novel anti-T. cruzi agents showing that the benzimidazole scaffold may represent an interesting therapeutic alternative for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  7. The diversity and expansion of the trans-sialidase gene family is a common feature in Trypanosoma cruzi clade members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel Angel; Cortez, Danielle R; Lima, Fábio M; Cortez, Caroline; Ramírez, José Luis; Martins, Andre G; Serrano, Myrna G; Teixeira, Marta M G; da Silveira, José Franco

    2016-01-01

    Trans-sialidase (TS) is a polymorphic protein superfamily described in members of the protozoan genus Trypanosoma. Of the eight TS groups recently described, TS group I proteins (some of which have catalytic activity) are present in the distantly related Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi phylogenetic clades, whereas other TS groups have only been described in some species belonging to the T. cruzi clade. In the present study we analyzed the repertoire, distribution and phylogenetic relationships of TS genes among species of the T. cruzi clade based on sequence similarity, multiple sequence alignment and tree-reconstruction approaches using TS sequences obtained with the aid of PCR-based strategies or retrieved from genome databases. We included the following representative isolates of the T. cruzi clade from South America: T. cruzi, T. cruzi Tcbat, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii, Trypanosoma rangeli and Trypanosoma conorhini. The cloned sequences encoded conserved TS protein motifs Asp-box and VTVxNVxLYNR but lacked the FRIP motif (conserved in TS group I). The T. conorhini sequences were the most divergent. The hybridization patterns of TS probes with chromosomal bands confirmed the abundance of these sequences in species in the T. cruzi clade. Divergence and relationship analysis placed most of the TS sequences in the groups defined in T. cruzi. Further examination of members of TS group II, which includes T. cruzi surface glycoproteins implicated in host cell attachment and invasion, showed that sequences of T. cruzi Tcbat grouped with those of T. cruzi genotype TcI. Our analysis indicates that different members of the T. cruzi clade, with different vertebrate hosts, vectors and pathogenicity, share the extensive expansion and sequence diversification of the TS gene family. Altogether, our results are congruent with the evolutionary history of the T. cruzi clade and represent a contribution to the understanding of the molecular

  8. International study to evaluate PCR methods for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood samples from Chagas disease patients.

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    Alejandro G Schijman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A century after its discovery, Chagas disease still represents a major neglected tropical threat. Accurate diagnostics tools as well as surrogate markers of parasitological response to treatment are research priorities in the field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of PCR methods in detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA by an external quality evaluation. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: An international collaborative study was launched by expert PCR laboratories from 16 countries. Currently used strategies were challenged against serial dilutions of purified DNA from stocks representing T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTU I, IV and VI (set A, human blood spiked with parasite cells (set B and Guanidine Hidrochloride-EDTA blood samples from 32 seropositive and 10 seronegative patients from Southern Cone countries (set C. Forty eight PCR tests were reported for set A and 44 for sets B and C; 28 targeted minicircle DNA (kDNA, 13 satellite DNA (Sat-DNA and the remainder low copy number sequences. In set A, commercial master mixes and Sat-DNA Real Time PCR showed better specificity, but kDNA-PCR was more sensitive to detect DTU I DNA. In set B, commercial DNA extraction kits presented better specificity than solvent extraction protocols. Sat-DNA PCR tests had higher specificity, with sensitivities of 0.05-0.5 parasites/mL whereas specific kDNA tests detected 5.10(-3 par/mL. Sixteen specific and coherent methods had a Good Performance in both sets A and B (10 fg/µl of DNA from all stocks, 5 par/mL spiked blood. The median values of sensitivities, specificities and accuracies obtained in testing the Set C samples with the 16 tests determined to be good performing by analyzing Sets A and B samples varied considerably. Out of them, four methods depicted the best performing parameters in all three sets of samples, detecting at least 10 fg/µl for each DNA stock, 0.5 par/mL and a sensitivity between 83.3-94.4%, specificity of 85

  9. International Study to Evaluate PCR Methods for Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in Blood Samples from Chagas Disease Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijman, Alejandro G.; Bisio, Margarita; Orellana, Liliana; Sued, Mariela; Duffy, Tomás; Mejia Jaramillo, Ana M.; Cura, Carolina; Auter, Frederic; Veron, Vincent; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Deborggraeve, Stijn; Hijar, Gisely; Zulantay, Inés; Lucero, Raúl Horacio; Velazquez, Elsa; Tellez, Tatiana; Sanchez Leon, Zunilda; Galvão, Lucia; Nolder, Debbie; Monje Rumi, María; Levi, José E.; Ramirez, Juan D.; Zorrilla, Pilar; Flores, María; Jercic, Maria I.; Crisante, Gladys; Añez, Néstor; De Castro, Ana M.; Gonzalez, Clara I.; Acosta Viana, Karla; Yachelini, Pedro; Torrico, Faustino; Robello, Carlos; Diosque, Patricio; Triana Chavez, Omar; Aznar, Christine; Russomando, Graciela; Büscher, Philippe; Assal, Azzedine; Guhl, Felipe; Sosa Estani, Sergio; DaSilva, Alexandre; Britto, Constança; Luquetti, Alejandro; Ladzins, Janis

    2011-01-01

    Background A century after its discovery, Chagas disease still represents a major neglected tropical threat. Accurate diagnostics tools as well as surrogate markers of parasitological response to treatment are research priorities in the field. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of PCR methods in detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA by an external quality evaluation. Methodology/Findings An international collaborative study was launched by expert PCR laboratories from 16 countries. Currently used strategies were challenged against serial dilutions of purified DNA from stocks representing T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTU) I, IV and VI (set A), human blood spiked with parasite cells (set B) and Guanidine Hidrochloride-EDTA blood samples from 32 seropositive and 10 seronegative patients from Southern Cone countries (set C). Forty eight PCR tests were reported for set A and 44 for sets B and C; 28 targeted minicircle DNA (kDNA), 13 satellite DNA (Sat-DNA) and the remainder low copy number sequences. In set A, commercial master mixes and Sat-DNA Real Time PCR showed better specificity, but kDNA-PCR was more sensitive to detect DTU I DNA. In set B, commercial DNA extraction kits presented better specificity than solvent extraction protocols. Sat-DNA PCR tests had higher specificity, with sensitivities of 0.05–0.5 parasites/mL whereas specific kDNA tests detected 5.10−3 par/mL. Sixteen specific and coherent methods had a Good Performance in both sets A and B (10 fg/µl of DNA from all stocks, 5 par/mL spiked blood). The median values of sensitivities, specificities and accuracies obtained in testing the Set C samples with the 16 tests determined to be good performing by analyzing Sets A and B samples varied considerably. Out of them, four methods depicted the best performing parameters in all three sets of samples, detecting at least 10 fg/µl for each DNA stock, 0.5 par/mL and a sensitivity between 83.3–94.4%, specificity of 85–95

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi: Inhibition of infection of human monocytes by aspirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho de Freitas, Rafael; Lonien, Sandra Cristina Heim; Malvezi, Aparecida Donizette; Silveira, Guilherme Ferreira; Wowk, Pryscilla Fanini; da Silva, Rosiane Valeriano; Yamauchi, Lucy Megumi; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli Fumie; Rizzo, Luiz Vicente; Bordignon, Juliano; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2017-11-01

    Cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential for progression of the parasite life cycle and development of Chagas disease. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) and other eicosanoids potently modulate host response and contribute to Chagas disease progression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of aspirin (ASA), a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor on the T. cruzi invasion and its influence on nitric oxide and cytokine production in human monocytes. The pretreatment of monocytes with ASA or SQ 22536 (adenylate-cyclase inhibitor) induced a marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection. On the other hand, the treatment of monocytes with SQ 22536 after ASA restored the invasiveness of T. cruzi. This reestablishment was associated with a decrease in nitric oxide and PGE 2 production, and also an increase of interleukin-10 and interleukin-12 by cells pre-treated with ASA. Altogether, these results reinforce the idea that the cyclooxygenase pathway plays a fundamental role in the process of parasite invasion in an in vitro model of T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Computational studies on sirtuins from Trypanosoma cruzi: structures, conformations and interactions with phytochemicals.

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    Lionel Sacconnay

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The silent-information regulator 2 proteins, otherwise called sirtuins, are currently considered as emerging anti-parasitic targets. Nicotinamide, a pan-sirtuin inhibitor, is known to cause kinetoplast alterations and the arrested growth of T. cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease. These observations suggested that sirtuins from this parasite (TcSir2rp1 and TcSir2rp3 could play an important role in the regulation of the parasitic cell cycle. Thus, their inhibition could be exploited for the development of novel anti-trypanosomal compounds. METHODS: Homology modeling was used to determine the three-dimensional features of the sirtuin TcSir2rp1 from T. cruzi. The apo-form of human SIRT2 and the same structure solved in complex with its co-substrate NAD(+ allowed the modeling of TcSir2rp1 in the open and closed conformational states. Molecular docking studies were then carried out. A library composed of fifty natural and diverse compounds that are known to be active against this parasite, was established based on the literature and virtually screened against TcSir2rp1 and TcSir2rp3, which was previously modeled by our group. RESULTS: In this study, two conformational states of TcSir2rp1 were described for the first time. The molecular docking results of compounds capable of binding sirtuins proved to be meaningful when the closed conformation of the protein was taken into account for calculations. This specific conformation was then used for the virtual screening of antritrypanosomal phytochemicals against TcSir2rp1 and TcSir2rp3. The calculations identified a limited number of scaffolds extracted from Vismia orientalis, Cussonia zimmermannii, Amomum aculeatum and Anacardium occidentale that potentially interact with both proteins. CONCLUSIONS: The study provided reliable models for future structure-based drug design projects concerning sirtuins from T. cruzi. Molecular docking studies highlighted not only the advantages

  12. Sympatry influence in the interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi with triatomine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworak, Elaine Schultz; Araújo, Silvana Marques de; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Massago, Miyoko; Ferreira, Érika Cristina; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is widely distributed in nature, circulating between triatomine bugs and sylvatic mammals, and has large genetic diversity. Both the vector species and the genetic lineages of T. cruzi present a varied geographical distribution. This study aimed to verify the influence of sympatry in the interaction of T. cruzi with triatomines. Methods: The behavior of the strains PR2256 (T. cruzi II) and AM14 (T. cruzi IV) was studied in Triatoma sordida (TS) and Rhodnius robustus (RR). Eleven fifth-stage nymphs were fed by artificial xenodiagnosis with 5.6 × 103 blood trypomastigotes/0.1mL of each T. cruzi strain. Every 20 days, their excreta were examined for up to 100 days, and every 30 days, the intestinal content was examined for up to 120 days, by parasitological (fresh examination and differential count with Giemsa-stained smears) and molecular (PCR) methods. Rates of infectivity, metacyclogenesis and mortality, and mean number of parasites per insect and of excreted parasites were determined. Sympatric groups RR+AM14 and TS+PR2256 showed higher values of the four parameters, except for mortality rate, which was higher (27.3%) in the TS+AM14 group. General infectivity was 72.7%, which was mainly proven by PCR, showing the following decreasing order: RR+AM14 (100%), TS+PR2256 (81.8%), RR+PR2256 (72.7%) and TS+AM14 (36.4%). Our working hypothesis was confirmed once higher infectivity and vector capacity (flagellate production and elimination of infective metacyclic forms) were recorded in the groups that contained sympatric T. cruzi lineages and triatomine species.

  13. Cytokine profiling in Chagas disease: towards understanding the association with infecting Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (a BENEFIT TRIAL sub-study.

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    Cristina Poveda

    Full Text Available Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is an important public health problem in Latin America. The immunological mechanisms involved in Chagas disease pathogenesis remain incompletely elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore cytokine profiles and their possible association to the infecting DTU and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease.109 sero-positive T. cruzi patients and 21 negative controls from Bolivia and Colombia, were included. Flow cytometry assays for 13 cytokines were conducted on human sera. Patients were divided into two groups: in one we compared the quantification of cytokines between patients with and without chronic cardiomyopathy; in second group we compared the levels of cytokines and the genetic variability of T. cruzi.Significant difference in anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines profiles was observed between the two groups cardiac and non-cardiac. Moreover, serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-22 and IL-10 presented an association with the genetic variability of T.cruzi, with significant differences in TcI and mixed infections TcI/TcII.Expression of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a relevant role in determining the clinical presentation of chronic patients with Chagas disease and suggests the occurrence of specific immune responses, probably associated to different T. cruzi DTUs.

  14. Cytokine profiling in Chagas disease: towards understanding the association with infecting Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (a BENEFIT TRIAL sub-study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Cristina; Fresno, Manuel; Gironès, Núria; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Ramírez, Juan David; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Marin-Neto, José A; Morillo, Carlos A; Rosas, Fernando; Guhl, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is an important public health problem in Latin America. The immunological mechanisms involved in Chagas disease pathogenesis remain incompletely elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore cytokine profiles and their possible association to the infecting DTU and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. 109 sero-positive T. cruzi patients and 21 negative controls from Bolivia and Colombia, were included. Flow cytometry assays for 13 cytokines were conducted on human sera. Patients were divided into two groups: in one we compared the quantification of cytokines between patients with and without chronic cardiomyopathy; in second group we compared the levels of cytokines and the genetic variability of T. cruzi. Significant difference in anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines profiles was observed between the two groups cardiac and non-cardiac. Moreover, serum levels of IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-22 and IL-10 presented an association with the genetic variability of T.cruzi, with significant differences in TcI and mixed infections TcI/TcII. Expression of anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines may play a relevant role in determining the clinical presentation of chronic patients with Chagas disease and suggests the occurrence of specific immune responses, probably associated to different T. cruzi DTUs.

  15. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

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    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  16. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

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    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  17. Early Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Reprograms Human Epithelial Cells

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    María Laura Chiribao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, has the peculiarity, when compared with other intracellular parasites, that it is able to invade almost any type of cell. This property makes Chagas a complex parasitic disease in terms of prophylaxis and therapeutics. The identification of key host cellular factors that play a role in the T. cruzi invasion is important for the understanding of disease pathogenesis. In Chagas disease, most of the focus is on the response of macrophages and cardiomyocytes, since they are responsible for host defenses and cardiac lesions, respectively. In the present work, we studied the early response to infection of T. cruzi in human epithelial cells, which constitute the first barrier for establishment of infection. These studies identified up to 1700 significantly altered genes regulated by the immediate infection. The global analysis indicates that cells are literally reprogrammed by T. cruzi, which affects cellular stress responses (neutrophil chemotaxis, DNA damage response, a great number of transcription factors (including the majority of NFκB family members, and host metabolism (cholesterol, fatty acids, and phospholipids. These results raise the possibility that early host cell reprogramming is exploited by the parasite to establish the initial infection and posterior systemic dissemination.

  18. Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Hernández, Roberto; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Reyes-Vivas, Horacio; Segura-Valdez, María De L.; Jiménez-García, Luis F.

    2005-08-01

    The nucleolus is the main site for synthesis and processing of ribosomal RNA in eukaryotes. In mammals, plants, and yeast the nucleolus has been extensively characterized by electron microscopy, but in the majority of the unicellular eukaryotes no such studies have been performed. Here we used ultrastructural cytochemical and immunocytochemical techniques as well as three-dimensional reconstruction to analyze the nucleolus of Trypanosoma cruzi, which is an early divergent eukaryote of medical importance. In T. cruzi epimastigotes the nucleolus is a spherical intranuclear ribonucleoprotein organelle localized in a relatively central position within the nucleus. Dense fibrillar and granular components but not fibrillar centers were observed. In addition, nuclear bodies resembling Cajal bodies were observed associated to the nucleolus in the surrounding nucleoplasm. Our results provide additional morphological data to better understand the synthesis and processing of the ribosomal RNA in kinetoplastids.

  19. Implication of Apoptosis for the Pathogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Débora Decote-Ricardo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is induced during the course of immune response to different infectious agents, and the ultimate fate is the recognition and uptake of apoptotic bodies by neighboring cells or by professional phagocytes. Apoptotic cells expose specific ligands to a set of conserved receptors expressed on macrophage cellular surface, which are the main cells involved in the clearance of the dying cells. These scavenger receptors, besides triggering the production of anti-inflammatory factors, also block the production of inflammatory mediators by phagocytes. Experimental infection of mice with the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi shows many pathological changes that parallels the evolution of human infection. Leukocytes undergoing intense apoptotic death are observed during the immune response to T. cruzi in the mouse model of the disease. T. cruzi replicate intensely and secrete molecules with immunomodulatory activities that interfere with T cell-mediated immune responses and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. This mechanism of immune evasion allows the infection to be established in the vertebrate host. Under inflammatory conditions, efferocytosis of apoptotic bodies generates an immune-regulatory phenotype in phagocytes, which is conducive to intracellular pathogen replication. However, the relevance of cellular apoptosis in the pathology of Chagas’ disease requires further studies. Here, we review the evidence of leukocyte apoptosis in T. cruzi infection and its immunomodulatory mechanism for disease progression.

  20. Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi in experimentally contaminated drinks Supervivencia de Trypanosoma cruzi en bebidas experimentalmente contaminadas

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    Diana Carolina Suárez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Introduction. Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, transmitted primarily by triatomine insects. However, in 2005, oral transmission was documented in countries where the disease is endemic for Chagas disease. This trend may also occur in Colombia, a situation that motivated epidemiological alerts and the necessity for exploring the risk level of oral, human-to-human infection by T. cruzi.
    Objective. Survival times were established for the T. cruzi strain DS using juices involved in the outbreak of Lebrija County (Cesar, Colombia in 2008.
    Materials and methods. Survival of the T. cruzi strain was evaluated as defined by vitality (forward movement and viability (growth in isolation medium Novy, McNeal and Nicolle/liver infusion tryptose. This strain was molecularly characterized as TCLA, isolated from a patient associated with an outbreak in Aguachica County (Santander, very near Lebrija. Its survival was tested in tangerine juice, guava, soursop (guanábana, water and sugar water.
    Results. The T. cruzi strain DS remained vital in mandarin at room temperature for 72 hr, at refrigerated temperatures for 36 hr;, the soursop (guanábana for 48 hr at room temperature and 384 hr under refrigeration; and guava at both temperatures 24 hr. This strain was viable 2 and 24 hours post-infection in each of the other juices at the two temperature conditions.
    Conclusions: The DS T. cruzi strain survived in all drinks for more than 24 hours post-infection, with a survival time of 384 hr in the juice of soursop (guanábana under refrigeration.

    Introducción. Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, el cual puede ser transmitido por diferentes vías. A partir de 2005 la transmisión oral se incrementó en aquellos países donde la enfermedad es considerada endémica por transmisión vectorial. Colombia no se aparta de esta tendencia, situación que motivó la alerta epidemiol

  1. The United States Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Study: evidence for vector-borne transmission of the parasite that causes Chagas disease among United States blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Paul T; Stramer, Susan L; Townsend, Rebecca L; Kamel, Hany; Ofafa, Karen; Todd, Charles W; Currier, Mary; Hand, Sheryl; Varnado, Wendy; Dotson, Ellen; Hall, Chris; Jett, Pamela L; Montgomery, Susan P

    2012-09-01

    Screening US blood donors for Trypanosoma cruzi infection is identifying autochthonous, chronic infections. Two donors in Mississippi were identified through screening and investigated as probable domestically acquired vector-borne infections, and the US T. cruzi Infection Study was conducted to evaluate the burden of and describe putative risk factors for vector-borne infection in the United States. Blood donors who tested enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay repeat reactive and positive by radioimmunoprecipitation assay, and whose mode of infection could not be identified, were evaluated with a questionnaire to identify possible sources of infection and by additional serologic and hemoculture testing for T. cruzi infection. Of 54 eligible donors, 37 (69%) enrolled in the study. Fifteen (41%) enrollees had four or more positive serologic tests and were considered positive for T. cruzi infection; one was hemoculture positive. Of the 15, three (20%) donors had visited a rural area of an endemic country, although none had stayed for 2 or more weeks. All had lived in a state with documented T. cruzi vector(s) or infected mammalian reservoir(s), 13 (87%) reported outdoor leisure or work activities, and 11 (73%) reported seeing wild reservoir animals on their property. This report adds 16 cases, including one from the Mississippi investigation, of chronic T. cruzi infection presumably acquired via vector-borne transmission in the United States to the previously reported seven cases. The estimated prevalence of autochthonous infections based on this study is 1 in 354,000 donors. Determining US foci of vector-borne transmission is needed to better assess risk for infection. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi among captive Neotropical primates in a Brazilian zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuzzi-Souza, Thaís Tâmara Castro; Nitz, Nadjar; Knox, Monique Britto; Reis, Filipe; Hagström, Luciana; Cuba, César A Cuba; Hecht, Mariana Machado; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo

    2016-01-26

    Neotropical primates are important sylvatic hosts of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. Infection is often subclinical, but severe disease has been described in both free-ranging and captive primates. Panstrongylus megistus, a major T. cruzi vector, was found infesting a small-primate unit at Brasília zoo (ZooB), Brazil. ZooB lies close to a gallery-forest patch where T. cruzi circulates naturally. Here, we combine parasitological and molecular methods to investigate a focus of T. cruzi infection involving triatomine bugs and Neotropical primates at a zoo located in the Brazilian Savannah. We assessed T. cruzi infection in vectors using optical microscopy (n = 34) and nested PCR (n = 50). We used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to examine blood samples from 26 primates and necropsy samples from two primates that died during the study. We determined parasite lineages in five vectors and two primates by comparing glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (G6pi) gene sequences. Trypanosoma cruzi was found in 44 vectors and 17 primates (six genera and eight species); one Mico chrysoleucus and one Saguinus niger had high parasitaemias. Trypanosoma cruzi DNA was detected in three primates born to qPCR-negative mothers at ZooB and in the two dead specimens. One Callithrix geoffroyi became qPCR-positive over a two-year follow-up. All G6pi sequences matched T. cruzi lineage TcI. Our findings strongly suggest vector-borne T. cruzi transmission within a small-primate unit at ZooB - with vectors, and perhaps also parasites, presumably coming from nearby gallery forest. Periodic checks for vectors and parasites would help eliminate T. cruzi transmission foci in captive-animal facilities. This should be of special importance for captive-breeding programs involving endangered mammals, and would reduce the risk of accidental T. cruzi transmission to keepers and veterinarians.

  3. EPIDEMIOLOGÍA MOLECULAR DE TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI

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    Felipe Guhl

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas causada por el parásito Trypanosoma cruzi es una zoonosis compleja, ampliamente distribuida en el continente americano. La infección puede ser adquirida a través de las heces de insectos triatominos, transfusión de sangre, trasplante de órganos, vía oral, por transmisión congénita y por accidentes de laboratorio. El completo entendimiento de la etiología y epidemiología de la enfermedad de Chagas a través de su distribución geográfica es complejo y permanece bajo intensa investigación hasta la actualidad. Los recientes estudios sobre la variabilidad genética del parásito han dado nuevas luces de los diferentes escenarios de los ciclos de transmisión de la enfermedad y su patogénesis en humanos. El propósito principal para la caracterización molecular de T.cruzi y sus múltiples genotipos está dirigido hacia su asociación con la clínica y la patogenesis de la enfermedad, así como al esclarecimiento de los diferentes escenarios de transmisión y los aspectos coevolutivos relacionados con reservorios e insectos vectores. La caracterización molecular de los diferentes aislamientos a partir de humanos, insectos y reservorios, ha permitido identificar la amplia variabilidad genética del parásito, abriendo nuevos caminos hacia la búsqueda de nuevos blancos terapéuticos y pruebas diagnósticas más específicas que contribuyan a mitigar la enfermedad de Chagas.

  4. A population study of the minicircles in Trypanosoma cruzi: predicting guide RNAs in the absence of empirical RNA editing

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    Westenberger Scott J

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structurally complex network of minicircles and maxicircles comprising the mitochondrial DNA of kinetoplastids mirrors the complexity of the RNA editing process that is required for faithful expression of encrypted maxicircle genes. Although a few of the guide RNAs that direct this editing process have been discovered on maxicircles, guide RNAs are mostly found on the minicircles. The nuclear and maxicircle genomes have been sequenced and assembled for Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, however the complement of 1.4-kb minicircles, carrying four guide RNA genes per molecule in this parasite, has been less thoroughly characterised. Results Fifty-four CL Brener and 53 Esmeraldo strain minicircle sequence reads were extracted from T. cruzi whole genome shotgun sequencing data. With these sequences and all published T. cruzi minicircle sequences, 108 unique guide RNAs from all known T. cruzi minicircle sequences and two guide RNAs from the CL Brener maxicircle were predicted using a local alignment algorithm and mapped onto predicted or experimentally determined sequences of edited maxicircle open reading frames. For half of the sequences no statistically significant guide RNA could be assigned. Likely positions of these unidentified gRNAs in T. cruzi minicircle sequences are estimated using a simple Hidden Markov Model. With the local alignment predictions as a standard, the HMM had an ~85% chance of correctly identifying at least 20 nucleotides of guide RNA from a given minicircle sequence. Inter-minicircle recombination was documented. Variable regions contain species-specific areas of distinct nucleotide preference. Two maxicircle guide RNA genes were found. Conclusion The identification of new minicircle sequences and the further characterization of all published minicircles are presented, including the first observation of recombination between minicircles. Extrapolation suggests a level of 4

  5. Improved enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA for the study of Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interaction in vitro

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    Mauricio R. M. P. Luz

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available We herein present an improved assay for detecting the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in infected cultures. Using chagasic human sera (CHS, we were able to detect T. cruzi infection in primary cultures of both peritoneal macrophages and heart muscle cells (MHC. To avoid elevated background levels - hitherto observed in all experiments especially in those using HMC - CHS were preincubated with uninfected cells in monolayers or suspensions prior to being used for detection of T. cruzi in infected monolayers. Preincubation with cell suspensions gave better results than with monolayers, reducing background by up to three times and increasing sensitivity by to twenty times. In addition, the continous fibroplastic cell line L929 was shown to be suitable for preadsorption of CHS. These results indicate that the high background levels observed in previous reports may be due to the presence of human autoantibodies that recognize surface and/or extracellular matrix components in cell monolayers. We therefore propose a modified procedure that increases the performance of the ELISA method, making it an useful tool even in cultures that would otherwise be expected to present low levels of infection or high levels of background

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi maxicircle heterogeneity in Chagas disease patients from Brazil.

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    Carranza, Julio César; Valadares, Helder M S; D'Avila, Daniella A; Baptista, Rodrigo P; Moreno, Margoth; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Sturm, Nancy R; Gontijo, Eliane D; Macedo, Andrea M; Zingales, Bianca

    2009-07-15

    The majority of individuals in the chronic phase of Chagas disease are asymptomatic (indeterminate form, IF). Each year, approximately 3% of them develop lesions in the heart or gastrointestinal tract. Cardiomyopathy (CCHD) is the most severe manifestation of Chagas disease. The factors that determine the outcome of the infection are unknown, but certainly depend on complex interactions amongst the genetic make-up of the parasite, the host immunogenetic background and environment. In a previous study we verified that the maxicircle gene NADH dehydrogenase (mitochondrial complex I) subunit 7 (ND7) from IF isolates had a 455 bp deletion compared with the wild type (WT) ND7 gene from CCHD strains. We proposed that ND7 could constitute a valuable target for PCR assays in the differential diagnosis of the infective strain. In the present study we evaluated this hypothesis by examination of ND7 structure in parasites from 75 patients with defined pathologies, from Southeast Brazil. We also analysed the structure of additional mitochondrial genes (ND4/CR4, COIII and COII) since the maxicircle is used for clustering Trypanosoma cruzi strains into three clades/haplogroups. We conclude that maxicircle genes do not discriminate parasite populations which induce IF or CCHD forms. Interestingly, the great majority of the analysed isolates belong to T. cruzi II (discrete typing unit, (DTU) IIb) genotype. This scenario is at variance with the prevalence of hybrid (DTU IId) human isolates in Bolivia, Chile and Argentina. The distribution of WT and deleted ND7 and ND4 genes in T. cruzi strains suggests that mutations in the two genes occurred in different ancestrals in the T. cruzi II cluster, allowing the identification of at least three mitochondrial sub-lineages within this group. The observation that T. cruzi strains accumulate mutations in several genes coding for complex I subunits favours the hypothesis that complex I may have a limited activity in this parasite.

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Coexpressing Ornithine Decarboxylase and Green Fluorescence Proteins as a Tool to Study the Role of Polyamines in Chagas Disease Pathology

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    Jeremías José Barclay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyamines are essential for Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. As T. cruzi behaves as a natural auxotrophic organism, it relies on host polyamines biosynthesis. In this paper we obtained a double-transfected T. cruzi parasite that expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP and a heterologous ornithine decarboxylase (ODC, used itself as a novel selectable marker. These autotrophic and fluorescent parasites were characterized; the ODC presented an apparent Km for ornithine of 0.51 ± 0.16 mM and an estimated Vmax value of 476.2 nmoles/h/mg of protein. These expressing ODC parasites showed higher metacyclogenesis capacity than the auxotrophic counterpart, supporting the idea that polyamines are engaged in this process. This double-transfected T. cruzi parasite results in a powerful tool—easy to follow by its fluorescence—to study the role of polyamines in Chagas disease pathology and in related processes such as parasite survival, invasion, proliferation, metacyclogenesis, and tissue spreading.

  8. 3D QSAR studies on binding affinities of coumarin natural products for glycosomal GAPDH of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Menezes, Irwin R. A.; Lopes, Julio C. D.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Oliva, Glaucius; Pavão, Fernando; Castilho, Marcelo S.; Vieira, Paulo C.; Pupo, M.^onica T.

    2003-05-01

    Drug design strategies based on Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) have been used to predict the activity of new compounds. The major advantage of this approach is that it permits the analysis of a large number of quantitative descriptors and uses chemometric methods such as partial least squares (PLS) to correlate changes in bioactivity with changes in chemical structure. Because it is often difficult to rationalize all variables affecting the binding affinity of compounds using CoMFA solely, the program GRID was used to describe ligands in terms of their molecular interaction fields, MIFs. The program VolSurf that is able to compress the relevant information present in 3D maps into a few descriptors can treat these GRID fields. The binding affinities of a new set of compounds consisting of 13 coumarins, for one of which the three-dimensional ligand-enzyme bound structure is known, were studied. A final model based on the mentioned programs was independently validated by synthesizing and testing new coumarin derivatives. By relying on our knowledge of the real physical data (i.e., combining crystallographic and binding affinity results), it is also shown that ligand-based design agrees with structure-based design. The compound with the highest binding affinity was the coumarin chalepin, isolated from Rutaceae species, with an IC50 value of 55.5 μM towards the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) from glycosomes of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. The proposed models from GRID MIFs have revealed the importance of lipophilic interactions in modulating the inhibition, but without excluding the dependence on stereo-electronic properties as found from CoMFA fields.

  9. Differential Gel Electrophoresis (DIGE Evaluation of Naphthoimidazoles Mode of Action: A Study in Trypanosoma cruzi Bloodstream Trypomastigotes.

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    Giselle Villa Flor Brunoro

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a neglected illness affecting millions of people in Latin America that recently entered non-endemic countries through immigration, as a consequence of globalization. The chemotherapy for this disease is based mainly on benznidazole and nifurtimox, which are very efficient nitroderivatives against the acute stage but present limited efficacy during the chronic phase. Our group has been studying the trypanocidal effects of naturally occurring quinones and their derivatives, and naphthoimidazoles derived from β-lapachone N1, N2 and N3 were the most active. To assess the molecular mechanisms of action of these compounds, we applied proteomic techniques to analyze treated bloodstream trypomastigotes, which are the clinically relevant stage of the parasite.The approach consisted of quantification by 2D-DIGE followed by MALDI-TOF/TOF protein identification. A total of 61 differentially abundant protein spots were detected when comparing the control with each N1, N2 or N3 treatment, for 34 identified spots. Among the differentially abundant proteins were activated protein kinase C receptor, tubulin isoforms, asparagine synthetase, arginine kinase, elongation factor 2, enolase, guanine deaminase, heat shock proteins, hypothetical proteins, paraflagellar rod components, RAB GDP dissociation inhibitor, succinyl-CoA ligase, ATP synthase subunit B and methionine sulfoxide reductase.Our results point to different modes of action for N1, N2 and N3, which indicate a great variety of metabolic pathways involved and allow for novel perspectives on the development of trypanocidal agents.

  10. Chronic murine myocarditis due to Trypanosoma cruzi: an ultrastructural study and immunochemical characterization of cardiac interstitial matrix

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    Sonia G. Andrade

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to define the mouse-model for chronic Chagas' disease, a serological, histopathological and ultrastructural study as well as immunotyping of myocardium collagenic matrix were performed on Swiss mice, chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi strains: 21 SF and mambaí (Type II; PMN and Bolivia (Type III, spontaneously surviving after 154 to 468 days of infection. Haemagglutination and indirect immunofluorescence tests showed high titres of specific antibodies. The ultrastructural study disclosed the cellular constitution of the inflammatory infiltrate showing the predominance of monocytes, macrophages with intense phagocytic activity, fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and abundant collagen matrix suggesting the association of the inflammatory process with fibrogenesis in chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. Artertolar and blood capillary alterations together with dissociation of cardiac cells from the capillary wall by edema and inflammation were related to ultrastructural lesions of myocardial cells. Rupture of parasitized cardiac myocells contribute to intensify the inflammatory process in focal areas. Collagen immunotyping showed the predominance of Types III and IV collagen. Collagen degradation and phagocytosis were present suggesting a reversibility of the fibrous process. The mouse model seems to be valuable in the study of the pathogenetic mechanisms in Chagas cardiomyopathy, providing that T. cruzi strains of low virulence and high pathogenecity are used.Utilizando o modelo experimental do camundongo, foi realizado um estudo sorológico, histopatológico e ultraestrutural bem como a imunotipagem do colágeno na matriz conjuntiva do miocárdio em camundongos suiços cronicamente infectados com as cepas 21 SF e Mambaí (Tipo II PMN e Bolívia (Tipo III por períodos de 154 a 468 dias. Os testes sorológicos e de imunofluorescência indireta mostraram altos títulos de anticorpos específicos. O estudo estrutural definiu melhor a

  11. Protein kinase CK1 from Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Calabokis, Maritza; Kurz, Liliana; Gonzatti, Mary I; Bubis, José

    2003-08-01

    A protein kinase activity, which uses casein as a substrate, has been purified to homogeneity from the epimastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, by sequential chromatography on Q sepharose, heparin sepharose, phenyl sepharose, and alpha-casein agarose. An apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Gel filtration chromatography and sedimentation analyses demonstrated that the purified native enzyme is a monomer with a sedimentation coefficient of 2.9 S. The hydrodynamic parameters indicated that the shape of the protein is globular with a frictional ratio f/f(o) = 1.36 and a Stokes radius of 27.7 A. When two selective peptide substrates for protein kinases CK1 and CK2 were used (RRKDLHDDEEDEAM. SITA and RRRADDSDDDDD, respectively), the purified kinase was shown to predominantly phosphorylate the CK1-specific peptide. Additionally, the enzyme was inhibited by N-(2-amino-ethyl)-5-chloroisoquinoline-8-sulfonamide, a specific inactivator of CK1s from mammals. Based on these results, we concluded that the purified kinase corresponds to a parasite CK1.

  12. Unraveling the differences of the hydrolytic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase and Trypanosoma rangeli sialidase: a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics modeling study.

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    Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Pierdominici-Sottile, Gustavo; Roitberg, Adrian E

    2014-06-05

    Chagas' disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a lethal, chronic disease that currently affects more than 10 million people in Central and South America. The trans-sialidase from Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, TcTS) is a crucial enzyme for the survival of this parasite: sialic acids from the host are transferred to the cell surface glycoproteins of the trypanosome, thereby evading the host's immune system. On the other hand, the sialidase of T. rangeli (TrSA), which shares 70% sequence identity with TcTS, is a strict hydrolase and shows no trans-sialidase activity. Therefore, TcTS and TrSA represent an excellent framework to understand how different catalytic activities can be achieved with extremely similar structures. By means of combined quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QM/MM, SCC-DFTB/Amberff99SB) calculations and umbrella sampling simulations, we investigated the hydrolysis mechanisms of TcTS and TrSA and computed the free energy profiles of these reactions. The results, together with our previous computational investigations, are able to explain the catalytic mechanism of sialidases and describe how subtle differences in the active site make TrSA a strict hydrolase and TcTS a more efficient trans-sialidase.

  13. Circulating levels of cyclooxygenase metabolites in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infections

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    Rita L. Cardoni

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available TRYPANOSOMA cruzi induces inflammatory reactions in several tissues. The production of prostaglandin F2α, 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α and thromboxane B2, known to regulate the immune response and to participate in inflammatory reactions, was studied in mice experimentally infected with T. cruzi. The generation of nitric oxide (NO, which could be regulated by cyclooxygenase metabolites, was also evaluated. In the acute infection the extension of inflammatory infiltrates in skeletal muscle as well as the circulating levels of cyclooxygenase metabolites and NO were higher in resistant C3H mice than in susceptible BALB/c mice. In addition, the spontaneous release of NO by spleen cells increased earlier in the C3H mouse strain. In the chronic infections, the tissue inflammatory reaction was still prominent in both groups of mice, but a moderate increase of thromboxane B2 concentration and in NO released by spleen cells was observed only in C3H mice. This comparative study shows that these mediators could be mainly related to protective mechanisms in the acute phase, but seem not to be involved in its maintenance in the chronic T. cruzi infections.

  14. Study of optically trapped living Trypanosoma cruzi/Trypanosoma rangeli - Rhodnius prolixus interactions by real time confocal images using CdSe quantum dots

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    de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Faustino, W. M.; Jacob, G. J.; Fontes, A.; Barbosa, L. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Stahl, C. V.; Santos-Mallet, J. R.; Gomes, S. A. O.; Feder, D.

    2008-08-01

    One of the fundamental goals in biology is to understand the interplay between biomolecules of different cells. This happen, for example, in the first moments of the infection of a vector by a parasite that results in the adherence to the cell walls. To observe this kind of event we used an integrated Optical Tweezers and Confocal Microscopy tool. This tool allow us to use the Optical Tweezers to trigger the adhesion of the Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli parasite to the intestine wall cells and salivary gland of the Rhodnius prolixus vector and to, subsequently observe the sequence of events by confocal fluorescence microscopy under optical forces stresses. We kept the microorganism and vector cells alive using CdSe quantum dot staining. Besides the fact that Quantum Dots are bright vital fluorescent markers, the absence of photobleaching allow us to follow the events in time for an extended period. By zooming to the region of interested we have been able to acquire confocal images at the 2 to 3 frames per second rate.

  15. Nitric oxide-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Seabra, A. B.; Kitice, N. A.; Pelegrino, M. T.; Lancheros, C. A. C.; Yamauchi, L. M.; Pinge-Filho, P.; Yamada-Ogatta, S. F.

    2015-05-01

    Chagas disease, also known as American trypanosomiasis, is a potentially life-threatening illness caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), and the disease remains a major health problem in many Latin American countries. Several papers report that the killing of the parasite is dependent on the production of nitric oxide (NO). The endogenous free radical NO is an important cellular signalling molecule that plays a key role in the defense against pathogens, including T. cruzi. As T. cruzi is able to compromise host macrophages decreasing endogenous NO production, the administration of exogenous NO donors represents an interesting strategy to combat Chagas disease. Thus, the aims of this study were to prepare and evaluate the antimicrobial activity of NO-releasing polymeric nanoparticles against T. cruzi. Biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles composed of chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate(TPP) were prepared and used to encapsulate mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), which is a thiol-containing molecule. Nitrosation of free thiols (SH) groups of MSA were performed by the addition of equimolar amount of sodium nitrite (NaNO2), leading to the formation of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles. These polymeric nanoparticles act as spontaneous NO donors, with free NO release. The results show the formation of nanoparticles with average hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 270 to 500 nm, average of polydispersity index of 0.35, and encapsulation efficiency in the range of 99%. The NO release kinetics from the S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles showed sustained and controlled NO release over several hours. The microbicidal activity of S-nitroso-MSA-containing nanoparticles was evaluated by incubating NO-releasing nanoparticles (200 - 600 μg/mL) with replicative and non-infective epimastigote, and non-replicative and infective trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. In addition, a significant decrease in the percentage of macrophage-infected (with amastigotes) and

  16. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV coinfection in southern Brazil

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    Dulce Stauffert

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease reactivation has been a defining condition for acquired immune deficiency syndrome in Brazil for individuals coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV since 2004. Although the first coinfection case was reported in the 1980s, its prevalence has not been firmly established. In order to know coinfection prevalence, a cross-sectional study of 200 HIV patients was performed between January and July 2013 in the city of Pelotas, in southern Rio Grande do Sul, an endemic area for Chagas disease. Ten subjects were found positive for T. cruzi infection by chemiluminescence microparticle immunoassay and indirect immunofluorescence. The survey showed 5% coinfection prevalence among HIV patients (95% CI: 2.0–8.0, which was 3.8 times as high as that estimated by the Ministry of Health of Brazil. Six individuals had a viral load higher than 100,000 copies per μL, a statistically significant difference for T. cruzi presence. These findings highlight the importance of screening HIV patients from Chagas disease endemic areas.

  17. Imidazolium compounds are active against all stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Faral-Tello, Paula; Liang, Mary; Mahler, Graciela; Wipf, Peter; Robello, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Imidazolium salts are best known for their applications in organic synthesis as room-temperature ionic liquids, or as precursors of stable carbenes, but they also show important biological properties such as anti-oxidative effects, induction of mitochondrial membrane permeabilisation and inhibition of the infection cycle of Plasmodium falciparum. For these reasons, and since chemotherapy for Chagas disease is inefficient, the aim of this study was to test the use of imidazolium compounds against the kinetoplastid haemoflagellate aetiological agent for this disease, namely Trypanosoma cruzi. The results show that five of the tested compounds are more effective than the reference drug benznidazole against the epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. Moreover, intracellular amastigotes were also affected by the compounds, which showed lower toxicity in host cells. Transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that the tested agents induced alterations of the kinetoplast and particularly of the mitochondria, leading to extraordinary swelling of the organelle. These results further demonstrate that the test agents with the best profile are those bearing symmetrical bulky substituents at N(1) and N(3), displaying promising activity against all forms of T. cruzi, interesting selectivity indexes and exceptional activity at low doses. Accordingly, these agents represent promising candidates for the treatment of Chagas disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Synthesis and anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of diaryldiazepines.

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    Menezes, Júlio César L; Vaz, Luana Beatriz A; de Abreu Vieira, Paula Melo; da Silva Fonseca, Kátia; Carneiro, Cláudia Martins; Taylor, Jason G

    2014-12-23

    Chagas disease is a so-called "neglected disease" and endemic to Latin America. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are drugs that have considerable efficacy in the treatment of the acute phase of the disease but cause many significant side effects. Furthermore, in the Chronic Phase its efficiency is reduced and their therapeutic effectiveness is dependent on the type of T. cruzi strain. For this reason, the present work aims to drive basic research towards the discovery of new chemical entities to treat Chagas disease. Differently substituted 5,7-diaryl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-diazepines were synthesized by cyclocondensation of substituted flavones with ethylenediamine and tested as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi candidates. Epimastigotes of the Y strain from T. cruzi were used in this study and the number of parasites was determined in a Neubauer chamber. The most potent diaryldiazepine that reduced epimastigote proliferation exhibited an IC50 value of 0.25 μM, which is significantly more active than benznidazole.

  19. Synthesis and Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Diaryldiazepines

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    Júlio César L. Menezes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a so-called “neglected disease” and endemic to Latin America. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are drugs that have considerable efficacy in the treatment of the acute phase of the disease but cause many significant side effects. Furthermore, in the Chronic Phase its efficiency is reduced and their therapeutic effectiveness is dependent on the type of T. cruzi strain. For this reason, the present work aims to drive basic research towards the discovery of new chemical entities to treat Chagas disease. Differently substituted 5,7-diaryl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-diazepines were synthesized by cyclocondensation of substituted flavones with ethylenediamine and tested as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi candidates. Epimastigotes of the Y strain from T. cruzi were used in this study and the number of parasites was determined in a Neubauer chamber. The most potent diaryldiazepine that reduced epimastigote proliferation exhibited an IC50 value of 0.25 μM, which is significantly more active than benznidazole.

  20. First Case of Natural Infection in Pigs: Review of Trypanosoma cruzi Reservoirs in Mexico

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    Paz María Salazar-Schettino

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological research project was performed in the State of Morelos including collection of samples for blood smears and culture, serological tests, and xenodiagnoses from a total of 76 domestic and peridomestic mammals. Two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were isolated by haemocultures; one from a pig (Sus scrofa, the first case of natural infection reported in Mexico, and the other from a dog (Canis familiaris. This study summarizes current information in Mexico concerning confirmed reservoirs of T. cruzi

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi: Genetic diversity influences the profile of immunoglobulins during experimental infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Daniela Maria; Talvani, André; Guedes, Paulo Marcos da Mata; Machado-Coelho, George Luiz Lins; de Lana, Marta; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2009-01-01

    The clonal evolution model postulated for Trypanosoma cruzi predicts a correlation between the phylogenetic divergence of T. cruzi clonal genotypes and their biological properties. In the present study, the linkage between phylogenetic divergence of the parasite and IgG, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b response has been evaluated during the acute and chronic phases of the experimental infection. Eight laboratory-cloned stocks representative of this phylogenetic diversity and including the lineages T. cruzi I (genotypes 19 and 20), T. cruzi II (genotype 32) and T. cruzi (genotype 39) have been studied. The results showed that the pattern of humoral immune response was correlated with T. cruzi genotype, and that stocks included in genotype 20 were responsible for the high IgG response in the acute and chronic phases. Moreover, T. cruzi I lineage was more efficient in over-expressing all subclasses of specific anti-parasite IgG than either T. cruzi II or T. cruzi lineages. Curiously, the alteration in the pattern of antibodies induced by Benznidazole treatment was related to the phase of the infection but not to the genotype of the parasite. The data suggest that genotypes of T. cruzi are able to drive levels/subclasses of specific IgG, hence giving rise to further concerns about the sensitivity of serological assays in the diagnosis of human Chagas disease.

  2. Molecular characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Mexican strains and their behavior in the mouse experimental model

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    César Gómez-Hernández

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: For a long time, the importance of Chagas disease in Mexico, where many regarded it as an exotic malady, was questioned. Considering the great genetic diversity among isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi, the importance of this biological characterization, and the paucity of information on the clinical and biological aspects of Chagas disease in Mexico, this study aimed to identify the molecular and biological characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from different endemic areas of this country, especially of the State of Jalisco. METHODS: Eight Mexican Trypanosoma cruzi strains were biologically and genetically characterized (PCR specific for Trypanosoma cruzi, multiplex-PCR, amplification of space no transcript of the genes of the mini-exon, amplification of polymorphic regions of the mini-exon, classification by amplification of intergenic regions of the spliced leader genes, RAPD - (random amplified polymorphic DNA. RESULTS: Two profiles of parasitaemia were observed, patent (peak parasitaemia of 4.6×10(6 to 10(7 parasites/mL and subpatent. In addition, all isolates were able to infect 100% of the animals. The isolates mainly displayed tropism for striated (cardiac and skeletal muscle. PCR amplification of the mini-exon gene classified the eight strains as TcI. The RAPD technique revealed intraspecies variation among isolates, distinguishing strains isolated from humans and triatomines and according to geographic origin. CONCLUSIONS: The Mexican T. cruzi strains are myotrophic and belong to group TcI.

  3. A comparative study of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in sylvatic mammals from a protected and a disturbed area in the Argentine Chaco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, M M; Enriquez, G F; Cardinal, M V; Piccinali, R V; Gürtler, R E

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the complex epidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission cycles requires comparative studies in widely different environments. We assessed the occurrence of T. cruzi infection in sylvatic mammals, their infectiousness to the vector, and parasite genotypes in a protected area of the Argentine Chaco, and compared them with information obtained similarly in a nearby disturbed area. A total of 278 mammals from >23 species in the protected area were diagnosed for T. cruzi infection using xenodiagnosis, kDNA-PCR and nuclear satellite DNA-PCR (SAT) from blood samples. The relative abundance and species composition differed substantially between areas. Didelphis albiventris opossums were less abundant in the protected area; had a significantly lower body mass index, and a stage structure biased toward earlier stages. The capture of armadillos was lower in the protected area. The composite prevalence of T. cruzi infection across host species was significantly lower in the protected area (11.1%) than in the disturbed area (22.1%), and heterogeneous across species groups. The prevalence of infection in D. albiventris and Thylamys pusilla opossums was significantly lower in the protected area (nil for D. albiventris), whereas infection in sigmodontine rodents was three times higher in the protected area (17.5 versus 5.7%). Parasite isolates from the two xenodiagnosis-positive mammals (1 Dasypus novemcinctus and 1 Conepatus chinga) were typed as TcIII; both specimens were highly infectious to Triatoma infestans. Fat-tailed opossums, bats and rodents were kDNA-PCR-positive and xenodiagnosis-negative. Desmodus rotundus and Myotis bats were found infected with T. cruzi for the first time in the Gran Chaco. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi Differentiates and Multiplies within Chimeric Parasitophorous Vacuoles in Macrophages Coinfected with Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessoa, Carina Carraro; Ferreira, Éden Ramalho; Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Rabinovitch, Michel; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Real, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    The trypanosomatids Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi are excellent models for the study of the cell biology of intracellular protozoan infections. After their uptake by mammalian cells, the parasitic protozoan flagellates L. amazonensis and T. cruzi lodge within acidified parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs). However, whereas L. amazonensis develops in spacious, phagolysosome-like PVs that may enclose numerous parasites, T. cruzi is transiently hosted within smaller vacuoles from which it soon escapes to the host cell cytosol. To investigate if parasite-specific vacuoles are required for the survival and differentiation of T. cruzi, we constructed chimeric vacuoles by infection of L. amazonensis amastigote-infected macrophages with T. cruzi epimastigotes (EPIs) or metacyclic trypomastigotes (MTs). These chimeric vacuoles, easily observed by microscopy, allowed the entry and fate of T. cruzi in L. amazonensis PVs to be dynamically recorded by multidimensional imaging of coinfected cells. We found that although T. cruzi EPIs remained motile and conserved their morphology in chimeric vacuoles, T. cruzi MTs differentiated into amastigote-like forms capable of multiplying. These results demonstrate that the large adaptive vacuoles of L. amazonensis are permissive to T. cruzi survival and differentiation and that noninfective EPIs are spared from destruction within the chimeric PVs. We conclude that T. cruzi differentiation can take place in Leishmania-containing vacuoles, suggesting this occurs prior to their escape into the host cell cytosol. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi, cancer and the Cold War Trypanosoma cruzi, câncer e a Guerra Fria

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    Nikolai Krementsov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 1946, the international community of cancer researchers was inspired by the announcement that two Soviet scientists, Nina Kliueva and Grigorii Roskin, had discovered anticancer properties in culture extracts made from the South American protozoan, Trypanosoma cruzi, and had produced a preparation - named after its discoverers KR - which showed clear therapeutic effects on cancer patients. Research teams from various countries enthusiastically pursued the promising new line of investigation. The story of the rise and fall of interest in the anticancer properties of T. cruzi in different countries suggests that during the second half of the twentieth century, the Cold War competition between the superpowers played an important role in shaping the research agendas of cancer studies.No verão de 1946, a comunidade internacional que desenvolve pesquisas sobre o câncer, inspirou-se no anúncio de que dois cientistas soviéticos, Nina Kliueva e Grigorii Roskin, descobriram propriedades anticancerígenas em cultura extraída do protozoário existente na América Latina, o Trypanosoma cruzi e produziram um preparado que foi denominado com as iniciais KR - em sua homenagem. Grupos de pesquisadores de diversos países buscaram com entusiasmo as promessas dessa nova linha de investigação. A história da ascensão e queda do interesse nas propriedades anticâncer do T. cruzzi em diferentes países sugere que durante a segunda metade do século 20, a Guerra Fria teve um papel importante na definição das agendas de pesquisas sobre o câncer.

  6. Protein 3-nitrotyrosine formation during Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice

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    M. Naviliat

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (·NO is a diffusible messenger implicated in Trypanosoma cruzi resistance. Excess production of ·NO and oxidants leads to the generation of nitrogen dioxide (·NO2, a strong nitrating agent. Tyrosine nitration is a post-translational modification resulting from the addition of a nitro (-NO2 group to the ortho-position of tyrosine residues. Detection of protein 3-nitrotyrosine is regarded as a marker of nitro-oxidative stress and is observed in inflammatory processes. The formation and role of nitrating species in the control and myocardiopathy of T. cruzi infection remain to be studied. We investigated the levels of ·NO and protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the plasma of C3H and BALB/c mice and pharmacologically modulated their production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. We also looked for protein 3-nitrotyrosine in the hearts of infected animals. Our results demonstrated that C3H animals produced higher amounts of ·NO than BALB/c mice, but their generation of peroxynitrite was not proportionally enhanced and they had higher parasitemias. While N G-nitro-arginine methyl ester treatment abolished ·NO production and drastically augmented the parasitism, mercaptoethylguanidine and guanido-ethyl disulfide, at doses that moderately reduced the ·NO and 3-nitrotyrosine levels, paradoxically diminished the parasitemia in both strains. Nitrated proteins were also demonstrated in myocardial cells of infected mice. These data suggest that the control of T. cruzi infection depends not only on the capacity to produce ·NO, but also on its metabolic fate, including the generation of nitrating species that may constitute an important element in parasite resistance and collateral myocardial damage.

  7. Serodiagnosis of Chronic and Acute Chagas' Disease with Trypanosoma cruzi Recombinant Proteins: Results of a Collaborative Study in Six Latin American Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Eufrosina S.; Luquetti, Alejandro O.; Levitus, Gabriela; Ponce, Carlos; Ponce, Elisa; Henriquez, Diana; Revollo, Susana; Espinoza, Bertha; Sousa, Octavio; Khan, Baldip; da Silveira, José Franco

    2004-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to diagnose Chagas' disease by a serological test was performed with Trypanosoma cruzi recombinant antigens (JL8, MAP, and TcPo). High sensitivity (99.4%) and specificity (99.3%) were obtained when JL8 was combined with MAP (JM) and tested with 150 serum samples from chagasic and 142 nonchagasic individuals. Moreover, JM also diagnosed 84.2% of patients in the acute phase of T. cruzi infection. PMID:14715803

  8. Acute central nervous system infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and AIDS

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    Pasquale Gallo

    1992-09-01

    Full Text Available The acute infection of the CNS by Trypanosoma cruzi acquired by blood transfusion is uncommon. The concomitance of AIDS in the patient reported shows the importance of cellular immunity in restriction of this parasite, and reinforces the problem of blood transfusion in endemic zones.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi: avirulence of the PF strain to Callithrix marmosets

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    Humberto Menezes

    1981-06-01

    Full Text Available Callithrix jacchus geoffroy marmosets (HumBol. 1812 were injected once subcutaneously with 10.000 parasites/g body weight and followed for a period of six months. The PF strain of Trypanosoma cruzi was used. Follow-up was done through blood cultures, xenodiagnosis, serological tests, and ECG. A small number of normaI animais served as control.

  10. Effects of organic solvents on the enzyme activity of Trypanosoma cruzi glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in calorimetric assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Henrik; Cheleski, J; Zottis, A

    2007-01-01

    OH), in the isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) kinetic assays for the catalyzed reaction of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from Trypanosoma cruzi. The solvent effects on T. cruzi GAPDH had not yet been studied. This enzyme was shown here to be affected by the organic solvents content up to 5...

  11. Occurrence of Trypanosoma cruzi in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.; Bruce, J.I.

    1962-01-01

    During 1954-1960, 2005 mammals of 18 species collected at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Maryland, were examined for trypanosomes. T. cruzi was found in 10 raccoons between October 31 and November 30. Infection occurred in 2 percent of all raccoons sampled, and in 11.3 percent of the 80 raccoons sampled in November. Examination was by direct smears, stained smears and cultures of heart blood. Although, in previous studies, at least two experimentally infected raccoons exhibited extended parasitemia (14 and 8 weeks), no such continuing parasitemia was observed in the natural infections. No trypanosomes were found in any of the other mammals examined.

  12. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of Trypanosoma cruzi phosphofructokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Evelyn; Lander, Noelia; Ramirez, Jose Luis

    2009-08-01

    The characterisation of the gene encoding Trypanosoma cruzi CL Brener phosphofructokinase (PFK) and the biochemical properties of the expressed enzyme are reported here. In contradiction with previous reports, the PFK genes of CL Brener and YBM strain T. cruzi were found to be similar to their Leishmania mexicana and Trypanosoma brucei homologs in terms of both kinetic properties and size, with open reading frames encoding polypeptides with a deduced molecular mass of 53,483. The predicted amino acid sequence contains the C-terminal glycosome-targeting tripeptide SKL; this localisation was confirmed by immunofluorescence assays. In sequence comparisons with the genes of other eukaryotes, it was found that, despite being an adenosine triphosphate-dependent enzyme, T. cruzi PFK shows significant sequence similarity with inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent PFKs.

  13. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of Trypanosoma cruzi phosphofructokinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Rodríguez

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The characterisation of the gene encoding Trypanosoma cruzi CL Brener phosphofructokinase (PFK and the biochemical properties of the expressed enzyme are reported here. In contradiction with previous reports, the PFK genes of CL Brener and YBM strain T. cruzi were found to be similar to their Leishmania mexicana and Trypanosoma brucei homologs in terms of both kinetic properties and size, with open reading frames encoding polypeptides with a deduced molecular mass of 53,483. The predicted amino acid sequence contains the C-terminal glycosome-targeting tripeptide SKL; this localisation was confirmed by immunofluorescence assays. In sequence comparisons with the genes of other eukaryotes, it was found that, despite being an adenosine triphosphate-dependent enzyme, T. cruzi PFK shows significant sequence similarity with inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent PFKs.

  14. Dimeric flavonoids from Arrabidaea brachypoda and assessment of their anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Cláudia Quintino; Queiroz, Emerson Ferreira; Meira, Cássio Santana; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Marcourt, Laurence; Vilegas, Wagner; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2014-06-27

    The nonpolar fraction of an aqueous ethanol extract of the roots of Arrabidaea brachypoda, a Brazilian medicinal plant, demonstrated significant in vitro activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite responsible for Chagas disease. Targeted isolation of the active constituents led to the isolation of three new dimeric flavonoids (1-3), and their structures were elucidated using UV, NMR, and HRMS analysis, as well as by chemical derivatization. The anti-T. cruzi activity and cytotoxicity toward mammalian cells were determined for these substances. Compound 1 exhibited no activity toward T. cruzi, while flavonoids 2 and 3 exhibited selective activity against these trypomastigotes. Compounds 2 and 3 inhibited the parasite invasion process and its intracellular development in host cells with similar potencies to benznidazole. In addition, compound 2 reduced the blood parasitemia of T. cruzi-infected mice. This study has revealed that these two dimeric flavonoids represent potential anti-T. cruzi lead compounds for further drug development.

  15. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiza, Javier M.; Burgos, Juan M.; Ojeda, Diego S.; Pascuale, Carla A.; Leguizamón, M. Susana; Quarleri, Jorge F.

    2017-01-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis. PMID:28824880

  16. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Urquiza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis.

  17. The effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on the cell cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, E.; Barrera, P.; Tonn, C.; Nieto, M.; Sartor, T.; Sosa, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous natural compounds have been used against Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. Here, we studied the effect of the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone on growth and morphology of parasites synchronized with hydroxyurea, at different periods of time after removal of the nucleotide.

  18. Maxi-circles and mini-circles in kinetoplast DNA from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Leon; A.C.C. Frasch; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); F. Fase-Fowler; P. Borst (Piet); F. Brunel; J. Davison

    1980-01-01

    textabstractMaxi-circles are a minor component of kinetoplast DNAs from all trypanosomatids studied, but they have not previously been found in Trypanosoma cruzi; We have spread intact kinetoplast DNA from the epimastigotes of strain Y in protein monolayers and analysed the mini-circle networks by

  19. Experimental transmission of the parasitic flagellates Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli between triatomine bugs or mice and captive neotropical bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice E Thomas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli-like trypanosomes have been found in a variety of neotropical bat species. In this study, bats (Artibeus lituratus, Carollia perspicillata, Desmodus rotundus, Glossophaga soricina, Molossus molossus, Phyllostomus hastatus were maintained under controlled conditions, and experiments were conducted to determine how they might become infected naturally with trypanosomes. All bats were first screened for existing infections by hemoculture and the examination of blood smears, and only apparently uninfected animals were then used in the experiments. Proof was obtained that the triatomine bug Rhodnius prolixus would readily feed upon some of the bats, and two species became infected after being bitten by bugs infected with T. rangeli. Some bats also became infected by ingesting R. prolixus carrying T. cruzi, or following subcutaneous or intragastic inoculation with fecal suspensions of R. prolixus containing T. cruzi. P. hastatus became infected after ingesting mice carrying T. cruzi. All of the bats studied inhabit roosts that may be occupied by triatomine bugs and, with the exception of D. rotundus, all also feed to at least some extent upon insects. These findings provide further evidence of how bats may play significant roles in the epidemiology of T. cruzi and T. rangeli in the New World tropics.

  20. Perspectives on Trypanosoma cruzi-induced heart disease (Chagas disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanowitz, Herbert B; Machado, Fabiana S; Jelicks, Linda A; Shirani, Jamshid; de Carvalho, Antonio C Campos; Spray, David C; Factor, Stephen M; Kirchhoff, Louis V; Weiss, Louis M

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. It is a common cause of heart disease in endemic areas of Latin America. The year 2009 marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of T cruzi infection and Chagas disease by the Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas. Chagasic cardiomyopathy develops in from 10% to 30% of persons who are chronically infected with this parasite. Echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are important modalities in the evaluation and prognostication of individuals with chagasic heart disease. The etiology of chagasic heart disease likely is multifactorial. Parasite persistence, autoimmunity, and microvascular abnormalities have been studied extensively as possible pathogenic mechanisms. Experimental studies suggest that alterations in cardiac gap junctions may be etiologic in the pathogenesis of conduction abnormalities. The diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is made by serology. The treatment of this infection has shortcomings that need to be addressed. Cardiac transplantation and bone marrow stem cell therapy for persons with Chagas disease have received increasing research attention in recent years.

  1. Interferon-Gamma Promotes Infection of Astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Mariante, Rafael M.; Silva, Andrea Alice; dos Santos, Ana Luiza Barbosa; Roffê, Ester; Santiago, Helton; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ) is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD). IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS) and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO). Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD. PMID:25695249

  2. Interferon-gamma promotes infection of astrocytes by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Rodrigues Silva

    Full Text Available The inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFNγ is crucial for immunity against intracellular pathogens such as the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease (CD. IFNγ is a pleiotropic cytokine which regulates activation of immune and non-immune cells; however, the effect of IFNγ in the central nervous system (CNS and astrocytes during CD is unknown. Here we show that parasite persists in the CNS of C3H/He mice chronically infected with the Colombian T. cruzi strain despite the increased expression of IFNγ mRNA. Furthermore, most of the T. cruzi-bearing cells were astrocytes located near IFNγ+ cells. Surprisingly, in vitro experiments revealed that pretreatment with IFNγ promoted the infection of astrocytes by T. cruzi increasing uptake and proliferation of intracellular forms, despite inducing increased production of nitric oxide (NO. Importantly, the effect of IFNγ on T. cruzi uptake and growth is completely blocked by the anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF antibody Infliximab and partially blocked by the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthesis L-NAME. These data support that IFNγ fuels astrocyte infection by T. cruzi and critically implicate IFNγ-stimulated T. cruzi-infected astrocytes as sources of TNF and NO, which may contribute to parasite persistence and CNS pathology in CD.

  3. Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas' Disease in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Caryn; Kjos, Sonia; Yabsley, Michael J.; Montgomery, Susan P.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Chagas' disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and causes potentially life-threatening disease of the heart and gastrointestinal tract. The southern half of the United States contains enzootic cycles of T. cruzi, involving 11 recognized triatomine vector species. The greatest vector diversity and density occur in the western United States, where woodrats are the most common reservoir; other rodents, raccoons, skunks, and coyotes are also infected with T. cruzi. In the eastern United States, the prevalence of T. cruzi is highest in raccoons, opossums, armadillos, and skunks. A total of 7 autochthonous vector-borne human infections have been reported in Texas, California, Tennessee, and Louisiana; many others are thought to go unrecognized. Nevertheless, most T. cruzi-infected individuals in the United States are immigrants from areas of endemicity in Latin America. Seven transfusion-associated and 6 organ donor-derived T. cruzi infections have been documented in the United States and Canada. As improved control of vector- and blood-borne T. cruzi transmission decreases the burden in countries where the disease is historically endemic and imported Chagas' disease is increasingly recognized outside Latin America, the United States can play an important role in addressing the altered epidemiology of Chagas' disease in the 21st century. PMID:21976603

  4. Molecular characterization and interactome analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi tryparedoxin II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diego G; Piñeyro, María Dolores; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A; Robello, Carlos

    2015-04-29

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, possesses two tryparedoxins (TcTXNI and TcTXNII), belonging to the thioredoxin superfamily. TXNs are oxidoreductases which mediate electron transfer between trypanothione and peroxiredoxins. This constitutes a difference with the host cells, in which these activities are mediated by thioredoxins. These differences make TXNs an attractive target for drug development. In a previous work we characterized TcTXNI, including the redox interactome. In this work we extend the study to TcTXNII. We demonstrate that TcTXNII is a transmembrane protein anchored to the surface of the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, with a cytoplasmatic orientation of the redox domain. It would be expressed during the metacyclogenesis process. In order to continue with the characterization of the redox interactome of T. cruzi, we designed an active site mutant TcTXNII lacking the resolving cysteine, and through the expression of this mutant protein and incubation with T. cruzi proteins, heterodisulfide complexes were isolated by affinity chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. This allowed us to identify sixteen TcTXNII interacting proteins, which are involved in a wide range of cellular processes, indicating the relevance of TcTXNII, and contributing to our understanding of the redox interactome of T. cruzi. T. cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, constitutes a major sanitary problem in Latin America. The number of estimated infected persons is ca. 8 million, 28 million people are at risk of infection and ~20,000 deaths occur per year in endemic regions. No vaccines are available at present, and most drugs currently in use were developed decades ago and show variable efficacy with undesirable side effects. The parasite is able to live and prolipherate inside macrophage phagosomes, where it is exposed to cytotoxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, derived from macrophage activation. Therefore, T. cruzi

  5. Congenital Trypanosoma cruzi Transmission in Santa Cruz, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bern, Caryn; Verastegui, Manuela; Gilman, Robert H.; LaFuente, Carlos; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Calderon, Maritza; Pacori, Juan; Abastoflor, Maria del Carmen; Aparicio, Hugo; Brady, Mark F.; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Angulo, Noelia; Marcus, Sarah; Sterling, Charles; Maguire, James H.

    2017-01-01

    Background We conducted a study of congenital Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Our objective was to apply new tools to identify weak points in current screening algorithms, and find ways to improve them. Methods Women presenting for delivery were screened by rapid and conventional serological tests. For infants of infected mothers, blood specimens obtained on days 0, 7, 21, 30, 90, 180, and 270 were concentrated and examined microscopically; serological tests were performed for the day 90, 180, and 270 specimens. Maternal and infant specimens, including umbilical tissue, were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the kinetoplast minicircle and by quantitative PCR. Results Of 530 women, 154 (29%) were seropositive. Ten infants had congenital T. cruzi infection. Only 4 infants had positive results of microscopy evaluation in the first month, and none had positive cord blood microscopy results. PCR results were positive for 6 (67%) of 9 cord blood and 7 (87.5%) of 8 umbilical tissue specimens. PCR-positive women were more likely to transmit T. cruzi than were seropositive women with negative PCR results (P < .05). Parasite loads determined by quantitative PCR were higher for mothers of infected infants than for seropositive mothers of uninfected infants (P < .01). Despite intensive efforts, only 58% of at-risk infants had a month 9 specimen collected. Conclusions On the basis of the low sensitivity of microscopy in cord blood and high rate of loss to follow-up, we estimate that current screening programs miss one-half of all infected infants. Molecular techniques may improve early detection. PMID:19877966

  6. Novel drug design for Chagas disease via targeting Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin: Homology modeling and binding pocket prediction on Trypanosoma cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition by naphthoquinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogindo, Charles O; Khraiwesh, Mozna H; George, Matthew; Brandy, Yakini; Brandy, Nailah; Gugssa, Ayele; Ashraf, Mohammad; Abbas, Muneer; Southerland, William M; Lee, Clarence M; Bakare, Oladapo; Fang, Yayin

    2016-08-15

    Chagas disease, also called American trypanosomiasis, is a parasitic disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). Recent findings have underscored the abundance of the causative organism, (T. cruzi), especially in the southern tier states of the US and the risk burden for the rural farming communities there. Due to a lack of safe and effective drugs, there is an urgent need for novel therapeutic options for treating Chagas disease. We report here our first scientific effort to pursue a novel drug design for treating Chagas disease via the targeting of T. cruzi tubulin. First, the anti T. cruzi tubulin activities of five naphthoquinone derivatives were determined and correlated to their anti-trypanosomal activities. The correlation between the ligand activities against the T. cruzi organism and their tubulin inhibitory activities was very strong with a Pearson's r value of 0.88 (P value cruzi tubulin polymerization inhibition. Subsequent molecular modeling studies were carried out to understand the mechanisms of the anti-tubulin activities, wherein, the homology model of T. cruzi tubulin dimer was generated and the putative binding site of naphthoquinone derivatives was predicted. The correlation coefficient for ligand anti-tubulin activities and their binding energies at the putative pocket was found to be r=0.79, a high correlation efficiency that was not replicated in contiguous candidate pockets. The homology model of T. cruzi tubulin and the identification of its putative binding site lay a solid ground for further structure based drug design, including molecular docking and pharmacophore analysis. This study presents a new opportunity for designing potent and selective drugs for Chagas disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Acetate oxidation by bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docampo, R; Cruz, F S; Leon, W; Schmunis, G A

    1979-05-01

    Bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi had a substantial increase in respiration in the presence of acetate. Oxidation of acetate took place via the tricarboxylic acid cycle and involved an antimycin A-sensitive respiratory pathway. Oxygen uptake in the presence of acetate was a sensitive to antimycin A inhibition as was CO2 production. There was a 6--7% residual O2 uptake which was not inhibited by high antimycin concentrations. Human anti-T. cruzi sera had no effect on oxygen uptake.

  8. Potent 5-nitrofuran derivatives inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi growth: Electrochemical, spectroscopic and biological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria Aravena, C.; Claudio Olea, A.; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes; Maya, Juan Diego; Rodríguez-Becerra, Jorge

    2011-07-01

    Cyclic voltammetry and electron spin resonance techniques were used in the investigation of several potential antiprotozoal containing thiosemicarbazone and carbamate nitrofurans. In the electrochemical behaviour, a self-protonation process involving the nitro group was observed. The reactivity of the nitro anion radical for these derivatives with glutathione, a biological relevant thiol, was also studied in means of cyclic voltammetry. These studies demonstrated that glutathione could react with radical species from 5-nitrofuryl system. Furthermore, from the voltammetric results, some parameters of biological significance as E71 (indicative of the biological nitro anion radical formation), and K (thermodynamic indicator the of oxygen redox cycling) have been calculated. We also evaluated the stability of the nitro anion radical in terms of the dimerization constant ( kd). The nitrofuran-free radicals from cyclic voltammetry were characterized by electron spin resonance. A clear dependence between both the thiosemicarbazone or carbamate substructure and the length of the linker, furyl- or furylpropenyl-spacer, and the delocalization of the unpaired electron was observed. Through of biological assays we obtained important parameters that account for the selective anti-trypanosomal activity of these derivatives. The trypomastigote viability study showed that all derivatives are as active as in the epimastigote form of the parasite in a doses dependent manner.

  9. A theoretical study of the molecular mechanism of the GAPDH Trypanosoma cruzi enzyme involving iodoacetate inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Agnaldo Silva; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio Nahum

    2011-10-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme (GAPDH) is an important biological target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents against Chagas disease. In this Letter, the inhibition mechanism of GAPDH involving iodoacetate (IAA) inhibitor was studied using the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach and molecular dynamic simulations. Analysis of the potential energy surface and potential of mean force show that the covalent attachment of IAA inhibitor to the active site of the enzyme occurs as a concerted process. In addition, the energy terms decomposition shows that NAD+ plays an important role in stabilization of the reagents and transition state.

  10. Genome and transcriptome studies of the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and Giardia intestinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farran, Alexandra J. E.

    Vocal fold (VF) diseases and disorders are difficult to treat surgically or therapeutically. Tissue engineering offers an alternative strategy for the restoration of functional VF. In this work, we have developed tissue engineering methodologies for the functional reconstruction of VF. As a first step, the structure, composition and mechanical properties of native VF tissues have been investigated. In pigs ranging from fetal to 2+ years old, the VF structure and viscoelastic properties were found to be age-dependent. Adult tissues were more organized, displaying a denser lamina propria, and mature elastin fibers compared to fetal tissues, resulting in higher storage moduli. Secondly, biomimetic scaffolds which recaptured the mechanical properties of the native VF were developed. Chemically-defined collagen-hyaluronic acid (HA) composite hydrogels, and elastin-mimetic hybrid polymers (EMHPs) were successfully used as conducive 3D matrices, and 2D elastic scaffolds respectively, to in vitro static culture of fibroblasts. While the collagen-HA hydrogels allowed for in situ cell encapsulation and supported cell attachment and proliferation in 3D, the integrin-binding domain RGDSP was needed for cell proliferation on EMHPs. To emulate in vitro the mechanical environment of the native VF tissue, a dynamic culture system capable of generating vibratory stimulations at human phonation frequencies was successfully created and characterized. Gene expression analysis of fibroblasts subjected to 1 hour vibrations in 2D revealed that the expression of ECM-related genes was altered in response to changes in vibratory frequency and amplitude. Finally, expanding on our previous studies, the dynamic culture system was modified to accommodate for the long-term dynamic culture of cell-laden hydrogels. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) encapsulated in a collagen/HA-based hydrogel, cultured in presence of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and subjected to high frequency

  11. Surface electrical charge of bloodstream trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi strains

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    Maria Auxiliadora de Sousa

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Bloodstream trypomastigotes of some Trypanosoma cruzi strains were processed through DEAE-cellulose columns under standardized conditions. The results obtained suggest mainly that these strains present different surface charges, that there are subpopulations of bloodstream trypomastigotes as regards electrical charges and that the broad forms are less negative than the slender ones.Tripomastigotas sanguíneos de algumas cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi foram processadas em colunas de DEAE-celulose sob condições padronizadas. Os resultados obtidos sugerem principalmente que estas cepas possuem cargas superficiais diferentes, que em relação a este aspecto existem subpopulações de tripomastigotas e que as formas largas são menos negativas do que as finas.

  12. In Vivo Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Hydro-Ethanolic Extract and Isolated Active Principles from Aristeguietia glutinosa and Mechanism of Action Studies

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    Javier Varela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The currently available treatments for Chagas disease show limited therapeutic potential and are associated with serious side effects. Attempting to find alternative drugs isolated from Nature as agents against Trypanosoma cruzi has been our goal. Recently, we have demonstrated the in vitro anti-T. cruzi activities of two secondary metabolites isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa (Lam., (family Asteraceae. These active principles displayed poor hemolytic activity, low toxicity against murine macrophages, and absence of mutagenicity. Herein, proof of concept in vivo studies of the whole hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa and of the most active component isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract, i.e., (+-15-hydroxy-7-labden-17-al, was done in a murine acute model of Chagas disease. Both treatments caused a decrease in the animals’ parasitemia. Metabolomic mechanism of action studies were done by 1H-NMR, both on the extract and on the active compounds, examining the effects of the metabolites both on membrane sterol biosynthesis and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, whereby we found that one of the metabolites inhibited the activity of the parasite mitochondrial dehydrogenases and the other inhibited the biosynthesis of parasite membrane sterols. The results are interesting in the context of popular use of plants for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  13. In vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of hydro-ethanolic extract and isolated active principles from Aristeguietia glutinosa and mechanism of action studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Javier; Serna, Elva; Torres, Susana; Yaluff, Gloria; de Bilbao, Ninfa I Vera; Miño, Patricio; Chiriboga, Ximena; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2014-06-23

    The currently available treatments for Chagas disease show limited therapeutic potential and are associated with serious side effects. Attempting to find alternative drugs isolated from Nature as agents against Trypanosoma cruzi has been our goal. Recently, we have demonstrated the in vitro anti-T. cruzi activities of two secondary metabolites isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa (Lam.), (family Asteraceae). These active principles displayed poor hemolytic activity, low toxicity against murine macrophages, and absence of mutagenicity. Herein, proof of concept in vivo studies of the whole hydro-ethanolic extract of the aerial parts of Aristeguietia glutinosa and of the most active component isolated from the hydro-ethanolic extract, i.e., (+)-15-hydroxy-7-labden-17-al, was done in a murine acute model of Chagas disease. Both treatments caused a decrease in the animals' parasitemia. Metabolomic mechanism of action studies were done by 1H-NMR, both on the extract and on the active compounds, examining the effects of the metabolites both on membrane sterol biosynthesis and mitochondrial dehydrogenases, whereby we found that one of the metabolites inhibited the activity of the parasite mitochondrial dehydrogenases and the other inhibited the biosynthesis of parasite membrane sterols. The results are interesting in the context of popular use of plants for the treatment of Chagas disease.

  14. Mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi Placenta Invasion and Infection: The Use of Human Chorionic Villi Explants

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    Ricardo E. Fretes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease, endemic in Latin America, is associated with premature labor and miscarriage. During vertical transmission the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi crosses the placental barrier. However, the exact mechanism of the placental infection remains unclear. We review the congenital transmission of T. cruzi, particularly the role of possible local placental factors that contribute to the vertical transmission of the parasite. Additionally, we analyze the different methods available for studying the congenital transmission of the parasite. In that context, the ex vivo infection with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of human placental chorionic villi constitutes an excellent tool for studying parasite infection strategies as well as possible local antiparasitic mechanisms.

  15. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection with DNA Vaccines in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 × 104 parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injecti...

  16. Betulinic acid induces cell death by necrosis in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Paloma Leão; Souza, Racquel Oliveira da Silva; Tessarolo, Louise Donadello; de Menezes, Ramon Róseo Paula Pessoa Bezerra; Sampaio, Tiago Lima; Canuto, Jader Almeida; Martins, Alice Maria Costa

    2017-10-01

    Chagas' disease is a neglected disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and constitutes a serious health problem worldwide. The treatment is limited, with variable efficacy of benznidazole and nifurtimox. Betulinic Acid (BA), a triterpene, can be found in medicinal herbs and has a wide variety of biological and pharmacological activities. The objective was to evaluate betulinic acid effects on the cell death mechanism in Trypanosoma cruzi strain Y. BA inhibited the growth of epimastigotes in periods of 24h (IC 50 =73.43μM), 48h (IC 50 =119.8μM) and 72h (IC 50 =212.2μM) of incubation; of trypomastigotes (IC 50 =51.88μM) in periods of 24h and intracellular amastigotes (IC 50 =25.94μM) in periods of 24 and 48h of incubation, no toxicity on LLC-MK 2 cells at the concentrations used. Analysis of the possible mechanism of parasite cell death showed alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential, alterations in cell membrane integrity, an increase in the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase swelling of the reservosomes. In conclusion, betulinic acid was be able to inhibition all developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain with necrotic mechanism and involvement of mitochondrial membrane potential alteration and increase in reactive oxygen species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro drug susceptibility of two strains of the wildlife trypanosome, Trypanosoma copemani: A comparison with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero, Adriana; Keatley, Sarah; Peacock, Christopher; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosomes are blood protozoan parasites that are capable of producing illness in the vertebrate host. Within Australia, several native Trypanosoma species have been described infecting wildlife. However, only Trypanosoma copemani has been associated with pathological lesions in wildlife hosts and more recently has been associated with the drastic decline of the critically endangered woylie (Bettongia penicillata). The impact that some trypanosomes have on the health of the vertebrate host has led to the development of numerous drug compounds that could inhibit the growth or kill the parasite. This study investigated and compared the in vitro susceptibility of two strains of T. copemani (G1 and G2) and one strain of Trypanosoma cruzi (10R26) against drugs that are known to show trypanocidal activity (benznidazole, posaconazole, miltefosine and melarsoprol) and against four lead compounds, two fenarimols and two pyridine derivatives (EPL-BS1937, EPL-BS2391, EPL-BS0967, and EPL-BS1246), that have been developed primarily against T.cruzi. The in vitro cytotoxicity of all drugs against L6 rat myoblast cells was also assessed. Results showed that both strains of T. copemani were more susceptible to all drugs and lead compounds than T. cruzi, with all IC50 values in the low and sub-μM range for both species. Melarsoprol and miltefosine exhibited the highest drug activity against both T. copemani and T. cruzi, but they also showed the highest toxicity in L6 cells. Interestingly, both fenarimol and pyridine derivative compounds were more active against T. copemani and T. cruzi than the reference drugs benznidazole and posaconazole. T. copemani strains exhibited differences in susceptibility to all drugs demonstrating once again considerable differences in their biological behaviour. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Genitourinary changes in hamsters infected and reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Cabrine-Santos Marlene

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors describe genitourinary changes in male hamsters infected and reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Changes in genital organs have been described in human and in experimental chagasic infection. Genital dysfunctions in chronic chagasic patients affect ejaculation, libido and sexual potency, and testis biopsies may show arrested maturation of germ cells, oligozoospermia and azoospermia. Sixty-five male hamsters were inoculated and reinoculated with 2x10³ trypomastigotes of T. cruzi VIC strain, and 22 non-infected animals constituted the control group. Animals were necropsied and fragments from testis, epididymis, seminal vesicle and bladder were collected and stained with hematoxylin-eosin. Peroxidase anti-peroxidase procedure was utilized to detect tissue parasitism. T. cruzi nests were found in testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle of these hamsters. Such parasitism plays a role in the origin of genital lesions observed in humans and laboratory animals during chronic chagasic infection.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi: Transporte de metabolitos esenciales obtenidos del hospedador Trypanosoma cruzi: Transport of essential metabolites acquired from the host

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    Claudio A. Pereira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available El Trypanosoma cruzi es el agente causal de la enfermedad de Chagas, endémica en Argentina y en toda América Latina. Presenta numerosas características metabólicas diferenciales respecto a sus hospedadores insectos y mamíferos. Algunas de estas diferencias fueron consecuencia de millones de años de adaptación al parasitismo en los cuales estos organismos protozoarios reemplazaron, a lo largo de su evolución, muchas rutas metabólicas de biosíntesis por sistemas de transporte de metabolitos desde el hospedador. En esta revisión se describen los avances en el conocimiento de los sistemas de transporte tanto bioquímicos como también de las moléculas involucradas en dichos procesos. Se aborda con especial énfasis los transportadores de aminoácidos y poliaminas de T. cruzi de la familia AAAP (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases ya que parece ser exclusiva de los tripanosomátidos. Teniendo en cuenta que estas moléculas se encuentran completamente ausentes en mamíferos podrían ser consideradas como potenciales blancos contra el Trypanosoma cruzi.Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a disease endemic not only in Argentina but also in all of Latinamerica. T. cruzi presents several metabolic characteristics which are completely absent in its insect vectors and in mammalian hosts. Some of these differences were acquired after millions of years of adaptation to parasitism, during which this protozoan replaced many biosynthetic routes for transport systems. In the present review, we describe the advances in the knowledge of T. cruzi transport processes and the molecules involved. In particular, we focus on aminoacid and polyamine transporters from the AAAP family (Amino Acid/Auxin Permeases, because they seem to be exclusive transporters from trypanosomatids. Taking into account that these permeases are completely absent in mammals, they could be considered as a potential target against Trypanosoma cruzi.

  20. Sialic Acid Glycobiology Unveils Trypanosoma cruzi Trypomastigote Membrane Physiology.

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    Andrés B Lantos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the flagellate protozoan agent of Chagas disease or American trypanosomiasis, is unable to synthesize sialic acids de novo. Mucins and trans-sialidase (TS are substrate and enzyme, respectively, of the glycobiological system that scavenges sialic acid from the host in a crucial interplay for T. cruzi life cycle. The acquisition of the sialyl residue allows the parasite to avoid lysis by serum factors and to interact with the host cell. A major drawback to studying the sialylation kinetics and turnover of the trypomastigote glycoconjugates is the difficulty to identify and follow the recently acquired sialyl residues. To tackle this issue, we followed an unnatural sugar approach as bioorthogonal chemical reporters, where the use of azidosialyl residues allowed identifying the acquired sugar. Advanced microscopy techniques, together with biochemical methods, were used to study the trypomastigote membrane from its glycobiological perspective. Main sialyl acceptors were identified as mucins by biochemical procedures and protein markers. Together with determining their shedding and turnover rates, we also report that several membrane proteins, including TS and its substrates, both glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, are separately distributed on parasite surface and contained in different and highly stable membrane microdomains. Notably, labeling for α(1,3Galactosyl residues only partially colocalize with sialylated mucins, indicating that two species of glycosylated mucins do exist, which are segregated at the parasite surface. Moreover, sialylated mucins were included in lipid-raft-domains, whereas TS molecules are not. The location of the surface-anchored TS resulted too far off as to be capable to sialylate mucins, a role played by the shed TS instead. Phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase-C activity is actually not present in trypomastigotes. Therefore, shedding of TS occurs via microvesicles instead of as a fully

  1. Antiparasitic evaluation of betulinic acid derivatives reveals effective and selective anti-Trypanosoma cruzi inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meira, Cássio Santana; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Lanfredi-Rangel, Adriana; Guimarães, Elisalva Teixeira; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid with several biological properties already described, including antiparasitic activity. Here, the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of betulinic acid and its semi-synthetic amide derivatives (BA1-BA8) was investigated. The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity and selectivity were enhanced in semi-synthetic derivatives, specially on derivatives BA5, BA6 and BA8. To understand the mechanism of action underlying betulinic acid anti-T. cruzi activity, we investigated ultrastructural changes by electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies showed that trypomastigotes incubated with BA5 had membrane blebling, flagella retraction, atypical cytoplasmic vacuoles and Golgi cisternae dilatation. Flow cytometry analysis showed that parasite death is mainly caused by necrosis. Treatment with derivatives BA5, BA6 or BA8 reduced the invasion process, as well as intracellular parasite development in host cells, with a potency and selectivity similar to that observed in benznidazole-treated cells. More importantly, the combination of BA5 and benznidazole revealed synergistic effects on trypomastigote and amastigote forms of T. cruzi. In conclusion, we demonstrated that BA5 compound is an effective and selective anti-T. cruzi agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Phospholipase A1: a novel virulence factor in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belaunzarán, María Laura; Wilkowsky, Silvina Elizabeth; Lammel, Estela María; Giménez, Guadalupe; Bott, Emanuel; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; de Isola, Elvira Luisa Durante

    2013-02-01

    Phospholipase A1 (PLA1) has been described in the infective stages of Trypanosoma cruzi as a membrane-bound/secreted enzyme that significantly modified host cell lipid profile with generation of second lipid messengers and concomitant activation of protein kinase C. In the present work we determined higher levels of PLA1 expression in the infective amastigotes and trypomastigotes than in the non-infective epimastigotes of lethal RA strain. In addition, we found similar expression patterns but distinct PLA1 activity levels in bloodstream trypomastigotes from Cvd and RA (lethal) and K98 (non-lethal) T. cruzi strains, obtained at their corresponding parasitemia peaks. This fact was likely due to the presence of different levels of anti-T. cruzi PLA1 antibodies in sera of infected mice, that modulated the enzyme activity. Moreover, these antibodies significantly reduced in vitro parasite invasion indicating the participation of T. cruzi PLA1 in the early events of parasite-host cell interaction. We also demonstrated the presence of lysophospholipase activity in live infective stages that could account for self-protection against the toxic lysophospholipids generated by T. cruzi PLA1 action. At the genome level, we identified at least eight putative genes that codify for T. cruzi PLA1 with high amino acid sequence variability in their amino and carboxy-terminal regions; a putative PLA1 selected gene was cloned and expressed as a recombinant protein that possessed PLA1 activity. Collectively, the results presented here point out at T. cruzi PLA1 as a novel virulence factor implicated in parasite invasion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Repertoire, Genealogy and Genomic Organization of Cruzipain and Homologous Genes in Trypanosoma cruzi, T. cruzi-Like and Other Trypanosome Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luciana; Ortiz, Paola A.; da Silva, Flávia Maia; Alves, João Marcelo P.; Serrano, Myrna G.; Cortez, Alane P.; Alfieri, Silvia C.; Buck, Gregory A.; Teixeira, Marta M. G.

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is a complex of genetically diverse isolates highly phylogenetically related to T. cruzi-like species, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei and Trypanosoma dionisii, all sharing morphology of blood and culture forms and development within cells. However, they differ in hosts, vectors and pathogenicity: T. cruzi is a human pathogen infective to virtually all mammals whilst the other two species are non-pathogenic and bat restricted. Previous studies suggest that variations in expression levels and genetic diversity of cruzipain, the major isoform of cathepsin L-like (CATL) enzymes of T. cruzi, correlate with levels of cellular invasion, differentiation, virulence and pathogenicity of distinct strains. In this study, we compared 80 sequences of genes encoding cruzipain from 25 T. cruzi isolates representative of all discrete typing units (DTUs TcI-TcVI) and the new genotype Tcbat and 10 sequences of homologous genes from other species. The catalytic domain repertoires diverged according to DTUs and trypanosome species. Relatively homogeneous sequences are found within and among isolates of the same DTU except TcV and TcVI, which displayed sequences unique or identical to those of TcII and TcIII, supporting their origin from the hybridization between these two DTUs. In network genealogies, sequences from T. cruzi clustered tightly together and closer to T. c. marinkellei than to T. dionisii and largely differed from homologues of T. rangeli and T. b. brucei. Here, analysis of isolates representative of the overall biological and genetic diversity of T. cruzi and closest T. cruzi-like species evidenced DTU- and species-specific polymorphisms corroborating phylogenetic relationships inferred with other genes. Comparison of both phylogenetically close and distant trypanosomes is valuable to understand host-parasite interactions, virulence and pathogenicity. Our findings corroborate cruzipain as valuable target for drugs, vaccine

  4. Initial studies on mechanism of action and cell death of active N-oxide-containing heterocycles in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Diego; Casanova, Gabriela; Cabrera, Gonzalo; Galanti, Norbel; Cerecetto, Hugo; González, Mercedes

    2014-04-01

    Chagas disease, endemic in 21 countries across Latin America, kills more people in the region each year than any other parasite-borne disease. Therapeutic options have problems ranging from toxicity, poor efficacy, drug resistance and high cost. Thus, cheaper and less toxic treatments are necessary. From our in-house chemical library of agents against Trypanosoma cruzi the most relevant N-oxide-containing heterocycles were selected for mode of action and type of death studies. Also included in these studies were two active nitrofuranes. Epimastigotes of T. cruzi were used as the biological model in this study. The metabolic profile was studied by 1H NMR in association with the MTT assay. Excreted catabolites data, using 1H NMR spectroscopy, showed that most of the studied N-oxides were capable of decreasing both the release of succinate and acetate shedding, the compounds therefore possibly acting on mitochondria. Only quinoxalines and the nitrofurane Nf1 showed significant mitochondrial dehydrogenase inhibitions, but with different dose-time profiles. In the particular case of quinoxaline Qx2 the glucose uptake study revealed that the integrity of some pathways into the glycosome could be affected. Optic, fluorescence (TUNEL and propidium iodide) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed for type of death studies. These studies were complemented with 1H NMR to visualize mobile lipids. At low concentrations none of the selected compounds showed a positive TUNEL assay. However, both quinoxalines, one furoxan and one benzofuroxan showed a necrotic effect at high concentrations. Curiously, one furoxan, Fx1, one benzofuroxan, Bfx1, and one nitrofurane, Nf1, caused a particular phenotype, with a big cytoplasmatic vacuole being observed while the parasite was still alive. Studies of TEM and employing a protease inhibitor (3-methyladenine) suggested an autophagic phenotype for Bfx1 and Nf1 and a 'BigEye' phenotype for Fx1.

  5. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Tokuoka, Keiji [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Uchiyama, Nahoko [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Okamoto, Naoki; Okano, Yousuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Inaka, Koji [Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan); Urade, Yoshihiro [Department of Molecular Behavioral Biology, Osaka Bioscience Institute, Osaka 565-0874 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi, E-mail: inouet@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maruwa Foods Co. Ltd, Tsutsui-cho 170-1, Yamatokoriyama, Nara 639-1123 (Japan)

    2007-10-01

    Old yellow enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi, has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Old yellow enzyme (OYE) is an NADPH oxidoreductase that contains a flavin mononucleotide as a prosthetic group. The OYE from Trypanosoma cruzi, which produces prostaglandin F{sub 2α}, a potent mediator of various physiological and pathological processes, from prostaglandin H2. The protein was recombinantly expressed and purified from Escherichia coli and was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 56.3, b = 78.8, c = 78.8 Å, β = 93.4° and two molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystals were suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies and diffracted to 1.70 Å resolution. A Patterson search method is in progress using the structure of OYE from Pseudomonas putida as a starting model.

  6. Modulation of host central carbon metabolism and in situ glucose uptake by intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Lentini, Gaelle; Dumoulin, Peter C; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2017-11-01

    Obligate intracellular pathogens satisfy their nutrient requirements by coupling to host metabolic processes, often modulating these pathways to facilitate access to key metabolites. Such metabolic dependencies represent potential targets for pathogen control, but remain largely uncharacterized for the intracellular protozoan parasite and causative agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Perturbations in host central carbon and energy metabolism have been reported in mammalian T. cruzi infection, with no information regarding the impact of host metabolic changes on the intracellular amastigote life stage. Here, we performed cell-based studies to elucidate the interplay between infection with intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes and host cellular energy metabolism. T. cruzi infection of non-phagocytic cells was characterized by increased glucose uptake into infected cells and increased mitochondrial respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis. While intracellular amastigote growth was unaffected by decreased host respiratory capacity, restriction of extracellular glucose impaired amastigote proliferation and sensitized parasites to further growth inhibition by 2-deoxyglucose. These observations led us to consider whether intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes utilize glucose directly as a substrate to fuel metabolism. Consistent with this prediction, isolated T. cruzi amastigotes transport extracellular glucose with kinetics similar to trypomastigotes, with subsequent metabolism as demonstrated in 13C-glucose labeling and substrate utilization assays. Metabolic labeling of T. cruzi-infected cells further demonstrated the ability of intracellular parasites to access host hexose pools in situ. These findings are consistent with a model in which intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes capitalize on the host metabolic response to parasite infection, including the increase in glucose uptake, to fuel their own metabolism and replication in the host cytosol. Our findings enrich

  7. Specific antibodies induce apoptosis in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Presas, Ana María; Tato, Patricia; Becker, Ingeborg; Solano, Sandra; Copitin, Natalia; Kopitin, Natalia; Berzunza, Miriam; Willms, Kaethe; Hernández, Joselin; Molinari, José Luis

    2010-05-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported. Mouse immune sera depleted complement-induced damage in epimastigotes characterized by morphological changes and death. The purpose of this work was to study the mechanism of death in epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented mouse immune serum. Epimastigotes were maintained in RPMI medium. Immune sera were prepared in mice by immunization with whole crude epimastigote extracts. Viable epimastigotes were incubated with decomplemented normal or immune sera at 37 degrees C. By electron microscopy, agglutinated parasites showed characteristic patterns of membrane fusion between two or more parasites; this fusion also produced interdigitation of the subpellicular microtubules. Apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and annexin V assays. Nuclear features were examined by 4'-,6-diamidino-2'-phenylindole diHCI cytochemistry that demonstrated apoptotic nuclear condensation. Caspase activity was also measured. TUNEL results showed that parasites incubated with decomplemented immune sera took up 26% of specific fluorescence as compared to 1.3% in parasites incubated with decomplemented normal sera. The Annexin-V-Fluos staining kit revealed that epimastigotes incubated with decomplemented immune sera exposed phosphatidylserine on the external leaflet of the plasma membrane. The incubation of parasites with immune sera showed caspase 3 activity. We conclude that specific antibodies are able to induce agglutination and apoptosis in epimastigotes, although the pathway is not elucidated.

  8. Mast Cell Function and Death in Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Meuser-Batista, Marcelo; Corrêa, José Raimundo; Carvalho, Vinícius Frias; de Carvalho Britto, Constança Felícia De Paoli; da Cruz Moreira, Otacilio; Batista, Marcos Meuser; Soares, Maurílio José; Filho, Francisco Alves Farias; e Silva, Patrícia Machado R.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Silva, Robson Coutinho; Henriques-Pons, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Although the roles of mast cells (MCs) are essential in many inflammatory and fibrotic diseases, their role in Trypanosoma cruzi–induced cardiomyopathy is unexplored. In this study, we treated infected CBA mice with cromolyn, an MC stabilizer, and observed much greater parasitemia and interferon-γ levels, higher mortality, myocarditis, and cardiac damage. Although these data show that MCs are important in controlling acute infection, we observed MC apoptosis in the cardiac tissue and peritoneal cavity of untreated mice. In the heart, pericardial mucosal MC die, perhaps because of reduced amounts of local stem cell factor. Using RT-PCR in purified cardiac MCs, we observed that infection induced transcription of P2X7 receptor and Fas, two molecules reportedly involved in cell death and inflammatory regulation. In gld/gld mice (FasL−/−), apoptosis of cardiac, but not peritoneal, MCs was decreased. Conversely, infection of P2X7−/− mice led to reduced peritoneal, but not cardiac, MC death. These data illustrate the immunomodulatory role played by MCs in T. cruzi infection and the complexity of molecular interactions that control inflammatory pathways in different tissues and compartments. PMID:21819958

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi gene expression in response to gamma radiation.

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    Priscila Grynberg

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is an organism highly resistant to ionizing radiation. Following a dose of 500 Gy of gamma radiation, the fragmented genomic DNA is gradually reconstructed and the pattern of chromosomal bands is restored in less than 48 hours. Cell growth arrests after irradiation but, while DNA is completely fragmented, RNA maintains its integrity. In this work we compared the transcriptional profiles of irradiated and non-irradiated epimastigotes at different time points after irradiation using microarray. In total, 273 genes were differentially expressed; from these, 160 were up-regulated and 113 down-regulated. We found that genes with predicted functions are the most prevalent in the down-regulated gene category. Translation and protein metabolic processes, as well as generation of precursor of metabolites and energy pathways were affected. In contrast, the up-regulated category was mainly composed of obsolete sequences (which included some genes of the kinetoplast DNA, genes coding for hypothetical proteins, and Retrotransposon Hot Spot genes. Finally, the tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1, a gene involved in double-strand DNA break repair process, was up-regulated. Our study demonstrated the peculiar response to ionizing radiation, raising questions about how this organism changes its gene expression to manage such a harmful stress.

  10. Estudo experimental de Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-cricetidae com cepas de Trypanosoma cruzi Studies on the experimental infection of Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-Cricetidae with three strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Monamaris M. Borges

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados resultados em relação a infecção expertmental de Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-Cricetidae com duas cepas de T. cruzi isoladas de casos humanos, Y e Berenice, e uma isolada de um triatomíneo silvestre, chamada costalimai. Foram realizados estudos em relação a evolução da parasitemia, duração da patência e prepatência da infecção. Com o objetivo de verificar a agressividade e tropismo tissular das cepas de T. cruzi nesta espécie de roedor, foram também realizados estudos histopatológicos. Os resultados obtidos mostraram que os níveis de parasitemias foram baixos para as três cepas estudadas. A patência da infecção variou de 14 a 16 dias nos animais inoculados com a cepa Y, 26 a 29 dias com a Berenice e 9 a 13 dias com a costalimai. O período prepatente variou de 3 a 5 dias nos animais inoculados com a cepa Y, de 2 a 6 dias com a cepa Berenice e de 6 a 8 dias com a costalimai. As três cepas apresentaram em Z. lasiurus, comprometimento nitidamente muscular, provocando reações leves, moderadas e intensas.Studies on the experimental infection of Zygodontomys lasiurus (Rodentia-Cricetidae are presented in the current paper. Three strains of T. cruzi were used in the experiments: two, Y and Berenice, were originated from human infection, while the third one was obtained from natural infection in a wild bug Triatoma costalimai. The evolution of the parasitemia was studied and the prepatent and patent periods determined. The tissular tropism and aggressiveness of the strains of T. cruzi were verified through histopathological studies. Results have shown that the parasitemia was always kept at low levels for all the strains. The prepatent period in the infected rodents varied from: 3 to 6 days in the Y strain; 2 to 6 days in the Berenice strain; 6 to 8 in the costalimai strain. The patent period showed the following duration patterns: 14 to 16 days in the Y strain; 26 to 29 in the Berenice strain and 6 to 8

  11. The role of IL-12 in experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection

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    J.S. Silva

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Host resistance to Trypanosoma cruzi infection is dependent on both natural and acquired immune responses. During the early acute phase of infection in mice, natural killer (NK cell-derived IFN-g is involved in controlling intracellular parasite replication, mainly through the induction of nitric oxide biosynthesis by activated macrophages. We have shown that IL-12, a powerful inducer of IFN-g production by NK cells, is synthesized soon after trypomastigote-macrophage interaction. The role of IL-12 in the control of T. cruzi infection in vivo was determined by treating infected mice with anti-IL-12 monoclonal antibody (mAb and analyzing both parasitemia and mortality during the acute phase of infection. The anti-IL-12 mAb-treated mice had higher levels of parasitemia and mortality compared to control mice. Also, treatment of infected mice with mAb specific for IFN-g or TNF-a inhibited the protective effect of exogenous IL-12. On the other hand, TGF-ß and IL-10 produced by infected macrophages inhibited the induction and effects of IL-12. Therefore, while IL-12, TNF-a and IFN-g correlate with resistance to T. cruzi infection, TGF-ß and IL-10 promote susceptibility. These results provide support for a role of innate immunity in the control of T. cruzi infection. In addition to its protective role, IL-12 may also be involved in the modulation of T. cruzi-induced myocarditis, since treatment of infected mice with IL-12 or anti-IL-12 mAb leads to an enhanced or decreased inflammatory infiltrate in the heart, respectively. Understanding the role of the cytokines produced during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection and their involvement in protection and pathogenesis would be essential to devise new vaccines or therapies.

  12. Experimental studies on Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum cruzi strains isolated from man, from animals and from triatomine bugs in Brazil

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    W. B. Petana

    1974-12-01

    Full Text Available A study on nine strains of T. cruzi isolated from man, from animais and from triatomine bugs in Brazil are described. The parasites were slightly viscerotropic in white mice in six of the strains, highly viscerotropic and cardiotropic in two strains, and asymptomatic on one strain. Mechanical and cyclical passage from infected to healthy mice, and treatment of the infected mice with immunosuppressant drug, did not increase the blood parasitaemia or strain virulence. The results of biometric studies on the blood trypanosomes from each strain are also described. The various aspects on the importance of T. cruzi strain Identification are emphasized and discussed.Nove cepas de T. cruzi, 5 isoladas do homem, 2 isoladas do cão e 2 outras isoladas de Triatoma infestans domiciliados, foram estudadas do ponto de vista morfólógico e de sua virulência e patogenicidade para o camundongo, em um período de observação de 8 a 12 meses. As cinco cepas isoladas do homem mostraram baixa parasitemia quando inoculadas no camundongo e provocaram nesse animal apenas redução dos glânglios mioentéricos do colon e discreto aumento desse órgão. Das duas cepas isoladas do cão uma provocou megacolon e cardiomegalia no camundongo e a outra comportau-se de forma semelhante às cepas isoladas do homem. Das cepas isoladas do T. infestans uma foi absolutamente avirulenta para o camundongo e a outra provocou redução dos gânglios do colon e do miocárdio, cardiomegalia e megacolon. Admitem os autores que a passagem "cíclica" de uma cepa de um reservatório para outro possa modificar o seu comportamento, servindo o homem como "reservatório estabilizador" da baixa virulência e patogenicidade das cepas, pelo menos daquelas isoladas de casos crônicos

  13. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody detection in eastern Andalusia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Clotilde; Concha-Valdez, Fanny; Cañas, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Ramón; Sánchez-Moreno, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Chagas disease caused by the protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is no longer found exclusively in Latin America; the disease is occurring in Europe, and Spain is the country with the highest prevalence. Our aim was to detect anti-T. cruzi antibodies in blood donors from southeast Spain, and we performed eight serological diagnostic assays on each of 550 blood samples collected in March-June 2010. Two in-house ELISA methods were used to test against a parasite lysate (ELISA-H) and the semi-purified superoxide dismutase excreted by T. cruzi (ELISA-SODe); we also used the Western blot technique against the same antigen (WB-SODe), indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) and four commercial tests. The serological test results showed a range of seroprevalence values, the lowest being 1.1%, determined by IFA and two commercial tests (Ab rapid and Chagascreen); other values were: 1.3% (commercial ELISA [Chagas ELISA IgG+IgM]); 2.1% (immunochromatographic test [Stick Chagas]); 2.7% (ELISA-H); 4.0% (WB-SODe); and 4.2%, the highest value (ELISA-SODe). The excellent specificity of SODe antigen for the detection of antibodies to T. cruzi in donors lead us to affirm that the serological test performed with this biomarker could provide a useful screening and confirmatory test method for cases of Chagas disease.

  14. Modulation of host cell mechanics by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Adam; Lenormand, Guillaume; Costales, Jaime; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2009-02-01

    To investigate the effects of Trypanosoma cruzi on the mechanical properties of infected host cells, cytoskeletal stiffness and remodeling dynamics were measured in parasite-infected fibroblasts. We find that cell stiffness decreases in a time-dependent fashion in T. cruzi-infected human foreskin fibroblasts without a significant change in the dynamics of cytoskeletal remodeling. In contrast, cells exposed to T. cruzi secreted/released components become significantly stiffer within 2 h of exposure and exhibit increased remodeling dynamics. These findings represent the first direct mechanical data to suggest a physical picture in which an intact, stiff, and rapidly remodeling cytoskeleton facilitates early stages of T. cruzi invasion and parasite retention, followed by subsequent softening and disassembly of the cytoskeleton to accommodate intracellular replication of parasites. We further suggest that these changes occur through protein kinase A and inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase signaling pathway. In the context of tissue infection, changes in host cell mechanics could adversely affect the function of the infected organs, and may play an important role on the pathophysiology of Chagas' disease. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi present distinct DNA damage responses.

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    Garcia, Juliana B F; Rocha, João P Vieira da; Costa-Silva, Héllida M; Alves, Ceres L; Machado, Carlos R; Cruz, Angela K

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania major and Trypanosoma cruzi are medically relevant parasites and interesting model organisms, as they present unique biological processes. Despite increasing data regarding the mechanisms of gene expression regulation, there is little information on how the DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in trypanosomatids. We found that L. major presented a higher radiosensitivity than T. cruzi. L. major showed G1 arrest and displayed high mortality in response to ionizing radiation as a result of the inefficient repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Conversely, T. cruzi exhibited arrest in the S/G2 cell cycle phase, was able to efficiently repair DSBs and did not display high rates of cell death after exposure to gamma irradiation. L. major showed higher resistance to alkylating DNA damage, and only L. major was able to promote DNA repair and growth recovery in the presence of MMS. ASF1c overexpression did not interfere with the efficiency of DNA repair in either of the parasites but did accentuate the DNA damage checkpoint response, thereby delaying cell fate after damage. The observed differences in the DNA damage responses of T. cruzi and L. major may originate from the distinct preferred routes of genetic plasticity of the two parasites, i.e., DNA recombination versus amplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Production of amastigotes from metacyclic trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Víctor T Contreras

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to recreate all the developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro have thus far been met with partial success. It is possible, for instance, to produce trypomastigotes in tissue culture and to obtain metacyclic trypomastigotes in axenic conditions. Even though T. cruzi amastigotes are known to differentiate from trypomastigotes and metacyclic trypomastigotes, it has only been possible to generate amastigotes in vitro from the tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes. The factors and culture conditions required to trigger the transformation of metacyclic trypomastigotes into amastigotes are as yet undetermined. We show here that pre-incubation of metacyclic trypomastigotes in culture (MEMTAU medium at 37°C for 48 h is sufficient to commit the parasites to the transformation process. After 72 h of incubation in fresh MEMTAU medium, 90% of the metacyclic parasites differentiate into forms that are morphologically indistinguishable from normal amastigotes. SDS-PAGE, Western blot and PAABS analyses indicate that the transformation of axenic metacyclic trypomastigotes to amastigotes is associated with protein, glycoprotein and antigenic modifications. These data suggest that (a T. cruzi amastigotes can be obtained axenically in large amounts from metacyclic trypomastigotes, and (b the amastigotes thus obtained are morphological, biological and antigenically similar to intracellular amastigotes. Consequently, this experimental system may facilitate a direct, in vitro assessment of the mechanisms that enable T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes to transform into amastigotes in the cells of mammalian hosts.

  17. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Triosephosphate Isomerase

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    Bourguignon SC

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The enzyme triosephosphate isomerase (TPI, EC 5.3.1.1 was purified from extracts of epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. The purification steps included: hydrophobic interaction chromatography on phenyl-Sepharose, CM-Sepharose, and high performance liquid gel filtration chromatography. The CM-Sepharose material contained two bands (27 and 25 kDa with similar isoelectric points (pI 9.3-9.5 which could be separated by gel filtration in high performance liquid chromatography. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the porcine TPI detected one single polypeptide on western blot with a molecular weight (27 kDa identical to that purified from T. cruzi. These antibodies also recognized only one band of identical molecular weight in western blots of several other trypanosomatids (Blastocrithidia culicis, Crithidia desouzai, Phytomonas serpens, Herpertomonas samuelpessoai. The presence of only one enzymatic form of TPI in T. cruzi epimastigotes was confirmed by agarose gel activity assay and its localization was established by immunocytochemical analysis. The T. cruzi purified TPI (as well as other trypanosomatid' TPIs is a dimeric protein, composed of two identical subunits with an approximate mw of 27,000 and it is resolved on two dimensional gel electrophoresis with a pI of 9.3. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal portion of the 27 kDa protein revealed a high homology to Leishmania mexicana and T. brucei proteins

  18. Diterpenoids from Azorella compacta (Umbelliferae active on Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Araya Jorge E

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of natural products isolated from Azorella compacta was evaluated, with particular emphasis on their effect against intracellular amastigotes. Five diterpenoids from A. compacta derived from mulinane and azorellane were isolated and identified. Only two products, named azorellanol (Y-2 and mulin-11,3-dien-20-oic acid (Y-5, showed trypanocidal activity against all stages of T. cruzi including intracellular amastigotes. At 10 µM, these compounds displayed a strong lytic activity. It ranged from 88.4 ± 0.6 to 99.0 ± 1 % for all strains and stages evaluate, with an IC50 /18 h values of 20-84 µM and 41-87 µM, respectively. The development of intracellular amastigotes was also inhibited by nearly 60% at 25 µM. The trypanocidal molecules Y-2 and Y-5 did show different degrees of cytotoxicity depending on the cell line tested, with an IC50 /24 h ranging from 33.2 to 161.2 µM. We evaluated the effect of diterpenoids against intracellular T. cruzi forms by immunofluorescent identification of a specific membrane molecular marker (Ssp-4 antigen of the T. cruzi amastigote forms. The accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements were found to be outstanding when examined by confocal microscopy.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase in complex with a neutralizing antibody: structure/function studies towards the rational design of inhibitors.

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    Alejandro Buschiazzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trans-sialidase (TS, a virulence factor from Trypanosoma cruzi, is an enzyme playing key roles in the biology of this protozoan parasite. Absent from the mammalian host, it constitutes a potential target for the development of novel chemotherapeutic drugs, an urgent need to combat Chagas' disease. TS is involved in host cell invasion and parasite survival in the bloodstream. However, TS is also actively shed by the parasite to the bloodstream, inducing systemic effects readily detected during the acute phase of the disease, in particular, hematological alterations and triggering of immune cells apoptosis, until specific neutralizing antibodies are elicited. These antibodies constitute the only known submicromolar inhibitor of TS's catalytic activity. We now report the identification and detailed characterization of a neutralizing mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb 13G9, recognizing T. cruzi TS with high specificity and subnanomolar affinity. This mAb displays undetectable association with the T. cruzi superfamily of TS-like proteins or yet with the TS-related enzymes from Trypanosoma brucei or Trypanosoma rangeli. In immunofluorescence assays, mAb 13G9 labeled 100% of the parasites from the infective trypomastigote stage. This mAb also reduces parasite invasion of cultured cells and strongly inhibits parasite surface sialylation. The crystal structure of the mAb 13G9 antigen-binding fragment in complex with the globular region of T. cruzi TS was determined, revealing detailed molecular insights of the inhibition mechanism. Not occluding the enzyme's catalytic site, the antibody performs a subtle action by inhibiting the movement of an assisting tyrosine (Y₁₁₉, whose mobility is known to play a key role in the trans-glycosidase mechanism. As an example of enzymatic inhibition involving non-catalytic residues that occupy sites distal from the substrate-binding pocket, this first near atomic characterization of a high affinity inhibitory molecule

  20. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in multitransfused patients in Colombia

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    Mauricio Beltrán

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study showed a low frequency of T. cruzi infection in multitransfused patients, suggesting that the risk of transfusion infection in Colombia is low. Known risk factors for transfusion-related infection were not associated with the presence of anti-T. cruzi antibodies.

  1. Protective immunity against Trypanosoma cruzi provided by oral immunization with Phytomonas serpens: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinge-Filho, P; Peron, J P S; de Moura, T R; Menolli, R A; Graça, V K; Estevão, D; Tadokoro, C E; Jankevicius, J V; Rizzo, L V

    2005-01-31

    We have previously demonstrated that Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoa that causes Chagas' disease. These antigens are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in Balb/c mice. In the present study, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) knockout (KO) mice and C57BL/6 mice treated with the nitric oxide inhibitor, aminoguanidine (AG, 50 mg kg(-1)) infected with T. cruzi, were used to demonstrate the role of nitric oxide (NO) to host protection against T. cruzi infection achieved by oral immunization with live P. serpens. A reduction in parasitaemia and an increase in survival were observed in C57BL/6 infected mice and previously immunized with P. serpens, when compared to non-immunized mice. iNOS (KO) mice immunized and C57BL/6 immunized and treated with AG presented parasitaemia and mortality rates comparable to those of infected and non-immunized mice. By itself, immunization with P. serpens did not induce inflammation in the myocardium, but C57BL/6 mice so immunized showed fewer amastigotes nests in the heart following an acute T. cruzi infection than those in non-immunized mice. These results suggest that protective immunity against T. cruzi infection induced by immunization with P. serpens is dependent upon enhanced NO production during the acute phase of T. cruzi infection.

  2. Bioenergetic profiling of Trypanosoma cruzi life stages using Seahorse extracellular flux technology.

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    Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Pereira, Camila F A; Dumoulin, Peter C; Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2016-08-01

    Energy metabolism is an attractive target for the development of new therapeutics against protozoan pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of human Chagas disease. Despite emerging evidence that mitochondrial electron transport is essential for the growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes in mammalian cells, fundamental knowledge of mitochondrial energy metabolism in this parasite life stage remains incomplete. The Clark-type electrode, which measures the rate of oxygen consumption, has served as the traditional tool to study mitochondrial energetics and has contributed to our understanding of it in T. cruzi. Here, we evaluate the Seahorse XF(e)24 extracellular flux platform as an alternative method to assess mitochondrial bioenergetics in isolated T. cruzi parasites. We report optimized assay conditions used to perform mitochondrial stress tests with replicative life cycle stages of T. cruzi using the XF(e)24 instrument, and discuss the advantages and potential limitations of this methodology, as applied to T. cruzi and other trypanosomatids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dialkylimidazole inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14α-demethylase as anti-Chagas disease agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadevara, Praveen Kumar; Racherla, Kishore Kumar; Olepu, Srinivas; Norcross, Neil R; Tatipaka, Hari Babu; Arif, Jennifer A; Planer, Joseph D; Lepesheva, Galina I; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Buckner, Frederick S; Gelb, Michael H

    2013-12-01

    New dialkylimidazole based sterol 14α-demethylase inhibitors were prepared and tested as potential anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents. Previous studies had identified compound 2 as the most potent and selective inhibitor against parasite cultures. In addition, animal studies had demonstrated that compound 2 is highly efficacious in the acute model of the disease. However, compound 2 has a high molecular weight and high hydrophobicity, issues addressed here. Systematic modifications were carried out at four positions on the scaffold and several inhibitors were identified which are highly potent (EC50 cruzi in culture. The halogenated derivatives 36j, 36k, and 36p, display excellent activity against T. cruzi amastigotes, with reduced molecular weight and lipophilicity, and exhibit suitable physicochemical properties for an oral drug candidate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Triatominae-Trypanosoma cruzi/T. rangeli: Vector-parasite interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, G A; Guhl, F; Schaub, G A

    2009-01-01

    Of the currently known 140 species in the family Reduviidae, subfamily Triatominae, those which are most important as vectors of the aetiologic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, belong to the tribes Triatomini and Rhodniini. The latter not only transmit T. cruzi but also Trypanosoma rangeli, which is considered apathogenic for the mammalian host but can be pathogenic for the vectors. Using different molecular methods, two main lineages of T. cruzi have been classified, T. cruzi I and T. cruzi II. Within T. cruzi II, five subdivisions are recognized, T. cruzi IIa-IIe, according to the variability of the ribosomal subunits 24Salpha rRNA and 18S rRNA. In T. rangeli, differences in the organization of the kinetoplast DNA separate two forms denoted T. rangeli KP1+ and KP1-, although differences in the intergenic mini-exon gene and of the small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) suggest four subpopulations denoted T. rangeli A, B, C and D. The interactions of these subpopulations of the trypanosomes with different species and populations of Triatominae determine the epidemiology of the human-infecting trypanosomes in Latin America. Often, specific subpopulations of the trypanosomes are transmitted by specific vectors in a particular geographic area. Studies centered on trypanosome-triatomine interaction may allow identification of co-evolutionary processes, which, in turn, could consolidate hypotheses of the evolution and the distribution of T. cruzi/T. rangeli-vectors in America, and they may help to identify the mechanisms that either facilitate or impede the transmission of the parasites in different vector species. Such mechanisms seem to involve intestinal bacteria, especially the symbionts which are needed by the triatomines to complete nymphal development and to produce eggs. Development of the symbionts is regulated by the vector. T. cruzi and T. rangeli interfere with this system and induce the production of antibacterial substances. Whereas T. cruzi is only

  5. [Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in the rural population of Sucre State, Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Jordán, Noris; Berrizbeitia, Mariolga; Rodríguez, Jessicca; Concepción, Juan Luis; Cáceres, Ana; Quiñones, Wilfredo

    2017-10-26

    The current study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Sucre State, Venezuela, and its association with epidemiological risk factors. The cluster sampling design allowed selecting 96 villages and 576 dwellings in the State's 15 municipalities. A total of 2,212 serum samples were analyzed by ELISA, HAI, and IFI. Seroprevalence in Sucre State was 3.12%. Risk factors associated with T. cruzi infection were: accumulated garbage, flooring and wall materials, type of dwelling, living in a house with wattle and daub walls and/or straw roofing, living in a house with risky walls and roofing, risky buildings and wattle and daub outbuildings, poultry inside the human dwelling, and presence of firewood. Infection was associated with individual age, and three seropositive cases were found in individuals less than 15 years of age. Sucre State has epidemiological factors that favor the risk of acquiring T. cruzi infection.

  6. Autonomic Dysfunction and Risk Factors Associated with Trypanosoma cruzi Infection among Children in Arequipa, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Natalie M.; Kawai, Vivian; Gilman, Robert H.; Bocangel, Cesar; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Cabrera, Lilia; Levy, Michael Z.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan Geny; Delgado, Freddy; Rosenthal, Lauren; Pinedo-Cancino, Vivian V.; Steurer, Francis; Seitz, Amy E.; Maguire, James H.; Bern, Caryn

    2011-01-01

    Chagas disease affects an estimated 8 million people in Latin America. Infected individuals have 20–30% lifetime risk of developing cardiomyopathy, but more subtle changes in autonomic responses may be more frequent. We conducted a matched case-control study of children in Arequipa, Peru, where triatomine infestation and Trypanosoma cruzi infection are emerging problems. We collected data on home environment, history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and autonomic testing. Signs of triatomine infestation and/or animals sleeping in the child's room and household members with Chagas disease were associated with increased infection risk. Electrocardiogram findings did not differ between cases and controls. However, compared with control children, infected children had blunted autonomic responses by three different measures, the Valsalva maneuver, the cold pressor test, and the orthostatic test. T. cruzi-infected children show autonomic dysfunction, although the prognostic value of this finding is not clear. Sustained vector control programs are essential to decreasing future T. cruzi infections. PMID:21212207

  7. Genetic characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi natural clones from the state of Paraíba, Brazil

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    Christian Barnabé

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from the state of Paraíba, Brazil, isolated from man, wild mammals, and triatomine bugs were studied by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and random primed amplified polymorphic DNA. Despite the low number of stocks, a notable genetic, genotypic, and phylogenetic diversity was recorded. The presence of the two main phylogenetic subdivisions, T. cruzi I and II, was recorded. The strong linkage disequilibrium observed in the population under survey suggests that T. cruzi undergoes predominant clonal evolution in this area too, although this result should be confirmed by a broader sample. The pattern of clonal variation does not suggests a recent origin by founder effect with a limited number of different genotypes.

  8. In vitro activity of Etanidazole against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Patricia B Petray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the in vitro action of an hydrosoluble 2-nitroimidazole, Etanidazole (EZL, against Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. EZL displayed lethal activity against isolated trypomastigotes as well as amastigotes of T. cruzi (RA strain growing in Vero cells or J774 macrophages, without affecting host cell viability. Although not completely equivalent to Benznidazole (BZL, the reference drug for Chagas chemotherapy, EZL takes advantage in exertingits anti-T. cruzi activity for longer periods without serious toxic side effects, as those recorded in BZL-treated patients. Our present results encourage further experiments to study in depth the trypanocidal properties of this drug already licensed for use in human cancers.

  9. New 1,3-thiazole derivatives and their biological and ultrastructural effects on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes Gomes, Paulo André Teixeira; de Oliveira Barbosa, Miria; Farias Santiago, Edna; de Oliveira Cardoso, Marcos Veríssimo; Capistrano Costa, Natáli Tereza; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; da Silva, Aline Caroline; Dos Santos, Thiago André Ramos; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; Brayner Dos Santosd, Fábio André; do Nascimento Pereira, Glaécia Aparecida; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2016-10-04

    In previous studies, the compound 3-(bromopropiophenone) thiosemicarbazone was described as a potent anti-Trypanosoma cruzi and cruzain inhibitor. In view to optimize this activity, 1,3-thiazole core was used as building-block strategy to access new lead generation of anti T. cruzi agents. In this way a series of thiazole derivatives were synthesized and most of these derivatives exhibited antiparasitic activity similar to benznidazole (Bzd). Among them, compounds (1c) and (1g) presented better selective index (SI) than Bzd. In addition, compounds showed inhibitory activity against the cruzain protease. As observed by electron microscopy, compound (1c) treatment caused irreversible and specific morphological changes on ultrastructure organization of T. cruzi, demonstrating that this class of compounds is killing parasites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in human monocyte-derived macrophages by parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Guadalupe Andreani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cells of monocyte/macrophage lineage are one of the major targets of HIV-1 infection and serve as reservoirs for viral persistence in vivo. These cells are also the target of the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, being one of the most important endemic protozoonoses in Latin America. It has been demonstrated in vitro that co-infection with other pathogens can modulate HIV replication. However, no studies at cellular level have suggested an interaction between T. cruzi and HIV-1 to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using a fully replicative wild-type virus, our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 antigen production by nearly 100% (p99% being stronger than HIV-T. cruzi (approximately 90% for BaL and approximately 85% for VSV-G infection. In MDM with established HIV-1 infection, T. cruzi significantly inhibited luciferate activity (p<0.01. By quantifying R-U5 and U5-gag transcripts by real time PCR, our study showed the expression of both transcripts significantly diminished in the presence of trypomastigotes (p<0.05. Thus, T. cruzi inhibits viral post-integration steps, early post-entry steps and entry into MDM. Trypomastigotes also caused a approximately 60-70% decrease of surface CCR5 expression on MDM. Multiplication of T. cruzi inside the MDM does not seem to be required for inhibiting HIV-1 replication since soluble factors secreted by trypomastigotes have shown similar effects. Moreover, the major parasite antigen cruzipain, which is secreted by the trypomastigote form, was able to inhibit viral production in MDM over 90% (p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study showed that T. cruzi inhibits HIV-1 replication at several replication stages in macrophages, a major cell target for both pathogens.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of Trypanosoma cruzi and Triatoma dimidiata in costal Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yim Yan; Sornosa Macias, Karen Jeniffer; Guale Martínez, Doris; Solorzano, Luis F; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Herrera, Claudia; Dumonteil, Eric

    2016-07-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. In Ecuador, Triatoma dimidiata and Rhodnius ecuadoriensis are the main vector species, responsible for over half of the cases of T. cruzi infection in the country. T. dimidiata is believed to have been introduced in Ecuador during colonial times, and its elimination from the country is thus believed to be feasible. We investigated here the molecular ecology of T. dimidiata and T. cruzi in costal Ecuador to further guide control efforts. Analysis of the Internal Transcribed Spacer 2 (ITS-2) of 23 specimens from Progreso, Guayas, unambiguously supported the likely importation of T. dimidiata from Central America to Ecuador. The observation of a very high parasite infection rate (54%) and frequent feeding on humans (3/5) confirmed a continued risk of transmission to humans. All genotyped parasites corresponded to TcI DTU and Trypanosoma rangeli was not detected in T. dimidiata. TcI subgroups corresponded to TcIa (25%), and mixed infections with TcIa and TcId (75%). Further studies should help clarify T. cruzi genetic structure in the country, and the possible impact of the introduction of T. dimidiata on the circulating parasite strains. The elevated risk posed by this species warrants continuing efforts for its control, but its apparent mobility between peridomestic and domestic habitats may favor reinfestation following insecticide spraying. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C. F.; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R.; de Messias-Reason, Iara J.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  13. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kárita C. F. Lidani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD, a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP, lectin (LP, and alternative (AP. The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion

  14. The Complement System: A Prey ofTrypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C F; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R; de Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6-8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  15. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrell, María Cristina; Losinno, Antonella Denisse; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia; Carrillo, Carolina

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients) to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression. PMID:29091711

  16. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Vanrell

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  17. The regulation of autophagy differentially affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanrell, María Cristina; Losinno, Antonella Denisse; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura Virginia; Carrillo, Carolina; Romano, Patricia Silvia

    2017-11-01

    Autophagy is a cellular process required for the removal of aged organelles and cytosolic components through lysosomal degradation. All types of eukaryotic cells from yeasts to mammalian cells have the machinery to activate autophagy as a result of many physiological and pathological situations. The most frequent stimulus of autophagy is starvation and the result, in this case, is the fast generation of utilizable food (e.g. amino acids and basic nutrients) to maintain the vital biological processes. In some organisms, starvation also triggers other associated processes such as differentiation. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi undergoes a series of differentiation processes throughout its complex life cycle. Although not all autophagic genes have been identified in the T. cruzi genome, previous works have demonstrated the presence of essential autophagic-related proteins. Under starvation conditions, TcAtg8, which is the parasite homolog of Atg8/LC3 in other organisms, is located in autophagosome-like vesicles. In this work, we have characterized the autophagic pathway during T. cruzi differentiation from the epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote form, a process called metacyclogenesis. We demonstrated that autophagy is stimulated during metacyclogenesis and that the induction of autophagy promotes this process. Moreover, with exception of bafilomycin, other classical autophagy modulators have similar effects on T. cruzi autophagy. We also showed that spermidine and related polyamines can positively regulate parasite autophagy and differentiation. We concluded that both polyamine metabolism and autophagy are key processes during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis that could be exploited as drug targets to avoid the parasite cycle progression.

  18. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors required during Trypanosoma cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, Juan Agustín; Vanrell, María Cristina; Salassa, Betiana Nebaí; Nola, Sébastien; Galli, Thierry; Colombo, María Isabel; Romano, Patricia Silvia

    2017-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is an obligate intracellular parasite that exploits different host vesicular pathways to invade the target cells. Vesicular and target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) are key proteins of the intracellular membrane fusion machinery. During the early times of T. cruzi infection, several vesicles are attracted to the parasite contact sites in the plasma membrane. Fusion of these vesicles promotes the formation of the parasitic vacuole and parasite entry. In this work, we study the requirement and the nature of SNAREs involved in the fusion events that take place during T. cruzi infection. Our results show that inhibition of N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor protein, a protein required for SNARE complex disassembly, impairs T. cruzi infection. Both TI-VAMP/VAMP7 and cellubrevin/VAMP3, two v-SNAREs of the endocytic and exocytic pathways, are specifically recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane in a synchronized manner but, although VAMP3 is acquired earlier than VAMP7, impairment of VAMP3 by tetanus neurotoxin fails to reduce T. cruzi infection. In contrast, reduction of VAMP7 activity by expression of VAMP7's longin domain, depletion by small interfering RNA or knockout, significantly decreases T. cruzi infection susceptibility as a result of a minor acquisition of lysosomal components to the parasitic vacuole. In addition, overexpression of the VAMP7 partner Vti1b increases the infection, whereas expression of a KIF5 kinesin mutant reduces VAMP7 recruitment to vacuole and, concomitantly, T. cruzi infection. Altogether, these data support a key role of TI-VAMP/VAMP7 in the fusion events that culminate in the T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Application of core-shell PEGylated CdS/Cd(OH) 2 quantum dots as biolabels of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, C. R.; Fontes, A.; Farias, P. M. A.; Santos, B. S.; de Menezes, F. D.; Ferreira, R. C.; Cesar, C. L.; Galembeck, A.; Figueiredo, R. C. B. Q.

    2008-11-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are a promising class of materials in the labeling of biological systems. In the present study we show the marking pattern of Trypanosoma cruzi ( T. cruzi) live parasites using PEGylated CdS/Cd(OH) 2 fluorescent nanocrystals. The analysis obtained by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicates that only the endocytic paths of parasites were labeled. The parasites were alive after the incubation with the CdS/Cd(OH) 2-PEG suspension. Labeling the T. cruzi with quantum dots can help to better understand the endocytosis process and also the cellular differentiation.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi in dogs: electrocardiographic and echocardiographic evaluation, in Malinalco, State of Mexico

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    González-Vieyra SD

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Sandra Díaz González-Vieyra1, Ninfa Ramírez-Durán2, Ángel H Sandoval-Trujillo3, Juan C Vázquez-Chagoyán1, Humberto G Monroy-Salazar1, Alberto Barbabosa-Pliego11Research Center of Advanced Studies in Animal Health, Veterinary Husbandry School, 2Medical and Ambiental Microbiology, Research Center of Advanced Studies in Health Science, School of Medicine, Autonomous University of the State of Mexico, Toluca, Mexico; 3Department of Biological Systems, Metropolitan Autonomous University, Xochimilco, Mexico City, MexicoAbstract: Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi is an important public health problem in Latin America. Dogs are considered a risk factor for human Chagas disease, a sentinel for T. cruzi infection in endemic regions and an animal model to study pathological aspects of the disease. The potential use of dogs as indicators of human cardiac pathogenicity of local T. cruzi strains has been studied insufficiently. We studied electrocardiographic (EKG and echocardiographic (ECG alteration frequencies observed in an open population of dogs in Malinalco, Mexico, and determined if such frequencies were statistically associated with T. cruzi infection in dogs. Animals (n = 139 were clinically examined and owners were asked to answer a questionnaire about dogs’ living conditions. Two commercial serological tests (IHA, ELISA were conducted to detect anti-T. cruzi serum antibodies. Significant differences between seropositive and seronegative animals in cardiomyopathic frequencies were detected through EKG and ECG (P < 0.05. Thirty dogs (21.58% were serologically positive to anti-T. cruzi antibodies (to ELISA and IHA assays, of which nine (30% had EKG and/or ECG alterations. From the remaining 104 (78.42% seronegative animals, five (4.5% had EKG and/or ECG abnormalities. Our data support the hypothesis that most EKG and ECG alterations found in dogs from Malinalco could be associated with T. cruzi infection. Considering the dog as a

  1. Comprehensive glycoprofiling of the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maria Julia Manso; Kawahara, Rebeca; Viner, Rosa; Colli, Walter; Mattos, Eliciane Cevolani; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Larsen, Martin Røssel; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2017-01-16

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle involving insect and mammalian hosts and distinct developmental stages. During T. cruzi developmental stages, glycoproteins play important role in the host-parasite interaction, such as cellular recognition, host cell invasion and adhesion, and immune evasion. In this study, comprehensive glycoprofiling analysis was performed in the epimastigote and trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi using two glycopeptide enrichment strategies, lectin-based and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, followed by high resolution LC-MS/MS. Following deglycosylation, a total of 1306 N-glycosylation sites in NxS/T/C motifs were identified from 690 T. cruzi glycoproteins. Among them, 170 and 334 glycoproteins were exclusively identified in epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, respectively. Besides, global site-specific characterization of the N- and O-linked glycan heterogeneity in the two life stages of T. cruzi was achieved by intact glycopeptide analysis, revealing 144/466 unique N-linked and 10/97 unique O-linked intact glycopeptides in epimastigotes/trypomastigotes, respectively. Conclusively, this study documents the significant T. cruzi stage-specific expression of glycoproteins that can help to better understand the T. cruzi phenotype and response caused by the interaction with different hosts during its complex life cycle. Chagas disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is a neglected disease which affects millions of people especially in Latin America. The absence of efficient drugs and vaccines against Chagas disease stimulates the search for novel targets. Glycoproteins are very attractive therapeutic candidate targets since they mediate key processes in the host-parasite interaction, such as cellular recognition, host cell invasion and adhesion, and immune evasion. This study aimed to provide an in depth characterization of the N-linked and O-linked glycoproteome of two T

  2. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10 1 , 10 2 , 10 3 and 10 4 using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between chromosomes are an

  3. Differentiation of Trypanosoma cruzi I (TcI) and T. cruzi II (TcII) genotypes using genes encoding serine carboxypeptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Catarina Andréa Chaves; Mayer, Christoph; Waniek, Peter Josef; Azambuja, Patricia; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2016-11-01

    The parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (Kinetoplastida, Trypanosomatidae) can be classified based on biochemical and molecular markers, into six lineages or discrete typing units (DTUs), T. cruzi I-VI (TcI-VI), from which TcI and TcII are the parental genotypes. Trying to understand the dispersion of the subpopulations of T. cruzi in nature and its complex transmission cycles, the serine carboxypeptidase genes of T. cruzi were used as a molecular marker in the present study. DTUs of 25 T. cruzi isolates derived from different hosts and from different regions of Brazil were classified. Using specific primers, the complete serine carboxypeptidase open reading frame of 1401 bp was sequenced. The obtained data shows significant differences in the sequences of TcI and TcII. The analysis of the T. cruzi significantly different serine carboxypeptidase genes allowed distinguishing between the parental DTUs TcI to TcII and the hybrid DTU TcVI which grouped within the latter branch. The sequence diversity within the T. cruzi subpopulations was rather low. The analysis using the genes encoding proteases seems to be an interesting approach for the reconstruction of the origin and genotype evolution of T. cruzi.

  4. Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) in the Pantanal region: association with Trypanosoma cruzi, different habitats and vertebrate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Filipe Martins; Jansen, Ana Maria; Mourão, Guilherme de Miranda; Jurberg, José; Nunes, Alessandro Pacheco; Herrera, Heitor Miraglia

    2015-01-01

    The transmission cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Brazilian Pantanal region has been studied during the last decade. Although considerable knowledge is available regarding the mammalian hosts infected by T. cruzi in this wetland, no studies have investigated its vectors in this region. This study aimed to investigate the presence of sylvatic triatomine species in different habitats of the Brazilian Pantanal region and to correlate their presence with the occurrences of vertebrate hosts and T. cruzi infection. The fieldwork involved passive search by using light traps and Noireau traps and active search by visual inspection. The light traps were placed at five selected points along forested areas for seven nights during each of the nine excursions. At each point where a light trap was set, eight Noireau traps were placed in palm trees and bromeliads. In all, 88 triatomine bugs were collected: two and one individuals from light traps and Noireau traps, respectively; three from peridomestic areas; 23 in coati nests; and 59 in thornbird nests. In this study, active search in microhabitats showed higher efficiency than passive search, since 95% of the triatomine bugs were caught in nests. Further, triatomine bugs were only found to be infected by T. cruzi in coati nests. Coati nests might act as a point of convergence and dispersion for triatomine bugs and mammal hosts infected by T. cruzi, thereby playing an important role in the sylvatic cycle of T. cruziin the Pantanal region.

  5. Geographical Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Hernán J.; Segovia, Maikell; Llewellyn, Martin S.; Morocoima, Antonio; Urdaneta-Morales, Servio; Martínez, Cinda; Martínez, Clara E.; Garcia, Carlos; Rodríguez, Marlenes; Espinosa, Raul; de Noya, Belkisyolé A.; Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Herrera, Leidi; Fitzpatrick, Sinead; Yeo, Matthew; Miles, Michael A.; Feliciangeli, M. Dora

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic zoonosis native to the Americas and is caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite is also highly genetically diverse, with six discrete typing units (DTUs) reported TcI – TcVI. These DTUs broadly correlate with several epidemiogical, ecological and pathological features of Chagas disease. In this manuscript we report the most comprehensive evaluation to date of the genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Venezuela. The dataset includes 778 samples collected and genotyped over the last twelve years from multiple hosts and vectors, including nine wild and domestic mammalian host species, and seven species of triatomine bug, as well as from human sources. Most isolates (732) can be assigned to the TcI clade (94.1%); 24 to the TcIV group (3.1%) and 22 to TcIII (2.8%). Importantly, among the 95 isolates genotyped from human disease cases, 79% belonged to TcI - a DTU common in the Americas, however, 21% belonged to TcIV- a little known genotype previously thought to be rare in humans. Furthermore, were able to assign multiple oral Chagas diseases cases to TcI in the area around the capital, Caracas. We discuss our findings in the context of T. cruzi DTU distributions elsewhere in the Americas, and evaluate the impact they have on the future of Chagas disease control in Venezuela. PMID:22745843

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi strain TcIV infects raccoons from Illinois

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    Cailey Vandermark

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The northern limits of Trypanosoma cruzi across the territory of the United States remain unknown. The known vectors Triatoma sanguisuga and T. lecticularia find their northernmost limits in Illinois; yet, earlier screenings of those insects did not reveal the presence of the pathogen, which has not been reported in vectors or reservoir hosts in this state. OBJECTIVES Five species of medium-sized mammals were screened for the presence of T. cruzi. METHODS Genomic DNA was isolated from heart, spleen and skeletal muscle of bobcats (Lynx rufus, n = 60, raccoons (Procyon lotor, n = 37, nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus, n = 5, Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana, n = 3, and a red fox (Vulpes vulpes. Infections were detected targeting DNA from the kinetoplast DNA minicircle (kDNA and satellite DNA (satDNA. The discrete typing unit (DTU was determined by amplifying two gene regions: the Spliced Leader Intergenic Region (SL, via a multiplex polymerase chain reaction, and the 24Sα ribosomal DNA via a heminested reaction. Resulting sequences were used to calculate their genetic distance against reference DTUs. FINDINGS 18.9% of raccoons were positive for strain TcIV; the rest of mammals tested negative. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These results confirm for the first time the presence of T. cruzi in wildlife from Illinois, suggesting that a sylvatic life cycle is likely to occur in the region. The analyses of sequences of SL suggest that amplicons resulting from a commonly used multiplex reaction may yield non-homologous fragments.

  7. Heterogeneous infectiousness in guinea pigs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Borrini Mayorí, Katty; Salazar Sánchez, Renzo; Ancca Suarez, Jenny; Xie, Sherrie; Náquira Velarde, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z

    2016-02-01

    Guinea pigs are important reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative parasite of Chagas disease, and in the Southern Cone of South America, transmission is mediated mainly by the vector Triatoma infestans. Interestingly, colonies of Triatoma infestans captured from guinea pig corrals sporadically have infection prevalence rates above 80%. Such high values are not consistent with the relatively short 7-8 week parasitemic period that has been reported for guinea pigs in the literature. We experimentally measured the infectious periods of a group of T. cruzi-infected guinea pigs by performing xenodiagnosis and direct microscopy each week for one year. Another group of infected guinea pigs received only direct microscopy to control for the effect that inoculation by triatomine saliva may have on parasitemia in the host. We observed infectious periods longer than those previously reported in a number of guinea pigs from both the xenodiagnosis and control groups. While some guinea pigs were infectious for a short time, other "super-shedders" were parasitemic up to 22 weeks after infection, and/or positive by xenodiagnosis for a year after infection. This heterogeneity in infectiousness has strong implications for T. cruzi transmission dynamics and control, as super-shedder guinea pigs may play a disproportionate role in pathogen spread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vaccination of dogs with Trypanosoma rangeli induces antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in a rural area of Córdoba, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Beatriz; Marini, Vanina; Gauna, Diego; Frias, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Dogs play a major role in the domestic cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, acting as reservoirs. In a previous work we have developed a model of vaccination of dogs in captivity with nonpathogenic Trypanosoma rangeli epimastigotes, resulting in the production of protective antibodies against T. cruzi, with dramatic decrease of parasitaemia upon challenge with 100,000 virulent forms of this parasite. The aim of this work was to evaluate the immunogenicity of this vaccine in dogs living in a rural area. Domestic dogs, free from T. cruzi infection, received three immunisations with fixed T. rangeli epimastigotes. Dogs were not challenged with T. cruzi, but they were left in their environment. This immunisation induced antibodies against T. cruzi for more than three years in dogs in their natural habitat, while control dogs remained serologically negative.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi strains from triatomine collected in Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

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    Aline Rimoldi Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Collection of triatomines in domestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments in states of Bahia and Rio Grande do Sul, Northeastern and Southern Brazil respectively, and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi strains. METHODS First, the captured triatomines were identified using insect identification keys, then their intestinal content was examined by abdominal compression, and the samples containing trypanosomatid forms were inoculated in LIT medium and Swiss mice. RESULTS Six triatomine species were collected in cities in Bahia, namely Panstrongylus geniculatus (01, Triatoma melanocephala (11, T. lenti (94, T. pseudomaculata (02, T. sherlocki (26 and T. sordida (460, and two in cities in Rio Grande do Sul, namely T. circummaculata (11 and T. rubrovaria (115. Out of the specimens examined, T. cruzi was isolated from 28 triatomine divided into four different species: T. melanocephala (one, T. lenti (one, T. rubrovaria (16 and T. sordida (10. Their index of natural infection by T. cruzi was 6.4%. CONCLUSIONS The isolation of T. cruzi strains from triatomines found in domestic and peridomestic areas shows the potential risk of transmission of Chagas disease in the studied cities. The maintenance of those T. cruzi strains in laboratory is intended to promote studies that facilitate the understanding of the parasite-vector-host relationship.

  10. Sesquiterpene lactones and the diterpene 5-epi-icetexone affect the intracellular and extracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, E.; Barrera, P.; Salinas, R.; Vega, I.; Nieto, M.; Tonn, C.; Kemmerling, U.; Mortara, R.A.; Sosa, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is a major health problem in Latin America and is caused by the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although many drugs have been used to alleviate the disease, these have been ineffective in the chronic phase and have also presented numerous side effects on patients. In this study

  11. In vitro evaluation of the activity of aromatic nitrocompounds against Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Renata B Oliveira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen compounds were evaluated for their activity against Trypanosoma cruzi blood stream forms at the concentration of 500 µg/ml. Six compounds were active and re-tested at lower concentrations.

  12. Molecular basis of mammalian cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Nobuko Yoshida

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishment of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas' disease, depends on a series of events involving interactions of diverse parasite molecules with host components. Here we focus on the mechanisms of target cell invasion by metacyclic trypomastigotes (MT and mammalian tissue culture trypomastigotes (TCT. During MT or TCT internalization, signal transduction pathways are activated both in the parasite and the target cell, leading to Ca2+ mobilization. For cell adhesion, MT engage surface glycoproteins, such as gp82 and gp35/50, which are Ca2+ signal-inducing molecules. In T. cruzi isolates that enter host cells in gp82-mediated manner, parasite protein tyrosine kinase as well as phospholipase C are activated, and Ca2+ is released from I P3-sensitive stores, whereas in T. cruzi isolates that attach to target cells mainly through gp35/50, the signaling pathway involving adenylate cyclase appears to be stimulated, with Ca2+ release from acidocalciosomes. In addition, T. cruzi isolate-dependent inhibitory signals, mediated by MT-specific gp90, may be triggered both in the host cell and the parasite. The repertoire of TCT molecules implicated in cell invasion includes surface glycoproteins of gp85 family, with members containing binding sites for laminin and cytokeratin 18, enzymes such as cruzipain, trans-sialidase, and an oligopeptidase B that generates a Ca2+-agonist from a precursor molecule.O estabelecimento da infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi, o agente da doença de Chagas, depende de uma série de eventos envolvendo interações de diversas moléculas do parasita com componentes do hospedeiro. Focalizamos aqui os mecanismos de invasão celular por tripomastigotas metacíclicos (TM e por tripomastigotas de cultura de tecido (TCT. Durante a internalização de TM ou TCT, vias de transdução de sinal são ativadas tanto no parasita como na célula alvo, acarretando a mobilização de Ca2+. Para adesão, TM utiliza as glicoprote

  13. Aspects of resistance to experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi; Aspectos da resistencia a infecao experimental com Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Viviane Liotti

    2010-07-01

    Chagas disease, a zoonosis caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, has a wide distribution in Latin America and extends from the southern part of the United States to Argentina. A number of 10 million of infected people is estimated and another 25 million exposed to the risk. Although discovered over a century, Chagas disease is still a serious infection that causes great socioeconomic impact, with no effective treatment at the chronic phase and in which, a lack of scientific knowledge can be observed. The main goal of this work was that obtaining and using consomic strain of mice, the resistance could be investigated. Consomic strains were produced by programmed mating, in which the animals were monitored with DNA polymorphic markers, and one of his chromosomes was replaced by his homologue from another strain. As parental, were used, the inbred strains C57BL/6/J Unib with resistant phenotype (donor) and as receiver, the A/JUnib strain, that has a susceptible phenotype. These models were used to produce five consomic strains: for the chromosomes 7 (CSs7), 11 (CSs11), 14 (CSs14), 17 (CSs17) and 19 (CSs19), described by Passos et al. (2003) as important in controlling infection caused by the Y strain of T. cruzi. In experimental testing, the consomics were inoculated intraperitoneally at doses of 10{sup 1}, 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 3} and 10{sup 4} using as control, animals from both parental lines. In all consomics, resistance was higher than that observed in the susceptible parental. In a second protocol, the consomics were mated with scheduled associations and the progenies were challenged with inocula employing increasing doses of trypomastigotes. The resistance observed in this group was also higher than that observed in the parental with susceptible phenotype. The observed results demonstrate that the use of the consomic strains that were produced order to assess the contribution of each chromosome in the resistance, as well as the effects of association between

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi prevalence and epidemiologic trends in lemurs on St. Catherines Island, Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Chris A; Polizzi, Crystal; Yabsley, Michael J; Norton, Terry M

    2007-02-01

    Lemurs on St. Catherines Island, Georgia were tested for Trypanosoma cruzi infection to develop a better understanding of the epizootiology of the parasite in nonhuman primates in the southeastern United States. Fifty-six ring-tailed (Lemur catta), blue-eyed black (Eulemur macaco flavifrons), and black-and-white ruffed (Varecia variegata variegata) lemurs were tested by hemoculture and serology to determine the prevalence of T. cruzi in the population. Of those tested 3 (5%) were identified as culture positive and 25 (44.6%) as seropositive. When hemoculture results were compared with those from a similar study performed in 1997, prevalence remained unchanged. Genetic characterization of the 3 culture isolates indicated they belong to the T. cruzi IIa group, which is identical to strains previously isolated from raccoons on the island. Despite the occurrence of T. cruzi in the population, there was no evidence that the health of the lemurs was compromised as a result of infection. Based upon prevalence and available breeding records we speculate that both vertical and vector-mediated transmission play significant roles in the epidemiology of T. cruzi on the island. This also represents the first report of autochthonous infection in blue-eyed black and black-and-white ruffed lemurs.

  15. Machine Learning Models and Pathway Genome Data Base for Trypanosoma cruzi Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Laura-Isobel; Sarker, Malabika; Yadav, Maneesh; Ponder, Elizabeth L.; Kallel, E. Adam; Kellar, Danielle; Chen, Steven; Arkin, Michelle; Bunin, Barry A.; McKerrow, James H.; Talcott, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease (NTD) caused by the eukaryotic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. The current clinical and preclinical pipeline for T. cruzi is extremely sparse and lacks drug target diversity. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we developed a computational approach that utilized data from several public whole-cell, phenotypic high throughput screens that have been completed for T. cruzi by the Broad Institute, including a single screen of over 300,000 molecules in the search for chemical probes as part of the NIH Molecular Libraries program. We have also compiled and curated relevant biological and chemical compound screening data including (i) compounds and biological activity data from the literature, (ii) high throughput screening datasets, and (iii) predicted metabolites of T. cruzi metabolic pathways. This information was used to help us identify compounds and their potential targets. We have constructed a Pathway Genome Data Base for T. cruzi. In addition, we have developed Bayesian machine learning models that were used to virtually screen libraries of compounds. Ninety-seven compounds were selected for in vitro testing, and 11 of these were found to have EC50 discovery can bring interesting in vivo active molecules to light that may have been overlooked. The approach we have taken is broadly applicable to other NTDs. PMID:26114876

  16. Synthesis and characterization of potent inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schormann, Norbert; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Murugesan, Srinivasan; Senkovich, Olga; Walker, Kiera; Chenna, Bala C.; Shinkre, Bidhan; Desai, Amar; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2010-09-17

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is a potential target for developing drugs to treat Chagas disease. We have undertaken a detailed structure-activity study of this enzyme. We report here synthesis and characterization of six potent inhibitors of the parasitic enzyme. Inhibitory activity of each compound was determined against T. cruzi and human DHFR. One of these compounds, ethyl 4-(5-[(2,4-diamino-6-quinazolinyl)methyl]amino-2-methoxyphenoxy)butanoate (6b) was co-crystallized with the bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase enzyme of T. cruzi and the crystal structure of the ternary enzyme:cofactor:inhibitor complex was determined. Molecular docking was used to analyze the potential interactions of all inhibitors with T. cruzi DHFR and human DHFR. Inhibitory activities of these compounds are discussed in the light of enzyme-ligand interactions. Binding affinities of each inhibitor for the respective enzymes were calculated based on the experimental or docked binding mode. An estimated 60-70% of the total binding energy is contributed by the 2,4-diaminoquinazoline scaffold.

  17. Activity of P536, a UDP-glucose analog, against Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcina, A.; Fresno, M.; Alarcon, B.

    1988-09-01

    P536, a UDP-glucose analog which was previously described as an antiviral agent, has a potent and selective activity against the intracellular and extracellular stages of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. It had a 50% inhibitory concentration of less than 5 micrograms/ml for T. cruzi extracellular cultured forms (epimastigote) and of 25 micrograms/ml for T. cruzi intracellular forms (amastigote) growing inside J774G8 macrophage-like cells. In contrast, the 50% inhibitory concentration was 100 micrograms/ml or greater for cultured mammalian cells and 180 micrograms/ml for the proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes. Furthermore, the addition of P536 (50 micrograms/ml) to T. cruzi-infected J774G8 cells cured the infected macrophages, making them able to grow and function normally. Studies on the mechanism of action of this drug indicated that it inhibited incorporation of (TVS)methionine, (TH)thymidine, (TH)mannose, ( UC)-N-acetylglucosamine, and (TH)uridine into macromolecules by T. cruzi epimastigotes, the last being the most sensitive.

  18. Synergy testing of FDA-approved drugs identifies potent drug combinations against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D Planer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 8 million persons, mainly in Latin America, are infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. Existing antiparasitic drugs for Chagas disease have significant toxicities and suboptimal effectiveness, hence new therapeutic strategies need to be devised to address this neglected tropical disease. Due to the high research and development costs of bringing new chemical entities to the clinic, we and others have investigated the strategy of repurposing existing drugs for Chagas disease. Screens of FDA-approved drugs (described in this paper have revealed a variety of chemical classes that have growth inhibitory activity against mammalian stage Trypanosoma cruzi parasites. Aside from azole antifungal drugs that have low or sub-nanomolar activity, most of the active compounds revealed in these screens have effective concentrations causing 50% inhibition (EC50's in the low micromolar or high nanomolar range. For example, we have identified an antihistamine (clemastine, EC50 of 0.4 µM, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (fluoxetine, EC50 of 4.4 µM, and an antifolate drug (pyrimethamine, EC50 of 3.8 µM and others. When tested alone in the murine model of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, most compounds had insufficient efficacy to lower parasitemia thus we investigated using combinations of compounds for additive or synergistic activity. Twenty-four active compounds were screened in vitro in all possible combinations. Follow up isobologram studies showed at least 8 drug pairs to have synergistic activity on T. cruzi growth. The combination of the calcium channel blocker, amlodipine, plus the antifungal drug, posaconazole, was found to be more effective at lowering parasitemia in mice than either drug alone, as was the combination of clemastine and posaconazole. Using combinations of FDA-approved drugs is a promising strategy for developing new treatments for Chagas disease.

  19. Functional characterization of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase of Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Carolina Furtado

    Full Text Available The oxidative lesion 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG is removed during base excision repair by the 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (Ogg1. This lesion can erroneously pair with adenine, and the excision of this damaged base by Ogg1 enables the insertion of a guanine and prevents DNA mutation. In this report, we identified and characterized Ogg1 from the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (TcOgg1, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Like most living organisms, T. cruzi is susceptible to oxidative stress, hence DNA repair is essential for its survival and improvement of infection. We verified that the TcOGG1 gene encodes an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase by complementing an Ogg1-defective Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. Heterologous expression of TcOGG1 reestablished the mutation frequency of the yeast mutant ogg1(-/- (CD138 to wild type levels. We also demonstrate that the overexpression of TcOGG1 increases T. cruzi sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2. Analysis of DNA lesions using quantitative PCR suggests that the increased susceptibility to H(2O(2 of TcOGG1-overexpressor could be a consequence of uncoupled BER in abasic sites and/or strand breaks generated after TcOgg1 removes 8-oxoG, which are not rapidly repaired by the subsequent BER enzymes. This hypothesis is supported by the observation that TcOGG1-overexpressors have reduced levels of 8-oxoG both in the nucleus and in the parasite mitochondrion. The localization of TcOgg1 was examined in parasite transfected with a TcOgg1-GFP fusion, which confirmed that this enzyme is in both organelles. Taken together, our data indicate that T. cruzi has a functional Ogg1 ortholog that participates in nuclear and mitochondrial BER.

  20. How Trypanosoma cruzi deals with oxidative stress: Antioxidant defence and DNA repair pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Silva, Alice; Cerqueira, Paula Gonçalves; Grazielle-Silva, Viviane; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Peloso, Eduardo de Figueiredo; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is an obligatory intracellular parasite with a digenetic life cycle. Due to the variety of host environments, it faces several sources of oxidative stress. In addition to reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by its own metabolism, T. cruzi must deal with high ROS levels generated as part of the host's immune responses. Hence, the conclusion that T. cruzi has limited ability to deal with ROS (based on the lack of a few enzymes involved with oxidative stress responses) seems somewhat paradoxical. Actually, to withstand such variable sources of oxidative stress, T. cruzi has developed complex defence mechanisms. This includes ROS detoxification pathways that are distinct from the ones in the mammalian host, DNA repair pathways and specialized polymerases, which not only protect its genome from the resulting oxidative damage but also contribute to the generation of genetic diversity within the parasite population. Recent studies on T. cruzi's DNA repair pathways as mismatch repair (MMR) and GO system suggested that, besides a role associated with DNA repair, some proteins of these pathways may also be involved in signalling oxidative damage. Recent data also suggested that an oxidative environment might be beneficial for parasite survival within the host cell as it contributes to iron mobilization from the host's intracellular storages. Besides contributing to the understanding of basic aspects of T. cruzi biology, these studies are highly relevant since oxidative stress pathways are part of the poorly understood mechanisms behind the mode of action of drugs currently used against this parasite. By unveiling new peculiar aspects of T. cruzi biology, emerging data on DNA repair pathways and other antioxidant defences from this parasite have revealed potential new targets for a much needed boost in drug development efforts towards a better treatment for Chagas disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Triatomine bugs, their microbiota and Trypanosoma cruzi: asymmetric responses of bacteria to an infected blood meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián; Villavicencio, Bianca; Correia, Nathália; Costa, Jane; Haag, Karen L

    2016-12-09

    Triatomine bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) are vectors of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. The study of triatomine gut microbiota has gained relevance in the last years due to its possible role in vector competence and prospective use in control strategies. The objective of this study is to examine changes in the gut microbiota composition of triatomines in response to a T. cruzi-infected blood meal and identifying key factors determining those changes. We sampled colony-reared individuals from six triatomine vectors (Panstrongylus megistus, Rhodnius prolixus, Triatoma brasiliensis, T. infestans, T. juazeirensis and T. sherlocki) comparing experimentally T. cruzi strain 0354-challenged and non-challenged insects. The microbiota of gut and gonad tissues was characterized using high throughput sequencing of region V3-V4 of bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The triatomine microbiota had a low intra-individual diversity, and a high inter-individual variation within the same host species. Arsenophonous appeared as the dominant triatomine bacterial symbiont in our study (59% of the total 16S coverage), but there were significant differences in the distribution of bacterial genera among vectors. In Rhodnius prolixus the dominant symbiont was Pectobacterium. Trypanosoma cruzi-challenge significantly affects microbiota composition, with challenged vectors harbouring a significantly more diverse bacterial community, both in the gut and the gonads. Our results show that blood-feeding with T. cruzi epimastigotes strongly affects microbiota composition in a species-specific manner. We suggest that triatomine-adapted enterobacteria such as Arsenophonus could be used as stable vectors for genetic transformation of triatomine bugs and control of Chagas disease.

  2. Evaluation of the Elecsys® Chagas Assay for the Detection ofTrypanosoma cruzi-Specific Antibodies in a Multicenter Study in Europe and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Chavez, Maria Delmans; Sambri, Vittorio; Schottstedt, Volkmar; Higuera-Escalante, Fernando Aparicio; Roessler, Dieter; Chaves, Monica; Laengin, Tina; Martinez, Alfredo; Fleischer, Bernhard

    2018-02-14

    Serology is the preferred method to confirm Chagas disease diagnosis and to screen blood donors. A battery of assays is often required due to the limited accuracy of single assays. The Elecsys® Chagas assay is a newly developed, double-antigen sandwich assay for use on the Elecsys® and cobas® e immunoassay analyzers, intended to identify individuals infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, for diagnosis and screening. The performance of the Elecsys® Chagas assay was evaluated in comparison with other widely used T. cruzi antibody assays, at multiple sites (Europe/Latin America). Relative sensitivity and specificity were assessed in samples from blood donors, pregnant women, and hospitalized patients, from endemic and non-endemic regions. The Elecsys® Chagas assay had an overall relative sensitivity of 100% ( n = 674). Overall relative specificity was 99.90% ( n = 14,681), 100% ( n = 313) and 100% ( n = 517) in samples from blood donors, pregnant women and hospitalized patients respectively. Analytical specificity was 99.83% ( n = 594). The Elecsys® Chagas assay detected T. cruzi antibodies in two World Health Organization (WHO)-standard T. cruzi reference panels (09/188 and 09/186) at a 1:512 dilution, corresponding to a cut-off sensitivity of approximately 1 mIU/ml. The Elecsys® Chagas assay demonstrated a robust performance under routine conditions at multiple sites in Europe and Latin America. In contrast to other available Chagas assays, the Elecsys® assay uses a reduced number of recombinant T. cruzi antigens resulting in a significantly smaller number of cross-reactions having improved analytical specificity, while being highly sensitive. Copyright © 2018 Flores-Chavez et al.

  3. Recent, independent and anthropogenic origins of Trypanosoma cruzi hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Lewis

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The single celled eukaryote Trypanosoma cruzi, a parasite transmitted by numerous species of triatomine bug in the Americas, causes Chagas disease in humans. T. cruzi generally reproduces asexually and appears to have a clonal population structure. However, two of the six major circulating genetic lineages, TcV and TcVI, are TcII-TcIII inter-lineage hybrids that are frequently isolated from humans in regions where chronic Chagas disease is particularly severe. Nevertheless, a prevalent view is that hybridisation events in T. cruzi were evolutionarily ancient and that active recombination is of little epidemiological importance. We analysed genotypes of hybrid and non-hybrid T. cruzi strains for markers representing three distinct evolutionary rates: nuclear GPI sequences (n = 88, mitochondrial COII-ND1 sequences (n = 107 and 28 polymorphic microsatellite loci (n = 35. Using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches we dated key evolutionary events in the T. cruzi clade including the emergence of hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI, which we estimated to have occurred within the last 60,000 years. We also found evidence for recent genetic exchange between TcIII and TcIV and between TcI and TcIV. These findings show that evolution of novel recombinants remains a potential epidemiological risk. The clearly distinguishable microsatellite genotypes of TcV and TcVI were highly heterozygous and displayed minimal intra-lineage diversity indicative of even earlier origins than sequence-based estimates. Natural hybrid genotypes resembled typical meiotic F1 progeny, however, evidence for mitochondrial introgression, absence of haploid forms and previous experimental crosses indicate that sexual reproduction in T. cruzi may involve alternatives to canonical meiosis. Overall, the data support two independent hybridisation events between TcII and TcIII and a recent, rapid spread of the hybrid progeny in domestic transmission cycles

  4. In silico molecular docking studies of new potential 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones on selected Trypanosoma cruzi and Leishmania enzyme targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Angel H; López, Simón E

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a series of 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones under its E-configuration have exhibited excellent in vitro antichagasic and antileishmanial profiles. Preliminary assays on both parasites suggested that the most active derivatives act through oxidative and nitrosative stress mechanisms; however, their exact mode of actions as anti-trypanosomal and anti-leishmanial agents have not been completely elucidated. This motivated to perform a molecular docking study on essential trypanosomatid enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), trypanothione reductase (TryR), cysteine-protease (CP) and pteridine reductase 1 (PTR1). In addition, to understand the experimental results of nitric oxide production obtained for infected macrophages with Leishmania parasite, a molecular docking was evaluated on nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme of Rattus norvegicus. Both diastereomers (E and Z) of the 4-phthalazinyl-hydrazones were docked on the mentioned targets. In general, molecular docking on T. cruzi enzymes revealed that the E-diastereomers exhibited lower binding energies than Z-diastereomers on the Fe-SOD and CP enzymes, while Z-diastereomers showed lower docking energies than E-isomers on TryR enzyme. For the Leishmania docking studies, the Z-isomers exhibited the best binding affinities on the PTR1 and iNOS enzymes, while the TryR enzyme showed a minor dependence with the stereoselectivity of the tested phthalazines. However, either the structural information of the ligand-enzyme complexes or the experimental data suggest that the significant antitrypanosomatid activity of the most active derivatives is not associated to the inhibition of the SOD, CP and PTR1 enzymes, while the TryR inhibition and nitric oxide generation in host cells emerge as interesting antitrypanosomatid therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses.

  6. Transcriptome and Functional Genomics Reveal the Participation of Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase in Trypanosoma cruzi Resistance to Benznidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Huertas, Paola; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana María; González, Laura; Triana-Chávez, Omar

    2017-07-01

    Currently, the only available treatments for Trypanosoma cruzi are benznidazole (Bz) and nifurtimox (Nfx). The mechanisms of action and resistance to these drugs in this parasite are not complete known. In order to identify differentially expressed transcripts between sensitive and resistant parasites, a massive pyrosequencing of the T. cruzi transcriptome was carried out. Additionally, the 2D gel electrophoresis profile of sensitive and resistant parasites was analyzed and the data were supported with functional genomics. The results showed 133 differentially expressed genes in resistant parasites. The transcriptome analysis revealed the regulation of different genes with several functions and metabolic pathways, which could suggest that resistance in T. cruzi is a multigenic process. Additionally, using transcriptomics, one gene, adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), was found to be down-regulated in the resistant parasites and its expression profile was confirmed by 2D electrophoresis analysis. The role of this gene in the resistance to Bz was confirmed overexpressing it in sensitive and resistant parasites. Interestingly, both parasites became more sensitive to Bz and H 2 O 2 . This is the first RNA-seq study to identify regulated genes in T. cruzi associated with Bz resistance and to show the role of APRT in T. cruzi resistance. Although T. cruzi regulation is mainly post-transcriptional, the transcriptome analysis, supported by 2D gel analysis and functional genomic, provides an overall idea of the expression profiles of genes under resistance conditions. These results contribute essential information to further the understanding of the mechanisms of action and resistance to Bz in T. cruzi. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1936-1945, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks and clones derived from Chagas disease patients: I-Behavioral characterization in vitro

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    Lauria-Pires L.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we isolated Trypanosoma cruzi from chronic Chagas heart disease and from megaesophagus patients. The parasite stock hSLU239 (heart disease yielded clones h1 and h2, whereas stock mSLU142 (megaesophagus yielded clones m1, m2, m3 and m4. The parasite growth kinetics, doubling time and differentiation in axenic liquid medium showed broad behavioral diversity. It was shown that a particular pattern of behavior for a parental stock could not necessarily be assigned for subsequent clones. This study indicates that i each Chagas disease patient is infected with several T. cruzi populations; ii clonal lines derived from patient samples may have different biological characteristics from the original isolate; and that iii additional behavioral and/or molecular markers are required for further characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks and clones derived from Chagas disease patients in order to identify correlations with pathology.

  8. High Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence associated with minimal cardiac pathology among wild carnivores in central Texas

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    Rachel Curtis-Robles

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the zoonotic vector-borne protozoal parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease in humans and dogs throughout the Americas. Despite the recognized importance of various wildlife species for perpetuating Trypanosoma cruzi in nature, relatively little is known about the development of cardiac disease in infected wildlife. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected cardiac tissue and blood from hunter-donated wildlife carcasses- including raccoon (Procyon lotor, coyote (Canis latrans, gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus, and bobcat (Lynx rufus – from central Texas, a region with established populations of infected triatomine vectors and increasing diagnoses of Chagas disease in domestic dogs. Based on PCR analysis, we found that 2 bobcats (14.3%, 12 coyotes (14.3%, 8 foxes (13.8%, and 49 raccoons (70.0% were positive for T. cruzi in at least one sample (right ventricle, apex, and/or blood clot. Although a histologic survey of right ventricles showed that 21.1% of 19 PCR-positive hearts were characterized by mild lymphoplasmocytic infiltration, no other lesions and no amastigotes were observed in any histologic section. DNA sequencing of the TcSC5D gene revealed that raccoons were infected with T. cruzi strain TcIV, and a single racoon harbored a TcI/TcIV mixed infection. Relative to other wildlife species tested here, our data suggest that raccoons may be important reservoirs of TcIV in Texas and a source of infection for indigenous triatomine bugs. The overall high level of infection in this wildlife community likely reflects high levels of vector contact, including ingestion of bugs. Although the relationship between the sylvatic cycle of T. cruzi transmission and human disease risk in the United States has yet to be defined, our data suggest that hunters and wildlife professionals should take precautions to avoid direct contact with potentially infected wildlife tissues.

  9. Estudio de la prevalencia de la infección por Trypanosoma cruzi en zarigüeyas (Didelphis albiventris en Santiago del Estero, Argentina Study of the prevalence of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in opossums (Didelphis albiventris in Santiago del Estero, Argentina

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    Nicolás J. Schweigmann

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Entre los principales reservorios silvestres de Trypanosoma cruzi se encuentran las zarigüeyas del género Didelphis, ampliamente distribuidas por el continente americano. En Amamá y Trinidad, Provincia de Santiago del Estero, Argentina, Didelphis albiventris es el marsupial más frecuente. Su población se renueva cada año y normalmente hay dos períodos reproductivos: uno a principios de la primavera y otro a principios del verano. Estas dos camadas son destetadas y abandonan la bolsa marsupial para incorporarse a la población, la primera (G1 a principios del verano y la segunda (G2 a principios del otoño. Entre 1988 y 1991 se estudiaron 409 individuos distintos de D. albiventris y los xenodiagnósticos revelaron que 35% de ellos estaban infectados por T. cruzi. Se observaron ciclos de renovación anual de la infección con prevalencias que oscilaron entre 22 y 43%. La adquisición del parásito ocurría a lo largo de todo el año, desde el verano hasta la primavera. La prevalencia de la infección aumentó con la edad. Los individuos G1 tuvieron tendencia a presentar mayores prevalencias que los G2, probablemente debido a un mayor tiempo de exposición a la transmisión. En las dos primeras categorías de edad, los individuos G2 mostraron mayores prevalencias que los G1, lo cual indica un aumento significativo de la intensidad de la transmisión durante el otoño. Las zarigüeyas deberían considerarse como una fuente potencial de ingreso de T. cruzi al ciclo doméstico.The opossum of the genus Didelphis is one of the principal wild reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi and is widely distributed in the Western Hemisphere. Didelphis albiventris is the most common marsupial in Amamá and Trinidad, two communities in the province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina. The D. albiventris population is replaced every year, and the opossum normally has two reproductive periods, one at the beginning of the spring and another at the beginning of the

  10. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote cell surface proteins by two complementary methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sébastien; Motta, Flávia N

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, a neglected infectious illness that affects millions of people, mostly in Latin America. Here, the cell surface subproteome of the T. cruzi epimastigote life form was characterized. In order to prepare samples enriched in epimastigote...

  11. Parasite Genome Projects and the Trypanosoma cruzi Genome Initiative

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    Wim Degrave

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the human genome project, a great number of genome projects on other "model" organism have been initiated, some of them already completed. Several initiatives have also been started on parasite genomes, mainly through support from WHO/TDR, involving North-South and South-South collaborations, and great hopes are vested in that these initiatives will lead to new tools for disease control and prevention, as well as to the establishment of genomic research technology in developing countries. The Trypanosoma cruzi genome project, using the clone CL-Brener as starting point, has made considerable progress through the concerted action of more than 20 laboratories, most of them in the South. A brief overview of the current state of the project is given

  12. Beta-interferon inhibits cell infection by Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Beta interferon has been shown to inhibit the capacity of bloodstream forms of the flagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, to associate with and infect mouse peritoneal macrophages and rat heart myoblasts. The inhibitory effect was abrogated in the presence of specific antibodies to the interferon. Pretreatment of the parasites with interferon reduced their infectivity for untreated host cells, whereas pretreament of either type of host cell did not affect the interaction. The effect of interferon on the trypanosomes was reversible; the extent of the inhibitory effect was significantly reduced afer 20 min, and was undetectable after 60 min when macrophages were used as host cells. For the myoblasts, 60 min elapsed before the inhibitory effect began to subside and 120 min elapsed before it became insignificant or undetectable.

  13. Secondary metabolites from Vietnamese marine invertebrates with activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thao, Nguyen Phuong; No, Joo Hwan; Luyen, Bui Thi Thuy; Yang, Gyongseon; Byun, Soo Young; Goo, Junghyun; Kim, Kyung Tae; Cuong, Nguyen Xuan; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Van Minh, Chau; Schmidt, Thomas J; Kang, Jong Seong; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-06-11

    Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM). Laevigatol B (1) and 5α-cholest-8(14)-ene-3β,7α-diol (5) exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  14. Diverse inhibitor chemotypes targeting Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51.

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    Shamila S Gunatilleke

    Full Text Available Chagas Disease, a WHO- and NIH-designated neglected tropical disease, is endemic in Latin America and an emerging infection in North America and Europe as a result of population moves. Although a major cause of morbidity and mortality due to heart failure, as well as inflicting a heavy economic burden in affected regions, Chagas Disease elicits scant notice from the pharmaceutical industry because of adverse economic incentives. The discovery and development of new routes to chemotherapy for Chagas Disease is a clear priority.The similarity between the membrane sterol requirements of pathogenic fungi and those of the parasitic protozoon Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas human cardiopathy, has led to repurposing anti-fungal azole inhibitors of sterol 14α-demethylase (CYP51 for the treatment of Chagas Disease. To diversify the therapeutic pipeline of anti-Chagasic drug candidates we exploited an approach that included directly probing the T. cruzi CYP51 active site with a library of synthetic small molecules. Target-based high-throughput screening reduced the library of ∼104,000 small molecules to 185 hits with estimated nanomolar K(D values, while cross-validation against T. cruzi-infected skeletal myoblast cells yielded 57 active hits with EC(50 <10 µM. Two pools of hits partially overlapped. The top hit inhibited T. cruzi with EC(50 of 17 nM and was trypanocidal at 40 nM.The hits are structurally diverse, demonstrating that CYP51 is a rather permissive enzyme target for small molecules. Cheminformatic analysis of the hits suggests that CYP51 pharmacology is similar to that of other cytochromes P450 therapeutic targets, including thromboxane synthase (CYP5, fatty acid ω-hydroxylases (CYP4, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17 and aromatase (CYP19. Surprisingly, strong similarity is suggested to glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferase, which is unrelated to CYP51 by sequence or structure. Lead compounds developed by pharmaceutical

  15. Polyclonal antibodies for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi circulating antigens.

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    Edith S Málaga-Machaca

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antigens in clinical samples is considered an important diagnostic tool for Chagas disease. The production and use of polyclonal antibodies may contribute to an increase in the sensitivity of immunodiagnosis of Chagas disease.Polyclonal antibodies were raised in alpacas, rabbits, and hens immunized with trypomastigote excreted-secreted antigen, membrane proteins, trypomastigote lysate antigen and recombinant 1F8 to produce polyclonal antibodies. Western blot analysis was performed to determine specificity of the developed antibodies. An antigen capture ELISA of circulating antigens in serum, plasma and urine samples was developed using IgY polyclonal antibodies against T. cruzi membrane antigens (capture antibody and IgG from alpaca raised against TESA. A total of 33 serum, 23 plasma and 9 urine samples were analyzed using the developed test. Among serum samples, compared to serology, the antigen capture ELISA tested positive in 55% of samples. All plasma samples from serology positive subjects were positive in the antigen capture ELISA. All urine positive samples had corresponding plasma samples that were also positive when tested by the antigen capture ELISA.Polyclonal antibodies are useful for detection of circulating antigens in both the plasma and urine of infected individuals. Detection of antigens is direct evidence of the presence of the parasite, and could be a better surrogate of current infection status.

  16. Trypanosoma cruzi contains two galactokinases; molecular and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo-Rojas, Ángel E; González-Marcano, Eglys B; Valera-Vera, Edward A; Acosta, Héctor R; Quiñones, Wilfredo A; Burchmore, Richard J S; Concepción, Juan L; Cáceres, Ana J

    2016-10-01

    Two different putative galactokinase genes, found in the genome database of Trypanosoma cruzi were cloned and sequenced. Expression of the genes in Escherichia coli resulted for TcGALK-1 in the synthesis of a soluble and active enzyme, and in the case of TcGALK-2 gene a less soluble protein, with predicted molecular masses of 51.9kDa and 51.3kDa, respectively. The Km values determined for the recombinant proteins were for galactose 0.108mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.091mM (TcGALK-2) and for ATP 0.36mM (TcGALK-1) and 0.1mM (TcGALK-2). Substrate inhibition by ATP (Ki 0.414mM) was only observed for TcGALK-2. Gel-filtration chromatography showed that natural TcGALKs and recombinant TcGALK-1 are monomeric. In agreement with the possession of a type-1 peroxisome-targeting signal by both TcGALKs, they were found to be present inside glycosomes using two different methods of subcellular fractionation in conjunction with mass spectrometry. Both genes are expressed in epimastigote and trypomastigote stages since the respective proteins were immunodetected by western blotting. The T. cruzi galactokinases present their highest (52-47%) sequence identity with their counterpart from Leishmania spp., followed by prokaryotic galactokinases such as those from E. coli and Lactococcus lactis (26-23%). In a phylogenetic analysis, the trypanosomatid galactokinases form a separate cluster, showing an affiliation with bacteria. Epimastigotes of T. cruzi can grow in glucose-depleted LIT-medium supplemented with 20mM of galactose, suggesting that this hexose, upon phosphorylation by a TcGALK, could be used in the synthesis of UDP-galactose and also as a possible carbon and energy source. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analyses of 32 Loci Clarify Phylogenetic Relationships among Trypanosoma cruzi Lineages and Support a Single Hybridization prior to Human Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-López, Carlos A.; Machado, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetic diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, has been traditionally divided in two major groups, T. cruzi I and II, corresponding to discrete typing units TcI and TcII-VI under a recently proposed nomenclature. The two major groups of T. cruzi seem to differ in important biological characteristics, and are thus thought to represent a natural division relevant for epidemiological studies and development of prophylaxis. To understand the potential connection between the different manifestations of Chagas disease and variability of T. cruzi strains, it is essential to have a correct reconstruction of the evolutionary history of T. cruzi. Methodology/Principal Findings Nucleotide sequences from 32 unlinked loci (>26 Kilobases of aligned sequence) were used to reconstruct the evolutionary history of strains representing the known genetic variability of T. cruzi. Thorough phylogenetic analyses show that the original classification of T. cruzi in two major lineages does not reflect its evolutionary history and that there is only strong evidence for one major and recent hybridization event in the history of this species. Furthermore, estimates of divergence times using Bayesian methods show that current extant lineages of T. cruzi diverged very recently, within the last 3 million years, and that the major hybridization event leading to hybrid lineages TcV and TcVI occurred less than 1 million years ago, well before the contact of T. cruzi with humans in South America. Conclusions/Significance The described phylogenetic relationships among the six major genetic subdivisions of T. cruzi should serve as guidelines for targeted epidemiological and prophylaxis studies. We suggest that it is important to reconsider conclusions from previous studies that have attempted to uncover important biological differences between the two originally defined major lineages of T. cruzi especially if those conclusions were obtained from single

  18. A recombinant protein based on Trypanosoma cruzi P21 enhances phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Adele A; Clemente, Tatiana M; Dos Santos, Marlus A; Machado, Fabrício C; Gomes, Rafael G B; Moreira, Heline Hellen T; Cruz, Mário C; Brígido, Paula C; Dos Santos, Paulo C F; Martins, Flávia A; Bahia, Diana; Maricato, Juliana T; Janini, Luiz M R; Reboredo, Eduardo H; Mortara, Renato A; da Silva, Claudio V

    2012-01-01

    P21 is a secreted protein expressed in all developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the recombinant protein based on P21 (P21-His(6)) on inflammatory macrophages during phagocytosis. Our results showed that P21-His(6) acts as a phagocytosis inducer by binding to CXCR4 chemokine receptor and activating actin polymerization in a way dependent onthe PI3-kinase signaling pathway. Thus, our results shed light on the notion that native P21 is a component related to T. cruzi evasion from the immune response and that CXCR4 may be involved in phagocytosis. P21-His(6) represents an important experimental control tool to study phagocytosis signaling pathways of different intracellular parasites and particles.

  19. A recombinant protein based on Trypanosoma cruzi P21 enhances phagocytosis.

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    Adele A Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: P21 is a secreted protein expressed in all developmental stages of Trypanosoma cruzi. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the recombinant protein based on P21 (P21-His(6 on inflammatory macrophages during phagocytosis. FINDINGS: Our results showed that P21-His(6 acts as a phagocytosis inducer by binding to CXCR4 chemokine receptor and activating actin polymerization in a way dependent onthe PI3-kinase signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, our results shed light on the notion that native P21 is a component related to T. cruzi evasion from the immune response and that CXCR4 may be involved in phagocytosis. P21-His(6 represents an important experimental control tool to study phagocytosis signaling pathways of different intracellular parasites and particles.

  20. Efficacy of voriconazole in a murine model of acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, J E N; Eagleson, M A; Postan, M; Cutrullis, R A; Freilij, H; Bournissen, F Garcia; Petray, P B; Altcheh, J

    2013-04-01

    Antifungal triazole derivatives have been studied as possible alternatives for the treatment of Chagas' disease. Voriconazole has demonstrated in vitro activity against Trypanosoma cruzi, but its efficacy in vivo has not yet been tested. We aimed to determine the effect of voriconazole in a murine model of acute T. cruzi infection. Treatment efficacy was evaluated by comparing parasitaemia, mortality and organ involvement (by histological examination) of infected mice. Treatment with voriconazole significantly lowered parasitaemia and mortality compared with controls, reduced the percentage of mice with amastigote nests in heart and skeletal muscle and moderately decreased myocardial inflammation. Our findings support the potential of voriconazole for the treatment of acute Chagas' disease and motivate future animal studies using varying doses and treatment schemes. Further evaluation of voriconazole for clinical use in human Chagas' patients is warranted.

  1. Looking for combination of benznidazole and Trypanosoma cruzi-triosephosphate isomerase inhibitors for Chagas disease treatment

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    Elena Aguilera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The current chemotherapy for Chagas disease is based on monopharmacology with low efficacy and drug tolerance. Polypharmacology is one of the strategies to overcome these limitations. OBJECTIVES Study the anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of associations of benznidazole (Bnz with three new synthetic T. cruzi-triosephosphate isomerase inhibitors, 2, 3, and 4, in order to potentiate their actions. METHODS The in vitro effect of the drug combinations were determined constructing the corresponding isobolograms. In vivo activities were assessed using an acute murine model of Chagas disease evaluating parasitaemias, mortalities and IgG anti-T. cruzi antibodies. FINDINGS The effect of Bnz combined with each of these compounds, on the growth of epimastigotes, indicated an additive action or a synergic action, when combining it with 2 or 3, respectively, and an antagonic action when combining it with 4. In vivo studies, for the two chosen combinations, 2 or 3 plus one fifth equivalent of Bnz, showed that Bnz can also potentiate the in vivo therapeutic effects. For both combinations a decrease in the number of trypomastigote and lower levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG-antibodies were detected, as well clear protection against death. MAIN CONCLUSIONS These results suggest the studied combinations could be used in the treatment of Chagas disease.

  2. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody detection in blood donors in the Southern Brazil

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    A.B. Araújo

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' Disease, is a widely spread protozoa in America. Blood transfusion is the secondly most important way of acquiring the infection. In blood banks, tests are performed to eliminate potentially infected blood. This study aimed to evaluate the positivity for T. cruzi in blood samples of donor's candidates in Southern Brazil. The study was based on a sampling containing all blood donors of Hemopel - a Pelotas City Blood Center, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil, from 2004 to 2005. Serological study was performed using ELISA Chagatest. Sampling containing values ± 20% cut off were evaluated using ELISA Chagatek, ELISA Alka/Adaltis, IHA Chagatest and IIF Imunocruzi. TESA-Blot was used as a confirmatory procedure in situations where blood samples showed conflicting results. From 4,482 samples collected in 2004 and 2005, the reactivity for anti-T. cruzi was 0.96% (43. Among those, 21 cases (0.47% were confirmed as positive - most of them were female, with low school level and averaging 47.2% years old. Interestingly, the blood donors are not aware of being contaminated and this fact makes it difficult for controlling the disease. Chagas' Disease was one of the main reasons for discarding blood bags through serological control in Southern Brazil. Sampling reactivity showed variation among the different techniques used for anti-T. cruzi research. In order to obtaining more secure and conclusive results, more than one diagnostic technique must be used.

  3. Ten-year incidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy among asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi-seropositive former blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Ester C; Ribeiro, Antonio L; Salemi, Vera M C; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Claudia; Antunes, Andre P; Menezes, Marcia M; Ianni, Barbara M; Nastari, Luciano; Fernandes, Fabio; Patavino, Giuseppina M; Sachdev, Vandana; Capuani, Ligia; de Almeida-Neto, Cesar; Carrick, Danielle M; Wright, David; Kavounis, Katherine; Goncalez, Thelma T; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Barbara; Custer, Brian; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L

    2013-03-12

    Very few studies have measured disease penetrance and prognostic factors of Chagas cardiomyopathy among asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi-infected persons. We performed a retrospective cohort study among initially healthy blood donors with an index T cruzi-seropositive donation and age-, sex-, and period-matched seronegatives in 1996 to 2002 in the Brazilian cities of São Paulo and Montes Claros. In 2008 to 2010, all subjects underwent medical history, physical examination, ECGs, and echocardiograms. ECG and echocardiogram results were classified by blinded core laboratories, and records with abnormal results were reviewed by a blinded panel of 3 cardiologists who adjudicated the outcome of Chagas cardiomyopathy. Associations with Chagas cardiomyopathy were tested with multivariate logistic regression. Mean follow-up time between index donation and outcome assessment was 10.5 years for the seropositives and 11.1 years for the seronegatives. Among 499 T cruzi seropositives, 120 (24%) had definite Chagas cardiomyopathy, and among 488 T cruzi seronegatives, 24 (5%) had cardiomyopathy, for an incidence difference of 1.85 per 100 person-years attributable to T cruzi infection. Of the 120 seropositives classified as having Chagas cardiomyopathy, only 31 (26%) presented with ejection fraction <50%, and only 11 (9%) were classified as New York Heart Association class II or higher. Chagas cardiomyopathy was associated (P<0.01) with male sex, a history of abnormal ECG, and the presence of an S3 heart sound. There is a substantial annual incidence of Chagas cardiomyopathy among initially asymptomatic T cruzi-seropositive blood donors, although disease was mild at diagnosis.

  4. Primeiro encontro do Triatoma costalimai naturalmente infectado pelo Trypanosoma cruzi: estudo de aspectos biológicos da amostra isolada First finding of Triatoma costalimai naturally infected by Trypanosoma cruzi: study of biological aspects of the isolated sample

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    Dalva A. Mello

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available Uma amostra de T. cruzi foi isolada pela primeira vez de um exemplar do Triatoma costalimai, capturado no município de Mambai, Goiás. Estudos experimentais sobre infectividade e virulência foram conduzidos em triatomíneos, Calomys callosus (Rodentia e camundongos albinos. Cultivo "In Vitro" da amostra isolada foi obtido com sucesso utilizando-se o meio LIT. As mensurações realizadas em tripomastigotas sanguícolas deram os seguintes resultados (mcg: comprimento total - 16,4 (± 1,1; flagelo livre - 4,9 (± 1,1; largura - 2,8 (± 0,6; distância NA - 4,8 (± 0,6; distância NP - 6,0 (± 0,5 e Indice nuclear 1,3.Tripanosoma cruzi is for the first time recorded infecting Triatoma costalimai captured in Mambaí couty, state of Goiás, Brasil. The isolated strain is easily cultivated on LIT medium. The above T. cruzi strain was inoculated in mice and in Calomys callosus (Rodentia. The infection can be considered mild in those animals. The prepatent period was 9,4 days for mice and 4,8 days for C. callosus. No lethality for C. callosus was observed during the period of observations. The maxima observed parasitemia was: 366.6/5 [cubic milimeters] for mice and 3,750/5 [cubic milimeters] for C. callosus. Pseudocysts were found in muscles cells of both infected rodent species. Cross-immunity tests showed that a previous infection gives resistance against reinoculation with a virulent T. cruzi strain. Nymphs of Dipetalogaster maximus, Rhdnius neglectus and T. infestans fed on infected animals acquired the infection.

  5. Genotyping of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and Trypanosoma rangeli genetic groups in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus by PCR-RFLP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Amanda R N; Dias, Greicy B M; Kimoto, Karen Y; Steindel, Mário; Grisard, Edmundo C; Toledo, Max Jean O; Gomes, Mônica L

    2016-04-01

    The specific detection and genetic typing of trypanosomes that infect humans, mammalian reservoirs, and vectors is crucial for diagnosis and epidemiology. We utilized a PCR-RFLP assay that targeted subunit II of cytochrome oxidase and 24Sα-rDNA to simultaneously detect and discriminate six Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) and two genetic groups of Trypanosoma rangeli (KP1+/KP1-) in intestinal contents of experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus. The PCR assays showed that in 23 of 29 (79.4%) mixed infections with the six T. cruzi DTUs and mixed infections with individual DTUs and/or groups KP1+ and KP1-, both parasites were successfully detected. In six mixed infections that involved TcIII, the TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI DTUs predominated to the detriment of TcIII, indicating the selection of genetic groups. Interactions between different genetic groups and vectors may lead to genetic selection over TcIII. The elimination of this DTU by the immune system of the vector appears unlikely because TcIII was present in other mixed infections (TcIII/TcIV and TcIII/KP1+). Both molecular markers used in this study were sensitive and specific, demonstrating their usefulness in a wide geographical area where distinct genotypes of these two species are sympatric. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in parasite-vector interactions are still poorly understood, our results indicate a dynamic selection toward specific T. cruzi DTUs in R. prolixus during mixed genotype infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi: Maintenance in Culture Modify Gene and Antigenic Expression of Metacyclic Trypomastigotes

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    Víctor T Contreras

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we examined whether the maintenance of Trypanosoma cruzi by long-time in axenic culture produces changes in gene expression and antigenic profiles. The studies were made with a Dm30L-clone from a low-virulent strain and a non-cloned virulent EP-strain of T. cruzi. Both parasites were maintained, for at least seven years, by successive alternate passage triatomine/mouse (triatomine condition, or by serial passage in axenic medium (culture condition. The comparison of the [35S]methionine metabolic labeling products of virulent and non-virulent parasites by 2D-SDS-PAGE, clearly indicates that the expression of metacyclic trypomastigotes (but not of epimastigotes proteins have been altered by laboratory maintenance conditions. Western blot analysis of EP and Dm30L-epimastigotes using a serum anti-epimastigotes revealed that although most of antigens are conserved, four antigens are characteristics of triatomine condition parasites and three other are characteristics of culture condition parasites. Anti-metacyclics serum revealed significative differences in EP- and Dm30L-metacyclic trypomastigotes from triatomine condition. However, avirulent metacyclic forms were antigenically very similar. These results suggest that besides a possible selection of avirulent subpopulation from T. cruzi strains genetically heterogeneous when maintained by long time in axenic culture, changes in virulence might be due to post-translational modifications of the antigens induced by the absence of the natural alternability (vertebrate-invertebrate in the life-cycle of T. cruzi

  7. The Trypanosoma cruzi nucleolus: a morphometrical analysis of cultured epimastigotes in the exponential and stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepomuceno-Mejía, Tomás; Lara-Martínez, Reyna; Cevallos, Ana María; López-Villaseñor, Imelda; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Hernández, Roberto

    2010-12-01

    Our group is interested in rRNA and ribosome biogenesis in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Epimastigotes represent an extracellular replicative stage of T. cruzi and can be cultured in axenic media. The growth curve of epimastigotes allows assessment of potential differences in the nucleoli of cells undergoing growth-rate transitions. To establish cellular parameters for studying ribosome biogenesis in T. cruzi, a morphometric analysis of the nucleoli of cultured cells in the exponential and stationary phases was conducted. Electron micrograph-based measurements of nuclear sections from independent cells demonstrated that the nucleolar area is over twofold higher in exponentially growing cells, as compared with epimastigotes in the stationary phase. The granular component of the nucleoli of actively growing cells was the main structural element. Cycloheximide moderately reduced the apparent size of the nucleoli without an apparent disruption of their architecture. Our results provide a firm basis for the establishment of an experimental model to study the organization of the nucleolus during the growth and development of T. cruzi. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Visual genome-wide RNAi screening to identify human host factors required for Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

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    Auguste Genovesio

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Therefore, the development of new and more effective drugs is of paramount importance. Although some host cellular factors that play a role in T. cruzi infection have been uncovered, the molecular requirements for intracellular parasite growth and persistence are still not well understood. To further study these host-parasite interactions and identify human host factors required for T. cruzi infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using cellular microarrays of a printed siRNA library that spanned the whole human genome. The screening was reproduced 6 times and a customized algorithm was used to select as hits those genes whose silencing visually impaired parasite infection. The 162 strongest hits were subjected to a secondary screening and subsequently validated in two different cell lines. Among the fourteen hits confirmed, we recognized some cellular membrane proteins that might function as cell receptors for parasite entry and others that may be related to calcium release triggered by parasites during cell invasion. In addition, two of the hits are related to the TGF-beta signaling pathway, whose inhibition is already known to diminish levels of T. cruzi infection. This study represents a significant step toward unveiling the key molecular requirements for host cell invasion and revealing new potential targets for antiparasitic therapy.

  9. Natural populations of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, have a complex multiclonal structure

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    Tibayrenc, M.; Ward, P.; Moya, A.; Ayala, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have studied 15 gene loci coding for enzymes in 121 Trypanosoma cruzi stocks from a wide geographic range - from the US and Mexico to Chile and southern Brazil. T.cruzi is diploid but reproduction is basically clonal, with very little if any sexuality remaining at present. They have identified 43 different clones by their genetic composition; the same genetic clone is often found in very distant places and in diverse hosts. There is much genetic heterogeneity among the different clones, and they cannot be readily classified into a few discrete groups that might represent natural taxa. These findings imply that the biological and medical characteristics need to be ascertained separately for each natural clone. The evidence indicates that clonal evolution is very ancient in T.cruzi. The authors propose two alternative hypotheses concerning the relationship between the biochemical diversity and the heterogeneity in other biological and medical characteristics of T. cruzi. One hypothesis is that the degree of diversity between strains simply reflects the time elapsed since their last common ancestor. The second hypothesis is that biological and medical heterogeneity is recent and reflects adaptation to different transmission cycles. A decision between the two hypotheses can be reached with appropriate studies, with important medical consequences.

  10. Unraveling Chagas disease transmission through the oral route: Gateways to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-dos-Santos, Danielle; Barreto-de-Albuquerque, Juliana; Guerra, Bárbara; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Ramos, Mariana Tavares; Mascarenhas, Barbara Angelica S.; Britto, Constança; Morrot, Alexandre; Serra Villa-Verde, Déa M.; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; de Meis, Juliana

    2017-01-01

    Oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is the most important route of infection in Brazilian Amazon and Venezuela. Other South American countries have also reported outbreaks associated with food consumption. A recent study showed the importance of parasite contact with oral cavity to induce a highly severe acute disease in mice. However, it remains uncertain the primary site of parasite entry and multiplication due to an oral infection. Here, we evaluated the presence of T. cruzi Dm28c luciferase (Dm28c-luc) parasites in orally infected mice, by bioluminescence and quantitative real-time PCR. In vivo bioluminescent images indicated the nasomaxillary region as the site of parasite invasion in the host, becoming consistently infected throughout the acute phase. At later moments, 7 and 21 days post-infection (dpi), luminescent signal is denser in the thorax, abdomen and genital region, because of parasite dissemination in different tissues. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated that the nasomaxillary region, heart, mandibular lymph nodes, liver, spleen, brain, epididymal fat associated to male sex organs, salivary glands, cheek muscle, mesenteric fat and lymph nodes, stomach, esophagus, small and large intestine are target tissues at latter moments of infection. In the same line, amastigote nests of Dm28c GFP T. cruzi were detected in the nasal cavity of 6 dpi mice. Parasite quantification by real-time qPCR at 7 and 21 dpi showed predominant T. cruzi detection and expansion in mouse nasal cavity. Moreover, T. cruzi DNA was also observed in the mandibular lymph nodes, pituitary gland, heart, liver, small intestine and spleen at 7 dpi, and further, disseminated to other tissues, such as the brain, stomach, esophagus and large intestine at 21 dpi. Our results clearly demonstrated that oral cavity and adjacent compartments is the main target region in oral T. cruzi infection leading to parasite multiplication at the nasal cavity. PMID

  11. Unraveling Chagas disease transmission through the oral route: Gateways to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and target tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Dos-Santos, Danielle; Barreto-de-Albuquerque, Juliana; Guerra, Bárbara; Moreira, Otacilio C; Berbert, Luiz Ricardo; Ramos, Mariana Tavares; Mascarenhas, Barbara Angelica S; Britto, Constança; Morrot, Alexandre; Serra Villa-Verde, Déa M; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Savino, Wilson; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinícius; Meis, Juliana de

    2017-04-01

    Oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is the most important route of infection in Brazilian Amazon and Venezuela. Other South American countries have also reported outbreaks associated with food consumption. A recent study showed the importance of parasite contact with oral cavity to induce a highly severe acute disease in mice. However, it remains uncertain the primary site of parasite entry and multiplication due to an oral infection. Here, we evaluated the presence of T. cruzi Dm28c luciferase (Dm28c-luc) parasites in orally infected mice, by bioluminescence and quantitative real-time PCR. In vivo bioluminescent images indicated the nasomaxillary region as the site of parasite invasion in the host, becoming consistently infected throughout the acute phase. At later moments, 7 and 21 days post-infection (dpi), luminescent signal is denser in the thorax, abdomen and genital region, because of parasite dissemination in different tissues. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated that the nasomaxillary region, heart, mandibular lymph nodes, liver, spleen, brain, epididymal fat associated to male sex organs, salivary glands, cheek muscle, mesenteric fat and lymph nodes, stomach, esophagus, small and large intestine are target tissues at latter moments of infection. In the same line, amastigote nests of Dm28c GFP T. cruzi were detected in the nasal cavity of 6 dpi mice. Parasite quantification by real-time qPCR at 7 and 21 dpi showed predominant T. cruzi detection and expansion in mouse nasal cavity. Moreover, T. cruzi DNA was also observed in the mandibular lymph nodes, pituitary gland, heart, liver, small intestine and spleen at 7 dpi, and further, disseminated to other tissues, such as the brain, stomach, esophagus and large intestine at 21 dpi. Our results clearly demonstrated that oral cavity and adjacent compartments is the main target region in oral T. cruzi infection leading to parasite multiplication at the nasal cavity.

  12. Unraveling Chagas disease transmission through the oral route: Gateways to Trypanosoma cruzi infection and target tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Silva-Dos-Santos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Oral transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is the most important route of infection in Brazilian Amazon and Venezuela. Other South American countries have also reported outbreaks associated with food consumption. A recent study showed the importance of parasite contact with oral cavity to induce a highly severe acute disease in mice. However, it remains uncertain the primary site of parasite entry and multiplication due to an oral infection. Here, we evaluated the presence of T. cruzi Dm28c luciferase (Dm28c-luc parasites in orally infected mice, by bioluminescence and quantitative real-time PCR. In vivo bioluminescent images indicated the nasomaxillary region as the site of parasite invasion in the host, becoming consistently infected throughout the acute phase. At later moments, 7 and 21 days post-infection (dpi, luminescent signal is denser in the thorax, abdomen and genital region, because of parasite dissemination in different tissues. Ex vivo analysis demonstrated that the nasomaxillary region, heart, mandibular lymph nodes, liver, spleen, brain, epididymal fat associated to male sex organs, salivary glands, cheek muscle, mesenteric fat and lymph nodes, stomach, esophagus, small and large intestine are target tissues at latter moments of infection. In the same line, amastigote nests of Dm28c GFP T. cruzi were detected in the nasal cavity of 6 dpi mice. Parasite quantification by real-time qPCR at 7 and 21 dpi showed predominant T. cruzi detection and expansion in mouse nasal cavity. Moreover, T. cruzi DNA was also observed in the mandibular lymph nodes, pituitary gland, heart, liver, small intestine and spleen at 7 dpi, and further, disseminated to other tissues, such as the brain, stomach, esophagus and large intestine at 21 dpi. Our results clearly demonstrated that oral cavity and adjacent compartments is the main target region in oral T. cruzi infection leading to parasite multiplication at the nasal

  13. A α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase is present in Trypanosoma cruzi glycosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Concepcion

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPDH-EC.1.1.1.8 has been considered absent in Trypanosoma cruzi in contradiction with all other studied trypanosomatids. After observing that the sole malate dehydrogenase can not maintain the intraglycosomal redox balance, GPDH activity was looked for and found, although in very variable levels, in epimastigotes extracts. GPDH was shown to be exclusively located in the glycosome of T. cruzi by digitonin treatment and isopycnic centrifugation. Antibody against T. brucei GPDH showed that this enzyme seemed to be present in an essentially inactive form at the beginning of the epimastigotes growth. GPDH is apparently linked to a salicylhydroxmic-sensitive glycerophosphate reoxidizing system and plays an essential role in the glycosome redox balance.

  14. Cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene as a DNA barcode for discriminating Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and closely related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marina Silva; Morelli, Karina Alessandra; Jansen, Ana Maria

    2017-10-16

    The DNA barcoding system using the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 mitochondrial gene (cox1 or COI) is highly efficient for discriminating vertebrate and invertebrate species. In the present study, we examined the suitability of cox1 as a marker for Trypanosoma cruzi identification from other closely related species. Additionally, we combined the sequences of cox1 and the nuclear gene glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) to evaluate the occurrence of mitochondrial introgression and the presence of hybrid genotypes. Sixty-two isolates of Trypanosoma spp. obtained from five of the six Brazilian biomes (Amazon Forest, Atlantic Forest, Caatinga, Cerrado and Pantanal) were sequenced for cox1 and GPI gene fragments. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed using neighbor-joining, maximum likelihood, parsimony and Bayesian inference methods. Molecular species delimitation was evaluated through pairwise intraspecific and interspecific distances, Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery, single-rate Poisson Tree Processes and multi-rate Poisson Tree Processes. Both cox1 and GPI genes recognized and differentiated T. cruzi, Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei, Trypanosoma dionisii and Trypanosoma rangeli. Cox1 discriminated Tcbat, TcI, TcII, TcIII and TcIV. Additionally, TcV and TcVI were identified as a single group. Cox1 also demonstrated diversity in the discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII and TcIII and in T. c. marinkellei and T. rangeli. Cox1 and GPI demonstrated TcI and TcII as the most genetically distant branches, and the position of the other T. cruzi DTUs differed according to the molecular marker. The tree reconstructed with concatenated cox1 and GPI sequences confirmed the separation of the subgenus Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) sp. and the T. cruzi DTUs TcI, TcII, TcIII and TcIV. The evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was informative for DTU differentiation using both genes. In the cox1 analysis, one SNP differentiated heterozygous hybrids from TcIV sequences

  15. Ultrastructural damage of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes exposed to decomplemented immune sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Presas, A M; Zavala, J T; Fauser, I B; Merchant, M T; Guerrero, L R; Willms, K

    2001-08-01

    The susceptibility of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes to lysis by normal or immune sera in a complement-dependent reaction has been reported, but the effects induced directly by immune serum depleted of complement remain unstudied. The aim of this work was to study the ultrastructural alterations induced in T. cruzi epimastigotes by immune mouse or rabbit sera with or without complement. A local isolate of T. cruzi (Queretaro) was used in all experiments. Immune sera were raised in both mouse and rabbit by immunization with T. cruzi epimastigote antigens. Light microscopy showed intense agglutination of epimastigotes when incubated with decomplemented mouse or rabbit immune sera. A distinctive ultrastructural feature of this agglutination pattern was the fusion of plasma membranes and a pattern of intercrossing between subpellicular microtubules. Agglutination was associated with fragmentation of nuclear membranes and swelling of cytoplasm, Golgi cisternae, endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and kinetoplast membranes. Agglutinated parasites also incorporated trypan blue stain. Results of [3H]-thymidine incorporation confirmed that epimastigotes exposed to specific antibodies in the absence of complement were incapable of proliferating. Ultrastructural changes observed in epimastigote micrographs incubated with decomplemented immune mouse sera were statistically significant (P<0.001) when compared with results obtained from images after incubation with decomplemented normal mouse sera.

  16. Comparison of four PCR methods for efficient detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in routine diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiringer, Peter; Pritsch, Michael; Flores-Chavez, María; Marchisio, Edoardo; Helfrich, Kerstin; Mengele, Carolin; Hohnerlein, Stefan; Bretzel, Gisela; Löscher, Thomas; Hoelscher, Michael; Berens-Riha, Nicole

    2017-07-01

    Due to increased migration, Chagas disease has become an international health problem. Reliable diagnosis of chronically infected people is crucial for prevention of non-vectorial transmission as well as treatment. This study compared four distinct PCR methods for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA for the use in well-equipped routine diagnostic laboratories. DNA was extracted of T. cruzi-positive and negative patients' blood samples and cultured T. cruzi, T. rangeli as well as Leishmania spp. One conventional and two real-time PCR methods targeting a repetitive Sat-DNA sequence as well as one conventional PCR method targeting the variable region of the kDNA minicircle were compared for sensitivity, intra- and interassay precision, limit of detection, specificity and cross-reactivity. Considering the performance, costs and ease of use, an algorithm for PCR-diagnosis of patients with a positive serology for T. cruzi antibodies was developed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recently differentiated epimastigotes from Trypanosoma cruzi are infective to the mammalian host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Rafael Luis; Contreras, Víctor Tulio; Marliére, Newmar Pinto; Aparecida Guarneri, Alessandra; Villamizar Silva, Luz Helena; Mazzarotto, Giovanny Augusto Camacho Antevere; Batista, Michel; Soccol, Vanete Thomaz; Krieger, Marco Aurelio; Probst, Christian Macagnan

    2017-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle in which four distinct developmental forms alternate between the insect vector and the mammalian host. It is assumed that replicating epimastigotes present in the insect gut are not infective to mammalian host, a paradigm corroborated by the widely acknowledged fact that only this stage is susceptible to the complement system. In the present work, we establish a T. cruzi in vitro and in vivo epimastigogenesis model to analyze the biological aspects of recently differentiated epimastigotes (rdEpi). We show that both trypomastigote stages of T. cruzi (cell-derived and metacyclic) are able to transform into epimastigotes (processes termed primary and secondary epimastigogenesis, respectively) and that rdEpi have striking properties in comparison to long-term cultured epimastigotes: resistance to complement-mediated lysis and both in vitro (cell culture) and in vivo (mouse) infectivity. Proteomics analysis of all T. cruzi stages reveled a cluster of proteins that were up-regulated only in rdEpi (including ABC transporters and ERO1), suggesting a role for them in rdEpi virulence. The present work introduces a new experimental model for the study of host-parasite interactions, showing that rdEpi can be infective to the mammalian host. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Rhodnius prolixus Life History Outcomes Differ when Infected with Different Trypanosoma cruzi I Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K.; Graham, Andrea L.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Chávez, Omar Triana

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a parasite on the life history of its vector is important for understanding and predicting disease transmission. Chagas disease agent Trypanosoma cruzi is a generalist parasite that is diverse across scales from its genetic diversity to the 100s of mammal and vector species it infects. Its vertebrate hosts show quite variable responses to infection, however, to date there are no studies looking at how T. cruzi variability might result in variable outcomes in its invertebrate host. Therefore, we investigated the effect of different T. cruzi I strains on Rhodnius prolixus survival and development. We found significant variation between insects infected with different strains, with some strains having no effect, as compared with uninfected insects, and others with significantly lower survival and development. We also found that different variables had varying importance between strains, with the effect of time postinfection and the blood:weight ratio of the infective meal significantly affecting the survival of insects infected with some strains, but not others. Our results suggest that T. cruzi can be pathogenic not only to its vertebrate hosts but also to its invertebrate hosts. PMID:26078316

  19. Enhancing effects of gamma interferon on phagocytic cell association with and killing of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, J. J.; Kierszenbaum, F.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Zlotnik, A.

    1985-01-01

    Results are reported from a study of the influence gamma interferon (GIFN) and interleukin 2 (IL2) have on the capability of P388D1 cells and mouse resident peritoneal macrophages (MPM) to attach to the blood-resident parasites Trypanosoma cruzi and kill them. Cultures of trypomastigote forms of the Tulahuen strain of T. cruzi grown in bovine serum were introduced into peritoneal cells of mice, along with P388D1 cells incubated with GIFN, IL2 and both. Control cells were also maintained. Statistical analysis were then performed on data on counts of the number of dead T. Cruzi cells. The GIFN enhanced the interaction of MPM and P388D1 cells with the surface of T. Cruzi, provided the interaction was given over 12 hr to take place. A depression of the cytotoxicity of P388D1 cells was attributed to mediation by H2O2, an effect partially offset by incubation with the lymphokine GIFN.

  20. Immunological Identification of Trypanosoma cruzi Lineages in Human Infection Along the Endemic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Marikena G.; Sartor, Paula A.; Burgos, Juan M.; Briceño, Luis; Rodríguez, Eva M.; Guhl, Felipe; Chavez, Omar Triana; Espinoza, Berta; Monteón, Victor M.; Russomando, Graciela; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Bottasso, Oscar A.; Leguizamón, Maria Susana

    2011-01-01

    Genotyping studies show a polarized geographic distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi lineages in humans. Here, we assessed their distribution along Latin America through an immunological approach we designated Western blot (WB) assay with Trypomastigote small-surface antigen (TSSA) I and TSSA II (TSSA-WB). These antigens are expressed by T. cruzi I (TCI; now TcI) and T. cruzi II (TCII; reclassified as TcII to TcVI) parasites. TSSA-WB showed good concordance with genotyping tests. An unexpected frequency of TSSA II recognition was observed in Colombia, Venezuela, and Mexico (northern region of Latin America). In Argentina and Paraguay (southern region), immunophenotyping confirmed the already reported TCII (TcII to TcVI) dominance. The lineage distribution between these regions showed significant difference but not among countries within them (except for Colombia and Venezuela). TSSA-WB shows TCII emergence in the northern region where TCI was reported as dominant or even as the unique T. cruzi lineage infecting humans. PMID:21212206

  1. Structural insights into the catalytic mechanism of Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, María Fernanda; Watts, Andrew G; Damager, Iben; Wehenkel, Annemarie; Nguyen, Tong; Buschiazzo, Alejandro; Paris, Gastón; Frasch, A Carlos; Withers, Stephen G; Alzari, Pedro M

    2004-05-01

    Sialidases are a superfamily of sialic-acid-releasing enzymes that are of significant interest due to their implication as virulence factors in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases. However, extensive studies of viral and microbial sialidases have failed to provide a comprehensive picture of their mechanistic properties, in part because the structures of competent enzyme-substrate complexes and reaction intermediates have never been described. Here we report these structures for the Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (TcTS), showing that catalysis by sialidases occurs via a similar mechanism to that of other retaining glycosidases, but with some intriguing differences that may have evolved in response to the substrate structure.

  2. 2-Pyridyl thiazoles as novel anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents: structural design, synthesis and pharmacological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Marcos Veríssimo de Oliveira; de Siqueira, Lucianna Rabelo Pessoa; da Silva, Elany Barbosa; Costa, Lívia Bandeira; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; Rabello, Marcelo Montenegro; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; da Cruz, Luana Faria; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhães; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; de Castro, Maria Carolina Accioly Brelaz; Bernhardt, Paul V; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2014-10-30

    The present work reports on the synthesis, anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activities and docking studies of a novel series of 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-1,3-thiazoles derived from 2-pyridine thiosemicarbazone. The majority of these compounds are potent cruzain inhibitors and showed excellent inhibition on the trypomastigote form of the parasite, and the resulting structure-activity relationships are discussed. Together, these data present a novel series of thiazolyl hydrazones with potential effects against Chagas disease and they could be important leads in continuing development against Chagas disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis and anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of naphthoquinone-containing triazoles: electrochemical studies on the effects of the quinoidal moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Emilay B T; Dias, Gleiston G; Rodrigues, Bernardo L; Guimarães, Tiago T; Valença, Wagner O; Camara, Celso A; de Oliveira, Ronaldo N; da Silva, Mauro G; Ferreira, Vitor F; de Paiva, Yen Galdino; Goulart, Marilia O F; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; de Castro, Solange L; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N

    2013-11-01

    In our continued search for novel trypanocidal compounds, twenty-six derivatives of para- and ortho-naphthoquinones coupled to 1,2,3-triazoles were synthesized. These compounds were evaluated against the infective bloodstream form of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. Compounds 17-24, 28-30 and 36-38 are described herein for the first time. Three of these novel compounds (28-30) were found to be more potent than the standard drug benznidazole, with IC50/24h values between 6.8 and 80.8μM. Analysis of the toxicity to heart muscle cells led to LC50/24h of activity, and it was observed that more electrophilic quinones were generally more potent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of betamethasone on the course of experimentai. Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico G.C. Abath

    1986-09-01

    Full Text Available In this experiment, the effect of betamethasone administered in the early post- acute infection of mice by Trypanosoma cruzi was studied. This drug was administered during 30 days after the 42nd day of infection in a dose of 0.15 mg/day. The betamethasone treatment did not cause fresh outbreaks of parasitemia and the histopathological findings in the chronic phase were not different from those in the control group. The higher cumulative mortality after treatment in the experimental group was due to superimposed bacterial infections. Outbred albino mice infected with low numbers ofY strain Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes were not suitable models for Chagas' disease, since after 7 months of observation only mild histological lesions developed in all the animais. Prolonged betamethasone treatment of mice infected with low numbers o/Trypanosoma cruzi of the Y strain, during the post-acute phase did not aggravate the course of infection.Foram estudados os efeitos da betametasona administrada na fase pós-aguda imediata de uma infecção pelo T. cruzi em camundongos. O tratamento consistiu de 30 doses diárias de 0,15 mg de betametasona, a partir de 42° dia de infecção, não havendo aparecimento de novos surtos de parasitemia. No tempo de duração do experimento (7 meses não houve diferença entre as lesões histopatológicas dos animais tratados e dos não tratados. O grupo experimental apresentou uma maior mortalidade acumulada no 75º dia de infecção, o que pode ser atribuído a infecções bacterianas associadas. Por outro lado, camundongos albinos "outbred", infectados com baixo inóculo, não se apresentaram como bom modelo de doença de Chagas, já que não desenvolveram lesões importantes nem na fase aguda nem após 7 meses de infecção. Em conclusão, o tratamento imunosupressivo prolongado, após a fase aguda de uma infecção mínima com a cepa Ydo T. cruzi não tem influência sobre o curso da infecção, pelo menos no que tange

  5. Prevalence and Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in People of Rural Communities of the High Jungle of Northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alroy, Karen A; Huang, Christine; Gilman, Robert H; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R; Marks, Morgan A; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Hillyard, Miranda; Verastegui, Manuela; Sanchez, Gerardo; Cabrera, Lilia; Vidal, Elisa; Billig, Erica M W; Cama, Vitaliano A; Náquira, César; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z

    2015-05-01

    Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi is seen exclusively in the Americas where an estimated 8 million people are infected with the parasite. Significant research in southern Peru has been conducted to understand T. cruzi infection and vector control, however, much less is known about the burden of infection and epidemiology in northern Peru. A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in humans (n=611) and domestic animals [dogs (n=106) and guinea pigs (n=206)] in communities of Cutervo Province, Peru. Sampling and diagnostic strategies differed according to species. An entomological household study (n=208) was conducted to identify the triatomine burden and species composition, as well as the prevalence of T. cruzi in vectors. Electrocardiograms (EKG) were performed on a subset of participants (n=90 T. cruzi infected participants and 170 age and sex-matched controls). The seroprevalence of T. cruzi among humans, dogs, and guinea pigs was 14.9% (95% CI: 12.2-18.0%), 19.8% (95% CI: 12.7-28.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.4-6.9%) respectively. In one community, the prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 17.2% (95% CI: 9.6-24.7%) among participants Peru.

  6. Detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood by PCR is associated with Chagas cardiomyopathy and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, E C; Ribeiro, A L; Lee, T H; Oliveira, C L; Carneiro-Proietti, A B; Antunes, A P; Menezes, M M; Ianni, B M; Salemi, V M; Nastari, L; Fernandes, F; Sachdev, V; Carrick, D M; Deng, X; Wright, D; Gonçalez, T T; Murphy, E L; Custer, B; Busch, M P

    2015-04-01

    The significance of detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in blood of antibody-positive patients for risk of development of Chagas heart disease is not well established. The objective of this study was to compare detection of T. cruzi DNA with known clinical and laboratory markers of Chagas cardiomyopathy (CC) severity. This is a case-control study nested within a retrospective cohort developed in Brazil to understand the natural history of Chagas disease. The study enrolled 499 T. cruzi seropositive blood donors (SP-BD) and 488 frequency matched seronegative control donors (SN-BD) who had donated between 1996 and 2002, and 101 patients with clinically diagnosed CC. In 2008-2010 all enrolled subjects underwent a health questionnaire, medical examination, electrocardiograms and echocardiograms and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses. A blinded panel of three cardiologists adjudicated the outcome of CC. Trypanosoma cruzi kinetoplast minicircle sequences were amplified by real-time PCR using an assay with a sensitivity of one parasite per 20 mL of blood. All testing was performed on coded samples. Rates of PCR detection of T. cruzi DNA were significantly (P = 0.003) higher in CC patients and SP-BD diagnosed with CC (79/105 [75.2 %]) compared with SP-BD without CC (143/279 [51.3%]). The presence of parasitaemia was significantly associated with known markers of disease progression such as QRS and QT interval duration, lower left ventricular ejection fraction, higher left ventricular index mass, and elevated troponin and NTpro-BNP levels. Trypanosoma cruzi PCR positivity is associated with presence and severity of cardiomyopathy, suggesting a direct role of parasite persistence in disease pathogenesis. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2015 European Society of Cardiology.

  7. Anion inhibition studies of the α-carbonic anhydrase from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease.

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    Pan, Peiwen; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Scozzafava, Andrea; Parkkila, Seppo; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2013-08-01

    The protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, encodes an α-class carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1), TcCA, which was recently shown to be crucial for its life cycle. Thiols, a class of strong TcCA inhibitors, were also shown to block the growth of the pathogen in vitro. Here we report the inhibition of TcCA by inorganic and complex anions and other molecules interacting with zinc proteins, such as sulfamide, sulfamic acid, phenylboronic/arsonic acids. TcCA was inhibited in the low micromolar range by iodide, cyanate, thiocyanate, hydrogensulfide and trithiocarbonate (KIs in the range of 44-93 μM), but the best inhibitor was diethyldithiocarbamate (KI=5 μM). Sulfamide showed an inhibition constant of 120 μM, but sulfamic acid was much less effective (KI of 10.6 mM). The discovery of diethyldithiocarbamate as a low micromolar TcCA inhibitor may be useful to detect leads for developing anti-Trypanosoma agents with a diverse mechanism of action compared to clinically used drugs (benznidazole, nifurtimox) for which significant resistance emerged. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Distribution and pathogenicity of Trypanosoma cruzi isolated from peridomestic populations of Triatoma infestans and Triatoma guasayana from rural western Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauricella, Marta A; Stariolo, Raúl L; Riarte, Adelina R; Segura, Elsa L; Gürtler, Ricardo E

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in peridomestic triatomines collected manually at a district-wide scale in rural villages around Olta, western Argentina, and typed the isolated strains according to their pathogenicity to laboratory mice. Of 1623 triatomines examined, only 14 (0.9%) were infected with T. cruzi based on microscopical examination of feces. The prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 0.8% in Triatoma infestans, 2.3% in T. guasayana, and nil in T. garciabesi, T. platensis, and T. eratyrusiformis. Local transmission occurred in kitchens, store-rooms and goat corrals or nearby, though at very low levels. T. cruzi was detected by at least one parasitological method in 11 (79%) of 14 microscope-positive bugs. Hemoculture was the most sensitive method (67%) followed by culture of organ homogenates, histopathology or xenodiagnosis of inoculated suckling mice (55-58%), and culture of microscope-positive bug feces (46%). The evidence suggests that most of the isolated T. cruzi strains would be myotropic type III. Our study establishes for the first time that peridomestic, microscope-positive T. guasayana nymphs were actually infected with T. cruzi, and may be implicated as a putative secondary vector of T. cruzi in domestic or peridomestic sites. PMID:16021298

  9. Environment, interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi and its host, and health Meio-ambiente, interações entre Trypanosoma cruzi e seu hospedeiro e saúde humana

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    Antonio R. L. Teixeira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An epidemiological chain involving Trypanosoma cruzi is discussed at the environmental level, and in terms of fine molecular interactions in invertebrate and vertebrate hosts dwelling in different ecosystems. This protozoan has a complex, genetically controlled plasticity, which confers adaptation to approximately 40 blood-sucking triatomine species and to over 1,000 mammalian species, fulfilling diverse metabolic requirements in its complex life-cycle. The Tr. cruzi infections are deeply embedded in countless ecotypes, where they are difficult to defeat using the control methods that are currently available. Many more field and laboratory studies are required to obtain data and information that may be used for the control and prevention of Tr. cruzi infections and their various disease manifestations. Emphasis should be placed on those sensitive interactions at cellular and environmental levels that could become selected targets for disease prevention. In the short term, new technologies for social mobilization should be used by people and organizations working for justice and equality through health information and promotion. A mass media directed program could deliver education, information and communication to protect the inhabitants at risk of contracting Tr. cruzi infections.Uma rede epidemiológica envolvendo o Trypanosoma cruzi foi discutida nos níveis ambientais e de interações moleculares nos hospedeiros que habitam em 19 diferentes ecossistemas. O protozoário tem uma enorme plasticidade controlada geneticamente que confere sua adaptação a cerca de quarenta espécies de triatomíneos e mais de mil espécies de mamíferos. Essas infecções estão profundamente embutidas em inúmeros ecótopos, onde elas estão inacessíveis aos métodos de controle utilizados. Muito mais estudos de campo e de laboratório são necessários à obtenção de dados e informação pertinentes ao controle e prevenção das infecções pelo Tr. cruzi e

  10. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with DNA vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 x 10(4) parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injections of 100 microg of plasmid DNA 1 week apart, beginning on day 5 postinfection. Control mice had high levels of parasitemia and mortality and severe cardiac inflammation, while mice treated with plasmid DNA encoding trypomastigote surface antigen 1 or Tc24 had reduced parasitemia and mild cardiac inflammation and >70% survived the infection. The efficacy of the immunotherapy also was significant when it was delayed until days 10 and 15 after infection. Parasitological analysis of cardiac tissue of surviving mice indicated that most mice still contained detectable parasite kinetoplast DNA but fewer mice contained live parasites, suggesting that there was efficient but not complete parasite elimination. DNA vaccine immunotherapy was also evaluated in CD1 mice infected with a low dose (5 x 10(2) parasites) as a model of chronic infection. Immunotherapy was initiated on day 70 postinfection and resulted in improved survival and reduced cardiac tissue inflammation. These results suggest that DNA vaccines have strong potential for the immunotherapy of T. cruzi infection and may provide new alternatives for the control of Chagas' disease.

  11. Geographical, landscape and host associations of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs and lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izeta-Alberdi, Amaia; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N; Moo-Llanes, David A; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-12-07

    The evolutionary history and ecological associations of Trypanosoma cruzi, the need to identify genetic markers that can distinguish parasite subpopulations, and understanding the parasite's evolutionary and selective processes have been the subject of a significant number of publications since 1998, the year when the first DNA sequence analysis for the species was published. The current analysis systematizes and re-analyzes this original research, focusing on critical methodological and analytical variables and results that have given rise to interpretations of putative patterns of genetic diversity and diversification of T. cruzi lineages, discrete typing units (DTUs), and populations, and their associations with hosts, vectors, and geographical distribution that have been interpreted as evidence for parasite subpopulation specificities. Few studies use hypothesis-driven or quantitative analysis for T. cruzi phylogeny (16/58 studies) or phylogeography (10/13). Among these, only one phylogenetic and five phylogeographic studies analyzed molecular markers directly from tissues (i.e. not from isolates). Analysis of T. cruzi DTU or lineage niche and its geographical projection demonstrate extensive sympatry among all clades across the continent and no significant niche differences among DTUs. DTU beta-diversity was high, indicating diverse host assemblages across regions, while host dissimilarity was principally due to host species turnover and to a much lesser degree to nestedness. DTU-host order specificities appear related to trophic or microenvironmental interactions. More rigorous study designs and analyses will be required to discern evolutionary processes and the impact of landscape modification on population dynamics and risk for T. cruzi transmission to humans.

  12. Bats, Trypanosomes, and Triatomines in Ecuador: New Insights into the Diversity, Transmission, and Origins of Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, C Miguel; Ocaña-Mayorga, Sofía; Tapia, Elicio E; Lobos, Simón E; Zurita, Alejandra P; Aguirre-Villacís, Fernanda; MacDonald, Amber; Villacís, Anita G; Lima, Luciana; Teixeira, Marta M G; Grijalva, Mario J; Perkins, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The generalist parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has two phylogenetic lineages associated almost exclusively with bats-Trypanosoma cruzi Tcbat and the subspecies T. c. marinkellei. We present new information on the genetic variation, geographic distribution, host associations, and potential vectors of these lineages. We conducted field surveys of bats and triatomines in southern Ecuador, a country endemic for Chagas disease, and screened for trypanosomes by microscopy and PCR. We identified parasites at species and genotype levels through phylogenetic approaches based on 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes and conducted a comparison of nucleotide diversity of the cytb gene. We document for the first time T. cruzi Tcbat and T. c. marinkellei in Ecuador, expanding their distribution in South America to the western side of the Andes. In addition, we found the triatomines Cavernicola pilosa and Triatoma dispar sharing shelters with bats. The comparisons of nucleotide diversity revealed a higher diversity for T. c. marinkellei than any of the T. c. cruzi genotypes associated with Chagas disease. Findings from this study increased both the number of host species and known geographical ranges of both parasites and suggest potential vectors for these two trypanosomes associated with bats in rural areas of southern Ecuador. The higher nucleotide diversity of T. c. marinkellei supports a long evolutionary relationship between T. cruzi and bats, implying that bats are the original hosts of this important parasite.

  13. Molecular Diversity of Trypanosoma cruzi Detected in the Vector Triatoma protracta from California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shender, Lisa A.; Lewis, Michael D.; Rejmanek, Daniel; Mazet, Jonna A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease in humans and dogs, is a vector-borne zoonotic protozoan parasite that can cause fatal cardiac disease. While recognized as the most economically important parasitic infection in Latin America, the incidence of Chagas disease in the United States of America (US) may be underreported and even increasing. The extensive genetic diversity of T. cruzi in Latin America is well-documented and likely influences disease progression, severity and treatment efficacy; however, little is known regarding T. cruzi strains endemic to the US. It is therefore important to expand our knowledge on US T. cruzi strains, to improve upon the recognition of and response to locally acquired infections. Methodology/Principle Findings We conducted a study of T. cruzi molecular diversity in California, augmenting sparse genetic data from southern California and for the first time investigating genetic sequences from northern California. The vector Triatoma protracta was collected from southern (Escondido and Los Angeles) and northern (Vallecito) California regions. Samples were initially screened via sensitive nuclear repetitive DNA and kinetoplast minicircle DNA PCR assays, yielding an overall prevalence of approximately 28% and 55% for southern and northern California regions, respectively. Positive samples were further processed to identify discrete typing units (DTUs), revealing both TcI and TcIV lineages in southern California, but only TcI in northern California. Phylogenetic analyses (targeting COII-ND1, TR and RB19 genes) were performed on a subset of positive samples to compare Californian T. cruzi samples to strains from other US regions and Latin America. Results indicated that within the TcI DTU, California sequences were similar to those from the southeastern US, as well as to several isolates from Latin America responsible for causing Chagas disease in humans. Conclusions/Significance Triatoma protracta populations

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi alkaline 2-DE: Optimization and application to comparative proteome analysis of flagellate life stages

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    Santana Jaime M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma cruzi, a flagellate protozoan, is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a chronic illness that causes irreversible damage to heart and digestive tract in humans. Previous 2-DE analyses of T. cruzi proteome have not focused on basic proteins, possibly because of inherent difficulties for optimizing 2-DE in the alkaline pH range. However, T. cruzi wide pH range 2-DE gels have shown few visible spots in the alkaline region, indicating that the parasite either did not have an appreciable amount of alkaline proteins or that these proteins were underrepresented in the 2-DE gels. Results Different IEF conditions using 6–11 pH gradient strips were tested for separation of T. cruzi alkaline proteins. The optimized methodology described here was performed using anodic "paper bridge" sample loading supplemented by increased concentration of DTT and Triton X-100 on Multiphor II (GE Healthcare equipment and an electrode pad embedded in DTT- containing solution near the cathode in order to avoid depletion of reducing agent during IEF. Landmark proteins were identified by peptide mass fingerprinting allowing the production of an epimastigote 2-DE map. Most identified proteins corresponded to metabolic enzymes, especially those related to amino acid metabolism. The optimized 2-DE protocol was applied in combination with the "two-in-one gel" method to verify the relative expression of the identified proteins between samples from epimastigote and trypomastigote life stages. Conclusion High resolution 2-DE gels of T. cruzi life forms were achieved using the optimized methodology and a partial epimastigote alkaline 2-DE map was built. Among 700 protein spots detected, 422 were alkaline with a pI above 7.0. The "two-in-one gel" method simplified the comparative analysis between T. cruzi life stages since it minimized variations in spot migration and silver-stained spot volumes. The comparative data were in agreement with

  15. Frequency of the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E J; Xiong, X; Carlier, Y; Sosa-Estani, S; Buekens, P

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is endemic in much of Latin America. With increased globalisation and immigration, it is a risk in any country, partly through congenital transmission. The frequency of congenital transmission is unclear. To assess the frequency of congenital transmission of T. cruzi. PubMed, Journals@Ovid Full Text, EMBASE, CINAHL, Fuente Academica and BIREME databases were searched using seven search terms related to Chagas disease or T. cruzi and congenital transmission. The inclusion criteria were the following: Dutch, English, French, Portuguese or Spanish language; case report, case series or observational study; original data on congenital T. cruzi infection in humans; congenital infection rate reported or it could be derived. This systematic review included 13 case reports/series and 51 observational studies. Two investigators independently collected data on study characteristics, diagnosis and congenital infection rate. The principal summary measure--the congenital transmission rate--is defined as the number of congenitally infected infants divided by the number of infants born to infected mothers. A random effects model was used. The pooled congenital transmission rate was 4.7% (95% confidence interval: 3.9-5.6%). Countries where T. cruzi is endemic had a higher rate of congenital transmission compared with countries where it is not endemic (5.0% versus 2.7%). Congenital transmission of Chagas disease is a global problem. Overall risk of congenital infection in infants born to infected mothers is about 5%. The congenital mode of transmission requires targeted screening to prevent future cases of Chagas disease. © 2013 RCOG.

  16. Mammalian cell invasion and intracellular trafficking by Trypanosoma cruzi infective forms

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    Renato A. Mortara

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, occurs as different strains or isolates that may be grouped in two major phylogenetic lineages: T. cruzi I, associated with the sylvatic cycle and T. cruzi II, linked to the human disease. In the mammalian host the parasite has to invade cells and many studies implicated the flagellated trypomastigotes in this process. Several parasite surface components and some of host cell receptors with which they interact have been identified. Our work focused on how amastigotes, usually found growing in the cytoplasm, can invade mammalian cells with infectivities comparable to that of trypomastigotes. We found differences in cellular responses induced by amastigotes and trypomastigotes regarding cytoskeletal components and actin-rich projections. Extracellularly generated amastigotes of T. cruzi I strains may display greater infectivity than metacyclic trypomastigotes towards cultured cell lines as well as target cells that have modified expression of different classes of cellular components. Cultured host cells harboring the bacterium Coxiella burnetii allowed us to gain new insights into the trafficking properties of the different infective forms of T. cruzi, disclosing unexpected requirements for the parasite to transit between the parasitophorous vacuole to its final destination in the host cell cytoplasm.O agente etiológico da doença de Chagas, Trypanosoma cruzi, ocorre como cepas ou isolados que podem ser agrupados em duas grandes linhagens filogenéticas: T. cruzi I associada ao ciclo silvestre e T. cruzi II ligada à doençahumana. No hospedeiro mamífero o parasita tem que invadir células, e vários estudos relacionam as formas flageladas tripomastigotas neste processo. Diferentes componentes de superfície dos parasitas e alguns dos respectivos receptores foram identificados. Em nosso trabalho temos procurado compreender como amastigotas, que normalmente são encontrados crescendo

  17. Plants of Brazilian restingas with tripanocide activity against Trypanosoma cruzi strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Robson Xavier; Souza, André Luis Almeida; Lima, Barbara; Tietbohl, Luis Armando Candido; Fernandes, Caio Pinho; Amaral, Raquel Rodrigues; Ruppelt, Bettina Monika; Santos, Marcelo Guerra; Rocha, Leandro

    2017-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi affecting millions of people, and widespread throughout Latin America. This disease exhibits a problematic chemotherapy. Benznidazole, which is the drug currently used as standard treatment, lamentably evokes several adverse reactions. Among other options, natural products have been tested to discover a novel therapeutic drug for this disease. A lot of plants from the Brazilian flora did not contain studies about their biological effects. Restinga de Jurubatiba from Brazil is a sandbank ecosystem poorly studied in relation to plant biological activity. Thus, three plant species from Restinga de Jurubatiba were tested against in vitro antiprotozoal activity. Among six extracts obtained from leaves and stem parts and 2 essential oils derived from leave parts, only 3 extracts inhibited epimastigote proliferation. Substances present in the extracts with activity were isolated (quercetin, myricetin, and ursolic acid), and evaluated in relation to antiprotozoal activity against epimastigote Y and Dm28 Trypanosoma cruzi strains. All isolated substances were effective to reduce protozoal proliferation. Essentially, quercetin and myricetin did not cause mammalian cell toxicity. In summary, myricetin and quercetin molecule can be used as a scaffold to develop new effective drugs against Chagas's disease.

  18. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Docking of New Benzenesulfonylhydrazone as Potential anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizondo-Jimenez, Silvia; Moreno-Herrera, Antonio; Reyes-Olivares, Rogelio; Dorantes-Gonzalez, Edith; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Oliveira, Eduardo A Gamosa de; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Lima, Lidia M; Palos, Isidro; Rivera, Gildardo

    2017-01-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Cruzain is a pharmacological target for designing a new drug against this parasite. Hydrazone and Nacylhydrazone derivatives have been traditionally associated as potential Cruzain inhibitors. Additionally, benzenesulfonyl derivatives show trypanocidal activity. Therefore, in this study, the combination of both structures has been taken into account for drug design. Seven benzenesulfonylhydrazone (BS-H) and seven N-propionyl benzenesulfonylhydrazone (BS-NAH) derivatives were synthetized and elucidated by infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and elemental analysis. All compounds were evaluated biologically in vitro against two strains of Trypanosoma cruzi (NINOA and INC-5), which are endemic in Mexico, and compared with the reference drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole. In order to gain insight into the putative molecular origin of the trypanocidal properties of these derivatives, docking studies were carried out with Cruzain. Compounds 4 and 6 (BS-H) and 10, 12-14 (BS-NAH) showed the best biological activity against NINOA and INC-5 strains, respectively. Compound 13 was the most potent trypanocidal compound showing a LC50 of 0.06 µM against INC-5 strain. However, compound 4 showed the best activity against both strains (LC50 activity. Benzenesulfonyl and N-propionyl benzenesulfonyl hydrazone derivatives are good options for developing new trypanocidal agents. Particularly, compound 4 could be considered a lead compound. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi and myoid cells from seminiferous tubules: interaction and relation with fibrous components of extracellular matrix in experimental Chagas' disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Luiz Otávio Pereira; Abreu-Silva, Ana Lucia; Hardoim, Daiana de Jesús; Tedesco, Roberto Carlos; Mendes, Verônica Gonçalves; da Costa, Sylvio Celso Gonçalves; Calabrese, Kátia da Silva

    2009-01-01

    The main transmission route of Trypanosoma cruzi is by triatomine bugs. However, T. cruzi is also transmitted through blood transfusion, organ transplantation, ingestion of contaminated food or fluids, or is congenital. Sexual transmission, although suggested since the discovery of Chagas’ disease, has remained unproven. Sexual transmission would require T. cruzi to be located at the testes and ovaries. Here we investigated whether T. cruzi is present in the gonads of mice infected with 104 T. cruzi trypomastigotes from the CL strain. Fourteen days after experimental infection, histopathological examination showed alterations in the extracellular matrix of the lamina propria of the seminiferous tubules. Furthermore, amastigotes were present in seminiferous tubules, within myoid cells, and in the adjacencies of the basal compartment. These results indicate that T. cruzi is able to reach seminiferous tubule lumen, thus suggesting that Chagas’ disease could potentially be transmitted through sexual intercourse. Complementary studies are required to demonstrate that Chagas’ disease can be transmitted by coitus. PMID:19200251

  20. mRNA localization mechanisms in Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Lysangela R Alves

    Full Text Available Asymmetric mRNA localization is a sophisticated tool for regulating and optimizing protein synthesis and maintaining cell polarity. Molecular mechanisms involved in the regulated localization of transcripts are widespread in higher eukaryotes and fungi, but not in protozoa. Trypanosomes are ancient eukaryotes that branched off early in eukaryote evolution. We hypothesized that these organisms would have basic mechanisms of mRNA localization. FISH assays with probes against transcripts coding for proteins with restricted distributions showed a discrete localization of the mRNAs in the cytoplasm. Moreover, cruzipain mRNA was found inside reservosomes suggesting new unexpected functions for this vacuolar organelle. Individual mRNAs were also mobilized to RNA granules in response to nutritional stress. The cytoplasmic distribution of these transcripts changed with cell differentiation, suggesting that localization mechanisms might be involved in the regulation of stage-specific protein expression. Transfection assays with reporter genes showed that, as in higher eukaryotes, 3'UTRs were responsible for guiding mRNAs to their final location. Our results strongly suggest that Trypanosoma cruzi have a core, basic mechanism of mRNA localization. This kind of controlled mRNA transport is ancient, dating back to early eukaryote evolution.

  1. Crystal Structure of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Hexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiu-Gong; Maldonado, Ernesto; Perez-Montfort, Ruy; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Tuena de Gomez-Puyou, Marietta; Gomez-Puyou, Armando; Rodriguez-Romero, Adela

    1999-08-01

    To gain insight into the mechanisms of enzyme catalysis in organic solvents, the x-ray structure of some monomeric enzymes in organic solvents was determined. However, it remained to be explored whether the structure of oligomeric proteins is also amenable to such analysis. The field acquired new perspectives when it was proposed that the x-ray structure of enzymes in nonaqueous media could reveal binding sites for organic solvents that in principle could represent the starting point for drug design. Here, a crystal of the dimeric enzyme triosephosphate isomerase from the pathogenic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi was soaked and diffracted in hexane and its structure solved at 2- angstrom resolution. Its overall structure and the dimer interface were not altered by hexane. However, there were differences in the orientation of the side chains of several amino acids, including that of the catalytic Glu-168 in one of the monomers. No hexane molecules were detected in the active site or in the dimer interface. However, three hexane molecules were identified on the surface of the protein at sites, which in the native crystal did not have water molecules. The number of water molecules in the hexane structure was higher than in the native crystal. Two hexanes localized at <4 angstrom from residues that form the dimer interface; they were in close proximity to a site that has been considered a potential target for drug design.

  2. Eco-epidemiological aspects of Trypanosoma cruzi, Trypanosoma rangeli and their vector (Rhodnius pallescens in Panama Generalidades do Trypanosoma cruzi, do Trypanosoma rangeli e do seu vetor (Rhodnius pallescens no Panamá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria de Vasquez

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The eco-epidemiology of T. cruzi infection was investigated in the Eastern border of the Panama Canal in Central Panama. Between 1999 and 2000, 1110 triatomines were collected: 1050 triatomines (94.6% from palm trees, 27 (2.4% from periurban habitats and 33 (3.0% inside houses. All specimens were identified as R. pallescens. There was no evidence of vector domiciliation. Salivary glands from 380 R. pallescens revealed a trypanosome natural infection rate of 7.6%, while rectal ampoule content from 373 triatomines was 45%. Isoenzyme profiles on isolated trypanosomes demonstrated that 85.4% (n = 88 were T. cruzi and 14.6% (n = 15 were T. rangeli. Blood meal analysis from 829 R. pallescens demonstrated a zoophilic vector behavior, with opossums as the preferential blood source. Seroprevalence in human samples from both study sites was less than 2%. Our results demonstrate that T. cruzi survives in the area in balanced association with R. pallescens, and with several different species of mammals in their natural niches. However, the area is an imminent risk of infection for its population, consequently it is important to implement a community educational program regarding disease knowledge and control measures.A epidemiologia da infecção do T. cruzi foi investigada na margem oriental do canal do Panamá, na região central da Republica do Panamá. A informação obtida durante o estudo avaliou fatores de risco da doença de Chagas nesta área. Entre 1999 e 2000, 1110 triatomíneos foram coletados: 1050 triatomíneos (94,6% em palmeiras, 27 (2,4% em habitats periurbanos e 33 (3,0% no interior de casas. Todos os espécimens foram identificados como R. pallescens. Não havia nenhuma evidência de domiciliação do vetor. O exame de glândulas salivares de 380 R. pallescens revelaram taxa de infecção natural por Trypanosoma de 7,6%, mas o conteúdo da ampola rectal de 373 triatomíneos mostrou 45% de positividade. Os perfis de isoenzimas em

  3. Trypanocide Treatment of Women Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi and Its Effect on Preventing Congenital Chagas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbro, Diana L.; Danesi, Emmaria; Olivera, Veronica; Codebó, Maria Olenka; Denner, Susana; Heredia, Cecilia; Streiger, Mirtha; Sosa-Estani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    With the control of the vectorial and transfusional routes of infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, congenital transmission has become an important source of new cases. This study evaluated the efficacy of trypanocidal therapy to prevent congenital Chagas disease and compared the clinical and serological evolution between treated and untreated infected mothers. We conducted a multicenter, observational study on a cohort of mothers infected with T. cruzi, with and without trypanocidal treatment before pregnancy. Their children were studied to detect congenital infection. Among 354 “chronically infected mother-biological child” pairs, 132 were treated women and 222 were untreated women. Among the children born to untreated women, we detected 34 infected with T. cruzi (15.3%), whose only antecedent was maternal infection. Among the 132 children of previously treated women, no infection with T. cruzi was found (0.0%) (p<0.05). Among 117 mothers with clinical and serological follow up, 71 had been treated and 46 were untreated. The women were grouped into three groups. Group A: 25 treated before 15 years of age; Group B: 46 treated at 15 or more years of age; Group C: untreated, average age of 29.2±6.2 years at study entry. Follow-up for Groups A, B and C was 16.3±5.8, 17.5±9.2 and 18.6±8.6 years respectively. Negative seroconversion: Group A, 64.0% (16/25); Group B, 32.6% (15/46); Group C, no seronegativity was observed. Clinical electrocardiographic alterations compatible with chagasic cardiomyopathy: Group A 0.0% (0/25); B 2.2% (1/46) and C 15.2% (7/46). The trypanocidal treatment of women with chronic Chagas infection was effective in preventing the congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi to their children; it had also a protective effect on the women's clinical evolution and deparasitation could be demonstrated in many treated women after over 10 years of follow up. PMID:25411847

  4. Low Doses of Simvastatin Therapy Ameliorate Cardiac Inflammatory Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Lilian; Caldas, Ivo Santana; Azevedo, Maíra Araújo; Gonçalves, Karolina Ribeiro; da Silva do Nascimento, Alvaro Fernando; Figueiredo, Vivian Paulino; de Figueiredo Diniz, Lívia; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Torres, Rosália Moraes; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Talvani, André

    2011-01-01

    Chagas cardiomyopathy remodeling is based on the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi in heart tissue and on the complex inflammatory response leading to a myocardium fibrosis and alterations in conductive and functional heart parameters. This study aims to evaluate Simvastatin on the inflammatory response and heart functionality using dogs infected with Y strain of T. cruzi. Animals were treated daily with Simvastatin (20 mg) for 6 months and submitted to clinical and immunopathological evaluations. Simvastatin reduced heart expression and serum levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) but not interleukin-10 (IL-10), possibly favoring blood parasitism but reducing inflammation and fibrosis in the left ventricle and right atrium. Simvastatin also ameliorated ejection fraction, diastolic diameter, and mass index of the left ventricle 6 months after infection. This study suggests that more investigation should be performed on the use of statins as a prophylactic therapy against cardiac remodeling because of their effects on modifying immune response and benefiting functional parameters in dogs with T. cruzi-induced ventricular dysfunctions. PMID:21292909

  5. Side effects of immunization with liver attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi in mice and rabbits.

    OpenAIRE

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S; Cossio, P M

    1982-01-01

    Immunity against lethal, bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was achieved in mice by preinoculation of approximately equal to 10(5) culture epimastigotes of an attenuated T. cruzi strain (TCC). The risks of TCC inoculation in terms of pathogenicity or eventual increase in virulence of TCC progeny were evaluated. No pathogenic parasites could be selected from TCC progeny by either mouse, triatome, or culture passages. Immunizing doses of live TCC did not induce in adult mice alterations res...

  6. In vitro activity of Etanidazole against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Petray, Patricia B; Morilla, María J; Corral, Ricardo S; Romero, Eder L

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro action of an hydrosoluble 2-nitroimidazole, Etanidazole (EZL), against Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease. EZL displayed lethal activity against isolated trypomastigotes as well as amastigotes of T. cruzi (RA strain) growing in Vero cells or J774 macrophages, without affecting host cell viability. Although not completely equivalent to Benznidazole (BZL), the reference drug for Chagas chemotherapy, EZL takes advantage in exertingits anti-T. cr...

  7. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Charneau, Sebastien; Mandacaru, Samuel C

    2014-01-01

    this well-established differentiation protocol to perform a comprehensive quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of the T. cruzi amastigogenesis. Samples from fully differentiated forms and two biologically relevant intermediate time points were Lys-C/trypsin digested, i......TRAQ-labeled and multiplexed. Subsequently, phosphopeptides were enriched using TiO2 matrix. Non-phosphorylated peptides were HILIC-fractionated prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics procedures were used for protein and phosphopeptide quantitation, identification and phosphorylation site assignment. We could...... induced by incubation in acidic medium were also evinced. To our knowledge, this work is the most comprehensive quantitative proteomics study of the T. cruzi amastigogenesis and this data will provide trustworthy basis for future studies and possibly for new potential drug targets....

  8. Strongyloides stercoralis infection increases the likelihood to detect Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in peripheral blood in Chagas disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Fernando; Sulleiro, Elena; Piron, Maria; Sánchez-Montalvá, Adrián; Sauleda, Silvia; Molina-Morant, Daniel; Moure, Zaira; Molina, Israel

    2017-11-01

    In a previous study performed by our group, Strongyloides stercoralis infection in patients with Chagas disease was associated with higher proportion of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA detection in peripheral blood. The aim of the study was to confirm this association in a larger cohort of patients. Cross-sectional study of all patients with Chagas disease diagnosed from 2005 to 2015 during blood donation at the Catalan Blood Bank. Demographic data and T. cruzi RT-PCR were collected. S. stercoralis infection diagnosis was based on a serological test. Two hundred and two blood donors were included. T. cruzi RT-PCR was positive in 72 (35.6%) patients, and S. stercoralis serology was positive in 22 (10.9%) patients. Patients with positive S. stercoralis serology had higher proportion of positive T. cruzi RT-PCR than those with negative serology (54.5% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.050), and the difference increased when taking a serological index cut-off of 2.5, which increases the specificity of the test to detect a confirmed strongyloidiasis (60% vs. 33%, P = 0.017). Patients with Chagas disease with positive S. stercoralis serology had higher proportion of positive T. cruzi RT-PCR in peripheral blood than those with negative serology, which reflects the potential immunomodulatory effects of S. stercoralis in T. cruzi co-infected patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Molecular characterization of lipoamide dehydrogenase gene in Trypanosoma cruzi populations susceptible and resistant to benznidazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Paula F; Moreira, Douglas S; Baba, Elio H; Volpe, Caroline M O; Ruiz, Jerônimo C; Romanha, Alvaro J; Murta, Silvane M F

    2016-11-01

    Lipoamide dehydrogenase (LipDH) is a flavin-containing disulfide oxidoreductase from the same group of thioredoxin reductase, glutathione reductase and trypanothione reductase. This enzyme is found in the mitochondria of all aerobic organisms where it takes part in at least three important multienzyme complexes from the citric acid cycle. In this study, we performed a phylogenetic analysis comparing the amino acid sequence of the LipDH from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcLipDH) with the LipDH from other organisms. Subsequently, the copy number of the TcLipDH gene, the mRNA and protein levels, and the enzymatic activity of the LipDH were determined in populations and strains of T. cruzi that were either resistant or susceptible to benznidazole (BZ). In silico analysis showed the presence of two TcLipDH alleles in the T. cruzi genome. It also showed that TcLipDH protein has less than 55% of identity in comparison to the human LipDH, but the active site is conserved in both of them. Southern blot results suggest that the TcLipDH is a single copy gene in the genome of the T. cruzi samples analyzed. Northern blot assays showed one transcript of 2.4 kb in all T. cruzi populations. Northern blot and Real Time RT-PCR data revealed that the TcLipDH mRNA levels were 2-fold more expressed in the BZ-resistant T. cruzi population (17LER) than in its susceptible pair (17WTS). Western blot results revealed that the TcLipDH protein level is 2-fold higher in 17LER sample in comparison to 17WTS sample. In addition, LipDH activity was higher in the 17LER population than in the 17WTS. Sequencing analysis revealed that the amino acid sequences of the TcLipDH from 17WTS and 17LER populations are identical. Our findings show that one of the mechanisms associated with in vitro-induced BZ resistance to T. cruzi correlates with upregulation of LipDH enzyme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrastructural and physiological changes induced by different stress conditions on the human parasite Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Hernández, Karla Daniela Rodríguez; Martínez, Ignacio; Agredano-Moreno, Lourdes Teresa; Jiménez-García, Luis Felipe; Espinoza, Bertha

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The life cycle of this protozoan parasite is digenetic because it alternates its different developmental forms through two hosts, a vector insect and a vertebrate host. As a result, the parasites are exposed to sudden and drastic environmental changes causing cellular stress. The stress response to some types of stress has been studied in T. cruzi, mainly at the molecular level; however, data about ultrastructure and physiological state of the cells in stress conditions are scarce or null. In this work, we analyzed the morphological, ultrastructural, and physiological changes produced on T. cruzi epimastigotes when they were exposed to acid, nutritional, heat, and oxidative stress. Clear morphological changes were observed, but the physiological conditions varied depending on the type of stress. The maintenance of the physiological state was severely affected by heat shock, acidic, nutritional, and oxidative stress. According to the surprising observed growth recovery after damage by stress alterations, different adaptations from the parasite to these harsh conditions were suggested. Particular cellular death pathways are discussed.

  11. A human astrocytoma cell line is highly susceptible to infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Camilo Vargas-Zambrano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes play a vital role in neuronal protection, homeostasis, vascular interchange and the local immune response. Some viruses and parasites can cross the blood-brain barrier and infect glia. Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease, can seriously compromise the central nervous system, mainly in immune-suppressed individuals, but also during the acute phase of the infection. In this report, the infective capacity of T. cruzi in a human astrocyte tumour-derived cell line was studied. Astrocytes exposed to trypomastigotes (1:10 ratio produced intracellular amastigotes and new trypomastigotes emerged by day 4 post-infection (p.i.. At day 6 p.i., 93% of the cells were infected. Using flow cytometry, changes were observed in both the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and II molecules and the chemokine secretion pattern of astrocytes exposed to the parasite. Blocking the low-density lipoprotein receptor on astrocytes did not reduce parasite intracellular infection. Thus, T. cruzi can infect astrocytes and modulate the immune response during central nervous system infection.

  12. New scenarios of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in the Orinoco region of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Lina María; Guhl, Felipe; Cordovez, Juan Manuel; Erazo, Diana

    2015-05-01

    Rhodnius prolixus, a blood-sucking triatomine with domiciliary anthropophilic habits, is the main vector of Chagas disease. The current paradigm of Trypanosoma cruzi transmission in Columbia includes a sylvatic and domiciliary cycle co-existing with domestic and sylvatic populations of reservoirs. The aim of this study is to evaluate the population densities and relative abundance of triatomines and mammals that may be involved in the sylvatic cycle of Chagas disease to clarify the epidemiological scenario in an endemic area in the province of Casanare. Insect vectors on Attalea butyracea palms were captured using both manual searches and bait traps. The capture of mammals was performed using Sherman and Tomahawk traps. We report an infestation index of 88.5% in 148 palms and an index of T. cruzi natural infection of 60.2% in 269 dissected insects and 11.9% in 160 captured mammals. High population densities of triatomines were observed in the sylvatic environment and there was a high relative abundance of reservoirs in the area, suggesting a stable enzootic cycle. We found no evidence of insect domiciliation. Taken together, these observations suggest that eco-epidemiological factors shape the transmission dynamics of T. cruzi, creating diverse scenarios of disease transmission.

  13. Benznidazole biotransformation and multiple targets in Trypanosoma cruzi revealed by metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Trochine

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The first line treatment for Chagas disease, a neglected tropical disease caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, involves administration of benznidazole (Bzn. Bzn is a 2-nitroimidazole pro-drug which requires nitroreduction to become active, although its mode of action is not fully understood. In the present work we used a non-targeted MS-based metabolomics approach to study the metabolic response of T. cruzi to Bzn.Parasites treated with Bzn were minimally altered compared to untreated trypanosomes, although the redox active thiols trypanothione, homotrypanothione and cysteine were significantly diminished in abundance post-treatment. In addition, multiple Bzn-derived metabolites were detected after treatment. These metabolites included reduction products, fragments and covalent adducts of reduced Bzn linked to each of the major low molecular weight thiols: trypanothione, glutathione, γ-glutamylcysteine, glutathionylspermidine, cysteine and ovothiol A. Bzn products known to be generated in vitro by the unusual trypanosomal nitroreductase, TcNTRI, were found within the parasites, but low molecular weight adducts of glyoxal, a proposed toxic end-product of NTRI Bzn metabolism, were not detected.Our data is indicative of a major role of the thiol binding capacity of Bzn reduction products in the mechanism of Bzn toxicity against T. cruzi.

  14. Analytical sensitivity and specificity of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) kit prototype for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in human blood samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Susana A Besuschio; Mónica Llano Murcia; Alejandro F Benatar; Severine Monnerat; Israel Cruz; Albert Picado; María de Los Ángeles Curto; Yutaka Kubota; Diana P Wehrendt; Paula Pavia; Yasuyoshi Mori; Concepción Puerta; Joseph M Ndung'u; Alejandro G Schijman

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess analytical parameters of a prototype LAMP kit that was designed for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in human blood. The prototype is based on the amplification of the highly repetitive satellite sequence of T.cruzi in microtubes containing dried reagents on the inside of the caps. The reaction is carried out at 65?C during 40 minutes. Calcein allows direct detection of amplified products with the naked eye. Inclusivity and selectivity were tested in purified DNA ...

  15. Secondary Metabolites from Vietnamese Marine Invertebrates with Activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Phuong Thao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine-derived natural products from invertebrates comprise an extremely diverse and promising source of the compounds from a wide variety of structural classes. This study describes the discovery of five marine natural products with activity against Trypanosoma species by natural product library screening using whole cell in vitro assays. We investigated the anti-trypanosomal activity of the extracts from the soft corals and echinoderms living in Vietnamese seas. Of the samples screened, the methanolic extracts of several marine organisms exhibited potent activities against cultures of Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi (EC50 < 5.0 μg/mL. Among the compounds isolated from these extracts, laevigatol B (1 from Lobophytum crassum and L. laevigatum, (24S-ergost-4-ene-3-one (2 from Sinularia dissecta, astropectenol A (3 from Astropecten polyacanthus, and cholest-8-ene-3β,5α,6β,7α-tetraol (4 from Diadema savignyi showed inhibitory activity against T. brucei with EC50 values ranging from 1.57 ± 0.14 to 14.6 ± 1.36 μM, relative to the positive control, pentamidine (EC50 = 0.015 ± 0.003 μM. Laevigatol B (1 and 5α-cholest-8(14-ene-3β,7α-diol (5 exhibited also significant inhibitory effects on T. cruzi. The cytotoxic activity of the pure compounds on mammalian cells was also assessed and found to be insignificant in all cases. This is the first report on the inhibitory effects of marine organisms collected in Vietnamese seas against Trypanosoma species responsible for neglected tropical diseases.

  16. Heteroleptic oxidovanadium(IV) complexes of 2-hydroxynaphtylaldimine and polypyridyl ligands against Trypanosoma cruzi and prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalese, Gonzalo; Mosquillo, M Florencia; Rostán, Santiago; Castiglioni, Jorge; Alho, Irina; Pérez, Leticia; Correia, Isabel; Marques, Fernanda; Costa Pessoa, João; Gambino, Dinorah

    2017-10-01

    In Latin America Chagas disease is an endemic illness caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), killing more people than any other parasitic disease. Current chemotherapies are old and inadequate, thus the development of efficient ones is urgently needed. Vanadium-based complexes have been shown to be a promising approach both against parasitic diseases and cancer and this study aims to achieve significant advances in the pursue of effective compounds. Heteroleptic vanadium complexes of Schiff bases and polypyridine compounds were prepared and their stability in solution evaluated by EPR (Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance) and NMR spectroscopy. Their in vitro activities were evaluated against T. cruzi and a set of cells lines representative of human cancer conditions, namely ovarian, breast and prostate cancer. In T. cruzi, most of the complexes depicted IC 50 values in the low μM range, induced changes of mitochondrial membrane potential and apoptosis. In cancer cells, complexes showed good to moderate activity and in metastatic cells (prostate PC3), some complexes inhibited the migratory ability, this suggesting that they display antimetastatic potential. Interestingly, complex 5 seemed to have a dual effect being the most cytotoxic complex on all cancer cells and also the most active anti-T-cruzi compound of the series. Globally the complexes showed promising anticancer and anti T. cruzi activities and also displayed some characteristics indicating they are worth to be further explored as antimetastatic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effectiveness of riboflavin and ultraviolet light pathogen reduction technology in eliminating Trypanosoma cruzi from leukoreduced whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Marco, Teresa; Cancino-Faure, Beatriz; Girona-Llobera, Enrique; Alcover, M Magdalena; Riera, Cristina; Fisa, Roser

    2017-06-01

    The parasitic Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, which is mainly transmitted by insect vectors. Other infection routes, both in endemic and in nonendemic areas, include organ and marrow transplantation, congenital transmission, and blood transfusion. Asymptomatic chronic chagasic individuals may have a low and transient parasitemia in peripheral blood and, consequently, they can unknowingly transmit the disease via blood transfusion. Riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV) light pathogen reduction is a method to reduce pathogen transfusion transmission risk based on damage to the pathogen nucleic acids. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of this technology for the elimination of T. cruzi parasites in artificially contaminated whole blood units (WBUs) and thus for decreasing the risk of T. cruzi transfusion transmission. The contaminated WBUs were leukoreduced by filtration and treated with riboflavin and UV light. The level of pathogen reduction was quantified by a real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) as a viability assay. The RNA (cDNA) quantification of the parasites showed a more than 99% reduction of viable T. cruzi parasites after leukoreduction and a complete reduction (100%) after the riboflavin and UV light treatment. Riboflavin and UV light treatment and leukoreduction used in conjunction appears to eliminate significant amounts of viable T. cruzi in whole blood. Both strategies could complement other blood bank measures already implemented to prevent the transmission of T. cruzi via blood transfusion. © 2017 AABB.

  18. Genetically different isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi elicit different infection dynamics in raccoons (Procyon lotor) and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Dawn M; Ellis, Angela E; Yabsley, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a genetically and biologically diverse species. In the current study we determined T. cruzi infection dynamics in two common North American reservoirs, Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and raccoons (Procyon lotor). Based on previous molecular and culture data from naturally-exposed animals, we hypothesised that raccoons would have a longer patent period than opossums, and raccoons would be competent reservoirs for both genotypes T. cruzi I (TcI) and TcIIa, while opossums would only serve as hosts for TcI. Individuals (n=2 or 3) of each species were inoculated with 1x10(6) culture-derived T. cruzi trypomastigotes of TcIIa (North American (NA) - raccoon), TcI (NA - opossum), TcIIb (South American - human), or both TcI and TcIIa. Parasitemias in opossums gradually increased and declined rapidly, whereas parasitemias peaked sooner in raccoons and they maintained relatively high parasitemia for 5weeks. Raccoons became infected with all three T. cruzi strains, while opossums only became infected with TcI and TcIIb. Although opossums were susceptible to TcIIb, infection dynamics were dramatically different compared with TcI. Opossums inoculated with TcIIb seroconverted, but parasitemia duration was short and only detectable by PCR. In addition, raccoons seroconverted sooner (3-7days post inoculation) than opossums (10days post inoculation). These data suggest that infection dynamics of various T. cruzi strains can differ considerably in different wildlife hosts.

  19. Differential Pattern of Infection of Sylvatic Nymphs and Domiciliary Adults of Triatoma infestans with Trypanosoma cruzi Genotypes in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupo, Antonella; Segovia, Verónica; García, Alejandro; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Ortiz, Sylvia; Solari, Aldo; Acuna-Retamar, Mariana; Torres-Pérez, Fernando; Cattan, Pedro E.

    2012-01-01

    In Chile, the main vector of Chagas disease, Triatoma infestans, is under control after insecticide spraying. However, it has been found colonizing wild habitats. This study evaluated Trypanosoma cruzi infection of sylvatic and domiciliary T. infestans and identified their parasite genotypes. The sample studied was composed mainly of T. infestans sylvatic nymphs and domiciliary adults from a semi-urban area with human dwellings under vector control surveillance. Results showed prevalences of 57.7% in nymphs and 68.6% in adults. Hybridization tests showed a major T. cruzi lineage (TcI) circulating in sylvatic (93.3%) and domiciliary (100%) T. infestans. TcII, TcV, and TcVI were also detected, mainly in nymphs, suggesting differential adaptation of T. cruzi lineages among instars. We also discuss the origin of domiciliary individuals of T. infestans and the risk of human infection by triatomines of sylvatic foci that invade houses despite vector control programs. PMID:22802439

  20. Histopathologic identification of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimath Alyemni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' encephalitis is an uncommon manifestation of T. cruzi infection, typically seen in immunocompromised patients. Encephalitis results from the reactivation of chronic infection predominately in individuals from endemic areas. Increased awareness of this complication is essential especially with increased migration of patients from endemic areas with concomitant HIV infection. Here we report a case of Chagas' encephalitis in an AIDS patient from Mexico in which there was no evidence of acute serologic, CSF, or blood infection by T. cruzi trypomastigotes.

  1. Broad patterns in domestic vector-borne Trypanosoma cruzi transmission dynamics: synanthropic animals and vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Bartsch, Sarah M; Lee, Bruce Y; Dobson, Andrew P

    2015-10-22

    Chagas disease (caused by Trypanosoma cruzi) is the most important neglected tropical disease (NTD) in Latin America, infecting an estimated 5.7 million people in the 21 countries where it is endemic. It is one of the NTDs targeted for control and elimination by the 2020 London Declaration goals, with the first goal being to interrupt intra-domiciliary vector-borne T. cruzi transmission. A key question in domestic T. cruzi transmission is the role that synanthropic animals play in T. cruzi transmission to humans. Here, we ask, (1) do synanthropic animals need to be targeted in Chagas disease prevention policies?, and (2) how does the presence of animals affect the efficacy of vector control? We developed a simple mathematical model to simulate domestic vector-borne T. cruzi transmission and to specifically examine the interaction between the presence of synanthropic animals and effects of vector control. We used the model to explore how the interactions between triatomine bugs, humans and animals impact the number and proportion of T. cruzi-infected bugs and humans. We then examined how T. cruzi dynamics change when control measures targeting vector abundance are introduced into the system. We found that the presence of synanthropic animals slows the speed of T. cruzi transmission to humans, and increases the sensitivity of T. cruzi transmission dynamics to vector control measures at comparable triatomine carrying capacities. However, T. cruzi transmission is amplified when triatomine carrying capacity increases with the abundance of syntathoropic hosts. Our results suggest that in domestic T. cruzi transmission scenarios where no vector control measures are in place, a reduction in synanthropic animals may slow T. cruzi transmission to humans, but it would not completely eliminate transmission. To reach the 2020 goal of interrupting intra-domiciliary T. cruzi transmission, it is critical to target vector populations. Additionally, where vector control measures

  2. Study from the Answer Immune humor the one antígenos from the side sores “Trypanosoma cruz”i well into dogs as of Area endêmica about to leishmaniose Resposta imune humoral aos antígenos de "Leishmania chagasi" e "Trypanosoma cruzi" em cães de área endêmica para leishmaniose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Roberto Franke

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to verify the presence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in dogs of Barra do Pojuca, Bahia, and assess the possible occurrence of cross-reactivity or infection with Leishmania mixed sp., we tested 265 sera using ELISA and 34 using Western Blot (WB. Among the 265 sera sampled 26 (9.8% were in the ELISA reagents for T. cruzi and of those, 12 (46.1% were also reagents to L. chagasi, resulting in double positive antibodies by this technique. Obtained in the WB of T. cruzi 6 sera (17.6% reagents, featuring 12 protein bands ranging from 49 to 104 kDa, 87 and 104 kDa of the higher frequency, observed in 33.3% of positive sera . In the WB of L. chagasi, 9 (26.5% sera had 48 bands visible, ranging from 7 to 181 kDa, with of 83 kDa of the higher frequency (55.5% of the samples. Of a total of 60 bands visible, 7 (11.3 % are common to the two agents (between 53 and 100 kDa, 6 (10 % were viewed only in WB with antigen of T. cruzi (between 49 and 104 kDa and the other 47 (78.3 % were viewed only in WB with L. chagasi (between 7 and 181 kDa. Our studies point to the recognition of anti-T. Cruzi and anti-L. Chagasi in samples of serum canine of the area studied, but the techniques the ELISA and WB using crude antigen was not enough to identify with certainty and mixed reactions cross infections.Objetiva-se com este trabalho verificar a presença de anticorpos contra Trypanosoma cruzi em cães de Barra do Pojuca (BA e também avaliar a possível ocorrência de reação cruzada ou infecção mista com Leishmania sp. Foram testados 265 soros utilizando ELISA e 34 utilizando Western Blotting (WB. Entre os soros amostrados, 26 (9,8% foram reagentes no ELISA para T. cruzi e desses, 12 (46,1% foram também reagentes para L. chagasi, resultando em dupla positividade sorológica por essa técnica. Obteve-se no WB de T. cruzi 6 soros (17,6% reagentes, apresentando 12 bandas protéicas, variando de 49 a 104 kDa, sendo 87 e 104 kDa as de maior freq

  3. Active transcription and ultrastructural changes during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila R.P. Ferreira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The differentiation of proliferating epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi , the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas’ disease, into the infective and non-proliferating metacyclic forms can be reproduced in the laboratory by incubating the cells in a chemically-defined medium that mimics the urine of the insect vector. Epimastigotes have a spherical nucleus, a flagellum protruding from the middle of the protozoan cell, and a disk-shaped kinetoplast - an organelle that corresponds to the mitochondrial DNA. Metacyclic trypomastigotes have an elongated shape with the flagellum protruding from the posterior portion of the cell and associated with a spherical kinetoplast. Here we describe the morphological events of this transformation and characterize a novel intermediate stage by three-dimensional reconstruction of electron microscope serial sections. This new intermediate stage is characterized by a kinetoplast compressing an already elongated nucleus, indicating that metacyclogenesis involves active movements of the flagellar structure relative to the cell body. As transcription occurs more intensely in proliferating epimastigotes than in metacyclics, we also examined the presence of RNA polymerase II and measured transcriptional activity during the differentiation process. Both the presence of the enzyme and transcriptional activity remain unchanged during all steps of metacyclogenesis. RNA polymerase II levels and transcriptional activity only decrease after metacyclics are formed. We suggest that transcription is required during the epimastigote-to-metacyclic trypomastigote differentiation process, until the kinetoplast and flagellum reach the posterior position of the parasites in the infective form.A diferenciação de formas epimastigotas (proliferativas do Trypanosoma cruzi, parasita protozoário causador da doença de Chagas, em formas metacíclicas tripomastigotas (infectivas e não proliferativas, pode ser reproduzida em laborat

  4. Morphological and Phylogenetic Description of Trypanosoma noyesi sp. nov.: An Australian Wildlife Trypanosome within the T. cruzi Clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botero, Adriana; Cooper, Crystal; Thompson, Craig K; Clode, Peta L; Rose, Karrie; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2016-11-01

    A number of trypanosome isolates from Australian marsupials are within the clade containing the human pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi. Trypanosomes within this clade are thought to have diverged from a common ancestral bat trypanosome. Here, we characterise Trypanosoma noyesi sp. nov. isolated from the critically endangered woylie (Bettongia pencillata) using phylogenetic inferences from three gene regions (18S rDNA, gGAPDH, and CytB) coupled with morphological and behavioural observations in vitro. We also investigated potential vectors and the presence of T. noyesi in the grey-headed flying fox (Pteropus poliocephalus). Phylogenetic analysis revealed T. noyesi and similar genotypes grouped at the periphery of the T. cruzi clade. T. noyesi is morphologically distinct both from other species of Australian trypanosomes and those within the T. cruzi clade. Although trypanosomes were not observed in the digestive tract of ectoparasites and biting flies collected from T. noyesi infected marsupials, tabanid and biting midges tested positive for T. noyesi DNA, indicating they are vector candidates. Tissues from flying foxes were negative for T. noyesi. This study provides novel information on the morphology and genetic variability of an Australian trypanosome within the T. cruzi clade. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  5. Critical importance of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway for Trypanosoma cruzi growth in the mammalian host cell cytoplasm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Muneaki, E-mail: muneaki@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Morales, Jorge; Fukai, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigeo; Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Inoue, Syou [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Inoue, Masayuki [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kita, Kiyoshi [Department of Biomedical Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harada, Shigeharu [Department of Applied Biology, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Tanaka, Akiko [Systems and Structural Biology Center, RIKEN, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 (Japan); Aoki, Takashi [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Nara, Takeshi, E-mail: tnara@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Molecular and Cellular Parasitology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established Trypanosoma cruzi lacking the gene for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase II. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of the cpsII gene significantly reduced the growth of epimastigotes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In particular, the CPSII-null mutant severely retarded intracellular growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The de novo pyrimidine pathway is critical for the parasite growth in the host cell. -- Abstract: The intracellular parasitic protist Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease in Latin America. In general, pyrimidine nucleotides are supplied by both de novo biosynthesis and salvage pathways. While epimastigotes-an insect form-possess both activities, amastigotes-an intracellular replicating form of T. cruzi-are unable to mediate the uptake of pyrimidine. However, the requirement of de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis for parasite growth and survival has not yet been elucidated. Carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase II (CPSII) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway, and increased CPSII activity is associated with the rapid proliferation of tumor cells. In the present study, we showed that disruption of the T. cruzicpsII gene significantly reduced parasite growth. In particular, the growth of amastigotes lacking the cpsII gene was severely suppressed. Thus, the de novo pyrimidine pathway is important for proliferation of T. cruzi in the host cell cytoplasm and represents a promising target for chemotherapy against Chagas disease.

  6. Frequent house invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected triatomines in a suburban area of Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The demographic transition of populations from rural areas to large urban centers often results in a disordered occupation of forest remnants and increased economic pressure to develop high-income buildings in these areas. Ecological and socioeconomic factors associated with these urban transitions create conditions for the potential transmission of infectious diseases, which was demonstrated for Chagas disease.We analyzed 930 triatomines, mainly Triatoma tibiamaculata, collected in artificial and sylvatic environments (forests near houses of a suburban area of the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil between 2007 and 2011. Most triatomines were captured at peridomiciles. Adult bugs predominated in all studied environments, and nymphs were scarce inside houses. Molecular analyses of a randomly selected sub-sample (n=212 of triatomines showed Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates of 65%, 50% and 56% in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments, respectively. We detected the T. cruzi lineages I and II and mixed infections. We also showed that T. tibiamaculata fed on blood from birds (50%, marsupials (38%, ruminants (7% and rodents (5%. The probability of T. cruzi infection was higher in triatomines that fed on marsupial blood (odds ratio (OR = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.22-3.11. Moreover, we observed a protective effect against infection in bugs that fed on bird blood (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.30-0.73.The frequent invasion of houses by infected triatomines indicates a potential risk of T. cruzi transmission to inhabitants in this area. Our results reinforce that continuous epidemiological surveillance should be performed in areas where domestic transmission is controlled but enzootic transmission persists.

  7. Identification of Trypanosoma cruzi Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) in Latin-American migrants in Barcelona (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abras, Alba; Gállego, Montserrat; Muñoz, Carmen; Juiz, Natalia A; Ramírez, Juan Carlos; Cura, Carolina I; Tebar, Silvia; Fernández-Arévalo, Anna; Pinazo, María-Jesús; de la Torre, Leonardo; Posada, Elizabeth; Navarro, Ferran; Espinal, Paula; Ballart, Cristina; Portús, Montserrat; Gascón, Joaquim; Schijman, Alejandro G

    2017-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is divided into six Discrete Typing Units (DTUs): TcI-TcVI. We aimed to identify T. cruzi DTUs in Latin-American migrants in the Barcelona area (Spain) and to assess different molecular typing approaches for the characterization of T. cruzi genotypes. Seventy-five peripheral blood samples were analyzed by two real-time PCR methods (qPCR) based on satellite DNA (SatDNA) and kinetoplastid DNA (kDNA). The 20 samples testing positive in both methods, all belonging to Bolivian individuals, were submitted to DTU characterization using two PCR-based flowcharts: multiplex qPCR using TaqMan probes (MTq-PCR), and conventional PCR. These samples were also studied by sequencing the SatDNA and classified as type I (TcI/III), type II (TcII/IV) and type I/II hybrid (TcV/VI). Ten out of the 20 samples gave positive results in the flowcharts: TcV (5 samples), TcII/V/VI (3) and mixed infections by TcV plus TcII (1) and TcV plus TcII/VI (1). By SatDNA sequencing, we classified the 20 samples, 19 as type I/II and one as type I. The most frequent DTU identified by both flowcharts, and suggested by SatDNA sequencing in the remaining samples with low parasitic loads, TcV, is common in Bolivia and predominant in peripheral blood. The mixed infection by TcV-TcII was detected for the first time simultaneously in Bolivian migrants. PCR-based flowcharts are very useful to characterize DTUs during acute infection. SatDNA sequence analysis cannot discriminate T. cruzi populations at the level of a single DTU but it enabled us to increase the number of characterized cases in chronically infected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequent house invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected triatomines in a suburban area of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Gilmar; Gurgel-Gonçalves, Rodrigo; Reis, Renato Barbosa; Santos, Carlos Gustavo Silva Dos; Amorim, Alekhine; Andrade, Sônia Gumes; Reis, Mitermayer G

    2015-04-01

    The demographic transition of populations from rural areas to large urban centers often results in a disordered occupation of forest remnants and increased economic pressure to develop high-income buildings in these areas. Ecological and socioeconomic factors associated with these urban transitions create conditions for the potential transmission of infectious diseases, which was demonstrated for Chagas disease. We analyzed 930 triatomines, mainly Triatoma tibiamaculata, collected in artificial and sylvatic environments (forests near houses) of a suburban area of the city of Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil between 2007 and 2011. Most triatomines were captured at peridomiciles. Adult bugs predominated in all studied environments, and nymphs were scarce inside houses. Molecular analyses of a randomly selected sub-sample (n=212) of triatomines showed Trypanosoma cruzi infection rates of 65%, 50% and 56% in intradomestic, peridomestic and sylvatic environments, respectively. We detected the T. cruzi lineages I and II and mixed infections. We also showed that T. tibiamaculata fed on blood from birds (50%), marsupials (38%), ruminants (7%) and rodents (5%). The probability of T. cruzi infection was higher in triatomines that fed on marsupial blood (odds ratio (OR) = 1.95, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-3.11). Moreover, we observed a protective effect against infection in bugs that fed on bird blood (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.30-0.73). The frequent invasion of houses by infected triatomines indicates a potential risk of T. cruzi transmission to inhabitants in this area. Our results reinforce that continuous epidemiological surveillance should be performed in areas where domestic transmission is controlled but enzootic transmission persists.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi response to sterol biosynthesis inhibitors: morphophysiological alterations leading to cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luis Kessler

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi displays similarities to fungi in terms of its sterol lipid biosynthesis, as ergosterol and other 24-alkylated sterols are its principal endogenous sterols. The sterol pathway is thus a potential drug target for the treatment of Chagas disease. We describe here a comparative study of the growth inhibition, ultrastructural and physiological changes leading to the death of T. cruzi cells following treatment with the sterol biosynthesis inhibitors (SBIs ketoconazole and lovastatin. We first calculated the drug concentration inhibiting epimastigote growth by 50% (EC(50/72 h or killing all cells within 24 hours (EC(100/24 h. Incubation with inhibitors at the EC(50/72 h resulted in interesting morphological changes: intense proliferation of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which was corroborated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy of the parasites stained with rhodamine 123, and strong swelling of the reservosomes, which was confirmed by acridine orange staining. These changes to the mitochondria and reservosomes may reflect the involvement of these organelles in ergosterol biosynthesis or the progressive autophagic process culminating in cell lysis after 6 to 7 days of treatment with SBIs at the EC(50/72 h. By contrast, treatment with SBIs at the EC(100/24 h resulted in rapid cell death with a necrotic phenotype: time-dependent cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial depolarization and reservosome membrane permeabilization (RMP, culminating in cell lysis after a few hours of drug exposure. We provide the first demonstration that RMP constitutes the "point of no return" in the cell death cascade, and propose a model for the necrotic cell death of T. cruzi. Thus, SBIs trigger cell death by different mechanisms, depending on the dose used, in T. cruzi. These findings shed new light on ergosterol biosynthesis and the mechanisms of programmed cell death in this ancient protozoan parasite.

  10. Influence of Ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase activity on Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon F Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. There are no vaccines or effective treatment, especially in the chronic phase when most patients are diagnosed. There is a clear necessity to develop new drugs and strategies for the control and treatment of Chagas disease. Recent papers have suggested the ecto-nucleotidases (from CD39 family from pathogenic agents as important virulence factors. In this study we evaluated the influence of Ecto-Nucleoside-Triphosphate-Diphosphohydrolase (Ecto-NTPDase activity on infectivity and virulence of T. cruzi using both in vivo and in vitro models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We followed Ecto-NTPDase activities of Y strain infective forms (trypomastigotes obtained during sequential sub-cultivation in mammalian cells. ATPase/ADPase activity ratios of cell-derived trypomastigotes decreased 3- to 6-fold and infectivity was substantially reduced during sequential sub-cultivation. Surprisingly, at third to fourth passages most of the cell-derived trypomastigotes could not penetrate mammalian cells and had differentiated into amastigote-like parasites that exhibited 3- to 4-fold lower levels of Ecto-NTPDase activities. To evidence the participation of T. cruzi Ecto-NTPDase1 in the infective process, we evaluated the effect of known Ecto-ATPDase inhibitors (ARL 67156, Gadolinium and Suramin, or anti-NTPDase-1 polyclonal antiserum on ATPase and ADPase hydrolytic activities in recombinant T. cruzi NTPDase-1 and in live trypomastigotes. All tests showed a partial inhibition of Ecto-ATPDase activities and a marked inhibition of trypomastigotes infectivity. Mice infections with Ecto-NTPDase-inhibited trypomastigotes produced lower levels of parasitemia and higher host survival than with non-inhibited control parasites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that Ecto-ATPDases act as facilitators of infection and virulence in vitro and in vivo and emerge as target

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry Into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emile Santos Barrias

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T.cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T.cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasithophorous vacuole (VP. Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the parasitophorous vacuole release from the host cell plasma membrane. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T.cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete VP formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss other mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair.

  12. Contribución al conocimiento de los reservorios del Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas,1909 en la Provincia de Corrientes, Argentina Contribution to knowledge of reservoirs of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909 in Corrientes Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Esther Bar

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de identificar a reservorios del Trypanosoma cruzi se investigaron 60 mamíferos en los Departamentos Capital y San Luis del Palmar. Se examinaron: primates, roedores, marsupiales, carnívoros y edentados; 40 vivían en cautiverio y 20 fueron capturados mediante trampas en una comunidad rural forestal. Los mamíferos fueron analizados por xenodiagnóstico, empleándose ninfas de 3o o 4o estadío de Triatoma infestans ayunadas durante 2 semanas. Las heces de los triatominos fueron observadas al microscopio (400x a los 30, 60 y 90 días post-alimentación. En 2 Saimiri sciureus y en 1 Cebus apella se constató infección por tripanosomas cruziformes. Se concluye que la parasitemia detectada fue baja. La presencia de Didelphis albiventris, reservorio potencial del Trypanosoma cruzi , en una zona de transmisión activa del parásito representa un factor de riesgo, por lo que son necesarias futuras investigaciones epidemiológicas para determinar la real diagnosis de esta parasitosis en la provincia de Corrientes, Argentina.In order to identify Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs in transmission areas, 60 mammals in Capital and San Luis del Palmar Departments, Corrientes, Argentina were studied. Primates, rodents, carnivores, marsupials and edentates were investigated, 40 of them living in captivity and 20 caught with traps in a rural area. The mammals were examined by xenodiagnosis and third or fourth instars nymphs of Triatoma infestans starved for 2 weeks were used. The feces were microscopically observed (400x for Trypanosoma cruzi infection at 30, 60 and 90 days after feeding. Trypanosoma cruzi-like parasites were identified in 2 Saimiri sciureus and 1 Cebus apella analyzed by xenodiagnosis. It was concluded that parasitemia was low. Howewer, the presence in a forest area of Didelphis albiventris, potential reservoir of the parasite, indicates a risk factor and deserves further epidemiological study for a true diagnosis of this

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-González, Gilberto; Figueroa-Lara, Alejandro; Elizondo-Cano, Miguel; Wilson, Leslie; Novelo-Garza, Barbara; Valiente-Banuet, Leopoldo; Ramsey, Janine M

    2016-03-01

    An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years of Mexico's mandated

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of Blood Donation Screening for Trypanosoma cruzi in Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Sánchez-González

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available An estimated 2 million inhabitants are infected with Chagas disease in Mexico, with highest prevalence coinciding with highest demographic density in the southern half of the country. After vector-borne transmission, Trypanosoma cruzi is principally transmitted to humans via blood transfusion. Despite initiation of serological screening of blood donations or donors for T. cruzi since 1990 in most Latin American countries, Mexico only finally included mandatory serological screening nationwide in official Norms in 2012. Most recent regulatory changes and segmented blood services in Mexico may affect compliance of mandatory screening guidelines. The objective of this study was to calculate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for total compliance of current guidelines from both Mexican primary healthcare and regular salaried worker health service institutions: the Secretary of Health and the Mexican Institute for Social Security. We developed a bi-modular model to analyze compliance using a decision tree for the most common screening algorithms for each health institution, and a Markov transition model for the natural history of illness and care. The incremental cost effectiveness ratio based on life-years gained is US$ 383 for the Secretary of Health, while the cost for an additional life-year gained is US$ 463 for the Social Security Institute. The results of the present study suggest that due to incomplete compliance of Mexico's national legislation during 2013 and 2014, the MoH has failed to confirm 15,162 T. cruzi infections, has not prevented 2,347 avoidable infections, and has lost 333,483 life-years. Although there is a vast difference in T. cruzi prevalence between Bolivia and Mexico, Bolivia established mandatory blood screening for T.cruzi in 1996 and until 2002 detected and discarded 11,489 T. cruzi -infected blood units and prevented 2,879 potential infections with their transfusion blood screening program. In the first two years

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi: experimental Chagas' disease in Rhesus monkeys. II. Ultraestructural and cytochemical studies of peroxidase and acid phosphatase activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Nazareth Leal de Meirelles

    1990-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural and cytochemical studies of peroxidase and acid phosphatase were performed in skin, lymph node and heart muscle tissue of thesus monkeys with experimental Chagas's disease. At the site of inoculation ther was a proliferative reaction with the presence of immature macrophages revealed by peroxidase technique. At the lymph node a difuse inflammatory exudate with mononuclear cells, fibroblasts and immature activated macrophages reproduces the human patrtern of acute Chagas' disease inflamatory lesions. The hearth muscle cells present different degrees of degenerative alterations and a striking increase in the number of lysosomal profiles that exhibit acid hydrolase reaction product. A strong inflammatory reaction was present due to lymphocytic infiltrate or due to eosinophil granulocytes associated to ruptured cells. The present study provides some experimental evidences that the monkey model could be used as a reliable model to characterize histopathological alterations of the human disease.

  16. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi Among Eleven Potential Reservoir Species from Six States Across the Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Emily L.; Roellig, Dawn M.; Gompper, Matthew E.; Monello, Ryan J.; Wenning, Krista M.; Gabriel, Mourad W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, is a substantial public health concern in Latin America. Although rare in humans and domestic animals in the United States, T. cruzi is commonly detected in some wildlife species, most commonly raccoons (Procyon lotor) and Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana). To increase our understanding of the reservoir host species range and geographic distribution, 11 species of mammals from six states spanning the known range of T. cruzi (Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Missouri, and Virginia) were tested for antibodies to T. cruzi using indirect immunofluorescent antibody testing. In addition, culture isolation attempts were conducted on a limited number of animals from Georgia and Florida. Evidence of T. cruzi was found in every state except California; however, low numbers of known reservoirs were tested in California. In general, the highest seroprevalence rates were found in raccoons (0–68%) and opossums (17–52%), but antibodies to T. cruzi were also detected in small numbers of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) from Arizona and Georgia, bobcats (Lynx rufus) from Georgia, two coyotes (Canis latrans) from Georgia and Virginia, and a ringtail (Bassariscus astutus) from Arizona. Culture-based prevalence rates for raccoons were significantly greater than those for opossums; however, seroprevalences of raccoons and opossums from several geographic locations in Georgia and Florida were not different, indicating that exposure rates of these two species are similar within these areas. For both raccoons and opossums, seroprevalence was significantly higher in females than in males. No difference was detected in seroprevalence between adults and juveniles and between animals caught in urban and rural locations. Our results indicate that T. cruzi prevalence varies by host species, host characteristics, and geographic region and provides data to guide future studies on the natural history of T. cruzi

  17. Application of core-shell PEGylated CdS/Cd(OH){sub 2} quantum dots as biolabels of Trypanosoma cruzi parasites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, C.R. [PPG Ciencias de Materiais, CCEN, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-901 (Brazil); Fontes, A. [Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-901 (Brazil)], E-mail: adriana.fontes@pesquisador.cnpq.br; Farias, P.M.A. [PPG Ciencias de Materiais, CCEN, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-901 (Brazil); Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-901 (Brazil); Santos, B.S. [Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-901 (Brazil); Menezes, F.D. de; Ferreira, R.C. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-901 (Brazil); Cesar, C.L. [Departamento de Eletronica Quantica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Cidade Universitaria, Campinas-SP 13083-970 (Brazil); Galembeck, A. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-901 (Brazil); Figueiredo, R.C.B.Q. [Departamento de Microbiologia, Centro de Pesquisas Aggeu Magalhaes, Cidade Universitaria, Recife-PE 50670-420 (Brazil)

    2008-11-30

    Semiconductor quantum dots are a promising class of materials in the labeling of biological systems. In the present study we show the marking pattern of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) live parasites using PEGylated CdS/Cd(OH){sub 2} fluorescent nanocrystals. The analysis obtained by confocal fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicates that only the endocytic paths of parasites were labeled. The parasites were alive after the incubation with the CdS/Cd(OH){sub 2}-PEG suspension. Labeling the T. cruzi with quantum dots can help to better understand the endocytosis process and also the cellular differentiation.

  18. Trypanocidal drugs for chronic asymptomatic Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Juan Carlos; Perez, Juan Guillermo; Cortes, Olga Lucia; Riarte, Adelina; Pepper, Micah; Marin-Neto, Jose Antonio; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2014-05-27

    Prevention of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) by treating infected populations with trypanocidal therapy (TT) remains a challenge. Despite a renewed enthusiasm for TT, uncertainty regarding its efficacy, concerns about its safety and limited availability remain barriers for a wider use of conventional drugs. We have updated a previous version of this review. To systematically search, appraise, identify and extract data from eligible studies comparing the outcome of cohorts of seropositive individuals to Trypanosoma cruzi exposed to TT versus placebo or no treatment. We sought eligible studies in electronic databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 1, 2014); MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to January week 5 2014); EMBASE (Ovid, 1980 to 2014 week 6) and LILACS (up to 6 May 2010)) by combining terms related with the disease and the treatment. The search also included a Google search, handsearch for references in review or selected articles, and search of expert files. We applied no language restrictions. Review authors screened the retrieved references for eligibility (those dealing with human participants treated with TT) and then assessed the pre-selected studies in full for inclusion. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies that provided data on either mortality or clinical progression of CCC after at least four years of follow-up. Teams of two review authors independently carried out the study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment, with a referee resolving disagreement within the pairs. Data collection included study design, characteristics of the population and interventions or exposures and outcome measures. We defined categories of outcome data as parasite-related (positive serology, xenodiagnosis or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) after TT) and participant-related (including efficacy outcomes such as progression towards CCC, all-cause mortality and side effects of TT). We reported

  19. Efficacy of some essential oils in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of orally administered Cymbopogon citratus, Zingiber officinale and Syzygium aromaticum essential oils (EOs) in mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Methods: Three experiments were conducted with 48 Swiss mice each. The animals were inoculated with 2 x 106 metacyclic ...

  20. Lack of evidence for integration of Trypanosoma cruzi minicircle DNA in South American human genomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flegontova, Olga; Lukeš, Julius; Flegontov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 5 (2012), s. 437-441 ISSN 0020-7519 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Trypanosoma cruzi * Kinetoplast minicircle * Chagas disease * Horizontal gene transfer * Human genome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.637, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020751912000781

  1. Galactonolactone oxidoreductase from Trypanosoma cruzi employs a FAD cofactor for the synthesis of vitamin C.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryashova, E.V.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Slot, I.G.M.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas' disease, is unable to salvage vitamin C (l-ascorbate) from its environment and relies on de novo synthesis for its survival. Because humans lack the capacity to synthesize ascorbate, the trypanosomal enzymes involved in ascorbate biosynthesis are

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi in the chicken model: Chagas-like heart disease in the absence of parasitism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Teixeira, A.R.L.; Gomes, C.; Nitz, N.; Sousa, A.O.; Alvez, R.M.; Guimaro, M.C.; Cordeiro, C.; Bernal, F.M.; Rosa, A.C.; Hejnar, Jiří; Leonardecz, E.; Hecht, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2011), e1000 ISSN 1935-2735 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Chagas disease * Trypanosoma cruzi * kDNA minicircles * inbred chicken Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.716, year: 2011

  3. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower...

  4. Functional Characterization of ABCC Proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi and Their Involvement with Thiol Transport

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    Kelli Monteiro da Costa

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is a neglected disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi and affects 8 million people worldwide. The main chemotherapy is based on benznidazole. The efficacy in the treatment depends on factors such as the parasite strain, which may present different sensitivity to treatment. In this context, the expression of ABC transporters has been related to chemotherapy failure. ABC transporters share a well-conserved ABC domain, responsible for ATP binding and hydrolysis, whose the energy released is coupled to transport of molecules through membranes. The most known ABC transporters are ABCB1 and ABCC1, involved in the multidrug resistance phenotype in cancer, given their participation in cellular detoxification. In T. cruzi, 27 ABC genes were identified in the genome. Nonetheless, only four ABC genes were characterized: ABCA3, involved in vesicular trafficking; ABCG1, overexpressed in strains naturally resistant to benznidazole, and P-glycoprotein 1 and 2, whose participation in drug resistance is controversial. Considering P-glycoprotein genes are related to ABCC subfamily in T. cruzi according to the demonstration using BLASTP alignment, we evaluated both ABCB1-like and ABCC-like activities in epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of the Y strain. The transport activities were evaluated by the efflux of the fluorescent dyes Rhodamine 123 and Carboxyfluorescein in a flow cytometer. Results indicated that there was no ABCB1-like activity in both T. cruzi forms. Conversely, results demonstrated ABCC-like activity in both epimastigote and trypomastigote forms of T. cruzi. This activity was inhibited by ABCC transport modulators (probenecid, indomethacin, and MK-571, by ATP-depleting agents (sodium azide and iodoacetic acid and by the thiol-depleting agent N-ethylmaleimide. Additionally, the presence of ABCC-like activity was supported by direct inhibition of the thiol-conjugated compound efflux with indomethacin, characteristic of

  5. Life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi (y strain in mice Ciclo evolutivo do Trypanosoma cruzi (cepa Y no camundongo branco (mus musculus. L

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    Pedro Luiz Silva Pinto

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1958, we have studied experimental Chagas' disease (CD by subcutaneous inoculation of 1,000 blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi (Y strain in Balb/C. mice. Evolution of parasitemia remained constant, beginning on the 5th and 6th day of the disease, increasing progressively, achieving a maximum on about the 30th day. After another month, only a few forms were present, and they disappeared from the circulation after the third month, as determined from direct examination of slides and the use of a Neubauer Counting Chamber. These events coincided with the appearance of amastigote nests in the tissues (especially the cardiac ones, starting the first week, and following the Gauss parasitemia curve, but they were not in parallel until the chronic stage. In 1997, we began to note the following changes: Parasites appeared in the circulation during the first week and disappeared starting on the 7th day, and there was a coincident absence of the amastigote nests in the tissues. A careful study verified that young forms in the evolutionary cycle of T. cruzi (epi + amastigotes began to appear alongside the trypomastigotes in the circulation on the 5th and 7th post-inoculation day. At the same time, rounded, oval, and spindle shapes were seen circulating through the capillaries and sinusoids of the tissues, principally of the hematopoietic organs. Stasis occurs because the diameter of the circulating parasites is greater than the vessels, and this makes them more visible. Examination of the sternal bone marrow revealed young cells with elongated forms and others truncated in the shape of a "C" occupying the internal surface of the blood cells that had empty central portions (erythrocytes?. We hypothesize that there could be a loss of virulence or mutation of the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi.Desde 1958, nós estudamos a doença de Chagas experimental, inoculando 1.000 formas sanguicolas de Trypanosoma cruzi, Chagas-1909, (cepa Y por via sub-cutânea em

  6. The isolation and identification of Trypanosoma cruzi from raccoons in Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, B.C.; Bauman, P.M.; Diamond, L.S.; Herman, C.M.

    1958-01-01

    Five raccoons trapped at Patuxent Research Refuge, Laurel, Maryland, were found to have trypanosomes in the blood which were morphologically indistinguishable from Trypanosoma cruzi on stained smears. The organism grew well in culture. It developed and reproduced in Triatoma protracta, T. infestans, T. phyllosoma, and Rhodnius prolixus. Experimental infections were produced in raccoons, opossums, mice, rats, and monkeys by inoculation of blood, culture, and triatome forms. Typical leishmaniform bodies were found in tissue sections of cardiac muscle fibers from naturally and experimentally infected animals. Cross agglutinations carried out with Iiving cultural forms and rabbit antisera demonstrated a close antigenic relationship between the raccoon trypanosome and T. cruzi (Brazil strain). On the basis of (1) morphology, (2) presence of leishmaniform tissue stages, (3) development in triatomes, (4) infectivity to a variety of mammals, (5) culture characteristics, and (6) cross reactions in serological tests, this parasite is considered conspecific with Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909), the causative agent of American human trypanosomiasis.

  7. Heme A synthesis and CcO activity are essential for Trypanosoma cruzi infectivity and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merli, Marcelo L; Cirulli, Brenda A; Menéndez-Bravo, Simón M; Cricco, Julia A

    2017-06-27

    Trypanosoma cruzi , the causative agent of Chagas disease, presents a complex life cycle and adapts its metabolism to nutrients' availability. Although T. cruzi is an aerobic organism, it does not produce heme. This cofactor is acquired from the host and is distributed and inserted into different heme-proteins such as respiratory complexes in the parasite's mitochondrion. It has been proposed that T. cruzi's energy metabolism relies on a branched respiratory chain with a cytochrome c oxidase-type aa 3 (C c O) as the main terminal oxidase. Heme A, the cofactor for all eukaryotic C c O, is synthesized via two sequential enzymatic reactions catalyzed by heme O synthase (HOS) and heme A synthase (HAS). Previously, TcCox10 and TcCox15 ( Trypanosoma cruzi Cox10 and Cox15 proteins) were identified in T. cruzi They presented HOS and HAS activity, respectively, when they were expressed in yeast. Here, we present the first characterization of TcCox15 in T. cruzi , confirming its role as HAS. It was differentially detected in the different T. cruzi stages, being more abundant in the replicative forms. This regulation could reflect the necessity of more heme A synthesis, and therefore more C c O activity at the replicative stages. Overexpression of a non-functional mutant caused a reduction in heme A content. Moreover, our results clearly showed that this hindrance in the heme A synthesis provoked a reduction on C c O activity and, in consequence, an impairment on T. cruzi survival, proliferation and infectivity. This evidence supports that T. cruzi depends on the respiratory chain activity along its life cycle, being C c O an essential terminal oxidase. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  8. Semisolid liver infusion tryptose supplemented with human urine allows growth and isolation of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli clonal lineages

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    Emanuella Francisco Fajardo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: INTRODUCTION This work shows that 3% (v/v human urine (HU in semisolid Liver Infusion Tryptose (SSL medium favors the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi and T. rangeli. METHODS Parasites were plated as individual or mixed strains on SSL medium and on SSL medium with 3% human urine (SSL-HU. Isolate DNA was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. RESULTS SSL-HU medium improved clone isolation. PCR revealed that T. cruzi strains predominate on mixed-strain plates. PFGE confirmed that isolated parasites share the same molecular karyotype as parental cell lines. CONCLUSIONS SSL-HU medium constitutes a novel tool for obtaining T. cruzi and T. rangeli clonal lineages.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi connatal transmission in dogs with Chagas disease: experimental case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Ballinas-Verdugo, Martha A; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Reyes, Pedro A; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2011-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi connatal transmission was studied in male and female mongrel dogs. Both dogs were experimentally infected, after which on the 20(th) day, lymphoadenomegaly and fever were found. Four months postinfection, they mated. At this time, Chagas disease was confirmed by two different diagnostic tests. The electrocardiogram and echocardiogram taken at the eight postinoculation month showed data consistent with ischemia, local conduction abnormalities and hypertrophy, as well as a diminished ejection fraction and left ventricular dilation, respectively. Four puppies were born and after weaning had weakness, progressive weight loss, and chronic diarrhea. Necropsy of all four showed digestive alterations and cardiac dilation. Serology in the offspring was positive for Chagas disease. The histopathological study demonstrated a cardiac chronic inflammatory process, although no parasites were found. Clinical data and serological determinations are consistent with death from advanced Chagas disease.

  10. Relationships between altitude, triatomine (Triatoma dimidiata) immune response and virulence of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE Fuentes-Vicente, J A; Cabrera-Bravo, M; Enríquez-Vara, J N; Bucio-Torres, M I; Gutiérrez-Cabrera, A E; Vidal-López, D G; Martínez-Ibarra, J A; Salazar-Schettino, P M; Córdoba-Aguilar, A

    2017-03-01

    Little is known about how the virulence of a human pathogen varies in the environment it shares with its vector. This study focused on whether the virulence of Trypanosoma cruzi (Trypanosomatida: Trypanosomatidae), the causal agent of Chagas' disease, is related to altitude. Accordingly, Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) specimens were collected at three different altitudes (300, 700 and 1400 m a.s.l.) in Chiapas, Mexico. The parasite was then isolated to infect uninfected T. dimidiata from the same altitudes, as well as female CD-1 mice. The response variables were phenoloxidase (PO) activity, a key insect immune response, parasitaemia in mice, and amastigote numbers in the heart, oesophagus, gastrocnemius and brain of the rodents. The highest levels of PO activity, parasitaemia and amastigotes were found for Tryp. cruzi isolates sourced from 700 m a.s.l., particularly in the mouse brain. A polymerase chain reaction-based analysis indicated that all Tryp. cruzi isolates belonged to a Tryp. cruzi I lineage. Thus, Tryp. cruzi from 700 m a.s.l. may be more dangerous than sources at other altitudes. At this altitude, T. dimidiata is more common, apparently because the conditions are more beneficial to its development. Control strategies should focus activity at altitudes around 700 m a.s.l., at least in relation to the region of the present study sites. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  11. Molecular and biological characterization of a highly pathogenic Trypanosoma cruzi strain isolated from a patient with congenital infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Bisio, Margarita; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; Altcheh, Jaime; Solana, María Elisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2018-03-01

    Although many Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) strains isolated from a wide range of hosts have been characterized, there is a lack of information about biological features from vertically transmitted strains. We describe the molecular and biological characteristics of the T. cruzi VD strain isolated from a congenital Chagas disease patient. The VD strain was typified as DTU TcVI; in vitro sensitivity to nifurtimox (NFX) and beznidazole (BZ) were 2.88 μM and 6.19 μM respectively, while inhibitory concentrations for intracellular amastigotes were 0.24 μM for BZ, and 0.66 μM for NFX. Biological behavior of VD strain was studied in a mouse model of acute infection, resulting in high levels of parasitemia and mortality with a rapid clearence of bloodstream trypomastigotes when treated with BZ or NFX, preventing mortality and reducing parasitic load and intensity of inflammatory infiltrate in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Treatment-induced parasitological cure, evaluated after immunossupression were 41% and 35% for BZ and NFX treatment respectively, suggesting a partial response to these drugs in elimination of parasite burden. This exhaustive characterization of this T. cruzi strain provides the basis for inclusion of this strain in a panel of reference strains for drug screening and adds a new valuable tool for the study of experimental T. cruzi infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence and Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in People of Rural Communities of the High Jungle of Northern Peru.

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    Karen A Alroy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi is seen exclusively in the Americas where an estimated 8 million people are infected with the parasite. Significant research in southern Peru has been conducted to understand T. cruzi infection and vector control, however, much less is known about the burden of infection and epidemiology in northern Peru.A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in humans (n=611 and domestic animals [dogs (n=106 and guinea pigs (n=206] in communities of Cutervo Province, Peru. Sampling and diagnostic strategies differed according to species. An entomological household study (n=208 was conducted to identify the triatomine burden and species composition, as well as the prevalence of T. cruzi in vectors. Electrocardiograms (EKG were performed on a subset of participants (n=90 T. cruzi infected participants and 170 age and sex-matched controls. The seroprevalence of T. cruzi among humans, dogs, and guinea pigs was 14.9% (95% CI: 12.2-18.0%, 19.8% (95% CI: 12.7-28.7% and 3.3% (95% CI: 1.4-6.9% respectively. In one community, the prevalence of T. cruzi infection was 17.2% (95% CI: 9.6-24.7% among participants < 15 years, suggesting recent transmission. Increasing age, positive triatomines in a participant's house, and ownership of a T. cruzi positive guinea pig were independent correlates of T. cruzi infection. Only one species of triatomine was found, Panstrongylus lignarius, formerly P. herreri. Approximately forty percent (39.9%, 95% CI: 33.2-46.9% of surveyed households were infested with this vector and 14.9% (95% CI: 10.4-20.5% had at least one triatomine positive for T. cruzi. The cardiac abnormality of right bundle branch block was rare, but only identified in seropositive individuals.Our research documents a substantial prevalence of T. cruzi infection in Cutervo and highlights a need for greater attention and vector control efforts in northern Peru.

  13. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of 10 medicinal plants used in northeast Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Garza, Zinnia Judith; Bazaldúa-Rodríguez, Aldo Fabio; Quintanilla-Licea, Ramiro; Galaviz-Silva, Lucio

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to screen the trypanocidal activity of plants used in traditional Mexican medicine for the treatment of various diseases related to parasitic infections. Cultured Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes were incubated for 96h with different concentrations of methanolic extracts obtained from Artemisia mexicana, Castela texana, Cymbopogon citratus, Eryngium heterophyllum, Haematoxylum brasiletto, Lippia graveolens, Marrubium vulgare, Persea americana, Ruta chalepensis and Schinus molle. The inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined for each extract via a colorimetric method. Among the evaluated species, the methanolic extracts of E. heterophyllum, H. brasiletto, M. vulgare and S. molle exhibited the highest trypanocidal activity, showing percentages of growth inhibition between 88 and 100% at a concentration of 150μg/ml. These medicinal plants may represent a valuable source of new bioactive compounds for the therapeutic treatment of trypanosomiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in blood banks of seven departments of Bolivia

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    Roxana Carrasco

    1990-03-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi infection was studied in 1,298 sera samples of blood banks from 7 capital departments of Bolivia, using the immunofluorescence test (IFI and Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (Elisa. The percentages of positivity in these 7 departments have an average of 28% and are distributed as follows: Sta. Cruz 51%, Tarija 45%, Cochabamba 28%, Sucre 39%, La Paz 4.9%, Oruro 6% and Potosi 24%. The prevalence is related with the altitude levels of the different departments. However in Potosi (3,945 m we found a 24% of prevalence, probably due to the proximity of endemic valleys to the city. The authors suggest a strict control in blood donors since there exists a great risk of infection

  15. Transcriptome Remodeling in Trypanosoma cruzi and Human Cells during Intracellular Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Shah-Simpson, Sheena; Okrah, Kwame; Belew, A. Trey; Choi, Jungmin; Caradonna, Kacey L.; Padmanabhan, Prasad; Ndegwa, David M.; Temanni, M. Ramzi; Corrada Bravo, Héctor; El-Sayed, Najib M.; Burleigh, Barbara A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular colonization and persistent infection by the kinetoplastid protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, underlie the pathogenesis of human Chagas disease. To obtain global insights into the T. cruzi infective process, transcriptome dynamics were simultaneously captured in the parasite and host cells in an infection time course of human fibroblasts. Extensive remodeling of the T. cruzi transcriptome was observed during the early establishment of intracellular infection, coincident with a major developmental transition in the parasite. Contrasting this early response, few additional changes in steady state mRNA levels were detected once mature T. cruzi amastigotes were formed. Our findings suggest that transcriptome remodeling is required to establish a modified template to guide developmental transitions in the parasite, whereas homeostatic functions are regulated independently of transcriptomic changes, similar to that reported in related trypanosomatids. Despite complex mechanisms for regulation of phenotypic expression in T. cruzi, transcriptomic signatures derived from distinct developmental stages mirror known or projected characteristics of T. cruzi biology. Focusing on energy metabolism, we were able to validate predictions forecast in the mRNA expression profiles. We demonstrate measurable differences in the bioenergetic properties of the different mammalian-infective stages of T. cruzi and present additional findings that underscore the importance of mitochondrial electron transport in T. cruzi amastigote growth and survival. Consequences of T. cruzi colonization for the host include dynamic expression of immune response genes and cell cycle regulators with upregulation of host cholesterol and lipid synthesis pathways, which may serve to fuel intracellular T. cruzi growth. Thus, in addition to the biological inferences gained from gene ontology and functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes in parasite and host, our

  16. Interactions Between Trypanosoma cruzi the Chagas Disease Parasite and Naturally Infected Wild Mepraia Vectors of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Soto, Ricardo; Ortiz, Sylvia; Cordova, Ivan; Bruneau, Nicole; Botto-Mahan, Carezza; Solari, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    Chagas disease, which ranks among the world's most neglected diseases, is a chronic, systemic, parasitic infection caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Mepraia species are the wild vectors of this parasite in Chile. Host-parasite interactions can occur at several levels, such as co-speciation and ecological host fitting, among others. Thus, we are exploring the interactions between T. cruzi circulating in naturally infected Mepraia species in all areas endemic of Chile. We evaluated T. cruzi infection rates of 27 different haplotypes of the wild Mepraia species and identified their parasite genotypes using minicircle PCR amplification and hybridization tests with genotype-specific DNA probes. Infection rates were lower in northern Chile where Mepraia gajardoi circulates (10-35%); in central Chile, Mepraia spinolai is most abundant, and infection rates varied in space and time (0-55%). T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs) TcI, TcII, TcV, and Tc VI were detected. Mixed infections with two or more DTUs are frequently found in highly infected insects. T. cruzi DTUs have distinct, but not exclusive, ecological and epidemiological associations with their hosts. T. cruzi infection rates of M. spinolai were higher than in M. gajardoi, but the presence of mixed infection with more than one T. cruzi DTU was the same. The same T. cruzi DTUs (TcI, TcII, TcV, and TcVI) were found circulating in both vector species, even though TcI was not equally distributed. These results suggest that T. cruzi DTUs are not associated with any of the two genetically related vector species nor with the geographic area. The T. cruzi vectors interactions are discussed in terms of old and recent events. By exploring T. cruzi DTUs present in Mepraia haplotypes and species from northern to central Chile, we open the analysis on these invertebrate host-parasite interactions.

  17. [Heterogeneous distribution of the prevalence of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies among blood donors in the State of Puebla, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteón, Victor M; Reyes-López, Pedro A; Sosa-Palacio, Adalid; León-Tello, Gloria; Martínez-Murguía, Jaime; Sosa-Jurado, Francisca

    2005-01-01

    To determine the seroprevalence and associated factors, of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi Ab) among blood donors living in rural and suburban areas and risk regions. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to December 2003, in 2489 blood donors of seven regions of Puebla, who were evaluated for mandatory viral and T. cruzi serological tests using validated procedures. The seroprevalence for T. cruzi Ab was 1.24% (31/2489), similar to hepatitis C (HVC) (1.5%) and higher than human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) (0.4%) and hepatitis B (HVB) (0.3%). The highest seroprevalences were observed in the regions of Tehuacan-Sierra Negra and Mixteca, up to 2.6%, while in Sierra nororiental and Angelopolis no positive blood donors were identified. A positive association was observed between seropositivity and being older than forty years and being born and raised in Tehuacan-Sierra Negra and Mixteca. T. cruzi seroprevalence distribution is heterogeneous, from 0% to 2.6%, with higher seroprevalences in the regions of Tehuacan-Sierra Negra and Mixteca.

  18. Bottlenecks in domestic animal populations can facilitate the emergence of Trypanosoma cruzi, the aetiological agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael Z; Tustin, Aaron; Castillo-Neyra, Ricardo; Mabud, Tarub S; Levy, Katelyn; Barbu, Corentin M; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; Naquira-Velarde, Cesar; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2015-07-07

    Faeces-mediated transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (the aetiological agent of Chagas disease) by triatomine insects is extremely inefficient. Still, the parasite emerges frequently, and has infected millions of people and domestic animals. We synthesize here the results of field and laboratory studies of T. cruzi transmission conducted in and around Arequipa, Peru. We document the repeated occurrence of large colonies of triatomine bugs (more than 1000) with very high infection prevalence (more than 85%). By inoculating guinea pigs, an important reservoir of T. cruzi in Peru, and feeding triatomine bugs on them weekly, we demonstrate that, while most animals quickly control parasitaemia, a subset of animals remains highly infectious to vectors for many months. However, we argue that the presence of these persistently infectious hosts is insufficient to explain the observed prevalence of T. cruzi in vector colonies. We posit that seasonal rains, leading to a fluctuation in the price of guinea pig food (alfalfa), leading to annual guinea pig roasts, leading to a concentration of vectors on a small subpopulation of animals maintained for reproduction, can propel T. cruzi through vector colonies and create a considerable force of infection for a pathogen whose transmission might otherwise fizzle out. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody Maturation in Trypanosoma cruzi-Infected Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcipar, Iván S.; Risso, Marikena G.; Silber, Ariel M.; Revelli, Silvia; Marcipar, Alberto J.

    2001-01-01

    The study of antibody avidity changes during infection has improved the understanding of the pathologic processes involved in several infectious diseases. In some infections, like toxoplasmosis, this information is being used for diagnostic purposes. Results of the evolution of antibody avidity for different specific antigens in Trypanosome cruzi-infected rats are presented. A Western blotting technique, combined with avidity analysis to identify antigens that elicit high-avidity antibodies, is suggested. In this system, antibodies showed high avidity values only during the chronic phase of infection and only in relation to antibodies against 21-, 33-, 41-, 42-, 56-, 58-, 66-, and 72-kDa antigens. Finally, a 97-kDa T. cruzi antigen, which was recognized by high-avidity antibodies and occurred in noninfected rats, was identified. These results allow us to evaluate the different antigens in chagasic infection. Our results show that with the correct choice of antigen it is possible to detect differences in maturation of antibodies and to discriminate, in an experimental model, between recent (acute) and chronic infections. PMID:11427430

  20. A quinoxaline derivative as a potent chemotherapeutic agent, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jean Henrique da Silva; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Corrêa, Arlene Gonçalves; Sangi, Diego Pereira; Nakamura, Celso Vataru

    2014-01-01

    Chagas' disease is a condition caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi that affects millions of people, mainly in Latin America where it is considered endemic. The chemotherapy for Chagas disease remains a problem; the standard treatment currently relies on a single drug, benznidazole, which unfortunately induces several side effects and it is not successful in the cure of most of the chronic patients. In order to improve the drug armamentarium against Chagas' disease, in the present study we describe the synthesis of the compound 3-chloro-7-methoxy-2-(methylsulfonyl) quinoxaline (quinoxaline 4) and its activity, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. Quinoxaline 4 was found to be strongly active against Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain and more effective against the proliferative forms. The cytotoxicity against LLCMK2 cells provided selective indices above one for all of the parasite forms. The drug induced very low hemolysis, but its anti-protozoan activity was partially inhibited when mouse blood was added in the experiment against trypomastigotes, an effect that was specifically related to blood cells. A synergistic effect between quinoxaline 4 and benznidazole was observed against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, accompanied by an antagonistic interaction against LLCMK2 cells. Quinoxaline 4 induced several ultrastructural alterations, including formations of vesicular bodies, profiles of reticulum endoplasmic surrounding organelles and disorganization of Golgi complex. These alterations were also companied by cell volume reduction and maintenance of cell membrane integrity of treated-parasites. Our results demonstrated that quinoxaline 4, alone or in combination with benznidazole, has promising effects against all the main forms of T. cruzi. The compound at low concentrations induced several ultrastructural alterations and led the parasite to an autophagic-like cell death. Taken together these results may support the

  1. A quinoxaline derivative as a potent chemotherapeutic agent, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Henrique da Silva Rodrigues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas' disease is a condition caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi that affects millions of people, mainly in Latin America where it is considered endemic. The chemotherapy for Chagas disease remains a problem; the standard treatment currently relies on a single drug, benznidazole, which unfortunately induces several side effects and it is not successful in the cure of most of the chronic patients. In order to improve the drug armamentarium against Chagas' disease, in the present study we describe the synthesis of the compound 3-chloro-7-methoxy-2-(methylsulfonyl quinoxaline (quinoxaline 4 and its activity, alone or in combination with benznidazole, against Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Quinoxaline 4 was found to be strongly active against Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain and more effective against the proliferative forms. The cytotoxicity against LLCMK2 cells provided selective indices above one for all of the parasite forms. The drug induced very low hemolysis, but its anti-protozoan activity was partially inhibited when mouse blood was added in the experiment against trypomastigotes, an effect that was specifically related to blood cells. A synergistic effect between quinoxaline 4 and benznidazole was observed against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, accompanied by an antagonistic interaction against LLCMK2 cells. Quinoxaline 4 induced several ultrastructural alterations, including formations of vesicular bodies, profiles of reticulum endoplasmic surrounding organelles and disorganization of Golgi complex. These alterations were also companied by cell volume reduction and maintenance of cell membrane integrity of treated-parasites. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrated that quinoxaline 4, alone or in combination with benznidazole, has promising effects against all the main forms of T. cruzi. The compound at low concentrations induced several ultrastructural alterations and led the

  2. Interactions between 4-aminoquinoline and heme: Promising mechanism against Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Guilherme Curty; Borges, Júlio Cesar; Calvet, Claudia Magalhães; de Araújo, Humberto Pinheiro; Zuma, Aline Araujo; do Nascimento, Samara Braga; Motta, Maria Cristina Machado; Bernardino, Alice Maria Rolim; Pereira, Mirian Claudia de Souza; Bourguignon, Saulo Cabral

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is a neglected tropical disease caused by the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The current drugs used to treat this disease have limited efficacy and produce severe side effects. Quinolines, nitrogen heterocycle compounds that form complexes with heme, have a broad spectrum of antiprotozoal activity and are a promising class of new compounds for Chagas disease chemotherapy. In this study, we evaluated the activity of a series of 4-arylaminoquinoline-3-carbonitrile derivatives against all forms of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro. Compound 1g showed promising activity against epimastigote forms when combined with hemin (IC50<1 μM), with better performance than benznidazole, the reference drug. This compound also inhibited the viability of trypomastigotes and intracellular amastigotes. The potency of 1g in combination with heme was enhanced against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes, suggesting a similar mechanism of action that occurs in Plasmodium spp. The addition of hemin to the culture medium increased trypanocidal activity of analog 1g without changing the cytotoxicity of the host cell, reaching an IC50 of 11.7 μM for trypomastigotes. The mechanism of action was demonstrated by the interaction of compound 1g with hemin in solution and prevention of heme peroxidation. Compound 1g and heme treatment induced alterations of the mitochondrion-kinetoplast complex in epimastigotes and trypomastigotes and also, accumulation of electron-dense deposits in amastigotes as visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The trypanocidal activity of 4-aminoquinolines and the elucidation of the mechanism involving interaction with heme is a neglected field of research, given the parasite's lack of heme biosynthetic pathway and the importance of this cofactor for parasite survival and growth. The results of this study can improve and guide rational drug development and combination treatment strategies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier

  3. Projected future distributions of vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in North America under climate change scenarios.

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    Miroslava Garza

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease kills approximately 45 thousand people annually and affects 10 million people in Latin America and the southern United States. The parasite that causes the disease, Trypanosoma cruzi, can be transmitted by insects of the family Reduviidae, subfamily Triatominae. Any study that attempts to evaluate risk for Chagas disease must focus on the ecology and biogeography of these vectors. Expected distributional shifts of vector species due to climate change are likely to alter spatial patterns of risk of Chagas disease, presumably through northward expansion of high risk areas in North America.We forecast the future (2050 distributions in North America of Triatoma gerstaeckeri and T. sanguisuga, two of the most common triatomine species and important vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi in the southern United States. Our aim was to analyze how climate change might affect the future shift of Chagas disease in North America using a maximum entropy algorithm to predict changes in suitable habitat based on vector occurrence points and predictive environmental variables. Projections based on three different general circulation models (CCCMA, CSIRO, and HADCM3 and two IPCC scenarios (A2 and B2 were analyzed. Twenty models were developed for each case and evaluated via cross-validation. The final model averages result from all twenty of these models. All models had AUC >0.90, which indicates that the models are robust. Our results predict a potential northern shift in the distribution of T. gerstaeckeri and a northern and southern distributional shift of T. sanguisuga from its current range due to climate change.The results of this study provide baseline information for monitoring the northward shift of potential risk from Chagas disease in the face of climate change.

  4. Captopril increases the intensity of monocyte infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and induces human T helper type 17 cells

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    Coelho dos Santos, J S; Menezes, C A S; Villani, F N A; Magalhães, L M D; Scharfstein, J; Gollob, K J; Dutra, W O

    2010-01-01

    The anti-hypertensive drug captopril is used commonly to reduce blood pressure of patients with severe forms of Chagas disease, a cardiomyopathy caused by chronic infection with the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Captopril acts by inhibiting angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the vasopressor metallopeptidase that generates angiotensin II and promotes the degradation of bradykinin (BK). Recent studies in mice models of Chagas disease indicated that captopril can potentiate the T helper type 1 (Th1)-directing natural adjuvant property of BK. Equipped with kinin-releasing cysteine proteases, T. cruzi trypomastigotes were shown previously to invade non-professional phagocytic cells, such as human endothelial cells and murine cardiomyocytes, through the signalling of G protein-coupled bradykinin receptors (B2KR). Monocytes are also parasitized by T. cruzi and these cells are known to be important for the host immune response during infection. Here we showed that captopril increases the intensity of T. cruzi infection of human monocytes in vitro. The increased parasitism was accompanied by up-regulated expression of ACE in human monocytes. While T. cruzi infection increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes significantly, compared to uninfected cells, T. cruzi infection in association with captopril down-modulated IL-10 expression by the monocytes. Surprisingly, studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that addition of the ACE inhibitor in association with T. cruzi increased expression of IL-17 by CD4+ T cells in a B2KR-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that captopril might interfere with host–parasite equilibrium by enhancing infection of monocytes, decreasing the expression of the modulatory cytokine IL-10, while guiding development of the proinflammatory Th17 subset. PMID:20964644

  5. Captopril increases the intensity of monocyte infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and induces human T helper type 17 cells.

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    Coelho dos Santos, J S; Menezes, C A S; Villani, F N A; Magalhães, L M D; Scharfstein, J; Gollob, K J; Dutra, W O

    2010-12-01

    The anti-hypertensive drug captopril is used commonly to reduce blood pressure of patients with severe forms of Chagas disease, a cardiomyopathy caused by chronic infection with the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Captopril acts by inhibiting angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), the vasopressor metallopeptidase that generates angiotensin II and promotes the degradation of bradykinin (BK). Recent studies in mice models of Chagas disease indicated that captopril can potentiate the T helper type 1 (Th1)-directing natural adjuvant property of BK. Equipped with kinin-releasing cysteine proteases, T. cruzi trypomastigotes were shown previously to invade non-professional phagocytic cells, such as human endothelial cells and murine cardiomyocytes, through the signalling of G protein-coupled bradykinin receptors (B(2) KR). Monocytes are also parasitized by T. cruzi and these cells are known to be important for the host immune response during infection. Here we showed that captopril increases the intensity of T. cruzi infection of human monocytes in vitro. The increased parasitism was accompanied by up-regulated expression of ACE in human monocytes. While T. cruzi infection increased the expression of interleukin (IL)-10 by monocytes significantly, compared to uninfected cells, T. cruzi infection in association with captopril down-modulated IL-10 expression by the monocytes. Surprisingly, studies with peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that addition of the ACE inhibitor in association with T. cruzi increased expression of IL-17 by CD4(+) T cells in a B(2) KR-dependent manner. Collectively, our results suggest that captopril might interfere with host-parasite equilibrium by enhancing infection of monocytes, decreasing the expression of the modulatory cytokine IL-10, while guiding development of the proinflammatory Th17 subset. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2010 British Society for Immunology.

  6. Transmission of Donor-Derived Trypanosoma cruzi and Subsequent Development of Chagas Disease in a Lung Transplant Recipient

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    A. B. Corey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Donor infection status should be considered when accepting an organ for transplant. Here we present a case of Chagas disease developing after a lung transplant where the donor was known to be Trypanosoma cruzi antibody positive. The recipient developed acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection with reactivation after treatment. Chagas disease-positive donors are likely to be encountered in the United States; donor targeted screening is needed to guide decisions regarding organ transplant and posttransplant monitoring.

  7. A Brief View of the Surface Membrane Proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Pech-Canul, Ángel de la Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas' disease which affects millions of people around the world mostly in Central and South America. T. cruzi expresses a wide variety of proteins on its surface membrane which has an important role in the biology of these parasites. Surface molecules of the parasites are the result of the environment to which the parasites are exposed during their life cycle. Hence, T. cruzi displays several modifications when they move from one host to another. Due to the complexity of this parasite's cell surface, this review presents some membrane proteins organized as large families, as they are the most abundant and/or relevant throughout the T. cruzi membrane. PMID:28656101

  8. Nanoemulsions of sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase inhibitors strongly inhibit the growth of Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; da Silva Cardoso, Verônica; Ricci Junior, Eduardo; Dos Santos, Elisabete Pereira; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2018-12-01

    Sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) inhibitors targeting the α-class enzyme from the protozoan pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, responsible of Chagas disease, were recently reported. Although many such derivatives showed low nanomolar activity in vitro, they were inefficient anti-T. cruzi agents in vivo. Here, we show that by formulating such sulfonamides as nanoemulsions in clove (Eugenia caryophyllus) oil, highly efficient anti-protozoan effects are observed against two different strains of T. cruzi. These effects are probably due to an enhanced permeation of the enzyme inhibitor through the nanoemulsion formulation, interfering in this way with the life cycle of the pathogen either by inhibiting pH regulation or carboxylating reactions in which bicarbonate/CO 2 are involved. This type of formulation of sulfonamides with T. cruzi CA inhibitory effects may lead to novel therapeutic approaches against this orphan disease.

  9. Oral exposure to Phytomonas serpens attenuates thrombocytopenia and leukopenia during acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rosiane V; Malvezi, Aparecida D; Augusto, Leonardo da Silva; Kian, Danielle; Tatakihara, Vera Lúcia H; Yamauchi, Lucy M; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F; Rizzo, Luiz V; Schenkman, Sergio; Pinge-Filho, Phileno

    2013-01-01

    Mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, rapidly develop anemia and thrombocytopenia. These effects are partially promoted by the parasite trans-sialidase (TS), which is shed in the blood and depletes sialic acid from the platelets, inducing accelerated platelet clearance and causing thrombocytopenia during the acute phase of disease. Here, we demonstrate that oral immunization of C57BL/6 mice with Phytomonas serpens, a phytoflagellate parasite that shares common antigens with T. cruzi but has no TS activity, reduces parasite burden and prevents thrombocytopenia and leukopenia. Immunization also reduces platelet loss after intraperitoneal injection of TS. In addition, passive transfer of immune sera raised in mice against P. serpens prevented platelet clearance. Thus, oral exposure to P. serpens attenuates the progression of thrombocytopenia induced by TS from T. cruzi. These findings are not only important for the understanding of the pathogenesis of T. cruzi infection but also for developing novel approaches of intervention in Chagas disease.

  10. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Marcia Cristina Paes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology.

  11. A Brief View of the Surface Membrane Proteins from Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Ángel de la Cruz Pech-Canul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causal agent of Chagas’ disease which affects millions of people around the world mostly in Central and South America. T. cruzi expresses a wide variety of proteins on its surface membrane which has an important role in the biology of these parasites. Surface molecules of the parasites are the result of the environment to which the parasites are exposed during their life cycle. Hence, T. cruzi displays several modifications when they move from one host to another. Due to the complexity of this parasite’s cell surface, this review presents some membrane proteins organized as large families, as they are the most abundant and/or relevant throughout the T. cruzi membrane.

  12. New imidazolidine derivatives as anti-Trypanosoma cruzi agents: structure-activity relationships.

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    Dos Santos Gomes, Fabiana Oliveira; de Melo, Cristiane Moutinho Lagos; Peixoto, Christina Alves; de Lima, Maria do Carmo Alves; Galdino, Suely Lins; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves; da Rocha Pitta, Ivan

    2012-12-01

    Imidazolidine derivatives are key components for the development of bioactive compounds for the treatment of many diseases, especially Chagas. In fact, others studies showed that the imidazolidine-2,4-dione has stood out by presenting a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities including anticonvulsants, antiarrhythmic, and antiparasitic. In the present study, we investigated the morphological alterations induced by imidazolidine derivates LPSF/NN-52 and LPSF/NN-100 on trypomastigotes forms of Trypanosoma cruzi through ultrastructural analysis by electron microscopy. Many concentrations were used to measure the antiparasitic propriety promoted by imidazolidine derivatives, and our study indicates that parasites treated with 13 μg mL(-1) of the imidazolidine derivates for 24 h revealed severe damage to the parasite's mitochondrial complex. Beyond that, also observed in treated parasites were the following: myelin bodies, enlargement of cytoplasm vacuole, fragmentation of endoplasmic reticulum, and some treated samples clearly showed signs of necrosis. To confirm the ultrastructural results, some assays were performed for knowledge cellular death induction promoted by imidazolidine derivates against immune spleen cells. The induction of the necrotic process through derivatives LPSF/NN-52 and LPSF/NN-100 showed similar results in relation to nifurtimox and benznidazole. In the last assays, it was demonstrated that NN-100 was efficient against epimastigotes and trypomastigotes forms and these results reinforce the mechanisms of action of both new imidazolidine derivatives against T. cruzi.

  13. Long-term reduction of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in sylvatic mammals following deforestation and sustained vector surveillance in northwestern Argentina

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    Ceballos, L.A.; Cardinal, M.V.; Vazquez-Prokopec, G.M.; Lauricella, M.A.; Orozco, M.M.; Cortinas, R.; Schijman, A.G.; Levin, M.J.; Kitron, U.; Gürtler, R.E.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term variations in the dynamics and intensity of sylvatic transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi were investigated around eight rural villages in the semiarid Argentine Chaco in 2002–2004 and compared to data collected locally in 1984–1991. Of 501 wild mammals from 13 identified species examined by xenodiagnosis, only 3 (7.9%) of 38 Didelphis albiventris opossums and 1 (1.1%) of 91 Conepatus chinga skunks were infected by T. cruzi. The period prevalence in opossums was four-fold lower in 2002–2004 than in 1984–1991 (32–36%). The infection prevalence of skunks also decreased five-fold from 4.1–5.6% in 1984–1991 to 1.1% in 2002–2004. Infection in opossums increased with age and from summer to spring in both study periods. The force of infection per 100 opossum-months after weaning declined more than six-fold from 8.2 in 1988–1991 to 1.2 in 2002–2004. Opossums were mainly infected by T. cruzi lineage I and secondarily by lineage IId in 1984–1991, and only by T. cruzi I in 2002–2004; skunks were infected by T. cruzi IId in 1984–1991 and by IIc in 2002–2004. The striking decline of T. cruzi infection in opossums and skunks occurred in parallel to community-wide insecticide spraying followed by selective sprays leading to very low densities of infected Triatoma infestans in domestic and peridomestic habitats since 1992; to massive deforestation around one of the villages or selective extraction of older trees, and apparent reductions in opossum abundance jointly with increases in foxes and skunks. These factors may underlie the dramatic decrease of T. cruzi infection in wild reservoir hosts. PMID:16839513

  14. Identification of three classes of heteroaromatic compounds with activity against intracellular Trypanosoma cruzi by chemical library screening.

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    Esther Bettiol

    Full Text Available The development of new drugs against Chagas disease is a priority since the currently available medicines have toxic effects, partial efficacy and are targeted against the acute phase of disease. At present, there is no drug to treat the chronic stage. In this study, we have optimized a whole cell-based assay for high throughput screening of compounds that inhibit infection of mammalian cells by Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes. A 2000-compound chemical library was screened using a recombinant T. cruzi (Tulahuen strain expressing beta-galactosidase. Three hits were selected for their high activity against T. cruzi and low toxicity to host cells in vitro: PCH1, NT1 and CX1 (IC(50: 54, 190 and 23 nM, respectively. Each of these three compounds presents a different mechanism of action on intracellular proliferation of T. cruzi amastigotes. CX1 shows strong trypanocidal activity, an essential characteristic for the development of drugs against the chronic stage of Chagas disease where parasites are found intracellular in a quiescent stage. NT1 has a trypanostatic effect, while PCH1 affects parasite division. The three compounds also show high activity against intracellular T. cruzi from the Y strain and against the related kinetoplastid species Leishmania major and L. amazonensis. Characterization of the anti-T. cruzi activity of molecules chemically related to the three library hits allowed the selection of two compounds with IC(50 values of 2 nM (PCH6 and CX2. These values are approximately 100 times lower than those of the medicines used in patients against T. cruzi. These results provide new candidate molecules for the development of treatments against Chagas disease and leishmaniasis.

  15. Immunodiagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas' Disease Infection in Naturally Infected Dogs

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    Lauricella MA

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on the standardization of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detecting specific antibodies anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in naturally infected dogs. Sera from 182 mongrel dogs of all ages residing in four rural villages in Santiago del Estero, Argentina, were collected in November 1994 and preserved in buffered neutral glycerin. All sera were tested by indirect hemagglutination test (IHAT, indirect immunofluorescence test (IFAT, and ELISA using the flagellar fraction of T. cruzi as antigen. Dog sera from an area without vectorial transmission were used to calculate ELISA specificity and cut-off value. Eighty-six percent of sera had concordant results for all tests. All sera reactive for IHAT and IFAT were also reactive for ELISA, except in one case. Sera tested by ELISA when diluted 1:200 allowed a clearer division between non-reactive and reactive sera than when 1:100 with greater agreement among serologic techniques. The specificity of ELISA was 96.2%. Among 34 adult dogs with a positive xenodiagnosis, sensitivity was 94% both for ELISA and IFAT. ELISA is the first choice for screening purposes and one of the pair of techniques recommended for diagnostic studies in dog populations

  16. [Seroprevalence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in 13 departments of Uruguay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatella, R; Calegari, L; Casserone, S; Civila, E; Carbajal, S; Pérez, G; Somma, R; Sampaio, I; Llanes, M E; Conti, M

    1989-08-01

    In 1985 a study was undertaken of the prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in 13 departments of Uruguay where transmission of the parasite by the vector Triatoma infestans persists. A total of 5,924 serum samples were selected using a probabilistic method--3,840 from individuals over the age of 12 (sample I) and 2,084 from subjects who were 12 years old (sample II). The population was classified according to place of residence (capital city, non-capital city, suburban area, and rural area). The percentage of positive sera detected by indirect immunofluorescence in the different departments ranged from 1 to 11%, and overall seroprevalence for the area was 3.4%. Based on the results obtained, it was possible to distinguish three areas: A, with seroprevalence from 6 to 11%; B, 2 to 3.2%, and C, 1 to 1.4%. In sample II from the Departments of Paysandú, Soriano, Flores, Florida, and Durazno, no cases of Chagas' disease were detected, which suggests that there is no active transmission of T. cruzi in this age group in the area studied. The number of persons estimated to have the disease was 36,952, or 1.3% of the total population of Uruguay and 4% of the population in the area surveyed. These seroprevalence figures are similar to those recorded in the province of Entre Ríos, Argentina, and in the neighboring municipalities of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

  17. Influence of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of mice infected by Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Déborah Maria Moreira da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Enriched environments normally increase behavioral repertoires and diminish the expression of abnormal behaviors and stress-related physiological problems in animals. Although it has been shown that experimental animals infected with microorganisms can modify their behaviors and physiology, few studies have evaluated how environmental enrichment affects these parameters. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of environmental enrichment on the behavior and physiology of confined mice infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. METHODS: The behaviors of 20 T. cruzi-infected mice and 20 non-infected mice were recorded during three treatments: baseline, enrichment, and post-enrichment. Behavioral data were collected using scan sampling with instantaneous recording of behavior every 30s, totaling 360h. Plasma TNF, CCL2, and IL-10 levels and parasitemia were also evaluated in infected enriched/non-enriched mice. Behavioral data were evaluated by Friedman’s test and physiological data by one-way ANOVA and area under the curve (AUC analysis. RESULTS: Results showed that environmental enrichment significantly increased exploratory behaviors and diminished inactivity. The use of environmental enrichment did not diminish circulating levels of TNF and IL-10 but diminished circulating levels of CCL2 and parasitemia. CONCLUSIONS: Positive behavioral and physiological effects of environmental enrichment were observed in mice living in enriched cages. Thus, environmental enrichment improved the welfare of these animals.

  18. Genetic Vaccination against Experimental Infection with Myotropic Parasite Strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Adriano Fernando Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In earlier studies, we reported that a heterologous prime-boost regimen using recombinant plasmid DNA followed by replication-defective adenovirus vector, both containing Trypanosoma cruzi genes encoding trans-sialidase (TS and amastigote surface protein (ASP 2, provided protective immunity against experimental infection with a reticulotropic strain of this human protozoan parasite. Herein, we tested the outcome of genetic vaccination of F1 (CB10XBALB/c mice challenged with myotropic parasite strains (Brazil and Colombian. Initially, we determined that the coadministration during priming of a DNA plasmid containing the murine IL-12 gene improved the immune response and was essential for protective immunity elicited by the heterologous prime-boost regimen in susceptible male mice against acute lethal infections with these parasites. The prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination of resistant female mice led to a drastic reduction in the number of inflammatory infiltrates in cardiac and skeletal muscles during the chronic phase of infection with either strain. Analysis of the electrocardiographic parameters showed that prophylactic vaccination reduced the frequencies of sinus arrhythmia and atrioventricular block. Our results confirmed that prophylactic vaccination using the TS and ASP-2 genes benefits the host against acute and chronic pathologies caused by T. cruzi and should be further evaluated for the development of a veterinary or human vaccine against Chagas disease.

  19. Insight into the exoproteome of the tissue-derived trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Rayner; Ricart, Carlos; Machado, Mara; Bastos, Izabela; Santana, Jaime; Sousa, Marcelo; Roepstorff, Peter; Charneau, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, one of the major neglected infectious diseases. It has the potential to infect any nucleated mammalian cell. The secreted/excreted protein repertoire released by T. cruzi trypomastigotes is crucial in host-pathogen interactions. In this study, mammalian tissue culture-derived trypomastigotes (Y strain) were used to characterize the exoproteome of the infective bloodstream life form. Proteins released into the serum-free culture medium after 3h of incubation were harvested and digested with trypsin. NanoLC-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 540 proteins, the largest set of released proteins identified to date in Trypanosome spp. Bioinformatic analysis predicted most identified proteins as secreted, predominantly by non-classical pathways, and involved in host-cell infection. Some proteins possess predicted GPI-anchor signals, these being mostly trans-sialidases, mucin associated surface proteins and surface glycoproteins. Moreover, we enriched phosphopeptides and glycopeptides from tryptic digests. The majority of identified glycoproteins are trans-sialidases and surface glycoproteins involved in host-parasite interaction. Conversely, most identified phosphoproteins have no Gene Ontology classification. The existence of various proteins related to similar functions in the exoproteome likely reflects this parasite’s enhanced mechanisms for adhesion, invasion and internalization of different host-cell types, and escape from immune defences.

  20. The biological in vitro effect and selectivity of aromatic dicationic compounds on Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Cristiane França da Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is a parasite that causes Chagas disease, which affects millions of individuals in endemic areas of Latin America. One hundred years after the discovery of Chagas disease, it is still considered a neglected illness because the available drugs are unsatisfactory. Aromatic compounds represent an important class of DNA minor groove-binding ligands that exhibit potent antimicrobial activity. This study focused on the in vitro activity of 10 aromatic dicationic compounds against bloodstream trypomastigotes and intracellular forms of T. cruzi. Our data demonstrated that these compounds display trypanocidal effects against both forms of the parasite and that seven out of the 10 compounds presented higher anti-parasitic activity against intracellular parasites compared with the bloodstream forms. Additional assays to determine the potential toxicity to mammalian cells showed that the majority of the dicationic compounds did not considerably decrease cellular viability. Fluorescent microscopy analysis demonstrated that although all compounds were localised to a greater extent within the kinetoplast than the nucleus, no correlation could be found between compound activity and kDNA accumulation. The present results stimulate further investigations of this class of compounds for the rational design of new chemotherapeutic agents for Chagas disease.

  1. Sulfonamide-metal complexes endowed with potent anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Zahid H; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; Sensato, Fabricio R; Moreira, Diogo Rodrigo Magalhaes; Pereira, Valéria Rego Alves; Neves, Juliana Kelle de Andrade Lemoine; de Oliveira, Andresa Pereira; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; Leite, Ana Cristina Lima

    2014-04-01

    In this article, we describe that mononuclear complexes composed of (5-chloro-2-hydroxybenzylidene)aminobenzenesulfonamides (L1-3) of general formula (L2(M)2H2O, where M is Co, Cu, Zn, Ni or Mn) reduced epimastigote proliferation and were found cidal for trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi Y strain. Complexes C5 and C11 have IC50 of 2.7 ± 0.27 and 4.8 ± 0.47 µM, respectively, for trypomastigotes, when the positive control Nifurtimox, which is also an approved drug for Chagas disease, showed IC50 of 2.7 ± 0.25 µM. We tested whether these complexes inhibit the enzyme T. cruzi trypanothione reductase or acting as DNA binders. While none of these complexes inhibited trypanothione reductase, we observed some degree of DNA binding, albeit less pronounced than observed for cisplatin in this assay. Unfortunately, most of these complexes were also toxic for mouse splenocytes. Along with the present studies, we discuss a number of interesting structure-activity relationships and chemical features for these metal complexes, including computational calculations.

  2. Standardization of serological tests for detecting anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in dogs

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    M. A. Lauricella

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the standardization of four serological reactions currently used in human serodiagnosis for the detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in naturally and experimentally infected dogs. Indirect immunofluorescence test (IFAT and hemagglutination test (IHAT were standardized, and complement fixation test (CFT and direct agglutination test (DAT were used for diagnostic confirmation. Four hundred and eighty one mongrel dogs that were studied by xenodiagnosis were used: (1 parasitemic dogs of two localities of endemic area (EA of Santiago del Estero province in Argentina (n = 134; (2 non-parasitemic dogs of the same area (n = 285; (3 dogs experimentally infected with T. cruzi in the patent period (n = 6; (4 non-infected dogs (n = 56 which were born in the city of Buenos Aires (BA, one non-EA for Chagas' disease. For IFAT, parasitemic dogs EA showed 95% of reactive sera. Non parasitemic dogs EA showed 77% of non reactive sera. None sera from BA were reactive for dilutions higher than four. For IHAT, 84% of sera of parasitemic dogs EA showed serological reactivity and among non parasitemic dogs BA, 61% were non reactive, while the remainder showed at most titres of 1/16. The cut-off titres for IFAT and IHAT were 1/16 and 1/32 respectively, and for CFT and DAT 1/1 and 1/128 respectively. Sensitivity for IFAT, IHAT, CF and DAT were 95%, 84%, 97% and 95% respectively.

  3. Genetic Profiling of the Isoprenoid and Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway Genes of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Raúl O.; Agüero, Fernán

    2014-01-01

    In Trypanosoma cruzi the isoprenoid and sterol biosynthesis pathways are validated targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. In this work we present a study of the genetic diversity observed in genes from these pathways. Using a number of bioinformatic strategies, we first identified genes that were missing and/or were truncated in the T. cruzi genome. Based on this analysis we obtained the complete sequence of the ortholog of the yeast ERG26 gene and identified a non-orthologous homolog of the yeast ERG25 gene (sterol methyl oxidase, SMO), and we propose that the orthologs of ERG25 have been lost in trypanosomes (but not in Leishmanias). Next, starting from a set of 16 T. cruzi strains representative of all extant evolutionary lineages, we amplified and sequenced ∼24 Kbp from 22 genes, identifying a total of 975 SNPs or fixed differences, of which 28% represent non-synonymous changes. We observed genes with a density of substitutions ranging from those close to the average (∼2.5/100 bp) to some showing a high number of changes (11.4/100 bp, for the putative lathosterol oxidase gene). All the genes of the pathway are under apparent purifying selection, but genes coding for the sterol C14-demethylase, the HMG-CoA synthase, and the HMG-CoA reductase have the lowest density of missense SNPs in the panel. Other genes (TcPMK, TcSMO-like) have a relatively high density of non-synonymous SNPs (2.5 and 1.9 every 100 bp, respectively). However, none of the non-synonymous changes identified affect a catalytic or ligand binding site residue. A comparative analysis of the corresponding genes from African trypanosomes and Leishmania shows similar levels of apparent selection for each gene. This information will be essential for future drug development studies focused on this pathway. PMID:24828104

  4. Criopreservação de formas de cultura do Trypanosoma cruzi Cryopreservation of Trypanosoma cruzi culture form

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    Lúcia Maria C. Galvão

    1981-09-01

    Full Text Available Formas de cultura de diferentes cepas do T.cruzi foram submetidas a vários processos de criopreservação. As percentagens de recuperação, avaliadas pela motilidade dos parasitas, foram consideradas como adequadas com algumas das técnicas empregadas, variando entre 60 a 80%. A estabilidade das características biológicas do material criopreservado foi investigada através do estudo das curvas de crescimento e diferenciação em meio acelular, infectividade para celulas de cultura de tecido ("Vero", diferenciação intracelular em cultura de tecido assim como infectividade e curso da infecção em animais de laboratório. De um modo geral essas características nao foram significativamente alteradas no material congelado e estocado por diferentes períodos de tempo.A systematic study of the cryopreservation of T. cruzi culture forms was per formed using different parasite strains and freezing methods. The recovery rates with some of the methods as evaluated by motility of the thawed parasites were fairly high (60-80%. The following aspects have been used to investigate the stability of the parasites' biological characteristics atter cryopreservation: growth and differentiation in acelular medium, infectivity to tissue culture "Vero" cells, intracellular differentiation and infectivity to animals. Those characteristics had not been significantly changed by the cryopreservation procedures.

  5. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi secreted proteins and host cell signaling pathways

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    Renata Watanabe Costa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6-7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion.

  6. Aspirin Modulates Innate Inflammatory Response and Inhibits the Entry of Trypanosoma cruzi in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages

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    Aparecida Donizette Malvezi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, a serious disorder that affects millions of people in Latin America. Cell invasion by T. cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential to the parasite’s life cycle and for the development of Chagas disease. Here, we present evidence suggesting the involvement of the host’s cyclooxygenase (COX enzyme during T. cruzi invasion. Pharmacological antagonist for COX-1, aspirin (ASA, caused marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection when peritoneal macrophages were pretreated with ASA for 30 min at 37°C before inoculation. This inhibition was associated with increased production of IL-1β and nitric oxide (NO∙ by macrophages. The treatment of macrophages with either NOS inhibitors or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 restored the invasive action of T. cruzi in macrophages previously treated with ASA. Lipoxin ALX-receptor antagonist Boc2 reversed the inhibitory effect of ASA on trypomastigote invasion. Our results indicate that PGE2, NO∙, and lipoxins are involved in the regulation of anti-T. cruzi activity by macrophages, providing a better understanding of the role of prostaglandins in innate inflammatory response to T. cruzi infection as well as adding a new perspective to specific immune interventions.

  7. Antichagasic Activity of Komaroviquinone Is Due to Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Catalyzed by Trypanosoma cruzi Old Yellow Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Uchiyama, Nahoko; Kabututu, Zakayi; Kubata, Bruno K.; Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Ito, Michiho; Nakajima-Shimada, Junko; Aoki, Takashi; Ohkubo, Kei; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Martin, Samuel K.; Honda, Gisho; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2005-01-01

    A novel potent trypanocidal diterpene, komaroviquinone, was reduced by Trypanosoma cruzi old yellow enzyme (TcOYE) to its semiquinone radical. The reductase activity in trypanosome lysates was completely immunoabsorbed by anti-TcOYE antibody. Since TcOYE is expressed throughout the T. cruzi life cycle, komaroviquinone is an interesting candidate for developing new antichagasic drugs.

  8. Insight into the exoproteome of the tissue-derived trypomastigote form of trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Queiroz, Rayner M L; Ricart, Carlos A O; Machado, Mara O

    2016-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease, one of the major neglected infectious diseases. It has the potential to infect any nucleated mammalian cell. The secreted/excreted protein repertoire released by T. cruzi trypomastigotes is crucial in host-pathogen interactions...

  9. Characterization of TcCYC6 from Trypanosoma cruzi, a gene with homology to mitotic cyclins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, María Agostina; Laverrière, Marc; Schenkman, Sergio; Wehrendt, Diana Patricia; Tellez-Iñón, María Teresa; Potenza, Mariana

    2016-06-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, is a protozoan parasite with a life cycle that alternates between replicative and non-replicative forms, but the components and mechanisms that regulate its cell cycle are poorly described. In higher eukaryotes, cyclins are proteins that activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), by associating with them along the different stages of the cell cycle. These cyclin-CDK complexes exert their role as major modulators of the cell cycle by phosphorylating specific substrates. For the correct progression of the cell cycle, the mechanisms that regulate the activity of cyclins and their associated CDKs are diverse and must be controlled precisely. Different types of cyclins are involved in specific phases of the eukaryotic cell cycle, preferentially activating certain CDKs. In this work, we characterized TcCYC6, a putative coding sequence of T. cruzi which encodes a protein with homology to mitotic cyclins. The overexpression of this sequence, fused to a tag of nine amino acids from influenza virus hemagglutinin (TcCYC6-HA), showed to be detrimental for the proliferation of epimastigotes in axenic culture and affected the cell cycle progression. In silico analysis revealed an N-terminal segment similar to the consensus sequence of the destruction box, a hallmark for the degradation of several mitotic cyclins. We experimentally determined that the TcCYC6-HA turnover decreased in the presence of proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that TcCYC6 degradation occurs via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The results obtained in this study provide first evidence that TcCYC6 expression and degradation are finely regulated in T. cruzi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Melatonin: Antioxidant and modulatory properties in age-related changes during Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazão, Vânia; Santello, Fabricia H; Colato, Rafaela P; Mazotti, Tamires T; Tazinafo, Lucas F; Toldo, Míriam Paula A; do Vale, Gabriel T; Tirapelli, Carlos R; do Prado, José C

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on selected biomarkers of innate and humoral immune response as well as the antioxidant/oxidant status (superoxide dismutase-SOD and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) to understand whether age-related changes would influence the development of acute Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) infection. Young- (5 weeks) and middle-aged (18 months) Wistar rats were orally treated with melatonin (gavage) (05 mg/kg/day), 9 days after infection. A significant increase in both SOD activity and GSH levels was found in plasma from all middle-aged melatonin-treated animals. Melatonin triggered enhanced expression of major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II) antigens on antigen-presenting cell (APC) and peritoneal macrophages in all treated animals. High levels of CD4 + CD28-negative T cells (*PMelatonin induced a significant reduction (***PMelatonin also triggered an upregulation of CD80 and CD86 expression in all young-treated groups. Significant percentages of B and spleen dendritic cells in middle-aged infected and treated animals were observed. Our data reveal new features of melatonin action in inhibiting membrane lipid peroxidation, through the reduction in 8-isoprostane, upregulating the antioxidant defenses and triggering an effective balance in the antioxidant/oxidant status during acute infection. The ability of melatonin to counteract the immune alterations induced by aging added further support to its use as a potential therapeutic target not only for T. cruzi infection but also for other immunocompromised states. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Experimental evidence of biological interactions among different isolates of Trypanosoma cruzi from the Chaco Region.

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    Paula G Ragone

    Full Text Available Many infectious diseases arise from co-infections or re-infections with more than one genotype of the same pathogen. These mixed infections could alter host fitness, the severity of symptoms, success in pathogen transmission and the epidemiology of the disease. Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, exhibits a high biological variability often correlated with its genetic diversity. Here, we developed an experimental approach in order to evaluate biological interaction between three T. cruzi isolates belonging to different Discrete Typing Units (DTUs TcIII, TcV and TcVI. These isolates were obtained from a restricted geographical area in the Chaco Region. Different mixed infections involving combinations of two isolates (TcIII + TcV, TcIII + TcVI and TcV + TcVI were studied in a mouse model. The parameters evaluated were number of parasites circulating in peripheral blood, histopathology and genetic characterization of each DTU in different tissues by DNA hybridization probes. We found a predominance of TcVI isolate in blood and tissues respect to TcIII and TcV; and a decrease of the inflammatory response in heart when the damage of mice infected with TcVI and TcIII + TcVI mixture were compared. In addition, simultaneous presence of two isolates in the same tissue was not detected. Our results show that biological interactions between isolates with different biological behaviors lead to changes in their biological properties. The occurrence of interactions among different genotypes of T. cruzi observed in our mouse model suggests that these phenomena could also occur in natural cycles in the Chaco Region.

  12. Experimental infection of two South American reservoirs with four distinct strains of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roellig, Dawn M.; McMillan, Katherine; Ellis, Angela E.; Vandeberg, John L.; Champagne, Donald E.; Yabsley, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Trypanosoma cruzi (Tc), the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a diverse species with 2 primary genotypes, TcI and TcII, with TcII further subdivided into 5 subtypes (IIa–e). This study evaluated infection dynamics of 4 genetically and geographically diverse T. cruzi strains in 2 South American reservoirs, degus (Octodon degus) and grey short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica). Based on prior suggestions of a genotype-host association, we hypothesized that degus (placental) would more readily become infected with TcII strains while short-tailed opossums (marsupial) would be a more competent reservoir for a TcI strain. Individuals (n = 3) of each species were intraperitoneally inoculated with T. cruzi trypomastigotes of TcIIa [North America (NA)-raccoon (Procyon lotor) origin], TcI [NA-Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana)], TcIIb [South America (SA)-human], TcIIe (SA-Triatoma infestans), or both TcI and TcIIa. Parasitaemias in experimentally infected degus peaked earlier (7–14 days post-inoculation (p.i.)) compared with short-tailed opossums (21–84 days p.i.). Additionally, peak parasitaemias were higher in degus; however, the duration of detectable parasitaemias for all strains, except TcIIa, was greater in short-tailed opossums. Infections established in both host species with all genotypes, except for TcIIa, which did not establish a detectable infection in short-tailed opossums. These results indicate that both South American reservoirs support infections with these isolates from North and South America; however, infection dynamics differed with host and parasite strain. PMID:20128943

  13. Different genotypes of Trypanosoma cruzi produce distinctive placental environment genetic response in chronic experimental infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juiz, Natalia Anahí; Solana, María Elisa; Acevedo, Gonzalo Raúl; Benatar, Alejandro Francisco; Ramirez, Juan Carlos; da Costa, Priscilla Almeida; Macedo, Andrea Mara; Longhi, Silvia Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Congenital infection of Trypanosoma cruzi allows transmission of this parasite through generations. Despite the problematic that this entails, little is known about the placenta environment genetic response produced against infection. We performed functional genomics by microarray analysis in C57Bl/6J mice comparing placentas from uninfected animals and from animals infected with two different T. cruzi strains: K98, a clone of the non-lethal myotropic CA-I strain (TcI), and VD (TcVI), isolated from a human case of congenital infection. Analysis of networks by GeneMANIA of differentially expressed genes showed that “Secretory Granule” was a pathway down-regulated in both infected groups, whereas “Innate Immune Response” and “Response to Interferon-gamma” were pathways up-regulated in VD infection but not in K98. Applying another approach, the GSEA algorithm that detects small changes in predetermined gene sets, we found that metabolic processes, transcription and macromolecular transport were down-regulated in infected placentas environment and some pathways related to cascade signaling had opposite regulation: over-represented in VD and down-regulated in K98 group. We also have found a stronger tropism to the placental organ by VD strain, by detection of parasite DNA and RNA, suggesting living parasites. Our study is the first one to describe in a murine model the genetic response of placental environment to T. cruzi infection and suggests the development of a strong immune response, parasite genotype-dependent, to the detriment of cellular metabolism, which may contribute to control infection preventing the risk of congenital transmission. PMID:28273076

  14. Ecological, social and biological risk factors for continued Trypanosoma cruzi transmission by Triatoma dimidiata in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Dulce M; De Urioste-Stone, Sandra M; Juárez, José G; Pennington, Pamela M

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease transmission by Triatoma dimidiata persists in Guatemala and elsewhere in Central America under undefined ecological, biological and social (eco-bio-social) conditions. Eco-bio-social risk factors associated with persistent domiciliary infestation were identified by a cross-sectional survey and qualitative participatory methods. Quantitative and qualitative data were generated regarding Trypanosoma cruzi reservoirs and triatomine hosts. Blood meal analysis and infection of insects, dogs and rodents were determined. Based on these data, multimodel inference was used to identify risk factors for domestic infestation with the greatest relative importance (>0.75). Blood meal analysis showed that 64% of 36 bugs fed on chickens, 50% on humans, 17% on dogs; 24% of 34 bugs fed on Rattus rattus and 21% on Mus musculus. Seroprevalence among 80 dogs was 37%. Eight (17%) of 46 M. musculus and three (43%) of seven R. rattus from households with infected triatomines were infected with T. cruzi Distinct Typing Unit I. Results from interviews and participatory meetings indicated that vector control personnel and some householders perceived chickens roosting and laying eggs in the house as bug infestation risk factors. House construction practices were seen as a risk factor for bug and rodent infestation, with rodents being perceived as a pest by study participants. Multimodel inference showed that house infestation risk factors of high relative importance are dog density, mouse presence, interior wall plaster condition, dirt floor, tile roofing and coffee tree presence. Persistent house infestation is closely related to eco-bio-social factors that maintain productive T. dimidiata habitats associated with dogs, chickens and rodents. Triatomine, dog and rodent infections indicate active T. cruzi transmission. Integrated vector control methods should include actions that consider the role of peridomestic animals in transmission and community memberś level of knowledge

  15. Genetic Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi DTUs in Wild Triatoma infestans from Bolivia: Predominance of TcI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenière, Simone Frédérique; Aliaga, Claudia; Waleckx, Etienne; Buitrago, Rosio; Salas, Renata; Barnabé, Christian; Tibayrenc, Michel; Noireau, François

    2012-01-01

    Background The current persistence of Triatoma infestans (one of the main vectors of Chagas disease) in some domestic areas could be related to re-colonization by wild populations which are increasingly reported. However, the infection rate and the genetic characterization of the Trypanosoma cruzi strains infecting these populations are very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Of 333 wild Triatoma infestans specimens collected from north to south of a Chagas disease endemic area in Bolivia, we characterized 234 stocks of Trypanosoma cruzi using mini-exon multiplex PCR (MMPCR) and sequencing the glucose phosphate isomerase (Gpi) gene. Of the six genetic lineages (“discrete typing units”; DTU) (TcI-VI) presently recognized in T. cruzi, TcI (99.1%) was overdominant on TcIII (0.9%) in wild Andean T. infestans, which presented a 71.7% infection rate as evaluated by microscopy. In the lowlands (Bolivian Chaco), 17 “dark morph” T. infestans were analyzed. None of them were positive for parasites after microscopic examination, although one TcI stock and one TcII stock were identified using MMPCR and sequencing. Conclusions/Significance By exploring large-scale DTUs that infect the wild populations of T. infestans, this study opens the discussion on the origin of TcI and TcV DTUs that are predominant in domestic Bolivian cycles. PMID:22685616

  16. Dogs infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in São Domingos do Capim, State of Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vívian Tavares Almeida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Almeida V.T., Kobayashi Y.T. da S., Roque A.L.R., Barros J.H.S., de Castro L.R.S., Madeira E.A.O., Uzcategui R.A.R. & Fernandes J.I. Dogs infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in São Domingos do Capim, State of Pará, Brazil. [Infecção por Trypanosoma cruzi em cães em São Domingos do Capim, Estado do Pará, Brasil.] Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(supl. 1:106- 112, 2015. Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde Animal na Amazônia, Universidade Federal do Pará, Campus II, BR 316 Km 62, Castanhal, PA 68743-970, Brasil. E-mail: vitalmeida21@hotmail.com The objective of this study was to determine the presence of Trypanosoma cruzi among dogs naturally infected by it inside four rural communities at the Municipality of São Domingos do Capim located in the Northeastern Pará, Brazil. Blood samples were collected from 113 dogs and 85.7% (30/35 of the serologically positive dogs had their blood re-collected after three months. The diagnosis of T. cruzi infection was performed by: fresh blood examination, hemoconcentration, hemoculture, as well as the serological assays Indirect Immunofluorescence Essay (IFAT and Imunoenzimatic essay (ELISA. The presence of positive dogs in both serologic tests (IFAT + ELISA was 31% (35/113, distributed among the four communities as follows: (12/44 Uricuriteua, (19/40 Cezaréia, (1/16 Aliança and (3/13 Catita. None of the samples was positive in the fresh blood examination or hemoconcentration, although it was possible to isolate T. cruzi, DTU TcI in one dog sample during its blood re-collection. These results show how dogs are exposed to the T. cruzi transmission cycle, revealing their importance as sentinels for the presence of this parasite in the studied area.

  17. Medicinal plants of Chile: evaluation of their anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Orlando M; Maya, Juan D; Ferreira, Jorge; Christen, Philippe; San Martin, José; López-Muñoz, Rodrigo; Morello, Antonio; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    The extracts of several plants of Central Chile exhibited anti-Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes activity. Most active extracts were those obtained from Podanthus ovatifolius, Berberis microphylla, Kageneckia oblonga, and Drimys winteri. The active extract of Drimys winteri (IC50 51.2 microg/mL) was purified and three drimane sesquiterpenes were obtained: polygodial, drimenol, and isodrimenin. Isodrimenin and drimenol were found to be active against the trypomastigote form of T. cruzi with IC50 values of 27.9 and 25.1 microM, respectively.

  18. AFAP-1L1-mediated actin filaments crosslinks hinder Trypanosoma cruzi cell invasion and intracellular multiplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Karine Canuto Loureiro; Teixeira, Thaise Lara; Machado, Fabrício Castro; da Silva, Aline Alves; Quintal, Amanda Pifano Neto; da Silva, Claudio Vieira

    2016-10-01

    Host actin cytoskeleton polymerization has been shown to play an important role during Trypanosoma cruzi internalization into mammalian cell. The structure and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in cells are regulated by a vast number of actin-binding proteins. Here we aimed to verify the impact of AFAP-1L1, during invasion and multiplication of T. cruzi. Knocking-down AFAP-1L1 increased parasite cell invasion and intracellular multiplication. Thus, we have shown that the integrity of the machinery formed by AFAP-1L1 in actin cytoskeleton polymerization is important to hinder parasite infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Utilización de Lepidium peruvianum maca, como medio de cultivo para el crecimiento de Trypanosoma cruzi

    OpenAIRE

    Saldaña C, Charles; Córdova P, Ofelia; Instituto de Investigación en Microbiología y Parasitología Tropical. Universidad Nacional de Trujillo. La Libertad, Perú.; Vargas V, Franklin; Instituto de Investigación en Microbiología y Parasitología Tropical. Universidad Nacional de Trujillo. La Libertad, Perú.

    2006-01-01

    Por sus características nutritivas de alto valor, se ensayó la posible utilidad del Lepidium peruvianum maca, como un medio para cultivar Trypanosoma cruzi. Bajo condiciones experimentales se procedió a incubar epimastigotes de T. cruzi en cuatro medios de cultivo bifásicos diferentes, a base de Lepidium peruvianum maca, los cuales fueron comparados con el medio de cultivo BHI como control. La incorporación de maca como medio de cultivo permitió el crecimiento de Trypanosoma cruzi; se determi...

  20. Tridimensional ultrastructure and glycolipid pattern studies of Trypanosoma dionisii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Miriam Pires de Castro; Ramos, Thiago Cesar Prata; Pinheiro, Adriana Maria V N; Bertini, Silvio; Takahashi, Helio Kiyoshi; Straus, Anita Hilda; Haapalainen, Edna Freymuller

    2013-12-01

    Trypanosoma (Schizotrypanum) dionisii is a non-pathogenic bat trypanosome closely related to Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chaga's disease. Both kinetoplastids present similar morphological stages and are able to infect mammalian cells in culture. In the present study we examined 3D ultrastructure aspects of the two species by serial sectioning epimastigote and trypomastigote forms, and identified common carbohydrate epitopes expressed in T. dionisii, T. cruzi and Leishmania major. A major difference in 3D morphology was that T. dionisii epimastigote forms present larger multivesicular structures, restricted to the parasite posterior region. These structures could be related to T. cruzi reservosomes and are also rich in cruzipain, the major cysteine-proteinase of T. cruzi. We analyzed the reactivity of two monoclonal antibodies: MEST-1 directed to galactofuranose residues of glycolipids purified from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and BST-1 directed to glycolipids purified from T. cruzi epimastigotes. Both antibodies were reactive with T. dionisii epimastigotes by indirect immunofluorescense, but we noted differences in the location and intensity of the epitopes, when compared to T. cruzi. In summary, despite similar features in cellular structure and life cycle of T. dionisii and T. cruzi, we observed a unique morphological characteristic in T. dionisii that deserves to be explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Antiprotozoal drug nitazoxanide enhances parasitemia, tissue lesions and mortality caused by Trypanosoma cruzi in murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle-Reyes, Juan Salvador; Melnikov, Valery; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana; Rodriguez-Hernández, Alejandrina; Wookee-Zea, Cristina; Pimientel-Rodrigez, Víctor; Rueda-Valdovinos, Gabriela; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; López-Lemus, Uriel A; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Chagas' disease is caused by unicellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi). It is endemic throughout Latin America, but nowadays has become a global challenge due to tourism and migration. Non-treated infection may result in health-threatening complications and lead to death. Current medications for this infection are nifurtimox (NFT) and benznidazol. Both drugs may cause side effects and are ineffective in the chronic phase. Therefore, new antichagasic compounds are urgently required. Nitazoxanide (NTZ) is a broad spectrum antiparasitic drug, proposed recently as a potential candidate to be added to the list of essential medicines for integrated neglected tropical disease control and elimination. Although the effect of NTZ against T. cruzi epimastigotes in vitro was reported, the corresponding experiments in animal models of T. cruzi infection have never been undertaken. The present work was designed to fill this gap and evaluate the effect of NTZ on experimental murine trypanosomiasis, in comparison with classical antichagasic agent NFT. Highly sensitive to T. cruzi BALB/c mice were infected using Albarrada T. cruzi strain, recently isolated in Mexico. Experimental groups were either left untreated, or otherwise treated with NFT, NTZ (100 and 1000 mg/kg), or with both drugs simultaneously. The severity of the infection was estimated based on criteria such as parasitemia, lesions in target tissues (heart, muscles and lungs) and mortality. Despite the expected protective effect, NTZ drastically aggravates the course of T. cruzi infection. Namely, parasitemia, tissue lesions and mortality caused by T. cruzi infection were significantly higher in NTZ-treated mice groups, even in comparison with untreated infected animals. NTZ by itself no produced mortality o tissue damage, and NFT showed an expected protective effect. Our results indicate that NTZ cannot be considered for Chagas' disease treatment. Moreover, NTZ should be used with caution in patients

  2. The brighter (and evolutionarily older) face of the metabolic syndrome: evidence from Trypanosoma cruzi infection in CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brima, Wunnie; Eden, Daniel J; Mehdi, Syed Faizan; Bravo, Michelle; Wiese, Mohammad M; Stein, Joanna; Almonte, Vanessa; Zhao, Dazhi; Kurland, Irwin; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Zima, Tomas; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Weiss, Louis M; Roth, Jesse; Nagajyothi, Fnu

    2015-05-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, results in chronic infection that leads to cardiomyopathy with increased mortality and morbidity in endemic regions. In a companion study, our group found that a high-fat diet (HFD) protected mice from T. cruzi-induced myocardial damage and significantly reduced post-infection mortality during acute T. cruzi infection. In the present study metabolic syndrome was induced prior to T. cruzi infection by feeding a high fat diet. Also, mice were treated with anti-diabetic drug metformin. In the present study, the lethality of T. cruzi (Brazil strain) infection in CD-1 mice was reduced from 55% to 20% by an 8-week pre-feeding of an HFD to induce obesity and metabolic syndrome. The addition of metformin reduced mortality to 3%. It is an interesting observation that both the high fat diet and the metformin, which are known to differentially attenuate host metabolism, effectively modified mortality in T. cruzi-infected mice. In humans, the metabolic syndrome, as presently construed, produces immune activation and metabolic alterations that promote complications of obesity and diseases of later life, such as myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Using an evolutionary approach, we hypothesized that for millions of years, the channeling of host resources into immune defences starting early in life ameliorated the effects of infectious diseases, especially chronic infections, such as tuberculosis and Chagas disease. In economically developed countries in recent times, with control of the common devastating infections, epidemic obesity and lengthening of lifespan, the dwindling benefits of the immune activation in the first half of life have been overshadowed by the explosion of the syndrome's negative effects in later life. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi growth in vitro by Solanum alkaloids: a comparison with ketoconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataing, B; Concepción, J L; Lobatón, R; Usubillaga, A

    1998-02-01

    The glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine, alpha-solamargine, alpha-solanine, solasonine, sycophantine, and tomatine, as well as the aglycones demissidine, solanidine, solanocapsine, solasodine, tomatidine, and veratrine were tested as growth inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi, strain EP, in LIT medium. Their activity was compared with the antifungal ketoconazole. Glycoalkaloids containing alpha-chacotriose showed trypanolytic activity against the epimastigote form and trypanocidal activity against the bloodstream and metacyclic trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi in culture medium in micromolar concentrations. Ketoconazole showed a lower activity, at the same concentrations of alpha-chaconine and alpha-solamargine. The observations indicate that the initial target of the compound is at the membrane level with a concomitant change in the parasite morphology. Moreover, internal compartments of the parasites were observed to be affected by the drugs, revealing the dissolution of some organelles as mitocondrias and glycosomes.

  4. CHICKEN COOPS, Triatoma dimidiata INFESTATION AND ITS INFECTION WITH Trypanosoma cruzi IN A RURAL VILLAGE OF YUCATAN, MEXICO

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    Edgar KOYOC-CARDEÑA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study longitudinally investigated the association between Triatoma dimidiata infestation, triatomine infection with Trypanosoma cruzi and household/backyard environmental characteristics in 101 homesteads in Molas and Yucatan, Mexico, between November 2009 (rainy season and May 2010 (dry season. Logistic regression models tested the associations between insect infestation/infection and potential household-level risk factors. A total of 200 T. dimidiata were collected from 35.6% of the homesteads, mostly (73% from the peridomicile. Of all the insects collected, 48% were infected with T. cruzi. Infected insects were collected in 31.6% of the homesteads (54.1% and 45.9% intra- and peridomiciliary, respectively. Approximately 30% of all triatomines collected were found in chicken coops. The presence of a chicken coop in the backyard of a homestead was significantly associated with both the odds of finding T. dimidiata (OR = 4.10, CI 95% = 1.61-10.43, p = 0.003 and the presence of triatomines infected with T. cruzi (OR = 3.37, CI 95% = 1.36-8.33, p = 0.006. The results of this study emphasize the relevance of chicken coops as a putative source of T. dimidiata populations and a potential risk for T. cruzi transmission.

  5. [Biotic and abiotic determinants of seroprevalence of antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi in Palmar de Bravo, Puebla, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Jurado, Francisca; Zumaquero-Ríos, José Lino; Reyes, Pedro A; Cruz-García, Abel; Guzmán-Bracho, Carmen; Monteón, Victor M

    2004-01-01

    To establish the relationship between seroprevalence for antibodies against Trypanosoma cruzi and its relationship with biotic and abiotic factors. A cross-sectional study was conducted between August 2000 and September 2001. The study population consisted of a simple random sample of 390 volunteers residing in Palmar de Bravo, Puebla, Mexico. Sample and data collection procedures included assaying antibodies against T. cruzi with validated assays, and searching for domestic reservoirs and triatomine bugs. The relationship between biotic and abiotic factors with seropositivity was assessed. Statistical analysis was conducted using Kappa values for diagnostic tests; statistical significance was assessed with 2 x 2 tables, chi-squared test with Yates' correction, Fisher exact test, and odds ratios. The seroprevalence of T. cruzi infection in humans was 4%; in domestic reservoirs (horses, pigs, and dogs) only 10% of canine reservoirs were positive. Vector species recognized were T. borberi and T. pallidipennis, with a Dispersion Area Index and a Colonization Index of 55% and 40%, respectively. The most important risk factors associated with positive serology were altitude (>2,150 and <2,180 meters above sea level), presence of triatomines, age, time of residence, and participation in a social assistance program. T. cruzi infection was identified in human beings, vectors, and possibly in domestic reservoirs, in communities located over 2,000 meters above sea level.

  6. Effects of medicinal plant extracts on growth of Leishmania (L. amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi Efeito de extratos de plantas medicinais no crescimento de Leishmania (L. amazonensis e Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Patrícia Shima Luize

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the screening of extracts obtained from 19 species of plants used in Brazilian traditional medicine for treatment of a variety of diseases. The extracts were tested against axenic amastigote and promastigote forms of Leishmania (L. amazonensis, and epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro at a concentration of 100 mg/ml. Baccharis trimera, Cymbopogon citratus, Matricaria chamomilla, Mikania glomerata, Ocimum gratissimum, Piper regnellii, Prunus domestica, Psidium guajava, Sambucus canadensis, Stryphnodendron adstringens, Tanacetum parthenium, and Tanacetum vulgare showed significant effects against one or both parasites, with a percentage of growth inhibition between 49.5 and 99%. The extracts showed no cytotoxic effect on sheep erythrocytes. These medicinal plants may be sources of new compounds that are clinically active against L. amazonensis and T. cruzi.Este estudo descreve a triagem de extratos obtidos de 19 espécies de plantas usadas na medicina tradicional brasileira para o tratamento de várias doenças. Os extratos foram testados contra formas amastigota axênica e promastigota de Leishmania (L. amazonensis, e formas epimastigota de Trypanosoma cruzi in vitro na concentração de 100 mg/ml. Baccharis trimera, Cymbopogon citratus, Matricaria chamomilla, Mikania glomerata, Ocimum gratissimum, Piper regnellii, Prunus domestica, Psidium guajava, Sambucus canadensis, Stryphnodendron adstringens, Tanacetum parthenium, e Tanacetum vulgare apresentaram efeito significante contra um ou ambos parasitas, com a porcentagem de inibição de crescimento entre 49,5 e 99%. Os extratos não mostraram efeito citotóxico em hemácias de carneiro. Essas plantas medicinais podem ser fontes alternativas de novos compostos clinicamente ativos contra L. amazonensis e T. cruzi.

  7. Expression and cellular trafficking of GP82 and GP90 glycoproteins during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer-Santos, Ethel; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa Leal; Yoshida, Nobuko; Franco da Silveira, Jos?

    2013-01-01

    Background: the transformation of noninfective epimastigotes into infective metacyclic trypomastigotes (metacyclogenesis) is a fundamental step in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, comprising several morphological and biochemical changes. GP82 and GP90 are glycoproteins expressed at the surface of metacyclic trypomastigote, with opposite roles in mammalian cell invasion. GP82 is an adhesin that promotes cell invasion, while GP90 acts as a negative regulator of parasite internalization. Our...

  8. In Vitro and in Vivo Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of a Novel Nitro-derivative

    OpenAIRE

    Muelas-Serrano, Susana; Le-Senne, Ana; Fernández-Portillo, Carlos; Nogal, Juan José; Ochoa, Carmen; Gómez-Barrio, Alicia

    2002-01-01

    Nitroarylidenemalononitriles and their cyanoacetamide derivatives with remarkable anti-epimastigote properties, were synthesized attempting to obtain new 3,5-diamino-4-(5'-nitroarylidene)-4H-thiadiazine 1,1-dioxide derivatives, which in previous reports had shown anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity. Tests to evaluate the cytotoxicity of compounds were performed on J774 macrophages. 5-nitro-2-thienyl-malononitrile (5NO2TM), was the only product which maintained a high anti-epimastigote activity at...

  9. El ensayo inmunoenzimatico en microgotas sobre nitrocelulosa (Dot-ELISA en el diagnostico de la enfermedad de Chagas: I. Estudio comparativo de dos preparaciones antigenicos de Trypanosoma cruzi The Dot-Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (Dot-ELISA in the diagnosis of Chagas-disease: I. Comparative study of two antigenic preparations of Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Rosa M. de Hubsch

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Se estudia el Ensayo Inmunoenzimático en Microgotas sobre Nitrocelulosa (Dot-ELISAcomparando dos preparados antigénicos de formas epimastigotas de cultivo de T. cruzi: 1 la fracción citoplasmática (antígeno citoplasmático y 2 el parásito total fijado previamente con formaldehido (antígeno integral. Se usaron sueros de: 95 pacientes chagásicos con serología convencional positiva, cardiopatía crónica y algunos con xenodiagnóstico positivo; 42 personas sanas y 32 con miocardipatía crónica con serología negativa y 74 pacientes con diferentes patologías incluyendo: sífilis, toxoplasmosis, lupus eritematoso diseminado, con factor reumatoide, leishmaniasis visceral, y leishmaniasis cutánea. Definidos los títulos diagnósticos (cut-off de 1:512 con antígeno citoplasmático y de 1: 128 con antígeno integral, la especificidad fue 96% para el primero y de 100% para el segundo; mientras que la sensibilidad fue de 100% para ambas. En el estudio comparativo con las pruebas serológicas convencionales examinando 147 sueros tomados de personas referidas al laboratório, Dot-ELISA con antígeno citoplasmático presentó índices deco-positividad de 1,0, co-negatividad de 0,989 y eficiencia 0,993. Dot-ELIS con antígeno integral dió 1,0, 0,979 y 0,986 respectivamente. De acuerdo con esta evaluación, la técnica Dot-ELISA con antígeno integral se presenta como una alternativa práctica para el diagnóstico serológico de la enfermedad de Chagas.Using the Dot-ELISA technique, two antigenic preparations of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigote forms have been compared for the diagnosis of Chagas' disease: (1 The citoplasmic fraction (citoplasmic antigen and (2 whole fixed epimastigotes (integral antigen. There was been used sera from 95 chagasic patients with chronic cadiomyopathy, positive conventional serology and either positive or negative xenodiagnosis; 74 subjects with negative conventional serology, and either clinically normal or presenting

  10. Simple methodology to directly genotype Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units in single and mixed infections from human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontempi, Iván A; Bizai, María L; Ortiz, Sylvia; Manattini, Silvia; Fabbro, Diana; Solari, Aldo; Diez, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Different DNA markers to genotype Trypanosoma cruzi are now available. However, due to the low quantity of parasites present in biological samples, DNA markers with high copy number like kinetoplast minicircles are needed. The aim of this study was to complete a DNA assay called minicircle lineage specific-PCR (MLS-PCR) previously developed to genotype the T. cruzi DTUs TcV and TcVI, in order to genotype DTUs TcI and TcII and to improve TcVI detection. We screened kinetoplast minicircle hypervariable sequences from cloned PCR products from reference strains belonging to the mentioned DTUs using specific kDNA probes. With the four highly specific sequences selected, we designed primers to be used in the MLS-PCR to directly genotype T. cruzi from biological samples. High specificity and sensitivity were obtained when we evaluated the new approach for TcI, TcII, TcV and TcVI genotyping in twenty two T. cruzi reference strains. Afterward, we compared it with hybridization tests using specific kDNA probes in 32 blood samples from chronic chagasic patients from North Eastern Argentina. With both tests we were able to genotype 94% of the samples and the concordance between them was very good (kappa=0.855). The most frequent T. cruzi DTUs detected were TcV and TcVI, followed by TcII and much lower TcI. A unique T. cruzi DTU was detected in 18 samples meantime more than one in the remaining; being TcV and TcVI the most frequent association. A high percentage of mixed detections were obtained with both assays and its impact was discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  12. Catalase expression impairs oxidative stress-mediated signalling in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Anna Cláudia Guimarães; Alves, Ceres Luciana; Goes, Grazielle Ribeiro; Resende, Bruno Carvalho; Moretti, Nilmar Silvio; Nunes, Vinícius Santana; Aguiar, Pedro Henrique Nascimento; Tahara, Erich Birelli; Franco, Glória Regina; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Pena, Sérgio Danilo Junho; Gadelha, Fernanda Ramos; Guarneri, Alessandra Aparecida; Schenkman, Sergio; Vieira, Leda Quercia; Machado, Carlos Renato

    2017-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is exposed to oxidative stresses during its life cycle, and amongst the strategies employed by this parasite to deal with these situations sits a peculiar trypanothione-dependent antioxidant system. Remarkably, T. cruzi's antioxidant repertoire does not include catalase. In an attempt to shed light on what are the reasons by which this parasite lacks this enzyme, a T. cruzi cell line stably expressing catalase showed an increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) when compared with wild-type cells. Interestingly, preconditioning carried out with low concentrations of H2O2 led untransfected parasites to be as much resistant to this oxidant as cells expressing catalase, but did not induce the same level of increased resistance in the latter ones. Also, presence of catalase decreased trypanothione reductase and increased superoxide dismutase levels in T. cruzi, resulting in higher levels of residual H2O2 after challenge with this oxidant. Although expression of catalase contributed to elevated proliferation rates of T. cruzi in Rhodnius prolixus, it failed to induce a significant increase of parasite virulence in mice. Altogether, these results indicate that the absence of a gene encoding catalase in T. cruzi has played an important role in allowing this parasite to develop a shrill capacity to sense and overcome oxidative stress.

  13. Trypanosoma cruzi uses macropinocytosis as an additional entry pathway into mammalian host cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrias, E S; Reignault, L C; De Souza, W; Carvalho, T M U

    2012-11-01

    Several intracellular pathogens are internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. It is no different with Trypanosoma cruzi. Evidences indicate that T. cruzi entry may occur by endocytosis/phagocytosis or by an active manner. Although macropinocytosis is largely considered an endocytic process where cells internalize only large amounts of solutes, several pathogens use this pathway to enter into host cells. To investigate whether T. cruzi entry into peritoneal macrophages and LLC-MK2 epithelial cells can be also mediated through a macropinocytosis-like process, we used several experimental strategies presently available to characterize macropinocytosis such as the use of different inhibitors. These macropinocytosis' inhibitors blocked internalization of T. cruzi by host cells. To further support this, immunofluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used. Field emission scanning electron microscopy revealed that after treatment, parasites remained attached to the external side of host cell plasma membrane. Proteins such as Rabankyrin 5, tyrosine kinases, Pak1 and actin microfilaments, which participate in macropinosome formation, were localized at T. cruzi entry sites. We also observed co-localization between the parasite and an endocytic fluid phase marker. All together, these results indicate that T. cruzi is able to use multiple mechanisms of penetration into host cell, including macropinocytosis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi Evades the Complement System as an Efficient Strategy to Survive in the Mammalian Host: The Specific Roles of Host/Parasite Molecules and Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Toloza, Galia; Ferreira, Arturo

    2017-01-01

    American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote) and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68), T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP), trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF), C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT) and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT). Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH) and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs). All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP), alternative (AP) or lectin pathways (LP). Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host-parasite interplay

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi Evades the Complement System as an Efficient Strategy to Survive in the Mammalian Host: The Specific Roles of Host/Parasite Molecules and Trypanosoma cruzi Calreticulin

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    Galia Ramírez-Toloza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available American Trypanosomiasis is an important neglected reemerging tropical parasitism, infecting about 8 million people worldwide. Its agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, exhibits multiple mechanisms to evade the host immune response and infect host cells. An important immune evasion strategy of T. cruzi infective stages is its capacity to inhibit the complement system activation on the parasite surface, avoiding opsonizing, immune stimulating and lytic effects. Epimastigotes, the non-infective form of the parasite, present in triatomine arthropod vectors, are highly susceptible to complement-mediated lysis while trypomastigotes, the infective form, present in host bloodstream, are resistant. Thus T. cruzi susceptibility to complement varies depending on the parasite stage (amastigote, trypomastigotes or epimastigote and on the T. cruzi strain. To avoid complement-mediated lysis, T. cruzi trypomastigotes express on the parasite surface a variety of complement regulatory proteins, such as glycoprotein 58/68 (gp58/68, T. cruzi complement regulatory protein (TcCRP, trypomastigote decay-accelerating factor (T-DAF, C2 receptor inhibitor trispanning (CRIT and T. cruzi calreticulin (TcCRT. Alternatively, or concomitantly, the parasite captures components with complement regulatory activity from the host bloodstream, such as factor H (FH and plasma membrane-derived vesicles (PMVs. All these proteins inhibit different steps of the classical (CP, alternative (AP or lectin pathways (LP. Thus, TcCRP inhibits the CP C3 convertase assembling, gp58/68 inhibits the AP C3 convertase, T-DAF interferes with the CP and AP convertases assembling, TcCRT inhibits the CP and LP, CRIT confers ability to resist the CP and LP, FH is used by trypomastigotes to inhibit the AP convertases and PMVs inhibit the CP and LP C3 convertases. Many of these proteins have similar molecular inhibitory mechanisms. Our laboratory has contributed to elucidate the role of TcCRT in the host

  16. Effect of cAMP on macromolecule synthesis in the pathogenic protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Dilvani O. Santos

    1988-09-01

    Full Text Available Macromolecule synthesis of Trypanosoma cruzi in culture was monitored using radioactive tracers. Cells of different days in culture displayed a preferential incorporation of precursors as follows: 1 day for (³H-thymidine cells; 3 days for (³H-uridine cells, and 4 days for (³H-leucine cells. Autoradiographic studies showed that (³H-thymidine was incorporated in the DNA of both kinetoplast and nucleus in this order. Shifts in the intracellular content of cAMP either by addition of dibutyryl-cAMP or by stimulation of the adenylcyclase by isoproterenol, caused an inhibition in the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins. Addition to the T. cruzi cultures of these agents which elevate the intracellular content ofcAMP provoked an interruption of cell proliferation as a result of the impairment of macromolecule synthesis. A discrimination was observed among the stereoisomers of isoproterenol, the L configuration showing to be most active.A síntese de macromoléculas de T. cruzi em cultura foi monitorada usando traçadores radioativos. Células de diferentes dias em cultura mostraram uma incorporação preferencial de precursores comco se seguez: 1 dia para (3H-timidina; 3 dias para (3H-uridina e 4 dias para (3H-leucina. Estudos autoradiográficos mostraram que (3H-leucina. Estudos autoradiográficos mostraram que (3H-timidina foi incorporada no DNA de ambos, cinetoplasto e núcleo, nesta ordem. Alterações no conteúdo intracelular de cAMP seja por adição de dibutiril-cAMP ou por estimulação de adenilciclase por isoproterenol, causav am inibição na síntese de DNA, RNA e proteínas. A adição destes agentes que elevam o conteúdo intracelular de cAMP em culturas de T.cruzi provocou inibição de crescimento, com resultado da síntese macromolecular imperfeita. Foi observada uma discriminação entre os estereoisômeros de isoproterenol, sendo a configuração L, a mais ativa.

  17. Inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi Sir2 related protein 1 as potential drugs against Chagas disease.

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    Luís Gaspar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease remains one of the most neglected diseases in the world despite being the most important parasitic disease in Latin America. The characteristic chronic manifestation of chagasic cardiomyopathy is the region's leading cause of heart-related illness, causing significant mortality and morbidity. Due to the limited available therapeutic options, new drugs are urgently needed to control the disease. Sirtuins, also called Silent information regulator 2 (Sir2 proteins have long been suggested as interesting targets to treat different diseases, including parasitic infections. Recent studies on Trypanosoma cruzi sirtuins have hinted at the possibility to exploit these enzymes as a possible drug targets. In the present work, the T. cruzi Sir2 related protein 1 (TcSir2rp1 is genetically validated as a drug target and biochemically characterized for its NAD+-dependent deacetylase activity and its inhibition by the classic sirtuin inhibitor nicotinamide, as well as by bisnaphthalimidopropyl (BNIP derivatives, a class of parasite sirtuin inhibitors. BNIPs ability to inhibit TcSir2rp1, and anti-parasitic activity against T. cruzi amastigotes in vitro were investigated. The compound BNIP Spermidine (BNIPSpd (9, was found to be the most potent inhibitor of TcSir2rp1. Moreover, this compound showed altered trypanocidal activity against TcSir2rp1 overexpressing epimastigotes and anti-parasitic activity similar to the reference drug benznidazole against the medically important amastigotes, while having the highest selectivity index amongst the compounds tested. Unfortunately, BNIPSpd failed to treat a mouse model of Chagas disease, possibly due to its pharmacokinetic profile. Medicinal chemistry modifications of the compound, as well as alternative formulations may improve activity and pharmacokinetics in the future. Additionally, an initial TcSIR2rp1 model in complex with p53 peptide substrate was obtained from low resolution X-ray data (3.5 Å to

  18. Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Triatoma sordida before and after community-wide residual insecticide spraying in the Argentinean Chaco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchiaverna, Natalia P; Gaspe, María S; Enriquez, Gustavo F; Tomassone, Laura; Gürtler, Ricardo E; Cardinal, Marta V

    2015-03-01

    Triatoma sordida is a secondary vector of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Gran Chaco and Cerrado eco-regions where it frequently infests peridomestic and domestic habitats. In a well-defined area of the humid Argentine Chaco, very few T. sordida were found infected when examined by optical microscopic examination (OM). In order to further assess the role of T. sordida and the relative magnitude of subpatent bug infections, we examined the insects for T. cruzi infection, parasite Discrete Typing Units (DTUs) and bloodmeal sources using various molecular techniques. Among 205 bugs with a negative or no OM-based diagnosis, the prevalence of infection determined by kDNA-PCR was nearly the same in bugs captured before (6.3%) and 4 months after insecticide spraying (6.4%). On average, these estimates were sixfold higher than the prevalence of infection based on OM (1.1%). Only TcI was identified, a DTU typically associated with opossums and rodents. Chickens and turkeys were the only bloodmeal sources identified in the infected specimens and the main local hosts at the bugs' capture sites. As birds are refractory to T. cruzi infection, further studies are needed to identify the infectious bloodmeal hosts. The persistent finding of infected T. sordida after community-wide insecticide spraying highlights the need of sustained vector surveillance to effectively prevent T. cruzi transmission in the domestic and peridomestic habitats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [A confirmatory diagnosis of antibodies anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in donors referred by blood banks in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Bello, Zoraida; Zavala-Jaspe, Reinaldo; Díaz-Villalobos, María; Mauriello, Luciano; Maekelt, Alberto; de Noya, Belkisyolé Alarcón

    2008-06-01

    To establish the confirmatory diagnosis of Trypanosoma cruzi infection, at least two immunoserological tests (ELISA, Indirect hamaglutination, IH, Complement Fixation Test, CFT) were carried out in 254 donors, from public and private blood banks of Venezuela, during 48 months between 1997-1998 and 2003-2004, referred to the Immunology Section of the Tropical Medicine Institute in Caracas. Antibodies anti-T. cruzi were detected in 129/254 (50,79%) by ELISA-IgG or IH and CFT. The "artificial xenodiagnosis" was positive in 10/118 persons with positive confirmed serology. Of 129 donors found positive by the serological tests, 68 were living in the capital region and 61 in the interior of the country. Likewise 113 were born in the interior of the country, 8 in Caracas and 8 in Colombia. Of them, 12 individuals serologically confirmed declared to have donated blood in a minimum of 4 occasions before diagnosis. The present study emphasizes the importance of detection of antibodies against T. cruzi in the integral evaluation of blood donors, since many of them with antibodies anti-T. cruzi, have donated blood several times previous to diagnosis.

  20. Biological behavior of Trypanosoma cruzi stocks obtained from the State of Amazonas, Western Brazilian Amazon, in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Wuelton Marcelo; Magalhães, Laylah Kelre Costa; Oliveira, Josué Costa; Guerra, Jorge Augusto de Oliveira; Silveira, Henrique; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas; Barbosa, Maria das Graças Vale

    2012-01-01

    The biological diversity of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi stocks in the Amazon region most likely plays an important role in the peculiar clinic-epidemiological features of Chagas disease in this area. Seven stocks of T. cruzi were recently isolated in the State of Amazonas, Brazil, from humans, wild mammals, and triatomines. They belonged to the TcI and Z3 genotypes and were biologically characterized in Swiss mice. Parasitological and histopathological parameters were determined. Four stocks did not promote patent parasitemia in mice. Three stocks produced low parasitemia, long pre-patent periods, and a patent period of 1 day or oscillating parasitemia. Maximum parasitemia ranged from 1,400 to 2,800 trypomastigotes/0.1 mL blood. Mice inoculated with the T. cruzi stocks studied showed low positivity during fresh blood examinations, ranging from 0% to 28.6%. In hemoculture, positivity ranged from 0% to 100%. Heart tissue parasitism was observed in mice inoculated with stocks AM49 and AM61. Stock AM49 triggered a moderate inflammatory process in heart tissue. A mild inflammatory process was observed in heart tissue for stocks AM28, AM38, AM61, and AM69. An inflammatory process was frequently observed in skeletal muscle. Examinations of brain tissue revealed inflammatory foci and gliosis in mice inoculated with stock AM49. Biological and histopathological characterization allowed us to demonstrate the low infectivity and virulence of T. cruzi stocks isolated from the State of Amazonas.

  1. Search for a platelet-activating factor receptor in the Trypanosoma cruzi proteome: a potential target for Chagas disease chemotherapy

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    Daniel Fábio Kawano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease (CD causes the highest burden of parasitic diseases in the Western Hemisphere and is therefore a priority for drug research and development. Platelet-activating factor (PAF causes the CD parasite Trypanosoma cruzi to differentiate, which suggests that the parasite may express PAF receptors. Here, we explored the T. cruzi proteome for PAF receptor-like proteins. From a total of 23,000 protein sequences, we identified 29 hypothetical proteins that are predicted to have seven transmembrane domains (TMDs, which is the main characteristic of the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, including the PAF receptor. The TMDs of these sequences were independently aligned with domains from 25 animal PAF receptors and the sequences were analysed for conserved residues. The conservation score mean values for the TMDs of the hypothetical proteins ranged from 31.7-44.1%, which suggests that if the putative T. cruzi PAF receptor is among the sequences identified, the TMDs are not highly conserved. These results suggest that T. cruzi contains several GPCR-like proteins and that one of these GPCRs may be a PAF receptor. Future studies may further validate the PAF receptor as a target for CD chemotherapy.

  2. 1,3,4-Thiadiazole derivatives of R-(+)-limonene benzaldehyde-thiosemicarbazones cause death in Trypanosoma cruzi through oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Solange C; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Desoti, Vânia C; Falzirolli, Hugo; da Silva, Cleuza C; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Silva, Sueli de O; Nakamura, Celso V

    2016-12-01

    This work evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of TDZ 2 on Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes and determined the possible mechanism of action of this compound on T. cruzi death. TDZ 2 inhibited T. cruzi proliferation in vitro and had low haemolytic potential. It also induced morphological and ultrastructural alterations. We observed a reduction of cell volume, the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, an increase in ROS production, lipoperoxidation of the cell membrane, lipid bodies formation and production of nitric oxide, a decrease in reduced thiols levels and, presence of autophagic vacuoles. The in vivo study found a reduction of parasitemia in animals treated with TDZ 2 alone or combined with benznidazole. Altogether, the alterations induced by TDZ 2 point to an oxidative stress condition that lead to T. cruzi cell death. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural Insights into Inhibition of Sterol 14[alpha]-Demethylase in the Human Pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Lepesheva, Galina I.; Hargrove, Tatiana Y.; Anderson, Spencer; Kleshchenko, Yuliya; Furtak, Vyacheslav; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Villalta, Fernando; Waterman, Michael R. (Vanderbilt); (NWU); (Meharry)

    2010-09-02

    Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis), which threatens the lives of millions of people and remains incurable in its chronic stage. The antifungal drug posaconazole that blocks sterol biosynthesis in the parasite is the only compound entering clinical trials for the chronic form of this infection. Crystal structures of the drug target enzyme, Trypanosoma cruzi sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), complexed with posaconazole, another antifungal agent fluconazole and an experimental inhibitor, (R)-4{prime}-chloro-N-(1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-(1H-imid-azol-1-yl)ethyl)biphenyl-4-carboxamide (VNF), allow prediction of important chemical features that enhance the drug potencies. Combined with comparative analysis of inhibitor binding parameters, influence on the catalytic activity of the trypanosomal enzyme and its human counterpart, and their cellular effects at different stages of the Trypanosoma cruzi life cycle, the structural data provide a molecular background to CYP51 inhibition and azole resistance and enlighten the path for directed design of new, more potent and selective drugs to develop an efficient treatment for Chagas disease.

  4. Role of Trypanosoma cruzi Trans-sialidase on the Escape from Host Immune Surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardy, Ana F. F. R.; Freire-de-Lima, Celio G.; Pérez, Ana R.; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the flagellate protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, affecting millions of people throughout Latin America. The parasite dampens host immune response causing modifications in diverse lymphoid compartments, including the thymus. T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) seems to play a fundamental role in such immunopathological events. This unusual enzyme catalyses the transference of sialic acid molecules from host glycoconjugates to acceptor molecules placed on the parasite surface. TS activity mediates several biological effects leading to the subversion of host immune system, hence favoring both parasite survival and the establishment of chronic infection. This review summarizes current findings on the roles of TS in the immune response during T. cruzi infection. PMID:27047464

  5. Colony polymerase chain reaction of stably transfected Trypanosoma cruzi grown on solid medium

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    Wagner G dos Santos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Tools for the genetic manipulation of Trypanosoma cruzi are largely unavailable, although several vectors for transfection of epimastigotes and expression of foreign or recombinant genes have been developed. We have previously constructed several plasmid vectors in which recombinant genes are expressed in T. cruzi using the rRNA promoter. In this report, we demonstrate that one of these vectors can simultaneously mediate expression of neomycin phosphotransferase and green fluorescent protein when used to stably transfect cultured epimastigotes. These stably transfected epimastigotes can be selected and cloned as unique colonies on solid medium. We describe a simple colony PCR approach to the screening of these T. cruzi colonies for relevant genes. Thus, the methodologies outlined herein provide important new tools for the genetic dissection of this important parasite.

  6. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Chiguer, Dylan L; Hernández-Luis, Francisco; Nogueda-Torres, Benjamín; Castillo, Rafael; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Hernández-Campos, Alicia; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-09-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal) drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol), has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target.

  7. JVG9, a benzimidazole derivative, alters the surface and cytoskeleton of Trypanosoma cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan L Díaz-Chiguer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi has a particular cytoskeleton that consists of a subpellicular network of microtubules and actin microfilaments. Therefore, it is an excellent target for the development of new anti-parasitic drugs. Benzimidazole 2-carbamates, a class of well-known broad-spectrum anthelmintics, have been shown to inhibit the in vitro growth of many protozoa. Therefore, to find efficient anti-trypanosomal (trypanocidal drugs, our group has designed and synthesised several benzimidazole derivatives. One, named JVG9 (5-chloro-1H-benzimidazole-2-thiol, has been found to be effective against T. cruzi bloodstream trypomastigotes under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Here, we present the in vitro effects observed by laser scanning confocal and scanning electron microscopy on T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Changes in the surface and the distribution of the cytoskeletal proteins are consistent with the hypothesis that the trypanocidal activity of JVG9 involves the cytoskeleton as a target.

  8. Synthesis and 2D-QSAR studies of neolignan-based diaryl-tetrahydrofuran and -furan analogues with remarkable activity against Trypanosoma cruzi and assessment of the trypanothione reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Ana Paula; de Carvalho, Marcelo Rodrigues; Bernardes, Lilian Sibelle Campos; Moraes, Milena Hoehr de; de Melo, Eduardo Borges; Lopes, Carla Duque; Steindel, Mario; da Silva, João Santana; Carvalho, Ivone

    2017-11-10

    Two series of diaryl-tetrahydrofuran and -furan were synthesised and screened for anti-trypanosomal activity against trypomastigote and amastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Based on evidence that modification of a natural product may result in a more effective drug than the natural product itself, and using known neolignan inhibitors veraguensin 1 and grandisin 2 as templates to synthesise simpler analogues, remarkable anti-trypanosomal activity and selectivity were found for 3,5-dimethoxylated diaryl-furan 5c and 2,4-dimethoxylated diaryl-tetrahydrofuran 4e analogues with EC 50 0.01 μM and EC 50 0.75 μM, respectively, the former being 260-fold more potent than veraguensin 1 and 150-fold better than benznidazole, the current available drugs for Chagas disease treatment. The ability of the most potent anti-trypanosomal compounds to penetrate LLC-MK2 cells infected with T. cruzi amastigotes parasite was tested, which revealed 4e and 5e analogues as the most effective, causing no damage to mammalian cells. In particular, the majority of the derivatives were non-toxic against mice spleen cells. 2D-QSAR studies show the rigid central core and the position of dimethoxy-aryl substituents dramatically affect the anti-trypanosomal activity. The mode of action of the most active anti-trypanosomal derivatives was investigated by exploring the anti-oxidant functions of Trypanothione reductase (TR). As a result, diarylfuran series displayed the strongest inhibition, highlighting compounds 5d-e (IC 50 19.2 and 17.7 μM) and 5f-g (IC 50 8.9 and 7.4 μM), respectively, with similar or 2-fold higher than the reference inhibitor clomipramine (IC 50 15.2 μM). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids.

  10. Chemical constituents from Waltheria indica exert in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretton, Sylvian; Bréant, Lise; Pourrez, Lucie; Ambuehl, Chiara; Perozzo, Remo; Marcourt, Laurence; Kaiser, Marcel; Cuendet, Muriel; Christen, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Six extracts from the roots and the aerial parts of Waltheria indica L. (Malvaceae) were screened for their in vitro antitrypanosomal activity towards Trypanosoma brucei brucei STIB 427 strain, T. brucei rhodesiense STIB 900 and Trypanosoma cruzi Tulahuen C4. The dichloromethane extract from the roots showed the highest activity against T. cruzi (IC50=0.74 μg/mL) as well as a good selectivity index (SI value of 35). Based on these results, this extract was fractionated and led to the isolation of three alkaloids (adouetin X (1), waltheriones A (2) and C (3)) and three pentacyclic triterpene derivatives (betulinic acid (4), 3β-acetoxy-27-trans-caffeoyloxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid methyl ester (5) and 3β-acetoxy-27-cis-caffeoyloxyolean-12-en-28-oic acid methyl ester (6)) identified by 1D and 2D NMR, UV, IR and MS analyses. Among these, waltherione C exhibited the highest and selective antitrypanosomal activity towards T. cruzi (IC50=1.93 μM) with low cytotoxicity (IC50=101.23 μM), resulting in a selectivity index value of 52. Waltherione C conforms to hit activity criteria with respect to T. cruzi as required by the WHO/TDR. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Trypanosoma cruzi: strain selection by diferent schedules of mouse passage of an initially mixed infection

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    Maria P. Deane

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available From an initial double infection in mice, established by simultaneous and equivalent inocula of bloodstream forms of strains Y and F of Trypanosoma cruzi, two lines were derived by subinoculations: one (W passaged every week, the other (M every month. Through biological and biochemical methods only the Y strain was identified at the end of the 10th and 16th passages of line W and only the F strain at the 2nd and 4th passages of line M. The results illustrate strain selection through laboratory manipulation of initially mixed populations of T. cruzi.De uma infecção inicialmente dupla em camundongo, estabelecida por inóculo simultaneo e equivalente de formas sanguíneas das cepas Y e F de Trypanosoma cruzi, duas linhagens foram originadas por subinoculações: uma (W passada casa semana, a outra (M cada mês. Por métodos biológicos e bioquímicos apenas a cepa Y foi identificada ao fim a 10a. e 16a. passagens da linhagem W e apenas a cepa F na 2a. e 4a.passagens de linhagem M. Os resultados demonstram a seleção de cepas através de manipulação em laboratorio de populações inicialmente mistas de T. cruzi.

  12. Rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation for the synthesis of quinonoid compounds: Significant Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activities and electrochemical studies of functionalized quinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Guilherme A M; Silva, Thaissa L; Goulart, Marilia O F; de Simone, Carlos A; Barbosa, Juliana M C; Salomão, Kelly; de Castro, Solange L; Bower, John F; da Silva Júnior, Eufrânio N

    2017-08-18

    Thirty four halogen and selenium-containing quinones, synthesized by rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation and palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions, were evaluated against bloodstream trypomastigotes of T. cruzi. We have identified fifteen compounds with IC 50 /24 h values of less than 2 μM. Electrochemical studies on A-ring functionalized naphthoquinones were also performed aiming to correlate redox properties with trypanocidal activity. For instance, (E)-5-styryl-1,4-naphthoquinone 59 and 5,8-diiodo-1,4-naphthoquinone 3, which are around fifty fold more active than the standard drug benznidazole, are potential derivatives for further investigation. These compounds represent powerful new agents useful in Chagas disease therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure-based approach to pharmacophore identification, in silico screening, and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship studies for inhibitors of Trypanosoma cruzi dihydrofolate reductase function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schormann, N.; Senkovich, O.; Walker, K.; Wright, D.L.; Anderson, A.C.; Rosowsky, A.; Ananthan, S.; Shinkre, B.; Velu, S.; Chattopadhyay, D. (UAB); (Connecticut); (Southern Research); (DFCI)

    2009-07-10

    We have employed a structure-based three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approach to predict the biochemical activity for inhibitors of T. cruzi dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS). Crystal structures of complexes of the enzyme with eight different inhibitors of the DHFR activity together with the structure in the substrate-free state (DHFR domain) were used to validate and refine docking poses of ligands that constitute likely active conformations. Structural information from these complexes formed the basis for the structure-based alignment used as input for the QSAR study. Contrary to indirect ligand-based approaches the strategy described here employs a direct receptor-based approach. The goal is to generate a library of selective lead inhibitors for further development as antiparasitic agents. 3D-QSAR models were obtained for T. cruzi DHFR-TS (30 inhibitors in learning set) and human DHFR (36 inhibitors in learning set) that show a very good agreement between experimental and predicted enzyme inhibition data. For crossvalidation of the QSAR model(s), we have used the 10% leave-one-out method. The derived 3D-QSAR models were tested against a few selected compounds (a small test set of six inhibitors for each enzyme) with known activity, which were not part of the learning set, and the quality of prediction of the initial 3D-QSAR models demonstrated that such studies are feasible. Further refinement of the models through integration of additional activity data and optimization of reliable docking poses is expected to lead to an improved predictive ability.

  14. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N. [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, Rafael M. [Biology of Host Parasite Interactions Unit, Institute Pasteur, 75015 Paris (France); Braz, Gloria R.C. [Department of Biochemistry, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, 21941-909 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Tanaka, Aparecida S., E-mail: Tanaka.bioq@epm.br [Department of Biochemistry, Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Escola Paulista de Medicina, 04044-020 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  15. The Ly49E receptor inhibits the immune control of acute Trypanosoma cruzi infection

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    Jessica Filtjens

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi circulates in the blood upon infection and invades a variety of cells. Parasites intensively multiply during the acute phase of infection and persist lifelong at low levels in tissues and blood during the chronic phase. Natural killer (NK and NKT cells play an important role in the immune control of T. cruzi infection, mainly by releasing the cytokine IFN-γ that activates the microbicidal action of macrophages and other cells and shapes a protective type 1 immune response. The mechanisms by which immune cells are regulated to produce IFN-γ during T. cruzi infection are still incompletely understood. Here, we show that urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA is induced early upon T. cruzi infection, and remains elevated until day 20 post inoculation. We previously demonstrated that the inhibitory receptor Ly49E, which is expressed, among others, on NK and NKT cells, is triggered by uPA. Therefore, we compared wild type (WT to Ly49E knockout (KO mice for their control of experimental T. cruzi infection. Our results show that young, i.e. 4- and 6-week-old, Ly49E KO mice control the infection better than WT mice, indicated by a lower parasite load and less cachexia. The beneficial effect of Ly49E depletion is more obvious in 4-week-old male than in female mice and weakens in 8-week-old mice. In young mice, the lower T. cruzi parasitemia in Ly49E KO mice is paralleled by higher IFN-γ production compared to their WT controls. Our data indicate that Ly49E receptor expression inhibits the immune control of T. cruzi infection. This is the first demonstration that the inhibitory Ly49E receptor can interfere with the immune response to a pathogen in vivo.

  16. Infecção tripla por Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum: relato de caso Triple infection by Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum: case report

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    Andrea Silvestre Lobão Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente registro acerca da identificação de infecção aguda de dois plasmódios e um Trypanosoma constitui evento raro. Pré-escolar, sexo feminino, 5 anos de idade, apresentou síndrome febril; foi submetida a exame de gota espessa no qual foram identificadas formas assexuadas e sexuadas de Plasmodium vivax e P. falciparum, respectivamente, além de tripomastigotas sanguíneos de Trypanosoma cruzi. No peridomicílio, foram encontrados insetos da espécie Rhodnius sp. Os autores reforçam a importância dos estudos dos ciclos peridomiciliares de T. cruzi em ambientes silvestres na Amazônia e discutem a importância da estratégia de vigilância continuada de Trypanosomas spp. nos exames de gota espessa.This report describes a rare case of acute infection caused by two Plasmodia and one Trypanosoma. 5 year-old female patient attending kindergarten presented persistent fever syndrome. She was submitted to thick smear exam, in which asexual and sexual forms of Plasmodium vivax and P. falciparum were detected, respectively, as well as trypomastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi. Rhodnius sp. triatomines were found in the vicinity. The authors reinforce the importance of investigating the domiciliary cycles of T. cruzi in the Amazon region. Moreover, we discuss the importance of continuous monitoring of Trypanosomas spp. in thick smear exams.

  17. Trypanosoma teixeirae: A new species belonging to the T. cruzi clade causing trypanosomosis in an Australian little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Amanda D; Mackie, John T; Stenner, Robyn; Gillett, Amber; Irwin, Peter; Ryan, Una

    2016-06-15

    Little is known about the genetic diversity and pathogenicity of trypanosomes in Australian bats. Recently a novel trypanosome species was identified in an adult female little red flying fox (Pteropus scapulatus) with clinical and pathological evidence of trypanosomosis. The present study used morphology and molecular methods to demonstrate that this trypanosome is a distinct species and we propose the name Trypanosoma teixeirae sp. n. Morphological comparison showed that its circulating trypomastigotes were significantly different from those of Trypanosoma pteropi and Trypanosoma hipposideri, two species previously described from Australian bats. Genetic information was not available for T. pteropi and T. hipposideri but phylogenetic analyses at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and glycosomal glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (gGAPDH) loci indicated that T. teixeirae sp. n. was genetically distinct and clustered with other bat-derived trypanosome species within the Trypanosoma cruzi clade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Phytomonas serpens, a tomato parasite, shares antigens with Trypanosoma cruzi that are recognized by human sera and induce protective immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breganó, José Wander; Picão, Renata Cristina; Graça, Viviane Krominski; Menolli, Rafael Andrade; Itow Jankevicius, Shiduca; Pinge Filho, P; Jankevicius, José Vítor

    2003-12-05

    The immune cross-reactivity between Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan that causes Chagas' disease, and Phytomonas serpens, a trypanosomatid that infects tomatoes, was studied. Sera from patients with Chagas' disease presented a strong reactivity with P. serpens antigens by conventional serological assays such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and direct agglutination test (DAT), confirmed after cross-absorption experiments. The results show that this protozoan is highly immunogenic and that rabbit and mouse hyperimmune serum raised against T. cruzi or P. serpens was able to recognize both T. cruzi and P. serpens antigens in immunofluorescence and agglutination assays. The antigenic cross-reactivity between T. cruzi and P. serpens was also demonstrated in vivo. BALB/c mice immunized by the intraperitoneal or oral route with P. serpens and later challenged with a lethal inoculum of T. cruzi blood forms showed a significant decrease in parasitemia and increase in survival compared to controls. A practical implication of these findings is that the ingestion by humans or animals of living plant trypanosomatids present in naturally infected edible fruits could potentially prime the immune response to T. cruzi antigens and interfere with the development of T. cruzi infection.

  19. Transmisión vectorial y congénita del Trypanosoma cruzi en Las Lomitas, Formosa Vectorial and congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Las Lomitas, Formosa

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    Sergio Sosa-Estani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas causada por el Trypanosoma cruzi es una causa importante de morbimortalidad en Latino América. El objetivo de este estudio fue describir las tasas de infestación en las viviendas de cuatro comunidades aborígenes de Las Lomitas (Región del Gran Chaco, Formosa, Argentina; la tasa de infección en la población infantil residente en las mismas, en donantes de sangre y en mujeres embarazadas que asistieron al Hospital de Las Lomitas y la tasa de infección congénita de niños nacidos de mujeres infectadas durante el período de estudio. La tasa de infestación en 172 viviendas evaluadas en 2006 alcanzó el 32%. La prevalencia de infección en 445 personas fue de 17.5% y en menores de 5 años de edad fue 8.6%. La tasa de infección en donantes de sangre alcanzó a 18.6% y en mujeres embarazadas fue 29.1%. La tasa de infección considerada congénita en 47 niños nacidos de mujeres infectadas residentes en viviendas bajo vigilancia fue de 17.0%. El estudio mostró, al momento de su inicio, índices compatibles con transmisión vectorial activa. Después del control vectorial con insecticidas, la tasa de infestación se redujo a 3.3%. El sistema de salud local incorporó procedimientos de prevención primaria y secundaria para evitar nuevos casos e instaurar el tratamiento de la población infectada.Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. The objective of this study was to describe the rate of infestation in four aboriginal communities in Las Lomitas (Great Chaco Region, Formosa, Argentina; the rate of infection in children residing in these communities, in blood donors and in pregnant women who received care at the Hospital Las Lomitas, as well as the rate of congenital infection in children born to women infected during the study period. The rate of infestation of 172 households evaluated in 2006 reached 32%. Prevalence of infection among 445 people was 17

  20. Cytokine-dependent and–independent gene expression changes and cell cycle block revealed in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected host cells by comparative mRNA profiling

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    Burleigh Barbara A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The requirements for growth and survival of the intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi within mammalian host cells are poorly understood. Transcriptional profiling of the host cell response to infection serves as a rapid read-out for perturbation of host physiology that, in part, reflects adaptation to the infective process. Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide array analysis we identified common and disparate host cell responses triggered by T. cruzi infection of phenotypically diverse human cell types. Results We report significant changes in transcript abundance in T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (2852, 2155 and 531 genes respectively; fold-change ≥ 2, p-value T. cruzi-infected fibroblasts and endothelial cells transwell plates were used to distinguish cytokine-dependent and -independent gene expression profiles. This approach revealed the induction of metabolic and signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, amino acid catabolism and response to wounding as common themes in T. cruzi-infected cells. In addition, the downregulation of genes involved in mitotic cell cycle and cell division predicted that T. cruzi infection may impede host cell cycle progression. The observation of impaired cytokinesis in T. cruzi-infected cells, following nuclear replication, confirmed this prediction. Conclusion Metabolic pathways and cellular processes were identified as significantly altered at the transcriptional level in response to T. cruzi infection in a cytokine-independent manner. Several of these alterations are supported by previous studies of T. cruzi metabolic requirements or effects on the host. However, our methods also revealed a T. cruzi-dependent block in the host cell cycle, at the level of cytokinesis, previously unrecognized for this pathogen-host cell interaction.

  1. Genetic variation and exchange in Trypanosoma cruzi isolates from the United States.

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    Dawn M Roellig

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is a multiclonal parasite with high levels of genetic diversity and broad host and geographic ranges. Molecular characterization of South American isolates of T. cruzi has demonstrated homologous recombination and nuclear hybridization, as well as the presence of 6 main genetic clusters or "discrete typing units" (DTUs. Few studies have extensively investigated such exchange events and genetic diversity in North American isolates. In the current study, we genetically characterized over 50 US isolates from wildlife reservoirs (e.g., raccoons, opossums, armadillos, skunks, domestic dogs, humans, nonhuman primates, and reduviid vectors from nine states (TX, CA, OK, SC, FL, GA, MD, LA, TN using a multilocus sequencing method. Single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified in sequences of the mismatch-repair class 2 (MSH2 and Tc52 genes. Typing based on the two genes often paralleled genotyping by classic methodologies using mini-exon and 18S and 24Sα rRNA genes. Evidence for genetic exchange was obtained by comparing sequence phylogenies of nuclear and mitochondrial gene targets, dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS and the cytochrome oxidase subunit II- NADH dehydrogenase subunit I region (COII-ND1, respectively. We observed genetic exchange in several US isolates as demonstrated by incongruent mitochondrial and nuclear genes phylogenies, which confirms a previous finding of a single genetic exchange event in a Florida isolate. The presence of SNPs and evidence of genetic exchange illustrates that strains from the US are genetically diverse, even though only two phylogenetic lineages have been identified in this region.

  2. Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity in vitro of phases and isolated compounds from Excoecaria lucida leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cristiane Franca; Pacheco, Ania Ochoa; Alves, Rayane Nogueira; Tavares, Josean Fechine; da Silva, Marcelo Sobral; Arranz, Julio Cesar Escalona

    2018-01-11

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. This illness is found mainly in 21 Latin American countries and an estimated 8 million people are infected worldwide. The unsatisfactory chemotherapy provokes severe toxicity and resistant strains. Medicinal plants constitute a promising source of new drugs and remedies against all kinds of disorders, mainly infectious diseases arousing interest worldwide. The aim of this study has been the isolation, structural identification and evaluation of the trypanocidal activity of samples present in the Excoecaria lucida Sw. leaves. Total extract (TE) of E. lucida Sw. leaves was obtained by ethanol extract therefore fractionated sequentially with hexane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, to obtain three phases: Hex, EA and But, respectively. Ellagic acid (EL1) was purified from both EA and But phases, while EL2; a 1:1 stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside plus sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside mixture was obtained from the Hex phase. Activity assays was performed using bloodstream and intracellular forms of T. cruzi and cytotoxicity assays using L929 fibroblasts. The EL1 and EL2 samples were more active against bloodstream trypomastigote forms with EC50 of 53.0±3.6 and 58.2±29.0 µg/mL, respectively; at 100 µg/mL. These samples also shown 70% of inhibition of L929 cells infection. Toxicity assays demonstrated that after 96 h of treatment only the fractions Hex and EA presented detectable cytotoxicity. ellagic acid, stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside and sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside are reported for the first time in E. lucida Sw. leaves as well as their biological activity studies supporting further investigations for Chagas disease treatment. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Vertical transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in the Province of Choapa, IV Region, Chile: Preliminary Report (2005-2008

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    Werner Apt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Chagas disease acquired special importance in Chile after the certification of the control of Triatoma infestans and transmission by blood donors affected with Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to establish adequate protocols for intervention and control in infected mother-neonate pairs in endemic zones of Chagas disease, we present partial results (2005-2008 of a pilot project which is being carried out in the Province of Choapa, IV Region, Chile, whose objectives are: determine the current prevalence of the disease in pregnant women, estimate the incidence of vertical transmission of T. cruzi to newborns, determine the lineages of the parasite present in mothers who do and do not transmit the disease, determine the prevalence of Chagas disease in maternal grandmothers of neonates and study placental histopathology. Preliminary results indicated that in this study period, 3.7% of the women who gave birth in the Province have Chagas disease and 2.5% of their newborns were infected. The most frequent T. cruzi genotypes found in mothers studied during pregnancy were TCI and TCIId, either alone or in mixed infections. A high percentage (74.3% of the grandmothers studied was infected with the parasite. In 29 placentas from mothers with Chagas disease we observed edema, necrosis, fibrinoid deposits and slight lymphoplasmocyte infiltration. In three placentas we found erythroblastosis and in one of them amastigote forms of T. cruzi; this was one of the cases of congenital infection. The evaluation of the diagnostic and control protocols generated will allow us to determine if it has been possible to modify the natural history of vertical transmission of T. cruzi in Chile.

  4. Importance of species of Triatominae (Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in risk of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in western Mexico.

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    Martínez-Ibarra, J A; Grant-Guillén, Y; Morales-Corona, Z Y; Haro-Rodríguez, S; Ventura-Rodríguez, L V; Nogueda-Torres, B; Bustos-Saldaña, R

    2008-05-01

    The epidemiological risk of infection by Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas in human populations of western Mexico is still under study. Although most vectors in this region and their vector capability are already known, new studies estimating the risk and the importance of individual Triatominae species (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) for T. cruzi transmission are necessary. For 1 yr, every month, > 400 human dwellings and their surroundings in eight communities of two western Mexico states were searched for triatomines. More than 1,000 specimens representing four species were collected and checked for T. cruzi infection. Based on the usual entomological indices, only the inhabitants of Gavilán El Progreso-La Villita are at serious risk of vectorial infection by T. cruzi. A population of Meccus longipennis (Usinger) was found living in peridomestic rock pile boundary walls after an insecticide spraying. It was confirmed the major role of peridomestic habitats as shelter areas for triatomines, particularly in rock pile boundary walls and chicken roosts. Triatominae presence also was verified in certain sylvatic habitats, including primarily heaps of stones. The important role of M. longipennis in the potential transmission of T. cruzi in the region and the secondary role of M. picturatus (Usinger) and Triatoma barberi Usinger also were confirmed. Null colonization of houses by T. barberi, which was collected primarily in peridomestic habitats, differs from its common intradomiciliary collection in other studies. Meccus pallidipennis (Stål) most probably does not exist in Nayarit. Meccus mazzottii (Usinger) and Meccus phyllosomus (Burmeister) are no longer found in Nayarit and Jalisco. Additional studies are necessary to determine the current epidemiological situation in other areas of western Mexico.

  5. Extended screening of Trypanosoma cruzi among the offspring of infected women. Barcelona North metropolitan area, Catalonia (Spain), 2005-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara Román, Albert; Valerio Sallent, Lluís; Pérez Quílez, Olga; Roure Díez, Sílvia; Moreno Millán, Nemesio; Villanova Sanfeliu, Xavier; Martinez Cuevas, Octavi

    2017-07-06

    To date, very little data is available on the extensive, familiar, serological screening of Trypanosoma cruzi from infected-index cases. As it is a parasite with possibility of mother-to-child fetal transmission, the study of the offspring of chronically infected women has a special relevance. An observational study using a capture-recapture method that evaluates the offspring serological status of women diagnosed with T. cruzi infection (positive serology) in the northern metropolitan area of Barcelona during 2005-2016. A total of 238 women with positive serology for T. cruzi were identified. Of these, 117 (49.2%) could be localized. Their offspring summarized 300 individuals, of which 192 (64%) had serology records, with 23 positive for T. cruzi (11.98%; CI95%: 8.1-17.3). Among the 53 children born within the study area, 5 (9.8%, CI95%: 4.2-20.9) cases of vertical transmission were recorded. All children born as of 2010 (the starting year of mother screening) had serological outputs. Offspring of T. cruzi-seropositive women showed a high rate of seropositivity. The prevalence of vertical transmission is also remarkably high but comparable to that obtained in other European studies. The main source of loss was non-accessible women. It is reasonable to formaly include extensive, familiar, serological assessment in Chagas screening guidelines. In order to avoid losses, any eventual screening should be implemented at the time of the maternal diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of buthionine sulfoximine nifurtimox and benznidazole upon trypanothione and metallothionein proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    JUAN DIEGO MAYA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins rich in sulfhydryl groups, such as metallothionein, are present in several strains of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Metallothionein-like protein concentrations ranged from 5.1 to 13.2 pmol/mg protein depending on the parasite strain and growth phase. Nifurtimox and benznidazole, used in the treatment of Chagas' disease, decreased metallothionein activity by approximately 70%. T. cruzi metallothionein was induced by ZnCl2. Metallothionein from T. cruzi was partially purified and its monobromobimane derivative showed a molecular weight of approximately 10,000 Da by SDS-PAGE analysis. The concentration of trypanothione, the major glutathione conjugate in T. cruzi, ranged from 3.8 to 10.8 nmol/mg protein, depending on the culture phase. The addition of buthionine sulfoximine to the protozoal culture considerably reduced the concentration of trypanothione and had no effect upon the metallothionein concentration. The possible contribution of metallothionein-like proteins to drug resistance in T. cruzi is discussed.

  7. Sympathetic glial cells and macrophages develop different responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation.

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    de Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Silva, Isabel Cristina Costa; Galvão, Lúcia Maria da Cunha; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) participates in neuronal lesions in the digestive form of Chagas disease and the proximity of parasitised glial cells and neurons in damaged myenteric ganglia is a frequent finding. Glial cells have crucial roles in many neuropathological situations and are potential sources of NO. Here, we investigate peripheral glial cell response to Trypanosoma cruzi infection to clarify the role of these cells in the neuronal lesion pathogenesis of Chagas disease. We used primary glial cell cultures from superior cervical ganglion to investigate cell activation and NO production after T. cruzi infection or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in comparison to peritoneal macrophages. T. cruzi infection was greater in glial cells, despite similar levels of NO production in both cell types. Glial cells responded similarly to T. cruzi and LPS, but were less responsive to LPS than macrophages were. Our observations contribute to the understanding of Chagas disease pathogenesis, as based on the high susceptibility of autonomic glial cells to T. cruzi infection with subsequent NO production. Moreover, our findings will facilitate future research into the immune responses and activation mechanisms of peripheral glial cells, which are important for understanding the paradoxical responses of this cell type in neuronal lesions and neuroprotection.

  8. The Trypanosoma cruzi Protein TcHTE Is Critical for Heme Uptake.

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    Marcelo L Merli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, presents nutritional requirements for several metabolites. It requires heme for the biosynthesis of several heme-proteins involved in essential metabolic pathways like mitochondrial cytochromes and respiratory complexes, as well as enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sterols and unsaturated fatty acids. However, this parasite lacks a complete route for its synthesis. In view of these facts, T. cruzi has to incorporate heme from the environment during its life cycle. In other words, their hosts must supply the heme for heme-protein synthesis. Although the acquisition of heme is a fundamental issue for the parasite's replication and survival, how this cofactor is imported and distributed is poorly understood. In this work, we used different fluorescent heme analogs to explore heme uptake along the different life-cycle stages of T. cruzi, showing that this parasite imports it during its replicative stages: the epimastigote in the insect vector and the intracellular amastigote in the mammalian host. Also, we identified and characterized a T. cruzi protein (TcHTE with 55% of sequence similarity to LHR1 (protein involved in L. amazonensis heme transport, which is located in the flagellar pocket, where the transport of nutrients proceeds in trypanosomatids. We postulate TcHTE as a protein involved in improving the efficiency of the heme uptake or trafficking in T. cruzi.

  9. Trypanosoma cruzi induces trophoblast differentiation: a potential local antiparasitic mechanism of the human placenta?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liempi, A; Castillo, C; Duaso, J; Droguett, D; Sandoval, A; Barahona, K; Hernández, A; Galanti, N; Maya, J D; Kemmerling, U

    2014-12-01

    The congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi) is responsible for one-third of new Chagas disease cases each year. During congenital transmission, the parasite breaks down the placental barrier formed by the trophoblast, basal laminae and villous stroma. The observation that only 5% of infected mothers transmit the parasite to the fetus implies that the placenta may impair parasite transmission. The trophoblast undergoes continuous epithelial turnover, which is considered part of innate immunity. Therefore, we propose that T. cruzi induces differentiation in the trophoblast as part of a local antiparasitic mechanism of the placenta. We analyzed β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) and syncytin protein expression in HPCVE and BeWo cells using immunofluorescence and western blotting. Additionally, β-hCG secretion into the culture medium was measured by ELISA. We assessed the differentiation of trophoblastic cells in BeWo cells using the two-color fusion assay and by determining desmoplakin re-distribution. T. cruzi trypomastigotes induce β-hCG secretion and protein expression as well as syncytin protein expression in HPCVE and BeWo cells. Additionally, the parasite induces the trophoblast fusion of BeWo cells. T. cruzi induces differentiation of the trophoblast, which may contribute to increase the trophoblast turnover. The turnover could be a component of local antiparasitic mechanisms in the human placenta. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A high-affinity putrescine-cadaverine transporter from Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Hasne, Marie-Pierre; Coppens, Isabelle; Soysa, Radika; Ullman, Buddy

    2011-01-01

    Summary Whereas mammalian cells and most other organisms can synthesize polyamines from basic amino acids, the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is incapable of polyamine biosynthesis de novo and therefore obligatorily relies upon putrescine acquisition from the host to meet its nutritional requirements. The cell surface proteins that mediate polyamine transport into T. cruzi, as well as most eukaryotes, however, have by-in-large eluded discovery at the molecular level. Here we report the identification and functional characterization of two polyamine transporters, TcPOT1.1 and TcPOT1.2, encoded by alleles from two T. cruzi haplotypes. Overexpression of the TcPOT1.1 and TcPOT1.2 genes in T. cruzi epimastigotes revealed that TcPOT1.1 and TcPOT1.2 were high-affinity transporters that recognized both putrescine and cadaverine but not spermidine or spermine. Furthermore, the activities and subcellular locations of both TcPOT1.1 and TcPOT1.2 in intact parasites were profoundly influenced by extracellular putrescine availability. These results establish TcPOT1.1 and TcPOT1.2 as key components of the T. cruzi polyamine transport pathway, an indispensable nutritional function for the parasite that may be amenable to therapeutic manipulation. PMID:20149109

  11. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    Valeria P Sülsen

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin

  12. Mode of Action of the Sesquiterpene Lactones Psilostachyin and Psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sülsen, Valeria P; Puente, Vanesa; Papademetrio, Daniela; Batlle, Alcira; Martino, Virginia S; Frank, Fernanda M; Lombardo, María E

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which is a major endemic disease in Latin America and is recognized by the WHO as one of the 17 neglected tropical diseases in the world. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C, two sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Ambrosia spp., have been demonstrated to have trypanocidal activity. Considering both the potential therapeutic targets present in the parasite, and the several mechanisms of action proposed for sesquiterpene lactones, the aim of this work was to characterize the mode of action of psilostachyin and psilostachyin C on Trypanosoma cruzi and to identify the possible targets for these molecules. Psilostachyin and psilostachyin C were isolated from Ambrosia tenuifolia and Ambrosia scabra, respectively. Interaction of sesquiterpene lactones with hemin, the induction of oxidative stress, the inhibition of cruzipain and trypanothione reductase and their ability to inhibit sterol biosynthesis were evaluated. The induction of cell death by apoptosis was also evaluated by analyzing phosphatidylserine exposure detected using annexin-V/propidium iodide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, assessed with Rhodamine 123 and nuclear DNA fragmentation evaluated by the TUNEL assay. Both STLs were capable of interacting with hemin. Psilostachyin increased about 5 times the generation of reactive oxygen species in Trypanosoma cruzi after a 4h treatment, unlike psilostachyin C which induced an increase in reactive oxygen species levels of only 1.5 times. Only psilostachyin C was able to inhibit the biosynthesis of ergosterol, causing an accumulation of squalene. Both sesquiterpene lactones induced parasite death by apoptosis. Upon evaluating the combination of both compounds, and additive trypanocidal effect was observed. Despite their structural similarity, both sesquiterpene lactones exerted their anti-T. cruzi activity through interaction with different targets. Psilostachyin accomplished its antiparasitic

  13. Δ9 desaturase from Trypanosoma cruzi: Key enzyme in the parasite metabolism. Cloning and overexpression.

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    Woelke, Mariela R; Paulucci, Natalia S; Selva, Armentano; Garban, Hermes; de Lema, Mirta García

    2017-01-01

    Desaturases, key enzymes in the metabolism of fatty acids, regulate the physical and biochemical properties of membranes. They adjust the composition of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in response to changes in the environmental. We demonstrated the existence of Δ9 desaturase activity in epimastigotes of the Trypanosoma cruzi Tulahuen strain. In the present study, showed that this enzyme has an approximate molecular mass of 50kDa and a pI value of approximately 9. In order to characterize the Δ9 desaturase of Trypanosoma cruzi, (TcΔ9DES) we have cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene consists of 1300bp and encodes a peptide of 433 amino acids with a molecular weight of 50kDa. Analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed three clusters of histidine and two hydrophobic regions, characteristic of membrane-bound desaturases. Gene expression studies showed that TcΔ9DES was overexpressed as an active protein. Fatty acid analysis showed that the expressed protein was confirmed to be functional with Δ9 desaturase activity. This enzyme changed the fatty acid profile of TcΔ9DES-expressing E. coli, decreasing the levels of palmitic (16:0) and stearic (18:0) acids and enhancing palmitoleic (16:1Δ9) and monounsaturated 18 carbons fatty acids. When [1-14C]palmitic or [1-14C]stearic acid was used as substrate, TcΔ9DES-expressing E. coli exhibited high desaturase activity associated with increased levels of monounsaturated fatty acids, suggesting that the TcΔ9DES enzyme was actively expressed in E. coli. To check the commitment of TcΔ9DES against sterol biosynthesis inhibitors we tested the activity under ketoconazole effect. Native TcΔ9DES, showed a significant activity inhibition. Since TcΔ9DES has shown active participation under different environmental factors, among them, ketoconazole, we consider that it plays a critical role in the metabolism of the parasite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Expression and purification of functional, recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi complement regulatory protein.

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    Beucher, Margaret; Meira, Wendell S F; Zegarra, Vasthy; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Norris, Karen A

    2003-01-01

    The complement regulatory protein (CRP) of Trypanosoma cruzi is a developmentally regulated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein that protects the parasite from complement-mediated killing, and is an important virulence determinant of the microorganism. CRP binds human complement components C3b and C4b to restrict activation of the complement cascade. Here, we report production of functional, recombinant T. cruzi CRP in mammalian cells and a one-step purification of the recombinant protein. Exchange of the crp DNA sequence encoding the carboxy-terminal GPI signal sequence with the corresponding sequence of decay accelerating factor (DAF) was necessary for recognition, cleavage, and addition of GPI in mammalian cells. CRP production was assessed in two mammalian cell lines with crp-daf gene expression driven by three different transcription control regions: Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early gene, and chicken beta-actin promoter/CMV enhancer. We present evidence that CRP produced in transfected Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cells was functional and protected the cells from complement-mediated lysis. To facilitate purification of the recombinant protein, a hexahistidyl tag was incorporated at 3(') end of the cDNA upstream of the GPI anchor addition sequence. An additional histidine fusion construct was made that allowed for secretion and recovery of recombinant protein from culture supernatant fluid. Both membrane and secreted forms of the protein were purified in one step by nickel nitrilotriacetic acid. The production and purification of functionally active CRP in a non-infectious expression system will allow for structure and function studies aimed at identifying the active site(s) of this protein.

  15. Identification of Anti-Trypanosoma cruziLead Compounds with Putative Immunomodulatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otta, Dayane Andriotti; de Araújo, Fernanda Fortes; de Rezende, Vitor Bortolo; Souza-Fagundes, Elaine Maria; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Costa-Silva, Matheus Fernandes; Santos, Raiany Araújo; Costa, Heloísa Alves; Siqueira Neto, Jair Lage; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa

    2018-02-05

    In substitution for the current Chagas disease treatment with several relevant side effects, new therapeutic candidates have been extensively investigated. In this context, the balanced interaction between mediators of the host immune response seems to be a key element for therapeutic success, where a pro-inflammatory microenvironment modulated by IL-10 is shown to be relevant to potentiate anti- Trypanosoma cruzi drug activity. This study aimed to identify the potential immunomodulatory activity of the anti- T. cruzi K777, Pyronaridine (PYR) and Furazolidone (FUR) compounds in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from noninfected subjects (NI) and chronic Chagas disease patients (CD). Our results showed low cytotoxicity to PBMC populations, with CC 50 = 13.1μM (K777); 9.0μM (PYR) and greater than 20μM (FUR). In addition, K777 showed no impact on the exposure index (EI) of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes (PHA), while PYR and FUR treatments induced increased EI of monocytes and T lymphocytes at late stages of apoptosis in NI subjects. Moreover, K777 induced a more prominent pro-inflammatory response (TNF-α + CD8 + /CD4 + , IFN-γ + CD4 + /CD8 + modulated by IL-10 (IL-10 + CD4 + T/CD8 + T) in comparison with PYR (TNF-α + CD8 + , IL-10 + CD8 + ) and FUR (TNF-α + CD8 + , IL-10 + CD8 + ). Signature analysis of intracytoplasmic cytokines corroborated with the proinflammatory/modulated (K777) and pro-inflammatory (PYR and FUR) profiles previously found. In conclusion, K777 lead compound may induce beneficial changes in the immunological profile of patients presenting the chronic phase of Chagas disease and may contribute to a more effective therapy against the disease. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Novo processo para triagem de medicamentos na infecção experimental pelo Trypanosoma cruzi Proposal of a new process for screening of drugs in experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Rubens Campos

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available É proposto processo para a triagem da capacidade terapêutica de medicamentos na infecção experimental pelo Trypanosoma cruzi. O método tem base no emprego de triatomíneos parasitados que se alimentam, decorridos períodos diferentes para haver compatibilização com níveis sangüíneos, em camundongos aos quais foi administrado o fármaco sob apreciação; assim, o tubo digestivo do hemíptero participará como estrutura propícia à avaliação. Em observação inicial, ocorreu utilização do benzonidazol, que se mostrou apenas parcialmente ativo, pelo menos de acordo com a maneira de execução do novo procedimento.We propose a screening process for detection of therapeutic activity of drugs against experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. It is based on the use of infected tryatominae that are fed on mice which have received the study drug. Blood meals are made at different time schedule in order to adapt with serum drug levels. The digestive tube of the hemyptera will, thus, work as a suitable structure for examination. In a initial observation, benzonidazole was used, and was shown to be only partially active at least in the conditions of this new procedure.

  17. Use of Tc-rCRP as a target for lytic antibody titration after experimental Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

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    Marques, Tatiane; Silva, Gustavo Caetano; Henrique Paiva, Priscila Moraes; Nascentes, Gabriel Antônio Nogueira; Ramirez, Luis Eduardo; Norris, Karen; Meira, Wendell Sérgio Ferreira

    2018-01-01

    Experimental Chagas disease has been used as a model to identify several host/parasite interaction factors involved in immune responses to Trypanosoma cruzi infection. One of the factors inherent to this parasite is the complement regulatory protein (Tc-CRP), a major epitope that induces production of lytic antibodies during T. cruzi infections. Previous studies have evaluated the function of Tc-CRP as an antigenic marker via ELISAs, which demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity when compared to other methods. Therefore, this study aimed to assess and compare the levels of lytic antibodies induced by this protein following experimental infection using different T. cruzi strains. Our results demonstrated that infections induced by strains isolated from vectors resulted in subpatent parasitaemia and low reactivity, as assessed by Tc-rCRP ELISAs. On the other hand, mice inoculated with T. cruzi strains isolated from patients developed patent parasitaemia, and presented elevated lytic antibodies titres, as measured by Tc-rCRP ELISA. In addition, comparison between different mouse lineages demonstrated that Balb/c mice were more reactive than C57BL/6 mice in almost all types of infections, except those infected by the AQ-4 strain. Parasites from the Hel strain generated the greatest lytic antibody response in all evaluated models. Therefore, application of sensitive techniques for monitoring immune responses would enable us to establish growth curves for lytic antibodies during the course of the infection, and allow us to discriminate between T. cruzi strains that originate from different hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology and Molecular Typing of Trypanosoma cruzi in Naturally-Infected Hound Dogs and Associated Triatomine Vectors in Texas, USA.

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    Rachel Curtis-Robles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease throughout the Americas. Few population-level studies have examined the epidemiology of canine infection and strain types of T. cruzi that infect canines in the USA. We conducted a cross-sectional study of T. cruzi infection in working hound dogs in south central Texas, including analysis of triatomine vectors collected within kennel environments.Paired IFA and Chagas Stat-Pak serological testing showed an overall seroprevalence of 57.6% (n = 85, with significant variation across kennels. Dog age had a marginally significant effect on seropositivity, with one year of age increase associated with a 19.6% increase in odds of being seropositive (odds ratio 95% CI 0.996-1.435; p = 0.055. PCR analyses of blood revealed 17.4% of dogs harbored parasite DNA in their blood, including both seronegative and seropositive dogs. Molecular screening of organs from opportunistically sampled seropositive dogs revealed parasite DNA in heart, uterus, and mammary tissues. Strain-typing showed parasite discrete typing units (DTU TcI and TcIV present in dog samples, including a co-occurrence of both DTUs in two individual dogs. Bloodmeal analysis of Triatoma gerstaeckeri and Triatoma sanguisuga insects collected from the kennels revealed exclusively dog DNA. Vector infection with T. cruzi was 80.6% (n = 36, in which T. gerstaeckeri disproportionately harbored TcI (p = 0.045 and T. sanguisuga disproportionately harbored TcIV (p = 0.029. Tracing infection status across dog litters showed some seropositive offspring of seronegative dams, suggesting infection of pups from local triatomine vectors rather than congenital transmission.Canine kennels are high-risk environments for T. cruzi transmission, in which dogs likely serve as the predominant parasite reservoir. Disease and death of working dogs from Chagas disease is associated with unmeasured yet undoubtedly significant financial consequences because working

  19. Effects of a marine serine protease inhibitor on viability and morphology of Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida Nogueira, Natália Pereira; Morgado-Díaz, José Andrés; Menna-Barreto, Rubem Figueiredo Sadok; Paes, Marcia Cristina; da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa

    2013-10-01

    It has been reported that serine peptidase activities of Trypanosoma cruzi play crucial roles in parasite dissemination and host cell invasion and therefore their inhibition could affect the progress of Chagas disease. The present study investigates the interference of the Stichodactyla helianthus Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor (ShPI-I), a 55-amino acid peptide, in T. cruzi serine peptidase activities, parasite viability, and parasite morphology. The effect of this peptide was also studied in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes and it was proved to be a powerful inhibitor of serine proteases activities and the parasite viability. The ultrastructural alterations caused by ShPI-I included vesiculation of the flagellar pocket membrane and the appearance of a cytoplasmic vesicle that resembles an autophagic vacuole. ShPI-I, which showed itself to be an important T. cruzi serine peptidase inhibitor, reduced the parasite viability, in a dose and time dependent manner. The maximum effect of peptide on T. cruzi viability was observed when ShPI-I at 1×10(-5)M was incubated for 24 and 48h which killed completely both metacyclic trypomastigote and epimastigote forms. At 1×10(-6)M ShPI-I, in the same periods of time, reduced parasite viability about 91-95% respectively. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated the formation of concentric membranar structures especially in the cytosol, involving organelles and small vesicles. Profiles of endoplasmic reticulum were also detected, surrounding cytosolic vesicles that resembled autophagic vacuoles. These results suggest that serine peptidases are important in T. cruzi physiology since the inhibition of their activity killed parasites in vitro as well as inducing important morphological alterations. Protease inhibitors thus appear to have a potential role as anti-trypanosomatidal agents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Where do Trypanosoma cruzi go? The distribution of parasites in blood components from fractionated infected whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancino-Faure, Beatriz; Fisa, Roser; Riera, Cristina; Girona-Llobera, Enrique; Jimenez-Marco, Teresa

    2016-09-01

    Platelets (PLTs) are the blood component most frequently involved in Trypanosoma cruzi transfusion transmission cases reported in the literature, although whole blood (WB) and red blood cells (RBCs) have also been incriminated. However, there is little knowledge of the parasite distribution among blood components. The aim of this study was to investigate in which blood component T. cruzi parasites concentrate the most, after fractionating artificially T. cruzi-infected WB. The T. cruzi parasite load was studied by a specific quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in WB, buffy coat (BC), PLT concentrates, RBCs before and after leukoreduction, and plasma (PL). The parasite load in WB experimentally infected with 1.5 × 10(6) parasites (2.78 × 10(3) parasite equivalents/mL) was unevenly distributed among the separated blood components. The highest level was found in the BC (6.94 × 10(3) parasite equivalents/mL) and RBCs before leukoreduction by filtration (2.51 × 10(3) parasite equivalents/mL), after which RBCs presented a 99.9% reduction in parasite levels. Both PL and PLTs, partially leukoreduced by centrifugation but nonfiltered, had low parasite levels, the lowest concentration being in PL. The highest parasite concentration was detected in the BC, followed by RBCs before leukoreduction. There is a notable risk of transfusion-transmitted Chagas disease associated with nonleukoreduced RBCs. Leukoreduction may be an effective prevention strategy for transfusion-transmitted T. cruzi infection, especially in endemic countries and in nonendemic countries with a high rate of immigration from Latin America. © 2016 AABB.

  1. Trypanosoma cruzi extracts elicit protective immune response against chemically induced colon and mammary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubillos, Luis; Freire, Teresa; Berriel, Edgardo; Chiribao, María Laura; Chiale, Carolina; Festari, María Florencia; Medeiros, Andrea; Mazal, Daniel; Rondán, Mariella; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Robello, Carlos; Osinaga, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite that causes Chagas' disease, has anticancer effects mediated, at least in part, by parasite-derived products which inhibit growth of tumor cells. We investigated whether immunity to T. cruzi antigens could induce antitumor activity, using two rat models which reproduce human carcinogenesis: colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), and mammary cancer induced by N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We found that vaccination with T. cruzi epimastigote lysates strongly inhibits tumor development in both animal models. Rats immunized with T. cruzi antigens induce activation of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and splenocytes from these animals showed higher cytotoxic responses against tumors as compared to rats receiving adjuvant alone. Tumor-associated immune responses included increasing number of CD11b/c(+) His48(-) MHC II(+) cells corresponding to macrophages and/or dendritic cells, which exhibited augmented NADPH-oxidase activity. We also found that T. cruzi lysate vaccination developed antibodies specific for colon and mammary rat cancer cells, which were capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in vitro. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies cross-reacted with human colon and breast cancer cell lines and recognized 41/60 (68%) colon cancer and 38/63 (60%) breast cancer samples in a series of 123 human tumors. Our results suggest that T. cruzi antigens can evoke an integrated antitumor response involving both the cellular and humoral components of the immune response and provide novel insights into the understanding of the intricate relationship between parasite infection and tumor growth. © 2015 UICC.

  2. MDL28170, a calpain inhibitor, affects Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis, ultrastructure and attachment to Rhodnius prolixus midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vítor Ennes-Vidal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. During the parasite life cycle, many molecules are involved in the differentiation process and infectivity. Peptidases are relevant for crucial steps of T. cruzi life cycle; as such, it is conceivable that they may participate in the metacyclogenesis and interaction with the invertebrate host. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper, we have investigated the effect of the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 on the attachment of T. cruzi epimastigotes to the luminal midgut surface of Rhodnius prolixus, as well as on the metacyclogenesis process and ultrastructure. MDL28170 treatment was capable of significantly reducing the number of bound epimastigotes to the luminal surface midgut of the insect. Once the cross-reactivity of the anti-Dm-calpain was assessed, it was possible to block calpain molecules by the antibody, leading to a significant reduction in the capacity of adhesion to the insect guts by T. cruzi. However, the antibodies were unable to interfere in metacyclogenesis, which was impaired by the calpain inhibitor presenting a significant reduction in the number of metacyclic trypomastigotes. The calpain inhibitor also promoted a direct effect against bloodstream trypomastigotes. Ultrastructural analysis of epimastigotes treated with the calpain inhibitor revealed disorganization in the reservosomes, Golgi and plasma membrane disruption. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of calpain and calpain-like molecules in a wide range of organisms suggests that these proteins could be necessary for basic cellular functions. Herein, we demonstrated the effects of MDL28170 in crucial steps of the T. cruzi life cycle, such as attachment to the insect midgut and metacyclogenesis, as well as in parasite viability and morphology. Together with our previous findings, these results help to shed some light on the functions of T. cruzi calpains. Considering the potential roles of

  3. Synthesis and Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity of Diaryldiazepines

    OpenAIRE

    Júlio César L. Menezes; Luana Beatriz A. Vaz; Paula Melo de Abreu Vieira; Kátia da Silva Fonseca; Cláudia Martins Carneiro; Jason G. Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a so-called “neglected disease” and endemic to Latin America. Nifurtimox and benznidazole are drugs that have considerable efficacy in the treatment of the acute phase of the disease but cause many significant side effects. Furthermore, in the Chronic Phase its efficiency is reduced and their therapeutic effectiveness is dependent on the type of T. cruzi strain. For this reason, the present work aims to drive basic research towards the discovery of new chemical entities t...

  4. Trypanosome species, including Trypanosoma cruzi, in sylvatic and peridomestic bats of Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodo, Carolyn L; Goodwin, Chloe C; Mayes, Bonny C; Mariscal, Jacqueline A; Waldrup, Kenneth A; Hamer, Sarah A

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to other mammalian reservoirs, many bat species migrate long-distances and have the potential to introduce exotic pathogens to new areas. Bats have long been associated with blood-borne protozoal trypanosomes of the Schizotrypanum subgenus, which includes the zoonotic parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, agent of Chagas disease. Another member of the subgenus, Trypanosoma dionisii, infects bats of Europe and South America, and genetic similarities between strains from the two continents suggest transcontinental movement of this parasite via bats. Despite the known presence of diverse trypanosomes in bats of Central and South America, and the presence of T. cruzi-infected vectors and wildlife in the US, the role of bats in maintaining and dispersing trypanosomes in the US has not yet been reported. We collected hearts and blood from 8 species of insectivorous bats from 30 counties across Texas. Using PCR and DNA sequencing, we tested 593 bats for trypanosomes and found 1 bat positive for T. cruzi (0.17%), 9 for T. dionisii (1.5%), and 5 for Blastocrithidia spp. (0.8%), a group of insect trypanosomes. The T. cruzi-infected bat was carrying TcI, the strain type associated with human disease in the US. In the T. dionisii-infected bats, we detected three unique variants associated with the three infected bat species. These findings represent the first report of T. cruzi in a bat in the US, of T. dionisii in North America, and of Blastocrithidia spp. in mammals, and underscore the importance of bats in the maintenance of trypanosomes, including agents of human and animal disease, across broad geographic locales. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of proline analogs as trypanocidal agents through the inhibition of a Trypanosoma cruzi proline transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayé, Melisa; Fargnoli, Lucía; Reigada, Chantal; Labadie, Guillermo R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2017-11-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, uses proline as its main carbon source, essential for parasite growth and stage differentiation in epimastigotes and amastigotes. Since proline is involved in many essential biological processes in T. cruzi, its transport and metabolism are interesting drug targets. Four synthetic proline analogues (ITP-1B/1C/1D/1G) were evaluated as inhibitors of proline transport mediated through the T. cruzi proline permease TcAAAP069. The trypanocidal activity of the compounds was also assessed. The compounds ITP-1B and ITP-1G inhibited proline transport mediated through TcAAAP069 permease in a dose-dependent manner. The analogues ITP-1B, -1D and -1G had trypanocidal effect on T. cruzi epimastigotes with IC 50 values between 30 and 40μM. However, only ITP-1G trypanocidal activity was related with its inhibitory effect on TcAAAP069 proline transporter. Furthermore, this analogue strongly inhibited the parasite stage differentiation from epimastigote to metacyclic trypomastigote. Finally, compounds ITP-1B and ITP-1G were also able to inhibit the transport mediated by other permeases from the same amino acid permeases family, TcAAAP. It is possible to design synthetic amino acid analogues with trypanocidal activity. The compound ITP-1G is an interesting starting point for new trypanocidal drug design which is also an inhibitor of transport of amino acids and polyamines mediated by permeases from the TcAAAP family, such as proline transporter TcAAAP069 among others. The Trypanosoma cruzi amino acid transporter family TcAAAP constitutes a multiple and promising therapeutic target for the development of new treatments against Chagas disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Trypanosoma cruzi CYP51 inhibitor derived from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis screen hit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung-Kuang Chen

    Full Text Available The two front-line drugs for chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections are limited by adverse side-effects and declining efficacy. One potential new target for Chagas' disease chemotherapy is sterol 14alpha-demethylase (CYP51, a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in biosynthesis of membrane sterols.In a screening effort targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51 (CYP51(Mt, we previously identified the N-[4-pyridyl]-formamide moiety as a building block capable of delivering a variety of chemotypes into the CYP51 active site. In that work, the binding modes of several second generation compounds carrying this scaffold were determined by high-resolution co-crystal structures with CYP51(Mt. Subsequent assays against the CYP51 orthologue in T. cruzi, CYP51(Tc, demonstrated that two of the compounds tested in the earlier effort bound tightly to this enzyme. Both were tested in vitro for inhibitory effects against T. cruzi and the related protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. One of the compounds had potent, selective anti-T. cruzi activity in infected mouse macrophages. Cure of treated host cells was confirmed by prolonged incubation in the absence of the inhibiting compound. Discrimination between T. cruzi and T. brucei CYP51 by the inhibitor was largely based on the variability (phenylalanine versus isoleucine of a single residue at a critical position in the active site.CYP51(Mt-based crystal structure analysis revealed that the functional groups of the two tightly bound compounds are likely to occupy different spaces in the CYP51 active site, suggesting the possibility of combining the beneficial features of both inhibitors in a third generation of compounds to achieve more potent and selective inhibition of CYP51(Tc.

  7. Recombination-driven generation of the largest pathogen repository of antigen variants in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, D Brent; Peng, Duo; Tarleton, Rick L

    2016-09-13

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, depends upon a cell surface-expressed trans-sialidase (ts) to avoid activation of complement-mediated lysis and to enhance intracellular invasion. However these functions alone fail to account for the size of this gene family in T. cruzi, especially considering that most of these genes encode proteins lacking ts enzyme activity. Previous whole genome sequencing of the CL Brener clone of T. cruzi identified ~1400 ts variants, but left many partially assembled sequences unannotated. In the current study we reevaluated the trans-sialidase-like sequences in this reference strain, identifying an additional 1779 full-length and partial ts genes with their important features annotated, and confirming the expression of previously annotated "pseudogenes" and newly annotated ts family members. Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME) analysis allowed us to generate a model T. cruzi ts (TcTS) based upon the most conserved motif patterns and demonstrated that a common motif order is highly conserved among ts family members. Using a newly developed pipeline for the analysis of recombination within large gene families, we further demonstrate that TcTS family members are undergoing frequent recombination, generating new variants from the thousands of functional and non-functional ts gene segments but retaining the overall structure of the core TcTS family members. The number and variety as well as high recombination frequency of TcTS family members supports strong evolutionary pressure, probably exerted by immune selection, for continued variation in ts sequences in T. cruzi, and thus for a unique immune evasion mechanism for the large ts gene family.

  8. Polymorphisms of blood forms and in vitro metacyclogenesis of Trypanosoma cruzi I, II, and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abegg, Camila Piva; Abreu, Ana Paula de; Silva, Juliane Lopes da; Araújo, Silvana Marques de; Gomes, Mônica Lúcia; Ferreira, Érika Cristina; Toledo, Max Jean de Ornelas

    2017-05-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of American trypanosomiasis has broad biological and genetic diversity. Remaining to be studied are polymorphisms of the blood forms and metacyclogenesis of different T. cruzi discrete typing units (DTUs). Our goal was to evaluate the relationship between T. cruzi DTUs, the morphology of blood trypomastigotes, and in vitro metacyclogenesis. T. cruzi strains that pertained to DTUs TcI, TcII, and TcIV from different Brazilian states were used. Parameters that were related to the morphology of eight strains were assessed in thin blood smears that were obtained from mice that were inoculated with blood or culture forms, depending on strain. The metacyclogenesis of 12 strains was measured using smears with Liver Infusion Tryptose culture medium and M16 culture medium (which is poor in nutrients and has a low pH) at the exponential phase of growth, both stained with Giemsa. The morphological pattern of TcII strains was consistent with broad forms of the parasite. In TcIV strains, slender forms predominated. The Y strain (TcII) was morphologically more similar to TcIV. Significant differences in polymorphisms were observed between DTUs. Metacyclogenesis parameters, although displaying large standard deviations, differed between the DTUs, with the following descending rank order: TcII > TcI > TcIV. The mean numbers of metacyclic trypomastigotes for TcII were significantly higher than the other DTUs. Although the DTUs presented overlapping characteristics, the general pattern was that different DTUs exhibited significantly different morphologies and metacyclogenesis, suggesting that the genetic diversity of T. cruzi could be related to parameters that are associated with the evolution of infection in mammalian hosts and its ability to disperse in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Household prevalence of seropositivity for Trypanosoma cruzi in three rural villages in northwest Argentina: environmental, demographic, and entomologic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürtler, R E; Chuit, R; Cécere, M C; Castañera, M B; Cohen, J E; Segura, E L

    1998-11-01

    Environmental, demographic, and entomologic variables were analyzed by logistic multiple regression analysis for their association with the likelihood of being seropositive for Trypanosoma cruzi in three highly infested rural villages of northwest Argentina. The prevalence of seropositivity for T. cruzi, as determined by the composite results of three serologic tests, was 34% among 338 persons in 1992. The strongest positive predictors of the adjusted odds of being infected were the household number of dogs, the density of T. cruzi-infected Triatoma infestans in bedroom areas, and each person's age. Dwellers from houses with roofs made completely or partly with a grass called simbol, or which used insecticides rudimentarily and nonsystematically, had a significantly lower odds of being seropositive for T. cruzi than residents from other types of dwellings. The adjusted odds of infection also increased with the number of T. cruzi-infected dogs or cats and the presence of chickens in bedroom areas. No significant effects on the adjusted odds of infection of a community-wide deltamethrin spraying carried out in one of the villages seven years before were detected. Socioeconomic indicators, such as domiciliary area, and numbers of corrals and livestock, were inversely related to being infected. Our study identified several manageable variables suitable for control actions, most of them not examined before in univariate or multivariate analyses. Environmental management based on low-cost housing with appropriate local materials and removal of domestic animals from domiciliary areas have a crucial role to play in the control of Chagas' disease in rural areas.

  10. Functional studies of TcRjl, a novel GTPase of Trypanosoma cruzi, reveals phenotypes related with MAPK activation during parasite differentiation and after heterologous expression in Drosophila model system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis Monteiro dos-Santos, Guilherme Rodrigo; Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad de; Nepomuceno-Silva, José Luciano

    2015-01-01

    The life cycle of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi comprises rounds of proliferative cycles and differentiation in distinct host environments. Ras GTPases are molecular switches that play pivotal regulatory functions in cell fate. Rjl is a novel GTPase with unknown function. Herein we show that TcRjl blocks in vivo cell differentiation. The forced expression of TcRjl leads to changes in the overall tyrosine protein phosphorylation profile of parasites. TcRjl expressing parasites sustained DNA synthesis regardless the external stimuli for differentiation. Heterologous expression in the Drosophila melanogaster genetic system strongly suggests a role from TcRjl protein in RTK-dependent pathways and MAPK activation.

  11. Functional studies of TcRjl, a novel GTPase of Trypanosoma cruzi, reveals phenotypes related with MAPK activation during parasite differentiation and after heterologous expression in Drosophila model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis Monteiro dos-Santos, Guilherme Rodrigo [Laboratório de Parasitologia Molecular, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fontenele, Marcio Ribeiro [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular do Desenvolvimento Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Dias, Felipe de Almeida [Laboratório de Bioquímica de Artrópodes Hematófagos, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Oliveira, Pedro Lagerblad de [Laboratório de Bioquímica de Artrópodes Hematófagos, Instituto de Bioquímica Médica, CCS, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia em Entomologia Molecular (INCT-EM) (Brazil); Nepomuceno-Silva, José Luciano [Laboratório Integrado de Bioquímica Hatisaburo Masuda, NUPEM/UFRJ, Pólo Barreto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Campus Macaé, Macaé (Brazil); and others

    2015-11-06

    The life cycle of the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi comprises rounds of proliferative cycles and differentiation in distinct host environments. Ras GTPases are molecular switches that play pivotal regulatory functions in cell fate. Rjl is a novel GTPase with unknown function. Herein we show that TcRjl blocks in vivo cell differentiation. The forced expression of TcRjl leads to changes in the overall tyrosine protein phosphorylation profile of parasites. TcRjl expressing parasites sustained DNA synthesis regardless the external stimuli for differentiation. Heterologous expression in the Drosophila melanogaster genetic system strongly suggests a role from TcRjl protein in RTK-dependent pathways and MAPK activation.

  12. Time and dose-dependence evaluation of nitroheterocyclic drugs for improving efficacy following Trypanosoma cruzi infection: A pre-clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzeti, Ana Lia; Diniz, Lívia de F; Gonçalves, Karolina R; Nascimento, Alvaro F S; Spósito, Pollyanna A F; Mosqueira, Vanessa C F; Machado-Coelho, George L L; Ribeiro, Isabela; Bahia, Maria T

    2018-02-01

    Benznidazole and nifurtimox-treatments regimens currently used in human are supported by very limited experimental data. This study was designed to evaluate the time and dose dependence for efficacy of the most important nitroheterocyclic drugs in use for Chagas disease. In order to evaluate time dependence, Y strain-infected mice received benznidazole for a total of 1, 3, 7, 10, 20, and 40 days. Treatment courses of 3-10-day were effective in clearing parasitaemia and suppressing mortality, but parasitological cure was not achieved. Extending the treatments to 20 or 40 days clearly improved benznidazole efficacy. The 20-day treatment induced cure in 57.1% of Y strain infections (partially drug resistant) but failed to cure Colombian strain infections (full drug resistant), while the 40-day treatment resulted in cure of 100% of Y and 50% of Colombian strain infected mice. The increased cure rates in T. cruzi infected animals that received nifurtimox for 40 days confirm the relationship between the length of treatment and efficacy. An improvement in efficacy was observed with increasing benznidazole doses; cure was verified in 28.6% (75 mg/kg), 57.1% (100 mg/kg) and 80% (300 mg/kg). Overall, these nonclinical study data provide evidence that the efficacy of benznidazole is dose and time dependent. These findings may be relevant for optimizing treatment of human Chagas disease. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efecto del aceite esencial de Aloysia triphylla britton (cedrón sobre el Trypanosoma cruzi en ratones The effect of the essential oil from Aloysia triphylla britton (lemon verbena on Trypanosoma cruzi in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Rojas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos. Determinar la actividad anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in vivo del aceite esencial de Aloysia triphylla en ratones. Materiales y Métodos. Los animales fueron asignados aleatoriamente a los siguientes grupos (n = 15 por grupo: infectados y no tratados (G1, infectados y tratados con benznidazol 100 mg/kg (G2, infectados y tratados con aceite esencial de Aloysia triphylla 100 mg/kg (G3, infectados y tratados con aceite esencial de Aloysia triphylla 250 mg/kg (G4; no infectados y no tratados (G5, y no infectados y tratados con 250 mg/kg de Aloysia triphyla (G6. La infección con T. cruzi se realizó con 104 tripomastigotes sanguíneos y el tratamiento empezó en el octavo día postinfección (dpi hasta el 28 dpi. La parasitemia se determinó con microscopía óptica cada dos días en 5 μL de sangre extraída de la cola. En el 14, 21 y 28 dpi se obtuvo sangre de la cola para el ensayo de creatina kinasa-MB (CK-MB, alanina aminotransferasa y creatinina; después, los animales fueron sacrificados y se extrajo el corazón para el estudio histopatológico. Resultados. El aceite esencial de cedrón produjo una reducción significativa de 85,4% del pico de parasitemia con la dosis de 250 mg/kg; también produjo reducción del número de amastigotes e infiltrados inflamatorios en el corazón. El nivel plasmático de CK-MB también disminuyó en el 28 dpi por efecto de dicho tratamiento. Conclusiones. En condiciones experimentales, el aceite esencial de Aloysia triphylla tiene efecto anti-Trypanosoma cruzi in vivo en ratones.Objectives. To determine the in-vivo anti-Trypanosoma cruzi activity of the essential oil from Aloysia triphylla in mice. Materials and methods. The mice (n = 15 in the study were randomly assigned to the following groups: infected and untreated (G1, infected and treated with benznidazole 100 mg/kg (G2, infected and treated with of Aloysia triphylla essential oil 100 mg/kg (G3, infected and treated with of Aloysia triphylla

  14. Distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units in Bolivian migrants in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Molina, José A; Poveda, Cristina; Martinez-Perez, Angela; Guhl, Felipe; Monge-Maillo, Begoña; Fresno, Manuel; López-Velez, Rogelio; Ramírez, Juan D; Girones, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. This parasite is transmitted to humans mainly through the faeces of infected triatomine "kissing" bugs, by blood transfusions or organ donation from infected donors, and can be transmitted from mother to child. This disease is endemic in the Americas, where Bolivia has up to 28.8% prevalence in general population. Increased migration to Europe has made it emerge in countries where it was previously unknown, being Spain the second country in number of patients after the United States. T. cruzi is an organism with a rich genetic diversity, what has been grouped into six discrete typing units (DTUs). Some authors have linked these DTUs either to specific geographical distribution or to the different clinical presentations. Nevertheless little is known about its distribution in migrant populations. Our aim was to describe the T. cruzi strains isolated from a population of chronically infected Bolivian patients attending our clinic in Madrid. Thirty-three consecutive patients meeting this condition were selected for the study. Molecular characterization was performed by an algorithm that combines PCR of the intergenic region of the mini exon-gene, the 24Sα and 18S regions of rDNA and the variable region of the satellite DNA. A descriptive analysis was performed and associations between epidemiological/clinical data and the different DTUs were tested. Twenty-seven out of thirty-three patients had their DTU detected. Mean age was 36 years (IQR 31-43.3) and 23 were women (76.7%). The median time since arrival to Spain was 60 months (IQR 43-81). The most common DTU were TcV, TcIV and TcI. Four patients had cardiac involvement: 2 had TcV and 2 could not have their DTU determined. TcIII was not isolated from any patient. DTUs distribution in migrant population seems to be similar to that observed in the patients' countries of origin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Dialogue of the Host-Parasite Relationship: Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Morais, Carlos Gustavo Vieira; Castro Lima, Ana Karina; dos Santos, Rosiane Freire; Da-Silva, Silvia Amaral Gonçalves; Dutra, Patrícia Maria Lourenço

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protozoa Leishmania spp. and Trypanosoma cruzi and the causative agents of Leishmaniasis and Chagas disease, respectively, belong to the Trypanosomatidae family. Together, these two neglected tropical diseases affect approximately 25 million people worldwide. Whether the host can control the infection or develops disease depends on the complex interaction between parasite and host. Parasite surface and secreted molecules are involved in triggering specific signaling pathways essential for parasite entry and intracellular survival. The recognition of the parasite antigens by host immune cells generates a specific immune response. Leishmania spp. and T. cruzi have a multifaceted repertoire of strategies to evade or subvert the immune system by interfering with a range of signal transduction pathways in host cells, which causes the inhibition of the protective response and contributes to their persistence in the host. The current therapeutic strategies in leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are very limited. Efficacy is variable, toxicity is high, and the emergence of resistance is increasingly common. In this review, we discuss the molecular basis of the host-parasite interaction of Leishmania and Trypanosoma cruzi infection and their mechanisms of subverting the immune response and how this knowledge can be used as a tool for the development of new drugs. PMID:26090399

  16. Trypanosoma Cruzi Cyp51 Inhibitor Derived from a Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Screen Hit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiung-Kuang; Doyle, Patricia S.; Yermalitskaya, Liudmila V.; Mackey, Zachary B.; Ang, Kenny K.H.; McKerrow, James H.; Podust, Larissa M.; (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2009-02-18

    The two front-line drugs for chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infections are limited by adverse side-effects and declining efficacy. One potential new target for Chagas disease chemotherapy is sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51), a cytochrome P450 enzyme involved in biosynthesis of membrane sterols. In a screening effort targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis CYP51 (CYP51{sub Mt}), we previously identified the N-[4-pyridyl]-formamide moiety as a building block capable of delivering a variety of chemotypes into the CYP51 active site. In that work, the binding modes of several second generation compounds carrying this scaffold were determined by high-resolution co-crystal structures with CYP51{sub Mt}. Subsequent assays against the CYP51 orthologue in T. cruzi, CYP51{sub Tc}, demonstrated that two of the compounds tested in the earlier effort bound tightly to this enzyme. Both were tested in vitro for inhibitory effects against T. cruzi and the related protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. One of the compounds had potent, selective anti-T. cruzi activity in infected mouse macrophages. Cure of treated host cells was confirmed by prolonged incubation in the absence of the inhibiting compound. Discrimination between T. cruzi and T. brucei CYP51 by the inhibitor was largely based on the variability (phenylalanine versus isoleucine) of a single residue at a critical position in the active site. CYP51{sub Mt}-based crystal structure analysis revealed that the functional groups of the two tightly bound compounds are likely to occupy different spaces in the CYP51 active site, suggesting the possibility of combining the beneficial features of both inhibitors in a third generation of compounds to achieve more potent and selective inhibition of CYP51{sub Tc}. Enzyme sterol 14{alpha}-demethylase (CYP51) is a well-established target for anti-fungal therapy and is a prospective target for Chagas disease therapy. We previously identified a

  17. Comparative effects of histone deacetylases inhibitors and resveratrol on Trypanosoma cruzi replication, differentiation, infectivity and gene expression

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    Vanina A. Campo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone post-translational modification, mediated by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases, is one of the most studied factors affecting gene expression. Recent data showing differential histone acetylation states during the Trypanosoma cruzi cell cycle suggest a role for epigenetics in the control of this process. As a starting point to study the role of histone deacetylases in the control of gene expression and the consequences of their inhibition and activation in the biology of T. cruzi, two inhibitors for different histone deacetylases: trichostatin A for class I/II and sirtinol for class III and the activator resveratrol for class III, were tested on proliferative and infective forms of this parasite. The two inhibitors tested caused histone hyperacetylation whereas resveratrol showed the opposite effect on both parasite forms, indicating that a biologically active in vivo level of these compounds was achieved. Histone deacetylase inhibitors caused life stage-specific effects, increasing trypomastigotes infectivity and blocking metacyclogenesis. Moreover, these inhibitors affected specific transcript levels, with sirtinol causing the most pronounced change. On the other hand, resveratrol showed strong anti-parasitic effects. This compound diminished epimastigotes growth, promoted metacyclogenesis, reduced in vitro infection and blocked differentiation and/or replication of intracellular amastigotes. In conclusion, the data presented here supports the notion that these compounds can modulate T. cruzi gene expression, differentiation, infection and histones deacetylase activity. Furthermore, among the compounds tested in this study, the results point to Resveratrol as promising trypanocidal drug candidate.

  18. Action of the medicine Canova® on peritoneal resident macrophages infected with Trypanosoma cruzi = Ação do medicamento Canova® em macrófagos peritoniais residentes infectados por Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Vanessa Tagawa Cardoso de Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20 million of people are chronically infected withTrypanosoma cruzi in Latin America. The present work investigated the action of the homeopathic medicine Canova® on in vitro experimental infections with T. cruzi Y strain, using Swiss mice resident peritoneal macrophages. Our results demonstrated that Canova®induced a decrease in the production of H2O2 and TNF-a at 20 and 40% concentrations when compared to the control RPMI. However, when compared with this medicine excipient, a significant decrease in these mediators was observed with Canova® at 40% concentration only. The production of NO and phagocytic activity were not affected. TNF-a inhibits T. cruzi replication in peritoneal macrophages in vitro, becoming an important agent of infection control by this parasite. Within this context, Canova®, unlike what has been reported with other infections, would function as a stimulator of the infection, since it inhibited the production of TNF-α by peritoneal resident macrophages in vitro. Further studies should be carried out with elicited macrophages, in order to confirm the inhibitoryactivity of Canova® on the production of TNF-α and other mediators in macrophages infected by T. cruzi.Aproximadamente 20 milhões de pessoas são cronicamente infectadas pelo Trypanosoma cruzi na América Latina. O presente trabalhoinvestigou a ação do medicamento homeopático Canova® em infecções experimentais “in vitro” com Trypanosoma cruzi, cepa Y, usando macrófagos residentes peritoniais de camundongos Swiss. Os resultados indicaram que Canova® induz a diminuição significativa da produção de H2O2 e TNF-α em concentrações de 20 e 40%, quando comparado com ocontrole RPMI. Quando comparado com o excipiente do medicamento, observou-se diminuição na concentração destes mediadores apenas na concentração de 40%. A produção de NO e a atividade fagocítica não foram afetadas. TNF-α inibe a replicação do protozoário em

  19. Synergistic Effect of Lupenone and Caryophyllene Oxide against Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Glendy Polanco-Hernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro trypanocidal activity of a 1 : 4 mixture of lupenone and caryophyllene oxide confirmed a synergistic effect of the terpenoids against epimastigotes forms of T. cruzi (IC50=10.4 μg/mL, FIC = 0.46. In addition, testing of the terpenoid mixture for its capacity to reduce the number of amastigote nests in cardiac tissue and skeletal muscle of infected mice showed a reduction of more than 80% at a dose level of 20.8 mg·kg−1·day−1.

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi seroprevalence in pregnant women and screening by PCR and microhaematocrit in newborns from Guanajuato, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-Rincón, Laura Mayela; Galaviz-Silva, Lucio; González-Bravo, Francisco Ernesto; Molina-Garza, Zinnia Judith

    2016-12-01

    Chagas disease is caused by an infection with the protozoan hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi, and it is a major endemic health problem in Latin America. The congenital route is one of the main non-vectorial pathways of transmission, which can arise either in the chronic or acute phase of maternal infection. Serological screening of T. cruzi infection was performed in 520 pregnant women and newborns at the Hospital General Regional de León, Guanajuato, Mexico, between 2014 and 2015. Anti-T. cruzi antibodies were detected in 20 mothers (4%) by ELISA and HIA with four PCR-positive newborn cases. Risk factors were identified according to an epidemiological survey, and the most significant (Pcruzi infection were the building materials of dwellings, the presence of pets and dwellings located in rural areas. This study constitutes the first systematic study on congenital Chagas disease and the epidemiological risk factors in Guanajuato. Our results represent the probability of an incidence of 770 cases per 100,000 births during a period of 12 months, with a vertical transmission rate by 0.8%, which highlights the necessity to establish reliable serological and PCR tests in pregnant women to prevent vertical transmission. However, it is also important to follow-up the newborns from seropositive mothers for one year, which is necessary, as many children yielded negative results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Emerging Chagas disease: trophic network and cycle of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi from palm trees in the Amazon.

    OpenAIRE

    Teixeira, A. R.; Monteiro, P. S.; Rebelo, J. M.; Arga?araz, E. R.; Vieira, D.; Lauria-Pires, L.; Nascimento, R.; Vexenat, C. A.; Silva, A. R.; Ault, S. K.; Costa, J. M.

    2001-01-01

    ABSTRACT A trophic network involving molds, invertebrates, and vertebrates, ancestrally adapted to the palm tree (Attalaea phalerata) microhabitat, maintains enzootic Trypanosoma cruzi infections in the Amazonian county Paço do Lumiar, state of Maranhão, Brazil. We assessed seropositivity for T. cruzi infections in the human population of the county, searched in palm trees for the triatomines that harbor these infections, and gathered demographic, environmental, and socioeco...

  2. The in vitro activity of fatty diamines and amino alcohols against mixed amastigote and trypomastigote Trypanosoma cruzi forms

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    Policarpo Ademar Sales Júnior

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Four diamines and three amino alcohols derived from 1-decanol, 1-dodecanol and 1,2-dodecanediol were evaluated in an in vitro assay against a mixture of trypomastigote and intracellular amastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. Two of these compounds (6 and 7 showed better activity against both proliferative stages of T. cruzi than the positive control benznidazole, three were of similar potency (1, 2 and 5 and two were less active (3 and 4.

  3. Real-time PCR strategy for the identification of Trypanosoma cruzi discrete typing units directly in chronically infected human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-San Martín, Catalina; Apt, Werner; Zulantay, Inés

    2017-04-01

    The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease, a major public health problem in Latin America. This parasite has a complex population structure comprised by six or seven major evolutionary lineages (discrete typing units or DTUs) TcI-TcVI and TcBat, some of which have apparently resulted from ancient hybridization events. Because of the existence of significant biological differences between these lineages, strain characterization methods have been essential to study T. cruzi in its different vectors and hosts. However, available methods can be laborious and costly, limited in resolution or sensitivity. In this study, a new genotyping strategy by real-time PCR to identify each of the six DTUs in clinical blood samples have been developed and evaluated. Two nuclear (SL-IR and 18S rDNA) and two mitochondrial genes (COII and ND1) were selected to develop original primers. The method was evaluated with eight genomic DNA of T. cruzi populations belonging to the six DTUs, one genomic DNA of Trypanosoma rangeli, and 53 blood samples from individuals with chronic Chagas disease. The assays had an analytical sensitivity of 1-25fg of DNA per reaction tube depending on the DTU analyzed. The selectivity of trials with 20fg/μL of genomic DNA identified each DTU, excluding non-targets DTUs in every test. The method was able to characterize 67.9% of the chronically infected clinical samples with high detection of TcII followed by TcI. With the proposed original genotyping methodology, each DTU was established with high sensitivity after a single real-time PCR assay. This novel protocol reduces carryover contamination, enables detection of each DTU independently and in the future, the quantification of each DTU in clinical blood samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Structures of dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase of Trypanosoma cruzi in the folate-free state and in complex with two antifolate drugs, trimetrexate and methotrexate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senkovich, Olga; Schormann, Norbert; Chattopadhyay, Debasish; (UAB)

    2010-11-22

    The flagellate protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the pathogenic agent of Chagas disease (also called American trypanosomiasis), which causes approximately 50 000 deaths annually. The disease is endemic in South and Central America. The parasite is usually transmitted by a blood-feeding insect vector, but can also be transmitted via blood transfusion. In the chronic form, Chagas disease causes severe damage to the heart and other organs. There is no satisfactory treatment for chronic Chagas disease and no vaccine is available. There is an urgent need for the development of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of T. cruzi infection and therefore for the identification of potential drug targets. The dihydrofolate reductase activity of T. cruzi, which is expressed as part of a bifunctional enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS), is a potential target for drug development. In order to gain a detailed understanding of the structure-function relationship of T. cruzi DHFR, the three-dimensional structure of this protein in complex with various ligands is being studied. Here, the crystal structures of T. cruzi DHFR-TS with three different compositions of the DHFR domain are reported: the folate-free state, the complex with the lipophilic antifolate trimetrexate (TMQ) and the complex with the classical antifolate methotrexate (MTX). These structures reveal that the enzyme is a homodimer with substantial interactions between the two TS domains of neighboring subunits. In contrast to the enzymes from Cryptosporidium hominis and Plasmodium falciparum, the DHFR and TS active sites of T. cruzi lie on the same side of the monomer. As in other parasitic DHFR-TS proteins, the N-terminal extension of the T. cruzi enzyme is involved in extensive interactions between the two domains. The DHFR active site of the T. cruzi enzyme shows subtle differences compared with its human counterpart. These differences may be exploited for the development of

  5. Trypanosoma cruzi-induced depressive-like behavior is independent of meningoencephalitis but responsive to parasiticide and TNF-targeted therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar-Pereira, Glaucia; Silva, Andrea Alice da; Pereira, Isabela Resende; Silva, Rafael Rodrigues; Moreira, Otacílio Cruz; de Almeida, Luciana Rodrigues; de Souza, Amanda Santos; Rocha, Monica Santos; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli

    2012-10